EurekAlert! - Breaking News

CCNY-led team breaks down social networking behaviorNew big-data analytics by a City College of New York-led team suggests that both an individual's economic status and how they are likely to react to issues and policies can be inferred by their position in social networks. The study could be useful in maximizing the effects of large-scale economic stimulus policies.
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Ars Technica

ZeniMax sues Samsung over Gear VR tech Was this headset using proprietary secrets stolen from ZeniMax? After winning a $500 million judgement against Oculus over the development of the company's virtual reality technology, id Software parent ZeniMax Media is now going after Oculus partner Samsung. In a federal lawsuit filed late last week in the Northern District of Texas, the company says that Samsung's Gear VR headset, widely advert
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sam Houston state researchers study DNA from explosivesResearchers at Sam Houston State University (SHSU) hope to unmask manufacturers of homemade explosives using new advancements in DNA technology.
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Gizmodo

PBS Is Streaming Every Episode of Mister Rogers' Neighborhood on Twitch Image: screengrab via PBS Twitch Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood is something I recall as a feeling rather than a specific set of memories. Wikipedia claims there was a whole cast of characters—Mr. McFeely, Pilot Ito, Officer Clemmons, and a few dozen puppets—but I don’t remember them. With the passage of time, the show’s details have collapsed into a singular sense of comfort and safety, the sensati
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Scientific American Content: Global

Geneticists Enlist Engineered Virus and CRISPR to Battle Citrus DiseaseDesperate farmers hope scientists can beat pathogen that is wrecking the US orange harvest -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists study atmospheric waves radiating out of hurricanesResearchers believe they have found a new way to monitor the intensity and location of hurricanes from hundreds of miles away by detecting atmospheric waves radiating from the centers of these powerful storms.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The brighter side of twisted polymersA strategy to produce highly fluorescent nanoparticles through careful molecular design of conjugated polymers has been developed by KAUST researchers. Such tiny polymer-based particles could offer alternatives to conventional organic dyes and inorganic semiconductor quantum dots as fluorescent tags for medical imaging.
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Ars Technica

Trump confirms he shared intel with Russia’s foreign minister Enlarge / WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 15: National Security Adviser Army Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster preparing to make a statement to reporters on May 15 regarding President Trump's sharing of intelligence with Russian officials. (credit: Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images) In an Oval Office meeting the day after firing FBI Director James Comey, President Donald Trump reportedly sha
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Venom becomes more potent as brown snakes ageThe 'blood nuking' capabilities of adult brown snake venom only come about after an amazing transformation. New research has shown the venom of young brown snakes attacks the nervous system, while the venom of older snakes has dangerous effects on the circulatory system.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Energy decay in graphene resonatorsResearchers have observed a new way of energy dissipation in graphene nano-resonators, outlines a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Children in Head Start who miss more preschool show fewer academic gainsA new study has found that children in Head Start who miss 10 percent or more of the school year have fewer gains in academics than their peers who attend preschool more regularly. Many researchers see high-quality preschool programs as a way to reduce long-term disparities in education. Placing an emphasis on attendance in preschool programs may be important to maximizing benefits.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Three-year-olds understand, value obligations of joint commitmentThe ability to engage in joint actions is a critical step toward becoming a cooperative human being. In particular, forming a commitment with a partner to achieve a goal that one cannot achieve alone is important for functioning in society. Previous research has shown that children begin collaborating with others between ages 2 and 3 years. However, it's less clear whether they understand the conc
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why did hunter-gatherers first begin farming?The beginnings of agriculture changed human history and has fascinated scientists for centuries. Researchers have now shed light on how hunter-gatherers first began farming and how crops were domesticated to depend on humans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

More than half of eligible US travelers not receiving measles immunization53 percent of individuals seeking pre-travel consultations at clinics across the country who were eligible to receive the measles, mumps, rubella vaccine were not vaccinated during the clinic visit, a new study has found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Great expectations force risky business acquisitionsA good reputation can be bad for business, according to new research from the University of Georgia.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

First flat lens for immersion microscope provides alternative to centuries-old techniqueA team of researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) has developed the first flat lens for immersion microscopy. This lens, which can be designed for any liquid, may provide a cost-effective and easy-to-manufacture alternative to the expensive, centuries-old technique of hand polishing lenses for immersion objectives.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study solves mystery of how plants use sunlight to tell time via cell protein signalingResearchers have solved a key mystery of how plants tell time, say scientists from Southern Methodist University, Dallas. Researchers learned a chemical bond in the protein Zeitlupe forms and breaks in reaction to sunlight at varying rates, signaling plants when to bloom, metabolize and store energy, and other functions. The discovery means plant clocks can be tuned by targeted mutations to plant
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The Atlantic

The Curse of Econ 101, Cont’d In January, James Kwak wrote about how basic economic principles can be applied to public policy in misleading ways . A letter to the editor, followed by James’s reply, is below. Thanks to Professor Kwak for his 2017 article in The Atlantic entitled “The Curse of Econ 101.” We participated in a discussion of this article in a recent economics conference, and it served as an excellent launching pa
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The Atlantic

Did the Russians Dupe Trump? In one way, it’s not exactly surprising that President Donald Trump reportedly shared with the Russian foreign minister Sergei Lavrov and ambassador Sergey Kislyak some “highly classified” information about a specific threat from ISIS, setting off alarm bells inside the intelligence community that the president himself had just “jeopardized a critical source of intelligence on the Islamic State.”
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Live Science

Incredible! Most Well-Preserved Armored Dinosaur Was a 'Spiky Tank'A spiky, tank-like dinosaur discovered in a Canadian mine is so well-preserved, it looks as if the fossilized creature were frozen in time for 110 million years.
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Gizmodo

Incredible First Person Footage of a Real Spacewalk Will Leave You Speechless GIF On March 24th, ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet was joined by NASA astronaut Shane Kimbrough on a spacewalk outside the International Space Station. The outing was fairly routine, but this amazing footage captured by Pesquet gives all of us stuck here on Earth an amazing first-person look of what it’s like to be an astronaut looking down on our planet. Advertisement The spacewalkers carried out v
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Ars Technica

AI’s next target could be NASA’s mission control HPE In the iconic movie 2001: A Space Odyssey, astronaut Dave Bowman must deal with HAL 9000, a sentient artificial intelligence computer that operates his spaceship. The computer is all-knowing and all-controlling, saying at one point, “Dave, this conversation can serve no purpose anymore. Goodbye.” It portends a dark future for automated AI and space travel. No one wants that outcome for real-w
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

HP Enterprise unveils computer 'for era of Big Data'Researchers from Hewlett-Packard Enterprise on Tuesday unveiled what they claimed was a breakthrough in computing with a new machine capable of handling vast amounts of data at supercomputing speeds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Family TV viewing and SMS texting could help cut internet energy useScrapping automatically-playing videos in apps and reversing trends of instant messaging and on-demand services could be key to cutting the growing energy demand of the Internet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Video: When water levitatesHave you ever seen a drop of water navigate a maze? It's possible thanks to the same phenomenon that lets you know if a griddle is hot enough for pancake batter. Water droplets that dance and skitter across a hot surface instead of boil away on the spot are experiencing the Leidenfrost effect. Understanding Leidenfrost—first described more than 200 years ago—helped engineers make more efficient st
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Futurity.org

To curb hookah smoking, make it seem less fun To prevent people from hookah smoking, the best strategy may be to counter the image of it as a fun way to socialize and relax, rather than emphasizing the negative health consequences. “What this study showed us is that young adults who take up hookah tobacco smoking do so because they think it’s cool and attractive, and they weren’t dissuaded by the health dangers of smoking,” says lead author
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Live Science

Sea Star Dines On Unusual Dinner | VideoA Researchers aboard the Okeanos Explorer recently captured video of the unusual behavior of a sea star eating a crinoid.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

From where will the next big earthquake hit the city of Istanbul?Scientists reckon with an earthquake with a magnitude of 7 or greater in this region in the coming years. The extent of such seismic threat to this Turkish city of Istanbul actually depends on how strongly the tectonic plates are entangled and on the exact nucleation point of the earthquake. A team led by Marco Bohnhoff from the GFZ German Research Centre for Geoscience now presents a study indica
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How doubts about getting better influence chronic pain treatment successA leading psychology professor at The University of Texas at Arlington has focused international attention on how a chronic pain patient's irrational doubts about never getting better can influence both his reactions to pain and even treatment outcomes.Chronic pain costs the US up to $635 billion each year in medical treatment and lost productivity, and is considered a problem of epidemic proporti
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Defective intercellular connections cause hydrocephalusA defective gene leads to changes in the cellular layer between cerebrospinal fluid and brain nervous tissue, thus causing a buildup of fluid in the brain. This link, which scientists from the German Cancer Research Center in Heidelberg have now discovered, is the first known mechanism underlying genetic hydrocephalus.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Weaponizing the internet for terrorismWriting in the International Journal of Collaborative Intelligence, researchers from Nigeria suggest that botnets and cyber attacks could interfere with infrastructure, healthcare, transportation, and power supply to as devastating an effect as the detonation of explosives of the firing of guns.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Extreme weather has greater impact on nature than expected -- researchers launch roadmapAn oystercatcher nest is washed away in a storm surge. Australian passerine birds die during a heatwave. A late frost in their breeding area kills off a group of American cliff swallows. Small tragedies that may seem unrelated, but point to the underlying long-term impact of extreme climatic events. In the special June issue of Phil. Trans. B researchers of the Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NI
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists discover uncommon superbug strain in greater Houston areaScientists used genome sequencing to discover that an otherwise rare strain of a superbug was found in more than one-third of the Houston patients studied.
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The Atlantic

Better, Slower, Safer Pitching On April 30, the New York Mets’ Noah Syndergaard reached a milestone in the life cycle of a young superstar pitcher. He had already played in the World Series and received Cy Young Award votes. He had a catchy nickname—“Thor,” after his burly build and flowing hair—and a devoted following. That afternoon, feeling a pain in his side, Syndergaard left his start against the Washington Nationals. He
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The Atlantic

My Family’s Slave Alex Tizon passed away in March. He was a Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist and the author of Big Little Man: In Search of My Asian Self . For more about Alex, please see this editor’s note . T he ashes filled a black plastic box about the size of a toaster. It weighed three and a half pounds. I put it in a canvas tote bag and packed it in my suitcase this past July for the transpacific flight to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Energy decay in graphene resonatorsEnergy dissipation is a key ingredient in understanding many physical phenomena in thermodynamics, photonics, chemical reactions, nuclear fission, photon emissions, or even electronic circuits, among others.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amazon's streaming software powers new smart TVsAmazon's streaming TV software will appear on a new line of smart TVs designed to blend streaming TV services and over-the-air channels, but not cable packages.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stars as random number generators could test foundations of physics(Phys.org)—Stars, quasars, and other celestial objects generate photons in a random way, and now scientists have taken advantage of this randomness to generate random numbers at rates of more than one million numbers per second. Generating random numbers at very high rates has a variety of applications, such as in cryptography and computer simulations.
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Gizmodo

This $33 Bluetooth Speaker Can Run For Up To 30 Hours on a Charge Aukey SoundTank Bluetooth Speaker , $33 with code AUKEYSK9 If you demand a lot out of your Bluetooth speakers, this discounted Aukey SoundTank might be just what you’re looking for. Very few Bluetooth speakers can run for 30 hours on a charge, nevermind ones that cost $33. This model is also splash-proof, and features dual 5W drivers, meaning it should be loud enough for most occasions indoors or
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Making brain implants smaller could prolong their lifespanMany diseases, including Parkinson's disease, can be successfully treated with electrical stimulation from an electrode implanted in the brain. However, the electrodes can produce scarring, which diminishes their effectiveness. Researchers have now demonstrated that making these electrodes much smaller can essentially eliminate this scarring.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Clot removal therapy effective outside six-hour window for some stroke patientsThe mantra 'time is brain' still holds for stroke treatment, but for some patients, clot-removal therapy may be effective outside the six-hour window.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Folk contraceptives lead researchers to drugs that block fertilizationMost contraceptives include steroid hormones at concentrations that can produce side effects in women. Scientists have now found two non-steroid chemicals that are effective at lower doses, potentially providing a better option. The researchers also found that testosterone and the stress hormone cortisol work the same way as these compounds, by blocking the power kick sperm need to penetrate the e
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Delphi joins BMW-Intel-Mobileye autonomous car partnershipAutomotive parts and electronics maker Delphi Corp. has joined with BMW, Intel and Mobileye to develop the building blocks of autonomous vehicles.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Global ransomware attacks—the impact and the responseA global cyberattack unleashed Friday has reportedly affected more than 200,000 computers across more than 150 countries. The "ransomware," called "WannaCry," exploits a vulnerability in the Windows operating system. The attacks hit companies and governments, encrypting users' computers and demanding bitcoin payments in exchange for unlocking the files. Asia was hit particularly hard Monday, becau
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Scientific American Content: Global

White House Expands Anti-Abortion Policy, Imperiling Global Health FundingThe new implementation of the so-called Mexico City Policy could restrict funds to foreign NGOs that perform non-abortion-related health work -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica

UploadVR set up “kink room” at the office, says ex-employee in lawsuit Enlarge / Will Mason is UploadVR's co-founder and president, and is one of the parties named in the lawsuit. (credit: eVRydayVR ) A San Francisco-based news startup, UploadVR, has been sued by a former employee, who alleged a long list of inappropriate behavior at the workplace, including gender discrimination and sexual harassment. The case comes at a time when a number of high profile examples
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Futurity.org

Taking Ritalin to study may change brain chemistry For young people who don’t have ADHD, recreationally taking Ritalin may lead to changes in brain chemistry associated with risk-taking behavior, sleep disruption, and other undesirable effects, a new study suggests. Ritalin, the brand name for methylphenidate, a central nervous system stimulant used to treat ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder), is a growing problem among college stude
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New Scientist - News

UK may force charities to prove complementary therapies workUK charity commission is considering putting in place measures that will force providers of complementary medicine to offer stronger evidence of benefits
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bathroom scales will inform about life threatening conditionsWeighing oneself has become one of the most common morning rituals. However, your weight is not the only message that can be delivered by your bathroom scales: the team of researchers at Kaunas University of Technology (KTU) Institute of Biomedical Engineering are developing the multifunctional scales, which can monitor your health and inform about potentially dangerous life conditions, such as ar
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nicotine enhances bees' activityNicotine-laced nectar can speed up a bumblebee's ability to learn flower colors, according to scientists. The researchers used artificial flowers in a tightly-monitored flight arena in the laboratory to mimic how flowering plants use animals as pollen carriers and reward pollinators with sugars found in floral nectar.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New, more efficient catalyst for water splittingPhysicists have discovered a catalyst that can split water into hydrogen and oxygen, composed of easily available, low-cost materials and operating far more efficiently than previous catalysts. That would solve one of the primary hurdles remaining in using water to produce hydrogen, one of the most promising sources of clean energy.
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Futurity.org

‘Clean’ drinking water in Bangladesh is often unsafe Far fewer people in Bangladesh have safe water than the state government has estimated, new research shows. In addition, many people who do not have access to safe drinking water are under the mistaken impression that their water is safe, drinkable, and clean. According to the latest national assessment, 85 percent of the people in Bangladesh have access to safe drinking water. However, the new r
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Arctic warming to increase Eurasian extreme cold eventsIn recent years, Arctic warming and extreme events have attracted widespread attention of the world. Recently, Dr. YAO Yao and Prof. LUO Dehai from the Institute of Atmospheric Physics investigated the impact of Ural blocking (UB) on Eurasian extreme cold events in response to Arctic warming and obtained some interesting findings.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Oddball enzyme provides easy path to synthetic biomaterialsMaterials scientists have written the recipe on how to use an oddball enzyme to build new biomaterials out of DNA. The work provides instructions for researchers the world over to build self-assembling molecules for applications ranging from drug delivery to nanowires.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Alloy compositions may influence particles' electronic statesA research team consisting of NIMS, Kyoto University and Oita University groups for the first time successfully measured the electronic states of alloy nanoparticles consisting of rhodium (Rh) and copper (Cu) that exhibit similar catalytic activities at different Rh-to-Cu ratios. The nanoparticles serve as a catalyst for exhaust gas purification.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Blennies have a lot of fang for such little fishesUnlike snakes, blennies evolved fangs before venom, through probably not because of any need to hunt big prey.
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Ars Technica

NextEV does it again, shatters the Nürburgring lap record in an electric car Enlarge (credit: NextEV) The folks at NextEV have done it again. Not content with settling for the fastest ever electric vehicle lap of the legendary 12.9-mile (20.8km) Nürburgring, it has gone one better and set a new production car record. Racing driver Peter Dumbreck lapped the Nordschleife in just 6:45.9 seconds: It's important to note that Nio EP9 isn't going to be built in volume. Just six
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The Atlantic

Can Philadelphia's Next District Attorney Follow Through on Reform? PHILADELPHIA—The race for district attorney here is crowded with reformists. The seven Democrats in Tuesday’s primary—which constitutes a de facto election in this solidly blue city—are all running on popular ticket items for the small but growing wave of “reform-minded” prosecutors assuming office across the country. Those include fixing the cash bail and civil-asset forfeiture systems, amping u
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pufferfish and humans share the same genes for teethHuman teeth evolved from the same genes that make the teeth of pufferfish, new research concludes. This research, say investigators, could be used to help address tooth loss in humans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

No escaping ocean plastic: 37 million bits of litter on one of world's remotest islandsThe beaches of one of the world's most remote islands have been found to be polluted with the highest density of plastic debris reported anywhere on the planet, a new study shows. Despite being uninhabited and located more than 5,000 kilometers from the nearest major population center, Henderson Island is littered with an estimated 37.7 million pieces of plastic.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ebola: Lives to be saved with new management approachEbola outbreaks are set to be managed quickly and efficiently, saving lives, with a new approach developed by an international team of researchers, which helps to streamline outbreak decision-making.
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Live Science

Measles in Minnesota: Outbreak Linked to Anti-Vax Efforts | VideoIn Minnesota, a recent measles outbreak can be traced to anti-vaccination efforts that discouraged immunization.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Switching to aspirin/clopidogrel following 1 month of new P2Y12 inhibitor/aspirin post-ACSParis, France: Switching to a fixed-dose combination of aspirin plus clopidogrel after one month of potent dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) with a new P2Y12 inhibitor plus aspirin following an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) treated with a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is associated with reduced risk of bleeding complications with no increase in ischaemic events, showed results from a stu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When water levitates (video)Have you ever seen a drop of water navigate a maze? This is possible thanks to the Leidenfrost effect, which also lets water droplets dance and skitter across a hot surface instead of boil away on the spot. Scientists are now using high-speed cameras to better understand the phenomenon. This investigation might lead to improvements in power generation. Watch superhot dancing droplets in this video
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bathroom scales will inform about life threatening conditionsWeighing oneself has become one of the most common morning rituals. However, your weight is not the only message that can be delivered by your bathroom scales: the team of researchers at Kaunas University of Technology (KTU) Institute of Biomedical Engineering are developing the multifunctional scales, which can monitor your health and inform about potentially dangerous life conditions, such as ar
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

World first self-donning system for surgical gownsThe research group at Osaka University has succeeded in developing a safe and easy self-donning and self-adjusting surgical gown called 'Selfgown,' which could also minimize environmental infection from splashes when taking off gloves.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How to accurately assess use of new psychoactive drugs such as 'bath salts'Researchers surveyed individuals entering NYC EDM parties about their drug usage, with almost one out of ten participants who reported no 'bath salt' use as per the gate question then reported use of one or more drugs in this class, such as methylone, providing evidence of under-reporting.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Oddball enzyme provides easy path to synthetic biomaterialsMaterials scientists have written the recipe on how to use an oddball enzyme to build new biomaterials out of DNA. The work provides instructions for researchers the world over to build self-assembling molecules for applications ranging from drug delivery to nanowires.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Switching to a low-glycemic diet may stop age-related eye disease, study suggestsLed by researchers at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, a study in mice finds that development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) could be arrested by switching from a high-glycemic to a low-glycemic diet.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cities need to 'green up' to reduce the impact of air pollutionThe harmful impact of urban air pollution could be combated by strategically placing low hedges along roads in a built-up environment of cities instead of taller trees, a new study has found.
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Gizmodo

The Most Interesting Part of Apple's New $5 Billion Campus Is a Pizza Box Image: USPTO This morning, Wired magazine published an early look into Apple’s brand new spaceship campus. The giant circle features the kinds of ridiculous details you might expect from Apple, like sliding glass doors that weigh 440,000 pounds each and 9,000 trees supposedly durable enough to survive the forthcoming climate crisis. Advertisement Such details are impressive, but they’re child’s p
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WIRED

Fascinating X-Rays Reveal the Guts of Cameras, From Polaroids to iPhones They don't make 'em like they used to. The post Fascinating X-Rays Reveal the Guts of Cameras, From Polaroids to iPhones appeared first on WIRED .
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Scientific American Content: Global

Women May Find Management Positions Less DesirableResearch suggests new approaches to increasing gender diversity -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org

Watch: ‘Top hats’ keep drones from crashing Researchers have created a team of free-flying robots that obeys the two rules of the air: don’t collide or undercut each other. They’ve also built autonomous blimps that recognize hand gestures and detect faces. In the first, five swarm quadcopters zip back and forth in formation, then change their behaviors based on user commands. The trick is to maneuver without smacking into each other or fly
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Remote island has 'world's worst' plastic rubbish densityThe uninhabited Pacific island is littered with 37.7 million pieces of plastic debris, scientists say.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New way to reduce skin scarring relies on a glue-like substance secreted by mussels(Phys.org)—A team of researchers at Pohang University of Science and Technology in South Korea has developed a new skin application designed to reduce skin scarring due to injury. In their paper published in the journal Biomaterials, the group describes the glue-like substance they created and how well it worked on rats.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why using AI to sentence criminals is a dangerous ideaArtificial intelligence is already helping determine your future – whether it's your Netflix viewing preferences, your suitability for a mortgage or your compatibility with a prospective employer. But can we agree, at least for now, that having an AI determine your guilt or innocence in a court of law is a step too far?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bacteria harness the lotus effect to protect themselvesDental plaque and the viscous brown slime in drainpipes are two familiar examples of bacterial biofilms. Removing such bacterial depositions from surfaces is often very difficult, in part because they are extremely water-repellent. A team of scientists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now been able to show how such biofilms adapt their surface texture to repel water—similar to lea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researcher discovers new species of South American rabbitA Portland State University researcher discovered that a rabbit known for centuries to exist in South America is different enough from its cousins to be its own unique species.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists find that 'fathers do matter' for the wandering albatrossOne of the predicted consequences of climate change is a shift in body mass distributions within animal populations. Yet body mass, an important component of the physiological state of an organism, can affect key life-history traits such as survival, chick mass and breeding success and population dynamics. Variation in body mass distribution is expected to have consequences for the conversation of
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Gizmodo

The Intel Trump Reportedly Gave the Russians Was Beyond Top Secret President Trump in the Oval Office with Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov and Russian ambassador to the US Sergey Kislyak and unnamed staff on Wednesday, May 10, 2017 (Russian Foreign Ministry/ Flickr) On Monday, The Washington Post broke the story that President Trump told Russian officials highly classified information when he met with them in the Oval Office last week. The story has been
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists decode genome of deadly tropical snailScientists from the University of Aberdeen are part of an international team which has been working to better understand the biology of a snail species that transmits a disease infecting 200 million people, killing around 200,000 each year in developing countries.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate-smart agriculture to ensure a food secure futureThanks to the ClimaAdapt project, 90,000 Indian smallholders now have access to extensive knowledge on how they can adapt their agricultural practise to a changing climate.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study reveals how changes in Martian rainfall shaped the planetHeavy rain on Mars reshaped the planet's impact craters and carved out river-like channels in its surface billions of years ago, according to a new study published in Icarus. In the paper, researchers from the Smithsonian Institution and the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory show that changes in the atmosphere on Mars made it rain harder and harder, which had a similar effect on
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Ars Technica

Is Final Fantasy 12: The Zodiac Age the blueprint for renovating old games? Enlarge It's difficult to celebrate games from the past in the same way as, say, an old book or a classic movie. As technology moves on, so too does the way in which we interact with games. A role-playing-game from the era of the Nintendo Entertainment System might share some similarities with the likes of Final Fantasy XV or The Witcher 3 , but going back to play those games now after years of r
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A mammoth task: How do we decide which species to resurrect?The resurrection of vanished species -- through cutting-edge technologies such as gene-editing -- should be targeted towards recently extinct species rather than ancient ones, according to a conservation biologist. He suggests that long-gone species such as the woolly mammoth would not be the best focus for de-extinction efforts.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New Zealand's mainland yellow-eyed penguins face extinction unless urgent action takenScientists have modeled factors driving mainland yellow-eyed penguin population decline and are calling for action to reduce regional threats. According to the researchers' prediction models, breeding success of the penguins will continue to decline to extinction by 2060 largely due to rising ocean temperatures.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: 'Moral enhancement' technologies are neither feasible nor wiseA recent study finds that 'moral enhancement technologies' -- which are discussed as ways of improving human behavior -- are neither feasible nor wise, based on an assessment of existing research into these technologies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ginger may help fight obesity and related disordersA new review notes that recent epidemiological and clinical studies have built a consensus that ginger has beneficial effects against obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and related disorders -- more commonly referred to as metabolic syndrome.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The brighter side of twisted polymersA strategy to produce highly fluorescent nanoparticles through careful molecular design of conjugated polymers has been developed by KAUST researchers. Such tiny polymer-based particles could offer alternatives to conventional organic dyes and inorganic semiconductor quantum dots as fluorescent tags for medical imaging.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fishing can cause slowly reversible changes in gene expressionCohort after cohort, fishing typically removes large fish from the population and can lead to rapid evolutionary changes in exploited fish populations.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Trump Officials Act to Tilt Federal Science Boards toward IndustryNew changes to EPA, Interior Department advisory groups could restrict or paralyze them, critics say -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica

UK gave Google’s DeepMind access to patient data without legal basis (credit: comedy_nose ) Google's DeepMind AI wing was given access to the personal medical records of 1.6 million NHS patients on an "inappropriate legal basis," the UK's top data protection adviser to the health service has said. In a letter sent to the Royal Free Hospital's medical director professor Stephen Powis, and seen by Sky News , the National Data Guardian Dame Fiona Caldicott—whose job
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fishing can cause slowly reversible changes in gene expressionCohort after cohort, fishing typically removes large fish from the population and can lead to rapid evolutionary changes in exploited fish populations. A new study from the University of Turku, Finland, shows that removing the largest individuals from the population can lead to massive gene expression changes in an experimentally exploited fish population. The study was funded by the Academy of Fi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pufferfish and humans share the same genes for teethHuman teeth evolved from the same genes that make the bizarre beaked teeth of the pufferfish, according to new research by an international team of scientists.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Precision measurement on heavy ions contradicts theory of interaction between atomic nucleus and electronFor the first time, a team of researchers under the leadership of TU Darmstadt has succeeded in measuring the transition between energy levels of the lithium-like ions of bismuth with such precision that it has become possible to reassess underlying theories. This has led to a surprising result—the understanding of the interaction between an electron and an atomic nucleus that we have had until no
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The coming disruption of OLED technologiesOrganic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) will soon show our world in a new light: the days of small light sources are numbered; in future, entire walls, ceilings, façades and car exteriors will light up our lives. Empa is exploring OLED development as a new research area.
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Dagens Medicin

Slagsmål om toprocentkrav fortsætter Økonomiforhandlingerne i Finansministeriet er skudt i gang med et regionalt krav om et opgør med det eksisterende effektiviseringsregime. Parallelt afholder Folketinget sin egen serie-armlægning om det omstridte toprocentkrav.
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Dagens Medicin

Formand: Ikke Medicinrådets opgave at efteruddanne fagudvalgsmedlemmer Fagudvalgsmedlemmer under Medicinrådet skal kunne holde sig fagligt opdaterede uden at sætte deres habilitet over styr, mener formand Jørgen Schøler Kristensen.
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Gizmodo

The Final Trailer For War for the Planet of the Apes Does Not Skimp on the War GIF Everyone’s angry at everyone else in the last War for the Planet of the Apes trailer, which makes sense, as the excellent prequel trilogy has always been building up to one final battle for the fate of human and simian kind. By the looks of it, it’s going to be one hell of a fight. Advertisement This last trailer is packed with new footage of glorious ape-vs.-human action, but actually still
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Porewater salinity key to reconstructing 250,000 years of Lake Van's historyThe sediments of Lake Van in Eastern Anatolia (Turkey) are a valuable climate archive. Now, using the salinity measured in sediment porewater, scientists have reconstructed the huge lake-level fluctuations that occurred over the past 250,000 years. This approach – based on simple physical concepts – is likely to be more widely applied in the future.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronomers characterize two 'super-Earths' in a distant planetary system(Phys.org)—An international team of astronomers led by Eike W. Guenther of the Thuringian State Observatory in Tautenburg, Germany, has characterized two "super-Earth" exoplanets orbiting a distant star designated K2-106, determining their size, mass and density. The new findings were presented in a paper published May 11 on the arXiv pre-print server.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Loss of pericytes deteriorates retinal environmentThis new study revealed how the loss of pericytes aggravates the retinal environment and function in a mouse experimental model. These findings could contribute to the development of new therapies for blindness-causing diseases, such as diabetic eye disease (diabetic retinopathy).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Interaction between the atomic nucleus and the electron on trialA team of researchers under the leadership of TU Darmstadt and with the participation of scientists from the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) has measured the transition between energy levels of heavy ions with such precision that it has become possible to reassess underlying theories. The surprising result which is published in 'Nature Communications': the understanding of the interact
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Low risk with deferred revascularization based on measures of intracoronary physiologyParis, France: Deferring revascularization based on measures of intracoronary physiology using either instantaneous wave-free ratio (iFR) or fractional flow reserve (FFR) is associated with a low risk of major adverse coronary events, showed results reported at EuroPCR 2017 from the largest real-world study to investigate this strategy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stiffer soles are making life more comfortable for some diabetic patientsThere isn't a one-size-fits-all approach when choosing the right footwear or inner sole to take away pressure from diabetic patients' feet. The body mass index (BMI) of diabetics indicates how stiff or soft the cushioning material in shoes should be. In an article in Springer's journal Annals of Biomedical Engineering, research led by Panagiotis Chatzistergos of Staffordshire University in the UK
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Family TV viewing and SMS texting could help cut internet energy useScrapping automatically-playing videos in apps and reversing trends of instant messaging and on-demand services could be key to cutting the growing energy demand of the Internet.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bacteria harness the lotus effect to protect themselvesDental plaque and the viscous brown slime in drainpipes are two familiar examples of bacterial biofilms. Removing such bacterial depositions from surfaces is often very difficult, in part because they are extremely water-repellent. A team of scientists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now been able to show how such biofilms adapt their surface texture to repel water -- similar to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Analysis for the seismotectonics of the 2016 MS6.4 Menyuan earthquakeThe MS6.4 Menyuan earthquake occurred on the northern side of the Lenglongling fault in the mid-western of the Qilian-Haiyuan fault zone on January 21, 2016. A recent research revealed the characteristics of the tectonic environment of the Menyuan earthquake.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How hard did it rain on Mars?Heavy rain on Mars reshaped the planet's impact craters and carved out river-like channels in its surface billions of years ago, according to a new study published in Icarus. In the paper, researchers from the Smithsonian Institution and the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory show that changes in the atmosphere on Mars made it rain harder and harder, which had a similar effect on
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Immunotherapy against bee stings in some cases incompleteThe preparations that are used for allergen immunotherapy against bee sting allergies do not always contain all the relevant venom components. This was the conclusion of an examination conducted by allergy experts at the Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich (TUM). According to their report in 'Human Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics', this could possibly influence the tre
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Swansea University scientists find that 'fathers do matter' for the wandering albatrossSwansea University scientist, Professor Luca Börger has been working with partners in Switzerland, France and the USA on a study led by Ph.D. student Tina Cornioley looking at the body mass of the wandering albatross. Variation in body mass distribution is expected to have consequences for the conversation of particular species.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sam Houston state researchers study DNA from explosivesResearchers at Sam Houston State University (SHSU) hope to unmask manufacturers of homemade explosives using new advancements in DNA technology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Popular weight-loss surgery puts patients at high risk for alcohol problemsOne in five patients who undergo one of the most popular weight-loss surgical procedures is likely to develop problems with alcohol, with symptoms sometimes not appearing until years after their surgery, according to one of the largest, longest-running studies of adults who got weight-loss surgery.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Spread of tau protein measured in the brains of Alzheimer's patientsIn a new study presented in Molecular Psychiatry, researchers at Karolinska Institutet have measured how deposits of the pathological protein tau spread through the brain over the course of Alzheimer's disease. Their results show that the size of the deposit and the speed of its spread differ from one individual to the next, and that large amounts of tau in the brain can be linked to episodic memo
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New on MIT Technology Review

Building Better Chatbots, Ransomware Fallout, and Skydiving From Drones—The Download, May 16, 2017The most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Can Quantum Mechanics Save the Cosmic Multiverse?A surprising connection between cosmology and quantum mechanics could unveil the secrets of space and time -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Egyptian vultures found to engage in puzzling cosmetic mud bathing rituals(Phys.org)—A trio of researchers working at the Doñana Biological Station in Spain has found that Egyptian vultures living in the Canary Islands dip their head, neck and chest in red soil to color themselves. In their paper published in in the journal Ecology, Thijs van Overveld, Manuel de la Riva and José Antonio Donázar describe their observations, a small experiment they conducted, and offer so
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Viden

Ubeboet stillehavs-ø er klodens mest plastikforurenede stedMen i Danmark ophobes plastik også. Det har konsekvenser for naturen og dyrelivet.
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New Scientist - News

Memo to whoever lands the world’s top health job – do this firstThe World Health Organization is picking its next leader to ease sickness and suffering. Here's what the new chief should prioritise, says Bjorn Lomborg
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Gizmodo

The DCEU Could Introduce Black Adam a Lot Sooner Than We Think Aquaman recruits a Power Ranger. Michael Fassbender is confirmed for another X-Men appearance. Get a first look at the familiar Predators of the Predator reboot. Plus, when to expect the return of The X-Files , tiny new snippets of Wonder Woman footage, and tons of Doctor Who pictures. To me, my Spoilers! Black Adam In an interview with Fandango , Dwayne Johnson revealed Black Adam will make an u
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Metal soaps critical in speed of deterioration of oil paintingsAn oil painting is not a permanent and unchangeable object, but undergoes a very slow change in the outer and inner structure. Metal soap formation is of great importance. Joen Hermans has managed to recreate the molecular structure of old oil paints: a big step towards better preservation of works of art. He graduated cum laude on Tuesday 9 May at the University of Amsterdam with NWO funding from
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why some social conventions stand the test of timeWhy some social conventions persist while others pass away is the subject of new research published in the journal American Economic Review.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Rescue old data before it’s too late If we don’t act soon to preserve past records, invaluable knowledge will be lost, warns Elizabeth Griffin. Nature 545 267 doi: 10.1038/545267a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Key to 'superbug' antibiotic resistance discoveredAn international study led by Monash University's Biomedicine Discovery Institute has discovered the molecular mechanism by which the potentially deadly superbug 'Golden Staph' evades antibiotic treatment, providing the first important clues on how to counter superbug antibiotic resistance.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Energy decay in graphene resonatorsAn ICFO study in Nature Nanotechnology reveals a new way of energy dissipation in graphene nano-resonators.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pitt analysis determines odds of a hookah non-smoker taking first puffA positive attitude toward and desire to take up hookah smoking are the most likely predictors of a young adult becoming a hookah tobacco smoker, University of Pittsburgh researchers found in the first nationally representative analysis of hookah use by young adults over an extended follow-up period.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Venom becomes more potent as brown snakes ageThe 'blood nuking' capabilities of adult brown snake venom only come about after an amazing transformation. New research led by University of Queensland scientist Associate Professor Bryan Fry has shown the venom of young brown snakes attacks the nervous system, while the venom of older snakes has dangerous effects on the circulatory system.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Arctic warming to increase Eurasian extreme cold eventsScientists from the CAS Institute of Atmospheric Physics investigated the impact of Ural blocking (UB) on Eurasian extreme cold events in response to Arctic warming and obtained some interesting findings.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How resilience can break the link between a 'bad' childhood and the youth justice systemMost young people in the youth justice system have been found to come from "troubled" backgrounds. However, many people with similar backgrounds don't ever end up in youth justice services.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Catchy names for exotic algaeUnicellular algae, to which the so-called dinophytes belong, are important primary producers in marine and freshwater habitats and, as such, they provide a vital source of food for other organisms. They also serve as indicator organisms, and are used to monitor the status of fish populations, as well as playing an important role in ecosystem modeling. Many dinophyte species are under certain circu
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Scientific American Content: Global

From Science to Knowledge to Hope: New Insights into the Multiverse and to Lou Gehrig's Disease -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

Insects Recognize Faces Using Processing Mechanism Similar to That of HumansConventional wisdom holds that the ability to recognize faces requires a complex mammalian brain. But some insects are quite adept at this task -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

HPE Debuts Its Next-Gen Computer--Sans Much-Anticipated Memristors“The Machine” research prototype is designed to tackle complex problems, but it’s a work in progress -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Scientist RSS

Thermo Fisher to Buy Patheon for $5.2 BillionThe scientific supply giant seeks to expand into biopharma development and manufacturing.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Faster Than a Speeding Root TipCells within the growing root tip of an Arabidopsis plant elongate and divide, driving it forward in search of nutrients.
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Dagens Medicin

Økonomiloftet skal ikke tage høje for befolkningsudviklingen Det midlertidige økonomiloft skal ikke reguleres efter befolkningsvæksten. Det vil ikke være hensigtsmæssig, mener sundhedsministeren.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cockatoos keep their tools safeOnly a few animal species such as New Caledonian crows or some primates have so far been found to habitually use tools. Even fewer can manufacture their own tools. Nevertheless, the Goffin's cockatoo, an Indonesian parrot, exhibit both abilities while seemingly lacking a genetic adaptation for tool use. Researchers at the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna and the University of Vienna have n
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

It's time to celebrate Africa's forgotten fossil huntersThere are few things more exciting for a professional palaeontologist than discovering fossil remains. In early 2017 I found a beautifully preserved skeleton sticking out of the ground in South Africa's Karoo region. It was the vertebral column of a big herbivorous animal called pareiasaur.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Portland State researcher discovers new species of South American rabbitA Portland State University researcher discovered that a rabbit known for centuries to exist in South America is different enough from its cousins to be its own unique species. His findings will be published May 17 in the Journal of Mammalogy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists study atmospheric waves radiating out of hurricanesResearchers believe they have found a new way to monitor the intensity and location of hurricanes from hundreds of miles away by detecting atmospheric waves radiating from the centers of these powerful storms.
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Ingeniøren

Norsk firma vil fabrikere brændstof af gammel plastFirmaet Quantafuel har udviklet en ekstra effektiv konverteringsproces, der kan omdanne 1 ton plast til 7-800 liter diesel. Nu bygger de et anlæg udenfor Oslo med norsk støtte.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Using dogs to find cats—overcoming the challenges of tracking cheetahsCheetahs are Africa's rarest big cat. Only an estimated 7,000 individuals are thought to survive in the wild. They're spread across 32 populations covering a vast area of more than 3 million square kilometres. Cheetah densities are never higher than two or three cheetahs per 100km2 and can be as low as one cheetah per 4,000km2. Lion density can be up to about 16.85 lions per 100km2. What's more, i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Medieval people reopened graves to honour familyAccording to archaeologists, a reopened grave usually indicates grave robbery. Martine van Haperen, however, draws a different conclusion. Mediaeval people presumably reopened graves to strengthen the ties with their family ancestors: they would take objects with a strong symbolic significance. Van Haperen even acted as a detective and reconstructed the contents of such a robbed grave. She will de
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Futurity.org

Bubble pushes 1 cancer cell from device at a time A new kind of microfluidic chip can capture rare, aggressive cancer cells, grow them on the chip, and release single cells on demand. The work could improve our understanding of how cancer spreads. For the first time, researchers can easily compare two different “sister” cells—born of the same original cancer cell—to explore how different genes are activated and deactivated as cancer cells divide
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Gizmodo

It's Your Lucky Day Because Amazon's Having a One-Day Lucky Brand Sale Up to 50% Off Lucky Brand Clothing, Shoes, & More Amazon’s Gold Box is filled with all the Lucky Brand denim, tees, henleys and dresses you could need . Everything is marked down up to 50% off, so you can score jeans for a steal. No four leaf clover required. But like every Gold Box deal, this one only lasts for today. Here are a few styles to look at, but be sure to head over to Amazon to see ev
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In the air and on the ground, an Azores search for better dataLow clouds populate the first two kilometers of the atmosphere. Cumuliform clouds heap high and are made from columns of fast-rising air. Stratiform are sheet-like and show little vertical air movement.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Forget sharp suits and shoulder pads—good leaders should only look like their staffForget sharp suits and shoulder pads – for most employees the ideal leader actually looks exactly like them, not the designer-clad employer often portrayed in TV or films, according to a new study.
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Live Science

Fidget Spinners Renew Focus on Kids' Attention SpansFidget spinners are one of the year's hottest toys, and while the devices can be a distraction in the classroom, they seem to be sparking a conversation about how to help kids pay attention, experts say.
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Live Science

A Cloud 'Tide' Fills the Grand Canyon in Gorgeous Time-Lapse VideoTime-lapse images recently captured an incredible sight — a "tide" of clouds rolling in to fill up the Grand Canyon.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Re-constructing the crew of the Mary RoseFor the first time in 500 years, scientists examining human remains from Henry VIII's flagship Mary Rose will be able to determine if any bones come from the same person.
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cognitive science

IBM and Nutanix Launch Hyperconverged Initiative to bring Enterprises into the Cognitive Era submitted by /u/RasterStudio [link] [comments]
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Popular Science

What to do if you get caught in an avalanche Environment We asked the experts There are a few steps you can take to save yourself. Read on.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Self-learning neuromorphic chip that composes musicToday, at the imec technology forum (ITF2017), imec demonstrated the world's first self-learning neuromorphic chip. The brain-inspired chip, based on OxRAM technology, has the capability of self-learning and has been demonstrated to have the ability to compose music.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop a 'molecular needle' using a simplified biological systemMinimalism is an increasingly popular lifestyle choice that encourages individuals to decrease the overall number of possessions owned and live more simply. According to minimalist philosophy, the reduction of unnecessary clutter enables one to live a more functional and purposeful existence. IMP-IMBA Group Leader and Centre for Structural Systems Biology scientist Thomas Marlovits, in collaborati
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

World's first thin-silicon implantable chip for high-precision haptic prostheticsImec announced today its success in fabricating a prototype implantable chip that aims to give patients more intuitive control over their arm prosthetics. The thin-silicon chip is a world's first for electrode density and was developed in collaboration with researchers at the University of Florida, as part of the IMPRESS project funded by the DARPA's HAPTIX program to create a closed-loop system f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why urban legends are more powerful than everHave you heard the one about the guy who went on holiday to Bolivia? You know, he went on a night out and randomly woke up in an ice-filled bathtub after someone had removed his kidney and harvested it for sale.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Jumping genes play a big role in what makes us humanJumping genes have been a powerful force in human evolution.
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WIRED

The Bizarre Quantum Test That Could Keep Your Data Secure Here's a test that could keep future quantum technology from being hacked. The post The Bizarre Quantum Test That Could Keep Your Data Secure appeared first on WIRED .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Finding alien megastructures around nearby pulsarsDuring the 1960s, Freeman Dyson and Nikolai Kardashev captured the imaginations of people everywhere by making some radical proposals. Whereas Dyson proposed that intelligent species could eventually create megastructures to harness the energy of their stars, Kardashev offered a three-tiered classification system for intelligent species based on their ability to harness the energy of their planet,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers uncover new way of growing stem cellsResearch led by The University of Western Australia has discovered a new, simple and less expensive way of growing human stem cells.
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Gizmodo

The Past Week Will Probably Get an Entire Wing in the Future Donald J. Trump Presidential Library President Donald Trump in the Oval Office of the White House on May 12, 2017 in Washington, DC (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images) As someone who spends every day researching and writing about history, I often think about how our era will be judged by future historians. And I can’t help but think that this particular week will be seen by people of the future as a major turning point in 2017. In f
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Live Science

The Search for Life on Mars Is About to Get WeirdAstrobiologists ponder sending gene sequencers, weather stations, drilling rigs and more to the Red Planet
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Expert discusses the future of human-centered roboticsScience and technology are essential tools for innovation, and to reap their full potential, we also need to articulate and solve the many aspects of today's global issues that are rooted in the political, cultural, and economic realities of the human world. With that mission in mind, MIT's School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences has launched The Human Factor—an ongoing series of stories a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Magnesium within plankton provides tool for taking the temperatures of past oceansScientists cannot travel into the past to take the Earth's temperature so they use proxies to discern past climates, and one of the most common methods for obtaining such data is derived from the remains of tiny marine organisms called foraminifera found in oceanic sediment cores.
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Videnskabens Verden

Den hænger lige oppe over vores hoveder, og det er næsten 50 år siden, at vi første gang sendte mennesker til Månen, men hvordan blev Månen egentlig dannet? Det har der været forskellige teorier om. Den nyeste forklaring involverer enorme kræfter - himmellegemer, der bragede ind i Jorden og flåede materiale væk fra den unge Jord, godt og vel 50 mio. år efter den blev skabt. Tilrettelæggelse: Charl
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WIRED

Why Governments Won’t Let Go of Secret Software Bugs The harder part will be determining when certain vulnerabilities, like WannaCry, are too big to keep secret. The post Why Governments Won't Let Go of Secret Software Bugs appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Apple’s New Campus: An Exclusive Look Inside the Mothership Flawless curves, milled aluminum, endless glass, walled garden—sounds like an Apple product. In fact, it's the company's biggest launch ever. The post Apple’s New Campus: An Exclusive Look Inside the Mothership appeared first on WIRED .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What can lost underwater lands tell us about climate change?Underwater lands that were submerged following the last Ice Age could yield vital clues about our current approach to climate change. Global experts in archaeology, climate change, history and oceanography are discussing how we can unlock these secrets at a prestigious Royal Society meeting on 15 May 2017.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

STEM students who learn by example may miss key concepts, study findsNo matter how smart, well-prepared or hard-working, many college students struggle with rigorous introductory science courses because their approach to learning fails to provide a working knowledge of abstract concepts that underlie examples presented in the classroom, suggests new research from Washington University in St. Louis.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fields and flows fire up cosmic acceleratorsEvery day, with little notice, the Earth is bombarded by energetic particles that shower its inhabitants in an invisible dusting of radiation, observed only by the random detector, or astronomer, or physicist duly noting their passing. These particles constitute, perhaps, the galactic residue of some far distant supernova, or the tangible echo of a pulsar. These are cosmic rays.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Preparations for a new season of physics at the Large Hadron ColliderLast week, the detectors of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) witnessed their first collisions of 2017. These test collisions were not for physics research, instead they were produced as part of the process of restarting the LHC. But have patience, data taking for physics will start in another few days.
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WIRED

Inside the Cult of Carol, the Internet’s Most Unlikely Fandom Todd Haynes' 2015 film has overturned conventional wisdom about what makes a cult classic. The post Inside the Cult of Carol , the Internet’s Most Unlikely Fandom appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Physicists Can’t Agree on What Science Even Means Anymore A nerd fight has broken out over whether cosmic inflation—one of the most widely accepted theories in physics—breaks the rules of testability. The post Physicists Can't Agree on What Science Even Means Anymore appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Review: PolyScience Smoking Gun Pro It's a fantastic update to a favorite tool for chefs and bartenders. The post Review: PolyScience Smoking Gun Pro appeared first on WIRED .
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Science | The Guardian

Ill-gotten gains – why Americanisms are a boon for the British Many phrases the British love to hate are actually old English expressions – while many genuine Americanisms are accepted without a fuss. Are they a bad thing? You do the math Do you hate Americanisms? Lots of people wince and reach for the green ink if they hear a British person speak of death as “passing”. Yet that euphemism is present in Chaucer and Shakespeare. What about “oftentimes”? It’s i
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New Scientist - News

Microbes might thrive after crash-landing on board a meteoriteSome extremophile bacteria could survive the a crash-landing of a meteorite or spacecraft, helping them travel between worlds
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Live Science

Search Begins for Roman Emperor's Legendary Party ShipsCaligula's luxury boats disappeared long ago, but Italian authorities are searching a lake southeast of Rome for any remains of his "orgy ships."
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New Zealand's mainland yellow-eyed penguins face extinction unless urgent action takenIn a newly published study in the international journal PeerJ, scientists have modeled factors driving mainland yellow-eyed penguin population decline and are calling for action to reduce regional threats. According to the researchers' prediction models, breeding success of the penguins will continue to decline to extinction by 2060 largely due to rising ocean temperatures.
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Ars Technica

Cosmic rays suggest dark matter is a self-annihilating WIMP Enlarge / AMS aboard the International Space Station. (credit: NASA ) What happens when two dark matter particles collide? We don’t know the answer to that question because we don’t know what dark matter is. A whole host of possible particles could constitute dark matter, and some of them allow dark matter to “self-interact.” Here, when two dark matter particles collide, they would decay into oth
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microrobots inspired by natureA revolutionary design mimics the rowing action of the cilia on single-celled Paramecium, demonstrating much faster movement than conventional microrobots.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cancer researchers tap human intuition of video gamers in quest to beat cancerVideo gamers have the power to beat cancer, according to cancer researchers and video game developers at Southern Methodist University, Dallas.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Peering into the heart of planet formationFor the first time, astronomers have been able to peer into the heart of planet formation, recording the temperature and amount of gas present in the regions most prolific for making planets.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Middle East Wars Forcing Change in Approach to Medical CareExtra patients and collapsed systems amplify problems -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New Zealand's mainland yellow-eyed penguins face extinction unless urgent action takenIconic Yellow-eyed penguins could disappear from New Zealand's Otago Peninsula by 2060, latest research warns. Researchers call for coordinated conservation action.
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The Atlantic

The Weird Thing About Today's Internet Hello. It’s my first day back covering technology for The Atlantic . It also marks roughly 10 years that I’ve been covering science and technology, so I’ve been thinking back to my early days at Wired in the pre-crash days of 2007. The internet was then, as it is now, something we gave a kind of agency to, a half-recognition that its movements and effects were beyond the control of any individual
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The Atlantic

Protecting the Public Commons The debate about the role technology plays in society is as old as humankind’s ability to use tools and techniques to change our world. The technologies we have in our hands today would be magic to our forefathers, from gene editing to spacecraft to the smartphone you’re likely using to read this article. The impact of information technology on democracies is a comparatively younger concern, driv
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Ars Technica

Microcar madness at the Lane Motor Museum Jonathan Gitlin NASHVILLE, Tenn.—Our automotive coverage at Ars Technica is—as one might expect—focused heavily on new technologies like autonomous cars and alternative powertrains. These fields of research and development have the potential to save lives (by reducing accidents) and the planet (through decreased carbon emissions). But a recent visit to the Lane Motor Museum in Nashville involved
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How plants tell timeFindings of a new study solve a key mystery about the chemistry of how plants tell time so they can flower and metabolize nutrients.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Laser tracks therapeutics, nutrients, toxinsLawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers have developed a laser-based tabletop device to measure carbon-14 (radiocarbon).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Thermal hydraulic researchers build largest transparent fuel test assembly in the worldAdvanced reactor technologies have generated interest for their potential to reduce fossil fuel emissions, improve energy efficiency and cut down on nuclear waste. Researchers with the Department of Nuclear Engineering at Texas A&M University have provided new insights into the workings of an advanced sodium-cooled fast reactor fuel assembly, having used a specialized test facility to measure hydr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Venom becomes more potent as brown snakes ageThe "blood nuking" capabilities of adult brown snake venom only come about after an amazing transformation.
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Trouble with Medical "Voluntourism"Lending a helping hand in countries with poor health infrastructure is usually well intentioned—but it can cause serious harm -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren

Bærbar måler ser, når tomaten er spiseklarForsker anvender Raman-spektroskopi til at måle tomatens næringsstoffer. Og samme metode kan bruges til andre frugter og grøntsager, der skifter farve undervejs i modningsprocessen.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate change will cut cereal yields, model predicts—technological advances could offset those lossesClimate change will likely cause wheat and barley yields to decline by 17 to 33 percent by the end of the century, predicts a new statistical model developed by researchers at the University of California, Davis, and Cornell University.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gene matches could aid science, but raise privacy concernsHow much could one really figure out about a person from 13 tiny snippets of DNA? At first glance, not much – in the world of genetics, 13 is tiny. But a new study suggests it may be enough to infer hundreds of thousands more markers, potentially revealing a wealth of genetic information, Stanford biologists report May 15 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
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Dagens Medicin

Fedmekirurgi kan give svært overvægtige bedre glykæmisk kontrol end medicinNye fem års resultater fra STAMPEDE-studiet viser, at overvægtige med et BMI på mellem 27-43 opnår bedre sundhed og livskvalitet med bariatrisk kirurgi end med livsstilsændring og intensiv medicinsk behandling.
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