NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Trump officials act to tilt federal science boards toward industry Critics say that changes to advisory groups at the Environmental Protection Agency and Department of Interior could restrict or paralyze them. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21999
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Viden
LIVE-TV Elefantunge er født i Københavns ZooFor første gang i tre år kan Zoologisk Have i København præsentere en babyelefant.
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Ingeniøren
DSB gør klar til at blokere streaming på togenes nye wifiNår DSB i 2019 kan tænde for et spritnyt wifi-netværk i togene, forbeholder selskabet sig ret til at lukke for adgangen til streamingtjenester. Internetforbindelsen i togene skal først og fremmest bruges til arbejde.
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Futurity.org
Leaving segregated areas can lower blood pressure The systolic blood pressure readings of African Americans dropped between one to five points when they moved to less segregated neighborhoods, report researchers. “This study provides stronger, more direct evidence that segregation impacts blood pressure and harms the health of African Americans,” says lead author Kiarri Kershaw, an assistant professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern Unive
1min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Building a better 'bot': Artificial intelligence helps human groupsArtificial intelligence doesn't have to be super-sophisticated to make a difference in people's lives, according to a new Yale University study. Even 'dumb AI' can help human groups.
4min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Testing quantum field theory in a quantum simulatorQuantum field theories are often hard to verify in experiments. Now, there is a new way of putting them to the test. Scientists have created a quantum system consisting of thousands of ultra cold atoms. By keeping them in a magnetic trap on an atom chip, this atom cloud can be used as a 'quantum simulator', which yields new insights into some of the most fundamental questions of physics.
4min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Social networking for the proteome, upgradedHarvard Medical School researchers have mapped the interaction partners for proteins encoded by more than 5,800 genes, representing over a quarter of the human genome, according to a new study published online in Nature on May 17. The network, dubbed BioPlex 2.0, identifies more than 56,000 unique protein-to-protein interactions -- 87 percent of them previously unknown -- the largest such network
4min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research opens the door to improved drugs for type 2 diabetesIn a new study, Wei Liu and his colleagues at The Biodesign Institute join an international team, led by Beili Wu from the Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica (SIMM), Chinese Academy of Sciences, to explore a central component in glucose regulation. Their findings shed new light on the structure of the glucagon receptor, a highly promising target for diabetes drug development.
4min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Approaching a decades-old goal: Making blood stem cells from patients' own cellsResearchers at Boston Children's Hospital have, for the first time, generated blood-forming stem cells in the lab using pluripotent stem cells, which can make virtually every cell type in the body. The advance, published today in the journal Nature, opens new avenues for research into the root causes of blood diseases and to creating immune-matched blood cells for treatment purposes, derived from
4min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Earth's atmosphere more chemically reactive in cold climatesA Greenland ice core providing a first glimpse at the history of reactive oxidants shows that for big temperature swings in the past 100,000 years, reactive oxidants are actually higher in cold climates. This means that new mechanisms -- not just water vapor, plant and soil emissions -- must affect the concentration of ozone and other oxidants in the atmosphere.
4min
WIRED
Google Lens Turns Your Camera Into a Search Box Computer vision helps Google know what's in your photos. Search helps it make those photos useful. The post Google Lens Turns Your Camera Into a Search Box appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
Google Rattles the Tech World With a New AI Chip for All Google will soon launch a cloud computing service that offers exclusive access to a new kind of artificial-intelligence chip designed by its own engineers. The post Google Rattles the Tech World With a New AI Chip for All appeared first on WIRED .
5min
Futurity.org
BPA may do long-lasting damage to painted turtles Exposure to the chemical Bisphenol A may permanently alter the genes of painted turtles, a new study suggests. BPA is a chemical that is used in a variety of consumer products, such as food storage containers, water bottles and certain resins. In previous studies, Cheryl Rosenfeld, an investigator in the University of Missouri Bond Life Sciences Center, along with colleagues determined that BPA c
8min
Popular Science
If that asteroid had been 30 seconds late, dinosaurs might rule the world and humans probably wouldn’t exist Science The meek inherited the Earth instead Location is everything, for both homeowners and dinosaurs. Here's why.
8min
Ars Technica
Google Lens knows more about what’s in your photos than you do Enlarge At Google I/O today, the company announced a new feature for Assistant and Photos called Google Lens. This feature that will come in updates to the Google Assistant and Google Photos will tell you more about what's in front of your device's camera, giving you contextual information and actionable options depending on what you're looking at. Developing. We'll add more details as they are a
10min
New on MIT Technology Review
Google Reveals a Powerful New AI Chip and SupercomputerThe new chip and a cloud-based machine learning supercomputer will help Google establish itself as AI-focused hardware maker.
11min
Gizmodo
The Neon Nintendo Switch Is Finally Back In Stock On Amazon, If You Hurry Nintendo Switch , $300 Amazon’s had a few short-lived restockings of the gray Nintendo Switch, but if you were holding out for the Neon model , it’s in stock for Prime members right now, the first time we’ve seen it there since initial preorders. Needless to say, we don’t expect it to last long at all. While you’re at it, Breath of the Wild also has a modest $8 discount right now. And the Pro Con
17min
Popular Science
Tyrannosaurus rex had a bone-crushing bite with a force of 8,000 pounds Animals 431,342 pounds per square inch Trex had bite backed up by 8,000 lbs of force. Read on.
23min
Popular Science
11 geeky rainbow things that'll probably make you smile more Gadgets We've done all the rainbow chasing for you. Add color to your life in the geekiest ways possible. Read on.
23min
The Atlantic
What Is Jogging Doing to Your Dog? Growing up in Ithaca, New York, I lived with as many as three Australian Shepherds at a time. My mother trains the breed for competition in a sprint-speed sport known as dog agility , so it was a common weekend activity for my family to head out to some remote field to exercise the pack. The dogs, which are known for their ferocious stamina, would spend hours chasing whatever toy projectile we co
24min
The Atlantic
Revisiting the Film That Holds the Key to the New Twin Peaks Even watching it today, 25 years after it premiered at Cannes to a chorus of boos, it’s hard not to think of Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me as an intentional act of sabotage by David Lynch. The film was based on the TV series that the director had co-created with Mark Frost in 1990; it was canceled the following year when ratings plummeted and critics turned on it. But Lynch, who had largely stepp
24min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study maps protein interactions for a quarter of the human genomeHarvard Medical School researchers have mapped the interaction partners for proteins encoded by more than 5,800 genes, representing over a quarter of the human genome, according to a new study published online in Nature on May 17.
26min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Testing quantum field theory in a quantum simulatorQuantum field theories are often hard to verify in experiments. Now, there is a new way of putting them to the test. Scientists have created a quantum system consisting of thousands of ultra cold atoms. By keeping them in a magnetic trap on an atom chip, this atom cloud can be used as a 'quantum simulator', which yields new insights into some of the most fundamental questions of physics.
26min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Earth's atmosphere more chemically reactive in cold climatesUnseen in the air around us are tiny molecules that drive the chemical cocktail of our atmosphere. As plants, animals, volcanoes, wildfires and human activities spew particles into the atmosphere, some of these molecules act as cleanup crews that remove that pollution.
26min
Scientific American Content: Global
Pushy AI Bots Nudge Humans to Change BehaviorResearchers use artificially intelligent bot programs to stimulate collaboration and make people more effective -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
28min
Gizmodo
Any Half-Decent Hacker Could Break Into Mar-a-Lago. We Tested It. Two weeks ago, on a sparkling spring morning, we went trawling along Florida’s coastal waterway. But not for fish. Advertisement We parked a 17-foot motor boat in a lagoon about 800 feet from the back lawn of the Mar-a-Lago Club in Palm Beach, and pointed a two-foot wireless antenna that resembled a potato gun toward the club. Within a minute, we spotted three weakly encrypted Wi-Fi networks. We
29min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
High-dose iron pills do not improve exercise capacity for heart failureAmong patients with a certain type of heart failure and iron deficiency, high-dose iron pills did not improve exercise capacity over 16 weeks, according to a study.
29min
Big Think
Slime Molds Join the Faculty at a Northeastern College Hampshire College appoints some slime molds as scholars-in-residence. Read More
32min
New on MIT Technology Review
ARM Wants to Put Its Chips Inside Your BrainNeural implants are all the rage in Silicon Valley. Now the well-known chip designer thinks its low-power processors could help make them a reality.
39min
Gizmodo
Alien Only Ever Needed One Sequel A promo shot from Aliens, which we wish was the only Alien sequel. All Images: 20th Century Fox No one argues that Alien and Aliens are the best films in the Alien franchise. It’s an objective, undisputed fact. After that, though, nothing is certain—is Alien 3 a good movie? How bad is Resurrection ? Do the Alien vs. Predator movies count? Did you like Prometheus ? The debates go on and on. Advert
41min
The Atlantic
How Does Impeachment Work? The Constitution has a failsafe. When the framers decided to create a powerful chief executive with a fixed term of office, it was immediately evident that a remedy was needed in case something went terribly wrong. As Virginia delegate George Mason observed early in the deliberations in Philadelphia, “some mode of displacing an unfit magistrate is rendered indispensable by the fallibility of thos
43min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chemists create the ultimate natural sunscreenChemists, materials scientists and nanoengineers have created what may be the ultimate natural sunscreen. They report the development of nanoparticles that mimic the behavior of natural melanosomes, melanin-producing cell structures that protect our skin, eyes and other tissues from the harmful effects of ultraviolet radiation.
44min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Atheism might be more common than assumed...but it's complicatedUsing a subtle, indirect measurement technique, psychology researchers have found that there are probably a lot more atheists (people who don't believe in God) in the U.S. than show up in telephone polls.
44min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Exercising can protect the brain from Alzheimer's diseaseThe evidence is clear. Physical activity is associated with a reduced risk of Alzheimer's disease, a new study concludes.
44min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Substantial differences between US counties for death rates from ischemic heart disease, strokeAlthough the absolute difference in US county-level cardiovascular disease mortality rates have declined substantially over the past 35 years for both ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease, large differences remain, according to a study.
44min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Findings do not support steroid injections for knee osteoarthritisAmong patients with knee osteoarthritis, an injection of a corticosteroid every three months over two years resulted in significantly greater cartilage volume loss and no significant difference in knee pain compared to patients who received a placebo injection, according to a study.
44min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brigatinib first to offer over 1-year control of ALK-positive lung cancer post-crizotinibResults of a multi-center, 222-person phase 2 clinical trial of the next-generation ALK inhibitor, brigatinib at 180mg/day, used after failure of crizotinib showed a 54 percent response rate and 12.9 month progression-free survival.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Finding traces of memory processing during sleepSleep helps us to retain the information that we have learned during the day. We know from animal experiments that new memories are reactivated during sleep. The brain replays previous experience while we sleep – and this replay strengthens memories overnight. Up to now, it was hard to demonstrate such a reactivation in humans, because the activity of individual neurons cannot be observed and most
51min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Loneliness in young adults linked to poor sleep qualityA link between loneliness and poor sleep quality has been identified in a study of more than 2,000 British young adults.
51min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
During heat waves, urban trees can increase ground-level ozonePlanting trees is a popular strategy to help make cities 'greener,' both literally and figuratively. But scientists have found a counterintuitive effect of urban vegetation: during heat waves, it can increase air pollution levels and the formation of ozone.
51min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Medical abortions obtained through online telemedicine shown to be effective, safeWomen in Ireland and Northern Ireland acquiring medical abortion pills through online telemedicine report successful terminations with low rates of adverse effects, according to new research.
51min
Popular Science
What would happen if Earth started to spin faster? Space Even a 1 mph speed boost would make things pretty weird If Earth were to suddenly spin out of control, you'd probably be too dead to worry about it. But we asked some experts just to see how it would all go down. Read on…
51min
Ars Technica
Ajit Pai accidentally supports utility rules and open-access networks Enlarge / FCC Chairman Ajit Pai speaks during the National Association of Broadcasters conference in Las Vegas on April 25, 2017. (credit: Getty Images | Ethan Miller ) Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai is a big fan of former President Bill Clinton's approach to regulating Internet service. Pai has repeatedly said that the FCC should return to Clinton-era regulatory policy, and
52min
New on MIT Technology Review
IBM Nudges Ahead in the Race for Quantum SupremacyA pair of new chips show that scaling up quantum devices looks increasingly plausible.
54min
Gizmodo
YouTube TV Just Added 7 New Networks—Here's How It Stacks Up Image from mxmstryo YouTube is new to the television streaming game but the company is already adding seven new networks —AMC, BBC America, Sundance TV, Telemundo, Universo, We TV and IFC—to their basic $35/month package. So you can now get more for your money when you subscribe to YouTube TV—but there are some limitations to know about before deciding if it’s the right service for you. It’s not
59min
Scientific American Content: Global
Why Banning Laptops from Airplane Cabins Doesn't Make SenseIt’s tempting to think that any level of cost and inconvenience is sensible if it cuts the risk of an attack even a little. But risks, inherent in flying and even driving, can never be avoided... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic
Congressional Republicans Are Quietly Shifting on Trump Over the last 24 hours, journalists have hunted down Republican members of Congress in search of quotes that include words like “Watergate,” “impeachment,” and “obstruction of justice?” And they’ve elicited a few. But the shift occurring within the congressional GOP is mostly manifesting itself in quieter ways. Take House Speaker Paul Ryan’s comments on Wednesday morning. First, consider what Rya
1h
The Atlantic
Trump Is Testing the GOP's Limits At about 3:30 p.m. on Tuesday, it seemed like a solitary flight of fancy when firebrand Democratic Representative Maxine Waters of Los Angeles told a conference of liberal activists in Washington, D.C., that “we don’t have to be afraid to use the word impeachment” when talking about President Trump. At about 5 p.m., the ground trembled when The New York Times posted its story that fired FBI Direc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Destruction of a quantum monopole observedScientists at Amherst College (USA) and Aalto University (Finland) have made the first experimental observations of the dynamics of isolated monopoles in quantum matter. The obtained fundamental understanding of monopole dynamics may help in the future to build even closer analogues of the magnetic monopoles.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Precise mechanisms of a calcium-dependent kinase during the formation of new memoriesThe protein CaMKII mediates calcium signals in the synaptic connections, where it plays a crucial role in the regulation of synaptic plasticity -- the cellular basis of learning and memory. MPFI researchers optimized existing imaging methods so they could better visualize the activation of CaMKII. For the first time, they were able to see how CaMKII acts during synaptic plasticity. Studies in this
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A step towards understanding ZikaBrisbane researchers have synthetically re-created Zika virus in the laboratory -- a breakthrough which will help to understand the virus and the fetal brain defects it causes. The collaborative research was led by University of Queensland School of Chemistry and Molecular Bioscience's Professor Alexander Khromykh and Professor Andreas Suhrbier from QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Even small quantities of opioids prescribed for minor injuries increase risk of long-term usePatients who received their first opioid prescription for an ankle sprain treated in US emergency departments (EDs) commonly received prescriptions for anywhere from 15 to 40 pills, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The results point to the urgent need for policies and guidelines to address when opioid medications are indicated for mi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How the brain 'plays' with predictability and randomness to choose the right time to actThe timing of our actions is stubbornly resistant to complete prediction. Here, scientists reveal that the job of being unpredictable is delegated to specific parts of the brain.
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Live Science
Antikythera Anniversary: Astronomical Computer Still Puzzles After 115 YearsToday's Google Doodle honors an intricate and mysterious astronomical computer found at the bottom of the Aegean Sea aboard a Roman cargo ship in 1902.
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Ars Technica
After uproar, Minecraft maker to stop feeding cookies to in-game parrots Enlarge / A Minecraft player approaches a parrot with a cookie that could be deadly in real life. (credit: Mojang) Usually, when outside groups worry about video games having a negative effect on children, they're focused on those games' potential normalization of violence or how games allegedly encourage a sedentary and emotionally unbalanced lifestyle . This week, though, Minecraft maker Mojang
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Science : NPR
Total Failure: When The Space Shuttle Didn't Come Home In Part 1 of the series Total Failure, a former NASA official recalls the disastrous mission of the space shuttle Columbia in 2003 and how the accident changed his life forever. (Image credit: Isabel Seliger for NPR)
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Gizmodo
Google Just Dropped Some of Its Patent Claims Against Uber Image: Getty Waymo quietly dropped several of the patent claims in its explosive lawsuit against Uber last night, admitting in a new court filing that although it stands behind its allegations of trade secret theft and may pursue new patent claims later, it isn’t moving forward with its current patent infringement claims against one of Uber’s lidar devices. Advertisement Waymo, the autonomous dri
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Gizmodo
China and India Are Surpassing the Climate Goals the US Can't Be Bothered to Meet AP President Trump’s “America First Energy Plan” will, ironically, put us far behind China and India in the push to modernize our energy grid. China and India are both on track to “overachieve” their Paris Climate Agreement goals of de-carbonizing their energy grids by 2030, according to the Climate Action Tracker study released Monday. Of the world’s top three carbon emitters—China, India, and t
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Futurity.org
Tourist pics and YouTube create 3D model of city A new technology platform uses algorithms to create 3D city models from image and video data. The platform, known as “VarCity”, is so versatile that it can use, evaluate, and automatically combine all possible kinds of image sources: aerial photographs, 360-degree panoramic images taken with special vehicles, and even standard photos such as those published by tourists on social networks and onli
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Patient's cells used to replicate dire developmental conditionA team of scientists has used the cells of AHDS patients to recreate not only the disease, but a mimic of the patient's blood-brain barrier in the laboratory dish using induced pluripotent stem cell technology.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Switching to a low-glycemic diet may stop age-related eye disease, study suggestsDevelopment of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) could be arrested by switching from a high-glycemic to a low-glycemic diet, suggests a new study conducted in mice.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
American chestnut rescue will succeed, but slower than expectedThe nearly century-old effort to employ selective breeding to rescue the American chestnut, which has been rendered functionally extinct by an introduced disease -- Chestnut blight, eventually will succeed, but it will take longer than many people expect.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New Zika virus inhibitor identifiedA new compound could serve as basis for drugs to prevent neurological complications of Zika, report researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Breaking down social networking behaviorNew big-data analytics suggests that both an individual's economic status and how they are likely to react to issues and policies can be inferred by their position in social networks. The study could be useful in maximizing the effects of large-scale economic stimulus policies.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Popular Sport Fish May Be Headed for Broad Extinction in CaliforniaClimate change is reducing the amount of cold water available to salmon, steelhead, and trout species, which is critical to their survival -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic
A Creationist Sues the Grand Canyon for Religious Discrimination “How did the Grand Canyon form?” is a question so commonly pondered that YouTube is rife with explanations. Go down into the long tail of Grand Canyon videos, and you’ll eventually find at a two-part, 35-minute lecture by Andrew Snelling. The first sign this isn’t a typical geology lecture comes comes about a minute in, when Snelling proclaims, “The Grand Canyon does provide a testament to the bi
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The Atlantic
Republicans Reluctantly Accept a New Role: Trump Inquisitors Updated on May 17 at 12:26 p.m. ET It wasn’t even two weeks ago that Republicans were back-slapping with Donald Trump at the White House, celebrating the passage of a health-care bill they hoped would rejuvenate their legislative agenda. Now, however, top GOP lawmakers are grimly accepting a role they wanted desperately to avoid—leading a presidential inquisition. Speaker Paul Ryan on Wednesday s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study illuminates fate of marine carbon in last steps toward sequestrationNew research explains how an ancient group of cells in the dark ocean wrings the last bit of energy from carbon molecules resistant to breakdown.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate change refuge for corals discovered (and how we can protect it right now)WCS scientists have discovered a refuge for corals where the environment protects otherwise sensitive species to the increasing severity of climate change.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study sheds light on origins of life on Earth through molecular functionDebate exists over how life began on Earth, but a new study provides evidence for a 'metabolism-first' model. Scientists at the University of Illinois mined the Gene Ontology database to trace the origins and evolution of molecular functions through time. The study shows metabolism and binding arose first, followed by the functional activities of larger macromolecules and cellular machinery.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Travel distances of juvenile fish key to better conservationMarine reserves -- sections of the ocean where fishing is prohibited -- promote coral reef sustainability by preventing overfishing and increasing fish abundance and diversity. But to be effective, they need to be sized right, and in a way that accounts for how far juvenile fish travel away from their parents after spawning.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mandarin shows increased tolerance to greeningA mandarin hybrid contains cellular activity -- known as metabolites -- that makes it more able to fend off greening than most other types of citrus, new research concludes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Being more active in school lessons can improve performance in testsChildren who take part in lessons which include physical activity show an increase in health-enhancing physical activity and academic performance, according to research.
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Viden
Kunstig intelligens skal beskytte computerspillere på nettetVed at aflytte brugernes samtaler vil man begrænse chikane på nettet.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Space weather events linked to human activityHuman activities, like nuclear tests and radio transmissions, have been changing near-Earth space and weather, and have created artificial radiation belts, damaged satellites and induced auroras.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sports medicine: Blood results help to predict fitness improvements in older marathon runnersEndurance sport has a beneficial impact on physical and mental performance and this can be seen in blood test results. A group of researchers has now shown, in a study conducted with older marathon runners, that these laboratory data could be used in the opposite way to predict future changes in fitness. This information can be used to optimize individual training programs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Young women's gradual weight gain lifts pregnancy blood pressure dangerResearchers are challenging women to start thinking about pre-pregnancy health sooner, with the finding that years of gradual weight gain more than doubles the risk of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. The increased risk was due to weight change and occurred regardless of whether the woman's body mass index (BMI) was initially categorized as healthy or overweight.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study sheds light on link between diseases like Alzheimer's and normal aging in the brainNeurodegenerative diseases are often associated with protein aggregates, highly intractable clumps of protein. Experiments on roundworms and mouse brain extracts yielded evidence that these disease-associated aggregates can be directly induced by proteins that aggregate together during normal aging. The present study therefore opens up a new area of preventative research targeting these age-depend
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study confirms benefits of fennel in reducing postmenopause symptomsFennel, an anise-flavored herb used for cooking, has long been known for its health benefits for a variety of issues, including digestion and premenstrual symptoms. A new study confirms that it is also effective in the management of postmenopause symptoms such as hot flashes, sleeplessness, vaginal dryness, and anxiety, without serious side effects.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Public divides over environmental regulation and energy policyA 54 percent majority of US adults believe that 'government regulations are necessary to encourage businesses and consumers to rely more on renewable energy sources,' while 38 percent support the notion that 'the private marketplace will ensure that businesses and consumers rely more on renewable energy sources, even without government regulations,' according to a new survey.
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Link Between Disorder and Genius: An Interview with Dr. Gail Saltz The Link Between Disorder and Genius: An Interview with Dr. Gail Saltz -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tea-time means leopard-time in IndiaA new WCS study finds that leopards are abundant in tea-garden landscapes in north-eastern India, but that their mere presence does not lead to conflicts with people.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sacrificing sleep for loveSleep is important, but if there is something more important or interesting to do -- for example, taking care of a baby, finishing a grant proposal before a deadline, or reading a fascinating book -- we may stay up late. In research published on May 16th in eLife, researchers report discovery of neurons that allow male fruit flies to suppress sleep so they can court female flies.
1h
The Atlantic
The Trump Presidency Falls Apart After an astonishing week of revelations, Donald Trump’s presidency appears to be on the verge of collapse. Consider what has happened just in the last 10 days: a string of damaging stories about a president unprecedented since at least the Nixon administration. On May 8, former Acting Attorney General Sally Yates appeared before Congress , offering testimony under oath that contradicted White Ho
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Gizmodo
The Handmaid's Tale Flips the Script to Show the Women Behind the Misogyny All Photos Courtesy Hulu The Handmaid’s Tale continues to surprise me. In a welcome twist, the show takes a step back from Offred and puts us in the shoes of the women complicit in her oppression... proving enablement is a crime all its own. “A Woman’s Place” opens on Offred (Elisabeth Moss) still in an afterglow after her night of passionate lovemaking with Nick. She knows it cannot happen again
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Gizmodo
Today's Best Deals: Wake-Up Light, MX Master Mouse, Hoover FloorMate, and More A $40 Philips Wake-Up light , Logitech’s MX Master Mouse , and Hoover’s FloorMate Deluxe lead off Wednesday’s best deals. Advertisement Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals The successor to one of the most popular mice ever made is within a few cents of its lowest price ever , while supplies last. The Logitech MX Master Mouse comes with all the accout
1h
WIRED
Rebuilding—and Recording With—the 1920s Technology That Changed American Music Forever A new PBS documentary chronicles the impact of the lathe—and next month will release the music contemporary artists recorded on one. The post Rebuilding—and Recording With—the 1920s Technology That Changed American Music Forever appeared first on WIRED .
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
NASA's Van Allen Probes spot human-made barrier shrouding EarthHumans have long been shaping Earth's landscape, but now scientists know that we also can shape our near-space environment with radio communications, which have been found to interact with particles in space.
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The Atlantic
The NBA’s Latest Attempt to Promote Competition: $200-Million Contracts What does it take to keep a basketball player from leaving his team? Some Utah Jazz fans are hoping a billboard will help. With the team’s season over, its 27-year-old star Gordon Hayward is eligible to enter free agency and likely to entertain enormous contract offers from several teams in July. In anticipation, some Salt Lake City residents have chipped in to emblazon his likeness and the sloga
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The Atlantic
Sage, Ink: The Anti-Watergate
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The Atlantic
The Decade of the Brain When George H.W. Bush declared the 1990s the ‘decade of the brain,’ early childhood development programs received a major cash infusion. The initiative also funded researchers who discovered that a child’s early experiences actually have a physiological impact on the brain. In response, states across the country began a huge push for pre-kindergarten education. Now, the majority of American child
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Current stimulation may keep visual neurons alive after injury -- but at a costIn a study published in Scientific Reports, researchers from Magdeburg University (Germany) and The Chinese University of Hong Kong report that for rats and mice, repetitive transorbital alternating current stimulation (rtACS) may help preserve visual neurons from cell death after injury.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Wallflower center pack baboons find placeUsing high-resolution GPS tracking, UC Davis Assistant Professor Margaret Crofoot and her team of researchers continuously monitored the movements of nearly an entire baboon troop in central Kenya to discover how interactions among group-mates influenced where in the troop individuals tended to be found. Similar to humans, some animals consistently were found in the vanguard of their troop while o
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Space weather events linked to human activityHuman activities, like nuclear tests and radio transmissions, have been changing near-Earth space and weather, and have created artificial radiation belts, damaged satellites and induced auroras.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA's Van Allen Probes spot man-made barrier shrouding EarthHumans have long been shaping Earth's landscape, but now scientists know that we also can shape our near-space environment with radio communications, which have been found to interact with particles in space.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Following gastric band surgery, device-related reoperation common, costlyAmong Medicare beneficiaries undergoing laparoscopic adjustable gastric band surgery, reoperation was common, costly, and varied widely across hospital referral regions, according to a study published by JAMA Surgery.
2h
Live Science
Stretchy Holograms Could Power 3D, Morphing ProjectionsAlmost all holograms contain a recording of just a single image, but now scientists at the University of Pennsylvania have built a hologram on stretchy material that can hold several images.
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Futurity.org
Mice with 3D-printed ovaries produce healthy pups Scientists have created 3D-printed ovary structures that, true to their design, actually ovulate. When a female mouse’s ovary was removed and replaced with the bioprosthetic ovary, the mouse was able to not only ovulate but also give birth to healthy pups. The moms were even able to nurse their young. The bioprosthetic ovaries are made of 3D-printed scaffolds that house immature eggs, and have be
2h
Popular Science
Trees might actually make summer air pollution even worse Environment Talk about treeson Planting trees while doing nothing about underlying air pollution is a bit like putting spinach on your double bacon donut burger. Read on.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Analysis examines safety of antidepressant use during pregnancyUse of fluoxetine -- the most commonly prescribed antidepressant -- during pregnancy is linked with a slightly increased risk of malformations in infants, according to a recent analysis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tool may help determine older adults' history of sports concussionsA new study in retired athletes takes the first steps in developing an objective tool for diagnosing a history of sports concussions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New test to rapidly diagnose sepsisResearchers have developed a test that can rapidly and reliably diagnose sepsis, a potentially life-threatening complication of bacterial infections.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How herbicide use and climate affect monarch butterfliesAn analysis of data in Illinois has found a link between higher county-level use of an herbicide called glyphosate and reduced abundance of adult monarch butterflies, especially in areas with concentrated agriculture. This association was only evident during the initial years of the adoption of herbicide-resistant crops (1994-2003), however, when glyphosate use was increasing most quickly.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cross-species links identified for osteoarthritisNew research has identified 'cell messages' that could help identify the early stages of osteoarthritis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Breast cancer risk is more affected by total body fat than abdominal fatA reduction in overall body fat, rather than abdominal fat, is associated with lower levels of breast cancer markers. Levels of several breast cancer risk markers were reduced in postmenopausal women who lost total body fat, rather than just belly fat. These results emphasize the importance of maintaining a healthy weight and could influence the design of diet and exercise plans for overweight wom
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Undetected Ebola infection in international healthcare workers very unlikelyUndiagnosed Ebola virus infection was probably very rare in international workers who were deployed during the 2013-2015 outbreak of the virus in West Africa, despite mild and asymptomatic cases of Ebola being known to occur, according to new research.
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Gizmodo
How to Watch Trump's Speech Today in the Middle of His Administration's Complete and Total Meltdown, No Cable Required President Donald Trump is making the commencement speech today at the US Coast Guard Academy graduation ceremony in Connecticut. It’s the president’s first appearance since Trump’s complete and total meltdown last night following the revelations that he had told FBI Director James Comey he didn’t want Michael Flynn investigated . Advertisement The event begins at 11am ET, 8am PT and is streaming
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Ars Technica
The Witcher coming to Netflix as a TV series Netflix announced today that it is working with Polish production and visual effects company Platige Image to create an English-language TV series based on the world of The Witcher . The series is technically based directly on the Witcher novels and story collections by Polish writer Andrzej Sapkowski, according to the announcement, But those stories (and the world in which they're set) have beco
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Aftermath of supereruption shows Toba magma system's great sizeThe rare but spectacular eruptions of supervolcanoes can cause massive destruction and affect climate patterns on a global scale for decades -- and a new study has found that these sites also may experience ongoing, albeit smaller eruptions for tens of thousands of years after.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Uncommon superbug strain in greater Houston areaScientists used genome sequencing to discover that an otherwise rare strain of a superbug was found in more than one-third of the Houston patients studied.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Salt domes and the U.S. Strategic Petroleum ReserveScientists have examined how salt domes behave and conclude that the U.S. Department of Energy is justified in extending the life of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Link found between donor, infection in heart, lung transplant recipientsResearchers have identified a possible cause for a rare infection in heart and lung transplant recipients: the donor.
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Gizmodo
Adorable Carbon Fiber Rocket Is Finally Ready to Launch Image: Rocket Lab Rockets are big, shiny hunks of metal that do extraordinary things—but you’d probably never call one “cute.” Kittens are cute. Capybaras? Definitely. But rockets, not so much—except for this little guy , from New Zealand-based startup Rocket Lab. Its name is Electron , and after years of preparation, its’s finally gearing up to launch as soon as next week. Advertisement The two-
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The Atlantic
Why Do Iranians Bother Voting? “However much you remove yourself from politics, you’re still inside this system” read the meme imploring me to vote during my last visit to Tehran in 2016. It was one of the many dozens of Facebook, Telegram, and text messages delivered by grassroots activists anxious to secure a friendly parliament for Iran’s incumbent president, Hassan Rouhani. Their shoestring get-out-the-vote campaign—loosel
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
GE Appliances to get Google voice control optionGE Appliances announced a deal with Google Wednesday enabling the US tech giant's voice control home hub to be used for cooking, cleaning and other functions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Romania foreign ministry target of 'surgical' cyberattackA Romanian cyber intelligence official has confirmed the foreign ministry had been the target of a "surgical, targeted, specialized" cyberattack likely orchestrated by another country.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Men sing about dating and sex more often than womenA new analysis of popular song lyrics from 1960 through 2008 reveals that men sing about both romantic love and sex more often than women. However, female artists sing about romantic love in a higher percentage of their songs. The difference is due to gender disparity in the number of songs, with male singers performing a considerably higher percentage of popular songs than female performers durin
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bumblebee populations higher in Detroit than in some less-urbanized areas; vacant lots could be a factorA new study of native bumblebee populations in southeastern Michigan cities found, surprisingly, that Detroit has more of the large-bodied bees than some surrounding, less urbanized locations.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Important step taken toward an HIV vaccineResearchers have developed a strategy that can revolutionize vaccine design. The new strategy is used to develop vaccines that can prevent HIV infection and the development of AIDS.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Conductive paper could enable future flexible electronicsRoll-up computer screens and other flexible electronics are getting closer to reality as scientists improve upon a growing number of components that can bend and stretch. One team now reports another development that can contribute to this evolution: a low-cost conductive paper that would be easy to manufacture on a large scale.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A third of high school students ride with drivers who have been drinkingOne in three high school students reports riding with a driver who has been drinking, while nearly one in five was in a car where the driver had consumed marijuana, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study links physician age to patient mortality riskHospitalized patients have a slightly higher risk of dying when treated by older hospitalists—internal medicine specialists who oversee the care of acutely ill hospitalized patients—new research concludes. The results suggest the critical importance of continuing medical education throughout the span of a physician’s professional career.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bathroom scales will inform about life threatening conditionsWeighing oneself has become one of the most common morning rituals. However, your weight is not the only message that can be delivered by your bathroom scales: the team of researchers is developing the multifunctional scales, which can monitor your health and inform about potentially dangerous life conditions, such as arteriosclerosis or cardiac arrhythmia.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Jumping genes are part of all that makes us humanAsk 10 people what makes humans human and you’ll probably get 10 different answers — and then some.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Scientists Dismayed as Texas Leans into Unproved Stem Cell TreatmentsThree bills under consideration in the state would make it easier to try unapproved therapies -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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TEDTalks (video)
A climate solution where all sides can win | Ted HalsteadWhy are we so deadlocked on climate, and what would it take to overcome the seemingly insurmountable barriers to progress? Policy entrepreneur Ted Halstead proposes a transformative solution based on the conservative principles of free markets and limited government. Learn more about how this carbon dividends plan could trigger an international domino effect towards a climate solution.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Are we educating educators about academic integrity?A study by Swansea University researchers has found that student academic integrity is not a core concept taught to academics in Higher Education.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists begin to unlock secrets of deep ocean color from organic matterAbout half of atmospheric carbon dioxide is fixed by ocean's phytoplankton, mainly picocyanobacteria, through a process called photosynthesis. Picocyanobacteria are tiny, unicellular microorganisms that are abundant and widely distributed in freshwater and marine environments. A large portion of biologically fixed carbon is formed by picocyanobacteria at the sea surface and then transported to the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why a crackly crust is essential to a baguette's aroma and tasteAn authentic French baguette is one of those key staples that foodies hunt for. Now scientists have gained new insight into why a crisp crust is a must for this quintessential bread. They report their findings on how crumb and crust structure affect aroma—and therefore, perceived taste—in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Readers ponder the randomness of DNA errorsReaders sent feedback on cellular slip-ups, moon mayhem and more.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is religion an evolved domain or instinct?The question about why more intelligent people tend to be atheistic dates back to the times of Romans and Ancient Greeks. The link between intelligence and religion can be explained if religion is considered an instinct, and intelligence the ability to rise above one's instincts. This is the suggestion by Edward Dutton of the Ulster Institute for Social Research in the UK, and Dimitri Van der Lind
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Science | The Guardian
Balasubramaniam Kathirgamathamby obituary My father, Balasubramaniam Kathirgamathamby, who has died of cancer aged 69, was a senior research chemist who specialised in coatings and formulation chemistry, developing fireproof architectural coatings, barnacle-resistant marine paints and drug excipients. He also invented a variant of the pigment ultramarine. His interest in ultramarine began while learning of its use in the Taj Mahal during
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Ingeniøren
Nyhedsanalyse: Roaming er gået fra en EU-vinder til taber-sagEU-Kommissionens interesse for prisstigninger i Danmark handler om at undgå en mediekatastrofe for unionen, for EU selv har ingen mulighed for at gribe ind.
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The Atlantic
The Broken Promise of Higher Education May is always an important month in the college calendar. Many high-school seniors across the nation make the decision where to attend college; millions of college students graduate and enter the workforce. It is the circle of life for colleges and universities in the United States—young students deciding what courses to take and what to major in, accumulating credits and knowledge, and, upon gra
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Ebola outbreak in the Congo, tuberculosis drug resistance in Russia and GM mustard seeds in India The week in science: 12–18 May 2017. Nature 545 270 doi: 10.1038/545270a
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
The wooden skyscrapers that could help to cool the planet Large timber buildings are getting safer, stronger and taller. They may also offer a way to slow down global warming. Nature 545 280 doi: 10.1038/545280a
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Geneticists enlist engineered virus and CRISPR to battle citrus disease Desperate farmers hope scientists can beat pathogen that is wrecking the US orange harvest. Nature 545 277 doi: 10.1038/545277a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How have European freshwater fish species changed over time?Over time, humans have contributed to the loss of native species and have introduced non-native species throughout Europe. A new analysis shows how European freshwater fish have changed profoundly since 1840. At the continental scale, the contemporary fauna holds net 11 more species today as exotic species introduction (26 species) exceeded native species loss (15 species). But the biggest change
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Secrets behind T. rex's bone crushing bites: T. rex could crush with 8,000 pound bite forcesThe giant Tyrannosaurus rex pulverized bones by biting down with forces equaling the weight of three small cars while simultaneously generating world record tooth pressures, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Regular physical activity and reduced sedentary time reduces build-up of dangerous liver fatNew research shows that both regular physical activity and avoiding inactivity (sedentary behavior) help reduce build-up of dangerous liver fat, an important complication of obesity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Healthy' obese people still at higher risk of cardiovascular disease events than general populationNew research shows that so-called 'metabolically healthy' obese people are still at higher risk of cardiovascular disease events such as heart failure or stroke than normal weight people.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Social ties help animals live longerLarge families and strong social ties help animals live longer, new research suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
As Uber and Waymo duke it out in court, the ugly battle over driverless cars is underwayIt's big. It's nasty. It's the fight for dominance in the burgeoning market for driverless cars - and the service they'll provide.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Populations along the eastern Mediterranean coast share a genetic heritage that transcends nationalityThe Mediterranean Sea has represented one of the most important crossroads in human history, acting both as a barrier and a bridge between three continents and multiple human groups characterized by different genetic and cultural backgrounds. Despite this complex history and despite modern national borders, there is a shared Mediterranean genetic continuity, extending from Sicily to Cyprus, where
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Are we educating educators about academic integrity?A study by Swansea University researchers has found that student academic integrity is not a core concept taught to academics in Higher Education.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hypertension before the age of 55 increases risk of cardiovascular deathWhen someone gets diagnosed with hypertension, either early (before the age of 55) or later in life, can have important health ramifications. According to a new study, diagnosis of high blood pressure at an earlier age is associated with greater risk of cardiovascular death and signifies an inherited predisposition for the disease. The findings, which appear in the British Medical Journal, offer i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers identify changes in lung cells following infectionsWhen people develop a respiratory infection, recovery from their illness leaves behind an immunological memory that influences how they will respond to later infections. In a new study, researchers demonstrate for the first time that recovery from bacterial pneumonia changes the tissue that was infected, seeding the lungs with immune cells called resident memory T (TRM) cells.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists begin to unlock secrets of deep ocean color from organic matterAbout half of atmospheric carbon dioxide is fixed by ocean's phytoplankton through a process called photosynthesis. A large portion of biologically fixed carbon is formed by picocyanobacteria at the sea surface and then transported to the deep ocean. But what remains a mystery is how colored dissolved organic matter which originates from plant detritus (either on land or at sea) makes it into the
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Ars Technica
Widely adopted method for thwarting MRSA fails in hospital that developed it Enlarge / Baby in an intensive care unit of a California hospital. (credit: Getty | Irfan Khan ) Between August and March, a deadly superbug spread to 10 infants in the intensive care unit of UC-Irvine Medical Center—the hospital where researchers developed a leading strategy to prevent the spread of that very superbug, the Los Angeles Times reports . The hospital’s strategy, referred to as "univ
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Electronic tattoos: Using distinctive body locations to control mobile devices intuitivelyComputer scientists from Saarland University and Google are giving wrinkles, knuckles and birthmarks a whole new meaning. Similarly to temporary tattoos for children, the researchers are placing ultra-thin, electronic tattoos on distinctive body locations. The user can touch, squeeze or pull them, and thereby intuitively control mobile devices such as a music player, or easily make indicators ligh
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Futurity.org
To fight disease outbreaks, ask ‘what don’t we know?’ A new approach to information-gathering, born of the 2014 Ebola outbreak, could save lives. “When a disease outbreak happens, there is a lot of information that you just don’t know: who will get sick, how will the disease spread, what will make things worse or better? But you still have to act,” says Katriona Shea, professor of biology at Penn State and senior author of the study. “Our approach a
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Gizmodo
How Much Force Could a T.Rex Bite Deliver? Image: Universal Pictures In the 1993 cult classic Jurassic Park , a T. rex manages to scare the living shit out of kid heroes Lex and Tim Murphy by casually ripping apart their Ford Explorer like it’s a scrap of meat. It’s a scene that crystallized the destructive power of this extinct apex predator in the public consciousness—and as a new study highlights, it might not have been that hyperbolic
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Science | The Guardian
The Antikythera mechanism: the world's first computer? – video The 2,000-year-old Antikythera shipwreck is considered the greatest archaeological discovery of the 20th century. It included ancient, ornate pottery, weapons, a skeleton that provides scientists with their first real hope of sequencing DNA from a shipwreck victim, and the famous Antikythera mechanism - thought to be the world’s first computer Images and footage courtesy of Michael Tsimperopoulos
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Better cathode materials for lithium-sulphur-batteriesA team at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) has for the first time fabricated a nanomaterial made from nanoparticles of a titanium oxide compound (Ti4O7) that is characterized by an extremely large surface area, and tested it as a cathode material in lithium-sulphur batteries. The highly porous nanomaterial possesses high storage capacity that remains nearly constant over many charging cycles.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Google DeepMind patient app legality questionedA leaked letter throws doubt on the legal basis for sharing 1.6 million patient records with DeepMind.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New gene therapy for vision loss is safe in humans, study suggestsIn a small and preliminary clinical trial, researchers and their collaborators have shown that an experimental gene therapy that uses viruses to introduce a therapeutic gene into the eye is safe and that it may be effective in preserving the vision of people with wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Time flies: Insect fossils in amber shed light on India's geological historyResearchers have identified three new species of insects encased in Cambay amber dating from over 54 million years ago. Researchers describe the new species of fungus gnats, which provide further clues to understanding India's past diversity and geological history.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dams are major driver of global environmental changeWater reservoirs created by damming rivers could have significant impacts on the world's carbon cycle and climate system that aren't being accounted for, a new study concludes.
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Gizmodo
Jezebel Their Breakup Proves Ben Hanisch Truly Was Amy Schumer’s Aidan | Deadspin Nashville Is A Gre Jezebel Their Breakup Proves Ben Hanisch Truly Was Amy Schumer’s Aidan | Deadspin Nashville Is A Great Place To Play Hockey | The Root Philippines President Attacks Neuroscientist Carl Hart for Speaking Against Drug War: ‘That Black Guy’...’Son of a Bitch Has Gone Crazy’ | Fusion Fox News Is Losing Its Mind Trying to Defend Trump Over the Comey-Flynn Crisis |
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Conductive paper could enable future flexible electronicsRoll-up computer screens and other flexible electronics are getting closer to reality as scientists improve upon a growing number of components that can bend and stretch. One team now reports in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces another development that can contribute to this evolution: a low-cost conductive paper that would be easy to manufacture on a large scale.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NRL tests autonomous 'soaring with solar' conceptResearchers at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), Vehicle Research Section and Photovoltaic Section are building on the proven concept of autonomous cooperative soaring of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Their research investigates the presence of solar photovoltaics (PV) to the cooperative autonomous soaring techniques, which enables long endurance flights of unmanned sailplanes that use
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Scientific American Content: Global
How Trump's Science Cuts Could Hurt States That Voted for HimResearch to aid new jobs in struggling industries is at risk -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
A Breakthrough in Flexible Electronics Could Turn Your T-Shirts Into Amazing Speakers 2017 might go down in history as the year those boxy speakers your dad still uses finally started to go extinct. Following the development of a heat-powered graphene chip that could replace the speaker in your phone, scientists at Michigan State University have developed a paper-thin, flexible electronic panel that could turn fabrics into speakers—among other applications. In late 2016, Nelson Se
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The impact of the rise in new drug rejectionsThe number of new drug applications rejected by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has been on the rise. The cover story of Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, explores why this is happening and what it means for patients.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Men sing about dating and sex more often than womenA new analysis of popular song lyrics from 1960 through 2008 reveals that men sing about both romantic love and sex more often than women. However, female artists sing about romantic love in a higher percentage of their songs. The difference is due to gender disparity in the number of songs, with male singers performing a considerably higher percentage of popular songs than female performers durin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New way of preventing pneumococcal brain invasionAn international team of researchers, led from Karolinska Institutet, has identified two receptors on the cells in the blood vessels of the brain that can be blocked and thereby prevent pneumococci from entering the brain. The study, which is published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, shows that the use of antibodies that block the receptors can potentially be used as a new therapeutic str
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bumblebee populations higher in Detroit than in some less-urbanized areas; vacant lots could be a factorA new study of native bumblebee populations in southeastern Michigan cities found, surprisingly, that Detroit has more of the large-bodied bees than some surrounding, less urbanized locations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Parents with bipolar benefit from self-help toolOnline self-management support for parents with Bipolar Disorder leads to improvements in parenting and child behavior. That is the finding of researchers from the Spectrum Centre for Mental Health Research at Lancaster University, who recruited 97 parents with Bipolar Disorder who have children aged between 3 and ten years old.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Children and adolescents who eat pasta have better overall diet quality new research showsNew research shows that pasta consumption in children and adolescents is associated with a better diet quality than that of children who do not eat pasta.
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Gizmodo
Cut the Cord With Best-Ever Deals on Anker's New Qi Charging Pads Anker PowerTouch 5 , $8 | Anker PowerTouch 10 , $13 If your phone supports Qi wireless charging, it’s a great day to buy some new pads to scatter around your home and office, as Anker’s 5W and 10W PowerTouch pads are both on sale for all-time low prices. Advertisement Other than the maximum charging speed and a few very minor design differences, these are functionally identical. The headlining fe
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Gizmodo
Chelsea Manning Free After Seven Years in Military Prison After seven years behind bars, Chelsea Manning was released early Wednesday morning from the Fort Leavenworth disciplinary barracks in Kansas. Advertisement “We are able to confirm that Chelsea Manning has been released safely from military prison,” Manning attorneys told Gizmodo by email. In a statement, Manning said: “After another anxious four months of waiting, the day has finally arrived. I
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Microbial fuel cell converts methane to electricityTransporting methane from gas wellheads to market provides multiple opportunities for this greenhouse gas to leak into the atmosphere. Now, an international team of researchers has taken the first step in converting methane directly to electricity using bacteria, in a way that could be done near the drilling sites.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New study describes how surface texture can help or hinder formation of ice crystalsA new study examining how ice forms from pure water found that the geometry of the surface that water is on can have an effect on whether or not it freezes, suggesting that surface geometry plays an important role in ice formation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Polymerases pause to help mediate the flow of genetic informationStop-and-go traffic is typically a source of frustration, an unneccesary hold-up on the path from point A to point B. But when it comes to the molecular machinery that copies our DNA into RNA, a stop right at the beginning of the path may actually be helpful. Recent research shows that this stop prevents another machine from immediately following the first, presumably to better control the traffic
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Futurity.org
For LGB teens, ‘it gets better’ isn’t enough Hoping that “it gets better” or clinging to the hope of a better future isn’t the best way for lesbian, gay, or bisexual teens to cope with sexual-orientation-related stress, a new study suggests. A better method, according to the research, is for teens to seek out organizations, activities, and resources focused specifically on the gay, lesbian, and bisexual community. Toomey and his collaborato
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Faster feeding may mean faster recovery in pancreatitisWhen the excruciating pain of a pancreas attack sends someone to the hospital, eating is probably the last thing they’re thinking of. For decades, medical teams have kept such patients away from solid food for days. But new research finds that patients who get food early in their illness may get out of the hospital quicker – without any added risk or problems.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Guidelines for implementation of Industry 4.0The internet of things, artificial intelligence, networked production, smart homes - these are the magic words of digital transformation. While the big technology companies are already equipping their products and production with artificial intelligence - all parts of the chain of values added are to supply data in the future -, German medium-sized companies are not succumbing to its spell. Not ye
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sowing new seeds of knowledge about the drivers of plant diversityA new study of Australian wildflower communities is improving understanding of how climatic stress controls plant diversity, based on the strategies different species use to survive, grow and reproduce.
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The Atlantic
The Fraudulent Populism of Tucker Carlson Earlier this week, MSNBC’s Mika Brzezinski made a provocative claim about Kellyanne Conway’s behavior as a lead surrogate during the 2016 campaign: that Conway would shill for Donald Trump while the cameras were rolling, but that once the cameras stopped, when her words would only reach the people in studio, she revealed that she was so disgusted by her talking points that she “needed a shower.”
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Good grief! Losing a friend brings wild birds closer togetherNew Oxford University research has revealed that instead of grieving, wild birds appear to adjust to the loss of a flockmate by increasing both the number and intensity of their relationships with other birds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Regular coral larvae supply from neighboring reefs helps degraded reefs recoverFor reefs facing huge challenges, more coral larvae doesn't necessarily translate to increased rates of coral recovery on degraded reefs, a new Queensland study has showed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Trojan fish': Invasive rabbitfish spread invasive speciesFor some time, unicellular benthic organisms from the Indo-Pacific have been spreading in the Mediterranean. An international team of scientists with the participation of the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel has now found evidence that a possible path of invasion has been in the gut of fish. The study was published in the international journal Limnology and Oceanography Letters this
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Popular Science
5 things we learned from WanaCryptor, the biggest ransomware attack in internet history Technology How do we stop this from happening again? On Friday, some hospitals in the United Kingdom were struck with a peculiar attack. Read on.
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Scientific American Content: Global
More Than Half of World's Deaths Still Have No Recorded CauseWHO says these data gaps make policymaking difficult -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
DAWN results show reduction in disability from stroke up to 24 hours of onsetResults from the DAWN stroke trial provide compelling evidence that selected patients suffering a major ischemic stroke recovered significantly better with mechanical retrieval of the blood clot with medical therapy compared with medical therapy alone when initiated up to 24 hours of the stroke.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why a crackly crust is essential to a baguette's aroma and tasteAn authentic French baguette is one of those key staples that foodies hunt for. Now scientists have gained new insight into why a crisp crust is a must for this quintessential bread. They report their findings on how crumb and crust structure affect aroma -- and therefore, perceived taste -- in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers invented tools from flashes of light for controlling signalling circuits in living cellsResearchers at Turku Centre for Biotechnology have invented new tools for decoding and controlling signalling circuits in living cells with flashes of light. In principle, any cellular circuit can now be targeted with the new method. By using this approach, the researchers discovered that major biological signalling circuits can be made to resonate when driven at their resonant frequency.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A third of high school students ride with drivers who have been drinkingOne in three high school students reports riding with a driver who has been drinking, while nearly one in five was in a car where the driver had consumed marijuana, according to a new study from the University of Waterloo.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Good news for grilling: Black pepper helps limit cancerous compounds in meat, study showsA commonly used spice is a champion at reducing carcinogenic compounds in grilled meats, report investigators. The study found that black pepper nearly eliminates the formation of heterocyclic amines, or HCAs, which can form on the surface of meat when it is cooked.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Family TV viewing and SMS texting could help cut internet energy useScrapping automatically-playing videos in apps and reversing trends of instant messaging and on-demand services could be key to cutting the growing energy demand of the Internet, say researchers.
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Ingeniøren
Kortlægning: Regeringen siger nej til nye krav om cirkulær økonomiEU’s miljøorganisationer har kortlagt regeringernes holdninger til fem af EU-Kommissionens ambitiøse forslag til lovkrav om cirkulær økonomi. Danmark siger nej til fire og står langt fra alene med afvisningen.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Computer game could help children choose healthy foodA simple brain-training game could help children choose healthy snacks instead of chocolate and sweets, according to a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Trojan fish': Invasive rabbitfish spread invasive speciesFor some time, unicellular benthic organisms from the Indo-Pacific have been spreading in the Mediterranean. An international team of scientists with the participation of the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel has now found evidence that a possible path of invasion has been in the gut of fish. The study was published in the international journal Limnology and Oceanography Letters this
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The impact of the rise in new drug rejectionsThe number of new drug applications rejected by the US Food and Drug Administration has been on the rise. The cover story of Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, explores why this is happening and what it means for patients.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers take an important step toward an HIV vaccineResearchers from the University of Copenhagen have developed a strategy that can revolutionize vaccine design. The new strategy is used to develop vaccines that can prevent HIV infection and the development of AIDS.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Conductive paper could enable future flexible electronicsRoll-up computer screens and other flexible electronics are getting closer to reality as scientists improve upon a growing number of components that can bend and stretch. One team now reports in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces another development that can contribute to this evolution: a low-cost conductive paper that would be easy to manufacture on a large scale.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How evolutionary miniaturization in insects influences their organsScientists from the Faculty of Biology of the Lomonosov Moscow State University have studied out, how organs of microinsects change their sizes in the process of miniaturization -- reduction in sizes of incest bodies in the process of evolution.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Energy-efficient green route to magnesium productionThrough a collaborative research program funded by Oricon Energy Inc., the research group of Professor Yuji Wada and Adjunct Professor Satoshi Fujii of the Tokyo Institute of Technology, School of Materials and Chemical Technology devised a magnesium smelting method that uses nearly 70 percent less energy than conventional methods by using microwaves.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NRL tests autonomous 'soaring with solar' conceptNRL researchers at the Vehicle Research Section and Photovoltaic Section are building on the proven concept of autonomous cooperative soaring of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), which enables long endurance flights of unmanned sailplanes that use the power of the Sun.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bitcoin's popular design is being exploited for theft and fraudThe very design features that make Bitcoin technology appealing to its users are also weaknesses being exploited for the theft of the cryptocurrency -- new research reveals.Transparent design features are supposed to promote trust in Bitcoin. However, computer scientists at Lancaster University and Universiti Teknologi MARA (Malaysia) show that these features are presenting opportunities for fraud
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ultrafast tunable semiconductor metamaterial createdAn international team of researchers has devised an ultrafast tunable metamaterial based on gallium arsenide nanoparticles, as published by Nature Communications. The new optical metamaterial paves the way to ultrafast information transfer on the nanoscale.
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WIRED
Andy Rubin, Crispr, and Amazon Star at Wired Business Conference 2017 Business today means contending with technologies that sound like plot devices from a comic book. Next month, we'll sit down with the people who made them. The post Andy Rubin, Crispr, and Amazon Star at Wired Business Conference 2017 appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
Only Congress, Not the FCC, Can Fix Net Neutrality Opinion: Despite what John Oliver says, the FCC isn't the one that can solve the net neutrality issue once and for all. Congress can. The post Only Congress, Not the FCC, Can Fix Net Neutrality appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
How Airbus Dreamed Up the Wild Design for Its Flying Car For once, function follows form. The post How Airbus Dreamed Up the Wild Design for Its Flying Car appeared first on WIRED .
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Gizmodo
Terrifying Looking T.Rex Ants Actually Total Wimps Gordon Yong, Insect Diversity Lab, National University of Singapore There are a lot of silly ways you can name a new species—maybe after a boat , or the President , or the sound you made when you found it. But this little ant probably received one of the most badass names possible: Tyrannomyrmex rex, T. rex for short. Advertisement Singaporean scientists recently spotted a colony of these ants fo
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Gizmodo
The Latest Transformers: The Last Knight Trailer Is All Explosions and Madness A new trailer for the fifth Transformers movie is here, and boy... are many, many things happening in it. I’d say it contains a 60/40 percent ratio of explosions to outright gibberish, which indicates to me that it may be the most insane Transformers movie since Dark of the Moon. Judge for yourself. So without doing one of io9's big breakdowns, let’s just break this down all simple-like. We’ve go
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Russian scientists have found the remains of an unknown animalDuring an expedition to the Krasnoyarsk Territory, scientists from Tomsk State University and St. Petersburg State University, discovered the remains of a previously unknown mammal -- the baidabatyr.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Better cathode materials for lithium-sulphur-batteriesA team at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) has for the first time fabricated a nanomaterial made from nanoparticles of a titanium oxide compound (Ti4O7) that is characterized by an extremely large surface area, and tested it as a cathode material in lithium-sulphur batteries. The highly porous nanomaterial possesses high storage capacity that remains nearly constant over many charging cycles.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Shared genetic heritage from Sicily to CyprusThe Mediterranean shores stretching between Sicily, Southern Italy and the Southern Balkans witnessed a long series of migration processes and cultural exchanges. Despite this complex history there is a shared genetic continuity, extending from Sicily to Cyprus, where the populations of certain Greek-speaking islands appear genetically closer to Southern Italian populations than to populations fro
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is religion an evolved domain or instinct?The question about why more intelligent people tend to be atheistic dates back to the times of Romans and Ancient Greeks. The link between intelligence and religion can be explained if religion is considered an instinct, and intelligence the ability to rise above one's instincts. This is the suggestion by Edward Dutton of the Ulster Institute for Social Research in the UK, and Dimitri Van der Lind
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Blind people have brain map for 'visual' observations tooIs what you're looking at an object, a face, or a tree? When processing visual input, our brain uses different areas to recognize faces, body parts, scenes, and objects. Scientists at KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Belgium, have now shown that people who were born blind use a 'brain map' with a very similar layout to distinguish between these same categories.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gene that affects cell power supply may hold key to bowel diseaseA key gene that helps to explain an underlying cause of incurable bowel disorders such as Crohn's disease has been identified by scientists. Blocking the gene harms vital parts of the cell and leads to bowel disease, while targeting these vital cell parts with drugs can reverse damage, the study shows. The findings aid understanding of the cause of these lifelong conditions and could lead to new t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New report finds young people troubled by romantic relationships, sexual harassmentA new report from the Making Caring Common project at the Harvard Graduate School of Education finds that young people struggle with romantic relationships and rampant misogyny and sexual harassment, but parents and other adults have commonly failed to address these problems.
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Gizmodo
We Crashed a Few Drones to Find the Best Folding Drone It’s drone season! It’s gorgeous out there and the world is full of beautiful scenes that need recording with a drone that buzzes through the air like a cloud of angry bees. Whether you’re an aspiring aerial photographer or a thrill-seeking life-caster, there have never been more options on the market for excellent quadcopters. Two of the best drones are so flexible you can fold them up and fit t
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Ars Technica
Bigger is better: Quantum volume expresses computer’s limit Enlarge / IBM's new 16-qubit quantum computer. (credit: IBM quantum experience ) The race to build the first useful quantum computer continues apace. And, like all races, there are decisions to be made, including the technology each competitor must choose. But, in science, no one knows the race course, where the finish line is, or even if the race has any sort of prize (financial or intellectual)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon refreshes lineup of low-cost tablets, new kids modelAmazon is offering a thinner and lighter version of its cheapest, 7-inch tablet, while shaving $10 off the price of an 8-inch model.
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Futurity.org
Very ill children live longer, but struggle to learn Children living with several once-fatal chronic pediatric health conditions are living longer, but their survival comes at a cost: many experience long-term neurocognitive deficits. In a first-of-its-kind review of meta-analytic results across conditions, researchers documented how the brain is affected by six conditions in an effort to identify directions for future research and clinical care. T
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New on MIT Technology Review
Better Quantum Chips, 3-D Printed Ovaries, and Apple’s Pizza Box—The Download, May 17, 2017The most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Another large-scale cyberattack underway: expertsAnother large-scale, stealthy cyberattack is underway on a scale that could dwarf last week's assault on computers worldwide, a global cybersecurity firm told AFP on Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bitcoin's popular design is being exploited for theft and fraudThe very design features that make Bitcoin technology appealing to its users are also weaknesses being exploited for the theft of the cryptocurrency – new research reveals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Severed limbs and wooden feet—how the ancients invented prostheticsWe are living through an incredibly exciting period for prosthetics. A pioneering brain computer interface that will allow veterans to control artificial body parts with their minds was recently announced by researchers in Virginia in the US. Meanwhile, Newcastle University in the UK is developing limbs which "see" objects in front of them and react at speeds more comparable with the real thing.
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Ars Technica
Chelsea Manning, who served more prison time than any US leaker, is freed Enlarge (credit: Francis Mariani ) Chelsea Manning was released from the Military Corrections Complex at Fort Leavenworth in Kansas on Wednesday—nearly three decades before the Army private's sentence was up for leaking classified military documents to WikiLeaks. The intelligence analyst, who left the barracks at 2am (CDT), was court-martialed and convicted of leaking more than 700,000 documents
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Ars Technica
Radeon Vega Frontier Edition: First AMD Vega GPU is for the pros The first graphics card based on AMD's upcoming 14nm FinFET Vega architecture is the Radeon Vega Frontier Edition, AMD revealed at its Financial Analyst Day yesterday. Unlike AMD's previous GPU launches, Vega FE isn't targeted at consumers, but rather at the booming artificial intelligence, machine learning, and creative markets where GPUs are currently in extremely high demand. Nvidia has employ
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Live Science
T. Rex Ants Turn Out to Be Timid | VideoAn ant named after a fearsome dinosaur turns out to be kind of a softie.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ozone and haze pollution weakens land carbon uptake in ChinaA study led by Dr. YUE Xu from CAS Institute of Atmospheric Physics provides the first systematic assessment of the effects of ozone and aerosol haze pollution on terrestrial ecosystem health and land carbon assimilation in China, for the present day and two possible future scenarios.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sowing new seeds of knowledge about the drivers of plant diversityA new study of Australian wildflower communities is improving understanding of how climatic stress controls plant diversity, based on the strategies different species use to survive, grow and reproduce."Plant diversity tends to be lower in more stressful environments," says University of Queensland School of Biological Sciences' lecturer, and CSIRO researcher, Dr John Dwyer
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Good grief! Losing a friend brings wild birds closer togetherNew Oxford University research has revealed that instead of grieving, wild birds appear to adjust to the loss of a flockmate by increasing both the number and intensity of their relationships with other birds.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Regular coral larvae supply from neighboring reefs helps degraded reefs recoverFor reefs facing huge challenges, more coral larvae doesn't necessarily translate to increased rates of coral recovery on degraded reefs, a new Queensland study has showed. The study, published today, was led by former University of Queensland School of Biological Sciences researcher Dr. Christopher Doropoulos, now of CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere, and involved collaboration with CSIRO, the Universi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Diverse populations make rational collective decisionsYes/no binary decisions by individual ants can lead to a rational decision as a collective when the individuals have differing preferences to the subject, according to research recently published in the journal Royal Society Open Science.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Young women's gradual weight gain lifts pregnancy blood pressure dangerResearchers are challenging women to start thinking about pre-pregnancy health sooner, with the finding that years of gradual weight gain more than doubles the risk of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. The increased risk was due to weight change and occurred regardless of whether the woman's body mass index (BMI) was initially categorized as healthy or overweight.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study tests how well humans interpret dog growls(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with Eötvös Loránd University in Hungary has conducted a study regarding how well humans interpret dog growls. In their paper published in Royal Society Open Science, the group reports on how well volunteers listening to taped dog growls correctly guessed the circumstances behind them.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Bronze-Age "Beaker Culture" Invaded Britain, Ancient-Genome Study FindsFamous bell-shaped pots are associated with a group of immigrants who may have displaced Neolithic farmers -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Dagens Medicin
LVS: Medicinrådet kan få svært ved at rekruttere lægerMedicinrådet og Danske Regioner bliver nødt til at finde nogle penge til løn og efteruddannelse af fagudvalgenes medlemmer, hvis rådet fortsat skal drives af de bedste hoveder. Det mener formand for de Lægevidenskabelige Selskaber Henrik Ullum.
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Gizmodo
Why You Probably Shouldn't Believe the Latest Justice League Rumors The Last Jedi could bring back another familiar ship. James Mangold discusses the future of X-23 in the X-Men movieverse. Plus, new details on Simon Pegg and Nick Frost’s next movie, dark times ahead on Riverdale , and new footage from Supergirl ’s season finale. Spoilers assemble! Justice League Salt shakers at the ready! An anonymous source at Splash Report claims massive reshoots have complete
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Futurity.org
Light sensor in fly eye offers clues to circadian rhythm Researchers have discovered the long-mysterious role one light-sensitive receptor protein plays moderating day-night cycles in fruit flies, potentially giving insight into how humans’ own circadian rhythms function. Humans aren’t the only creatures whose circadian rhythms are dictated by light. The tiny Drosophila melanogaster —generally called the fruit fly—sets its regular day-and-night-activit
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The insidious class divide in music teachingA passionate debate is raging regarding musical education which threatens to unbalance the already critically privileged world of classical music. And, ironically, some of those who believe that music education should be made more accessible are arguing for measures that will actually exacerbate that privilege.
4h
Ingeniøren
Norge indfører miljømærkning for bilerBilerne rangeres efter brændstofforbrug, afgifter og udledning af NOx samt CO2. Mærkningen er imidlertid baseret på industriens egne tal fra laboratoriemålinger.
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Ars Technica
AMD unveils Ryzen Threadripper: A monster CPU with 16 cores, 32 threads Enlarge 16-core, 32-thread versions of AMD Ryzen CPUs codenamed Threadripper will launch this summer, the company revealed at its Financial Analyst Day yesterday. With one of the gnarliest CPU codenames we've ever seen, the Threadripper multicore monsters will go head-to-head with Intel's Broadwell-E and upcoming Skylake-E High-End Desktop (HEDT) CPUs alongside a new motherboard platform that pro
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Scientific American Content: Global
Science Diplomacy Is More Vital Than EverPartnering across borders means faster discovery and a safer world -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Large volcanic eruption may have caused the first mass extinctionResearchers say they may have found the cause of the first mass extinction of life.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fostering motivation could help keep marginalized girls in schoolA field study in Malawi reveals psychological factors played an important role in whether girls attended school, even under conditions of extreme poverty and deprivation: Girls were significantly more likely to attend class when they were intrinsically excited about school and learning, even when they struggled with a lack of basic resources at home.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers to predict cognitive dissonance according to brain activityA new study by HSE researchers has uncovered a new brain mechanism that generates cognitive dissonance -- a mental discomfort experienced by a person who simultaneously holds two or more contradictory beliefs or values, or experiences difficulties in making decisions. The results of the study have been published in the paper 'Open Access Neural Mechanisms of Cognitive Dissonance (Revised): an EEG
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Two studies show possibility of some cosmic rays existing due to dark matter collisions(Phys.org)—Two teams working independently have conducted studies with similar results suggesting the possibility that some of the cosmic rays striking the Earth arise from dark matter particles colliding with one another. One group, a trio of researchers with RWTH Aachen University in Germany, created models simulating conditions both with and without dark matter-produced particles. The other gro
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WIRED
The Best Way To Transmit Satellite Data? In Trucks. Really When you have nearly unfathomable depths of information, the quickest way to move it is still the actual highway, not the information-super-one. The post The Best Way To Transmit Satellite Data? In Trucks. Really appeared first on WIRED .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
IBM builds its most powerful universal quantum computing processorsIBM announced today it has successfully built and tested its most powerful universal quantum computing processors. The first new prototype processor will be the core for the first IBM Q early-access commercial systems. The first upgraded processor will be available for use by developers, researchers, and programmers to explore quantum computing using a real quantum processor at no cost via the IBM
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Canadian ice core samples show Holocene temperatures were higher than today(Phys.org)—An international team of researchers has examined ice cores taken from an island in northern Canada in the 1980s and found that air temperatures during the Holocene were higher than today. Further, there have been unprecedented air temperature changes in the area over the past half-century. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes
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Futurity.org
Risk of alcohol trouble rises after this weight-loss surgery One in five patients who undergo one of the most popular weight-loss surgical procedures are likely to develop problems with alcohol, report researchers, who found that symptoms sometimes didn’t appear until years after the surgery. The findings indicate that bariatric surgery patients should receive long-term clinical follow-up to monitor for and treat alcohol use disorder, which includes alcoho
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
How Trump’s science cuts could hurt states that voted for him Rural and struggling areas have benefited from funding that is now at risk. Nature 545 273 doi: 10.1038/545273a
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The Scientist RSS
Gene Therapy for Age-Related Macular Degeneration Safe in HumansA small Phase I clinical trial reports that, even at high doses, the treatment did not lead to adverse reactions.
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day:WaitFor ItA current moved this prehistoric ammonite's lifeless shell across the seafloor, producing an almost 28-foot-long fossilized scratch.
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Dagens Medicin
Astman afviser fælles pulje til fagudvalgsmedlemmers efteruddannelse Fagudvalgsmedlemmer under Medicinrådet får ingen ekstra pulje til regionalt finansieret efteruddannelse, hvis det står til formanden for regionernes sundhedsudvalg.
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Dagens Medicin
Beslutningsforslag i Folketinget: Regering skal droppe toprocentskrav Enhedslisten opfordrer i et beslutningsforslag regeringen til at droppe kravet til landets sygehuse om at producere to pct. mere for de samme penge.
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Science | The Guardian
Riders on the storm: the scientists who chase tornadoes - in pictures With funding from the US National Science Foundation and other government grants, scientists and meteorologists from the Center for Severe Weather Research try to get close to supercell storms and tornadoes. They’re trying to better understand tornado structure and strength, how low-level winds affect and damage buildings, and to learn more about tornado formation and prediction. Continue reading
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Development engineers support sustainability through self-sufficiencyHow do you help someone thousands of miles away in an Indian slum fix their roof, or someone in the African urban jungle access cervical cancer screening? You might think of sending some money, or perhaps supporting some charitable agencies. But in recent years a new solution has emerged—one that empowers as it helps people solve their own problems. The latest kind of engineering being explored at
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Gizmodo
The First Picture From Star Trek: Discovery Explores Strange New Worlds Image: CBS/Dalia Naber via Entertainment Weekly Our first good look at the stars of the next Star Trek show is here, and there’s not a Starfleet uniform in sight. But there is a mysterious planet, and a peek at the show’s two leading ladies—Michelle Yeoh and Sonequa Martin-Green—in action. Advertisement Debuted by Entertainment Weekly this morning, the picture seems strangely un- Trek -y. Without
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple, Qualcomm spat intensifies, manufacturers drawn inManufacturers that build Apple's iPhone and iPad are being drawn in to an escalating dispute between the tech giant and the chipmaker Qualcomm.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fostering motivation could keep marginalized girls in schoolEducation—and girls' education in particular—is often cited as one of the key pathways out of poverty, but in many parts of the world women and girls still face significant barriers that prevent them from attending school. Now, a field study in Malawi reveals psychological factors played an important role in whether girls attended school, even under conditions of extreme poverty and deprivation: G
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Three little letters that could make you a big hero at the beach this summer: CPRNew study shows that bystander CPR is associated with favorable neurological survival for drowning victims in cardiac arrest
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
During heat waves, urban trees can increase ground-level ozonePlanting trees is a popular strategy to help make cities 'greener,' both literally and figuratively. But scientists have found a counterintuitive effect of urban vegetation: During heat waves, it can increase air pollution levels and the formation of ozone. Their study appears in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study sheds light on link between diseases like Alzheimer's and normal aging in the brainNeurodegenerative diseases are often associated with protein aggregates, highly intractable clumps of protein. Experiments on roundworms and mouse brain extracts yielded evidence that these disease-associated aggregates can be directly induced by proteins that aggregate together during normal aging. The present study therefore opens up a new area of preventative research targeting these age-depend
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UC San Diego chemists create the ultimate natural sunscreenChemists, materials scientists and nanoengineers at UC San Diego have created what may be the ultimate natural sunscreen.
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Futurity.org
Taking steroids less often could ‘fix’ muscles Weekly doses of glucocorticoid steroids like prednisone help speed recovery in muscle injuries—and also repair muscles damaged by muscular dystrophy, new research with mice suggests. One of the major problems of using steroids such as prednisone is they can cause muscle wasting and weakness when taken long term. This is a significant problem for people who take steroids for chronic conditions—and
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video: NASA's sounding rocketsThe spectacle of a mammoth rocket 'breaking the surly bonds of Earth' takes our breath away. Equally amazing are the secrets revealed to us by science missions these rockets have launched – and NASA puts careful thought into what kind of mission will best achieve that science. Sometimes a large, multi-instrumented mission on a giant rocket is the best way to go. But other missions are better suite
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Gizmodo
This Alarm Clock Is One of Kinja Deals' Most Popular Products Ever, and It's Never Been Cheaper Philips HF3500 Wake-Up Light , $40 If you still haven’t upgraded your morning routine up a life-changing wake-up light, Philips’ entry level model just got a huge price drop . The Philips HF3500 is currently marked down to $40 , easily besting all previous deals. While there are higher end models with color-shifting lights and multiple wake-up sounds, this model still offers a reasonably convinci
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Loss of pericytes deteriorates retinal environmentDiscovering the role of pericytes in the blood-retinal barrier suggesting pathogenetic insights into diabetic retinopathy, outlines a new report.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Exoskeleton helps soldiers carry heavy gearTheir demanding missions often require soldiers to carry heavy equipment packs long distances over rough terrain, or up and down stairs and underground infrastructure in urban environments. Exhaustion and injury are frequently a consequence of these challenging operational scenarios. A new exoskeleton from Lockheed Martin offers a solution.
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Gizmodo
Putin Offers to Give Congress Transcripts of Russia's Chat With Trump in the Oval Office Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks after the Belt and Road Forum at the China National Convention Center in China on May 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko, pool) According to multiple reports, Vladimir Putin just offered to provide a transcript of the discussion between President Trump and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov that occurred last week in the Oval Office . There wa
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The Atlantic
Freedom for Chelsea Manning Chelsea Manning, the U.S. Army soldier who was sentenced to 35 years in prison for leaking thousands of secret files to WikiLeaks, walked free today from the military detention facility in Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, after spending about seven years in prison. She reportedly left the facility at 3 a.m. ET. Manning, 29, who was sentenced in 2013, entered prison as Bradley Manning, but announced a da
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The Atlantic
Putin Offers to Provide a Transcript Vladimir Putin just wants to help. The Russian president offered Wednesday to provide transcripts of President Trump’s Oval Office conversations with Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov and other top Russian officials last week to the U.S. Congress if necessary, during which Trump reportedly disclosed highly classified Israeli intelligence. According to CNN, Putin made the offer during a press confere
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Live Science
'Scrotum Frog' Tadpoles Hatch For 1st Time in North AmericaCritically endangered Lake Titicaca tadpoles hatch in Denver.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
During heat waves, urban trees can increase ground-level ozonePlanting trees is a popular strategy to help make cities "greener," both literally and figuratively. But scientists have found a counterintuitive effect of urban vegetation: During heat waves, it can increase air pollution levels and the formation of ozone. Their study appears in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemists create the ultimate natural sunscreenChemists, materials scientists and nanoengineers at UC San Diego have created what may be the ultimate natural sunscreen.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Depression not as big a killer as previously thoughtOver three decades of research suggest that depression increases the odds of death. However, a new research paper throws doubt on this presumed link after finding no evidence of a direct association between depression and all-cause mortality. The paper involved the largest ever analysis on the topic.
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Scientific American Content: Global
When Emergency Pediatric Surgery Is Anything ButRushing to "fix" intersex infants can cause far more harm than good -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science-Based Medicine
Another ADHD DenierJohn Rosemond, a self-help columnist, denies the science of ADHD with the usual invalid and outdated arguments.
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Viden
VIDEO Se øjeblikket hvor elefantungen kommer til verden i zooKl. 04.24 blev en cirka 90 kg tung hanelefantunge født i Zoologisk Have i København.
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Live Science
Towering Rock Once Hidden Beneath Earth Seen from SpaceThe last vestiges of an ancient volcano are visible from orbit.
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Futurity.org
How just 13 DNA snippets could identify you Just 13 snippets of DNA may be enough to make conclusions about hundreds of thousands of genetic markers, even those not present in the sample, possibly revealing enough to indicate personal identity information. The new study’s results may help foster scientific collaborations and aid researchers working with degraded or incomplete DNA samples, such as those collected from wildlife or archaeolog
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Intel sharing at heart of US, Europe talks on laptop banThe intelligence behind plans to broaden a U.S. ban on in-flight laptops and tablets to include planes from Europe took center stage on Wednesday as American and European officials met to discuss the looming decision.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
One of first Soviet cosmonauts Gorbatko diesSoviet cosmonaut Viktor Gorbatko, a colleague of Yuri Gagarin, the first man in space, died Wednesday at the age of 82, Russia's space agency said.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Butterfly wings inspire invention that opens door to new solar technologiesEngineers have invented tiny structures inspired by butterfly wings that open the door to new solar cell technologies and other applications requiring precise manipulation of light.
5h
WIRED
San Francisco Tries to Ban Delivery Robots Before They Flatten Someone’s Toes Little more than a month after a startup unleashed robots to deliver food to San Franciscans, a city lawmaker is saying no. The post San Francisco Tries to Ban Delivery Robots Before They Flatten Someone's Toes appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
Google I/O 2017 Liveblog: Breaking News From the Live Keynote The Google I/O 2017 keynote address starts at 10 am Pacific, and we'll be liveblogging it right here on this page. The post Google I/O 2017 Liveblog: Breaking News From the Live Keynote appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
Denying Health Care to Diabetics Makes Just About Zero Sense It's not worth denying care to people based on health habits—even if you could prove those habits caused disease. The post Denying Health Care to Diabetics Makes Just About Zero Sense appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
Google I/O 2017: Watch Live Video of Google’s Big Show Right Here The Google I/O 2017 keynote address begins at 10 am Pacific (1 pm Eastern) on Wednesday, May 17, at Shoreline Amphitheater in Mountain View, California. The post Google I/O 2017: Watch Live Video of Google's Big Show Right Here appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED
One Candidate’s Plan to Resist Trump by Teaching Kids to Code Maryland gubernatorial candidate Alec Ross argues the a more inclusive economy depends on ensuring all students have access to a computer science education The post One Candidate's Plan to Resist Trump by Teaching Kids to Code appeared first on WIRED .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Diverse populations make rational collective decisionsYes/no binary decisions by individual ants can lead to a rational decision as a collective when the individuals have differing preferences to the subject, according to research recently published in the journal Royal Society Open Science. This binary mechanism of decision-making could provide a basis for understanding how neurons in the human brain, which also make binary choices, work together.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hunting for the superpartner of the top quarkSupersymmetry (SUSY) is one of the most attractive theories extending the Standard Model of particle physics. SUSY would provide a solution to several of the Standard Model's unanswered questions, by more than doubling the number of elementary particles, giving each fermion a bosonic partner and vice versa. In many SUSY models the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) constitutes dark matter.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists use Einstein's 'spooky' entanglement to invent super-sensitive gravitational wave detectorThe first direct detection of gravitational waves, a phenomenon predicted by Einstein's 1915 general theory of relativity, was reported by scientists in 2016.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Are public sector organisations more at risk from cyber-attacks on old computers?Hospitals across Britain were crippled by the recent ransomware cyber-attack, making the country's National Health Service one of the most high-profile victims of the global incident.
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Dagens Medicin
Ny sygeplejefaglig direktør på Sygehus Sønderjylland Eva Nielsen bliver ny sygeplejefaglig direktør på Sygehus Sønderjylland. Den nye direktion på sygehuset er dermed på plads efter en periode med konstitueret ledelse.
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Ars Technica
The state of the car computer: Forget horsepower, we want megahertz! Audi MMI on the Q7 was one of our favorites. If I asked you "how many computing devices do you own?" your mind will probably first jump to your PCs and laptops at home, and then to your smartphones and tablets. The more tech savvy might include smartwatches, TVs, and video game systems. But there's one computing device that not many people think about as a computing device: the car infotainment s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New computation tools enable much faster and cheaper product developmentFaster, more accurate and agile computation tools and methods have been developed through the SEMTEC project, led by VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. This will enable the elimination of the expensive and time-consuming prototype phase in the electromechanical industry. Finnish industry will gain a competitive advantage due to the faster product development of electrical motors, generators
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Gizmodo
What's the Emoji For Treason? President Donald J. Trump listens as the president of Turkey Recep Tayyip Erdogan speaks during a press conference on May 16, 2017 (Photo by Michael Reynolds-Pool/Getty Images) Former acting Attorney General Sally Yates was fired by Donald Trump after she declined to enforce his unconstitutional Muslim travel ban. But before she got the boot, Yates warned Trump that his national security advisor,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Time flies: Insect fossils in amber shed light on India's geological historyResearchers have identified three new species of insects encased in Cambay amber dating from over 54 million years ago. In a new study published by PeerJ, researchers describe the new species of fungus gnats, which provide further clues to understanding India's past diversity and geological history.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Differences in fat tissues' light reflecting properties make for easy detectionA technique that uses light imaging to monitor how one type of fat tissue is converted to another has been employed by A*STAR researchers to better understand conditions such as diabetes and obesity. The technique could underpin a fast and cost-effective approach to monitoring this conversion.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Making molecules that twinkleResearchers at Singapore's Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) have harnessed the power of carbon dioxide to make two symmetrical star-shaped molecules in a single step. These molecules could be used to build complex, functional polymeric materials useful for personal care, coatings and drug delivery.
6h
Live Science
How Did Pluto Get Its 'Whale'?Some scientists believe Pluto's red "whale"-shaped region is the mark of a giant impact — the same one that produced Pluto's huge moon Charon.
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Live Science
Beyond Fidget Spinners: 10 Ways to Help Kids ConcentrateWhat's the best way to help children concentrate?
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Live Science
'Winged Serpent' Fossil Found in 5-Million-Year-Old SinkholeThe fossilized remains of an ancient "winged serpent" were discovered among hundreds of other snake bones.
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Live Science
T. Rex Could Pulverize Bones with a Force of Nearly 8,000 PoundsTyrannosaurus rex could gnash and chomp its teeth together with such force that it could easily pulverize the bones of its prey, a new study finds.
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Science | The Guardian
Here be dragons: the million-year journey of the Komodo dragon | Hanneke Meijer Far from being the special result of insular evolution, Komodo dragons are the last survivors of a group of huge lizards that ranged over much of Australasia In 1910, Lieutenant Jacques Karel Henri van Steyn van Hensbroek was stationed on Flores Island in eastern Indonesia within the Dutch colonial administration, when he received word of a “land crocodile” of unusually large size living on the n
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The Sydney Barrier Reef—engineering a natural defence against future stormsThe risk of more severe storms and cyclones in the highly urbanised coastal areas of Newcastle, Sydney and Wollongong might not be acute, but it is a real future threat with the further warming of the southern Pacific Ocean. One day a major storm – whether an East Coast Low or even a cyclone – could hit Sydney.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Witchweed—destructive by natureScientists in Japan have designed a synthetic molecule that gives new insight into how a destructive weed might be detecting its host crops.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds journalism's 'digital disruption' places job dissatisfaction on certain news employeesThe rise of the internet has greatly changed journalism over the last few decades, altering how newspapers deliver content and how journalists practice their profession.
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The Atlantic
Democracy Has a Design Problem Technology alone can’t save democracy. When technology is designed and used well, it can make it easier for people to participate in elections and other activities of civic life. But when it’s not, technology that promises to help ends up being harmful. Some tools or programs meant to improve access to information are only available to people who are comfortable with technology, who have smartpho
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Chaco Canyon’s ancient civilization continues to puzzleA dynasty may have risen from the dead in an ancient Chaco great house.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Time flies: Insect fossils in amber shed light on India's geological historyA new species of fungus gnat in Indian amber closely resembles its fossil relatives from Europe, disproving the concept of a strongly isolated Indian subcontinent.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The structure of a pathogenic effector protein from Legionella pneumophilaLondon-based scientists have elucidated the structure of a large fragment of a bacterial protein, known as WipA, which is secreted by Legionella pneumophila. The work, recently published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, showed that the protein possessed some fascinating features that gave valuable insights into its mechanism of action.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Scientists Think They're More Rational Than Other PeopleResearchers may have an overconfident view of their profession's objectivity -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astronomer discovers supernova in Fireworks GalaxyOn May 13, 2017, Patrick Wiggins, public outreach educator for the University of Utah's Department of Physics & Astronomy, and NASA solar system ambassador to Utah, spotted something unusual in the sky. He was looking at the spiral galaxy NGC 6946, known as the Fireworks Galaxy, in the Cygnus constellation over 22 million light-years away from his telescope at his home near Erda, Utah. He noticed
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Unique model tagging technique identifies soot's pollution source over ChinaCoating chimney flues and diesel exhaust pipes, black carbon leaves a sooty footprint on Earth. But how to track its travel through the atmosphere?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Large volcanic eruption may have caused the first mass extinctionResearchers in the U.S. and Japan say they may have found the cause of the first mass extinction of life on Earth.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Can Plants Hear?Flora may be able to detect the sounds of flowing water or munching insects -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research reveals integrated pest management best option for treatment of soybean aphidsAbout 89.5 million acres of soybeans will be planted across the United States in 2017—a record high, according to the USDA. Research published in the April 2017 issue of Pest Management Science indicates that many of these soybean growers will invest in neonicotinoid insecticide seed treatments. The two-year, multi-state study revealed that, even during periods of infestation by the key pest acros
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Archaeologist wraps up excavation in Tombos, Sudan in the Nile River ValleyA Purdue University bioarchaeologist finished another field season looking at immigration and colonization during the New Kingdom occupation of Nubia in about 1400 B.C. along the Nile River Valley.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Greening-resistant 'Sugar Belle' mandarin orange found to be high in volatiles and beneficial phenolic compoundsWhile citrus greening disease has blemished the Florida industry, University of Florida scientists have developed a mandarin hybrid that seems to be winning the battle. Now, researchers are learning what makes this fruit a fighter.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
FADO—a ground-breaking tool to reconstruct the history of galaxiesFADO is a new analysis tool developed by Instituto de Astrofísica e Ciências do Espaço (IA) astronomers Jean Michel Gomes and Polychronis Papaderos, which uses light emitted by both stars and ionized gas in a galaxy to reconstruct its formation history by means of genetic algorithms. This tool was presented in a recent article, accepted for publication in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Movie shows Ceres at opposition from sunNASA's Dawn spacecraft successfully observed Ceres at opposition on April 29, taking images from a position exactly between the sun and Ceres' surface. Mission specialists had carefully maneuvered Dawn into a special orbit so that the spacecraft could view Occator Crater, which contains the brightest area of Ceres, from this new perspective.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemists brought folded proteins to lifeScientists from ITMO University in Saint Petersburg and Hebrew University in Jerusalem have found a way to recover a protein structure after its chemical denaturation. The method is based on electrostatic interaction between folded, or denatured, proteins and alumina, which unwrap them. The authors highlight the versatility of the method, which works for both specific molecules and multiprotein sy
6h
Dagens Medicin
Thomas Senderovitz får europæisk toppost Lægemiddelstyrelsens direktør udnævnt til ledelsen af de europæiske lægemiddelmyndigheders samarbejdsorganisation.
7h
Ingeniøren
Danmark ikke klar til kampen mod hackere På trods af al den data og økonomi, der er i danske it-systemer, så er vi slet ikke forberedt på de angreb, der kan ramme os i fremtiden. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/danmark-ikke-klar-kampen-mod-hackere-1076738 Version2
7h
Ingeniøren
WannaCry-værktøj kan tidligere være brugt til at mine kryptovaluta Det NSA-hackerværktøj, som The Shadow Brokers lækkede for en måned siden, blev angiveligt brugt til at skabe et omfattende botnetværk til at mine kryptovaluta for flere uger siden. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/wannacry-vaerktoej-kan-vaere-brugt-tidligere-at-mine-kryptovaluta-1076721 Version2
7h
Ingeniøren
Kvantecomputere risikerer at tabe kryptokapløbetDen mest udbredte krypteringsteknik kan måske allligevel modstå et angreb fra kvantecomputere med en gigantisk stor krypteringsnøgle. Forskere har fundet en metode til at lave sådanne nøgler.
7h
Ingeniøren
Sydeuropæere skal betale for danske turisters mobiltrafikNu skal de lokale mobilbrugere betale for nordeuropæiske turisters roaming siger teleselskaberne. Europakommissionen kalder det opportunisme.
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Dagens Medicin
32 forskellige specialer bemander 1813 Der er en blandet flok læger med 32 forskellige specialer, der bemander 1813. Men de er alle kvalificerede til arbejdet, mener koncerndirektør.
7h
Ingeniøren
Nu skal arkitekter høre lyden i bygningen, inden den er byggetEt nyt simulations-værktøj skal hjælpe arkitekter og ingeniører til at kunne opleve skitserede rum gennem virtual reality og dermed designe rum med den rette akustik fra begyndelsen.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists propose better battery system for smart home useSmart homes need smart batteries. Current systems overuse power, which can shorten the life of batteries and the devices they power. Future batteries may get an intelligence boost to mitigate the problem.
7h
NYT > Science
Feature: When the Lab Rat Is a SnakeWhy Burmese pythons may be the best way to study diabetes, heart disease and the protective effects of gastric-bypass surgery in humans.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microbial fuel cell converts methane to electricityTransporting methane from gas wellheads to market provides multiple opportunities for this greenhouse gas to leak into the atmosphere. Now, an international team of researchers has taken the first step in converting methane directly to electricity using bacteria, in a way that could be done near the drilling sites.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study describes how surface texture can help or hinder formation of ice crystalsA new study examining how ice forms from pure water found that the geometry of the surface that water is on can have an effect on whether or not it freezes, suggesting that surface geometry plays an important role in ice formation. Greater understanding of how ice forms could have implications ranging from transportation safety to food production.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dams are major driver of global environmental changeWater reservoirs created by damming rivers could have significant impacts on the world's carbon cycle and climate system that aren't being accounted for, a new study concludes.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The secrets behind T. rex's bone crushing bites: Researchers find T. rex could crush 8,000 poundsThe giant Tyrannosaurus rex pulverized bones by biting down with forces equaling the weight of three small cars while simultaneously generating world record tooth pressures, according to a new study by a Florida State University-Oklahoma State University research team.
7h
Dagens Medicin
Landsret ændrer sygeplejerskes drabsdomØstre Landsret nægter at kende sygeplerske skyldig i drab.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dams are major driver of global environmental changeWater reservoirs created by damming rivers could have significant impacts on the world's carbon cycle and climate system that aren't being accounted for, a new study concludes.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cross-species links identified for osteoarthritisNew research from the University of Liverpool, published today in the journal NPJ Systems Biology and Applications, has identified 'cell messages' that could help identify the early stages of osteoarthritis.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study describes how surface texture can help or hinder formation of ice crystalsA new study examining how ice forms from pure water found that the geometry of the surface that water is on can have an effect on whether or not it freezes, suggesting that surface geometry plays an important role in ice formation.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The secrets behind T. rex's bone crushing bites: Researchers find T. rex could crush 8,000 poundsThe giant Tyrannosaurus rex pulverized bones by biting down with forces equaling the weight of three small cars while simultaneously generating world record tooth pressures, according to a new study by a Florida State University-Oklahoma State University research team.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Microbial fuel cell converts methane to electricityTransporting methane from gas wellheads to market provides multiple opportunities for this greenhouse gas to leak into the atmosphere. Now, an international team of researchers has taken the first step in converting methane directly to electricity using bacteria, in a way that could be done near the drilling sites.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Instagram copies another Snapchat feature: Face filtersInstagram continued to play copycat to Snapchat, launching on Tuesday its own version of face filters - a feature popularized on Snap Inc.'s app.
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Science : NPR
Advice For Your Dinner Party Stories: Keep It Familiar There's a difference between the stories we tell and the stories we like to hear. New social science research finds most of us like to listen to stories about familiar things.
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Science : NPR
Tyrannosaurus Rex's Bite Force Measured 8,000 Pounds, Scientists Say "That's like setting three small cars on top of the jaws of a T. rex — that's basically what was pushing down," a researcher says. Humans bite with a measly 200 pounds of force. (Image credit: Scientific Reports)
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The Atlantic
The Pentagon Is Almost Ready for Its Close-Up The Pentagon will spend the next several months gearing up for a mission so complicated that many officials doubt it can be pulled off, an undertaking so immense that the military hasn’t once dared to try it before. No, this isn’t a story about deploying a fancy new weapon, or unveiling a new aircraft, or launching a military operation of any kind: The Department of Defense is preparing for its f
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The Atlantic
North Korea: The Military Options The Trump administration claims “all options are on the table” for dealing with North Korea’s nuclear-weapons program—from using military force, to pressuring China to cut off economic relations with North Korea, to Donald Trump negotiating directly with Kim Jong Un. But what do those options look like? And what consequences could they have? This series explores those questions, option by option.
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The Atlantic
Where Russia Is Seen as a Buffer Against the U.S. For Americans who worry about Russia’s impact on the United States, recent events have provided plenty of fodder. This week, it was a report claiming that President Trump divulged highly classified intelligence to Russian officials, a disclosure that some say is sure to hurt American interests. Last week, it was the news that Trump had fired James Comey, the FBI director who requested more resour
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Domino's stock is up about 5,000 percent since 2008. One reason: You can order and track pizzas onlineAs the severe recession took hold in 2008, Domino's Pizza Inc. was sinking as well.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What's next after 'massive disruption' from cyber-attack? A view from the trenchesAs the cyber-attack continues to spread around the globe causing massive disruption and damages for universities, hospitals, automakers and many other businesses including FedEx, only one thing is certain: It won't be the last.
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Viden
Her sætter du digitale fodsporHver dag efterlader vi et spor af data bag os. Det stammer fra vores smartphones, computere og vores færden i det overvågede offentlige rum. Men hvad sætter hvilke spor, og er det noget vi skal bekymre os om?
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Ancient-genome study finds Bronze Age ‘Beaker culture’ invaded Britain Famous bell-shaped pots associated with group of immigrants who may have displaced Neolithic farmers. Nature 545 276 doi: 10.1038/545276a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lawsuit: Google makes billions by failing to properly police rampant 'click fraud' on adsIt may be hard to imagine that an ad offering "Welder b-tonis" - something with no connection to reality - would get clicks from potential customers.
8h
New Scientist - News
Ebola once again on the prowl as emergency teams stand readyThree deaths and 19 suspected cases of Ebola in the DR Congo have health officials worried – but the chances of another deadly rampage are thankfully slim
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Report: California fish face extinction on increased level unless trends changeNearly half of California's diverse types of native salmon, steelhead and trout are headed toward extinction in 50 years unless environmental trends are reversed, a team of scientists warn in a new report.
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Dagens Medicin
Lovindgreb gør yngre almenmedicinere usikre på karrierevej Mistillid mellem praktiserende læger og offentlige myndigheder gør yngre almenmedicinere mere tilbageholdende med at investere i egen praksis, mener Forum for Yngre Almenmedicinere.
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Dagens Medicin
Nye tal: Antallet af sygeplejersker i almen praksis dykket Antallet af sygeplejersker i almen praksis er dykket siden 2012. Det kan man takke økonomiloftet for, mener PLO-formand. Professor peger på manglende politisk investeringsvilje og dårlig branding af almen praksis som forklaringer.
9h
Viden
TÆT PÅ Peter "Raket" Madsen: Uden originaler er der ingentingHer kan du stille spørgsmål til amatørastronauten Peter Madsen,
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Viden
Forsker til Brinkmann: Modstand mod overvågning er noget pjatVideoovervågning er effektivt, når forskere fx analyserer uheld i trafikken. Men europæisk modstand blokerer for livreddende projekter, advarer førende dansk videoforsker. Psykolog Svend Brinkmann forstår dog godt modviljen.
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Viden
Ny elefantunge i Københavns Zoo: Den lille han blev født i natFor første gang i tre år kan Zoologisk Have i København præsentere en levende elefantunge.
9h
Ingeniøren
Kæmpe propeller bliver mere miljøvenligeNormalt har et skib både propel og ror. Men en ny skibspropel med dieselelektrisk motor kan dreje skibet alene.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Federal appeals court upholds Google trademarkA federal appeals court has rejected a lawsuit that aimed to cancel Google's trademark by arguing that "google" is now synonymous with searching the internet.
9h
Viden
Otte funfacts om elefanterVed du, at elefanterne kan stå op at sove ?
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dubai firm dreams of harvesting icebergs for waterA Dubai firm's dream of towing icebergs from the Antarctic to the Arabian Peninsula could face some titanic obstacles.
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Science | The Guardian
Why don’t people like me? You asked Google – here’s the answer | Anouchka GroseEvery day millions of internet users ask Google life’s most difficult questions, big and small. Our writers answer some of the commonest queries Way before the internet, people put a great deal of effort into getting “likes”. You could even say that one’s ability to generate likes is a primary human concern. Babies are useless, so it’s very important that people like them. If nobody likes them, th
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Rare 'lefty' snail left on the shelfRare left coiled snail, Jeremy, has been rejected by potential mates and is now stuck in a love triangle.
10h
NeuWrite West
Can electronic tongues change the future of taste? Imagine that you are about to take your first bite into a brownie ice cream sundae, or your mom’s homemade special lasagna. I bet the memory of your favorite foods is making your taste buds tingle. Right. This. Second. Now picture a computer “tasting” the difference between an apple and apple pie. Is a computer algorithm really capable of mimicking our taste system? Before we learn about this new
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NeuWrite West
When seeing is not really believing: How neural adaptation can deceive us It’s a misty morning in 380 B.C. Greece, and Aristotle is taking his daily stroll along a flowing brook. Eventually he stops and observes the water, letting his eyes soften their focus on its motion. When he finally rips his gaze away, he notices that the stationary rocks around the brook seem to be moving in his gaze, as if they’re floating upstream! He quickly jots this observation down: “the s
10h
NeuWrite West
Supersensors: How the loss of one sense impacts the others Would you ever voluntarily give up one of your senses? Turns out, the answer for an ever-increasing number of people is yes (albeit only temporarily). Novelty concepts such as dining in the dark have risen in popularity over the past decade; restaurant-goers frequently give up their sense of sight as a way to have a “heightened” mealtime experience 1 . Most of these diners believe that their temp
10h
NeuWrite West
For those with pure word deafness, actions always speak louder than words The phone rings — you hear it. The caller ID displays — you read it. You pick up the phone — you say hello. But no matter how hard you listen, you can’t understand a single word that’s said either by you or the caller. No, you haven't just crossed over into the Twilight Zone; you have a rare syndrome called pure word deafness (PWD). Individuals with PWD cannot understand any speech, even if they
10h
NeuWrite West
The ballad of flavor, or Why my mother smells funny When I say my mother smells funny, I don't mean that she has an odor or can sniff out humor, but that her senses have been altered. A number of years ago, my mother slipped on a bathroom floor and hit her head. The displacement of her brain stunned her seventh nerve and severed her olfactory bulb, which convey taste and smell, respectively. For several weeks the experience of eating was like chew
10h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Baldwin (Max Planck Inst.) 3: Plant’s perspective on seeds, sex, and microbes Part 1: Studying a plant’s ecological interactions in the genomics era (Part 1): Dr. Baldwin reveal the mechanism by which the native tobacco plant, Nicotiana attenuata, uses floral metabolites to attract and guide its favorite pollinator. Part 2: Nicotina attenuata’s responses to attack from a nicotine-tolerant herbivore: Baldwin outlines the evolutionary responses that the Nicotina attenuata ha
10h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Baldwin (Max Planck Inst.) 2: Nicotina attenuata’s responses to attack from the moth’s caterpillar Part 1: Studying a plant’s ecological interactions in the genomics era (Part 1): Dr. Baldwin reveal the mechanism by which the native tobacco plant, Nicotiana attenuata, uses floral metabolites to attract and guide its favorite pollinator. Part 2: Nicotina attenuata’s responses to attack from a nicotine-tolerant herbivore: Baldwin outlines the evolutionary responses that the Nicotina attenuata ha
10h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Baldwin (Max Planck Inst.) 1: Studying a plant’s ecological interactions in the genomics era Part 1: Studying a plant’s ecological interactions in the genomics era (Part 1): Dr. Baldwin reveal the mechanism by which the native tobacco plant, Nicotiana attenuata, uses floral metabolites to attract and guide its favorite pollinator. Part 2: Nicotina attenuata’s responses to attack from a nicotine-tolerant herbivore: Baldwin outlines the evolutionary responses that the Nicotina attenuata ha
10h
Ingeniøren
Aktindsigt: Sundhedsplatformen vandt på it-understøttelse af dagligt hospitalsarbejde Sundhedsplatformen var den dyreste løsning, målt på Total Cost of Ownership. Men vandt, især som følge af systemets funktionalitet. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/trods-kritik-laegerne-sundhedsplatformen-vandt-paa-understoettelse-dagligt-hospitalsarbejde Version2
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Male birds adjust courtship behavior based on social contextMale birds that have already paired up with a female aren't above looking for a little action on the side. A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances explores how male juncos adjust their courtship behavior to their social landscape, finding that while both paired and unpaired males will try to get the attention of a new female on their turf, they go about it in different ways.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study reveals how pesticide use and climate affect monarch butterfliesAn analysis of data in Illinois has found a link between higher county-level use of an herbicide called glyphosate and reduced abundance of adult monarch butterflies, especially in areas with concentrated agriculture. This association was only evident during the initial years of the adoption of herbicide-resistant crops (1994-2003), however, when glyphosate use was increasing most quickly.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Australia considers banning laptops from airliner cabinsAustralia is considering following the United States and Britain in banning laptops from inbound airliner cabins, the prime minister said, but declined to explain whether the move was related to an Islamic State group threat that President Donald Trump discussed with Russian diplomats.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What we currently know about the global cyberattackThe danger from a global cyberattack that spread to some 150 nations continues to fade, and that's only some of the good news.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Open SESAME: science centre inaugurated in JordanJordan's King Abdullah II on Tuesday formally launched an international research centre whose members include experts from around the world including arch-rivals Iran and Israel.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Greenpeace says Canadian forestry lawsuit aims to silence criticsGreenpeace on Tuesday urged major publishing houses to not buy paper from a major Canadian forestry company that is suing the activist group.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google poised to roll out arsenal of services, gadgetsGoogle is about to provide the latest peek at its digital services and gadgets as it seeks to become an even more influential force in people's lives.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nicholas Sand, creator of famous Orange Sunshine LSD, diesSwiss scientist Albert Hofmann may have invented LSD, and Timothy Leary was clearly its most prominent frontman.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US, Europe discuss new laptop ban on flightsU.S. and European officials will discuss Wednesday plans to broaden a U.S. ban on in-flight laptops and tablets to include planes from Europe.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Twitter shares rise on word of Biz Stone's returnTwitter shares gained Tuesday on word that co-founder Biz Stone was returning to the social network after six years away.
11h
Science | The Guardian
Multiverse: have astronomers found evidence of parallel universes? To many these past 12 months seem as if we have already slipped into a parallel universe but Brexit and Trump are nothing compared to the alternate universes some astronomers are contemplating They call it the multiverse. It’s a cosmos in which there are multiple universes. And by multiple, I mean an infinite number. These uncountable realms sit side by side in higher dimensions that our senses a
11h
Science | The Guardian
Looking tired can harm your social life, say researchers People who have had too little sleep are considered less attractive, in poorer health and less appealing to socialise with, a psychology study has found Never mind the pallid face, wrinkles and bloodshot eyes. Missing out on sleep can harm your social life as well as your looks, researchers say. Psychologists found that people who had too little sleep were not only regarded as less attractive and
12h
Science | The Guardian
Seeking medical abortions online is safe and effective, study finds Almost 95% of those seeking drugs and advice online safely ended their pregnancy without medical intervention, say researchers, although women should still be wary of scammers A study into women who seek abortion pills online in the face of strict laws against terminations has found that almost 95% safely ended their pregnancy without surgical intervention. Experts say the study underscores the s
12h
Gizmodo
This Mexican American Astronaut Has a Unique Perspective on Borders The son of Mexican migrants, José Hernández grew up picking fruit on farms. He always dreamed of becoming an astronaut, and finally achieved his goal—after NASA rejected him 11 times. In 2004, he became part of NASA’s 19th class of astronauts. Advertisement While flying over North America from outer space, Hernández says he got a unique perspective on cross-border politics. “I had to go out of th
12h
Science | The Guardian
No such thing as 'fat but fit', major study finds ‘Metabolically healthy obese’ are 50% more likely to suffer heart disease than those of normal weight, finds University of Birmingham study People who are obese run an increased risk of heart failure and stroke even if they appear healthy, without the obvious warning signs such as high blood pressure or diabetes, according to a major new study. The findings, presented at the European Congress on
12h
Ingeniøren
Nye katalysatorer til storforurenende ME-lokomotiver har spillet fallitDSB har i fire år forsøgt at begrænse den massive forurening fra de gamle lokomotiver. Men enten øgede man udledningen af NO2, eller også revnede de nye katalysatorer.
12h
The Scientist RSS
Mice Successfully Reproduce with 3-D Printed OvariesResearchers have constructed prosthetic female reproductive organs and implanted them in mice, some of which conceived and gave birth to live young.
13h
The Atlantic
U.S. Imposes New Sanctions on Syria The Trump administration has imposed a new round of sanctions on five people and five companies in Syria, the U.S. Treasury Department announced Tuesday. In a statement, the department cited Syria’s “relentless attacks on civilians” as grounds for the sanctions. A day earlier, the Trump administration accused Syria’s Assad regime of cremating the remains of thousands of hanged prisoners in “an ef
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Polymerases pause to help mediate the flow of genetic informationStop-and-go traffic is typically a source of frustration, an unneccesary hold-up on the path from point A to point B. But when it comes to the molecular machinery that copies our DNA into RNA, a stop right at the beginning of the path may actually be helpful. Recent research from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research shows that this stop prevents another machine from immediately following the
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study confirms benefits of fennel in reducing postmenopause symptomsFennel, an anise-flavored herb used for cooking, has long been known for its health benefits for a variety of issues, including digestion and premenstrual symptoms. A new study confirms that it is also effective in the management of postmenopause symptoms such as hot flashes, sleeplessness, vaginal dryness, and anxiety, without serious side effects. The study outcomes are published online today in
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How have European freshwater fish species changed over time?Over time, humans have contributed to the loss of native species and have introduced non-native species throughout Europe. A new analysis shows how European freshwater fish have changed profoundly since 1840. At the continental scale, the contemporary fauna holds net 11 more species today as exotic species introduction (26 species) exceeded native species loss (15 species). But the biggest change
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study reveals how pesticide use and climate affect monarch butterfliesAn analysis of data in Illinois has found a link between higher county-level use of an herbicide called glyphosate and reduced abundance of adult monarch butterflies, especially in areas with concentrated agriculture. This association was only evident during the initial years of the adoption of herbicide-resistant crops (1994-2003), however, when glyphosate use was increasing most quickly.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Extra weight may increase dental risksBeing overweight or obese was linked with an increased likelihood of having poor oral health in a recent study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tool may help determine older adults' history of sports concussionsA new study in retired athletes takes the first steps in developing an objective tool for diagnosing a history of sports concussions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New test to rapidly diagnose sepsisResearchers have developed a test that can rapidly and reliably diagnose sepsis, a potentially life-threatening complication of bacterial infections.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Trial demonstrates benefits of learning sessions for managing rheumatoid arthritisA new study found that group-based quality improvement sessions help rheumatologists care for rheumatoid arthritis patients with the recommended 'treat to target' (TTT) approach to care. This approach involves setting a target for treatment, measuring progress towards achieving the target regularly, altering treatments until reaching and maintaining target, and sharing the decisions with patients.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Improved care of osteoarthritis may help improve older patients' mobilityIn a large study of individuals aged 55 years, hip and knee osteoarthritis was the greatest contributor to difficulty walking, and the effect increased with more hips and knees affected by osteoarthritis.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Analysis examines safety of antidepressant use during pregnancyUse of fluoxetine -- the most commonly prescribed antidepressant -- during pregnancy is linked with a slightly increased risk of malformations in infants, according to a recent analysis of published studies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Opiate use study in hospitalized seniors with nonsurgical conditions shows negative outcomesAlso being presented at AGS: Study on medical marijuana (MM) shows reluctance in those 65+ to try newly legalized option.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Male birds adjust courtship behavior based on social contextMale birds that have already paired up with a female aren't above looking for a little action on the side. A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances explores how male juncos adjust their courtship behavior to their social landscape, finding that while both paired and unpaired males will try to get the attention of a new female on their turf, they go about it in different ways.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Trump Efforts to Blunt Climate Tool Likely to Provoke Legal BacklashThe administration wants to weaken the “social cost of carbon” as it looks to overhaul Obama’s climate regulations.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How have European freshwater fish species changed over time?Over time, humans have contributed to the loss of native species and have introduced non-native species throughout Europe. A new analysis shows how European freshwater fish have changed profoundly since 1840. At the continental scale, the contemporary fauna holds net 11 more species today as exotic species introduction (26 species) exceeded native species loss (15 species). But the biggest change
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Gizmodo
'Molecular Condoms' Could Be the Best Form of Birth Control Yet GIF GIF source: Nucleus Medical Media In a breakthrough that almost sounds too good to be true, researchers have found a potential new form of birth control that could solve numerous problems. It offers the possibility of being effective for both sexes, no hormonal side effects, and might even be a Plan B that doesn’t piss off anti-abortion advocates. In a newly published study , scientists from
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Ingeniøren
Ingeniørerne har talt: Her er landets bedste ingeniørfirma For 17. år i streg kårer danske ingeniører og it-folk virksomhederne med det bedste image. Vil Novo Nordisk løbe med prisen igen, eller har medicinalkæmpen mistet sin førerposition? https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/profilanalysen-ingenioererne-har-talt-dette-landets-bedste-ingenioerfirma-8168 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
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Ingeniøren
Disse virksomheder har flest ledige jobs lige nu Månedens listen over de firmaer, der har allerflest jobopslag på Jobfinder. Find ud af, hvilke nye navne der har fået en plads i top ti. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/disse-virksomheder-har-flest-ledige-jobs-lige-nu-8159 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
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Gizmodo
Jordan Peele's Next Project Is a Terrifying Lovecraftian Story About Race in 1950s America Getty It was clear that after Get Out made a cool $162 million in America alone, writer-director Jordan Peele was going to go on and make more fantastic (and hopefully horrifying) things. After a couple of months of speculation, we now know what his next project’s going to be. Advertisement According to a Deadline report , Peele’s partnering with J.J. Abrams and Warner Brothers Television to adap
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The Atlantic
McMaster's Dilemma Donald Trump campaigned against the “swamp” and the establishment — but as president, it is respected professionals with government experience to whom he’s turned in times of crisis. The latest well-regarded official to find his credibility pulled into Trump’s maelstrom of scandal is National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster. “The place that has the highest risk is in the White House,” said Eric Ed
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NYT > Science
Wounded Troops Discharged for Misconduct Often Had PTSD or T.B.I.The Government Accountability Office found that thousands of soldiers were ousted, and cut off from benefits, despite diagnoses of traumatic brain injury or mental disorders.
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Gizmodo
If The Last Jedi Really Has the Biggest Reveal in Star Wars History, What Could It Be? Luke Skywalker in The Last Jedi. Image: Disney A Japanese ad for Star Wars: The Last Jedi makes a very intriguing claim—it says the film will include the biggest, most shocking reveal in Star Wars history. The obvious answer is that this will be the discovery of Rey’s origin, but we got to thinking... what if it isn’t? Advertisement Here’s the ad, via Star Wars News Net . (Note: We reached out to
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Cities need 'hedges as well as trees' for environmentScientists suggest smaller plants are better at absorbing air pollution around tall buildings.
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New Scientist - News
Corals that grow faster in warm water could beat climate changeThe unique history of the Red Sea means that reefs in its northern part may be able to adapt to higher water temperatures, at least for a while
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NYT > Science
Jerry Canterbury, Whose Paralysis Led to Informed Consent Laws, Is Dead at 78A surgery left Mr. Canterbury partly paralyzed at 19 led to a ruling that transformed how doctors deal with patients in evaluating the risks of treatment.
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Gizmodo
Trump's Bodyguard Leaks the Defense Secretary's Phone Number 'the Old-Fashioned Way' Photo: AP Donald Trump famously doesn’t trust computers. At an event on New Year’s Eve, he told reporters, “You know, if you have something really important, write it out and have it delivered by courier, the old-fashioned way.” Well, a pen and paper screwed him when his bodyguard recently displayed the cellphone number of the Secretary of Defense for all the world to see. What you see in the pic
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The Atlantic
Did President Trump Obstruct Justice? Tuesday’s bombshell report that President Trump asked former FBI Director James Comey to drop the federal investigation into former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn will almost certainly strengthen a growing consensus among legal scholars that the president may have committed obstruction of justice, an impeachable offense. The New York Times reported Tuesday afternoon that Comey kept memos
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Free range-eggs seen as tastier, more nutritious and safer, study findsPeople choose to buy free-range or cage-free eggs because they believe they taste better and are better quality than eggs from caged hens, new research published today suggests.
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The Atlantic
Sharapova Denied Wild Card to the French Open Tennis pro Maria Sharapova will not be allowed to compete in this year’s French Open on May 28, the president of the French Tennis Federation (FTF), Bernard Giudicelli, announced Tuesday. Last year, Sharapova was banned from the sport for 15 months after testing positive for meldonium, a heart disease drug. April marked the end of the ban and the start of her official return to professional tenni
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cognitive science
Of genetics, reality, brains, and topology submitted by /u/ImpracticalJuggler [link] [comments]
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The Atlantic
The 'Leak' in the Age of Alternative Facts “I think national security is put at risk by this leak and leaks like this.” That was H.R. McMaster, talking to reporters on Tuesday morning. President Trump’s national security advisor was not referring, in this case, to the president’s reported leak of classified intelligence to Russian officials, during a meeting in the White House—a leak that The Washington Post , corroborated by several othe
17h
The Atlantic
American Institutions Strike Back The bad news is that Donald Trump is the most incompetent president in modern American history. The good news is that Donald Trump is the most incompetent president in modern American history. He was too incompetent to understand his own health care bill, or accurately describe the direction in which the “armada” designed to intimidate North Korea was heading, or restrain himself from disclosing
17h
Gizmodo
Breville Smart Oven Air: The Best Toaster Oven Is Now An Air-Fryer And Dehydrator You voted Breville’s Toaster Ovens the best in the business, and their latest, the Smart Oven Air , even replaces your dehydrator and air-fryer, along with your toaster (obviously), your oven (maybe), and possibly even your slow cooker. The Smart Oven Mini I’ve had for years is a great alternative to my oven and microwave , but the Smart Oven Air makes me question why I even have a full size oven
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Loose Lips What We’re Following White House Bombshells: In the aftermath of The Washington Post ’s report that President Trump divulged top-secret information to Russian officials, National-Security Adviser H.R. McMaster issued a contradictory defense , claiming that Trump’s actions were “wholly appropriate,” and that he didn’t know where the information came from. Most of Trump’s defenders have emphasized
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The Atlantic
The House Demands to See the Comey Memos Updated on May 16 at 7:43 p.m. ET On Tuesday evening, congressional lawmakers were forced to respond to the second immediately controversial story involving the president to surface in roughly 24 hours. The New York Times reported that President Trump asked former FBI Director James Comey to halt a federal investigation into ousted National-Security Adviser Michael Flynn, citing a memo written by
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Loneliness in young adults linked to poor sleep qualityResearchers from King's College London have found a link between loneliness and poor sleep quality in a study of more than 2,000 British young adults.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows that cafes, restaurants and fast food outlets, and schools, are key sources of unhealthy, non-core foods for adolescentsAdolescents are getting many of their unhealthy, non-core foods such as soft drinks, chips, and sweets from cafes, restaurants, fast-food outlets (collectively called 'eateries'), and schools, according to a UK study presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity in Porto, Portugal.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Just 2 weeks of inactivity could lead to changes that increase risk of developing diseaseNew research presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Porto, Portugal (May 17-20) shows that just two weeks of inactivity in young healthy people can reduce muscle mass and produce metabolic changes that could lead to an increased risk of developing chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and potentially premature death.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows regular physical activity and reduced sedentary time reduces build-up of dangerous liver fatNew research presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Porto, Portugal (May 17-20) shows that both regular physical activity and avoiding inactivity (sedentary behavior) help reduce build-up of dangerous liver fat, an important complication of obesity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study of 3.5 million people shows 'healthy' obese people are still at higher risk of cardiovascular disease events than the general populationNew research presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Porto, Portugal, shows that so-called 'metabolically healthy' obese people are still at higher risk of cardiovascular disease events such as heart failure or stroke than normal weight people.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Social ties help animals live longerLarge families and strong social ties help animals live longer, new research suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Breast cancer risk is more affected by total body fat than abdominal fatA reduction in overall body fat, rather than abdominal fat, is associated with lower levels of breast cancer markers. The study published in Endocrine-Related Cancer, found that levels of several breast cancer risk markers were reduced in postmenopausal women who lost total body fat, rather than just belly fat. These results emphasize the importance of maintaining a healthy weight and could influe
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Inflammatory signature of nonalcoholic fatty liver diseaseA team of investigators has identified key inflammatory cells involved in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Current treatment for the disorder involves changes to diet, yet no medication has been approved for treatment. Findings from this study provide a potential therapeutic target and offer the possibility for developing a treatment.
18h
WIRED
Bragi’s Fancy New Earbuds Translate for You in Real Time The new Dash Pros also offer longer battery life, fitness tracking, and that oh-so-sweet custom sound. The post Bragi's Fancy New Earbuds Translate for You in Real Time appeared first on WIRED .
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Science | The Guardian
Barking up the right tree: study shows we can understand dog growls Scientists discover humans can correctly identify canine emotions – with women better at it than men Humans can determine a dog’s mood by the sound of its growl, scientists have found, with women showing greater ability than men. While previous studies have found that humans can unpick the context of barks, the latest study investigated whether the same was true of canine grumbles, with some prev
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Higher temperatures could trigger an uptick in damselfly cannibalismExperiments in the lab suggest that increases in temperature could indirectly lead to an increase in cannibalistic damselfly nymphs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Analysis determines odds of a hookah non-smoker taking first puffA positive attitude toward and desire to take up hookah smoking are the most likely predictors of a young adult becoming a hookah tobacco smoker, researchers found in the first nationally representative analysis of hookah use by young adults over an extended follow-up period.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Large Impacts May Cause Volcanic EruptionsReally big meteorite or asteroid strikes may cause melting and deep deformations that eventually lead to volcanic eruptions. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Social ties help animals live longerLarge families and strong social ties help animals live longer, new research suggests.
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Gizmodo
Why This Man Is Risking Jail by Refusing to Surrender Passwords at a London Airport Photo Courtesy Cage Muhammad Rabbani wasn’t shocked last winter when he was stopped by British authorities at Heathrow airport. It would’ve been more astonishing had he simply walked up to the passport counter, declared his business and been allowed to pass. Advertisement A British activist whose work entails the defense of people affected by British anti-terror laws—and the war on terror, more b
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New species of South American rabbit discoveredA rabbit known for centuries to exist in South America is different enough from its cousins to be its own unique species, research has concluded.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers study DNA from explosivesResearchers hope to unmask manufacturers of homemade explosives using new advancements in DNA technology.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Popular weight-loss surgery puts patients at high risk for alcohol problemsOne in five patients who undergo one of the most popular weight-loss surgical procedures is likely to develop problems with alcohol, with symptoms sometimes not appearing until years after their surgery, according to one of the largest, longest-running studies of adults who got weight-loss surgery.
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Gizmodo
Adequate Man How The Wizards Ended Up With The Worst Team Name In Sports | The Slot What Happens Whe Adequate Man How The Wizards Ended Up With The Worst Team Name In Sports | The Slot What Happens When a Bike-Friendly L.A. City Council Candidate Turns Out to Be an Internet Troll? | Fusion White House Aides’ Actual Defense of Trump’s Russia Leak: He’s Not Smart Enough to Cause Harm | The Root White People Are Amazed That a White Woman Was Treated Like a White Woman |
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cockatoos keep their tools safeOnly a few animal species such as New Caledonian crows or some primates have so far been found to habitually use tools. Even fewer can manufacture their own tools. Nevertheless, the Goffin's cockatoo, an Indonesian parrot, exhibit both abilities while seemingly lacking a genetic adaptation for tool use. Researchers have now shown yet another tool-related ability in these clever parrots.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New gene therapy for vision loss proven safe in humansIn a small and preliminary clinical trial, Johns Hopkins researchers and their collaborators have shown that an experimental gene therapy that uses viruses to introduce a therapeutic gene into the eye is safe and that it may be effective in preserving the vision of people with wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Medical abortions obtained through online telemedicine shown to be effective, safeWomen in Ireland and Northern Ireland acquiring medical abortion pills through online telemedicine report successful terminations with low rates of adverse effects, according to new research published in The BMJ by Princeton University, the University of Texas at Austin and Women on Web.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Early medical abortion using medication and online telemedicine can be effective and safeMedical abortion using online telemedicine and self-administered medication can be highly effective and safe, and outcomes compare favorably with in-clinic protocols. Reported rates of adverse events are low. Women are able to self-identify symptoms of potentially serious complications, and most report seeking medical attention when advised. Results have important implications for women living in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Treatment in hospital by older doctors linked to higher death ratesPatients in US hospitals treated by older physicians have higher mortality than patients cared for by younger physicians, except those physicians treating high volumes of patients, finds a study published by The BMJ today.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Online abortion service can offer alternative to unsafe methods to end pregnancyEarly medical abortion using online telemedicine can offer an alternative to unsafe methods to end a pregnancy for women in countries where access to safe abortion is restricted, finds a study published by The BMJ today.
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Gizmodo
Here Is the Porn Video That Played in DC's Union Station Last Night [NSFW] Last night, a display screen in Union Station—one of Washington DC’s main transit hubs—found itself moonlighting as a tiny pornographic theater. Now, Gizmodo can exclusively reveal footage of the incident, and I can assure you that, one, it’s definitely pornography, and two, I have never had a commute this stimulating. Advertisement While not technically safe for work, this version has the most e
19h
The Atlantic
Did Trump Try to Shut Down the FBI's Michael Flynn Investigation? During a meeting in February, President Trump asked then-FBI Director James Comey to kill an investigation into former National-Security Adviser Michael Flynn, saying, “I hope you can let this go.” That’s according to a memo that Comey wrote after the meeting and circulated to top FBI officials, and which was read to—though not obtained by—a reporter The New York Times . Comey’s memo reportedly f
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