EurekAlert! - Breaking News
For anorexia nervosa, researchers implicate genetic locus on chromosome 12A landmark study led by UNC School of Medicine researchers has identified the first genetic locus for anorexia nervosa and has revealed that there may also be metabolic underpinnings to this potentially deadly illness.
12h
Gizmodo
Melissa McCarthy Is Riding the Sean Spicer Podium Outside of CNN Right Now Image: YouTube / SNL / Elana Zak On Friday morning, a few excited CNN staffers started tweeting some silly photos. Melissa McCarthy, costumed as Sean Spicer, was riding her motorized White House lectern around the street in front of the network’s offices. Why? We’ll give you one guess. Advertisement It’s for Saturday Night Live. Melissa McCarthy is hosting this week, and it looks like the show de
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Ingeniøren
Nu skal der også asfalteres under togskinnerneEt dansk videnkonsortium lover at stå klar med et banebrydende nyt underlag til skinner om tre år.
9h

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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UK researchers develop low tech method for environmental sampling of campylobacterA team of researchers from the United Kingdom has developed a novel method for assessing human/pathogen interactions in the natural environment, using citizen scientists wearing boot socks over their shoes during walks in the countryside. In the process, they found that slightly less than half of the socks were positive for the gastrointestinal pathogen, Campylobacter.
5min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dig it! Two new shrimp species found in burrows at the bottom of the Gulf of CaliforniaAlthough the Santa María-La Reforma lagoon complex in the Gulf of California is one of the most important areas for shrimp fishery, little is known about the crustacean species that live in burrows dug in the bottom. In addition to presenting two new species for science, the researchers collaborate to build up on the knowledge of small shrimp species living there.
7min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The blink of an eye may predict risk for alcohol problemsThe startle response, often recorded as an eye-blink reflex, is a defensive measure believed to reflect emotional processing. Patients with alcohol use disorders (AUDs) show abnormal startle-reflex responses to alcohol-related stimuli. This study examined startle-reflex responses to various visual stimuli among heavy drinkers, and assessed whether certain patterns predict the development of AUDs f
7min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Migratory seabird deaths linked to hurricanesStronger and more frequent hurricanes may pose a new threat to the sooty tern, a species of migratory seabird found throughout the Caribbean and Mid-Atlantic, a new study reveals. The study is the first to map the birds' annual migratory path and demonstrate how its timing and trajectory place them in the direct path of hurricanes moving into the Caribbean from the Atlantic. Climate change may inc
7min
The Atlantic
Photos of the Week: 5/6–5/12 “Poopootovs” fly in Caracas protests, a Ferrari races a Roman chariot in Italy, flooding in Quebec, celebrating Buddha’s birthday in Thailand, a hailstorm on the red carpet at the MTV Movie Awards, and much more.
8min
The Atlantic
Trump's 10-Point Trade Plan for China The Trump administration announced Thursday a new trade agreement with China that will allow for increased U.S. beef and natural gas exports to its top trading partner. Under the 10-point deal , China will lift its ban on U.S. beef imports (which was put in place following the outbreak of bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or mad cow disease, in 2003). American liquified natural gas exporters and
8min
Live Science
Small-Brained Human Cousin Was Surprisingly SmartPaleoanthropologists now also say a primitive-looking relative to modern humans was likely much smarter than the current understanding of the primitive hominins would suggest.
13min
New on MIT Technology Review
Widespread Ransomware Attack Hits U.K. HospitalsThe National Health Service has found data on many of its computers locked up by hackers, and may be faced with little choice but to capitulate to demands for cash.
16min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Imbalanced gut microbiome linked to systemic sclerosis, study suggestsAmericans and Norwegians with systemic sclerosis had higher levels of bacteria that can cause inflammation and lower levels of bacteria that are believed to protect against inflammation compared with healthy people.
21min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop low tech method for environmental sampling of campylobacterA team of researchers from the United Kingdom has developed a novel method for assessing human/pathogen interactions in the natural environment, using citizen scientists wearing boot socks over their shoes during walks in the countryside. In the process, they found that slightly less than half of the socks were positive for the gastrointestinal pathogen, Campylobacter. The research is published in
21min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study provides detailed glimpse of predators' effects on complex, subtidal food webResearch using time-lapse photography in the Galapagos Marine Reserve suggests the presence of a key multilevel 'trophic cascade' involving top- and mid-level predators as well as urchins and algae.
26min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Large multicenter study shows high success rate for robotic PCI proceduresResults from the PRECISION trial (Efficacy and Safety Outcomes of Radial- vs Femoral-Access RoboticPercutaneous Coronary Intervention: Final Results of the Multicenter PRECISION Registry) were presented today as a late-breaking clinical trial at the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) 2017 Scientific Sessions in New Orleans.
26min
Popular Science
How to build a medieval crossbow DIY A Middle-Aged model Want to channel your inner medieval warrior? William Gurstelle designed a model crossbow that you can make using basic tools.
30min
New Scientist - News
Massive cyberattack hits several hospitals across EnglandHackers are demanding a ransom for hospitals to regain access to their computer systems. Patients are being diverted and staff are locked out of computers
33min
Blog » Languages » English
Body Mod Battle: Results! Congratulations on a showdown well fought! It appears that Team Piercings has won, but there are bonuses and applause for all. Check out the leaderboard! Artwork by Daniela Gamba
35min
Gizmodo
Hospitals Across England Infected With Ransomware, Leaving Patients Without Care Photo: Getty England’s healthcare system fell victim to a massive cyberattack Friday afternoon, forcing several hospitals to divert emergency patients to other facilities. Ransomware appears to be the cause. Advertisement At roughly 12:30pm local time, the National Health Service’s (NHS) clinical and patient systems began crashing, with pop-up messages appearing on screens demanding $300 in bitco
36min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees intensifying Tropical Cyclone Ella now heading westTropical Cyclone Ella is intensifying and NASA observed heavy rainfall in the storm. Ella is now expected to pass to the north of Fiji which is good news for the island nation.
40min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Early treatment for NSTEMI patients shows greater rate of survivalResults from 'Outcomes of Early vs. Late Revascularization in Low and High-Risk Patients Hospitalizedwith Non-ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Surveillance Study' were presented today as a late-breaking clinical trial at the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) 2017 Scientific Sessions in New Orleans.
40min
Live Science
Rare Page from England’s First Printer Found in Library | VideoA rare, 540-year-old page from a medieval priests’ handbook that dates back to the earliest days of book printing in England was discovered in a library at the University of Reading.
40min
Ars Technica
Ram is recalling more than a million trucks for faulty software Enlarge / A 2015 Ram 1500, one of the models affected by this recall. (credit: FCA) Dodgy software code controlling side airbags and safety belt pretensioners is responsible for a recall affecting more than a million Ram pickup trucks. On Friday, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA) announced that it will be recalling Ram 1500 and 2500 trucks (model years 2013 to 2016) and Ram 3500 trucks (model years
48min
The Atlantic
The Ransomware Attack on the NHS Is Part of a Worrying Trend At least 16 hospitals across England were crippled by a large-scale ransomware attack on Friday. Doctors, administrators, and other NHS workers were locked out of their computers, and instead saw a pop-up message demanding ransom in exchange for access to the system, according to several reports. NHS England didn’t immediately respond to questions about whether any ransom was paid, the amount of
51min
The Atlantic
The Mystery of Off-The-Grid Whale Moms Thick fog sat over Cape Cod Bay the morning of April 20, so the survey boat had to work by sound. Every so often, the researchers aboard cut their engine and listened for deep blows to track down surfacing right whales. By mid-afternoon, the fog had lifted, and Marilyn Marx could clearly see markings on one nearby whale that made her excited. “Big white scar!” she called down to the others from t
51min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Awesomesauce,' proclaims US astronaut on historic spacewalkSo what is it like to float out into the vacuum of space?
51min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Water droplets as miniaturized test tubesModern laboratory technology cannot only help develop new medicine, but also make quicker diagnoses of higher precision. Scientists have now developed laboratory equipment that facilitates the search for active substances and the examination of cell samples. Thus, costs are reduced by a factor of up to one hundred.
56min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Equipment water leak shortens spacewalk by two US astronautsAn equipment water leak shortened Friday's spacewalk by two U.S. astronauts at the International Space Station, but they still managed to replace a faulty electronics box.
57min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Several Spanish firms targeted in cyber attacksTelecom giant Telefonica and several other Spanish companies were targeted in cyber attacks Friday, the government said.
57min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
"Ransomware" cyberattack cripples hospitals across EnglandA large cyberattack crippled computer systems at hospitals across England on Friday, with appointments canceled, phone lines down and patients turned away.
57min
Gizmodo
Giant Sea Monster Washes On Shore Because World Is Ending Image: YouTube/ Patasiwa Kumbang Amalatu While many of us envisioned the world going out in a wicked blaze of glory, sadly, that doesn’t seem to be the way things will go. Instead, we have to settle for Ted Cruz, the other horsemen of the apocalypse, and this massive beast that just washed up on the shore of Indonesia’s Maluku province. Advertisement In a series of unnerving YouTube videos, local
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Race, gender and socioeconomic factors impact PCI outcomesResults from 'Interaction Effects of Race/Ethnicity and Sex on Outcomes after PCI: A Subanalysis of the PLATINUM Diversity study' were presented today as a late-breaking clinical trial at the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) 2017 Scientific Sessions in New Orleans.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Analysis looks at role type of valve plays in patient outcomes post-TAVRResults from 'Impact of valve design and bivalirudin vs. unfractionated heparin for anticoagulation in transcatheter aortic valve replacement: Results from the BRAVO-3 trial' were presented today as a late-breaking clinical trial at the Society for CardiovascularAngiography and Interventions (SCAI) 2017 Scientific Sessions in New Orleans.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team solves mystery of colloidal chainsWhen Northwestern Engineering's Erik Luijten met Zbigniew Rozynek, they immediately became united by a mystery.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hafnia dons a new face: Materials research creates potential for improved computer chips and transistorsIt's a material world, and an extremely versatile one at that, considering its most basic building blocks—atoms—can be connected together to form different structures that retain the same composition.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Electrostatic design of materials: A fundamentally new approachResearchers have mapped out a radically new approach for designing optical and electronic properties of materials.
1h
The Atlantic
Is the Watergate-Comey Comparison Simply a Way to Score Partisan Points? The election of Donald Trump, and the early days of his presidency, have driven many Americans to rummage through history in search of context and understanding. Trump himself has been compared to historical figures ranging from Ronald Reagan to Henry Ford , and from Andrew Jackson to Benito Mussolini . His steps have been condemned as unprecedented by his critics, and praised as historic by his
1h
Popular Science
Why the universe is so dang empty Entertainment From the folks behind PHD Comics Why is there so much space? Read on.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Counterintuitive approach to treating a brain cancerThe loss of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN has been linked to tumor growth and chemotherapy resistance in the almost invariably lethal brain cancer glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Now, researchers have shown that one way to override the growth-promoting effects of PTEN deletion is, surprisingly, to inhibit a separate tumor suppressor gene.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Faster, smaller, more powerful computer chips: Hafnia dons a new faceAs computer chips become smaller, faster and more powerful, their insulating layers must also be much more robust -- currently a limiting factor for semiconductor technology. A research team says this new phase of hafnia is an order of magnitude better at withstanding applied fields.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fast, simple way to create two-dimensional electronic circuitsTeam discovers fast, simple way to create two-dimensional electronic circuits that could potentially lead to a new generation of electronic devices.
1h
Scientific American Content: Global
Secretary of State Gives Nod to Climate Action at Arctic MeetingRex Tillerson signed an agreement recognizing the Paris climate accord, but said the president was not rushing to make a decision on whether to leave the pact -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Science | The Guardian
Historic Turkish tomb moved to make way for hydroelectric dam 1,100-tonne Zeynel Bey monument relocated despite legal challenge to Tigris river construction project An enormous 15th-century tomb in south-eastern Turkey has been moved to make way for a hydroelectric dam on the Tigris river. The 1,100-tonne Zeynel Bey monument was lifted whole on Friday and transported more than a mile on a wheeled platform, the state-run Anadolu news agency said. Continue re
1h
Live Science
Thanking 'Cigars and God,' Oldest US Vet Turns 111The oldest verified surviving U.S. war veteran, Richard Overton, turned 111 years old yesterday (May 11), and he credits cigars and God for his supercentenarian life.
1h
Live Science
'Drones' Exhibit Takes Flight at the Intrepid Museum | VideoThe past, present and future of drones are on display in "Drones: Is the Sky the Limit?", a new exhibit at the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum in New York.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New data show Human Milk Oligosaccharide (HMO) improves the balance of bacteria in formula-fed babies' digestive systems*, providing important immune system and health benefitsNew Abbott data presented this week, at the 50th Annual Congress of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) in Prague, further supports the important role Human Milk Oligosaccharides (or HMOs) play in supporting the immune system of formula-fed babies. It all starts in the digestive system.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stress-mitigation interventions for parents did not lessen symptoms among kids with asthmaA $2.2 million, first-of-its kind randomized study found no differences between kids with asthma who received standard care based on National Institutes of Health guidelines compared with kids whose parents received stress-mitigation techniques in addition to evidence-based asthma care.
1h
Gizmodo
Elon Musk's Latest Tunnel Test Feels Like Going Into Hyperspace GIF GIF: Lucasfilm Ltd. The more I learn about Elon Musk’s Boring Project— a batshit idea to build a tunnel that sends cars at breakneck speeds under Los Angeles—the more I want to take a ride. The twisted genius just posted video of a test sled zooming through a test tunnel. Holy shit, it’s like going into hyperspeed, and I want to ride! And I feel a little sick now, too! Advertisement Don’t wor
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Gizmodo
What Four Game of Thrones Spin-Offs Could GRRM and HBO Possibly Be Working On? HBO. Greetings, my garrulous guttersnipes! (I feel like I’m turning into a Batman ‘66 villain here.) This week: Those Game of Thrones spin-off series! How to improve the Iron Fist TV show’s story! Whether Stormtroopers get paid! And a question so weird, I couldn’t stop answering it! (You’ll know it when you see it.) The Game Isn’t Over Sophia: Ever since the announcement that HBO was working on f
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The Atlantic
The Confusion Over the New Ebola Outbreak The Ebola virus has emerged again in the Democratic Republic of Congo, and brought along two of its primary symptoms: confusion and misinformation. Earlier this morning, the World Health Organization announced that on May 11, the Ministry of Health of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) notified WHO and partners of a case of Ebola, which had been confirmed by a national reference laborator
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Gizmodo
Media Goes Apeshit After One Guy Gets Sick Off of Sushi This is a very nice piece of sushi I enjoyed once (Image: Ryan F. Mandelbaum) Sushi usually contains raw food. It is not cooked. Raw things are full of bacteria, and sometimes parasites, because animals have those things in their tissue. Sushi can get you sick. This should not be a surprise. Advertisement But still, everyone is surprised. Here they are, being surprised. Would you like to know wha
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Futurity.org
Virtual grief support groups can ease depression Participating in online virtual reality support groups could be a good option for bereaved older adults, research shows. As the US population ages, an estimated half of women older than 65 are widows, while one-sixth of men of the same age have lost their spouses. Support groups have proved to be a helpful resource for those dealing with grief, but for older individuals, obstacles such as geograp
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Lack of dust makes China's air pollution much worseNew research suggests that less dust means means more dirty air in major Chinese population centres.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Why does Belgium shine so brightly?Tens of thousands of people marvel over shots of brightly lit Belgium taken from space.
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New Scientist - News
Ultrasonic speaker lets you whisper to people 30 metres awayWearable device beams words using targeted sound waves to prevent anyone overhearing and could eventually be used by soldiers and divers
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New Scientist - News
Hear the roar of the lionfish recorded for the first timeThe vocalisations of the voracious lionfish could help us keep tabs on this invasive species as it works its way up the US east coast
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New Scientist - News
Polar bears shift from seals to bird eggs as Arctic ice meltsThe habitat overlap of polar bears and their main prey, ringed seals, is disappearing and the bears are instead getting closer to nesting birds
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Science | The Guardian
Man who found 'richest' Viking hoard in the UK to get £2m award Metal detectorist who unearthed 10th-century artefacts including silver bracelets and a bird-shaped pin set to receive ex gratia payment A metal detectorist who discovered the “richest collection” of rare Viking artefacts ever found in the UK is set to receive a reward of almost £2m. Derek McLennan uncovered the 10th-century hoard, which includes silver bracelets and brooches, a gold ring, an ena
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Gizmodo
Today's Best Deals: Anker Audio Gear, Adjustable Dumbbells, Thermos, and More Bowflex’s insanely-popular adjustable dumbbells , an Anker audio gear Gold Box , Thermos food jars , and more lead Friday’s best deals. Advertisement Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Anker Audio Gold Box Anker’s reader - favorite audio products don’t get nearly as many discounts as their iconic USB charging gear, but that changes with today’s Amaz
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Live Science
540-Year-Old Page from Medieval Priests’ Handbook DiscoveredThe page was ripped from a priests' handbook hundreds of years ago, and it could be one of England's oldest fragments of printed text.
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Gizmodo
We Are Suing the Justice Department for Trump Surveillance Warrants Today, Gizmodo’s parent company, Gizmodo Media Group, filed a Freedom of Information Act complaint in a New York federal district court against the Department of Justice, seeking the warrant applications that the FBI used to justify surveillance against Trump campaign officials and their associates. Advertisement Those warrant applications—presented to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court,
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Popular Science
A demagogic dinosaur, a mysterious space robot, and other amazing images of the week Science Newsworthy eye-candy Our favorite images from this week's science, technology, and space news. Read on.
1h
Ars Technica
Massive ransomware attack hits UK hospitals, Spanish banks Enlarge (credit: Health Service Journal) A large number of hospitals, GPs, and walk-in clinics across England have been locked down by a ransomware attack, reports suggest. There are also some reports of a ransomware attack hitting institutions in Portugal and Spain, though it isn't known if the incidents are connected. NHS England says it is aware of the issue, but hasn't yet issued an official
1h
TEDTalks (video)
How human noise affects ocean habitats | Kate StaffordOceanographer Kate Stafford lowers us into the sonically rich depths of the Arctic Ocean, where ice groans, whales sing to communicate over vast distances -- and climate change and human noise threaten to alter the environment in ways we don't understand. Learn more about why this underwater soundscape matters and what we might do to protect it.
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The Atlantic
Five Reasons Why the Comey Affair Is Worse Than Watergate The tangled affair now known as Watergate began 45 years ago, before most of today’s U.S. population had even been born. (The median age of Americans is about 38, so most people in the country were born in 1979 or thereafter.) Thus for most people “Watergate” is a historical allusion—obviously negative in its implications, since it led to the only presidential resignation in American history, but
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Inside Science
Reports of Universe's Fine-Tuning May Be Exaggerated Reports of Universe's Fine-Tuning May Be Exaggerated New simulations suggests life could exist in universes very different from our own. Suntopimage.jpg High energy X-rays streaming off the sun Image credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/GSFC Space Friday, May 12, 2017 - 08:15 Gabriel Popkin, Contributor (Inside Science) -- In their 1994 song " Why does the sun shine? " the rock band They Might be Giants sin
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Big Think
How a 1,000-Year-Old Religious Edict Shaped the Modern Chicken Research suggests that a religious edict from the Catholic Church shaped the evolution of the modern chicken. Read More
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cognitive science
Neuroscience shows that our gut instincts about only children are right submitted by /u/mywan [link] [comments]
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Popular Science
See how much sugar is packed into 'healthy' food Health Using xkcd's classic (and gross) Cadbury Egg analogy There's more sugar in a can of tonic water than in a Cadbury cream egg. Just think about that for a second.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stem cells in plants and animals behave surprisingly similarlyA new study shows that the behavior of stem cells in plants and animals is surprisingly similar. The researchers were able to produce mathematical equations that reveal very small differences in the behavior of the proteins. The results can hopefully be used in stem cell research involving humans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chronic childhood illness linked with later life mental health problemsA new study into the effects of chronic physical illness in children on their life-long mental health has found that such experiences appear to increase the chances of them having depression and anxiety in adulthood.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What goes down, must come up: Stirring things up in the Earth's mantleNew insights into the convection patterns of the Earth's mantle and its chemical makeup have been revealed. The new findings suggest that the mantle does not flow ubiquitously, as has been previously thought - and that it is instead divided into two very large domains that convect only within themselves, with little evidence of them mixing together.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Stunning images reveal glacial landscapes under the oceansThe most detailed atlas of the seafloor ever compiled offers colorful imagery and ghostly glimpses of Earth’s glacial past.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Europe’s Latest Billion-Dollar Startup Wants to Build the Matrix. Really.Originally established to build ultra-realistic video games, the firm now plans to simulate the world in silico.
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Popular Science
Watch live as astronauts complete the 200th ISS spacewalk Space After a short delay, the walk is underway Happy 200th spacewalk! Read on.
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Science | The Guardian
Lab notes: it was all bones, brains and horrifying sushi this week in science It’s been quite an eclectic week in science, but all the richer for it, say I. For starters, the Developing Human Connectome Project released its first set of really rather stunning images . They’re trying to map the connections in the human brain from womb to birth (that’s right: this includes pics of the brains of unborn babies. Amazing.) in the hope that it will help them understand how condit
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Gizmodo
Rare Harry Potter Prequel Stolen, J.K. Rowling Pleads for Return Image: WB. A one-of-a-kind Harry Potter prequel has been stolen, and author J.K. Rowling is eager to get it back in the right hands. Advertisement Local police in Birmingham, England, are asking for the public’s help after a burglary resulted in the theft of a rare Harry Potter prequel. The story was penned on a postcard by Rowling in 2008 as part of Waterstone’s charity event called “What’s Your
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Ars Technica
Microsoft confirms coming keyboard support for Xbox One games Soon, you'll be able to use overdesigned gaming keyboards like this instead of overdesigned control pads on the Xbox One. It's been nearly a year since Microsoft's Phil Spencer promised we were "not years away, it’s more like months away" from full support for mouse and keyboard controls on the Xbox One. At the Build Conference this week, Microsoft confirmed that full support for keyboards (but n
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
International team solves mystery of colloidal chainsTeam discovers fast, simple way to create two-dimensional electronic circuits that could potentially lead to a new generation of electronic devices.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study on blue tits: Smell first, and then begNestling blue tits can discriminate between the smell of other nestlings and adapt their begging behavior accordingly, suggests a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Untangling the knots in cell stressA new study describes how different UPR transducers are used selectively for protein correction.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Osteoarthritis could be prevented with good diet and exerciseOsteoarthritis can potentially be prevented with a good diet and regular exercise, a new expert review reports.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Playground politics: What drives rejection amongst children?New research approaches the subject of rejection in a different way. It asked the children doing the rejecting, the 'rejecters,' for the reasons they disliked certain children. The study revealed the act of rejection is complex -- the behavior of the rejected child is only partly, or not at all, to blame.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Next-gen solar cells could be improved by atomic-scale redesignResearchers have uncovered the exact mechanism that causes new solar cells to break down in air, paving the way for a solution.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Immune cells rely on receptor to signal counterattack on parasitic wormImmune cells, called macrophages, may rely on a compound to signal an attack to beat back attacks from parasitic worms, according to an international team of researchers.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
For anorexia nervosa, researchers implicate genetic locus on chromosome 12A landmark study has identified the first genetic locus for anorexia nervosa and has revealed that there may also be metabolic underpinnings to this potentially deadly illness.
2h
Big Think
Fall Asleep and Wake Up Refreshed On This High-Tech Pillow If you're constantly tired because you can't break your bad sleeping patterns, this super smart Sunrise Pillow might put you back in the game. Read More
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Gizmodo
Scientists Finally Know What Makes These Weird Glass Droplets So Incredibly Strong GIF GIF: YouTube SmarterEveryDay Something unusual happens when a drop of molten glass falls into water. As it cools, it creates a crystal clear tadpole-like droplet that’s bulletproof on one end, but impossibly fragile on the other. We’ve known about these droplets for 400 years, but scientists have only recently figured out what makes them almost indestructible. In a video posted just a few wee
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Gizmodo
Trump's Lawyer Inspires an Instant Meme, With Few Exceptions (Photo by Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images) Donald Trump’s lawyers have issued a letter to proclaim that the president’s tax returns for the past decade have no “income of any type from Russian sources.” Well, “with few exceptions,” as the Associated Press tweeted . But Trump hasn’t released his tax returns, so the AP story about the letter came with a big fat caveat : Advertisement Advertiseme
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New on MIT Technology Review
Nvidia CEO: Software Is Eating the World, but AI Is Going to Eat SoftwareJensen Huang predicts that health care and autos are going to be transformed by artificial intelligence.
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New Scientist - News
Mussel gloop can be used to make wounds knit without any scarsSecretions from mussels together with a synthesised skin protein create the ultimate glue – one that seamlessly meshes together skin wounds in rats
2h
The Atlantic
'Protecting Religious Freedom Is a Foreign-Policy Priority of the Trump Administration' Vice President Pence stood before a packed ballroom in downtown D.C. on Thursday, looking out on an audience of Orthodox priests, evangelicals, Catholics, and other Christians from all over the world. Franklin Graham, the son of the evangelist Billy Graham and head of the international charity Samaritan’s Purse, had convened a world summit on the persecution of Christians. Attendee name-tags hint
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists find a way to pack grains and drugs most efficientlyScientists have discovered a way to solve a problem that has baffled humans for so long it is mentioned in the Bible: achieving the most efficient packing of objects such as grains and pharmaceutical drugs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New lung 'organoids' in a dish mimic features of full-size lungNew lung “organoids”—tiny 3-D structures that mimic features of a full-sized lung—have been created from human pluripotent stem cells by researchers. The team used the organoids to generate models of human lung diseases in a lab dish, which could be used to advance our understanding of a variety of respiratory diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hafnia dons a new faceAs computer chips become smaller, faster and more powerful, their insulating layers must also be much more robust -- currently a limiting factor for semiconductor technology. A collaborative University of Kentucky-Texas A&M University research team says this new phase of hafnia is an order of magnitude better at withstanding applied fields.
2h
Gizmodo
This Dolphin Getting Breathalyzed Is All of Us Image: Pasamontes et al By now, you probably know that humans are really screwing up the ocean. Climate change aside, we often dump oil into it, ruining the lives of whatever animals live nearby. Just imagine if someone drilled for oil right in the center of your house and then accidentally got the toxic black sludge all over your bedroom, bathroom, car, and all of your food. Thankfully, scientis
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Shearing of alpacas is necessary, but also stressfulAlpacas, a species of New World camelids, have very thick wool. This requires them to be shorn regularly, just like sheep. But shearing is a source of stress for the animals. This has now been confirmed for the first time based on an evaluation of clinical, hormonal and behavioral parameters. The scientists were able to show that even the act of restraining the animals in different positions relea
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Futurity.org
‘Walk in their shoes’ isn’t the best way to empathize Advising someone to “walk a mile in their shoes” as a way to get them to empathize with others may be bad advice for their emotional health, according to a new study. “That’s because there are two routes to empathy and one of them is more personally distressing and upsetting than the other,” says Michael Poulin, associate professor in the University at Buffalo psychology department and coauthor o
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Ars Technica
Slip-triggered wearable robot twists elderly people’s hips to prevent falls Enlarge / A prototype of the exoskeleton (credit: Hillary Sanctuary / EPFL) With a slip and a twist, a robotic device that fits around an elderly person’s pelvis can avert a perilous tumble, Italian researchers report in Scientific Reports . The device—like the shorts version of exoskeleton pants—can sense an impending fall within 350 milliseconds and apply torque directly to the erring limb. The
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Gizmodo
Thirsty Twitter Executive Sees End of Democracy as Great Business Opportunity [Update] More like Anthony Not-agoodtweeter. (Image: Getty) Today, in the middle of a truly impressive example of “tweeting through it,” President Trump sent out—possibly from the toilet—the following message: “Maybe the best thing to do would be to cancel all future ‘press briefings’ and hand out written responses for the sake of accuracy???” (Three question marks indicate just how good an idea this is.)
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The Atlantic
What Really Happened at the Trump-Comey Dinner? Updated on May 12 at 11:32 p.m. On some days, comparisons between the present moment and Watergate seem like overheated frenzy. And on other days, it seems like President Trump is actively courting them. On Wednesday, that was Trump inviting former Nixon aide Henry Kissinger to the White House. Friday, that’s a tweet he fired off in the morning: James Comey better hope that there are no "tapes" o
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Ars Technica
Gizmodo went phishing with the Trump team—will they catch a charge? Enlarge / Go phishing the White House and you may need a bigger boat. (credit: Lsuff ) Earlier this week, the team at Gizmodo's Special Projects Desk published a report on how they "phished" members of the administration and campaign teams of President Donald Trump . Gizmodo identified 15 prominent figures on Trump's team and sent e-mails to each posing as friends, family members, or associates c
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
In both love and war, alligators signal size by bellowingAmerican alligators produce loud, low-frequency vocalizations called 'bellows'. Cognitive biologists investigated these vocalizations and found that they reveal the caller's body size. Alligators can use this information to avoid unpromising contests for mates and breeding areas.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Anticancer nanomaterials created by simulating underwater volcanic conditionsResearchers have developed anticancer nanomaterials by simulating the volcano-induced dynamic chemistry of the deep ocean. The novel method enables making nanoclusters of zinc peroxide in an environmentally friendly manner, without the use of additional chemicals. The as-synthesised zinc peroxide nanoparticles can be used as a tool for cancer therapy and against other complicated diseases.
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Popular Science
Report: 96 percent of pilot-reported drone sightings are totally benign Aviation Close encounters of the drone kind are rarer than they seem Report from model airplane hobbyist group finds 96 percent of drone sightings harmless…
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ludwig researchers identify counterintuitive approach to treating a brain cancerThe loss of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN has been linked to tumor growth and chemotherapy resistance in the almost invariably lethal brain cancer glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Now, Ludwig researchers have shown that one way to override the growth-promoting effects of PTEN deletion is, surprisingly, to inhibit a separate tumor suppressor gene.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New lung 'organoids' in a dish mimic features of full-size lungNew lung 'organoids' -- tiny 3-D structures that mimic features of a full-sized lung -- have been created from human pluripotent stem cells by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC). The team used the organoids to generate models of human lung diseases in a lab dish, which could be used to advance our understanding of a variety of respiratory diseases.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EPA may allow massive mine near pristine Alaskan bayThe Trump administration settled a lawsuit Friday over the proposed development of a massive gold and copper mine at the headwaters of one of Alaska's premier salmon fisheries.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New lung 'organoids' in a dish mimic features of full-size lungNew lung "organoids"—tiny 3-D structures that mimic features of a full-sized lung—have been created from human pluripotent stem cells by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC). The team used the organoids to generate models of human lung diseases in a lab dish, which could be used to advance our understanding of a variety of respiratory diseases.
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Gizmodo
Jezebel Star of New Film About a Man Who Pulls a Sword Out of a Stone: ‘I’m Too Old For Fairy Tales’ Jezebel Star of New Film About a Man Who Pulls a Sword Out of a Stone: ‘I’m Too Old For Fairy Tales’ | Deadspin Report: Tim Tebow Could Be Moving Up In The World | The Root New Jersey’s Bill Brennan Might Be the Realest Politician You’ve Never Heard Of | Fusion You Won’t Find a More Horrifying Anti-Immigrant Proposal Than What This Republican Came Up With |
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Gizmodo
This Discounted Digital Frame Makes a Great Last Minute Gift for Mom Nixplay Seed 10 WiFi Digital Photo Frame Mother’s Day is the perfect time to throw all the sappiness you can think of into one gift, and Amazon gets that. Today only, get this digital photo frame from Nixplay for $125. Choose from four different frame colors and upload all the photos you could want, including uploading ones straight from their app.
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Futurity.org
Trained larvae suggest nature and nurture collaborate A new study suggests nature and nurture do collaborate to determine the behavior of a population. Evolutionary biologist Julia Saltz of Rice University and her colleagues studied the habits of about 50,000 Drosophila melanogaster larvae that, like people, have the ability to sense enticing odors and an incentive to avoid them when they’re associated with an unpleasant experience. The researchers
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WIRED
Veggies Grown With Toilet Water Could Be Headed to Your Table Starting as early as December, the city of Modesto, CA will sell its highly treated wastewater to struggling nearby farmers. The post Veggies Grown With Toilet Water Could Be Headed to Your Table appeared first on WIRED .
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The Atlantic
Student-Government Politics and Identity Politics: This Week's Top 7 Education Stories Inside a Stealth Plan for Political Influence Michael Vasquez | The Chronicle of Higher Education [Charlie Kirk], the rising young conservative star, uses his frequent Fox News appearances to blast college campuses as “islands of totalitarianism” filled with liberal students and faculty members who force their worldview upon those around them. So Kirk’s nonprofit political-advocacy group, Turning
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The Atlantic
Should Parents Who Refuse to Edit Their Babies' Genes Be Punished? As I wrote a few weeks ago , advances in biotechnology could make this a pressing question in the near future—and under certain conditions, this reader’s answer is yes: My gut instinct is that I would lean towards punishment if the parents were to have the fetus tested for genetic abnormalities and diseases and the test came back positive, but the parents still refused to consider gene editing. I
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The Atlantic
Master of None’s Greatest Strength Is Its Curiosity This post contains some spoilers for Master of None Season 2 . It’s not an insult to Aziz Ansari to say that the best episodes of his show Master of None , which he co-created and stars in, are often the ones where he fades into the background. Still, it may be a weird conclusion to arrive at when you consider how crucial Ansari’s vision and comedic style—infectiously goofy, pop-culture savvy, an
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Ingeniøren
ING BAGSIDEN: Udfordring – vandfortyndbar spraymalingHer er ugens produktinformation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
X-rays from copper source set new gold standard for measuring industrial materialsResearchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have produced and precisely measured a spectrum of X-rays using a new, state-of-the-art machine. The instrument they used to measure the X-rays took 20 years to develop, and will help scientists working at the agency make some of the world's most accurate measurements of materials for use in everything from bridges to pharmac
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers find key molecule that could lead to new therapies for anemiaNew findings reported in Science could impact a whole slew of iron disorders, ranging from iron-deficiency anemia to iron-overload liver disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Birds choose their neighbors based on personalityBirds of a feather nest together, according to a new study which has found that male great tits (Parus major) choose neighbours with similar personalities to their own.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study analyses foods for radioactive substancesIn cooperation with the Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR), the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) is to analyse foods prepared within the scope of the BfR MEAL Study for radiation caused by radioactive elements such as uranium. Main focus will be on the foods most often consumed by the population in Germany. These include cereal products, vegetables and potatoes, dairy product
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Antimicrobial resistance: Successful interdisciplinary effortsAs antimicrobial-resistant bacteria can be transmitted between humans and animals, research into antimicrobial resistance must in particular investigate the mechanisms of the spread of the bacteria and the resistance genes. This is the finding that will be presented at the final symposium of the RESET and MedVet-Staph research projects from April 26-28, 2017 at the Federal Institute for Risk Asses
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New gelatin devices that imitate the activity of the body in bone regenerationWhen one's own body is no longer capable of regenerating the bone defects it suffers, fitting compatible, biodegradable structures that can be used as temporary scaffolding in the damaged tissues is, as a general rule, very helpful. The NanoBioCel group in the UPV/EHU's Faculty of Pharmacy has led the development of one of these scaffolds, which apart from physical support, also offers the chance
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Science | The Guardian
It’s hard to talk about mental health at the best of times, which these are not ‘Nobody, even Trump, should be blamed for being mentally ill. But nor should we pretend mental illness affects only the nice’ Should we talk more openly about mental illness, or should we shut up? It depends which side of the Atlantic you’re on. In Britain, the future head of state has thrown his weight behind an admirable campaign for more conversation, but in America, where the current head of
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Futurity.org
There’s no scientific proof that our sense of smell stinks We tend to think animals, like dogs and rodents, have much better senses of smell than we humans do. But that’s not true, say researchers. This myth has survived for the last 150 years with no scientific proof, according to neuroscientist John McGann, associate professor in the Rutgers University-New Brunswick psychology department. “It has been a long cultural belief that in order to be a reason
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New Scientist - News
Brain zaps let minimally conscious people communicate for a weekDaily brain stimulation has “awakened” people with brain damage, allowing them to communicate for a week. The tech could eventually be used at home
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Gizmodo
El Niño Could Be Ready to Party Again as Soon as This Fall GIF Remember the halcyon days of 2016, when we were bidding adieu to El Niño and recovering from the death of Harambe? Well, the beloved gorilla may have departed this world for good, but El Niño will return. It always does. Advertisement Perhaps even as soon as this fall. On Thursday, the National Weather Service’s Climate Prediction Center (CPC) released its monthly El Niño forecast bulletin, p
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Software convenes rapid, on-demand 'flash organizations'Flash organizations are a new crowdsourcing technique that enables anyone to assemble an entire organization from a paid crowdsourcing marketplace and lead that organization in pursuit of complex, open-ended goals.
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The Atlantic
Jeff Sessions Reinvigorates the Drug War Updated on May 12 at 11:37 a.m. ET Democratic and Republican officials alike took up the banner of criminal-justice reform over the past five years, hoping to reduce the nation’s unprecedented prison population and scale back the harshest punishments of the tough-on-crime era. Now Attorney General Jeff Sessions has taken a major step toward rolling back their efforts. In a memo released Friday, S
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The Atlantic
Protests in Budapest and Escapes to Canada: The Week in Global-Affairs Writing India’s Silicon Valley Is Dying of Thirst. Your City May Be Next. Samanth Subramanian | WIRED “Bangalore has a problem: It is running out of water, fast. Cities all over the world, from those in the American West to nearly every major Indian metropolis, have been struggling with drought and water deficits in recent years. But Bangalore is an extreme case. Last summer, a professor from the Indian
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WIRED
Why Can’t We Have a Good King Arthur Movie? Blame Game of Thrones The oft-told legend has been eclipsed by the story that aimed to subvert it. The post Why Can't We Have a Good King Arthur Movie? Blame Game of Thrones appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
The New Serialized Samurai Jack Is the Best Revival on TV Serialized storytelling and doubling down on its core premise makes this revival of a the legendary cartoon one of the best things on TV. The post The New Serialized Samurai Jack Is the Best Revival on TV appeared first on WIRED .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SoftBank sinks $500M into UK virtual reality startupA British startup founded five years ago by Cambridge University computer science graduates has received $502 million to develop large-scale virtual reality projects in a funding round led by Japan's SoftBank.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Latvian daredevil in 'drone-diving' world firstA Latvian tech company is claiming a world first after successfully test-flying a super-powered drone which lifted a daredevil skydiver aloft, from where he parachuted safely back down to earth.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
X-rays from copper source set new gold standard for measuring industrial materialsWith this new, unique X-ray machine, NIST can make some of the world's most accurate measurements, and calibrate everyone else's X-rays, too.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Immune cells rely on receptor to signal counterattack on parasitic wormImmune cells, called macrophages, may rely on a compound to signal an attack to beat back attacks from parasitic worms, according to an international team of researchers, including Zissis C. Chroneos, associate professor of pediatrics, and microbiology and immunology at Penn State College of Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Smartphones in the ER can help discharge patients fasterChest pain patients in the emergency department whose attending emergency physicians received lab results delivered direct to their smartphones spent about 26 minutes less waiting to be discharged than patients whose lab results were delivered to the electronic patient record on the hospital computer system. The results of a randomized, controlled trial of a quality improvement initiative were pub
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What goes down, must come up: Stirring things up in the Earth's mantleUniversity of Leicester researcher leads study into convection patterns of Earth's mantle.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Electrostatic design of materials: TU Graz demonstrates a fundamentally new approachResearchers at the Institute of Solid State Physics map out a radically new approach for designing optical and electronic properties of materials in Advanced Materials.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Six-legged livestock for sustainable food productionFarming crickets for human consumption is less of a burden on the environment than other livestock production systems according to a new study. Results suggest that insect farming systems can be improved to become even more environmentally sustainable in the future.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Famous tree-climbing lions of Uganda roaming farther as prey animals decreaseScientists in Uganda studying the behaviors of the country's famous tree-climbing lions have found that the home ranges of lion prides in the study areas have increased over time as they search farther for diminishing numbers of prey animals.
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Big Think
Physicists Outline 10 Different Dimensions and How You’d Experience Them Where gravity comes from has been an utter mystery. String theory offers an explanation. Read More
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Ars Technica
SpaceX may finally be reaching a nirvana of high flight rates Enlarge / The static fire test of the Falcon 9 rocket launching an Inmarsat satellite was completed on Thursday. (credit: SpaceX) Due to accidents, production issues, and other factors, SpaceX has in recent years failed to achieve a "high volume" launch rate of a dozen or more Falcon 9 rockets per year. Famously, the company has a backlog of 70 or more missions, which SpaceX estimates to be worth
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cognitive science
The way we think about being careful is due for an upgrade. submitted by /u/scasner [link] [comments]
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dig it! Two new shrimp species found in burrows at the bottom of the Gulf of CaliforniaAlthough the Santa María-La Reforma lagoon complex in the Gulf of California is one of the most important areas for shrimp fishery, little is known about the crustacean species that live in the burrows dug in the bottom.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Untangling the knots in cell stressHow do cells correctly make proteins?
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Gizmodo
Huge Trove of Confidential Medical Records Discovered on Unsecured Server Accessible to Anyone Photo: Getty At least tens of thousands, if not millions of medical records of New York patients were until recently readily accessible online to just about anyone who knew how to look. Advertisement Patient demographic information, social security numbers, records of medical diagnoses and treatments, along with a plethora of other highly-sensitive records were left completely undefended by a med
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Missing PiecesResearchers made a 3-D reconstruction of one of neurobiology's most famous brains-that of Henry Gustav Molaison (HM).
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The Scientist RSS
Bioengineered Pancreas Effective in First PatientThe diabetic volunteer continued to produce insulin one year after she received a transplant of abdominal islet cells.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Water droplets as miniaturized test tubesScientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have developed laboratory equipment that facilitates the search for active substances and the examination of cell samples, reducing costs by a factor of up to 100.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Osteoarthritis could be prevented with good diet and exerciseOsteoarthritis can potentially be prevented with a good diet and regular exercise, a new expert review published in the Nature Reviews Rheumatology reports.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Shearing of alpacas is necessary, but also stressfulAlpacas, a species of New World camelids, have very thick wool. This requires them to be shorn regularly, just like sheep. But shearing is a source of stress for the animals. This has now been confirmed for the first time by researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna based on an evaluation of clinical, hormonal and behavioral parameters. The scientists were able to show that even the act of restraining the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In both love and war, alligators signal size by bellowingAmerican alligators produce loud, low-frequency vocalizations called 'bellows'. Cognitive biologists at the University of Vienna, Stephan Reber and Tecumseh Fitch, investigated these vocalizations and found that they reveal the caller's body size. Alligators can use this information to avoid unpromising contests for mates and breeding areas. The study results were published in Scientific Reports.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Next-gen solar cells could be improved by atomic-scale redesignResearchers have uncovered the exact mechanism that causes new solar cells to break down in air, paving the way for a solution.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dig it! Two new shrimp species found in burrows at the bottom of the Gulf of CaliforniaAlthough the Santa María-La Reforma lagoon complex in the Gulf of California is one of the most important areas for shrimp fishery, little is known about the crustacean species that live in burrows dug in the bottom. In addition to presenting two new species for science, the researchers collaborate to build up on the knowledge of small shrimp species living there. The study is published in the ope
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Playground politics -- what drives rejection amongst children?New research, published in the open-access journal Frontiers in Psychology, approaches this subject in a different way. It asked the children doing the rejecting, the 'rejecters,' for the reasons they disliked certain children. The study revealed the act of rejection is complex -- the behavior of the rejected child is only partly, or not at all, to blame.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chronic childhood illness linked with later life mental health problemsA new study into the effects of chronic physical illness in children on their life-long mental health has found that such experiences appear to increase the chances of them having depression and anxiety in adulthood.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stem cells in plants and animals behave surprisingly similarly: StudyA new study from Lund University in Sweden shows that the behavior of stem cells in plants and animals is surprisingly similar. The researchers were able to produce mathematical equations that reveal very small differences in the behavior of the proteins. The results can hopefully be used in stem cell research involving humans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists find a way to pack grains and drugs most efficientlyScientists have discovered a way to solve a problem that has baffled humans for so long it is mentioned in the Bible: achieving the most efficient packing of objects such as grains and pharmaceutical drugs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Untangling the knots in cell stressIn an article published in the Journal of Cell Biology, Tokiro Ishikawa and Kazutoshi Mori of Kyoto University describe how different UPR transducers are used selectively for protein correction.
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Gizmodo
A Potential Glimpse at the Ships of the Han Solo Movie Yet another Once Upon a Time star will not return for season seven. Some deep-sea villains could play a part in Aquaman . Stephen King and J.J. Abrams’ new horror collaboration has found its star. Plus, a gross new clip from Alien: Covenant , more tiny Defenders teasers, and Shannara Chronicles has a new home. Spoilers get! Han Solo Star Wars News Net has uncovered a ton of un-embeddable concept
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Ars Technica
Anglophiles: Hang up your VPN; iPlayer isn’t for you anymore Enlarge (credit: BBC) Age verification systems may be something that the Tory government has been fixated on recently, but the BBC is yet to implement one to crack down on licence fee evaders. Instead, it will imminently force Brits to sign into its online iPlayer service, before allowing them to view or listen to programmes. E-mail addresses used to login to the iPlayer will be matched with reco
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Futurity.org
Sidekick for antibiotic would ‘gunk up’ superbugs Researchers have discovered compounds that block bacterial resistance to tetracyclines, a major class of antibiotics. “If these bugs can’t chew up this antibiotic anymore, they are re-sensitized to the effects of the drug.” Targeting bacterial resistance to antibiotics—rather than developing new kinds of antibiotics to which microbes are not already resistant—may be the best way to combat antibio
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tamoxifen protects against obesity-related metabolic disordersTamoxifen is the gold standard for endocrine treatment of estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer. Tamoxifen is also known to have metabolic effects. A new study reports that the drug also prevents obesity, fatty liver, and insulin resistance in female mice who were fed a high-fat diet and whose ovaries had been removed. The study was also able to pinpoint which estrogen receptors underlie these
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
More natural dust in the air improves air quality in eastern ChinaHuman-made pollution in eastern China's cities worsens when less dust blows in from the Gobi Desert, according to a new study. That's because dust plays an important role in determining the air temperatures and thereby promoting winds to blow away human-made pollution. Less dust means the air stagnates, with human-made pollution becoming more concentrated and sticking around longer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Techniques for elemental analysis and imaging using X-ray measurements obtained from an ordinary digital cameraA NIMS research group succeeded in developing new techniques to perform analysis and imaging of chemical elements by taking images of a target material using an ordinary, visible-light digital camera with a slight modification, and obtaining X-ray spectra from processed images.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Toddlers’ screen time linked to speech delays and lost sleep, but questions remainTwo new studies link handheld screen time for young children to less sleep and greater risk of expressive language delays. But the results are preliminary.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cilia structure plays a major role in determining susceptibility to neural tube defectsResearch shows that the improper methylation of a protein called 'Septin2,' which regulates the structure of cilia, was associated with an increased risk of having a neural tube defect (NTD) and confirms that cilia are important factors in determining susceptibility of NTDs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cancer metastasis: The unexpected perils of hypoxiaThe low oxygen concentrations that prevail in many tumors enhance their propensity to metastasize to other tissues. Researchers have now uncovered the molecular mechanism that links the two phenomena.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Plasma membrane protein may help generate new neurons in the adult hippocampusNew research sheds important light on the inner workings of learning and memory. Specifically, scientists show that a plasma membrane protein, called Efr3, regulates brain-derived neurotrophic factor-tropomyosin-related kinase B signaling pathway (BNDF-TrkB) and affects the generation of new neurons in the hippocampus of adult brains.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Can crab shells provide a 'green' solution to malaria?A non-toxic mixture of chitin-rich crab shell powder and nanosized silver particles could be an environmentally friendly way of curbing the spread of disease-carrying mosquitoes, and malaria in particular.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Rodents with trouble walking reveal potential treatment approach for most common joint diseaseMaintaining the supply of a molecule that helps to nourish cartilage prevented osteoarthritis in animal models of the disease, according to a new report.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Killer Whales Are Speciating Right in Front of UsKiller whales appear to be splitting into several separate species, perhaps because cultural differences among populations are driving them apart -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ImmusanT publishes positive data from Phase 1 trials of Nexvax2 in celiac disease patientsImmusanT announces the publication of positive data from Phase 1 clinical trials of the Nexvax2 therapeutic vaccine in celiac disease patients in The Lancet Gastroenterology and Hepatology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research suggests link between imbalanced gut microbiome and systemic sclerosisAmericans and Norwegians with systemic sclerosis had higher levels of bacteria that can cause inflammation and lower levels of bacteria that are believed to protect against inflammation compared with healthy people. Study participants from United States, however, had a greater imbalance between the 'good' and 'bad' gut bacteria compared with the participants from Norway. The researchers suspect th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Famous tree-climbing lions of Uganda roaming farther as prey animals decreaseScientists in Uganda studying the behaviors of the country's famous tree-climbing lions have found that the home ranges of lion prides in the study areas have increased over time as they search farther for diminishing numbers of prey animals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Deeper understanding of environmental values gained through broader collaborationIt's understood that chemists and geologists come from very different science disciplines, but people tend to file all social scientists under one category—social. But within the social sciences, a psychologist is very different from an anthropologist or an economist. A University of Illinois study illuminates the need to engage social scientists from a specific discipline to solve problems by bri
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Gizmodo
Watch NASA's Glorious 200th ISS Space Walk Live Image: NASA Two hundred tangos in space and counting: today, NASA astronauts Peggy Whitson and Jack Fischer are performing the 200th American spacewalk outside the International Space Station (ISS). NASA is streaming the entire four hour endeavor on its channel here . Advertisement This is far from Whitson’s first (space) rodeo, as she currently holds the record for most spacewalks performed by a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study shows photos more credible, cartoons more persuasiveIf you're creating a message to educate, inform, or persuade, don't underestimate the power of a well-executed cartoon. A new study at the University of Illinois suggests if you're trying to convince the public to change their stance on a topic such as wind energy, you may be more successful if you use a cartoon rather than a photograph.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Beauty requires thought: Study supports philosophical claimDoes the experience of beauty require a person to think? And can sensuous pleasures, like eating or sex, be beautiful? Such questions have long preoccupied philosophers, with Immanuel Kant making the famous claim that beauty requires thought, unlike sensuous pleasure, which, he said, can never be beautiful. Now, researchers say that Kant was right on one count and wrong on the other.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First comprehensive map of subcellular localization of proteins reveals new insightsThe first analysis of how proteins are arranged in a cell was published today in Science, revealing that a large portion of human proteins can be found in more than one location in a given cell.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Rare feline genetic disorders identified through whole genome sequencingVeterinary neurologists found a genetic link between degenerative myelopathy (DM) in dogs and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig's disease in people. Now they have found that a biomarker test that helps diagnose ALS also can assist with determining a diagnosis for degenerative myelopathy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Latest fast radio burst adds to mystery of their source(Phys.org)—An international team of space researchers has reported on the detection of a new fast radio burst (FRB) and their efforts to trace its source. They have written a paper describing the detection and search for evidence, and have uploaded it to the arXiv preprint server.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
It's a myth that humans' sense of smell is inferior to that of other animals – here's whyConventional wisdom has it that humans have a poorer sense of smell than most other animals. Sure, we can smell – most of us appreciate the aroma of our morning coffee or a delightful fragrance, and we're able to detect burning toast or a gas leak. But we have nonetheless long been thought to be relative weaklings in the animal kingdom's league of olfactory excellence, which puts dogs and rodents
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Stem cells in plants and animals behave surprisingly similarlyA new study from Lund University in Sweden shows that the behaviour of stem cells in plants and animals is surprisingly similar. The researchers were able to produce mathematical equations that reveal very small differences in the behaviour of the proteins. The results can hopefully be used in stem cell research involving humans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dementia-related brain changes observed before memory or thinking problems are noticeableScientists discover a potential predictor for early dementia that could inform the development of drug and therapeutic interventions to treat or slow down the disease.
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Gizmodo
Uber Just Lost Its Attempt To Keep Its Court Battle With Waymo Out Of The Public Eye Photo: AP The lawsuit between Google’s self-driving car project Waymo and Uber is proceeding to trial, after a judge late Thursday denied Uber’s request to move the case to arbitration and out of the public eye. The judge, William Alsup, also referred the case for a criminal investigation over possible trade secrets theft. Advertisement Following a revelation last week that a criminal investigati
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Gizmodo
Agents of SHIELD and Once Upon a Time Are Both Coming Back Next Season, But Powerless Isn't The cast of Agents of SHIELD, who are all still employed. Image: ABC Two popular genre shows with unclear futures just got some good news. A third did not. Advertisement ABC just announced it’s bringing back Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. for a fifth season and Once Upon A Time for a seventh season. Both shows averaged about four and a half million viewers per episode this year, which isn’t part
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WIRED
How One Startup Built Better Health Insurance With the Magic of Data Oscar works with the same sloppy, unstandardized data every other insurance company has. It's what they did with it that was totally different. The post How One Startup Built Better Health Insurance With the Magic of Data appeared first on WIRED .
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Live Science
Water, Weird Clouds Found on Alien 'Warm Neptune'Astronomers have detected water vapor and evidence of exotic clouds in the atmosphere of a Neptune-mass planet known as HAT-P-26b.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Building the Matrix, Drugs Made of Sewage, and Anti-Innovation America—The Download, May 12, 2017The most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.
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Gizmodo
The Body Is Not a Computer—Stop Thinking of It as One Illustration by Angelica Alzona/Gizmodo When former DARPA chief Regina Dugan announced on stage last month that Facebook planned to build a brain computer interface to allow users to send their thoughts directly to the social network without a keyboard intermediary, it had all the Silicon Valley swagger of Facebook circa “ move fast and break things .” With the same audacity that any other Facebo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Harvesting big data could bring about the next transport revolution, right nowThe future of transport appears full of fun and flashy possibilities. From super-fast hyperloop transport systems, to self-driving cars and hovering taxis, new technology promises to move us further and faster than ever before. Yet for cities facing everyday problems such as congestion, air pollution and under capacity, the most effective solution could be the humble bus – coupled with the power o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How New Zealand's forests may transform in the futureResearch from Victoria University of Wellington suggests the ancient forests on New Zealand's West Coast may be under threat from climate change in the near future.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Entropy landscape sheds light on quantum mysteryBy precisely measuring the entropy of a cerium copper gold alloy with baffling electronic properties cooled to nearly absolute zero, physicists in Germany and the United States have gleaned new evidence about the possible causes of high-temperature superconductivity and similar phenomena.
4h
Ars Technica
15-second ads coming to Amazon’s Alexa Enlarge Where there's a media platform popular with consumers, advertisers are never far behind. Case in point, Amazon's digital assistant Alexa , which has made its way into everything from smartphones to fridges since launching inside a wireless speaker back in 2014. VoiceLabs, a chunderifically self-described "Voice Experience Analytics" company, is hoping to cash-in on Amazon's success by ins
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A fundamentally new approach to electrostatic design of materialsResearchers at the Institute of Solid State Physics map out a radically new approach for designing optical and electronic properties of materials in Advanced Materials.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Whole-mantle convection with tectonic plates preserves long-term global patterns of upper mantle geochemistryNew insights into the convection patterns of the Earth's mantle and its chemical makeup have been revealed by a researcher from the University of Leicester.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
In both love and war, alligators signal size by bellowingAmerican alligators produce loud, low-frequency vocalizations called "bellows." Cognitive biologists at the University of Vienna, Stephan Reber and Tecumseh Fitch, investigated these vocalizations and found that they reveal the caller's body size. Alligators can use this information to avoid unpromising contests for mates and breeding areas. The study results were published in Scientific Reports.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists unlock secret of chromosome copierUniversity of Dundee scientists have solved a mystery concerning one of the most fundamental processes in cell biology, in a new discovery that they hope may help to tackle cancer one day.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Jurassic drop in ocean oxygen lasted a million yearsDramatic drops in oceanic oxygen, which cause mass extinctions of sea life, come to a natural end -- but it takes about a million years.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists ID human protein essential for human cytomegalovirus replicationScientists have demonstrated that a human protein known as valosin containing protein (VCP) is essential for replication of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). The findings identify VCP as a potential new treatment target.
4h
Popular Science
Historic floods are ravaging Canada Environment Climate change is likely a factor Southeastern Canada is experiencing record breaking floods. Read on.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Heavy storms can overwhelm older sewer systems, causing a spike in sewage-borne bacterial and viral infectionsIn older U.S. cities, heavy rainfall doesn't just flood basements. It can also send a wave of dangerous pathogens into municipal water sources. Lakes, rivers, streams and even reservoirs may see an uptick in sewage-borne bacteria and viruses after heavy rains, infecting boaters and swimmers and overwhelming the ability of treatment plants to purify drinking water, according to Jyotsna Jagai, MPH05
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Science | The Guardian
Should complementary and alternative medicine charities lose their charitable status? | Michael Marshall Reliable evidence matters - and the Charity Commission’s consultation is a chance to make that clear to complementary and alternative therapy charities Right now, the Charity Commission is in the middle of a public consultation, asking whether or not organisations that offer complementary and alternative therapies should continue to have charitable status. This review presents an unprecedented op
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Science | The Guardian
Brazil announces end to Zika public health emergency Fall in cases brings end to the emergency 18 months after the virus hit headlines around the world Brazil has declared an end to its public health emergency over the Zika virus, 18 months after a surge in cases drew headlines around the world. The mosquito-borne virus was not considered a major health threat until the 2015 outbreak revealed that Zika can lead to severe birth defects . One of thos
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Gizmodo
Amazon's Gold Box Is Full Of Your Favorite Anker Audio Gear Anker Audio Gold Box Anker’s reader - favorite audio products don’t get nearly as many discounts as their iconic USB charging gear, but that changes with today’s Amazon Gold Box . Inside, you’ll find big savings on two different sets of SoundBuds, a mini speaker that’s about half the size of a soda can, the waterproof SoundCore Sport , and the and the booming SoundCore Sport XL . Like all Gold Bo
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What egg-producing housefly males can tell us about the evolution of sex determinationHow do the two sexes come about? The answer to this question is more complex than one would expect. Though sexual reproduction invariably depends on the presence of male and female individuals, the genetic basis of sex determination varies strongly between species. This diversity is particularly evident in houseflies. This insect order provides an excellent model to study how different sex-determi
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Viden
QUIZ: Hvor lang er snablen på en elefant?Og hvad er forskellen på den afrikanske og den indiske elefant? Du kan teste dig selv om elefanterne nedenunder.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Distrust of experts happens when we forget they are human beingsIn 2016, conservative, pro-brexit, British politician Michael Gove announced that people in England "…have had enough of experts with organisations from acronyms saying that they know what is best and getting it consistently wrong."
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Supercomputing mimics berkelium experiments to validate new findThe Titan supercomputer at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) has enabled scientists to explore an unexpected oxidation state in the rare, radioactive element berkelium that was first observed in experiment. The OLCF is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Re-designing urban food gardens to deliver maximum benefitEver wondered why growing food at home never seems to save you any money?
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Shearing of alpacas is necessary, but also stressfulAlpacas, a species of New World camelids, have very thick wool. This requires them to be shorn regularly, just like sheep. But shearing is a source of stress for the animals. This has now been confirmed for the first time by researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna based on an evaluation of clinical, hormonal and behavioural parameters. The scientists were able to show that even the act of restraining th
5h
The Atlantic
How Pixar Lost Its Way A well-regarded Hollywood insider recently suggested that sequels can represent “a sort of creative bankruptcy.” He was discussing Pixar, the legendary animation studio, and its avowed distaste for cheap spin-offs. More pointedly, he argued that if Pixar were only to make sequels, it would “wither and die.” Now, all kinds of industry experts say all kinds of things. But it is surely relevant that
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The Atlantic
The New King Arthur May Be the Worst Retelling of the Myth Yet Guy Ritchie’s King Arthur: Legend of the Sword begins with an assault on a castle featuring giant war elephants so plagiaristically familiar that I suspect the filmmakers will be hearing from Peter Jackson’s attorneys. They may have to get in line, however. The baby Arthur, son of the slain King Uther Pendragon (Eric Bana), is soon sent down the river, à la Moses, before being raised as a thief i
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Science | The Guardian
Narwhals: new footage reveals possible purpose for mysterious tusk – video Drone footage in Canada captures the behaviour of rarely-seen narwhals which appear to use their long tusks to tap and stun fish, making them easier to catch. Narwhals, a type of whale, live in remote locations, meaning very little is known about them. WWF and Fisheries and Oceans Canada have been working together to monitor the creature to better protect it from industrial development Continue r
5h
Ingeniøren
Manglende licens kan blokere for drømmejobbetNår IDA oplever problemer med udenlandsk certificering, er det oftest i Storbritannien, hvor en certificering kan være afgørende for at komme i betragtning til et job.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SHINE software shows data using virtual realityA new piece of free, online software, called SHINE3D, has been developed by researchers at CERN's NA61/SHINE experiment to show the physics data they're creating in 3-D.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Not a lizard nor a dinosaur, tuatara is the sole survivor of a once-widespread reptile groupHave you ever heard of the tuatara? It's a reptile that decapitates birds with its saw-like jaws, lives to about 100 years old, and can remain active in near-freezing temperatures.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
Helping Cancer's Forgotten VictimsPatients in lower-resourced countries have mostly been left behind—but that could be changing -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Helicopter crew's shark warning to paddle-boardersA sheriff's helicopter crew warns paddle-boarders they are swimming with sharks off the California coast.
5h
Popular Science
Why your brain thinks these identical lines are different lengths Science The Müller–Lyer illusion toys with how your brain remembers the world around you. The Müller–Lyer illusion takes advantage of how your brain remembers the world around you.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers shape the future of nano-electronicsThe future of nano-electronics is here. A team of researchers from the Air Force Research Laboratory, Colorado School of Mines, and the Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois have developed a novel method for the synthesis of a composite material that has the potential of vastly improving the electronics used by the Air Force.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
One laser is enoughGases in the environment can be spectroscopically probed fast and precisely using so-called dual frequency combs. Researchers at ETH have now developed a method by which such frequency combs can be created much more simply and cheaply than before.
5h
The Atlantic
Donald Trump's Own Words Become 'Exhibit A' Against Him The most widely reported statement from Donald Trump’s NBC News interview with Lester Holt concerns this tidbit about the process of firing FBI Director James Comey: “When I decided to just do it,” Trump explained on camera, “I said to myself, I said, you know, this Russia thing, with Trump and Russia, is a made up story, it’s an excuse for the Democrats to have lost an election that they should
5h
The Atlantic
L'Etat, C'est Trump Thank you, Kellyanne Conway. On Thursday on Fox News, the President’s most polished defender told America the truth about why Donald Trump fired James Comey: Trump “expects people who are serving in his administration to be loyal to the country and to be loyal to the administration.” And he sees no distinction between the two. He expected the FBI Director to be his personal cop, pursuing those “c
5h
Live Science
Which Came First, Sleep Problems or Anxiety?There's a strong link between anxiety and depression, and sleep problems, and it goes both ways.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A holey graphene electrode framework that enables highly efficient charge delivery(Phys.org)—A team of researchers affiliated with institutions in the U.S., China and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has developed a new type of porous graphene electrode framework that is capable of highly efficient charge delivery. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes how they overcame traditional conflicts arising between tradeoffs involving density and speed to prod
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists find a way to pack grains and drugs most efficientlyScientists have discovered a way to solve a problem that has baffled humans for so long it is mentioned in the Bible: achieving the most efficient packing of objects such as grains and pharmaceutical drugs.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Water leak delays historic 200th spacewalk (Update)NASA discovered a water leak Friday at the International Space Station, delaying the start of the milestone 200th spacewalk at the global space lab.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fiat Chrysler recall: pickup air bags, belts may be disabledFiat Chrysler is recalling approximately 1 million trucks in North America due to a software glitch that could prevent side air bags and seatbelts from deploying during a rollover.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Endangered Finnish seals go online to highlight plightWildlife conservationists in Finland are planning to give endangered seals a spot of online fame by streaming encounters with some of the few hundred remaining mammals in a bid to raise awareness of their plight.
5h
WIRED
Photo of the Week: China’s Building a Full-Sized Titanic Replica Because Why Not Soon you too can relive an actual tragedy. The post Photo of the Week: China’s Building a Full-Sized Titanic Replica Because Why Not appeared first on WIRED .
5h
WIRED
The Surprising Repercussions of Making AI Assistants Sound Human Humanlike speech poses a major challenge to designers, and raises important questions about what people really want from their virtual assistants. The post The Surprising Repercussions of Making AI Assistants Sound Human appeared first on WIRED .
5h
WIRED
Cortana Just Got Microsoft Back in the Smartphone Game Now, Cortana can integrate your digital life across devices, whether they run on Windows, iOS, or Android. No Windows phone required. The post Cortana Just Got Microsoft Back in the Smartphone Game appeared first on WIRED .
5h
Viden
Ny måling: Danskerne byder ulven velkommenSelv om de fleste danskere er positive overfor flere rovdyr i dansk natur, er godt en ud af fire skeptiske. Men der er ingen grund til at være bange for ulvene, forklarer biolog.
5h
Gizmodo
Newly Declassified Document About Spy Satellites on the Space Shuttle Leaves the Sexy Bits To Your Imagination The Space Shuttle orbiter Columbia sits outside the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1 on April 15, 1999 (Photo by NASA) What’s the first thing you think about when you think of NASA’s space shuttle program? Sally Ride? Spinning in microgravity? The Challenger explosion? That episode of the Simpsons ? You might not think about the US military and intelligence community launching spy satellites, bu
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Science | The Guardian
Popularity of sushi has brought rise in parasitic infections, warn doctors Doctors have highlighted the need for awareness of anisakiasis, caused by the larvae of a worm found in contaminated undercooked or raw fish or seafood From nigiri to temaki, sushi has boomed in popularity in the west, but now doctors are warning of a less appetising trend: a rise in parasitic infections. A team of doctors from Portugal raised concerns after a 32-year old man was admitted to hosp
5h
Live Science
Famed Tree-Climbing Lions Running Low on PreyA rare group of tree-climbing lions living in Uganda must range farther and farther to find enough prey to survive, a new study found.
6h
The Atlantic
Broken Technology Hurts Democracy American democracy is in crisis. Part of that crisis has to do with technology. But there’s another, often overlooked, factor at play. I’m a professor, so I think that fixing America starts with education. We can help improve our democratic processes by using technology to improve schools. I don’t mean that we should put iPads into every school, or give every child a laptop. I mean something more
6h
Live Science
Huge Hidden Landforms Under Antarctica Contribute to Ice Sheet's MeltingGiant sediment ridges about the size of the Eiffel Tower are carving the ice sheet from below.
6h
Live Science
New Drones Exhibit Has It All: Cool Tech, Games and ScienceLive Science peeks at a new exhibit at the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum called "Drones: Is the Sky the Limit?"
6h
Ars Technica
Creating, cooling, and probing a molecule, all in one place Enlarge / Atoms are always up to something. (credit: Jurgen Appelo / Flickr ) I love all aspects of quantum physics, but the quantum mechanics of ultra-cold atoms and molecules has a special place in my heart. Cooling and controlling molecules is really, really hard work, but you can do some impressive things with the results. In a recent publication, a team of physicists has outlined a general p
6h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Watch male cuttlefish fight over a female in the wildFor the first time, researchers have observed the competitive mating behaviors of the European cuttlefish in the field.
6h
Scientific American Content: Global
Fossil of Oldest Known Baleen-Whale Relative Unearthed in PeruSkeleton from South America enables palaeontologists to piece together the puzzle of baleen-whale evolution -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Finding mental disorders with mathWhat if a brain scan could detect the presence of a mental disorder even before symptoms have emerged? Or predict which depressed patients would respond to a particular medication and which would not? Or determine the likely rate of progression of Alzheimer's?
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tracking the protein patrollersA nanoprobe developed by biophysicists at NC State could allow researchers to trace the movements of different proteins along DNA – without the drawbacks of current methods.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A cheaper, greener way to grow crystalline semiconductor filmsUniversity of Michigan chemists have developed a greener, cheaper way to make single-crystalline semiconductor films, components at the heart of all of our electric gadgetry.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Environment benefits from large middle class in some Asian countriesA large middle class in Thailand and Indonesia is demanding more environmental protection; something not happening in other developing South-East Asian nations.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Seven ways to help your kids with math homeworkIf you've ever had to help your child with math homework, you really appreciate their teachers, who do it every day. "Math anxiety" isn't something only kids experience.
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Viden
Ny elefantunge: Fra flirt til fødselSe hvad der sker fra elefanterne parrer sig til, den nyfødte unge står på benene.
6h
NYT > Science
Pet City: The Doctor Will See Your Iguana NowAt an exotic-animal hospital on the Upper West Side, a day’s worth of cases includes a duck with egg problems and a reptile with a troubled nose.
7h
NYT > Science
Feature: Can Prairie Dogs Talk?An Arizona biologist believes that their sounds should be considered language — and that someday we’ll understand what they have to say.
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NYT > Science
A Photo From Space Shows Belgium Shining Bright, and Social Media Lights UpPhotos taken by a French astronaut sparked a discussion about their beauty — and also raised questions about energy use.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New CDC-funded portal enables health providers to schedule free colon cancer screeningsA new CDC-funded portal enables health providers to schedule free colorectal cancer screenings for uninsured patients in Cook County. Illinois Colon CARES, a UChicago Medicine-led initiative, is seeking to become model for other states to increase access for vulnerable populations.
7h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Safeguarding Islam's ancient pastA recent conference in Bahrain brought together experts in Islamic archaeology to discuss the lessons of the past and how to safeguard Muslim heritage for future generations.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Uintah Basin captured by Copernicus Sentinel-2ASentinel-2 takes us over the border of the US states Utah and Colorado.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers create anticancer nanomaterials by simulating underwater volcanic conditionsResearchers at Aalto University, Finland, have developed anticancer nanomaterials by simulating the volcano-induced dynamic chemistry of the deep ocean. The novel method enables making nanoclusters of zinc peroxide in an environmentally friendly manner without the use of additional chemicals. The as-synthesised zinc peroxide nanoparticles can be used as a tool for cancer therapy and against other
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Lost' forests found covering an area two-thirds the size of AustraliaA new global analysis of the distribution of forests and woodlands has "found" 467 million hectares of previously unreported forest – an area equivalent to 60% of the size of Australia.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lab unveils 'heart-on-a-chip'Prescription drugs have enabled millions of Americans with chronic medical conditions to live longer and more fulfilling lives, but many promising new drugs never make it to the human trials stage due to the potential for cardiac toxicity.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ancient ground squirrels prove to belong to a present-day speciesMembers of the Faculty of Biology of the Lomonosov Moscow State University have studied arctic ground squirrels in the Indigirka river basin, and found that their relatives now inhabit Kamchatka. The scientists have shared the research results in an article published in Scientific Reports.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers analyze link between employment status and domestic violenceResearchers from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) have carried out a study that analyzes sociodemographic characteristics related to gender-based violence. The study reveals that there is a lower incidence of domestic violence in families whose employment status is more equal.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Fire-streaks' are created in collisions of atomic nucleiAt very high energies, the collision of massive atomic nuclei in an accelerator generates hundreds or even thousands of particles that undergo numerous interactions. Physicists at the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Cracow, Poland, have shown that the course of this complex process can be represented by a surprisingly simple model: Extremely hot matter moves away
7h
Ingeniøren
Danmark skal beslutte sig for, om Crispr/Cas9 er GMORetssag i Frankrig får EU-Kommissionen til at stoppe processen med afklaring af, hvilke planteforædlingsteknologier, der er GMO. Danmark starter dog samtidig en åben proces om samme spørgsmål.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Microscopic Lego' to keep scientists busy 'for next 50 years'Atom-scale building blocks that have been compared to microscopic Lego are allowing researchers to play with the properties of common materials, and the possibilities are so great that it could keep scientists busy for the next 50 years.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Alaska counters lack of fresh veggies with greenhouse guideCold-climate greenhouses have long been an option for increasing the limited growing season in Alaska, where fresh produce is a rarity in a harsh environment. But for many remote communities that rely on costly imported diesel fuel for their power source, they're too expensive to operate.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Jurassic drop in ocean oxygen lasted a million yearsDramatic drops in oceanic oxygen, which cause mass extinctions of sea life, come to a natural end - but it takes about a million years.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers create anticancer nanomaterials by simulating underwater volcanic conditionsResearchers at Aalto University, Finland, have developed anticancer nanomaterials by simulating the volcano-induced dynamic chemistry of the deep ocean. The novel method enables making nanoclusters of zinc peroxide in an environmentally friendly manner, without the use of additional chemicals. The as-synthesised zinc peroxide nanoparticles can be used as a tool for cancer therapy and against other
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Jurassic drop in ocean oxygen lasted a million yearsDramatic drops in oceanic oxygen, which cause mass extinctions of sea life, come to a natural end -- but it takes about a million years.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Invasive lung cancer cells display symbiosis -- Key to metastasisLung cancer cells making up an invasive pack have specialized roles as leaders and followers, and depend on each other for mobility and survival. The genes supporting the cells' interdependence, explored with innovative cell separation techniques, could be keys to future treatments aimed at impairing cancer metastasis.
7h
The Atlantic
In Afghanistan, Trump Is Poised to Re-Escalate a Hopeless War Republicans are supposedly becoming more nationalistic, less willing to bear the burdens of global empire. Democrats are supposedly moving left, abandoning the “indispensable nation” hawkishness favored by the Clintons. American politics, we are told, is turning into a battle between Breitbart and Bernie Sanders. So how come America is reportedly considering escalating its war in Afghanistan? Don
8h
Gizmodo
Trump Says He Didn't Know Michael Flynn in 2015, Which Is a Big Fucking Lie President Donald Trump giving an interview to Lester Holt of NBC News on May 11, 2017 where Trump claimed he didn’t know Michael Flynn in 2015, which is a lie (NBC News/YouTube/Screenshot) Last night, President Trump spoke with Lester Holt in an interview for NBC News. It’s truly a jaw-dropping conversation for a number of reasons, but there’s one important lie that everyone seems to have missed.
8h
Ingeniøren
Med støtte på 30 mio. skal skolebørn lære at tænke som ingeniørerOver de næste tre år skal Engineer the future udvikle undervisningsmateriale til folkeskolen, der kan udklække ingeniører og naturvidenskabsfolk blandt de yngre i befolkning.
8h
Viden
Elefanttante og kameraer skal hjælpe ny elefantunge til verden i Københavns ZooZoologisk Have glæder sig til igen at få en babyelefant. Haven har ikke haft en levende elefantunge siden 2014.
8h
The Atlantic
Why Trump Was Surprised by the Comey Backlash One of the more intriguing bits to emerge from the Comey canning are the widespread reports that Donald Trump assumed that his kicking the FBI director to the curb would be met with cheers—or at least shrugs—across the political spectrum. While the narratives coming out of the White House have been muddled and contradictory to the point of near-incoherence, administration officials have been leak
9h
The Atlantic
Did Global Warming Really ‘Pause’ During the 2000s? It is the first year of the new Republican president’s term. He has taken over a healthy economy from his Democratic predecessor, and, with it, the freedom to branch out beyond the typical Reaganism. He has also inherited a slew of environmental policies, many of which combat global warming. Most important among these is a fledgling UN treaty, a global agreement to restrict greenhouse-gas emissio
9h
Science | The Guardian
Cary Grant: how 100 acid trips in Tinseltown 'changed my life' At the height of his fame, Cary Grant turned to LSD therapy for help. He later claimed the drug saved him, but did it also spell the end of his career? In the late 1950s, at the height of his fame, Cary Grant set off on a trip in search of his true self, unpicking the myth he had spent three decades perfecting. He tried hypnosis and yoga and felt that they both came up short. So he began dropping
9h
Science-Based Medicine
Naturopathic Edumacation: A FAQAn evaluation of a Naturopathic Education FAQ.
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Science | The Guardian
Female mannequins aren't just skinny, they're emaciated A new study has found that female mannequins, but not male ones, represent extremely underweight women There have have been several observations in the press and on social media in the past few years that some of the mannequins used to sell women’s fashion represent unrealistic and unhealthy body sizes. But until we started to look into it, the issue had not been researched properly, and the evid
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Delayed use of blood thinners for atrial fibrillation patients increases risk of dementiaNew, first-of-its-kind, large-scale study includes more than 76,000 heart patients.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
S.Korea's largest games maker goes publicSouth Korea's biggest mobile games maker Netmarble went public in Seoul Friday as it seeks overseas acquisitions, with early trading valuing the firm at around $12 billion.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New Zealand's ambitious plan to save birds: Kill every ratNew Zealand has set itself an environmental goal so ambitious it's been compared to putting a man on the moon: ridding the entire nation of every last rat, possum and stoat.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US intel chiefs express doubts about Kaspersky security softwareTop US intelligence chiefs on Thursday publicly expressed doubts about the global cybersecurity firm Kaspersky Labs because of its roots in Russia.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Judge refers theft allegations against Uber to US AttorneyA federal judge has referred trade secret theft allegations made against Uber by Google's autonomous car unit to the U.S. Attorney's office for investigation.
10h
Science | The Guardian
If you have no children, who will care for you when you’re old? | Sonia Sodha We had to fight to get my grandfather good care. Those of us who don’t have children need a new approach Few of us are immune from the anxiety that can quickly set in when we contemplate our own ageing. Who will be there for us when us can no longer physically take care of ourselves? Who will be around to remind us of who we were in our moments of lucidity when our minds have started slipping awa
11h
Ars Technica
Judge refers Waymo v. Uber lawsuit to criminal investigators An Uber driverless Ford Fusion in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. (credit: Getty Images) Waymo's allegations of trade secret theft against Uber should be referred to the US attorney for investigation, "based on the evidentiary record supplied thus far," a federal judge ruled yesterday. "The Court takes no position on whether a prosecution is or is not warranted, a decision entirely up to the United Sta
11h
Ingeniøren
Tre ting, som får arbejdsgivere til at tænde på din LinkedIn-profil Hvis din LinkedIn-profil skal vække potentielle arbejdsgiveres interesse handler det om, at fortælle hvad du kan, frem for hvem du er. Her er de tre ting, som en saftig LinkedIn-profil skal indeholde. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/tre-ting-faar-arbejdsgivere-at-taende-paa-din-linkedin-profil-7779 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
11h
WIRED
Review: 2017 Ford GT Welcome back to the supercar game, Ford. You've been missed. The post Review: 2017 Ford GT appeared first on WIRED .
12h
The Atlantic
Former U.S. Representative Found Guilty of Fraud Former U.S. Representative Corrine Brown was found guilty Thursday of pocketing hundreds of thousands of dollars that she raised for a fake charity alongside her former chief of staff, Elias “Ronnie” Simmons. Brown was a member of the House of Representatives for more than two decades, and one of the first African-Americans from Florida to be elected to Congress. She ran for reelection in 2016, b
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lifting your spirits doesn't require many repsEngaging in light or moderate physical activity such as taking a walk or going for a bike ride is the best way for normally inactive people to beat the blues and improve their sense of well-being, according to a University of Connecticut study. Researchers say that in this study there was no additional emotional benefit gained from working out aggressively.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Severe mental illness linked to much higher risk for cardiovascular diseaseAn international study of more than 3.2 million people with severe mental illness reveals a substantially increased risk for developing cardiovascular disease compared to the general population.
13h
New on MIT Technology Review
An Algorithm Summarizes Lengthy Text Surprisingly WellTraining software to accurately sum up information in documents could have great impact in many fields, such as medicine, law, and scientific research.
13h
cognitive science
Are Humans Hardwired to Be Cruel to Each Other? | Robert Sapolsky submitted by /u/Nobody35593 [link] [comments]
13h
Ars Technica
Microsoft reaches beyond Windows with Timeline and Pick Up Where I Left Off Resuming an activity in Windows Timeline. (video link) SEATTLE—At its annual Build developer conference, Microsoft took the wraps off the next major Windows 10 version, the Fall Creators Update , and announced some of its new features. One of these new features, Timeline, is going to be good when you're using Windows 10—but even better when you're not. Timeline tracks what you're doing—which docu
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Global distribution of sea animalsResearchers analyze data about the global distribution of sea animals and develop a Web app.
15h
Live Science
How Many US High Schoolers Binge Drink?About one-third of U.S. high schoolers say they drink alcohol, and one in six say they binge drink, according to a new report.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New insights into the tumor metabolismTumors, inflammation and circulatory disorders locally disturb the body's acid-base balance. These changes in pH value could be used for example to verify the success of cancer treatments. Up to now, however, there has been no imaging method to render such changes visible in patients. Now a team has developed a pH sensor that renders pH values visible through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) -- in
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New lyme disease forecast map targets rising tide of ticksNew research offers veterinarians a forecasting map that tells them which parts of the country are most at risk of Lyme disease infections in dogs, which could also help track and predict Lyme disease in people.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Populations adapt as nature and nurture work togetherA study of fruit fly larvae leads researchers to conclude that nature and nurture do collaborate in determining the behavior of a population. Researchers found a genetic correlation between learning and behavioral plasticity in relation to changing conditions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ancient Mars impacts created tornado-like winds that scoured surfacePlumes of vapor generated by ancient impacts on Mars created tornado-like winds possibly swirling at more than 500 miles per hour, which explain mysterious streaks seen near large impact craters on the Martian surface.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Some forests have been hiding in plain sightA new estimate of dryland forests suggests that the global forest cover is at least 9 percent higher than previously thought. The finding will help reduce uncertainties surrounding terrestrial carbon sink estimates.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Is this the 'holey' grail of batteries?In a battery system, electrodes containing porous graphene scaffolding offer a substantial improvement in both the retention and transport of energy, a new study reveals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Low heart rate linked to stalking behaviors in menA low resting heart rate, which has been linked to aggression and violent offending, has been implicated in stalking behavior in males, according to a recent study.
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NYT > Science
Tillerson, in Alaska, Gives No Hint on Paris Climate AccordAt a meeting of the Arctic Council, the secretary of state was noncommittal when asked about the administration’s view on the landmark climate agreement.
16h
WIRED
Magic Leap, and the Troubles In Sexism Valley Misogyny in the tech industry isn't just wrong---it's a warning sign that a company is in trouble. The post Magic Leap, and the Troubles In Sexism Valley appeared first on WIRED .
16h
The Atlantic
Trump Signs a Long-Awaited Cybersecurity Order President Donald Trump signed an executive order on Thursday that aims to protect the U.S. from cybersecurity risks, including computer hacking. The news comes just days after Trump fired the nation’s former FBI director, James Comey, who was conducting an investigation into the alleged Russian hacking of the Democratic party and its 2016 candidate, Hillary Clinton. In March, Comey revealed the F
16h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Arctic summit: Trump to make 'right decision for the US' on climatePresident Trump will make "the right decision for the US" as he reviews the climate change policy.
16h
Futurity.org
To experience beauty, you’ll have to think In order to experience beauty, we must think, a new study suggests, confirming the 18th-century idea of Immanuel Kant’s about the relationship between beauty and thought. “The experience of beauty is a form of pleasure,” explains Denis Pelli, a professor of psychology and neural science at New York University and the study’s senior author. “To get it, we must think.” “From Homer’s Iliad to today’
17h
WIRED
The Real Threat to Our Government Is Tech Illiteracy Drafting sane tech policy is hard. But that's no excuse for not doing it, as Comey's tenure as FBI director proves. The post The Real Threat to Our Government Is Tech Illiteracy appeared first on WIRED .
17h
WIRED
You Can’t Bug the Oval Office (For Long, Anyway) A Russian photographer in the White House has raised suspicions of surveillance. But the real issue is Trump's lack of security care. The post You Can't Bug the Oval Office (For Long, Anyway) appeared first on WIRED .
17h
Futurity.org
Seniors remain uneasy 3 years after Ferguson When a white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, shot Michael Brown, Jr., in August 2014, civil unrest lasted for weeks. The aftershocks continue, including for older people in the community who say issues relating to safety remains their highest concern, a new study finds. “Safety was a very interesting topic because people talked about it in various ways,” says gerontologist Nancy Morrow-Howe
17h
Scientific American Content: Global
The Sneaky Danger of Space DustWhen tiny particles of space debris slam into satellites, the collision could cause the emission of hardware-frying radiation. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
17h
The Atlantic
The Russians Troll Trump It’s hard to imagine how Wednesday could have gone any worse for the Trump White House. But it did, because the Trump White House didn’t see any reason to cancel or reschedule or somehow modify the president’s promise to Russian President Vladimir Putin that he would receive Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov in the Oval Office. Apparently, the day after firing the man investigating members o
17h
Live Science
Hepatitis C Cases Triple, and Opioid Crisis Is Mainly to BlameCases of hepatitis C have tripled over a five-year span, thanks in large part to the exploding opioid epidemic, which leads to IV drug use.
18h
Ars Technica
In the Arctic, carbon dioxide goes down where methane comes up Enlarge / One example of a methane seep (off the coast of Virginia, in this case). (credit: NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program ) Reports of methane bubbling up from the bottom of the East Siberian Sea may have induced some climate change anxiety. In recent years, plumes of methane bubbles rising up from what was once dry permafrost have been observed off the Siberian coast. But their context was uncle
18h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Crisis Response What We’re Following Comey, Cont’d: The latest explanation for the controversial dismissal comes from President Trump himself, who says he’d planned to fire the FBI director “regardless” of the DAG’s recommendation. What’s it mean for the president to fire a principal officer charged with investigating his campaign? Though many commentators have called this a constitutional crisis, the firing doe
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Gizmodo
Rosie O'Donnell Says A Former FBI Agent Changed Her Mind About James Comey Photo: Getty If you thought that President Trump and Rosie O’Donnell finally agreed on something—as the president’s tweets would have you believe—you’d be dead wrong. Despite what she may have stated before, Rosie doesn’t think that James Comey should’ve been fired from the FBI this week. Advertisement In Twitter direct messages on Thursday, she told Gizmodo that when she tweeted “FIRE COMEY” in
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Compound corrects iron-delivery defectsInvestigators describe a compound known as Hinokitiol which can correct iron-delivery defects in preclinical models. Their study lays the groundwork for investigating Hinkitiol's full potential beyond cellular and model organisms.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Disentangling chloroplast geneticsProper DNA inheritance is essential for healthy chloroplast: the energy center of all plant cells. Researchers discover a new gene in chloroplast that disentangles its DNA for proper plant health.
18h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: Humans Have a Poor Sense of Smell? It’s Just a MythThe belief that the human nose isn’t very acute is not based on empirical evidence, a scientist says in a new review.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cutting smoking rates could save the NHS £67 million a yearIf smoking rates dropped to 5 percent in the UK by 2035, the NHS could save £67million in just one year, according to research published in Tobacco Control today.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Beware of parasites in raw/undercooked fish, warn doctorsAn unseen hazard of eating raw or undercooked fish/seafood is on the rise in Western countries, where dishes, such as sushi, are becoming increasingly popular, warn doctors today in BMJ Case Reports.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drug used for alcohol dependence might also treat stuttering, suggest researchersBaclofen, a drug that has recently been used to treat alcohol dependence despite not officially being licensed for this condition, might also help stop stuttering, suggest researchers in the journal BMJ Case Reports.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cut UK smokers to under 5 percent to lop millions off healthcare and productivity costsSetting an ambitious UK target of a smoking prevalence of less than 5 percent by 2035 would avoid nearly 12,500 new cases of serious disease and save more than £600 million in healthcare and lost productivity costs in that year alone, conclude researchers in Tobacco Control.
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Science : NPR
Heroin Epidemic Is Driving A Spike In Hepatitis C Cases, CDC Says From 2010 to 2015, the number of new infections leaped nearly 300 percent, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And researchers appear confident of the cause. (Image credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
18h
Big Think
How Does Jesus Fit Into Islam? Jesus was a revered figure and prophet in the Quran. But what exactly do Muslims believe about him? Read More
18h
NeuWrite San Diego
Identity CrisisWho are you? How do you know? I’ve been thinking a lot about identity this week. It all started when I received a letter from the IRS that began “Dear TAXPAYER” and essentially asked, “Are you who you say you are?” (Yes, it’s me! Please send me my tax refund!) To validate my identity, I […]
18h
The Atlantic
Mark Colvin, of Australia and the World Today the eminent Australian broadcaster Mark Colvin died at age 65. This is a sad moment for his country, for his many friends (of whom I was glad to be one), and for his craft. Mark Colvin’s impact on and prominence in his home country may be difficult for Americans to imagine, since no single U.S. news organization has the nationwide omnipresence of the Australian Broadcasting Company (ABC) fo
19h
Big Think
Thanks, Robot! Humans are Showing Kindness with Their AI Helpers. Even though there is no ramification for being rude or cold to AI, we may have a tendency to display gratitude. Why? An interview with the founder of x.ai, Dennis Mortensen. Read More
19h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Desperate For Protein? Join These Ladies In Chomping Down On A Giant Worm! #NakedAndAfraidXL | Sundays at 11/10c Lacey finds a huge worm and prepares it for dinner. Will it be a tasty meal, or full of something we'd rather not think about? Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/naked-and-afraid-xl More info: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/naked-and-afraid-xl/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebo
19h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: We're Gonna Need a Bigger Showboat Today in 5 Lines In an interview with NBC, President Trump called former FBI Director James Comey a “showboat,” and said he was going to fire him “regardless” of what the Justice Department recommended. During his testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee, Acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe denied the White House’s assertion that FBI employees had lost confidence in Comey. The leaders of
19h
The Atlantic
The Senate Confirms Trump's NAFTA Negotiator The Senate confirmed Robert Lighthizer as U.S. trade representative on Thursday, putting in place the man the Trump administration has been waiting on to begin renegotiating the North American Free Trade Agreement. Unlike many of President Trump’s appointees, the Senate easily approved Lighthizer, voting 82-14. Still, the vote was held up for weeks because Lighthizer needed a special waiver due t
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Gizmodo
MST3K Robots Pitch New Shows to Netflix, Like Fuller House but With Piles of Bodies GIF We are smack dab in the middle of TV pick-up season, what with Syfy’s just-announced round of shows and Fox’s The Gifted getting its first teaser trailer , so it’s only natural that Crow T. Robot and Tom Servo from Netflix’s MST3K reboot would want to get in on the action. Only, most of their shows seem to involve murdering vast sums of people. Advertisement The Netflix video features Crow an
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Gizmodo
Jezebel ‘Y’all Are Demons’: An Investigation Into a Patch and Who Stole It | Deadspin The Real 2017 Jezebel ‘Y’all Are Demons’: An Investigation Into a Patch and Who Stole It | Deadspin The Real 2017 Name Of The Year Is... | The Root Can We Talk About This Thing Bothering Me About Dear White People ? | Fusion Trump to Hang Map of His National Popular Vote Loss in White House |
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Antiproton count hints at dark matter annihilationAntimatter in cosmic rays could be a sign of dark matter.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Certain medical diagnoses may increase hospitalized patients' risk of kidney injuryPatients who were admitted to the hospital with sepsis, heart diseases, polytrauma, liver disease, and cardiovascular surgery were at elevated risk for developing acute kidney injury (AKI).The medical records of most patients who developed hospital-acquired AKI did not include the diagnosis code for AKI.
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Gizmodo
Is This Bluetooth Salt Shaker the Juicero of Seasoning? Screenshot via mysmalt.com It is with a heavy heart that I must inform you of a “smart salt shaker” called “ The Smalt .” Oddly, the shaking aspect of this shaker is still decidedly unplugged— you still have do all the shaking; Smalt just “tracks” it for you. (And lights up. And plays music.) It is, essentially, the Juicero of seasoning. As far as how it “tracks”—does it know about my oddly high
20h
The Atlantic
Is Donald Trump a Secret Redditor? The president of the United States has long-running beef with the actress Rosie O’Donnell, and that is not even the most surreal sentence I have written today . But this is not about me: It’s about Donald Trump and it’s about his tweet to O’Donnell at 3:55 p.m. “We finally agree on something Rosie,” says the tweet, published via Trump’s personal account, @realDonaldTrump. Trump was referring to a
20h
Live Science
Baby Endangered Royal Turtles Hatch in Cambodia | VideoConservationists recently announced the successful hatching of nine Cambodian Royal Turtle babies, offering hope for the critically endangered population.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Free C3d regulates immune checkpoint blockade and enhances anti-tumor immunityResearchers have found a protein that stops cancer's ability to prevent the immune system from destroying cancer cells. The protein, free C3d, has the potential to be developed into a cancer vaccine and a cancer treatment.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Unexpectedly primitive atmosphere found around distant 'warm Neptune'A new study led by NASA with contributions from the University of Maryland reveals that the distant planet HAT-P-26b has a primitive atmosphere composed almost entirely of hydrogen and helium. Located about 437 light years away from Earth, HAT-P-26b orbits a star roughly twice as old as the sun. The analysis is one of the most detailed studies to date of a 'warm Neptune,' a planet that is Neptune-
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ancient Mars impacts created tornado-like winds that scoured surfaceIn looking at NASA images of Mars a few years ago, Brown University geologist Peter Schultz noticed sets of strange bright streaks emanating from a few large-impact craters on the planet's surface. The streaks are odd in that they extend much farther from the craters than normal ejecta patterns, and they are only visible in thermal infrared images taken during the Martian night.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Migratory seabird deaths linked to hurricanesStronger and more frequent hurricanes may pose a new threat to the sooty tern, an iconic species of migratory seabird found throughout the Caribbean and Mid-Atlantic, a new Duke University-led study reveals.
20h
Popular Science
What a Jell-O brain tells us about the future of human-machine interaction Technology Expanding the ways people connect with the digital landscape Yang Zhang, a 26-year-old computer science doctoral student at Carnegie Mellon University, created a touch-sensitive model of the human brain out of red Jell-O and milk…
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Knowledge of DNA repair mechanisms advances with new paperWe humans like to think our DNA is well-protected in the nucleus of each cell. But it's a hard life for the hard-working genetic code.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Liquid-crystal and bacterial living materials self-organize and move in their own waySmart glass, transitional lenses and mood rings are not the only things made of liquid crystals; mucus, slug slime and cell membranes also contain them. Now, a team of researchers is trying to better understand how liquid crystals, combined with bacteria, form living materials and how the two interact to organize and move.
20h
The Atlantic
The White House Declares War on the Specter of Voter Fraud If the intensifying scrutiny over alleged Russian interference in the election and the affairs of the White House and the truly unprecedented firing of former FBI Director James Comey by President Trump weren’t enough to fill a news cycle, the White House released an executive order on Thursday afternoon establishing the “Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity.” The commission wil
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ancient Mars impacts created tornado-like winds that scoured surfacePlumes of vapor generated by ancient impacts on Mars created tornado-like winds possibly swirling at more than 500 miles per hour, which explain mysterious streaks seen near large impact craters on the Martian surface.
20h
Ars Technica
Sprint sues government over elimination of broadband price caps Enlarge / Money. (credit: Getty Images | GP Kidd ) Sprint and Windstream sued the Federal Communications Commission this week over a decision that will help AT&T, Verizon, and CenturyLink charge higher prices for certain business Internet services. The FCC last month voted to eliminate price caps for the so-called Business Data Services (BDS) that are offered by incumbent phone companies througho
20h
Live Science
How 450-Million-Year-Old Bacteria Evolved into a Dangerous SuperbugA dangerous bacteria found in hospitals might have originated from an ancestor that lived in the guts of the first animals to walk on land.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microsoft aims at 'mixed reality' with new devicesMicrosoft on Thursday debuted hardware for reaching into virtual worlds powered by its technology as it looked to "mixed reality" as the next big computing platform.
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Science | The Guardian
Robot spaceplane returns from hush-hush mission Craft touches down on the Kennedy Space Centre runway where the now retired space shuttle landed 78 times from 1984 to 2011 The US Air Force’s X-37B robotic space plane landed on 7 May after 718 days in orbit. This was the unmanned spacecraft’s fourth trip into space and, as before, the precise details of the sojourn are classified. The only payloads that the military revealed upon the vehicle’s
20h
Gizmodo
Halo Fan Turns Microsoft's Cortana Into Actual Hologram GIF Usually, Cortana the personal assistant is just a disembodied voice. One Halo fan decided to take his Cortana to the next level by building a rad hologram appliance that responds to your queries. Advertisement The whole thing is still a work in progress, creator Jarem “ untitled network ” Archer says, but it’s still pretty cool to watch it in action: The animations were built with a Unity 3D
20h
Ars Technica
Microsoft’s new VR controllers will be great—until SteamVR “Knuckles” arrive Enlarge / Surprise! Microsoft has its own VR controller. (credit: Microsoft ) Thursday's Microsoft Build keynote included a repeated call from Technical Fellow Alex Kipman about the importance of mixed reality (meaning, virtual reality headsets and their "augmented" reality siblings like Hololens). This platform will drive "the future of computing," he said, and he repeated Microsoft's call to us
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Magnet study sees potential for MRE in measuring liver fibrosis in childrenResearchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with collaborators across the nation, have determined that magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) can be an accurate, non-invasive tool to identify liver fibrosis in children. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is now the most common cause of chronic liver disease in children, and scarring of the liver, known as fibrosis, i
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Migratory seabird deaths linked to hurricanesStronger and more frequent hurricanes may pose a new threat to the sooty tern, a species of migratory seabird found throughout the Caribbean and Mid-Atlantic, a new Duke-led study reveals. The study is the first to map the birds' annual migratory path and demonstrate how its timing and trajectory place them in the direct path of hurricanes moving into the Caribbean from the Atlantic. Climate chang
21h
Ars Technica
Intel’s Itanium CPUs, once a play for 64-bit servers and desktops, are dead Enlarge (credit: Intel) Remember Itanium? Intel's first crack at 64-bit server processors from circa the turn of the millennium? Well, two things: Intel is releasing four new 9700-series Itanium CPUs based on the "Kittson" architecture , and the chips are the last new Itanium processors that the company plans to ship. An Intel spokesperson confirmed to PC World that this was the end of the line f
21h
The Atlantic
How Hollywood Keeps Telling the Legend of King Arthur King Arthur: Legend of the Sword introduces its title character via a flashy montage about his adolescence on the streets of Roman London in the inimitable style of the director Guy Ritchie. Arthur (Charlie Hunnam), an orphan abandoned by his royal parents as a boy, is raised by brothel owners. He climbs the ranks of the underworld, turning into a glorified mobster/bouncer with ripped abs trained
21h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
China cracks down on fake data in drug trials Researchers and manufacturers face possible jail time — or execution — for fraudulent submissions to nation's drug agency. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21977
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Knowledge of DNA repair mechanisms advances with new paper from Mayo Clinic scientistsWe humans like to think our DNA is well-protected in the nucleus of each cell. But it's a hard life for the hard-working genetic code.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Liquid-crystal and bacterial living materials self-organize and move in their own waySmart glass, transitional lenses and mood rings are not the only things made of liquid crystals; mucus, slug slime and cell membranes also contain them. Now, a team of researchers is trying to better understand how liquid crystals, combined with bacteria, form living materials and how the two interact to organize and move.
21h
Gizmodo
Samsung Dex Comes Heartbreakingly Close to Turning a Phone Into a Full-Blown Computer Image: Gizmodo / Eleanor Fye The Samsung Dex is a tiny new smartphone dock that wades carefully toward a world in which smartphones serve as our primary computers. It’s about the size of a hockey puck, and when the Galaxy S8 , a monitor, and a Bluetooth keyboard and mouse are connected, the Dex turns the phone into a surprisingly functional desktop. The idea is that instead of lugging a laptop ar
21h
Gizmodo
Watching Foods Deflate and Re-Inflate Has Left Me Starving and Confused GIF Mike Pelletier’s short film Still Life looks nothing like the classical paintings of bowls of fruit and flowers you’ll find in a stuffy art gallery. Using hyper-realistic computer animation, Pelletier’s film instead features fruits, vegetables, and breads that look like they’re secretly balloons as they deflate and then fill back up with air. Advertisement You’ll feel a little confused at the
21h
Popular Science
Humans have a better sense of smell than you think Science The nose knows You can blame a 19th century scientists for the mistaken idea that our sense of smell stinks.
21h
New Scientist - News
Neptune-like exoplanet spotted that has a watery atmosphereSigns of water in a gas giant exoplanet’s atmosphere suggest the world formed much closer to its star than gas giants in our solar system did
21h
New Scientist - News
Hanging on: In search of the bat that returned from the deadThe Cuban greater funnel-eared bat was thought extinct until a small population was spotted in a forgotten corner of the island – surviving, but only just
21h
Ars Technica
Astronomers find water in the atmosphere of a warm, Neptune-sized planet Enlarge / An artist's conception of planet HAT-P-26b, along with the outlines of the two telescopes that imaged it. (credit: NASA/GSFC ) Scientists are announcing a rare look into the atmosphere of a distant exoplanet more than 400 light years away. The planet is roughly Neptune-sized and orbits close to its host star. And now we know its atmosphere contains significant amounts of water. Signific
21h
The Scientist RSS
Zika's Economic BurdenA new analysis estimates that the viral disease could cost between $183 million and more than $10 billion in the U.S. alone.
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Gizmodo
Six Best Pairs Of Men's Premium Underwear, And A Pee Poll Image via MeUndies Earlier this week we asked you to unzip and talk about your picks for best men’s premium underwear. Some of you ignored the criteria completely, some of you nominated underwear marketed toward women, and many of you engaged in a healthy debate about best practices when peeing. There’s something for everyone here. Note: This post got long, so we’re putting the poll at the top fo
21h
The Atlantic
A Republican Congressman Meets His Angry Constituency WILLINGBORO, N.J.— Representative Tom MacArthur knew well what he was getting into when he showed up in this Democratic stronghold on Wednesday . The second-term lawmaker who had almost single-handedly resuscitated the House Republican health-care bill would hear from the constituents who now despised him for playing hero at their expense. He had come back to face a particular kind of music—the c
21h
New on MIT Technology Review
Personal AI Privacy Watchdog Could Help You Regain Control of Your DataIf regulators aren’t going to help consumers make sense of what companies are doing with their data, maybe artificial intelligence can.
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Popular Science
How we finally figured out the color of dinosaur feathers Animals Excerpt: The Evolution of Beauty Describing the plumage coloration of Anchiornis huxleyi was like writing the very first entry in the Field Guide to Jurassic Dinosaurs. Read on.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astronomers pursue renegade supermassive black holeSupermassive holes are generally stationary objects, sitting at the centers of most galaxies. However, using data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and other telescopes, astronomers recently hunted down what could be a supermassive black hole that may be on the move.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
High levels of radon found in Pennsylvania water wellsCancer-causing radon has been found in some Pennsylvania water wells, adding slightly to the much bigger threat faced by homeowners from airborne sources of the radioactive gas.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA analyzed powerful Tropical Cyclone Donna's extreme rainfallTropical Cyclone Donna was one of the most powerful out-of-season tropical cyclones ever recorded in the southern hemisphere and generated extreme amounts of rainfall along its path. NASA analyzed and mapped rainfall totals generated by the storm.
21h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Cells that trim brain connections are linked to autism A difference in brain biology between the sexes might render males most vulnerable to autism. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21978
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Futurity.org
Breast cancer is more deadly without insurance Research has found that uninsured patients were 60 percent more likely to die from breast cancer. Uninsured women with breast cancer were nearly 2.6 times more likely to have a late-stage diagnosis than cancer patients who were insured, the study in the journal Cancer shows. “Access to screening services may play a role in the association between insurance status and breast cancer stage at diagno
21h
Gizmodo
Trump Finally Signs Overdue Executive Order About 'The Cyber' President Donald Trump signed an executive order on Thursday aimed at strengthening the cybersecurity of the federal government, according to the White House. Advertisement A copy of the document distributed to a White House press list and later posted on the White House website details Trump’s first attempt to develop a protocol for defending the U.S. against malicious hackers and securing the n
21h
Live Science
3D-Printed 'Eyes' Could Help Blind Children's Faces Grow NaturallyResearchers used a 3D printer to create eye-like structures to help the faces of kids who are missing eyes to grow naturally and symmetrically.
22h
WIRED
Star Neuroscientist Tom Insel Leaves the Google-Spawned Verily for … a Startup? What could be going on at Verily that would lead the former head of the National Institutes of Mental Health to bail on Google-sized money and data? The post Star Neuroscientist Tom Insel Leaves the Google-Spawned Verily for ... a Startup? appeared first on WIRED .
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists ID human protein essential for human cytomegalovirus replicationScientists have demonstrated that a human protein known as valosin containing protein (VCP) is essential for replication of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). The findings, published in PLOS Pathogens, identify VCP as a potential new treatment target.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA analyzed powerful Tropical Cyclone Donna's extreme rainfallTropical Cyclone Donna was one of the most powerful out-of-season tropical cyclones ever recorded in the southern hemisphere and generated extreme amounts of rainfall along its path. NASA analyzed and mapped rainfall totals generated by the storm.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Oldest buckthorn fossilized flowers found in ArgentinaAround 66 million years ago, at the end of the Cretaceous period, a giant asteroid crashed into the present-day Gulf of Mexico, leading to the extinction of the non-avian dinosaurs. How plants were affected is less understood, but fossil records show that ferns were the first plants to recover many thousands of years afterward.Now, a team including Cornell researchers reports the discovery of the
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Selfish genes hide for decades in plain sight of worm geneticistsCrossing wild Hawaiian C. elegans with the familiar lab strain reveals genes that benefit themselves by making mother worms poison offspring who haven’t inherited the right stuff.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dutch group says it will soon start cleaning up ocean trashA Dutch foundation aiming to rid the world's oceans of plastic waste says it will start cleaning up the huge area of floating junk known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch within the next 12 months, two years earlier than planned.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using single-cell RNA sequencing and clever statistical analysis to track stem cells as they matureAdult stem cells have the ability to transform into many types of cells, but tracing the path individual stem cells follow as they mature and identifying the molecules that trigger these fateful decisions are difficult in a living animal.
22h
Ars Technica
Cable lobby conducts survey, finds that Americans want net neutrality (credit: M3Li55@ ) As US cable companies push to eliminate or change net neutrality rules, the industry's primary lobby group today released the results of a survey that it says shows "strong bipartisan consensus that the government should let the Internet flourish without imposing burdensome regulations." But proponents of keeping the current rules can find plenty to like in the survey conducted
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Three new sub-species of snow leopard discoveredA recent research paper in the Journal of Heredity reveals that there are three sub-species of snow leopard. Until now, researchers had assumed this species, Panthera uncia, was monotypic.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New understanding of superconductor's 'normal' state may open the way to solving longstanding puzzleSince the discovery two decades ago of the unconventional topological superconductor Sr2RuO4, scientists have extensively investigated its properties at temperatures below its 1°K critical temperature (Tc), at which a phase transition from a metal to superconducting state occurs. Now experiments done at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in the Madhavan and Abbamonte laboratories, in c
22h
The Atlantic
Human Landscapes of Mexico Mexico is an enormous and diverse country, with approximately 120 million people living in 770,000 square miles (2 million sq km). Modern Mexicans, as well as prehistoric cultures, have been reshaping the land to their needs for centuries, much of that impact visible from aerial and satellite photography—from pyramids and canals to resorts, enormous cities, ports, farms, aquaculture, and more. Ov
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sniffing out stem cell fates in the noseSingle-cell RNA sequencing has allowed researchers to identify adult stem cells as they transform into mature cells, but the process becomes complicated when stem cells can transform into several different types of cells. UC Berkeley neuroscientists teamed with statisticians and computer scientists to improve the analysis of their experimental results, and were able to track stem cell fates in the
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Antibiotic-resistant microbes date back to 450 million years ago, well before the age of dinosaursLeading hospital 'superbugs,' known as the enterococci, arose from an ancestor that dates back 450 million years -- about the time when animals were first crawling onto land (and well before the age of dinosaurs), according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Three new sub-species of snow leopard discoveredA recent research paper reveals that there are three sub-species of snow leopard. Until now, researchers had assumed this species, Panthera uncia, was monotypic.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How plankton and bacteria shape ocean sprayAs the oceans ebb and flow, the resulting waves and splashes form tiny bubbles.The bubbles burst and release a vapor -- called sea spray aerosol -- into the air. This aerosol scatters sunlight and is involved in forming clouds and ultimately climate. But no two bubbles are the same, researchers report. They analyzed sea spray and found that the atmospheric-changing properties of the bubbles are in
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why one eye-targeting virus could make for a useful gene-delivery toolIn their quest to replicate themselves, viruses have gotten awfully good at tricking human cells into pumping out viral proteins. A team of researchers has now uncovered the structural details that make one virus a better tool for future therapies than its closely related 'cousin.'
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Ars Technica
HP laptops covertly log user keystrokes, researchers warn Enlarge / Keyloggers like this one surreptitiously store passwords and other confidential data entered into a computer. (credit: infosectoday.com ) HP is selling more than two dozen models of laptops and tablets that covertly monitor every keystroke a user makes, security researchers warned Thursday. The devices then store the key presses in an unencrypted file on the hard drive. The keylogger is
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Ars Technica
Radio station spent two years advising listeners how to stash child porn Enlarge (credit: Zack Briggs KVOA ) The startling "public service announcement" broadcast by Arizona's CAVE 97.7 FM for two years is now off the air. "Never keep paper pictures, tapes, or films of naked juveniles where anyone else can find them," is the advisory PSA that late-night listeners to CAVE frequently heard, narrated by station owner Paul Lotsof. "In many cases, the penalty for possessio
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Science : NPR
Disappearing Montana Glaciers A 'Bellwether' Of Melting To Come? Glaciers there are "an early indicator of the kinds of changes that are going to occur elsewhere," a scientist says. Since 1966, the glaciers in Glacier National Park shrunk an average of 39 percent. (Image credit: USGS)
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Watery exoplanet’s skies suggest unexpected origin storyCompared with Neptune, HAT-P-26b’s atmosphere has few heavy elements, suggesting it formed differently than the ice giants in Earth’s solar system.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Baleen whales' ancestors were toothy suction feedersModern whales' ancestors probably hunted and chased down prey, but somehow, those fish-eating hunters evolved into filter-feeding leviathans. An analysis of a 36.4-million-year-old whale fossil suggests that before baleen whales lost their teeth, they were suction feeders that most likely dove down and sucked prey into their mouths. The study also shows that whales most likely lost the hind limbs
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Molecular prosthetics' can replace missing proteins to treat diseaseResearchers have demonstrated that a small molecule can transport iron in human cells and live animals when proteins that normally do the same job are missing, a condition that often causes severe anemia in patients. Such 'molecular prosthetics' might treat a host of incurable diseases caused by protein deficiencies, such as anemias, cystic fibrosis or certain types of heart disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
This nasal receptor mediates the appetizing smell of fish foodThe aquatic environment is full of tantalizing chemicals that can guide a fish to mates or meals. Now, scientists in Japan have identified the olfactory receptor and brain circuitry that picks up the scent of adenosine triphosphate, or ATP. Although mostly known for carrying energy within cells, ATP is also a constituent of fish prey such as brine shrimp and plankton. The newly identified receptor
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Primitive atmosphere discovered around 'Warm Neptune'A pioneering new study uncovering the 'primitive atmosphere' surrounding a distant world could provide a pivotal breakthrough in the search to how planets form and develop in far-flung galaxies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA study finds unexpectedly primitive atmosphere around 'warm Neptune'By combining observations from NASA's Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes, a new study has found that the planet HAT-P-26b has an atmosphere composed almost entirely of hydrogen and helium, with a relatively cloudless sky.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows 'walking a mile in their shoes' may be hazardous to your healthWhen it comes to empathy, the idiom that suggests 'walking a mile in their shoes' turns out to be problematic advice, according to new research published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mannequin, trained actors help physicians learn to diagnose and communicate brain deathA Loyola Medicine study has found that two simulation techniques dramatically improved physicians' brain death diagnostic and communications skills. The techniques employ SimMan® 3G, a high-tech patient simulator (mannequin) and actors who simulate family members having a brain-death discussions.
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Gizmodo
Superman's Mom Hates to Be Honest, But Justice League Is Worse Than Avengers [Updated] Looks like Superman’s mom doesn’t think he’s the most special boy in all the world, or at least shes’s not that impressed with his superpowered friends. When asked whether the Justice League movie will blow Marvel’s The Avengers out of the water, Diana Lane simply said: “No.” Advertisement In an appearance on Watch What Happens with Andy Cohen Live , Lane was asked by a viewer whether she could s
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The Atlantic
Trump: 'Regardless of Recommendation, I Was Going to Fire Comey' President Trump has once again changed his story on when and why he fired James Comey, saying he had decided to fire the FBI director even before he received a memo from the deputy attorney general laying out the case for dismissing Comey. “What I did is I was going to fire Comey, my decision,” Trump said during an interview Thursday with NBC News’ Lester Holt. “ I was going to fire regardless of
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Popular Science
Prototype exoskeleton helps the elderly keep their balance Technology Why have a walker when you could have an exosuit? A new exoskeleton is meant to prevent these falls from happening, by using adaptive mechanisms that activate only when it senses that the wearer is about to fall. Read…
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Popular Science
An air fryer for 50 percent off? I'd fry it. Gadgets It's $100. An air fryer for 50 percent off? I'd buy it.
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Gizmodo
How Smart Watches Might Actually Improve Your Health Image: Getty Images If you sacrifice style to strap a clunky Apple Watch or Fitbit to your wrist, one of the tradeoffs is supposedly the ability to better monitor your health. But so far, the health benefits of tracking your step count or heart rate are mostly unproven. In fact, some research has suggested the benefits are actually nil . Advertisement But fitness trackers do collect valuable data
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Gizmodo
President Donald Trump: 'What Is Digital?' President Trump touring the USS Gerald R. Ford in March (Photo: AP) The president’s confusing, concerning, and ultimately crazy week continued on Thursday with a prickly Time cover package. It contained an unnerving interview between the magazine’s White House correspondent and Donald Trump. Based on his answers, the president really, really doesn’t understand modern technology, and his aversion
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Live Science
'Alien: Covenant In Utero' Lets You Experience a Neomorph Birth in VRThe team behind the upcoming "Alien: Covenant" - the latest entry in Ridley Scott's "Alien" science fiction franchise - has released a virtual reality video experience that shows exactly what it's like to be one of the space horror film's neomorph aliens.
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WIRED
Want to Save the Trees? Unleash the Fungus! Where logging and burning and farming have leveled forests and sapped the soil of nutrients, scientists are shrooming in the most sober sense of the word. The post Want to Save the Trees? Unleash the Fungus! appeared first on WIRED .
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists unveil the UK's largest resource of human stem cells from healthy donorsOne of the largest sets of high quality human induced pluripotent stem cell lines from healthy individuals has been produced by a consortium involving the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute. Comprehensively annotated and available for independent research, the hundreds of stem cell lines are a powerful resource for scientists studying human development and disease.
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The Atlantic
A Texas Bill That Allows Adoption Agencies to Discriminate The Texas House of Representatives passed a bill on Wednesday that would allow adoption and foster care agencies, whether public or private, to refuse to place children in certain homes, depending on the agency's religious affiliation. Supporters say it provides important legal cover from lawsuits, but critics say it allows religious institutions to discriminate against households of different re
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The Atlantic
Snatched: A 2017 Movie That Wishes It Were 1997 I imagine the pitch meeting went something like this: Producer 1: “So the conceit is: A mother and a daughter go on vacation together in Ecuador ...” Producer 2: “But then: They get kidnapped! And have to escape! In the jungle!” Producer 1: “Yeah! Think Romancing the Stone ! But with a mother and daughter! For a Mother’s Day release, obviously.” Producer 2: “Obviously. But it’ll be edgy. And funn
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New understanding of superconductor's 'normal' state may help solve longstanding puzzleexperiments done at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in the Madhavan and Abbamonte laboratories, in collaboration with researchers at six institutions in the US, Canada, United Kingdom, and Japan, have shed new light on the electronic properties of this material at temperatures 4°K above Tc.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Video imaging reveals how immune cells sense dangerHow do T cells, the beat cops of the immune system, detect signs of disease without the benefit of eyes? Like most cells, they explore their surroundings through direct physical contact, but how T cells feel out intruders rapidly and reliably enough to nip infections and other threats in the bud has remained a mystery to researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First comprehensive map of subcellular localization of proteins reveals new insightsThe first analysis of how proteins are arranged in a cell was published today in Science, revealing that a large portion of human proteins can be found in more than one location in a given cell.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Organ signal find raises hopes of immune disorder treatmentsThe discovery of key signals that help tissues repair after injury could pave the way for new treatments for asthma and organ scarring, a study suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Disentangling chloroplast geneticsProper DNA inheritance is essential for healthy chloroplast: the energy center of all plant cells. Japanese researchers discover a new gene in chloroplast that disentangles its DNA for proper plant health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study of worms reveals 'selfish genes' that encode a toxin -- and its antidoteUCLA scientists found that a worm commonly used in lab research possesses a pair of genes that encode both a poison and its antidote. The genes represent one of the clearest examples to date of a 'selfish genetic element' at the molecular level.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Three new sub-species of snow leopard discoveredA recent research paper in the Journal of Heredity reveals that there are three sub-species of snow leopard. Until now, researchers had assumed this species, Panthera uncia, was monotypic.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Movement of early humans into the Indian subcontinentScientists in India have used a diffusion model to study the movement and merger of early humans into and in the Indian subcontinent starting from their initial location as determined by archaeologists. They then identify locations where different groups are expected to merge, and compare this data with genetic studies of tribes from that region to show that predictions agree with genetic data.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dartmouth tuberculosis vaccine passes important milestoneInvestigators at Dartmouth's Geisel School of Medicine announced that two new studies of DAR-901, their investigational vaccine against tuberculosis (TB), have moved it to the forefront of new vaccines in development for global control of this deadly infectious disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Compound corrects iron-delivery defectsInvestigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital, in collaboration with colleagues at University of Illinois Champaign-Urbana, describe a compound known as Hinokitiol which can correct iron-delivery defects in preclinical models. Their study lays the groundwork for investigating Hinkitiol's full potential beyond cellular and model organisms.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Measuring the impact of a changing climate on threatened Yellowstone grizzly bearsA new analysis of Yellowstone grizzly bear diets reveals that grizzlies in the region continue to feed upon the products of an endangered tree species currently declining at the hands of climate change. Such changes are forcing some bears to look for more varied food sources. The researchers say the results call for increased monitoring efforts in the region.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Primitive atmosphere discovered around 'Warm Neptune'A pioneering new study uncovering the 'primitive atmosphere' surrounding a distant world could provide a pivotal breakthrough in the search to how planets form and develop in far-flung galaxies.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Saying goodbye to glaciersGlaciers around the world are disappearing before our eyes, and the implications for people are wide-ranging and troubling, Twila Moon, a glacier expert at the University of Colorado Boulder, concludes in a Perspectives piece in the journal Science today.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is this the 'holey' grail of batteries?In a battery system, electrodes containing porous graphene scaffolding offer a substantial improvement in both the retention and transport of energy, a new study reveals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
This myth smells fishyWhen listing animals with a keen sense of smell, people are not likely to place their own species, humans, at the top, perhaps picking rabbits or dogs instead. But in this Review, John McGann points to evidence, from a variety of research efforts, that the belief that humans have an inferior sense of smell may be more a remnant of an old myth than a hypothesis based on fact.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A watery exoplanet of unexpected composition -- and perhaps originAstronomers have discovered that a Neptune-sized planet orbiting another star has an atmosphere containing water and clouds. While thousands of exoplanets have been discovered to date, little is known about their atmospheres, especially for bodies smaller than Jupiter.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Some forests have been hiding in plain sightA new estimate of dryland forests suggests that the global forest cover is at least 9 percent higher than previously thought. The finding will help reduce uncertainties surrounding terrestrial carbon sink estimates.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Molecular prosthetics' can replace missing proteins to treat diseaseResearchers have demonstrated that a small molecule can transport iron in human cells and live animals when proteins that normally do the same job are missing, a condition that often causes severe anemia in patients. Such 'molecular prosthetics' might treat a host of incurable diseases caused by protein deficiencies, such as anemias, cystic fibrosis or certain types of heart disease.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The human sense of smell: It's stronger than we thinkThe assertion that animals have a better sense of smell than humans is a 19th century myth with no scientific proof, says Rutgers University-New Brunswick neuroscientist John McGann who spent part of the last year reviewing existing research, examining data and delving into the historical writings that helped create the long-held misconception.
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NYT > Science
Matter: To Simulate Climate Change, Scientists Build Miniature WorldsA series of experimental “mesocosms” in Australia show that a warming world will have unexpected effects on marine ecosystems.
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NYT > Science
Art Review: Please Smell the Art: Anicka Yi Will See That You DoAt her solo show at the Guggenheim, the Hugo Boss prize winner fuses human, plant and animal scents into an art of the future.
23h
Live Science
People Smell Great! Human Sniffers Sensitive as Dogs'Turns out, humans are better at smelling than we thought.
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Live Science
Orcas May Be Eating Great White Sharks' Livers | VideoOrcas are thought to be the culprits behind the deaths of three great white sharks found dead and liverless in South Africa.
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Gizmodo
Syfy's Plan to Save Itself: Harry Potter, Comic Books, and George R.R. Martin Image: Krypton, Syfy For years now—since around the time the channel purposefully misspelled its name from Sci Fi to Syfy—the former home of science fiction on television has been something of a joke. And now the channel and its owners at NBC think they can save it. Advertisement At an event Tuesday evening in New York, NBC Universal Cable Entertainment’s President of Entertainment, Chris McCumbe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why one eye-targeting virus could make for a useful gene-delivery toolIn their quest to replicate themselves, viruses have gotten awfully good at tricking human cells into pumping out viral proteins. That's why scientists have been working to use viruses as forces for good: to deliver useful genes to human cells and help patients who lack important proteins or enzymes.
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Popular Science
This watery, Neptune-sized exoplanet could help us learn how new worlds evolve Space It's surprisingly lacking in heavy elements Researchers have published some of the most detailed study yet of a medium, Neptune-sized planet.
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Academia under fire in Hungary
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Pinpointing HIV spread in Africa poses risks
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In a first, natural selection defeats a biocontrol insect
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Newest member of human family is surprisingly young
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Pocket-sized sequencers start to pay off big
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China cracks down on coastal fisheries
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NIH to cap grants for well-funded investigators
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Fears of Ebola resurgence quickly dispelled in Liberia
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Charge delivery goes the distance
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Myriad take two: Can genomic databases remain secret?
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Faulty logic
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Why science? Scientists share their stories
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Tracing our ancestors in cave sediments
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How much water is in that exoplanet?
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ER-PM contacts in nonclathrin endocytosis
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Mapping the world's dry forests
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Humans have a good sense of smell
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Search and capture in space and time
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As with donuts, the holes matter
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A more pathological amyloid-{beta} oligomer
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Disrupting housefly gene reverses sex
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Macrophages feel the heart beat
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Targeting senescence to combat osteoarthritis
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Crop resistance to parasites
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Quantum dots visibly forge carbon bonds
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A probable dwarf planet beyond Neptune
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Selection acts on the neighbors
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Three-dimensional holey-graphene/niobia composite architectures for ultrahigh-rate energy storage Nanostructured materials have shown extraordinary promise for electrochemical energy storage but are usually limited to electrodes with rather low mass loading (~1 milligram per square centimeter) because of the increasing ion diffusion limitations in thicker electrodes. We report the design of a three-dimensional (3D) holey-graphene/niobia (Nb 2 O 5 ) composite for ultrahigh-rate energy storage
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Science current issue
Neandertal and Denisovan DNA from Pleistocene sediments Although a rich record of Pleistocene human-associated archaeological assemblages exists, the scarcity of hominin fossils often impedes the understanding of which hominins occupied a site. Using targeted enrichment of mitochondrial DNA, we show that cave sediments represent a rich source of ancient mammalian DNA that often includes traces of hominin DNA, even at sites and in layers where no homin
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Science current issue
Restored iron transport by a small molecule promotes absorption and hemoglobinization in animals Multiple human diseases ensue from a hereditary or acquired deficiency of iron-transporting protein function that diminishes transmembrane iron flux in distinct sites and directions. Because other iron-transport proteins remain active, labile iron gradients build up across the corresponding protein-deficient membranes. Here we report that a small-molecule natural product, hinokitiol, can harness
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Science current issue
Reticulon 3-dependent ER-PM contact sites control EGFR nonclathrin endocytosis The integration of endocytic routes is critical to regulate receptor signaling. A nonclathrin endocytic (NCE) pathway of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is activated at high ligand concentrations and targets receptors to degradation, attenuating signaling. Here we performed an unbiased molecular characterization of EGFR-NCE. We identified NCE-specific regulators, including the endopla
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Science current issue
Bottom-up construction of a superstructure in a porous uranium-organic crystal Bottom-up construction of highly intricate structures from simple building blocks remains one of the most difficult challenges in chemistry. We report a structurally complex, mesoporous uranium-based metal-organic framework (MOF) made from simple starting components. The structure comprises 10 uranium nodes and seven tricarboxylate ligands (both crystallographically nonequivalent), resulting in a
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Science current issue
HAT-P-26b: A Neptune-mass exoplanet with a well-constrained heavy element abundance A correlation between giant-planet mass and atmospheric heavy elemental abundance was first noted in the past century from observations of planets in our own Solar System and has served as a cornerstone of planet-formation theory. Using data from the Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescopes from 0.5 to 5 micrometers, we conducted a detailed atmospheric study of the transiting Neptune-mass exoplanet HA
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Science current issue
Holliday junction resolvases mediate chloroplast nucleoid segregation Holliday junctions, four-stranded DNA structures formed during homologous recombination, are disentangled by resolvases that have been found in prokaryotes and eukaryotes but not in plant organelles. Here, we identify monokaryotic chloroplast 1 (MOC1) as a Holliday junction resolvase in chloroplasts by analyzing a green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant defective in chloroplast nucleoid (DNA-
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Science current issue
The extent of forest in dryland biomes Dryland biomes cover two-fifths of Earth’s land surface, but their forest area is poorly known. Here, we report an estimate of global forest extent in dryland biomes, based on analyzing more than 210,000 0.5-hectare sample plots through a photo-interpretation approach using large databases of satellite imagery at (i) very high spatial resolution and (ii) very high temporal resolution, which are a
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Science current issue
Coupling between distant biofilms and emergence of nutrient time-sharing Bacteria within communities can interact to organize their behavior. It has been unclear whether such interactions can extend beyond a single community to coordinate the behavior of distant populations. We discovered that two Bacillus subtilis biofilm communities undergoing metabolic oscillations can become coupled through electrical signaling and synchronize their growth dynamics. Coupling incre
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Science current issue
Male sex in houseflies is determined by Mdmd, a paralog of the generic splice factor gene CWC22 Across species, animals have diverse sex determination pathways, each consisting of a hierarchical cascade of genes and its associated regulatory mechanism. Houseflies have a distinctive polymorphic sex determination system in which a dominant male determiner, the M-factor, can reside on any of the chromosomes. We identified a gene, Musca domestica male determiner ( Mdmd ), as the M-factor. Mdmd
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Science current issue
Big data, big picture: Metabolomics meets systems biology
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Science current issue
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Webinar | Generating CRISPR mouse models: Challenges and solutions
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Visualizing dynamic microvillar search and stabilization during ligand detection by T cells During immune surveillance, T cells survey the surface of antigen-presenting cells. In searching for peptide-loaded major histocompatibility complexes (pMHCs), they must solve a classic trade-off between speed and sensitivity. It has long been supposed that microvilli on T cells act as sensory organs to enable search, but their strategy has been unknown. We used lattice light-sheet and quantum do
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Science current issue
Poor human olfaction is a 19th-century myth It is commonly believed that humans have a poor sense of smell compared to other mammalian species. However, this idea derives not from empirical studies of human olfaction but from a famous 19th-century anatomist’s hypothesis that the evolution of human free will required a reduction in the proportional size of the brain’s olfactory bulb. The human olfactory bulb is actually quite large in absol
23h
WIRED
Microsoft Shows Off Its Own Super-Sensing VR Controller You'll be able to buy Microsoft's new controller this holiday season. The post Microsoft Shows Off Its Own Super-Sensing VR Controller appeared first on WIRED .
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New on MIT Technology Review
Home Monitors Are Getting Smarter (and Creepier)Startup Lighthouse’s home assistant-slash-monitor can tell you who’s in your house, and what they’re doing.
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Science | The Guardian
Not to be sniffed at: human sense of smell rivals that of dogs, says study Human olfactory abilities have been underestimated and are just as good as those of other mammals, says neuroscientist “Man smells poorly,” Aristotle wrote, while Charles Darwin concluded that a sense of smell was of “extremely slight service” to the civilised human. When it comes to detecting odours, we have long dismissed human abilities as second-rate. Now this view has been challenged in a sc
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Gizmodo
Your Sense of Smell Is Not as Terrible as You Think Image: D. Lewis (UCL Chemistry )/Flickr Watch a dog sniff its way around town, smelling grass, fire hydrants and butts along the way. You might think “wow, I’ll never be able to do that.” But why not? Have you even tried? Advertisement If you did, you might be surprised by what you smell. As far back as the ancient Greeks, humans have derided the “less divine” sense of smell. In the 19th century,
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Gizmodo
Reddit Users Lose Real Money After Meme Currency Bot Dies Shiba Inu. Photo: AP Another day, another cryptocurrency clusterfuck. This week, the creator of the tipping bot “dogetipbot”—a service that let Reddit users “tip” each other in Dogecoin— announced that his company is broke, he’s broke, and the bot is broke because he spent all the coins, after he himself ran out of money. Advertisement Dogecoin was originally conceived as a joke featuring a popul
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The Atlantic
Why Does Heat Kill Cells? Above a certain temperature, a cell will collapse and die. One of the most straightforward explanations for this lack of heat hardiness is that the proteins essential to life—the ones that extract energy from food or sunlight, fend off invaders, destroy waste products and so on—often have beautifully precise shapes. They start as long strands, then fold into helixes, hairpins and other configurat
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The Atlantic
The Myth That Humans Have Poor Smell Is Nonscents For years, John McGann has been studying the science of smell by working with rats and mice at Rutgers University. But when he turned his attention to humans, he was in for a shock. The common wisdom is that our sense of smell stinks, compared to that of other mammals. McGann had always suspected that such claims were exaggerated, but even he wasn’t prepared for just how acute his volunteers’ nos
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The Atlantic
Trump Wants ‘Goddamned Steam,’ Not Digital Catapults on Aircraft Carriers Navy officials were “blindsided” on Thursday, a spokesman told me, by President Donald Trump’s suggestion that he has convinced the Navy to abandon a long-planned digital launching system in favor of steam on its newest aircraft carrier. In a wide-ranging interview with Time magazine, Trump described his disgust with the catapult system known as Electro-Magnetic Aircraft Launch System, nicknamed
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First comprehensive map of subcellular localization of proteins reveals new insightsThe first analysis of how proteins are arranged in a cell was published today in Science, revealing that a large portion of human proteins can be found in more than one location in a given cell.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study of worms reveals 'selfish genes' that encode a toxin—and its antidoteA UCLA study has found that a common strain of Caenorhabditis elegans—a type of roundworm frequently used in laboratory research on neural development—has a pair of genes that encode both a poison and its antidote. The new research also revealed that if worms with the two genes mate with wild strains of C. elegans that don't have both genes, their offspring who don't inherit the antidote can't pro
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Saying goodbye to glaciersGlaciers around the world are disappearing before our eyes, and the implications for people are wide-ranging and troubling, Twila Moon, a glacier expert at the University of Colorado Boulder, concludes in a Perspectives piece in the journal Science today.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Disentangling chloroplast genetics: Scientists isolate a critical gene for plant healthProper DNA inheritance is essential for healthy cell growth and division. The same goes for the genetic material found in chloroplasts: the energy centers of all plant cells.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Measuring the impact of a changing climate on threatened Yellowstone grizzly bearsClimate change is altering the environment in Yellowstone National Park and its surrounding region and scientists at the University of California San Diego and Unity College are studying its impacts on the diets of threatened grizzly bears.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Primitive atmosphere discovered around 'Warm Neptune'A pioneering new study uncovering the 'primitive atmosphere' surrounding a distant world could provide a pivotal breakthrough in the search to how planets form and develop in far-flung galaxies.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Are These Last Alaskans Ready To Be Parents? | The Last Alaskans #LastAlaskans | Wednesdays at 10/9c Facing the bitter cold and a lack of snow, pregnant Ashley and Tyler are cooped up inside their tiny cabin, patiently awaiting their third family member. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/the-last-alaskans/ More Alaskans! http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/the-last-alaskans/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeD
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Futurity.org
3D printing could make medical implants in hours A new 3D-printing technology could create medical implants that are stronger, less expensive, more flexible, and more comfortable than anything currently available. In a new paper in Science Advances , researchers describe the process they developed for using 3D printing and soft silicone to manufacture items that millions of patients use: ports for draining bodily fluids, implantable bands, ball
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Find gratis videnskabelige artikler med nyt værktøjBrowser-tilføjelsen Unpaywall finder gratis versioner af videnskabelige artikler der ligger bag en betalingsmur.
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New on MIT Technology Review
AR Is Making Its Way into the ORDoctors may soon be able to augment their view of your body, but it will be some time before it’s commonplace.
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WIRED
Microsoft Makes Windows Play Nice With All Your Other Gadgets With its next update, Microsoft's focusing on making Windows 10 a more functional part of your entire gadget ecosystem. The post Microsoft Makes Windows Play Nice With All Your Other Gadgets appeared first on WIRED .
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Futurity.org
Rare quasars measure ripples in ‘cosmic web’ In the vast expanses between galaxies, only atoms—a haze of hydrogen gas left over from the Big Bang—occupy solitary cubes one meter on a side. On the largest scale, this diffuse material forms a network of filamentary structures known as the “cosmic web,” its tangled strands spanning billions of light years and accounting for the majority of atoms in the universe. Now, a team of astronomers has
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Distance at which supernova would spark mass extinctions on EarthKU researcher Adrian Melott examines the effects of a supernova on Earth's biology in new research to appear in Astrophysical Journal. The KU researcher and colleagues argue the estimated distance of the supernova thought to have occurred roughly 2.6 million years ago should be cut in half.
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Gizmodo
Save $7 On OxyLED's New Modular Motion-Sensing Night Lights [Exclusive] OxyLED T-04 Night Light , $18 with code KINJAT04 OxyLED’s uber-popular motion-sensing night lights come in a lot of different varieties now , but today, you can get their new T-04 modular, rechargeable, night light with the code KINJAT04 for $18. While the T-02 is one of the most popular products, these T-04 night lights are significantly easier to recharge. With its modular design, you can detac
23h
The Atlantic
Silicon Valley's Big Bet on Europe's Hip New Start-Up Scene On a recent Tuesday evening in Berlin, Mohamed Jimale stood onstage in a cavernous blue-lit event space before a crowd of hundreds. Projected on a screen behind him was the headshot of a mellow-looking goat. “You become the owner of the goats’ babies,” Jimale explained during his pitch for Ari.Farm, his livestock-investment startup based in Stockholm. The crowd murmured approval. “We’re planning
23h
Popular Science
This ancient whale had teeth, but it still sucked food off the ocean floor Animals It's a distant baleen relative, and it had the best of both worlds Predecessors of filter feeding whales had teeth. Read on.
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Gizmodo
Microsoft's New Mixed Reality Controllers Look Very Familiar Images: Microsoft Today at its annual Build developer conference , Microsoft announced its own set of motion controllers made for its burgeoning Windows Mixed Reality platform. As we’ve mentioned in previous reports, the company is calling its new computing platform “mixed reality” because it combines different elements of augmented and virtual reality. The platform itself is baked directly into
23h
Live Science
Cotton Swabs Send 34 Kids to the ER Every DayDon't put it in your ear! Cotton swabs cause thousands of injuries.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Enterococci may have evolved antimicrobial resistance millions of years agoEnterococci bacteria are the bane of hospitals, causing thousands of multidrug-resistant infections in patients each year. Now, researchers have traced evidence of the bacteria's evolutionary history back 425 million years and theorize that the same traits that allow the bacteria to thrive in hospitals likely emerged when they were carried onto land in the guts of the world's first terrestrial ani
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study looks at the prevalence, challenges of athletes with ADHDIt's estimated there are more than six million children in the United States with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). There has been a lot of research about the impact ADHD can have on students in the classroom, but much less is known about how ADHD might impact athletes on the field of play.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hepatitis C increasing among pregnant womenHepatitis C infections among pregnant women nearly doubled from 2009-2014, likely a consequence of the country's increasing opioid epidemic that is disproportionately affecting rural areas of states including Tennessee and West Virginia.
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The Economist: The world this week
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The Economist: The world this week
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The Economist: The world this week
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New on MIT Technology Review
Is Automation Warping the Labor Market as Dramatically as We Think?A new study provides a counter to the conventional wisdom that robots are stealing our jobs.
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New Scientist - News
What politicians can learn from the French election hackPolitically motivated hacking and fake news campaigns are the new normal, but France’s president-elect Emmanuel Macron has shown how to fend off attacks
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New Scientist - News
We are on track to pass 1.5°C warming in less than 10 yearsBusiness as usual would cause the planet to warm above the aspirational 1.5°C limit agreed at the UN Paris meeting as early as 2026
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Ars Technica
Spotify and—no joke—iTunes are coming to the Windows Store Enlarge (credit: Microsoft) Microsoft's education-centric Windows 10 S has caused some controversy for its inability to run apps from outside the Windows Store, but as we've argued , it does have the potential to attract developers to the Windows Store and create a healthier app ecosystem for all Windows users. Today at its Build conference, Microsoft mentioned two major additions coming to the W
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Ingeniøren
Tak for alt, Cassini og HuygensEn 20 år lang og farefuld færd med gys og glæder er ved at slutte mere end en milliard kilometer borte i den ydre del af Solsystemet. Heldigvis er der noget at se frem til i den anden ende.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Discovery in the early universe poses black hole growth puzzleQuasars are luminous objects with supermassive black holes at their centers, visible over vast cosmic distances. Infalling matter increases the black hole mass and is also responsible for a quasar's brightness. Now, using the W.M. Keck observatory in Hawaii, astronomers led by Christina Eilers have discovered extremely young quasars with a puzzling property: these quasars have the mass of about a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Windows 10 update aims to help identify best photos, videosAn upcoming feature in Microsoft's Windows 10 system will automatically identify the best photos and videos to help people create highlights of their experiences.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why one eye-targeting virus could make for a useful gene-delivery toolIn their quest to replicate themselves, viruses have gotten awfully good at tricking human cells into pumping out viral proteins. A team of researchers led by Associate Professor Vijay Reddy at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) has now uncovered the structural details that make one virus a better tool for future therapies than its closely related 'cousin.'
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The Scientist RSS
The RNA Age: A PrimerOur guide to all known forms of RNA, from cis-NAT to vault RNA and everything in between.
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New on MIT Technology Review
How Encrypted Weather Data Could Help Corporate Blockchain Dreams Come TrueBanks and investors have sunk millions into the idea that blockchain programs called smart contracts can make finance and other industries more efficient.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Alzheimer's experts call for changes in FDA drug approval standardsLeading Alzheimer's disease researchers and a prominent patient advocate today published an analysis, 'Single Endpoint for New Drug Approvals for Alzheimer's Disease,' urging the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to clarify and modernize its current approach for approving new treatments for Alzheimer's disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
TV accentuates traditional women's roles at expense of their needsCollege women who frequently watch television or who believe that the content is real, tend to endorse the gender roles that are portrayed often on TV, says a University of Michigan researcher.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stem cell therapy holds promise for treating most severe cases of anginaResults from 'CD34+ Stem Cell Therapy Improves Exercise Time and Mortality in Refractory Angina: A Patient Level Meta-Analysis' were presented today as a late-breaking clinical trial at the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) 2017 Scientific Sessions in New Orleans.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Fossil of oldest known baleen-whale relative unearthed in Peru Skeleton from South America enables palaeontologists to piece together the puzzle of baleen-whale evolution. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21966
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The Atlantic
Get Me Roger Stone Profiles the Man Who Created President Trump On Wednesday morning, as President Trump digested the reports on morning television about his firing of the FBI director James Comey, he fired off a handful of tweets critiquing the news about his own administration. Trump belittled Comey, whom he asserted had lost the confidence of “almost everyone in Washington.” He lambasted Senator Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut, whom he accused of devisin
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Popular Science
Neighborhoods subjected to deadly air quality can finally fight back From Our Blogs: Nexus Media News New devices let citizen scientists detect local pollutants Habitatmap works with community-based organizations and schools to create education and advocacy maps promoting important health and environmental issues.
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Gizmodo
An ISP Shill Group Is Trotting Out Misleading Google Ads About Net Neutrality The Broadband for America website. As we’ve documented repeatedly , the forces pushing the repeal of the FCC’s net neutrality rules—including FCC Chair Ajit Pai himself—aren’t being totally honest about what they want. They’ll tell you that they support net neutrality, and a “free and open” internet, just not Title II. What they don’t mention, of course, is that Title II is currently the only leg
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Gizmodo
Trump May Have Just Derailed A Crucial Part Of America's Future Aircraft Carrier Fleet Pre-commissioning Unit Gerald R. Ford. Photo credit: U.S. Navy It looks like after almost a decade of development, the ultra-advanced Gerald R. Ford supercarrier will be commissioned this year. An important detail about this ship, the first of its class, is that it does not use steam catapults to launch planes as is traditional, but instead uses an electromagnetic system to fling them into the ai
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Ars Technica
Cloudflare, sued by its first “patent troll,” hits back hard Matthew Prince, cofounder and chief executive officer of CloudFlare Inc. (credit: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images) Cloudflare, the Internet security company and content delivery network, was founded more than seven years ago but miraculously hadn't ever been hit with a patent infringement lawsuit from a non-practicing entity (commonly referred to as a "patent troll") until this March
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bacteria living in marine sponge produce toxic compounds found in man-made productsResearchers have discovered for the first time that a common marine sponge hosts bacteria that specialize in the production of toxic compounds nearly identical to man-made fire retardants, a finding that could help scientists better understand the human health implications of these common additives.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientist identify key locations for spread of pin-tailed whydahsInvasive parasites are a biological oxymoron. And yet, they are in our backyards! This study analyzes the case of a brood parasitic bird, the pin-tailed whydah ( Vidua macroura ) and its recent spread into the Americas!
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First study of Oncolytic HSV-1 in children & young adults with cancer indicates safety, tolerabilityHSV1716 -- an oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 -- has been studied in adults via injection into the brain and superficial tumors. Now, a team of researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center have completed the first phase 1 trial of the virus in the pediatric population, published online in Clinical Cancer Research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Analysis shows increased risk of early stroke with new-onset atrial fibrillation post-TAVRResults from 'Effect of bivalirudin versus unfractionated heparin in patients with baseline or new-onset atrial fibrillation in transcatheter aortic valve replacement: From the BRAVO-3 randomized trial' were presented today as a late-breaking clinical trial at the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) 2017 Scientific Sessions in New Orleans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Interrupting inflammatory signals decreases repeat artery blockageResults from the DANCE trial (Dexamethasone Infusion to the Adventitia to Enhance Clinical Efficacy after Femoropopliteal Revascularization) were presented today as a late-breaking clinical trial at the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) 2017 Scientific Sessions in New Orleans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Antibiotic-resistant microbes date back to 450 million years ago, well before the age of dinosaursLeading hospital 'superbugs,' known as the enterococci, arose from an ancestor that dates back 450 million years -- about the time when animals were first crawling onto land (and well before the age of dinosaurs), according to a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
This nasal receptor mediates the appetizing smell of fish foodThe aquatic environment is full of tantalizing chemicals that can guide a fish to mates or meals. Now, scientists in Japan have identified the olfactory receptor and brain circuitry that picks up the scent of adenosine triphosphate, or ATP. Although mostly known for carrying energy within cells, ATP is also a constituent of fish prey such as brine shrimp and plankton. The newly identified receptor
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biological activity found to affect aerosols produced from sea sprayChemists have discovered that tiny particulate matter called aerosols lofted into the atmosphere by sea spray and the bursting of bubbles at the ocean's surface are chemically altered by the presence of biological activity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Compiling big data in a human-centric wayWhen a group of researchers in the Undiagnosed Disease Network at Baylor College of Medicine realized they were spending days combing through databases searching for information regarding gene variants, they decided to do something about it. By creating MARRVEL (Model organism Aggregated Resources for Rare Variant ExpLoration) they are now able to help not only their own lab but also researchers e
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Baleen whales' ancestors were toothy suction feedersModern whales' ancestors probably hunted and chased down prey, but somehow, those fish-eating hunters evolved into filter-feeding leviathans. An analysis of a 36.4-million-year-old whale fossil suggests that before baleen whales lost their teeth, they were suction feeders that most likely dove down and sucked prey into their mouths. The study published in Current Biology also shows that whales mos
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Beauty requires thought -- study supports philosophical claimDoes the experience of beauty require a person to think? And can sensuous pleasures, like eating or sex, be beautiful? Such questions have long preoccupied philosophers, with Immanuel Kant making the famous claim that beauty requires thought, unlike sensuous pleasure, which, he said, can never be beautiful. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology say that Kant was right on one count and wron
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How plankton and bacteria shape ocean sprayAs the oceans ebb and flow, the resulting waves and splashes form tiny bubbles.The bubbles burst and release a vapor -- called sea spray aerosol -- into the air. This aerosol scatters sunlight and is involved in forming clouds and ultimately climate. But no two bubbles are the same, researchers report in the journal Chem. They analyzed sea spray and found that the atmospheric-changing properties o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Beauty requires thought, neuroscientists findExperiencing beauty requires thought, a team of neuroscientists finds, in a new study that confirms an 18th-century claim by the philosopher Immanuel Kant.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
As heat index climbs, emergency visits, deaths rise in New EnglandNew research shows that New Englanders are susceptible to serious health effects even when the heat index is below 100, a finding that has helped to change the National Weather Service threshold for heat warnings.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Robotic 'exoskeleton' prevents elderly falls: studyScientists unveiled a lightweight, robotic, outer "skeleton" Thursday that can detect when someone loses their balance, correct their gait, and prevent their fall.
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Gizmodo
Everything You Need to Know About the Inhumans, Marvel's Latest TV Stars Image Credit: Michael Muller/Marvel for Entertainment Weekly . Inhumans: Once and Future Kings cover art by Nick Bradshaw. So we finally have our first look at the Inhumans , the stars of Marvel and ABC’s new limited TV series that finally brings Stan Lee and Jack Kirby’s outlandish superteam to live-action after years of groundwork being laid by Agents of SHIELD . Don’t know your Terrigenesis fr
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Ancient whale tells tale of when baleen whales had teethA 36 million-year-old whale fossil bridges the gap between ancient toothy predators and modern filter-feeding baleen whales.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientist identify key locations for spread of pin-tailed whydahsInvasive parasites are a biological oxymoron. And yet, they are in our backyards! This study analyzes the case of a brood parasitic bird, the pin-tailed whydah (Vidua macroura) and its recent spread into the Americas!
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Maryland regulators OK nation's largest offshore wind planMaryland regulators on Thursday approved plans for the nation's first large-scale offshore wind projects, saying the decision will position the state to be a leader in the developing industry.
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Ars Technica
Windows 10 fall update will restore (and improve) OneDrive’s best feature Microsoft Windows 10 was a big improvement over Windows 8.1 in most important ways, but it made a big change to the way OneDrive syncing worked. In Windows 8.1, you could see all the files you had stored in OneDrive, but the operating system would only actually download and open the file when you needed to open it. At least for PCs that usually have Internet connections, this was a neat way to of
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Ars Technica
Judge Dredd TV series is one step closer to happening Enlarge (credit: Lionsgate) Attention, citizens of Mega City One: Judge Dredd will finally be coming to a vid-screen near you. Entertainment Weekly is reporting that Rebellion, the British game company that also owns 2000AD —the " Galaxy's greatest comic " and the home of the antihero lawman—and IM Global are working on a live-action TV series about the future cop. This will be welcome news for t
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Science | The Guardian
36m-year-old fossil discovery is missing link in whale evolution, say researchers Mystacodon selenensis , found in Peru, is the oldest known cousin of modern baleen whales and offers unprecedented evolutionary insights Fossil hunters say they have unearthed a missing link in the evolution of baleen whales after digging up the remains of a creature thought to have lived more than 36 million years ago. The whales, known as mysticeti, sport a bristling collection of sieve-like pl
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Ars Technica
Xamarin Live Player (almost) takes the Mac out of iOS development Enlarge / The Retina 5K iMac just got a bit cheaper. (credit: Andrew Cunningham) SEATTLE—With the Xamarin tooling built in to Visual Studio, iOS and Android developers can already use a PC for a big part of their dev process by using the Visual Studio IDE for writing their code. For iOS development, however, there has always been an extra complication: the actual software building and deployment
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA caught Tropical Storm Adrian quickly losing steamThe first tropical storm of the Eastern Pacific Ocean season was already losing steam when the Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead the day it formed. By the next day, May 11, Tropical Storm Adrian weakened to a remnant low pressure area.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Snapchat faces harsh reality check after earnings missSnapchat's ambition to become the next big social media platform hit a brutal reality check with the first earnings report from parent company Snap Inc.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research increases distance at which supernova would spark mass extinctions on EarthIn 2016, researchers published "slam dunk" evidence, based on iron-60 isotopes in ancient seabed, that supernovae buffeted the Earth—one of them about 2.6 million years ago. University of Kansas researcher Adrian Melott, professor of physics and astronomy, supported those findings in Nature with an associated letter, titled "Supernovae in the neighborhood."
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Live Science
What Is Intelligence? 20 Years After Deep Blue, AI Still Can't Think Like HumansTwenty years ago, IBM computer Deep Blue beat the world's greatest chess player in a first for machines. How far has artificial intelligence come since then?
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Science | The Guardian
Finland voices concern over US and Russian climate change doubters New chair of Arctic council calls for Paris treaty on global warming to be respected amid fears of commitment downgrade Finland, the new chair of the Arctic council, has appealed to climate change scientists to fight the threat of the US and Russia tearing up commitments to combat global warming. The Nordic country takes up the two-year chairmanship of the body, increasingly a forum where argumen
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cilia structure plays a major role in determining susceptibility to neural tube defectsResearch published online in The FASEB Journal shows that the improper methylation of a protein called 'Septin2,' which regulates the structure of cilia, was associated with an increased risk of having a neural tube defect (NTD) and confirms that cilia are important factors in determining susceptibility of NTDs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA caught Tropical Storm Adrian quickly losing steamThe first tropical storm of the Eastern Pacific Ocean season was already losing steam when the Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead the day it formed. By the next day, May 11, Tropical Storm Adrian weakened to a remnant low pressure area.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research increases distance at which supernova would spark mass extinctions on EarthKU researcher Adrian Melott examines the effects of a supernova on Earth's biology in new research to appear in Astrophysical Journal. The KU researcher and colleagues argue the estimated distance of the supernova thought to have occurred roughly 2.6 million years ago should be cut in half.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A dual-functional GLP-1 analogue may improve insulin sensitivity and help fight diabetesAccording to research published online in The FASEB Journal, scientists have discovered a dual peptide called 'PGLP-1' that promotes insulin secretion and inhibits gluconeogenesis (a metabolic process that produces glucose).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tropical Cyclone Ella wrapped in NASA imageryTropical Cyclone Ella has large bands of thunderstorms wrapping around the center and from the east of center in imagery from the NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rare feline genetic disorders identified through whole genome sequencing at MUIn 2009, Joan Coates, a veterinary neurologist, along with other researchers at the University of Missouri and the Broad Institute, found a genetic link between degenerative myelopathy (DM) in dogs and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig's disease in people. Now, Coates and Michael Garcia, an associate professor in the Division of Biological Sciences, have found that a biomarker tes
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The Atlantic
The Tragedy of James Comey Before he was summarily fired by the chief executive he played no small role in electing , former FBI Director Jim Comey told Congress that his late-October 2016 decision to violate Department of Justice guidelines by telling Congress he was reopening the Clinton email investigation was done to avoid the perception of political favoritism. “I have a fabulous staff at all levels and one of my juni
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
This nasal receptor mediates the appetizing smell of fish foodThe aquatic environment is full of tantalizing chemicals that can guide a fish to mates or meals. Now, scientists in Japan have identified the olfactory receptor and brain circuitry that picks up the scent of adenosine triphosphate, or ATP. Although mostly known for carrying energy within cells, ATP is also a constituent of fish prey such as brine shrimp and plankton. The newly identified receptor
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Antibiotic-resistant microbes date back to 450 million years ago, well before the age of dinosaursLeading hospital "superbugs," known as the enterococci, arose from an ancestor that dates back 450 million years—about the time when animals were first crawling onto land (and well before the age of dinosaurs), according to a new study led by researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear, the Harvard-wide Program on Antibiotic Resistance and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. Published online to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Baleen whales' ancestors were toothy suction feedersModern whales' ancestors probably hunted and chased down prey, but somehow, those fish-eating hunters evolved into filter-feeding leviathans. An analysis of a 36.4-million-year-old whale fossil suggests that before baleen whales lost their teeth, they were suction feeders that most likely dove down and sucked prey into their large mouths. The study published on May 11 in Current Biology also shows
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How plankton and bacteria shape ocean sprayAs the oceans ebb and flow, the resulting waves and splashes form tiny bubbles. The bubbles burst and release a vapor—called sea spray aerosol—into the air. This aerosol scatters sunlight and is involved in forming clouds and ultimately climate. But no two bubbles are the same, University of California, San Diego, researchers report May 11 in the journal Chem. They analyzed sea spray and found tha
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Gizmodo
A Brief History of Trump and TiVo, Which He Called 'One of the Great Inventions of All Time' Photo: AP Donald Trump, the seventy-year-old president of the United States of America, really loves his TiVo. This much is clear from a new Time magazine profile on Trump , which focuses on what our nation’s mercurial boss does after hours. Advertisement To no one’s surprise, the leader of the free world spends a lot of time watching cable news. But hidden in the article was this beautiful refer
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Popular Science
Protect your inbox from phishing and other email attacks DIY Defenses up Your email account can get exposed to all kinds of internet nasties, but with the right tools and some common sense, you can keep your inbox protected.
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Popular Science
Horizontal stripes make you look thinner, not wider Science A brain scientist's guide to fashion. This Helmholtz square illusion contradicts a standard rule of fashion: Horizontal stripes make you look shorter, and wider. Read on.
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Science : NPR
Tesla Begins Taking Orders For Its Solar Energy Roof Tile Systems The company offers an "infinity" warranty on its tiles that integrate solar power into roof coverings. Tesla has published a web tool that can estimate costs and savings. (Image credit: AP)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tropical Cyclone Ella wrapped in NASA imageryTropical Cyclone Ella has large bands of thunderstorms wrapping around the center and from the east of center in imagery from the NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds bacteria in marine sponge produce toxic flame retardant-like compoundsA Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego-led research team discovered for the first time that a common marine sponge hosts bacteria that specialize in the production of toxic compounds nearly identical to man-made fire retardants.
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The Scientist RSS
Genome DigestWhat researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species' genomes
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Gizmodo
How to Buy Second-Hand Tech Without Getting Ripped Off Image: Getty There are some fantastic bargains to be had if you can live without the shiniest, newest gadgets—but diving into the second-hand market comes with its own set of potential pitfalls and problems. Advertisement Saving some cash on tech that’s used or dated isn’t a new idea, but the landscape is changing all the time, as new kit appears and disappears, and demand fluctuates. You’re goin
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Gizmodo
Today's Best Deals: Amazon Jeans Sale, InstantPot, Grid-It, and More Amazon’s premium denim sale , $10 off an Instant Pot , the Grid-It organizer , and more lead Thursday’s best deals. Advertisement Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Grid-It Organizer , $7 Grid-It organizers use a criss-crossing arrangement of elastic straps to secure your sundry power cables and gadgets in your bag, and you can pick up a large one f
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists confirm correlation between malignant hyperthermia and exertional heat strokeNew research published online in The FASEB Journal may ultimately help athletes and trainers better understand who may be more at risk for heat stroke. In the report, scientists use animals to show that there is a link between the susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia (MH) and exertional heat stroke.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists show protective effects of suppressing thyroid hormone receptors in retinaNew research published online in The FASEB Journal (http://www.fasebj.org) suggests that the suppression of thyroid hormone receptor activity locally in the retina protects cone photoreceptor cells in mouse models of human retinal degenerative diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Combining heroin and commonly prescribed non-opioid pain killers leads to a significant rise in overdose deathsA multi-disciplinary study has shown that the recent substantial increase in prescriptions for two drugs, pregabalin and gabapentin, used widely for a range of neurological disorders is closely correlated with a rise in the number of overdose deaths in England and Wales. These drugs have become drugs of abuse, according to new University of Bristol findings published in Addiction, which highlight
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cornell researches black bear boom in New YorkThe black bear population in southern New York has grown and expanded its range since the early 1990s, which has led to increased encounters with humans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Plasma membrane protein may help generate new neurons in the adult hippocampusNew research published online in The FASEB Journal sheds important light on the inner workings of learning and memory. Specifically, scientists show that a plasma membrane protein, called Efr3, regulates brain-derived neurotrophic factor-tropomyosin-related kinase B signaling pathway (BNDF-TrkB) and affects the generation of new neurons in the hippocampus of adult brains.
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Live Science
What's Behind the Fidget Spinner Fad?Adults are dumbfounded by the popularity of these spinning things, and according to an expert on fads, that's probably the point.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Irreversible ocean warming threatens the Filchner-Ronne Ice ShelfBy the second half of this century, rising air temperatures above the Weddell Sea could set off a self-amplifying meltwater feedback cycle under the Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf, ultimately causing the second-largest ice shelf in the Antarctic to shrink dramatically.
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WIRED
The Traditional Lecture Is Dead. I Would Know—I’m a Professor An awesome science show from the '80s makes it to YouTube, and it shows just how pointless the traditional lecture is. The post The Traditional Lecture Is Dead. I Would Know—I’m a Professor appeared first on WIRED .
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Futurity.org
Device prevents dips and spikes in body’s drug levels Scientists have developed a new device that can monitor and maintain drug levels in the bloodstream of animals. If the device can be made to work in humans, it could save lives by preventing under- or overdosing of medication, a new research paper suggests. As with coffee or alcohol, the way each person processes medication is unique. One person’s perfect dose may be another person’s deadly overd
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cognitive science
Human behavioral complexity peaks at age 25 submitted by /u/eleitl [link] [comments]
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ignored? Better a 'no' than no answer at allAfter experiencing social exclusion, a minimum of attention suffices to reduce individuals' negative emotions. Even rejection or unkind comments are better for well-being than being ignored by other people. This finding has important implications for the treatment of applicants during selection processes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Learning styles: A once hot debate redshiftsA new study reveals while most higher education faculty believe Learning Styles is an important approach for teaching, they don't actually use the pedagogical tool because it is fundamentally flawed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Teleconnection between the tropical Pacific and AntarcticaThe higher the seawater temperature in the tropical Pacific, the more likely ice breakup will occur in East Antarctica, according to researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Who in Europe drinks the most? The richFor the first time, researchers have found a way to compare how much alcohol Europeans drink. And Britain, Ireland and Portugal top the list.
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Ars Technica
And the name of the next Windows 10 update is… the Fall Creators Update Enlarge (credit: Liz West ) SEATTLE—The branding of the next major Windows 10 update has been revealed, and it's pretty similar to the name given to the current Creators Update version: it will be the Fall Creators Update. The name seems a little awkward—for our British readers, "fall" means "autumn"—and it positions the release as a continuation of the work done in the Creators Update. Microsoft
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Ars Technica
New Windows look and feel, Neon, is officially the “Microsoft Fluent Design System” Enlarge / Project Neon in the Groove Music app. (credit: Tom Hounsell ) SEATTLE—Earlier this year, pictures of a new Windows look and feel leaked . Codenamed Project Neon , the new look builds on Microsoft Design Language 2 (MDL2), the styling currently used in Windows 10, to add elements of translucency and animation. Neon has now been officially announced, and it has an official new name: the M
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Ars Technica
Verizon outbids AT&T for nationwide “5G” spectrum Enlarge (credit: Aurich / Thinkstock) Verizon has outbid AT&T to buy spectrum-holding company Straight Path Communications for $3.1 billion after "an unusually intense bidding war" between the top two wireless carriers in the US, The Wall Street Journal reported today. AT&T announced its own $1.6 billion acquisition of the company on April 10, saying that Straight Path "holds a nationwide portfol
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Live Science
After the Flood: Author Kim Stanley Robinson Describes Future NYC UnderwaterSpace.com talked with author Kim Stanley Robinson about how he developed his vision of a drowned New York, his thoughts on climate change and what role fiction has to play in determining what humans do next.
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Live Science
Burial Chamber of Princess Possibly Found in Ancient Egypt PyramidThe burial chamber of a royal princess was possibly discovered in a 3,800-year-old pyramid in Dahshur, Egypt, archaeologists say.
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Popular Science
Cage-free chickens keep winding up with broken bones, and scientists are looking for a solution Animals Million dollar birdie Cage-free chickens are breaking their bones, but a new award is trying to help. Read on.
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Gizmodo
Make Your Browser Talk With This Wonderfully Annoying Human Speech Simulator GIF If half your work day is spent thinking up ways to troll and annoy your co-workers, today’s going to be an easy one. Neil Thapen’s Pink Trombone is a browser-based speech synthesizer that lets you manipulate a simulated mouth, throat, tongue, and nasal cavity to create a remarkably realistic—and equally annoying—human voice. Advertisement Manipulating the various parameters to produce the bas
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The Atlantic
The Dismantling of New Orleans's Confederate Monuments More than 150 years after the Civil War and more than 100 years since its construction, the city of New Orleans removed early Thursday morning its monument to Confederate President Jefferson Davis. The dismantling of the statue honoring the first and only president of the Confederate States of America follows the New Orleans City Council decision in December 2015 to remove four monuments commemor
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dramatic cooperation between two infectious bacteria revealed by BIDMC researchersNew methodology allowed researchers at BIDMC to more easily investigate mechanisms of infection and provide new insight into how pathogens can work together to cause disease. Using the new tool, researchers confirmed a safer model for study of Brucella species, which cause a potentially debilitating infectious disease in humans and cattle.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cancer metastasis: The unexpected perils of hypoxiaThe low oxygen concentrations that prevail in many tumors enhance their propensity to metastasize to other tissues. Researchers at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich led by Professor Heiko Hermeking have now uncovered the molecular mechanism that links the two phenomena.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds bacteria in marine sponge produce toxic flame retardant-like compoundsA Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego-led research team discovered for the first time that a common marine sponge hosts bacteria that specialize in the production of toxic compounds nearly identical to man-made fire retardants.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ancient ground squirrels prove to belong to a present-day speciesMembers of the Faculty of Biology of the Lomonosov Moscow State University have studied arctic ground squirrels, inhabiting the Indigirka river basin, and found out that their relatives now inhabit Kamchatka. The scientists have shared with the research results in an article, published in Scientific Reports journal.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Populations adapt as nature and nurture work togetherA study of fruit fly larvae leads researchers to conclude that nature and nurture do collaborate in determining the behavior of a population. Researchers at Rice University found a genetic correlation between learning and behavioral plasticity in relation to changing conditions.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Lions face same threats as extinct Ice Age cats - studyTwo big cats including the African lion are most at risk from extinction due to loss of prey, say scientists.
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WIRED
Doppler’s Wireless Earbuds Now Detect and Destroy the Clamor Around You Ear-computers are now one step closer to controlling everything in your world. The post Doppler's Wireless Earbuds Now Detect and Destroy the Clamor Around You appeared first on WIRED .
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Warmer temperatures cause decline in key runoff measureSince the mid-1980s, the percentage of precipitation that becomes streamflow in the Upper Rio Grande watershed has fallen more steeply than at any point in at least 445 years, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Not survival of the fittest for Tasmanian devilsFit and healthy Tasmanian devils are being taken down by deadly facial tumors that are attacking the 'best' animals in the population, according to novel research.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Century-Old Tumors Offer Rare Cancer CluesDNA sequences from 100-year-old tumor samples could bolster childhood cancer research -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org
Does Red Bull in cocktails add placebo buzz? Just telling a young man that his alcoholic drink contains some Red Bull can make him feel more drunk, daring, and sexually self-confident, research shows. “Studies say there’s no physiological difference from drinking alcohol mixed with energy drinks, but we wanted to study the psychological effects,” says study coauthor Aradhna Krishna, professor of marketing at the University of Michigan’s Ros
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Live Science
Deep Blue vs. Garry Kasparov: 20th Anniversary of Epic Chess MatchToday marks the 20th anniversary of an epic chess match between IBM's computer Deep Blue and world chess champion Garry Kasparov.
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Gizmodo
Look at These Weird Ant Babies Image: Fox, E.G.P et al A team of scientists decided the field of larval biology in ants was neglected. So they took pictures of trap-jaw ant babies. And wow...the ant babies were weird. Wow! (Image: Fox, E.G.P et al) Okay, so technically a “larva” isn’t a “baby.” It’s more like the first evolution of a newly-hatched Pokémon that transforms into the adult as it ages. But that doesn’t change the f
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Ingeniøren
Dansk ingeniør i USA: Ingeniørlicens sikrer et vist niveauJens Korsgaard måtte til tre eksaminer for at få lov at være projektansvarlig på sin amerikanske arbejdsplads. Han ser både fordele og ulemper ved det amerikanske system.
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The Atlantic
A Cold War Among Cosmologists Turns Hot In the slimmest fractions of the very first second, the universe grew, and grew, and grew. By the time it slowed down, what had been a tiny, quivering quantum realm was stretched out until it looked smooth and flat, save for speckles of denser matter that later became galaxies, stars, and planets. This is the origin story of cosmic inflation, a school of thought developed in the 1980s that has it
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The Atlantic
Trump's Embrace of the Bubble “We are all Keynesians now,” Richard Nixon famously remarked, but only Donald Trump could have convinced himself that he is Keynes. Consider this exchange from an interview with The Economist published Thursday: You understand the expression “prime the pump”? Yes. We have to prime the pump. It’s very Keynesian. We’re the highest-taxed nation in the world. Have you heard that expression before, fo
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stretchable hologram can switch between multiple imagesThe possibility of sending and receiving holographic messages has long tantalized sci-fi fans. Although we're not there yet, scientists have now created holograms that can change from one image to another as the materials used to generate them are stretched.
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Ars Technica
Pirates upset that popular graphics mod won’t work for them Enlarge / If you want to improve these graphics through a popular PC mod, you need to actually buy the game. Game pirates have been rejoicing of late over the quick cracking and re-cracking of games protected with Denuvo, which was once considered the unbreakable best-in-class piracy protection on the market. Now, some of those pirates are angry that a popular mod re-enables piracy checks for one
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Zinc acetate lozenges may increase the recovery rate from the common cold by three-foldAccording to a meta-analysis of three randomized controlled trials, zinc acetate lozenges may increase the rate of recovery from the common cold three fold. On the fifth day, 70 percent of the zinc lozenge patients had recovered compared with 27 percent of the placebo patients.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
At last: Beautiful, consistent carbon beltsChemists have tried to synthesize carbon nanobelts for more than 60 years, but none have succeeded until now. Carbon nanobelts are expected to serve as a useful template for building carbon nanotubes and open a new field of nanocarbon science.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Airline Laptop Ban Could Be Extended to Flights from EuropeThe Department of Homeland Security is weighing the possibility of expanding a ban on electronics larger than cell phones aboard U.S.-bound aircraft -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Combining risk scores improves identification of AFib patients at increased risk of dementiaCombining risk scores helps clinicians better identify atrial fibrillation patients who face increased risks of developing dementia, researchers have found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study identifies biomarker that may indicate risk of atrial fibrillationResearchers have identified a microRNA biomarker that demonstrates a strong association with the incidence of atrial fibrillation, the most common abnormal heart rhythm.
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The Atlantic
The Fatal Flaw in Trump's ISIS Plan When Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan visits Washington next week, he and President Donald Trump will no doubt spend considerable time discussing the future of the Syrian-Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG), America’s favored contingent in the war against the Islamic State. With U.S. assistance over the past two and a half years, the YPG-dominated anti-ISIS forces have recaptured some
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Belief increases buzz: Mixing energy drinks and alcoholParticipants of the study who believed they were drinking an energy drink and alcohol cocktail were more likely to believe themselves quite drunk and uninhibited.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Shelf sediments reveal climate shifts through the eonsClimate change around Antarctica can severely affect Australia's rainfall and even influence the distribution of wet and dry zones across southeast Asia, an international study has revealed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel epigenetic changes in leukemiaResearchers have discovered epigenetic changes that contribute to one-fifth of cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), an aggressive cancer that arises out of the blood-forming cells in bone marrow. The mutations also play a role in a large majority of low-grade gliomas, which are among the most-treatable brain tumors.
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Gizmodo
Deadspin Here We Are Again | The Slot Trump Reportedly ‘Taken Aback’ By Bipartisan Backlash Against Deadspin Here We Are Again | The Slot Trump Reportedly ‘Taken Aback’ By Bipartisan Backlash Against Comey Firing | Fusion We Might Not Have Sean Spicer to Kick Around Anymore | The Grapevine Steve Harvey to Show Staff: ‘Do Not Approach Me’ |
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Gizmodo
Last Night's Arrow Solved a Five-Year-Old Mystery With the World's Most Noncommittal Shrug Image: CW The opening scene of Arrow ’s very first episode included an easter egg that had comics fans in fits from the get-go: the mask of the villain Deathstroke, perched upon a makeshift stand, speared by an arrow. Ominous, right? Well, last night’s Arrow finally answered how and why that mask was there, and... well, the answer was “meh.” Most of last night’s episode, “Honor Thy Fathers” dealt
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WIRED
An Electric Shock Could Keep Patients From Bleeding Out Researchers in the field of bioelectronic medicine are developing a neural tourniquet to supercharge the body's ability to stop bleeding with just a few zaps. The post An Electric Shock Could Keep Patients From Bleeding Out appeared first on WIRED .
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Live Science
Can a 'Poop Transplant' Change Your Weight?Studies in mice have garnered attention for a remarkable result: When the feces of one mouse was transplanted to another mouse, the recipient mouse either gained or lost weight.
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Ars Technica
Uber will likely need to follow same rules as taxi companies in Europe Enlarge (credit: David Ramos/Getty Images) Uber isn't a benign platform offering to ferry people from A to B via a simple app—it's a transportation service and as such must comply with the relevant rules, a law adviser at Europe's top court has said. In a non-binding opinion , advocate general Maciej Szpunar concluded that "the service offered by Uber cannot be classified as an 'information socie
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cage-constrained growth of engineered cartilage reduces swelling and improves functionResearchers have shown that a novel cage constraint can prevent engineered cartilage from swelling during growth in culture, leading to better collagen stability and enhanced functional properties of the cartilage.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Chomsky: Republicans 'dangerous' on climateNoam Chomsky argues the Republican Party is the most dangerous organisation in human history.
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