Big Think

From AI to Mass Shootings, Neuroscience Is the Future of Problem Solving David Eagleman, n euroscientist and host of 'The Brain' on PBS, will speak at the Los Angeles Hope Festival on Sunday, May 21. The event is free but seats are limited. Read More
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Big Think

3 Keys For Cultivating Genius While some still believe it to be innate, psychologists think genius can be cultivated. Three key elements motivate you to do so. Read More
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Gizmodo

What Happens When a Bike-Friendly L.A. City Council Candidate Turns Out to Be an Internet Troll? Illustration: Jim Cooke/GMG One day after Republican New Hampshire State Representative Robert Fisher was revealed to be the creator of radically misogynist Reddit forum “The Red Pill,” a progressive bike activist running for a Los Angeles city council seat across the country faced a surprisingly similar uproar. Advertisement Last month, former bike shop owner and District 1 City Council candidat
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Will The Memphis Crew Get Away With These Starting Line Shenanigans? #StreetOutlaws | Mondays at 9/8c on Discovery JJ tries to talk his way into a win. Not today. Not when Daddy Dave's win is on the line. Full episodes streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/street-outlaws/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ Discovery https://www.facebook.com/StreetOutlaws Follow on Twitter: h
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

When your spouse calls and interrupts your workday, is that a good thing?Interruptions during work and family time come with consequences and benefits, research shows. Now investigators offer strategies to build on the benefits.
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Finding Memo Today in 5 Lines The New York Times reports that President Trump asked former FBI Director James Comey “to shut down the federal investigation into Mr. Trump’s former national security adviser, Michael T. Flynn,” according to a memo written by Comey. The Times also reports that Israel is the source of the classified information Trump reportedly shared with Russian officials. Trump took to Twitter
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WIRED

5 Tools to Help Protect Yourself From Ransomware Some pick-ups that could help protect you from the next big ransomware wave. The post 5 Tools to Help Protect Yourself From Ransomware appeared first on WIRED .
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How to accurately assess use of new psychoactive drugs such as 'bath salts'Researchers surveyed individuals entering NYC EDM parties about their drug usage, with almost one out of ten participants who reported no 'bath salt' use as per the gate question then reported use of one or more drugs in this class, such as methylone, providing evidence of under-reporting.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

From where will the next big earthquake hit the city of Istanbul?Scientists reckon with an earthquake with a magnitude of 7 or greater in this region in the coming years. The extent of such seismic threat to this Turkish city of Istanbul actually depends on how strongly the tectonic plates are entangled and on the exact nucleation point of the earthquake. A team of researchers now presents a study indicating that the next major earthquake is more likely to orig
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Prototype drug uses novel mechanism to treat lung cancersLung cancer tumors were prevented in mice by a novel small molecule that directly activates a tumor suppressor protein, report researchers in a new article.
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Ars Technica

“Genericide” legal assault to nullify the Google trademark fails Enlarge (credit: David Kravets/Arstechnica) What do a teleprompter, thermos, hoover, aspirin, and videotape have in common? They were once trademarked but lost their legally protected status because their names became too generic. Google won't be joining that list any time soon. Google defeated a "genericide" lawsuit Tuesday that claimed Google should no longer be trademarked because the word "go
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Live Science

Teen's Death: How Caffeine Can Kill a Healthy PersonA teen in South Carolina has died after drinking three caffeinated beverages in a short period of time.
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Ars Technica

Steam tries to shut down “fake” games that abuse Trading Card system A few of the Trading Card-enabled games that likely won't be affected by Steam's new update. (credit: Valve ) Following its recently announced updates to Steam store curation and game discovery , Valve announced today that it would be taking steps against "bad actors exploiting the store algorithm for financial gain." Specifically, Valve says it will start targeting game makers that use phony acc
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Popular Science

What to get Dad this Father's Day Gadgets For star gazers, beer enthusiasts, and sharp dressers. A PopSci Father's Day gift guide. Gift ideas for star gazers, beer enthusiasts, and sharp dressers. Read on.
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Gizmodo

You Will Feel Unclean Watching This Video of Bee Sex GIF Image: Karla Thomspon. Gif via Hudson Hongo For those who came here expecting the uncut version of Bee Movie , you’re in the wrong place. This is a blog about some very unnerving bee-on-bee action—not some culmination of sexual tension between Renee Zellweger and Jerry Seinfeld’s characters in the 2007 cult movie . Apparently, long-horned bees copulating is pretty unsettling and uh, there’s v
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Live Science

Hubby's Dislike of Wife's Friends Linked to Greater Divorce RiskDivorce is more likely when husbands disapprove of their wives' friends or think they're interfering.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Some mother cells kick DNA damage 'down the road' to offspring, CU study saysA new University of Colorado Boulder study has shown that some dividing human cells are 'kicking the can down the road,' passing on low-level DNA damage to offspring, causing daughter cells to pause in a quiescent, or dormant, state previously thought to be random in origin.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists propose better battery system for smart home useA collaborative research team has proposed a novel programming solution to optimize power consumption in batteries. The scientists from the Chinese Academy of Sciences and University of Science and Technology Beijing published their results in IEEE/CAA Journal of Automatica Sinica . It is the first study to use adaptive dynamic programming method while also considering the physical charging and di
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Popular Science

The Waymo-Lyft alliance could shift the competition for a robotic taxi service into high gear Technology A science fiction fantasy of driverless cabs feels closer Last year, passengers took over 162 million rides with ride-hailing service Lyft, all of which were steered by human drivers. But in the near future, that may change.
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WIRED

The Emoji Movie Misses the Point of Emoji In the new animated film, emoji have to do exactly what they were intended for, which is the opposite of what they do IRL. The post The Emoji Movie Misses the Point of Emoji appeared first on WIRED .
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Gizmodo

Fly on a Treadmill Uncovers Potential Hearing Aid Problem Image: Lee et al You’re a tiny parasitic fly, minding your business stuck with wax to a tether, standing on a spherical treadmill. Why? You don’t quite remember, but it’s fine. This is what you do now. Advertisement Suddenly, a cricket chirps, and another sound plays somewhere near it. Ah! I must approach that cricket, you think. I must raise my larvae on top of it. Because that is also what I do
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Science : NPR

Struggling Nuclear Industry Lobbies State Governments For Help The nuclear industry is struggling with aging plants and competition from cheaper natural gas. Now, touting itself as another form of "clean" energy, it's lobbying state lawmakers for help. (Image credit: John S. Zeedick/AP)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Antibody biosensor offers unlimited point-of-care drug monitoringA team of scientists has developed several antibody-based biosensors that have the potential to help healthcare centers in developing countries or even patients in their own homes keep track of drug concentration in the blood.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists show how defects in blood-brain barrier could cause neurological disorderScientists for the first time have assembled a 'disease in a dish' model that pinpoints how a defect in the blood-brain barrier can produce an incurable psychomotor disorder, Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome. The findings point to a path for treating this syndrome and hold promise for analyzing other neurological diseases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Real-time technique for studying ionic liquids at electrode interfacesThis electron microscope-based imaging technique could help scientists optimize the performance of ionic liquids for batteries and other energy storage devices.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Conflicting effects of climate, vector behavior on spread of plant diseaseTo better understand the effects of climate change on agroecosystems, researchers conducted one of the first transdisciplinary studies on the effects of temperature change, leafhopper vector behavior, and the spread of Pierce's disease on grapevines. The results show that, although a warming climate may exacerbate disease symptoms in infected grapevines, innate vector behavior may set an upper lim
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Swirling swarms of bacteria offer insights on turbulenceWhen bacteria swim at just the right speed, swirling vortices emerge. As those patterns disintegrate into chaos, physicists detect a telling mathematical signature.
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Gizmodo

This Logan Noir Trailer Is a Straight-Up Johnny Cash Music Video Fox When the very first trailer for Fox’s Logan dropped last year, it was the ad’s careful use of Johnny Cash’s haunting “Hurt” that suggested the movie would have an emotional weight and depth to it unlike any other X-Men flick. The song was always perfect crystallization of the older Wolverine’s painful struggle, but in this new trailer for the movie’s black-and-white version, footage from the
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Gizmodo

Why Fusion en Español Won’t Be Publishing Today When media goes dark. Symbol of protest. MEXICO CITY – Fusion’s Spanish vertical is joining the protest known in Mexico as #UnDiaSinPeriodismo (A Day Without Journalism) today. Several Mexican news websites and other outlets will be shutting down Tuesday to honor Javier Valdez , a renowned drug war reporter who was killed yesterday in the northern state of Sinaloa. We will be following suit by no
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Refining the ocean's thermometerThe chemistry of shells of plankton called foraminifera are a record of past climate. Recent experiments show magnesium levels vary in foram shells due to different growth rates during daily light/dark cycles.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

3-D models reveal hidden details of zebrafish behaviorIn the first experiments of their kind, researchers found significant discrepancies in data generated when tracking the social behavior of zebrafish in two dimensions as opposed to 3-D. Although the researchers say the cost of 3-D tracking is too expensive to replace 2-D studies, it could significantly reduce the number of fish needed for laboratory experiments.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Narco-deforestation' study links loss of Central American tropical forests to cocaineCentral American tropical forests are beginning to disappear at an alarming rate, threatening the livelihood of indigenous peoples there and endangering some of the most biologically diverse ecosystems in North America. The culprit? Cocaine.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Photoreceptor cell death leads to blindness in CLN5 form of Neuronal Ceroid LipofuscinosisResearchers have discovered a likely cause for visual impairment and eventual loss of vision in the Finnish variant of Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (NCL). Visual impairment associated with the Finnish variant of NCL may be caused by impaired retinal waste management system, including autophagy, leading primarily to the death of photoreceptor cells that are of essential for vision.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Fathers do matter' for the wandering albatrossBiologists have been looking at the body mass of the wandering albatross. Variation in body mass distribution is expected to have consequences for the conversation of particular species.
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Big Think

What Explains the Bursts of Innovation in the Archaeological Record? A new paper suggests population size and migration explain the sudden bursts of innovation seen 50,000 years ago. Read More
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Science : NPR

An Experiment Helps Heroin Users Test Their Street Drugs For Fentanyl Some people on heroin die because the drug was laced with something much stronger — like fentanyl. A few needle exchange programs give users test strips to check their drug's content before injecting. (Image credit: Mary Harris/WNYC)
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Live Science

What the Higgs Is Going on with Mass?By now, most people have heard the refrain: "The Higgs boson creates mass." But the reality is a bit more complicated than that.
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Live Science

NASA Awards $100,000 in 3D-Printing Habitat CompetitionThe first printing segment of NASA's 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge is now complete, and the U.S. space agency has awarded $100,000 to the winning two teams.
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The Atlantic

Was Trump's Disclosure to the Russians Unprecedented? It’s not every day that you hear about the American president casually sharing an ally’s super-secret intelligence with Russian officials in the Oval Office. But was Donald Trump’s disclosure unprecedented? What exactly is new here, and what isn’t? “It’s not unprecedented at all for presidents or national-security advisers or secretaries of state to share classified information with foreign offic
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Macrophages identified as key factor for regeneration in mammalsNew findings shed light on how immune cells might be harnessed to someday help stimulate tissue regeneration in humans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

3-D printed ovaries produce healthy offspring3-D printed bioprosthetic mouse ovaries restored fertility in infertile mice and produced healthy mouse pups. The mothers also were able to nurse their pups. The research is targeted to women whose cancer treatments impaired their fertility and hormone production. The ovaries are constructed of 3-D printed scaffolds that house immature eggs and were successful in boosting hormone production and re
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Ars Technica

Decrypted: American Gods grants our wish for hot jinn action Starz This week Ars Technica's podcast Decrypted explores the action-packed third episode of American Gods , where we meet a jinn from the ancient city of Uran (located today in Oman), a disgruntled traveling salesman, and an ancient Egyptian death god. And that's just the part where Mr. Wednesday isn't up to one of his more intricate cons. Yes, this podcast contains spoilers. My guest this week
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cyber kid stuns experts showing toys can be 'weapons'An 11-year-old "cyber ninja" stunned an audience of security experts Tuesday by hacking into their Bluetooth devices to manipulate a teddy bear and show how interconnected smart toys "can be weaponised".
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Gizmodo

Start Your Philips Hue Collection With This $135 Third-Gen Starter Kit Refurb Philips Hue Third Generation Starter Kit , $135 (shown at checkout) We see lots of deals these days on the original Philips Hue starter kit, and a few on the second generation model (which added Apple HomeKit support) but this is one of the first opportunities we’ve seen to save on the third generation set , with bulbs that produce more vivid blues and greens. This set is a refurb , but it
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Live Science

Fearsome Armored Dino 'Frozen in Time' for 110 Million Years | VideoA 110-million-year-old, statuesque and spiky nodosaur is the best-preserved armored dinosaur on record.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Weekly steroids strengthen and repair musclesIn a surprising finding, weekly doses of glucocorticoid steroids, such as prednisone, help speed recovery in muscle injuries, reports a new study. The weekly steroids also repaired muscles damaged by muscular dystrophy. When given daily over long periods, prednisone can cause muscle wasting. But the once weekly doses of the steroid increased proteins that stimulate muscle repair. The studies were
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Investing in drug safety monitoring could avoid complications -- and save medical costsIncreased investment in 'pharmacovigilance surveillance' -- systems to proactively monitor safety problems with new medications -- has the potential to avoid harmful drug effects while lowering healthcare costs, according to a study in the June issue of Medical Care. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Under cyber attack: UH researchers look at how to catch a 'phisher'As cybersecurity experts scramble to stop another wave of ransomware and malware scams that have infected computers around the world, computer science experts at the University of Houston are "phishing" for reasons why these types of attacks are so successful. The research findings, presented last month at the ACM Asia Conference on Computer and Communications Security, are being used to develop t
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Big Think

How 100 LSD Therapy Sessions Helped This Iconic Actor Make Peace with His past His use of the drug may have inspired Dr. Timothy Leary. Read More
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Ars Technica

Report: Apple shows it’s taking the Mac seriously with WWDC laptop updates Enlarge / The 2016 MacBook. (credit: Andrew Cunningham) A new report from Bloomberg indicates that we may get more than just software updates at Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference next month . Most notably, both the MacBook Pro and the 12-inch MacBook are supposedly being refreshed with Intel's latest "Kaby Lake" CPUs, which boost clock speeds and include slightly better GPUs that can accele
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Gizmodo

World's Worst Website Goes Down (Again) Image: Wesearchr logo Let’s breathe a sigh of relief: For now, at least, Wesearchr is dead. Again . Advertisement What is/was Wesearchr, you ask? If the site’s own messaging is to be believed, it was a crowdfunding site created to reward whistleblowers for sharing potentially sensitive information of journalistic value. A visit to the site itself, however, revealed Wesearchr to be a donation hub
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The Scientist RSS

Study Bucks Belief that Oxidative Stress Is Bad for PregnancyMouse experiments indicate that, contrary to observations in pregnant women, reactive oxygen species contribute to normal placental development.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Under cyber attack: UH researchers look at how to catch a 'phisher'As cybersecurity experts scramble to stop another wave of ransomware and malware scams that have infected computers around the world, computer science experts at the University of Houston are 'phishing' for reasons why these types of attacks are so successful.
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Gizmodo

Adorable Tadpoles Become Hungry Murder Machines When Dad Goes Away The doting male frogs generally separate their young to keep them safe—from each other. Photo Credit: Lisa Schulte Splash-back poison frogs ( Ranitomeya variabilis ) are generally devoted parents, with the amphibian dads taking on the bulk of the childcare responsibilities. But when the frog fathers skip out on their young, it’s every tadpole for themselves, and that means a horrifying cannibalis
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Big Think

Is Universal Basic Income the Best or Worst Idea Ever? It really depends on who you ask, as one European poll found out. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Canada blocked climate change audit: officialCanada's auditor general blasted Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's government Tuesday for effectively blocking an audit of efforts to eliminate fossil fuel subsidies in the fight against climate change.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UK prison moves to stop drone deliveries of contrabandA British prison will install anti-drone technology to stop contraband being smuggled through the skies, the jail's governor told AFP on Tuesday.
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The Atlantic

GOP Lawmakers Call for Inside Information on Trump Disclosure Updated on May 16, 2017 at 4:00 p.m. Some congressional Republicans are calling for greater transparency from the Trump administration, including classified briefings, to explain exactly what happened during a recent meeting between the president and Russian officials. On Monday, The Washington Post reported that “Trump revealed highly classified information to the Russian foreign minister and am
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Popular Science

How the first broad-spectrum antibiotic emerged from the Missouri dirt Entertainment Excerpt: Miracle Cure A patch of grass in Missouri harbored the early beginnings of the first broad-spectrum antibiotic. Read on.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Narco-deforestation' study links loss of Central American tropical forests to cocaineCentral American tropical forests are beginning to disappear at an alarming rate, threatening the livelihood of indigenous peoples there and endangering some of the most biologically diverse ecosystems in North America.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study documents aftermath of a supereruption, and expands size of Toba magma systemThe rare but spectacular eruptions of supervolcanoes can cause massive destruction and affect climate patterns on a global scale for decades - and a new study has found that these sites also may experience ongoing, albeit smaller eruptions for tens of thousands of years after.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Plants call 911 to help their neighborsWhen Harsh Bais, a botanist at the University of Delaware, emailed Connor Sweeney to tell the high school student he would be willing to mentor him on a research project, Sweeney, a competitive swimmer, was so ecstatic he could have swum another 200-meter butterfly at practice.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

3-D models reveal hidden details of zebrafish behaviorZebrafish have become increasingly popular model animals in preclinical and neurobehavioral research due to their genetic similarity to humans and rapid rate of reproduction. Studies of zebrafish behavior have shed light on social and biological phenomena ranging from the dynamics of collective animal behavior, such as shoaling and schooling, to anxiety, fear, and leadership. Borrowing from decade
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Marine scientists determine how the larvae of a common coral species respond to environmental stressesTalk about stressed out. Cauliflower coral larvae are feeling the heat—literally.
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Viden

MP3’en er på vej mod gravenMen det populære format er langt fra dødt endnu.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

3-D-printed, soft, four legged robot can walk on sand and stoneEngineers have developed the first soft robot that is capable of walking on rough surfaces, such as sand and pebbles. The 3-D-printed, four-legged robot can climb over obstacles and walk on different terrains.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Atheism might be more common than assumed...but it's complicatedIt's tough to figure out just how religious or nonreligious different populations of people are. Widely-cited telephone polls (e.g., Gallup, Pew) suggest U.S. atheist prevalence ranging from 3% to 11%. But in the US, there's heavy stigma leveled against religious disbelief, which might make people reluctant to disclose their lack of belief over the phone to a stranger. Using a subtle, indirect mea
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The Atlantic

Getting to the Bottom of Americans' Fascination With Wealth America is a country that celebrates wealth. It is also a country where millions struggle day to day, with no real hope of prosperity in their future. Lauren Greenfield, a photojournalist, has been documenting this tension for nearly 30 years in her photography and films, which have covered subjects ranging from consumerism and body-image norms to the vast expansion of credit-card debt and the Gr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Plants call 911 to help their neighborsA University of Delaware professor teamed with a local high school student on research that found injured plants will send out warning signals to neighboring plants. The signals are sent through airborne chemicals released mainly from leaves. In the study, neighboring plants that received the signal responded by boosting their defenses.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A tale of two sitesMarine scientists determine how the larvae of a common coral species respond to environmental stresses in Taiwan and Moorea.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study documents aftermath of a supereruption, and expands size of Toba magma systemThe rare but spectacular eruptions of supervolcanoes can cause massive destruction and affect climate patterns on a global scale for decades -- and a new study has found that these sites also may experience ongoing, albeit smaller eruptions for tens of thousands of years after.
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New on MIT Technology Review

India and China Are Emerging as Climate IconsSix months ago, America led the world’s push to solve climate change. Now it looks on as two reformed nations take its place.
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Gizmodo

The 15 Best Science Fiction and Fantasy Noir Films Gattaca. Image: Columbia Pictures Putting the tantalizing mixture of scifi and fantasy with stylish, gritty crime and intrigue on movie screens is nothing new. In fact, it’s been a tradition practically since film noir came into fashion, and the combination has resulted in some truly great films. Here are our favorites. 15) The Thirteenth Floor An amazing new virtual reality program can transport
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Public divides over environmental regulation and energy policyA 54% majority of U.S. adults believe that "government regulations are necessary to encourage businesses and consumers to rely more on renewable energy sources," while 38% support the notion that "the private marketplace will ensure that businesses and consumers rely more on renewable energy sources, even without government regulations," according to a new Pew Research Center survey.
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Live Science

Cannibal 'T. Rex' Ants Seen Live for 1st Time Ever (and They're Shy)The first-ever observations of the rare T. rex ant in action reveal a secretive, timid species, albeit a cannibal.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Humans rely more on 'inferred' visual objects than 'real' onesHumans treat 'inferred' visual objects generated by the brain as more reliable than external images from the real world, according to new research.
22h
WIRED

HTC’s Squishy New Phone Has All The Things—Even Alexa Looking for a phone loaded with new tech and new ideas? Introducing the HTC U11. The post HTC's Squishy New Phone Has All The Things---Even Alexa appeared first on WIRED .
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Gizmodo

What's Happening With Me Target and I at 3100 14th Street NW Washington DC 20010 USA, our favorite meeting place. (Image: Medium/Libby Watson.) In a moving Medium post published on Tuesday, Twitter co-founder Biz Stone announced that he would be rejoining the company he created with Jack Dorsey in 2006. I, however, also have some major news. Advertisement I go to Target about once a week. When I go there, that red-walled
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists develop real-time technique for studying ionic liquids at electrode interfacesIonic liquids—salts made by combining positively charged molecules (cations) and negatively charged molecules (anions) that are liquid at relatively low temperatures, often below room temperature—are increasingly being investigated for uses in batteries, supercapacitors, and transistors. Their unique physical and chemical properties, including good ionic conductivity, low flammability and volatili
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How scientists turned a flag into a loudspeakerA paper-thin, flexible device not only can generate energy from human motion, it can act as a loudspeaker and microphone as well, nanotechnology researchers report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Protecting Peru's river dolphinsRiver dolphins and Amazonian manatees in Peru will benefit from new protection thanks to a newly developed plan.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tumor cells get stiff before becoming invasiveBreast cancer cells undergo a stiffening state prior to acquiring malignant features and becoming invasive. The discovery identifies a new signal in tumor cells that can be further explored when designing cancer-targeting therapies.
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New Scientist - News

Driest ten months in 100 years recorded in southern EnglandThe last 10 months were the driest July to April for southern England in records stretching back more than 100 years, figures reveal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Narco-deforestation' study links loss of Central American tropical forests to cocaineCentral American tropical forests are beginning to disappear at an alarming rate, threatening the livelihood of indigenous peoples there and endangering some of the most biologically diverse ecosystems in North America. The culprit? Cocaine.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Public divides over environmental regulation and energy policyA 54 percent majority of US adults believe that 'government regulations are necessary to encourage businesses and consumers to rely more on renewable energy sources,' while 38 percent support the notion that 'the private marketplace will ensure that businesses and consumers rely more on renewable energy sources, even without government regulations,' according to a new Pew Research Center survey.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

3-D models reveal hidden details of zebrafish behaviorIn the first experiments of their kind, researchers found significant discrepancies in data generated when tracking the social behavior of zebrafish in two dimensions as opposed to 3-D. Although the researchers say the cost of 3-D tracking is too expensive to replace 2-D studies, it could significantly reduce the number of fish needed for laboratory experiments.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Undetected Ebola infection in international healthcare workers very unlikelyUndiagnosed Ebola virus infection was probably very rare in international workers who were deployed during the 2013-2015 outbreak of the virus in West Africa, despite mild and asymptomatic cases of Ebola being known to occur, according to new research led by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Responders to recent West Africa Ebola epidemic show little evidence of infectionResponders to the West African Ebola epidemic of 2014-2016 who returned to the UK and Ireland included many who reported possible Ebola virus exposure or Ebola-associated symptoms, according to a new study published in PLOS Medicine. The study, conducted by Catherine F. Houlihan of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, UK and colleagues, also reports that the vast majority showed no ev
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The Atlantic

Did Trump Pass Israeli Intelligence to the Russians? Under siege for President Trump’s reported disclosure of classified information to two Russian officials last week , the White House has focused on the legality of any disclosure, saying the president can share what he wants. But that narrow view overlooks the other implications of the disclosure. According to The Washington Post and others, the information was extremely sensitive, shared with th
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The Atlantic

'A New Era' in U.S.-Turkish Relations President Trump welcomed Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan to the White House Tuesday for a meeting the Turkish leader said marks “a historical turn of tide” in relations between the NATO allies despite recent tensions over the U.S.’s plan to arm Kurdish rebels in Syria. Three issues loomed over the talks, their first face-to-face encounter since Trump took office: Kurdish rebels, the extrad
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

3-D-printed, soft, four legged robot can walk on sand and stoneEngineers at the University of California San Diego have developed the first soft robot that is capable of walking on rough surfaces, such as sand and pebbles. The 3D-printed, four-legged robot can climb over obstacles and walk on different terrains.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

T-cell signaling process central to immune responseThe immune system cells known as T cells play a central role in the body's ability to fight infections and cancer. For decades, however, details of the molecular signaling process that leads to T cell activation have remained a mystery. Now scientists have obtained the first glimpse of the process by which recognition of an antigen (such as a viral protein) by the T cell receptor triggers the firs
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Ars Technica

WCry ransomware worm’s Bitcoin take tops $70k as its spread continues (credit: fdecomite ) WCry , the National Security Agency exploit-powered ransomware worm that began spreading worldwide on Friday, had reportedly affected hundreds of thousands of computers before the weekend, but the malware had only brought in about $20,000 in ransom payments. However, as the world returned to the office on Monday, those payments have been rapidly mounting, based on tracking da
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Key to 'superbug' antibiotic resistance discoveredAn international study has discovered the molecular mechanism by which the potentially deadly superbug 'Golden Staph' evades antibiotic treatment, providing the first important clues on how to counter superbug antibiotic resistance.
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Scientific American Content: Global

How Satellite Images Can Confirm Human Rights AbusesThe U.S. government claims a Syrian crematory is hiding mass prisoner killings -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo

The Complete Guide to Dumping Google Had enough of Google meddling in your affairs ? Rather impressed by what Microsoft is doing with Outlook on the web? A little bit spooked by how much data Mountain View has on you? Whatever your reasons for splitting up with Google, here’s how to make sure it’s a clean and uncomplicated break. Get your data out Google Takeout is simple and easy to use. Image: Screenshot To give Google some credit
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Science | The Guardian

‘An almost biblical notion of evil’ – why Ian Brady haunts the British psyche Other child killers have slid off into obscurity, but Brady and fellow Moors murderer Myra Hindley have fascinated and revolted the nation for 50 years. We still haven’t heard the last of them He has been, for half a century, “the most hated man in Britain”, the walking embodiment of evil, an unrepentant Antichrist and exhibit No 1 in the argument for bringing back the death penalty. Now he has d
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Disney Research transforms movie-quality animations for interactive viewingCinema-quality animations and virtual reality graphics that need to be rendered in real-time are often mutually exclusive categories, but Disney Research has developed a new process that transforms high-resolution animated content into a novel video format to enable immersive viewing.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Refining the ocean's thermometerThe chemistry of shells of plankton called foraminifera are a record of past climate. Recent experiments led by UC Davis scientists show magnesium levels vary in foram shells due to different growth rates during daily light/dark cycles.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists develop real-time technique for studying ionic liquids at electrode interfacesThis electron microscope-based imaging technique could help scientists optimize the performance of ionic liquids for batteries and other energy storage devices.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

3-D-printed, soft, four legged robot can walk on sand and stoneEngineers at the University of California San Diego have developed the first soft robot that is capable of walking on rough surfaces, such as sand and pebbles. The 3-D-printed, four-legged robot can climb over obstacles and walk on different terrains. Researchers led by Michael Tolley, a mechanical engineering professor at the University of California San Diego, will present the robot at the IEEE
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Atheism might be more common than assumed...but it's complicatedUsing a subtle, indirect measurement technique, psychology researchers have found that there are probably a lot more atheists (people who don't believe in God) in the U.S. than show up in telephone polls.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UK researchers identify macrophages as key factor for regeneration in mammalsThe team's findings, published today in eLife, shed light on how immune cells might be harnessed to someday help stimulate tissue regeneration in humans.
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Minimizing irreversible losses in quantum systems by local counterdiabatic driving [Physics]Counterdiabatic driving protocols have been proposed [Demirplak M, Rice SA (2003) J Chem Phys A 107:9937–9945; Berry M (2009) J Phys A Math Theor 42:365303] as a means to make fast changes in the Hamiltonian without exciting transitions. Such driving in principle allows one to realize arbitrarily fast annealing protocols...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Compositional data supports decentralized model of production and circulation of artifacts in the pre-Columbian south-central Andes [Anthropology]The circulation and exchange of goods and resources at various scales have long been considered central to the understanding of complex societies, and the Andes have provided a fertile ground for investigating this process. However, long-standing archaeological emphasis on typological analysis, although helpful to hypothesize the direction of contacts, has...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Molecular mechanism of multispecific recognition of Calmodulin through conformational changes [Biochemistry]Calmodulin (CaM) is found to have the capability to bind multiple targets. Investigations on the association mechanism of CaM to its targets are crucial for understanding protein–protein binding and recognition. Here, we developed a structure-based model to explore the binding process between CaM and skMLCK binding peptide. We found the...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Spinal motor neuron protein supersaturation patterns are associated with inclusion body formation in ALS [Biochemistry]Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a heterogeneous degenerative motor neuron disease linked to numerous genetic mutations in apparently unrelated proteins. These proteins, including SOD1, TDP-43, and FUS, are highly aggregation-prone and form a variety of intracellular inclusion bodies that are characteristic of different neuropathological subtypes of the disease. Contained within...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Different phosphoisoforms of RNA polymerase II engage the Rtt103 termination factor in a structurally analogous manner [Biochemistry]The carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) orchestrates dynamic recruitment of specific cellular machines during different stages of transcription. Signature phosphorylation patterns of Y1S2P3T4S5P6S7 heptapeptide repeats of the CTD engage specific “readers.” Whereas phospho-Ser5 and phospho-Ser2 marks are ubiquitous, phospho-Thr4 is reported to...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Pre/pro-B cells generate macrophage populations during homeostasis and inflammation [Cell Biology]Most tissue-resident macrophages (Mφs) are believed to be derived prenatally and are assumed to maintain themselves throughout life by self-proliferation. However, in adult mice we identified a progenitor within bone marrow, early pro-B cell/fraction B, that differentiates into tissue Mφs. These Mφ precursors have non-rearranged B-cell receptor genes and coexpress...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

{Delta}Np63{alpha} is a common inhibitory target in oncogenic PI3K/Ras/Her2-induced cell motility and tumor metastasis [Cell Biology]Activation of phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K), Ras, and Her2 signaling plays a critical role in cancer development. Hotspot constitutive activating mutations in oncogenes, such as PIK3CA encoding the p110α catalytic subunit or RAS, as well as overexpression of Her2, are frequently found in human tumors and cancers. It has been...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Molecular codes for cell type specification in Brn3 retinal ganglion cells [Developmental Biology]Visual information is conveyed from the eye to the brain by distinct types of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). It is largely unknown how RGCs acquire their defining morphological and physiological features and connect to upstream and downstream synaptic partners. The three Brn3/Pou4f transcription factors (TFs) participate in a combinatorial code...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structural variants caused by Alu insertions are associated with risks for many human diseases [Genetics]Interspersed repeat sequences comprise much of our DNA, although their functional effects are poorly understood. The most commonly occurring repeat is the Alu short interspersed element. New Alu insertions occur in human populations, and have been responsible for several instances of genetic disease. In this study, we sought to determine...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Brd4 modulates the innate immune response through Mnk2-eIF4E pathway-dependent translational control of I{kappa}B{alpha} [Immunology and Inflammation]Bromodomain-containing factor Brd4 has emerged as an important transcriptional regulator of NF-κB–dependent inflammatory gene expression. However, the in vivo physiological function of Brd4 in the inflammatory response remains poorly defined. We now demonstrate that mice deficient for Brd4 in myeloid-lineage cells are resistant to LPS-induced sepsis but are more susceptible...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

SP and IL-33 together markedly enhance TNF synthesis and secretion from human mast cells mediated by the interaction of their receptors [Immunology and Inflammation]The peptide substance P (SP) and the cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) have been implicated in inflammatory processes. Mast cells are recognized as important in inflammatory responses. Here, we report that IL-33 (30 ng/mL), a member of the IL-1 family of cytokines, administered in combination with SP (1 µM), markedly...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Inducible Fgf13 ablation enhances caveolae-mediated cardioprotection during cardiac pressure overload [Medical Sciences]The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) homologous factor FGF13, a noncanonical FGF, has been best characterized as a voltage-gated Na+ channel auxiliary subunit. Other cellular functions have been suggested, but not explored. In inducible, cardiac-specific Fgf13 knockout mice, we found—even in the context of the expected reduction in Na+ channel current—an...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

GRP78 haploinsufficiency suppresses acinar-to-ductal metaplasia, signaling, and mutant Kras-driven pancreatic tumorigenesis in mice [Medical Sciences]Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains a highly lethal disease in critical need of new therapeutic strategies. Here, we report that the stress-inducible 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78/HSPA5), a key regulator of endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis and PI3K/AKT signaling, is overexpressed in the acini and PDAC of Pdx1-Cre;KrasG12D/+;p53f/+ (PKC) mice as early as...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Suppressors and activators of JAK-STAT signaling at diagnosis and relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Down syndrome [Medical Sciences]Children with Down syndrome (DS) are prone to development of high-risk B-cell precursor ALL (DS-ALL), which differs genetically from most sporadic pediatric ALLs. Increased expression of cytokine receptor-like factor 2 (CRLF2), the receptor to thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), characterizes about half of DS-ALLs and also a subgroup of sporadic “Philadelphia-like”...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Protein-mediated viral latency is a novel mechanism for Merkel cell polyomavirus persistence [Microbiology]Viral latency, in which a virus genome does not replicate independently of the host cell genome and produces no infectious particles, is required for long-term virus persistence. There is no known latency mechanism for chronic small DNA virus infections. Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) causes an aggressive skin cancer after prolonged...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

MEF2D haploinsufficiency downregulates the NRF2 pathway and renders photoreceptors susceptible to light-induced oxidative stress [Neuroscience]Gaining mechanistic insight into interaction between causative factors of complex multifactorial diseases involving photoreceptor damage might aid in devising effective therapies. Oxidative stress is one of the potential unifying mechanisms for interplay between genetic and environmental factors that contribute to photoreceptor pathology. Interestingly, the transcription factor myocyte enhancer fa
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Universal transition from unstructured to structured neural maps [Neuroscience]Neurons sharing similar features are often selectively connected with a higher probability and should be located in close vicinity to save wiring. Selective connectivity has, therefore, been proposed to be the cause for spatial organization in cortical maps. Interestingly, orientation preference (OP) maps in the visual cortex are found in...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Evolutionarily conserved TRH neuropeptide pathway regulates growth in Caenorhabditis elegans [Neuroscience]In vertebrates thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) is a highly conserved neuropeptide that exerts the hormonal control of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels as well as neuromodulatory functions. However, a functional equivalent in protostomian animals remains unknown, although TRH receptors are conserved in proto- and deuterostomians. Here we identify a TRH-like neuropeptide precursor...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Opposing roles of primate areas 25 and 32 and their putative rodent homologs in the regulation of negative emotion [Neuroscience]Disorders of dysregulated negative emotion such as depression and anxiety also feature increased cardiovascular mortality and decreased heart-rate variability (HRV). These disorders are correlated with dysfunction within areas 25 and 32 of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), but a causal relationship between dysregulation of these areas and such symptoms has...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

A normalization model suggests that attention changes the weighting of inputs between visual areas [Neuroscience]Models of divisive normalization can explain the trial-averaged responses of neurons in sensory, association, and motor areas under a wide range of conditions, including how visual attention changes the gains of neurons in visual cortex. Attention, like other modulatory processes, is also associated with changes in the extent to which...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Folate rescues vitamin B12 depletion-induced inhibition of nuclear thymidylate biosynthesis and genome instability [Physiology]Clinical vitamin B12 deficiency can result in megaloblastic anemia, which results from the inhibition of DNA synthesis by trapping folate cofactors in the form of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-methylTHF) and subsequent inhibition of de novo thymidylate (dTMP) biosynthesis. In the cytosol, vitamin B12 functions in the remethylation of homocysteine to methionine, which...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Evidence of strain structure in Plasmodium falciparum var gene repertoires in children from Gabon, West Africa [Population Biology]Existing theory on competition for hosts between pathogen strains has proposed that immune selection can lead to the maintenance of strain structure consisting of discrete, weakly overlapping antigenic repertoires. This prediction of strain theory has conceptual overlap with fundamental ideas in ecology on niche partitioning and limiting similarity between coexisting...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Dixon et al., Highly efficient delivery of functional cargoes by the synergistic effect of GAG binding motifs and cell-penetrating peptides [Correction]CELL BIOLOGY Correction for “Highly efficient delivery of functional cargoes by the synergistic effect of GAG binding motifs and cell-penetrating peptides,” by James E. Dixon, Gizem Osman, Gavin E. Morris, Hareklea Markides, Michael Rotherham, Zahia Bayoussef, Alicia J. El Haj, Chris Denning, and Kevin M. Shakesheff, which appeared in issue...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Chen et al., Intestinal NCoR1, a regulator of epithelial cell maturation, controls neonatal hyperbilirubinemia [Correction]DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY Correction for “Intestinal NCoR1, a regulator of epithelial cell maturation, controls neonatal hyperbilirubinemia,” by Shujuan Chen, Wenqi Lu, Mei-Fei Yueh, Eva Rettenmeier, Miao Liu, Johan Auwerx, Ruth T. Yu, Ronald M. Evans, Kepeng Wang, Michael Karin, and Robert H. Tukey, which appeared in issue 8, February 21, 2017,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Hobbie et al., Contrasting nitrogen and phosphorus budgets in urban watersheds and implications for managing urban water pollution [Correction]ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES, SUSTAINABILITY SCIENCE Correction for “Contrasting nitrogen and phosphorus budgets in urban watersheds and implications for managing urban water pollution,” by Sarah E. Hobbie, Jacques C. Finlay, Benjamin D. Janke, Daniel A. Nidzgorski, Dylan B. Millet, and Lawrence A. Baker, which appeared in issue 16, April 18, 2017, of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Burak and Fiete, Fundamental limits on persistent activity in networks of noisy neurons [Correction]NEUROSCIENCE, PHYSICS Correction for “Fundamental limits on persistent activity in networks of noisy neurons,” by Yoram Burak and Ila R. Fiete, which appeared in issue 43, October 23, 2012, of Proc Natl Acad Sci USA (109:17645–17650; first published October 9, 2012; 10.1073/pnas.1117386109). The authors note that, due to a printer’s...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Trade in the pre-Columbian Andes Vaquerías ware, Cajón Valley. The long-distance exchange of goods and resources is a key factor in the development of complex societies. To improve understanding of ancient trade practices, Marisa Lazzari et al. (pp. E3917–E3926) examined the exchange of ceramics, obsidian artifacts, and volcanic rock tools...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Failure to replicate a genetic signal for sex bias in the steppe migration into central Europe [Biological Sciences]Goldberg et al. (1) used genome-wide ancient DNA data (2) from central European Bronze Age (BA) populations and their three ancestral sources of steppe pastoralists (SP), Anatolian farmers (AF), and European hunter-gatherers (HG) to investigate whether the SP migration into central Europe after 5,000 years ago (3, 4) was sex-biased....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Lazaridis and Reich: Robust model-based inference of male-biased admixture during Bronze Age migration from the Pontic-Caspian Steppe [Biological Sciences]By comparing the sex-specifically inherited X chromosome to the autosomes in ancient genetic samples, we (1) studied sex-specific admixture for two prehistoric migrations. For each migration we used several admixture estimation procedures—including ADMIXTURE model-based clustering (2)—to compare X-chromosomal and autosomal ancestry in contemporaneous Central Europeans and we interpreted greater ad
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

B vitamins and pollution, an interesting, emerging, yet incomplete picture of folate and the exposome [Biological Sciences]We read the interesting article by Zhong et al. (1) describing how B-vitamin supplementation reduces the adverse epigenetic response to fine particles associated with air pollution. However, we feel it is extremely premature to suggest, as the authors do, that “individual-level prevention” via vitamin supplements “might be used as prevention...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Lucock et al.: Significance of interpretation and misinterpretation of a small mechanistic study [Biological Sciences]The aim of our small mechanistic study (1) was to test the biologic plausibility that ambient particle pollution might have epigenetic effects on DNA methylation that could be modulated by methyl donor supplements. We acknowledge in this letter and in our paper that generalizability of our results is limited not...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

QnAs with Angel Rubio [QnAs]Just as physics requires a different set of tools to explore phenomena at the quantum scale, chemistry requires a quantum paradigm. At the macroscale, the interaction of light with chemical entities can be observed in processes such as photosynthesis. But the actual interaction between photons and other matter occurs in...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Supersaturated proteins in ALS [Biochemistry]Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by rapidly progressive degeneration of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. Although most forms of ALS are sporadic (sALS), ∼10% of cases are inherited in families (fALS). More than 50 ALS genes have been identified, with 16 of...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Long reach of inclusive fitness [Evolution]Inclusive fitness theory is one of the central paradigms of behavioral ecology (1, 2). Initially developed to explain the effect of genetic relatedness on prosocial behaviors such as altruism and cooperation, the power of inclusive fitness thinking became even more evident when modifications to the original models were applied to...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Compass in the data ocean: Toward chronotherapy [Systems Biology]In the globalized modern society, the world is continuously moving 24 h a day 7 d a week. Prominent cities on the earth can be seen brightly lit at night from outer space. People on earth have daily (circadian) rhythms based more on their social circumstances than on natural cycles...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Cell geometry dictates TNF{alpha}-induced genome response [Applied Physical Sciences]Cells in physiology integrate local soluble and mechanical signals to regulate genomic programs. Whereas the individual roles of these signals are well studied, the cellular responses to the combined chemical and physical signals are less explored. Here, we investigated the cross-talk between cellular geometry and TNFα signaling. We stabilized NIH...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Shape-driven solid-solid transitions in colloids [Applied Physical Sciences]Solid–solid phase transitions are the most ubiquitous in nature, and many technologies rely on them. However, studying them in detail is difficult because of the extreme conditions (high pressure/temperature) under which many such transitions occur and the high-resolution equipment needed to capture the intermediate states of the transformations. These difficulties...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Stability of bound species during alkene reactions on solid acids [Engineering]This study reports the thermodynamics of bound species derived from ethene, propene, n-butene, and isobutene on solid acids with diverse strength and confining voids. Density functional theory (DFT) and kinetic data indicate that covalently bound alkoxides form C–C bonds in the kinetically relevant step for dimerization turnovers on protons within...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Maize defective kernel mutant generated by insertion of a Ds element in a gene encoding a highly conserved TTI2 cochaperone [Agricultural Sciences]We have used the newly engineered transposable element Dsg to tag a gene that gives rise to a defective kernel (dek) phenotype. Dsg requires the autonomous element Ac for transposition. Upon excision, it leaves a short DNA footprint that can create in-frame and frameshift insertions in coding sequences. Therefore, we...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of the Markovian Mpemba effect and its inverse [Applied Physical Sciences]Under certain conditions, it takes a shorter time to cool a hot system than to cool the same system initiated at a lower temperature. This phenomenon—the “Mpemba effect”—was first observed in water and has recently been reported in other systems. Whereas several detail-dependent explanations were suggested for some of these...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Chemotaxis and autochemotaxis of self-propelling droplet swimmers [Applied Physical Sciences]Chemotaxis and autochemotaxis play an important role in many essential biological processes. We present a self-propelling artificial swimmer system that exhibits chemotaxis as well as negative autochemotaxis. Oil droplets in an aqueous surfactant solution are driven by interfacial Marangoni flows induced by micellar solubilization of the oil phase. We demonstrate...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Single-stranded nucleic acid elasticity arises from internal electrostatic tension [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Understanding of the conformational ensemble of flexible polyelectrolytes, such as single-stranded nucleic acids (ssNAs), is complicated by the interplay of chain backbone entropy and salt-dependent electrostatic repulsions. Molecular elasticity measurements are sensitive probes of the statistical conformation of polymers and have elucidated ssNA conformation at low force, where electrostatic repu
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The role of momentum transfer during incoherent neutron scattering is explained by the energy landscape model [Biophysics and Computational Biology]We recently introduced a model of incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) that treats the neutrons as wave packets of finite length and the protein as a random walker in the free energy landscape. We call the model ELM for “energy landscape model.” In ELM, the interaction of the wave packet...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Mechanism of signal propagation in Physarum polycephalum [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Complex behaviors are typically associated with animals, but the capacity to integrate information and function as a coordinated individual is also a ubiquitous but poorly understood feature of organisms such as slime molds and fungi. Plasmodial slime molds grow as networks and use flexible, undifferentiated body plans to forage for...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Efficient assignment and NMR analysis of an intact virus using sequential side-chain correlations and DNP sensitization [Biophysics and Computational Biology]An experimental strategy has been developed to increase the efficiency of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in solid-state NMR studies. The method makes assignments simpler, faster, and more reliable via sequential correlations of both side-chain and Cα resonances. The approach is particularly suited to complex biomolecules and systems with significant chemical-shift...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Golgi apparatus self-organizes into the characteristic shape via postmitotic reassembly dynamics [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The Golgi apparatus is a membrane-bounded organelle with the characteristic shape of a series of stacked flat cisternae. During mitosis in mammalian cells, the Golgi apparatus is once fragmented into small vesicles and then reassembled to form the characteristic shape again in each daughter cell. The mechanism and details of...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Sequential allosteric mechanism of ATP hydrolysis by the CCT/TRiC chaperone is revealed through Arrhenius analysis [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Knowing the mechanism of allosteric switching is important for understanding how molecular machines work. The CCT/TRiC chaperonin nanomachine undergoes ATP-driven conformational changes that are crucial for its folding function. Here, we demonstrate that insight into its allosteric mechanism of ATP hydrolysis can be achieved by Arrhenius analysis. Our results show...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Limitations of ex vivo measurements for in vivo neuroscience [Biophysics and Computational Biology]A long history of postmortem studies has provided significant insight into human brain structure and organization. Cadavers have also proven instrumental for the measurement of artifacts and nonneural effects in functional imaging, and more recently, the study of biophysical properties critical to brain stimulation. However, death produces significant changes in...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Vimentin fibers orient traction stress [Cell Biology]The intermediate filament vimentin is required for cells to transition from the epithelial state to the mesenchymal state and migrate as single cells; however, little is known about the specific role of vimentin in the regulation of mesenchymal migration. Vimentin is known to have a significantly greater ability to resist...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Human phosphatase CDC14A regulates actin organization through dephosphorylation of epithelial protein lost in neoplasm [Cell Biology]CDC14 is an essential dual-specificity phosphatase that counteracts CDK1 activity during anaphase to promote mitotic exit in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Surprisingly, human CDC14A is not essential for cell cycle progression. Instead, it regulates cell migration and cell adhesion. Little is known about the substrates of hCDC14A and the counteracting kinases. Here,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Enantiomerically enriched, polycrystalline molecular sieves [Chemistry]Zeolite and zeolite-like molecular sieves are being used in a large number of applications such as adsorption and catalysis. Achievement of the long-standing goal of creating a chiral, polycrystalline molecular sieve with bulk enantioenrichment would enable these materials to perform enantioselective functions. Here, we report the synthesis of enantiomerically enriched...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Biocompatible and totally disintegrable semiconducting polymer for ultrathin and ultralightweight transient electronics [Chemistry]Increasing performance demands and shorter use lifetimes of consumer electronics have resulted in the rapid growth of electronic waste. Currently, consumer electronics are typically made with nondecomposable, nonbiocompatible, and sometimes even toxic materials, leading to serious ecological challenges worldwide. Here, we report an example of totally disintegrable and biocompatible semiconducting.
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Impact of backbone fluorination on nanoscale morphology and excitonic coupling in polythiophenes [Chemistry]Fluorination represents an important strategy in developing high-performance conjugated polymers for photovoltaic applications. Here, we use regioregular poly(3-ethylhexylthiophene) (P3EHT) and poly(3-ethylhexyl-4-fluorothiophene) (F-P3EHT) as simplified model materials, using single-molecule/aggregate spectroscopy and molecular dynamic simulations, to elucidate the impacts of backbone fluorinatio
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Elucidating interplay of speed and accuracy in biological error correction [Chemistry]One of the most fascinating features of biological systems is the ability to sustain high accuracy of all major cellular processes despite the stochastic nature of underlying chemical processes. It is widely believed that such low error values are the result of the error-correcting mechanism known as kinetic proofreading. However,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Paper-based plasma sanitizers [Engineering]This work describes disposable plasma generators made from metallized paper. The fabricated plasma generators with layered and patterned sheets of paper provide a simple and flexible format for dielectric barrier discharge to create atmospheric plasma without an applied vacuum. The porosity of paper allows gas to permeate its bulk volume...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Photonic hypercrystals for control of light-matter interactions [Engineering]Photonic crystals (PCs) have emerged as one of the most widely used platforms for controlling light–matter interaction in solid-state systems. They rely on Bragg scattering from wavelength-sized periodic modulation in the dielectric environment for manipulating the electromagnetic field. A complementary approach to manipulate light–matter interaction is offered by artificial media...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Explaining negative kin discrimination in a cooperative mammal society [Evolution]Kin selection theory predicts that, where kin discrimination is possible, animals should typically act more favorably toward closer genetic relatives and direct aggression toward less closely related individuals. Contrary to this prediction, we present data from an 18-y study of wild banded mongooses, Mungos mungo, showing that females that are...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

African genomes illuminate the early history and transition to selfing in Arabidopsis thaliana [Evolution]Over the past 20 y, many studies have examined the history of the plant ecological and molecular model, Arabidopsis thaliana, in Europe and North America. Although these studies informed us about the recent history of the species, the early history has remained elusive. In a large-scale genomic analysis of African...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

High-density lipoprotein receptor SCARB1 is required for carotenoid coloration in birds [Evolution]Yellow, orange, and red coloration is a fundamental aspect of avian diversity and serves as an important signal in mate choice and aggressive interactions. This coloration is often produced through the deposition of diet-derived carotenoid pigments, yet the mechanisms of carotenoid uptake and transport are not well-understood. The white recessive...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Nasal-associated lymphoid tissues (NALTs) support the recall but not priming of influenza virus-specific cytotoxic T cells [Immunology and Inflammation]The lymphoid tissue that drains the upper respiratory tract represents an important induction site for cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) immunity to airborne pathogens and intranasal vaccines. Here, we investigated the role of the nasal-associated lymphoid tissues (NALTs), which are mucosal-associated lymphoid organs embedded in the submucosa of the nasal passage,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

CXCR4 signaling and function require the expression of the IgD-class B-cell antigen receptor [Immunology and Inflammation]Mature B cells coexpress both IgM and IgD B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) classes, which are organized on the cell surface in distinct protein islands. The specific role of the IgD–BCR is still enigmatic, but it is colocalized with several other receptors on the B-cell surface, including the coreceptor CD19. Here,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Conditional knockin of Dnmt3a R878H initiates acute myeloid leukemia with mTOR pathway involvement [Medical Sciences]DNMT3A is frequently mutated in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). To explore the features of human AML with the hotspot DNMT3A R882H mutation, we generated Dnmt3a R878H conditional knockin mice, which developed AML with enlarged Lin−Sca1+cKit+ cell compartments. The transcriptome and DNA methylation profiling of bulk leukemic cells and the single-cell...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

High spatial correspondence at a columnar level between activation and resting state fMRI signals and local field potentials [Neuroscience]Although blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI has been widely used to map brain responses to external stimuli and to delineate functional circuits at rest, the extent to which BOLD signals correlate spatially with underlying neuronal activity, the spatial relationships between stimulus-evoked BOLD activations and local correlations of BOLD signals in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Genetic rescue models refute nonautonomous rod cell death in retinitis pigmentosa [Neuroscience]Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease, in which the death of mutant rod photoreceptors leads secondarily to the non-cell autonomous death of cone photoreceptors. Gene therapy is a promising treatment strategy. Unfortunately, current methods of gene delivery treat only a fraction of diseased cells, yielding retinas that are...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Inner Workings: In search for “magic” nuclei, theory catches up to experiments [Physics]The bundle of 78 nucleons in a single nickel-78 nucleus are infinitesimal. And yet, calculating that nucleus’s structure entailed an enormous computing effort: 5 million CPU hours on the most powerful supercomputer in the United States. The results could offer key insights into the potential existence of the long-sought “island...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Novel quantum phase transition from bounded to extensive entanglement [Physics]The nature of entanglement in many-body systems is a focus of intense research with the observation that entanglement holds interesting information about quantum correlations in large systems and their relation to phase transitions. In particular, it is well known that although generic, many-body states have large, extensive entropy, ground states...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Revealing the frictional transition in shear-thickening suspensions [Physics]Shear thickening in dense particulate suspensions was recently proposed to be driven by the activation of friction above an onset stress needed to overcome repulsive forces between particles. Testing this scenario represents a major challenge because classical rheological approaches do not provide access to the frictional properties of suspensions. Here...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Lsd1 prevents age-programed loss of beige adipocytes [Physiology]Aging is accompanied by major changes in adipose tissue distribution and function. In particular, with time, thermogenic-competent beige adipocytes progressively gain a white adipocyte morphology. However, the mechanisms controlling the age-related transition of beige adipocytes to white adipocytes remain unclear. Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (Lsd1) is an epigenetic eraser enzyme positively...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

ILDR1 is important for paracellular water transport and urine concentration mechanism [Physiology]Whether the tight junction is permeable to water remains highly controversial. Here, we provide evidence that the tricellular tight junction is important for paracellular water permeation and that Ig-like domain containing receptor 1 (ILDR1) regulates its permeability. In the mouse kidney, ILDR1 is localized to tricellular tight junctions of the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Short tandem target mimic rice lines uncover functions of miRNAs in regulating important agronomic traits [Plant Biology]Improvements in plant agricultural productivity are urgently needed to reduce the dependency on limited natural resources and produce enough food for a growing world population. Human intervention over thousands of years has improved the yield of important crops; however, it is increasingly difficult to find new targets for genetic improvement....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Interspecies hormonal control of host root morphology by parasitic plants [Plant Biology]Parasitic plants share a common anatomical feature, the haustorium. Haustoria enable both infection and nutrient transfer, which often leads to growth penalties for host plants and yield reduction in crop species. Haustoria also reciprocally transfer substances, such as RNA and proteins, from parasite to host, but the biological relevance for...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Molecular link between auxin and ROS-mediated polar growth [Plant Biology]Root hair polar growth is endogenously controlled by auxin and sustained by oscillating levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These cells extend several hundred-fold their original size toward signals important for plant survival. Although their final cell size is of fundamental importance, the molecular mechanisms that control it remain largely...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Brain connectivity dynamics during social interaction reflect social network structure [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Social ties are crucial for humans. Disruption of ties through social exclusion has a marked effect on our thoughts and feelings; however, such effects can be tempered by broader social network resources. Here, we use fMRI data acquired from 80 male adolescents to investigate how social exclusion modulates functional connectivity...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Complexity and compositionality in fluid intelligence [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Compositionality, or the ability to build complex cognitive structures from simple parts, is fundamental to the power of the human mind. Here we relate this principle to the psychometric concept of fluid intelligence, traditionally measured with tests of complex reasoning. Following the principle of compositionality, we propose that the critical...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Variation in the {beta}-endorphin, oxytocin, and dopamine receptor genes is associated with different dimensions of human sociality [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]There is growing evidence that the number and quality of social relationships have substantial impacts on health, well-being, and longevity, and, at least in animals, on reproductive fitness. Although it is widely recognized that these outcomes are mediated by a number of neuropeptides, the roles these play remain debated. We...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Visual working memory buffers information retrieved from visual long-term memory [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Human memory is thought to consist of long-term storage and short-term storage mechanisms, the latter known as working memory. Although it has long been assumed that information retrieved from long-term memory is represented in working memory, we lack neural evidence for this and need neural measures that allow us to...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Effect of media presentations on willingness to commit to organ donation [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]We examine how presentations of organ donation cases in the media may affect people's willingness to sign organ donation commitment cards, donate the organs of a deceased relative, support the transition to an “opt-out” policy, or donate a kidney while alive. We found that providing identifying information about the prospective...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Oxytocin under opioid antagonism leads to supralinear enhancement of social attention [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]To provide new preclinical evidence toward improving the efficacy of oxytocin (OT) in treating social dysfunction, we tested the benefit of administering OT under simultaneously induced opioid antagonism during dyadic gaze interactions in monkeys. OT coadministered with a μ-opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone, invoked a supralinear enhancement of prolonged and selective...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Optimal incentives for collective intelligence [Social Sciences]Collective intelligence is the ability of a group to perform more effectively than any individual alone. Diversity among group members is a key condition for the emergence of collective intelligence, but maintaining diversity is challenging in the face of social pressure to imitate one’s peers. Through an evolutionary game-theoretic model...
23h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

CYCLOPS reveals human transcriptional rhythms in health and disease [Systems Biology]Circadian rhythms modulate many aspects of physiology. Knowledge of the molecular basis of these rhythms has exploded in the last 20 years. However, most of these data are from model organisms, and translation to clinical practice has been limited. Here, we present an approach to identify molecular rhythms in humans...
23h
Futurity.org

Victims of workplace bullying get terrible advice Most advice that victims of workplace bullies get from friends, family, and coworkers is not helpful, but many report that they’d pass along similarly cliché advice to other victims, a new study suggests. Targets of workplace bullying get plenty of advice from coworkers and family on how to respond to the situation and make it stop. While well intentioned, much of the advice victims receive is im
23h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

How's This For A Wake Up Call? A Deckhand Gets Snagged By A Hook On The Wizard #DeadliestCatch | Tuesdays at 9/8c Wizard deckhand Robby comes dangerously close to being mauled by the throwing hook as it whips across the deck. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/deadliest-catch/ Get the latest on your favorite captains: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Step aboard
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Engaging diamond for next-era transistorsMost transistors are silicon-based and silicon technology has driven the computer revolution. In some applications, however, silicon has significant limitations. Silicon devices are prone to faltering and failing in difficult environments. Addressing these challenges, scientists describe new work developing diamond-based transistors.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Complications from thyroid cancer surgery more common than believed, study findsAs thyroid cancer rates rise, more people are having surgery to remove all or part of their thyroid. A new study suggests complications from these procedures are more common than previously believed.
23h
Futurity.org

Is the U.S. still a magnet for immigrant scientists? The United States has long been a magnet for scientists from all over the world. Scientist Raphael Valdivia, who came to the United States from Peru, now wonders if that legacy is at risk. He discusses this concern in an installment of Duke University’s “Glad You Asked” podcast, in which campus experts pose questions to the president and describe why that question matters. Hear the podcast: “So t
23h
Gizmodo

Plants Can Tell Time Way Better Than You Can Image: Dawid Skalec /Wikimedia Commons Telling time seems easy enough—just look at a clock, dummy! Not so easy if you’re a plant without any eyes or ears, though. But seriously, smart plants need to know the time more than many humans do, especially since they rely on sunlight to produce their food through photosynthesis. Us dumb humans, meanwhile, are still trying to understand how our vegetable
23h
Gizmodo

The More Outdoor Motion Lights You Buy, the More You Save 20 LED Spotlight , $16 with code GXSNVQQ3 | 2-Pack 20 LED Spotlights , $30 with code EG87DGM2 | 4-Pack 20 LED Spotlights , $57 with code 6JG35W5E Without any wiring to futz with, Mpow’s solar-powered, motion-sensing spotlights are the easiest way to illuminate your front porch or lawn, and a bunch of different configurations are on sale today, including two different sizes of lights. All of the p
23h
The Atlantic

Harry Styles Dons the Costume of Classic Rock In the recent Rolling Stone cover story on Harry Styles, the ur-rock-reporter Cameron Crowe describes the Jamaican studio where the One Direction member’s solo album was recorded as “something like a Caribbean version of Big Pink,” referring to the house where Bob Dylan and The Band once collaborated. Another studio Styles used reminds Crowe of the house in The Beatles’s Help! It’s repeatedly men
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Endangered vaquita marina porpoise could be extinct by 2018: WWFThe vaquita marina, a tiny porpoise native to Mexico, could be extinct by next year if urgent action including a ban on gillnets is not taken, the World Wildlife Fund for Nature warned.
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Gizmodo

ABC Is Staging a Bizarre Little Mermaid Musical Spectacular This Fall Image: Disney Live action musicals on network TV are all the rage these days, and now ABC is entering the genre with its own weird mishmash version of The Little Mermaid . But this version will be a two-hour special event that somehow promises to meld scenes from the animated Disney classic with live musical performances by an as-yet-unrevealed cast of “celebrity artists.” The hell? Advertisement
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Don't count on your chickens countingTo understand numbers, you need culture, says a cognitive scientist. He argues against the current conventional wisdom that numerical cognition is biologically endowed.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Moral enhancement' technologies are neither feasible nor wiseA recent study finds that 'moral enhancement technologies' -- which are discussed as ways of improving human behavior -- are neither feasible nor wise, based on an assessment of existing research into these technologies.
23h
Live Science

Turtle Triumph: Nine New Cambodian Royal Turtles HatchNine hatchlings raise hope for the critically endangered Royal Turtle.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Disney Research transforms movie-quality animations for interactive viewingCinema-quality animations and virtual reality graphics that need to be rendered in real-time are often mutually exclusive categories, but Disney Research has developed a new process that transforms high-resolution animated content into a novel video format to enable immersive viewing.
23h
Ars Technica

Title II hasn’t hurt network investment, according to the ISPs themselves Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Jonathan Kitchen) The Federal Communications Commission's primary justification for eliminating Title II net neutrality rules is that broadband network investment has tanked since the rules were implemented two years ago. FCC Chairman Ajit Pai has cited a few research reports describing declines in capital expenditures, and industry lobbyists have repeatedly argued
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

After receiving bad advice, bullying victims say they would give same bad advice to othersTargets of workplace bullying get plenty of advice from coworkers and family on how to respond to the situation and make it stop. While well intentioned, much of the advice victims receive is impractical or only makes their situation worse. Despite the bad advice, most victims said they would tell others in their situation to do the same thing.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Using genomics to fight deadly parasitic diseaseAn international team of researchers is now one step closer to eliminating a deadly parasitic disease responsible for killing hundreds of thousands of people around the world every year.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

An immunity gene evolved in Southeast Asia to protect against leprosyA mutation in an immune system gene rapidly rose in frequency in Southeast Asia approximately 50,000 years ago because it likely conferred protection against leprosy. The findings show that the gene variant, called HLA-B*46:01, encodes a protein that binds to molecules derived from the bacterium that causes leprosy. This HLS protein then presents these foreign molecules to the immune system, which
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The Atlantic

The 'Coffin Homes' of Hong Kong Associated Press photographer Kin Cheung spent time recently photographing some of the tiny subdivided housing units in Hong Kong, known as “coffin homes,” and those who live in them. Cheung reports that there is a “dark side to the property boom in wealthy Hong Kong, where hundreds of thousands of people priced out of the market must live in partitioned apartments, ‘coffin homes’ and other inade
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The Atlantic

The Many Contradictions of White House Spin on Russia Lieutenant General H.R. McMaster, President Trump’s national-security adviser, is the White House official with the greatest credibility, both within the press and in both political parties—a result of both his career and his perceived independence from a president whose trustworthiness is in tatters. But a short, sometimes tense briefing Tuesday showed how the current moment tugs McMaster in con
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Snail's DNA secrets unlocked in fight against river diseaseScientists have decoded the genome of a snail involved in the spread of a deadly parasitic disease.
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Gizmodo

Tiny, Incredibly Sad Voice: 'Hey, Instagram Has Selfie Filters, Too!' Facebook just can’t seem to help itself. Today, the company’s photo-sharing app Instagram announced that it’s adding “face filters.” Trouble is, the concept is just a bad rip-off of the one offered by rival app Snapchat. Advertisement Instagram announced the “idea” in a blog post : Today, we’re introducing face filters in the camera, an easy way to turn an ordinary selfie into something fun and e
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Popular Science

A solar charger for 72 percent off? I'd buy it. Gadgets It's $21. A solar charger for 72 percent off? I'd buy it. Read on.
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Gizmodo

This Is What The Jail On An Aircraft Carrier Looks Like The USS Nimitz. Photo credit: United States Navy Aircraft carriers are massive floating cities, housing over 5,000 people. They have their own nuclear power plants, their own airfields, even their own jails buried in the bowels of the ship. Except in the Navy, they call it a “brig.” Advertisement Get into serious trouble on board, or get into some piracy on the high seas, and this is where you’ll
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Big Think

Study Finds Link Between Parasites and Authoritarianism A study suggests that countries with a high prevalence of parasites are likely to have authoritarian governments. Read More
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Popular Science

It’s easier than ever to die of a caffeine overdose Health Just stick to coffee A high school student's tragic death by caffeine overdose highlights how easy it is to consume a lethal level of caffeine.
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Ars Technica

Liveblog: Google I/O 2017 Enlarge (credit: Ron Amadeo) Grab your sunscreen and sunglasses, because Google's biggest show is almost here! Google I/O 2017 kicks off May 17th at 1PM ET (10AM PT, 6PM UK) and we'll bring you all the coverage live from the show. We will once again be forced to go outside, as the event is again being held at the Shoreline Amphitheater and in tents set up in the surrounding parking lot. The event
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Using genomics to fight deadly parasitic diseaseAn international team of researchers, led by University of New Mexico Associate Professor Coenraad Adema, is now one step closer to eliminating a deadly parasitic disease responsible for killing hundreds of thousands of people around the world every year.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

After receiving bad advice, bullying victims say they would give same bad advice to othersTargets of workplace bullying get plenty of advice from coworkers and family on how to respond to the situation and make it stop. While well intentioned, much of the advice victims receive is impractical or only makes their situation worse. Despite the bad advice, most victims said they would tell others in their situation to do the same thing.
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WIRED

Watch People With Accents Confuse the Hell Out of AI Assistants We put the three top smart speakers to the test. The post Watch People With Accents Confuse the Hell Out of AI Assistants appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Scientists 3-D Print Mouse Ovaries That Actually Make Babies Researchers used "tissue as ink" to squirt out ovaries that successfully grew mouse pups. The post Scientists 3-D Print Mouse Ovaries That Actually Make Babies appeared first on WIRED .
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Viden

VOXPOP: Hvem var det nu, Inge Lehmann var?Detaljerne kan være svære at huske, men et monument har vores mest berømte kvindelige forsker absolut fortjent, mener danskerne.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Higher mass transit use associated with lower obesity ratesHealthy mass transit systems could contribute to healthier communities, according to a new study that determined higher mass transit use was correlated with lower obesity rates in counties across the United States.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Exercising can protect the brain from Alzheimer's diseaseThe evidence is clear. Physical activity is associated with a reduced risk of Alzheimer's disease, says a panel of researchers and not-for-profit leaders, led by UBC's Okanagan campus.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Inflammatory signature of nonalcoholic fatty liver diseaseA team of investigators led by Rohit Kohli, MBBS, MS, of Children's Hospital Los Angeles, has identified key inflammatory cells involved in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Current treatment for the disorder involves changes to diet, yet no medication has been approved for treatment. Findings from this study provide a potential therapeutic target and offer the possibility for developing a treatme
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The Atlantic

Freeing Technology From the Pace of Bureaucracy Technology can be powerful, but it isn’t inherently good or bad. Just as a hammer isn’t inherently good or bad; what matters is how it’s used. Are we using the tool to build or to destroy? Technology can be a weapon against democracy. Fake news, fabricated for virality, spreads harmful propaganda at the speed of a share. Governments use technology to violate the privacy of law-abiding citizens. B
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The Atlantic

The Tuberculosis Hospital That Treated America's Vaudeville Stars Before films and television became the primary source of entertainment in America, vaudeville reigned supreme. These variety shows—where audiences could see everything from sideshow performers to slapstick comedy to Babe Ruth singing during the offseason, all on the same bill—offered access to the day’s top talent, as well as a glimpse of the glamour of the stage. If a town was big enough to have
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

American chestnut rescue will succeed, but slower than expectedThe nearly century-old effort to employ selective breeding to rescue the American chestnut, which has been rendered functionally extinct by an introduced disease—Chestnut blight, eventually will succeed, but it will take longer than many people expect.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Warm weather increases the incidence of serious surgical site infectionsSurgical site infections, a common healthcare-associated infection, are seasonal -- increasing in the summer and decreasing in the winter-according to new research. Temperatures above 90°F were associated with 28.9 percent increased odds for hospitalization with a surgical site infection (SSI) compared to temperatures less than 40°F.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

First flat lens for immersion microscope provides alternative to centuries-old techniqueScientists have developed the first flat lens for immersion microscopy. This lens, which can be designed for any liquid, may provide a cost-effective and easy-to-manufacture alternative to the expensive, centuries-old technique of hand polishing lenses for immersion objectives.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Porewater salinity: Key to reconstructing 250,000 years of Lake Van’s historyThe sediments of Lake Van in Eastern Anatolia (Turkey) are a valuable climate archive. Now, using the salinity measured in sediment porewater, scientists have reconstructed the huge lake-level fluctuations that occurred over the past 250,000 years. This approach – based on simple physical concepts – is likely to be more widely applied in the future.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Spread of tau protein measured in brains of Alzheimer's patientsResearchers have measured how deposits of the pathological protein tau spread through the brain over the course of Alzheimer's disease. Their results show that the size of the deposit and the speed of its spread differ from one individual to the next, and that large amounts of tau in the brain can be linked to episodic memory impairment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Immunotherapy against bee stings in some cases incompleteThe preparations that are used for allergen immunotherapy against bee sting allergies do not always contain all the relevant venom components. This was the conclusion of an examination conducted by allergy experts.
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Gizmodo

Our Grandkids May Be Born From 3D-Printed Ovaries Gels made from a 3D printed layer of placenta at at Children’s National Medical Center, in Washington. Image: Andrew Harnik/AP Fertility has become a major target for regenerative medicine. What if, the thinking goes, science and medicine could be used to simply restore fertility to women who for one reason or another no longer have it? In mice, scientists have now done just that. Advertisement I
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Ars Technica

The power strokes sperm use to drill an egg get dashed by herbal remedies Enlarge / Human Spermatozoa, Scanning Electron Micrograph. (credit: Enver Kerem Dirican ) For the final stretch of their fertilization journey, sperm rev up their whip-like tails to ludicrous egg-boring speed. But amid chemicals from old herbal remedies, sperm may be left feebly treading water a few strokes from the finish line. Two steroid-like chemicals from plants used in traditional medicines
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Gizmodo

These Beloved Penguins May Be Doomed Image: Thomas Mattern It seems like everything on this trash planet is doomed to go extinct before humans do, much to my chagrin. The woeful tale of New Zealand’s yellow-eyed penguin is no different: the adorable bird—which even makes an appearance on the country’s currency—is dangerously close to extinction, at least at one well-monitored mainland breeding ground. And it’s (probably) all our fau
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Live Science

What Is Gluten Sensitivity? | VideoHow is gluten sensitivity different from celiac disease?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Staying healthy during WorldPride 2017ECDC has published a rapid risk assessment to assess the risk of outbreaks and transmission of communicable diseases during the WorldPride festival period taking place in Madrid in June 2017. For respiratory and vector-borne diseases, the risk is considered low, for food and waterborne diseases the risk is low to moderate, for vaccine-preventable diseases, it is moderate and for sexually transmitt
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Higher mass transit use associated with lower obesity ratesHealthy mass transit systems could contribute to healthier communities, according to a new study by University of Illinois researchers that determined higher mass transit use was correlated with lower obesity rates in counties across the United States.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vitamin D promotes fatty acid oxidation in zebrafish adipose tissue1α,25(OH)2D3 is the principal active hormonal form of vitamin D3 and is responsible for most of VD's biological actions. a Chinese research team led by Professor Yin Zhan at the Institute of Hydrobiology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences discovered an inverse correlation between the plasma levels of 1,25(OH)2D3 and body lipid content during zebrafish development and aging.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Patient's cells used to replicate dire developmental conditionA team of scientists from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Cedars-Sinai in Los Angeles have used the cells of AHDS patients to recreate not only the disease, but a mimic of the patient's blood-brain barrier in the laboratory dish using induced pluripotent stem cell technology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

An immunity gene evolved in Southeast Asia to protect against leprosyA mutation in an immune system gene rapidly rose in frequency in Southeast Asia approximately 50,000 years ago because it likely conferred protection against leprosy. The findings, published in Cell Reports, show that the gene variant, called HLA-B*46:01, encodes a protein that binds to molecules derived from the bacterium that causes leprosy. This HLS protein then presents these foreign molecules
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA to create first-ever space-based sodium lidar to study poorly understood mesosphereA team of NASA scientists and engineers now believes it can leverage recent advances in a greenhouse-detecting instrument to build the world's first space-based sodium lidar to study Earth's poorly understood mesosphere.
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Futurity.org

People might be taking ‘bath salts’ by accident Use of synthetic drugs such as “bath salts” goes widely under-reported, partially because many people—even users—lack of knowledge about these drugs, a new study suggests. In addition, the methods of surveying and assessing this kind of drug use may be lacking and require reevaluation, the study says. Hundreds of new psychoactive substances have emerged in recent years, and determining their prev
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Popular Science

New 3D printed “ovaries” enabled mice to give birth to live young Health The ovary substitutes may one day help treat infertility in humans Researchers have figured a new technique to grow 3D printed “ovaries” and implant them into a pregnant mouse, which enabled the mother to give birth to live young. Read…
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Scientific American Content: Global

Why Installing Software Updates Makes Us WannaCryAll people had to do to stay safe from the global WannaCry ransomware attack was update their software. But people often don’t, for a number of specific reasons -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo

Building a Flamethrower Skateboard Makes All Your Tricks Infinitely More Impressive GIF Tony Hawk landing a 900 is an impressive feat, but do you know what would make it even more impressive? A trail of fire making it seem like Tony’s skateboard has a fighter jet afterburner propelling him up the half-pipe. Does that sound a little dangerous? Yes. Are there instructions online for upgrading your favorite deck with fire? Of course there are . Mike Warren, who previously merged a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

France fines Facebook for data protection breachesFrance's data protection agency said Tuesday it had fined Facebook for collecting information on users without their knowledge, following a probe of the social network in cooperation with other European regulators.
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Futurity.org

Colorectal screening options can boost participation Helping patients understand colonoscopy alternatives and make a colorectal cancer screening choice based on their own values—combined with one-on-one support—dramatically increases screening completion among patients with historically lower screening rates. Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. The findings of a new study report a 40 percent increase
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New Scientist - News

Pregnant rays tangled in trawler nets have small, sickly babiesRays, and possibly sharks, could suffer reproductive loss from being dragged around by fishing nets before being released
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Managing stress helps transistor performanceScientists have developed a new CESL method that introduces tensile stress into both the channel and the drift region, improving overall performance by offering low drift resistance, high cut-off frequency and desirable breakdown characteristics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Stiffer soles are making life more comfortable for some diabetic patientsThere isn't a one-size-fits-all approach when choosing the right footwear or inner sole to take away pressure from diabetic patients' feet. The body mass index (BMI) of diabetics indicates how stiff or soft the cushioning material in shoes should be. New research provides the first scientific evidence to help healthcare professionals provide bespoke footcare to their diabetic patients.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Defective intercellular connections cause hydrocephalusA defective gene leads to changes in the cellular layer between cerebrospinal fluid and brain nervous tissue, thus causing a buildup of fluid in the brain. This link is the first known mechanism underlying genetic hydrocephalus.
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Live Science

Sea Star Chows Down on Unusual Dinner in New VideoThe sea star finds its dinner where it can.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Experts see possible North Korea links to global cyberattackCybersecurity experts are pointing to circumstantial evidence that North Korea may be behind the global "ransomware" attack: the way the hackers took hostage computers and servers across the world was similar to previous cyberattacks attributed to North Korea.
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The Atlantic

Cyberwar Is Officially Crossing Over Into the Real World The devastating effects of a massive cyberattack are no more confined to a computer network than any other action carried out online. People use the computers and the internet all the time to make things happen in the physical world. A cyberattack isn’t just a cyber attack. It’s an attack. Hospitals, pharmacies, and major corporations like FedEx and the Spanish telecommunications giant Telefonica
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Photoreceptor cell death leads to blindness in CLN5 form of Neuronal Ceroid LipofuscinosisResearchers from the University of Eastern Finland have discovered a likely cause for visual impairment and eventual loss of vision in the Finnish variant of Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (NCL). Visual impairment associated with the Finnish variant of NCL may be caused by impaired retinal waste management system, including autophagy, leading primarily to the death of photoreceptor cells that are
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

American chestnut rescue will succeed, but slower than expectedThe nearly century-old effort to employ selective breeding to rescue the American chestnut, which has been rendered functionally extinct by an introduced disease -- Chestnut blight, eventually will succeed, but it will take longer than many people expect.
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Futurity.org

See how a flag blasts sound like a loudspeaker A paper-thin, flexible device can not only generate energy from human motion, but also act as a loudspeaker and microphone, report researchers. The audio breakthrough could eventually lead to products like a foldable loudspeaker, a voice-activated security patch for computers, and even a talking newspaper. “You could essentially have a voice-activated newspaper that talks back to you.” “Every tec
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Quanta Magazine

A Defense of the Reality of Time Physicists and philosophers seem to like nothing more than telling us that everything we thought about the world is wrong. They take a peculiar pleasure in exposing common sense as nonsense. But Tim Maudlin thinks our direct impressions of the world are a better guide to reality than we have been led to believe. Not that he thinks they always are. Maudlin, who is a professor at New York Universit
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Travel distances of juvenile fish key to better conservationMarine reserves—sections of the ocean where fishing is prohibited—promote coral reef sustainability by preventing overfishing and increasing fish abundance and diversity. But to be effective, they need to be sized right, and in a way that accounts for how far juvenile fish travel away from their parents after spawning.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How plants use sunlight to tell time via cell protein signalingResearchers have solved a key mystery of how plants tell time. Researchers learned a chemical bond in the protein Zeitlupe forms and breaks in reaction to sunlight at varying rates, signaling plants when to bloom, metabolize and store energy, and other functions. The discovery means plant clocks can be tuned by targeted mutations to plant proteins that may improve resistance to pathogens and crop
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How atmospheric waves radiate out of hurricanesResearchers believe they have found a new way to monitor the intensity and location of hurricanes from hundreds of miles away by detecting atmospheric waves radiating from the centers of these powerful storms.
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Gizmodo

Today's Best Deals: Dress Shoes, Lucky Brand Clothing, $9 Multitool, and More Discounted dress shoes , Amazon’s one-day Lucky brand clothing sale , and a $9 multitool lead off Tuesday’s best deals. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Netgear Nighthawk R6700 , $90 after $20 coupon If your home network has more holes than Swiss cheese, Netgear’s Nighthawk R6700 features beamforming, USB ports, and up to 1750 Mbps maximum through
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New Zika virus inhibitor identifiedCompound could serve as basis for drugs to prevent neurological complications of Zika.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Link found between donor, infection in heart, lung transplant recipientsResearchers at Mayo Clinic have identified a possible cause for a rare infection in heart and lung transplant recipients: the donor.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

TB bacteria evolve at alarming rateScientists carried out a research aimed at identifying the genes and mutations in them that allow mycobacteria to thrive in people with altered immune status including HIV-positive patients. They developed a catalog of mutations in more than 300 virulence (disease causing) genes. Further analysis identified a set of three mutations which may enable mycobacteria to develop rapidly in an immunocompr
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The Atlantic

The Risks of Sharing Intelligence The Washington Post first reported Monday that President Trump revealed information about an Islamic State plot that “had been provided by a U.S. partner through an intelligence-sharing arrangement” during an Oval Office meeting with Russian officials. As a result, the U.S. relationship with the source of that information, a partner in the Middle East with knowledge of the terrorist group, could
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bacteria harness the lotus effect to protect themselvesDental plaque and the viscous brown slime in drainpipes are two familiar examples of bacterial biofilms. Removing such bacterial depositions from surfaces is often very difficult, in part because they are extremely water-repellent. Scientists have now been able to show how such biofilms adapt their surface texture to repel water -- similar to leaves.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Extreme weather has greater impact on nature than expectedAn oystercatcher nest is washed away in a storm surge. Australian passerine birds die during a heatwave. A late frost in their breeding area kills off a group of American cliff swallows. Small tragedies that may seem unrelated, but point to the underlying long-term impact of extreme climatic events.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team breaks down social networking behaviorNew big-data analytics by a City College of New York-led team suggests that both an individual's economic status and how they are likely to react to issues and policies can be inferred by their position in social networks. The study could be useful in maximizing the effects of large-scale economic stimulus policies.
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Gizmodo

Here's How to Watch Today's Press Briefing About Trump's Leaks to the Russians Yesterday, Donald Trump’s national security advisor H.R. McMaster told America that the reports about Trump leaking classified info to the Russians were fake. That seems to have been a lie . But hopefully it will all get straightened out during today’s live press briefing. Advertisement You can watch the livestream of the McMaster press briefing on YouTube . It’s scheduled to start at 11:30am Eas
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Gizmodo

Injustice 2: The Kotaku Review The fighting game Injustice: Gods Among Us gave us a world torn apart by conflict between between two of comics’ greatest heroes. Now brutal murderer Superman and “I don’t want to fight you” Batman are back, joining forces against the most diabolical foe the DC Universe has ever faced—loot boxes. Advertisement When we last left our courageous heroes, a good half of them weren’t courageous heroes
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Managing stress helps transistor performanceTensile mechanical stress can have a useful effect for some transistors, where the resulting atomic strain allows its current-carrying electron-hole pairs better mobility. However, when that stress is applied to the whole device, as is a popular approach via use of what's called contact etching stop layers (CESLs), the drift region adjacent to the stretched channel is compressed and results in red
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

From where will the next big earthquake hit the city of Istanbul?The city of Istanbul is focus of great concern for earthquake researchers. This 15-million metropole is situated very close to the so-called North Anatolian Fault Zone which runs just outside of the city gates below the Marmara Sea. Here in the underground there is a constant build-up of energy which results from an interlocking of the tectonic plates causing plate movement to come to a halt until
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Don't count on your chickens countingClocks and calendars, sports scores and stock-market tickers - our society is saturated with numbers. One of the first things we teach our children is to count, just as we teach them their ABCs. But is this evidence of a biological drive? No, says cognitive scientist Rafael Nunez of the University of California San Diego. It is evidence of our cultural preoccupations. "Numerical cognition," he say
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Oddball enzyme provides easy path to synthetic biomaterialsMaterials scientists have written the recipe on how to use an oddball enzyme to build new biomaterials out of DNA. The work provides instructions for researchers the world over to build self-assembling molecules for applications ranging from drug delivery to nanowires.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

World first self-donning system for surgical gownsScientists have succeeded in developing a safe and easy self-donning and self-adjusting surgical gown called 'Selfgown,' which could also minimize environmental infection from splashes when taking off gloves.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cities need to 'green up' to reduce impact of air pollutionThe harmful impact of urban air pollution could be combated by strategically placing low hedges along roads in a built-up environment of cities instead of taller trees, a new study has found.
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The Atlantic

How Trump’s Defenders Are Inadvertently Indicting Him The news that Donald Trump reportedly shared sensitive classified information with Russian officials during an Oval Office meeting last week produced four major reactions. There were some who refused to believe the Washington Post scoop , even though the White House still has not specifically denied that the president shared classified info, despite carefully parsed denunciations of the story, an
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Extreme weather has greater impact on nature than expected—researchers launch roadmapAn oystercatcher nest is washed away in a storm surge. Australian passerine birds die during a heatwave. A late frost in their breeding area kills off a group of American cliff swallows. Small tragedies that may seem unrelated, but point to the underlying long-term impact of extreme climatic events. In the special June issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B researchers of the N
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fishing can lead to rapid evolutionary changes in exploited fish populationsCohort after cohort, fishing typically removes large fish from the population and can lead to rapid evolutionary changes in exploited fish populations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Travel distances of juvenile fish key to better conservationMarine reserves -- sections of the ocean where fishing is prohibited -- promote coral reef sustainability by preventing overfishing and increasing fish abundance and diversity. But to be effective, they need to be sized right, and in a way that accounts for how far juvenile fish travel away from their parents after spawning.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Managing stress helps transistor performanceA research team in China have developed a new CESL method that introduces tensile stress into both the channel and the drift region, improving overall performance by offering low drift resistance, high cut-off frequency and desirable breakdown characteristics. Their work is described in an article appearing this week in the journal AIP Advances, from AIP Publishing.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Complications from thyroid cancer surgery more common than believed, study findsAs thyroid cancer rates rise, more people are having surgery to remove all or part of their thyroid. A new study suggests complications from these procedures are more common than previously believed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Engaging diamond for next-era transistorsMost transistors are silicon-based and silicon technology has driven the computer revolution. In some applications, however, silicon has significant limitations. Silicon devices are prone to faltering and failing in difficult environments. Addressing these challenges, Jiangwei Liu, from Japan's National Institute for Materials Sciences, and his colleagues describe new work developing diamond-based
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Don't count on your chickens countingTo understand numbers, you need culture, says UC San Diego cognitive scientist Rafael Nunez. He argues against the current conventional wisdom that numerical cognition is biologically endowed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

3-D printed ovaries produce healthy offspring3-D printed bioprosthetic mouse ovaries restored fertility in infertile mice and produced healthy mouse pups. The mothers also were able to nurse their pups. The research is targeted to women whose cancer treatments impaired their fertility and hormone production. The ovaries are constructed of 3-D printed scaffolds that house immature eggs and were successful in boosting hormone production and re
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

High-dose iron pills do not improve exercise capacity for heart failureAmong patients with a certain type of heart failure and iron deficiency, high-dose iron pills did not improve exercise capacity over 16 weeks, according to a study published by JAMA.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Findings do not support steroid injections for knee osteoarthritisAmong patients with knee osteoarthritis, an injection of a corticosteroid every three months over two years resulted in significantly greater cartilage volume loss and no significant difference in knee pain compared to patients who received a placebo injection, according to a study published by JAMA.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Substantial differences between US counties for death rates from ischemic heart disease, strokeAlthough the absolute difference in US county-level cardiovascular disease mortality rates have declined substantially over the past 35 years for both ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease, large differences remain, according to a study published by JAMA.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Great expectations force risky business acquisitionsA good reputation can be bad for business, according to new research from the University of Georgia.
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Ingeniøren

Ekspert: Beredskaber skal have egen adgang til 700-MHz båndetDansk rådgiver i radiofrekvenser opfordrer Danmark til at give beredskaberne egen adgang til 700-MHz båndet, så staten kan opfylde sin forpligtelse til at passe bedst muligt på de danske borgere.
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Ingeniøren

Vejbroer kan bære meget mere, end man troedeEfter at have testbelastet flere broer til kollaps vurderer DTU, Vejdirektoratet og Cowi, at bæreevnen af mange eksisterende broer kan være undervurderet. Holder resultaterne, kan der spares mange penge på forstærkninger og omkørsler.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How hard did it rain on Mars?Heavy rain on Mars reshaped the planet's impact craters and carved out river-like channels in its surface billions of years ago, according to a new study. Scientists show that changes in the atmosphere on Mars made it rain harder and harder, which had a similar effect on the planet's surface as we see on Earth.
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New Scientist - News

Google DeepMind NHS data deal was ‘legally inappropriate’DeepMind’s 2015 data-sharing agreement with the Royal Free NHS trust has an “inappropriate legal basis”, according to a letter from the UK’s National Data Guardian
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Gizmodo

Over 560 Million Passwords Discovered in Anonymous Online Database A trove of more than 560 million login credentials has been exposed by a leaky database, researchers revealed on Tuesday, including email addresses and passwords stolen from as many as 10 popular online services. Advertisement The dataset, which remains insecure, was first discovered this month by the Kromtech Security Center . It was further verified by Troy Hunt, a noted security researcher and
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Gizmodo

The Myth of Flyer’s Rights Illustration by Angelica Alzona. Flyer beware. There’s been a lot of disdain aimed toward airline companies lately, and for good reason. United Airlines literally dragged a man off of a plane because they “needed” his seat for an employee, and kicked off some girls because they were wearing leggings . Delta booted a family of four because their youngest son was using a seat that had been assigned
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Gizmodo

Deadspin Why Does Everyone Think Derek Jeter Was A Great Captain? Deadspin Why Does Everyone Think Derek Jeter Was A Great Captain? | The Slot Trump Says He Did Share Intel With Russia Mere Hours After White House Said He Didn’t | Fusion ‘Pay Trump Bribes Here’ Projected by Protesters Onto Trump’s DC Hotel | The Root The 2017 Miss USA Is a Proud, Black HBCU Graduate, and She’s Also Problematic as Hell |
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The Atlantic

What Happens When Intelligence Agencies Lose Faith in the President? American military and intelligence agencies must assume from now on that the president of the United States is a security risk. He cannot be trusted to protect state secrets. In a parliamentary system, a head of government who did what Donald Trump has done would already have resigned. There is no sign of that from the 45th president. Instead, the remainder of the U.S. government must cope with a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cities need to 'green up' to reduce the impact of air pollutionThe harmful impact of urban air pollution could be combated by strategically placing low hedges along roads in a built-up environment of cities instead of taller trees, a new study has found.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Engaging diamond for next-era transistorsAs consumers around the world have become increasingly dependent on electronics, the transistor, a semiconductor component central to the operation of these devices, has become a critical subject of scientific research. Over the last several decades, scientists and engineers have been able to both shrink the average transistor size and dramatically reduce its production costs. The current generati
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Science | The Guardian

3D-printed ovaries allow infertile mice to give birth The creation of artificial ovaries for humans is a step closer after birth of healthy pups from mice given ‘ovarian bioprosthesis’ Infertile mice have given birth to healthy pups after having their fertility restored with ovary implants made with a 3D printer. Researchers created the synthetic ovaries by printing porous scaffolds from a gelatin ink and filling them with follicles, the tiny, fluid
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Popular Science

How to share your location (without broadcasting it to the world) DIY Keep it on a need-to-know basis Whether you're arranging a meet-up in the city or want to check your kids got to school, these are the apps that will let you share your, and others', locations.
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Popular Science

New Zealand's yellow-eyed penguin is waddling towards extinction Environment Humans are likely to blame Yellow-eyed penguins are headed towards extinction, and while climate change isn’t helping, it’s not the only factor.
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TEDTalks (video)

What makes life worth living in the face of death | Lucy KalanithiIn this deeply moving talk, Lucy Kalanithi reflects on life and purpose, sharing the story of her late husband, Paul, a young neurosurgeon who turned to writing after his terminal cancer diagnosis. "Engaging in the full range of experience -- living and dying, love and loss -- is what we get to do," Kalanithi says. "Being human doesn't happen despite suffering -- it happens within it."
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Gizmodo

It Sure Looks Like the FCC’s Anti-Net Neutrality Bot Problem Got Worse Image: Getty Last week, we reported that tens of thousands of fraudulent comments had been filed in favor Ajit Pai’s proposal to roll back net neutrality rules, using text taken from the Center for Individual Freedom (though, according to the CFIF, they aren’t behind the fake comments). We spoke to several people who had comments filed under their names and addresses, as did reporters from other
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cognitive science

Orient and Orientate submitted by /u/CamSpdr2 [link] [comments]
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Warm weather increases the incidence of serious surgical site infectionsSurgical site infections, a common healthcare-associated infection, are seasonal -- increasing in the summer and decreasing in the winter-according to new research published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. Temperatures above 90°F were associated with 28.9 percent increased odds for hospitalization with a
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