Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nokia and Apple settle long-running legal disputesNokia and Apple have settled their numerous legal disputes after signing an agreement to work together.
11h
The Atlantic

The 25th Amendment Makes Presidential Disability a Political Question Last week, in The New York Times, Ross Douthat became the latest and perhaps most prominent advocate of using the Twenty-Fifth Amendment to remove President Donald Trump from office. Section 4 of the Twenty-Fifth Amendment allows the vice president and a majority of the Cabinet to recommend the removal of the president in cases where he is “unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office,
11h
The Atlantic

The Peculiar Prophecies of Nostradonald Trump Donald Trump doesn’t need a crystal ball, he has a mysterious glowing orb. No, wait. Scratch that. Donald Trump doesn’t need a crystal ball, he has a mysterious clairvoyant Twitter account. There seems to be, Trump watchers have noticed, a weirdly prophetic tweet in Trump’s past for every new aspect of his presidency—from his weekends golfing at Mar-a-Lago to each new bombshell scoop about the em
11h
Ingeniøren

Blod fra ebola-overlever kan lede til fremtidig vaccineForskere har fundet antistoffer i en vestafrikansk mands blod, der måske kan være nøglen til en vaccine mod alle ebola-stammer.
11h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Herd knowledgeAs a warming climate threatens traditional food supplies in the Arctic, one rural Alaskan village is flying in hundreds of reindeer by cargo plane. James Cook went to find out why.
11h
BBC News - Science & Environment

The DNA detectiveA man abandoned as a baby 61 years ago traced his family using a DNA detective. But what do they do?
11h
Ingeniøren

Her er 'gør det selv'-elbilenEn ny åben platform til elbiler skulle kunne samles på en time.
12h
Ingeniøren

VIDEO: Se jernbanebro blive opført på blot ti dageEn tidsramme på ti dage fik travlheden på de sydsjællandske skinner til at blomstre hen over påsken. Seks byggepladser med 150 mand arbejdede med elektrificeringen af tognettet og byggede en bro.
12h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Frozen 'space sperm' passes fertility testViable mouse sperm stored in space gives hope for sperm banks on the Moon, a Japanese team says.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new tool for discovering nanoporous materialsEPFL scientists have developed a mathematical 'face-recognition' method for identifying and discovering nanoporous materials based on their pore size.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Weather patterns' influence on frost timingThe frost-free season in North America is approximately 10 days longer now than it was a century ago. In a new study, published today in Nature Communications, researchers from the University of Utah and the US Geological Survey parse the factors contributing to the timing of frost in the United States. Atmospheric circulation patterns, they found, were the dominant influence on frost timing, alth
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wolves need space to roam to control expanding coyote populationsWolves and other top predators need large ranges to be able to control smaller predators whose populations have expanded, according to a study appearing May 23 in Nature Communications. The results were similar across three continents, showing that as top predators' ranges were cut back and fragmented, they were no longer able to control smaller predators.
12h
The Atlantic

American Presidents for Decades Secretly Recorded Their Conversations What did the president say? And how did he say it? These riffs on the questions that Republican Senator Howard Baker asked during the Watergate hearings help frame the current political moment in America. Whether they apply to President Trump’s alleged request for loyalty from then-FBI Director James Comey, or his Oval Office remarks to senior Russian officials about sensitive intelligence matter
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new tool for discovering nanoporous materialsMaterials classified as "nanoporous" have structures (or "frameworks") with pores up to 100 nm in diameter. These include diverse materials used in different fields from gas separation, catalysis, and even medicine (e.g. activated charcoal). The performance of nanoporous materials depends on both their chemical composition and the shape of their pores, but the latter is very difficult to quantify.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wolves need space to roam to control expanding coyote populationsWolves and other top predators need large ranges to be able to control smaller predators whose populations have expanded to the detriment of a balanced ecosystem.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Air circulation affects frost more than global warming—for nowGardeners know the frustration of a false spring. Coaxed outside by warm weather, some people plant their gardens in the spring only to see a sudden late frost strike at the plants with a killer freezer burn. Grumbling green thumbs, along with farmers and water supply managers, would benefit from more accurate predictions of the first and last frosts of the season.
12h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Publish houses of brick, not mansions of straw Papers need to include fewer claims and more proof to make the scientific literature more reliable, warns William G. Kaelin Jr. Nature 545 387 doi: 10.1038/545387a
12h
Dagens Medicin

Faglig vurdering afgørende i nye visitationsregler for fedmeoperationer Sundhedsstyrelsen har offentliggjort nye visitationsretningslinjer for fedmekirurgi. Bmi- eller aldersgrænser bliver ikke afgørende.
12h
The Atlantic

The Mick Mulvaney Budget Hits the Hill The budget proposal the White House will deliver to Congress on Tuesday might carry Donald Trump’s name, but it reflects Mick Mulvaney’s fiscal vision. The president has been uncharacteristically quiet on the most expansive policy statement of his young administration, ceding responsibility for both its substance and message to his staunchly conservative budget director. And Mulvaney has certainl
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chinese online retailer developing one-ton delivery dronesChina's biggest online retailer, JD.com Inc., announced plans Monday to develop drone aircraft capable of carrying a ton or more for long-distance deliveries.
13h
WIRED

An Improved AlphaGo Wins Its First Game Against the World’s Top Go Player Nineteen-year-old grandmaster Ke Jie hoped to beat the Google AI as its own game. But the AI is better than ever. The post An Improved AlphaGo Wins Its First Game Against the World's Top Go Player appeared first on WIRED .
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China urges balance on environment, economy in AntarcticaA Chinese leader on Tuesday urged international representatives to strike a "proper balance" between environmental and economic interests in Antarctica, as the frozen continent's vulnerability to climate change raises worries that some nations could seek to exploit its natural resources.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google AI programme beats top-ranked Go playerGoogle's computer programme AlphaGo beat the world's top-ranked player in the ancient Chinese board game Go on Tuesday, re-affirming the arrival of what its developers tout as a ground-breaking new form of artificial intelligence.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Despite partisanship surrounding voter ID, most voters don't believe it suppresses turnoutMost Americans—even average Democrats—do not accept the argument that voter identification laws can suppress voter turnout, according to a new study that includes a University of Kansas professor.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New project uses phones and drones to monitor endangered speciesConservation researchers have developed an interactive software tool called ConservationFIT that can "read" digital images of animal footprints captured from smartphones, cameras or drones and accurately identify the species, sex and age of the animal that made the tracks, and even match tracks to individual animals.
13h
Dagens Medicin

Kardiolog-formand: Svært at finde kandidater til fagudvalg under Medicinrådet Habilitetsregler og stigende arbejdspres kan gøre det svært at finde egnede kandidater til Medicinrådets fagudvalg, mener formanden for Dansk Cardiologisk Selskab, Lene Holmvang.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why our brain cells may prevent us burning fat when we're dietingA study carried out in mice may help explain why dieting can be an inefficient way to lose weight: key brain cells act as a trigger to prevent us burning calories when food is scarce.
14h
Ingeniøren

Pensionskassen vil fortsat investere i fossil energi: Nu skal ingeniørerne til afstemningISP Pensions medlemmer skal senest 30. maj tilkendegive, om de ønsker, deres pensionskasse fortsat investerer i fossile energiselskaber. Bestyrelsen opfordrer medlemmerne til at beholde de klima-uvenlige investeringer.
14h
Science-Based Medicine

Confessions of a Quack: Holistic Harry Tells the Inside Story of Alternative Medicine Confessions of a Quack is fiction, but it provides real insights into the thinking processes and motivations of quacks, alternative medicine providers, and their patients.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sony chief promises profitability, but is short on specificsSony's leader promised a comeback for the Japanese electronics and entertainment company having its best profitability in two decades.
14h
Dagens Medicin

Overgange og fejlordinationer er skyld i alvorlige fejl i AK-behandlingDet er især, når patienter flyttes mellem to sektorer, at der sker fejl i behandlingen med blodfortyndende medicin. Det viser et nyt studie, som har undersøgt årsagen til utilsigtede hændelser i forbindelse med AK-behandling.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

North Korea-linked hackers 'highly likely' behind WannaCry: SymantecThe Lazarus hacking group, widely believed to be connected to North Korea, is "highly likely" responsible for the WannaCry global cyberattack that hit earlier this month, US anti-virus firm Symantec said.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China scrambles to tame bike chaosA booming rental bike business has flooded China's streets with packs of cyclists, but their habit of going the wrong way and abandoning their rides anywhere is causing havoc.
14h
Live Science

New Sunscreen Recommendations for 2017: Here's What to Look ForNot all sunscreens are created equal: Nearly three-quarters of sunscreens are either ineffective or contain chemicals that could harm your health, a new report finds.
14h
Ingeniøren

Kaspersky efter XP-panik: WannaCry-orm gik efter Windows 7 og Server 2008 Langt størstedelen af computere ramt af WannaCry kørte Windows 7, oplyser Kaspersky Lab. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/wannacry-inficeringer-ramte-hovedsageligt-windows-7-saa-godt-intet-paa-xp-1076944 Version2
14h
Dagens Medicin

’Fed, men fit’ kan være en myte Det er ikke noget, som man kan kalde ’’sund fedme’, slår ny forkning fast.
15h
Live Science

5 Things You Didn't Know About SunscreenA stroll down the sunscreen aisle can be a stressful experience. Here's what to keep in mind.
15h
Science | The Guardian

High blood platelet count 'as good a cancer predictor as a lump in the breast' Common blood tests could help diagnose cancer early even in patients that show no other symptoms, study finds A common blood test could help diagnose cancer earlier, according to research suggesting a high platelet count is strongly associated with the disease. Platelets are tiny blood cells that circulate in the body, helping wounds to clot. But in some individuals too many platelets are produce
15h
Science | The Guardian

Living in cities 'puts teens at greater risk of psychotic experiences' Findings suggest early interventions for adolescents brought up in urban areas could be valuable, researchers say Teenagers who live in large cities could be at greater risk of having psychotic experiences , according to research examining the impact of urban life on mental health. The finding ties in with previous studies and suggests that early interventions for young people in deprived urban n
15h
Live Science

Facts About Sunscreen and Sun ProtectionSunscreen is the best line of defense against skin cancer. However, many people aren't using it correctly.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Food is not just the sum of its nutrientsThe nutritional value of a food should be evaluated on the basis of the foodstuff as a whole, and not as an effect of the individual nutrients. This is the conclusion of an international expert panel of epidemiologists, physicians, food and nutrition scientists and brought together by the University of Copenhagen and University of Reading. Their conclusion reshapes our understanding of the importa
16h
Live Science

Chaco Culture: Pueblo Builders of the SouthwestThe Chaco Culture flourished between roughly the 9th and 13th centuries A.D. in what is now New Mexico.
16h
The Scientist RSS

Companies Pursue Diagnostics that Mine the MicrobiomeTests so far typically screen for risky patterns that may augment traditional types of clinical data.
16h
Gizmodo

Watch Words Beautifully Express Their Own Meaning on an Old Typewriter GIF Random Clips This austere and delightful little short shows just how much you can communicate with few resources and a decent amount of ingenuity. Clocking in at just over a minute long, Disillusionment of 10 Point Font is like an amuse-bouche of viral videos—doesn’t waste your time and leaves a nice impression. Its creators simply type out words and animate them in a metaphorical way that co
16h
The Atlantic

Kim Jong Un Plans to Mass Produce Ballistic Missiles Following the launch of a medium-range ballistic missile on Sunday, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un called for the missile’s mass production and eventual deployment, the nation’s Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) reported Monday. According to the news outlet, Kim approved the missile “for action” after praising its accuracy, saying it should be “rapidly mass produced in a serial way.” Despite rec
16h
The Atlantic

'We Can't Walk Away From This Truth' Last week, the City of New Orleans finished removing four monuments—to Confederate President Jefferson Davis, Generals P.G.T. Beauregard and Robert E. Lee, and the postwar battle of Liberty Place. The removals occasioned threats, protests, and celebrations. On Friday, Mayor Mitch Landrieu explained to his city why he had concluded that the monuments needed to come down. -Yoni Appelbaum The soul o
16h
Science | The Guardian

Robot hearts: medicine’s new frontier From bovine valves to electrical motors and 3-D printed hearts, cardiologists are forging ahead with technologies once dismissed as “crazy ideas” On a cold, bright January morning I walked south across Westminster Bridge to St Thomas’ Hospital, an institution with a proud tradition of innovation: I was there to observe a procedure generally regarded as the greatest advance in cardiac surgery sinc
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Despite partisanship surrounding voter ID, most voters don't believe it suppresses turnoutMost Americans -- even average Democrats -- do not accept the argument that voter identification laws can suppress voter turnout, according to a new study that includes a University of Kansas professor.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Strategic brain training positively affects neural connectivity for individuals with TBIA study from the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas shows that a specific instructor-led brain training protocol can stimulate structural changes in the brain and neural connections even years after a traumatic brain injury (TBI). The findings, published in Brain and Behavior, further suggest that changes in cortical thickness and neural network connectivity may prove an e
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Off-the-shelf, power-generating clothes are almost hereA lightweight, comfortable jacket that can generate the power to light up a jogger at night may sound futuristic, but materials scientist Trisha Andrew at UMass Amherst could make one today. In a new paper this month, she and colleagues outline a way to apply breathable, pliable, metal-free electrodes to fabric and off-the-shelf clothing so it feels good to the touch and also transports enough ele
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study examines child death rates in motor vehicle crashes by stateNew research finds that an estimated 1,100 pediatric deaths could be averted over five years with an absolute 10 percent improvement in child restraint use.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Flight delay? Lost luggage? Don't blame airline mergers, Indiana University research showsAn analysis of 15 years of US Department of Transportation statistics found that airline consolidation has had little negative impact on on-time performance.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dentists in good compliance with American Heart Association guidelines, according to Rochester epidemiology projectIn the first study examining dental records in the Rochester Epidemiology Project, results show that dentists and oral surgeons are in good compliance with guidelines issued by the American Heart Association (AHA) in 2007, describing prophylactic antibiotic use prior to invasive dental procedures.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Family history of Alzheimer's may alter metabolic gene that increases risk for diseaseA new Iowa State University study may have identified the link that explains years of conflicting research over a mitochondrial gene and the risk for Alzheimer's disease. Researchers found a dramatic difference in the gene's impact on memory, general cognitive function and risk based on a family history of Alzheimer's disease and the length of a specific section of the gene.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

US child welfare system could save $12 billion, improve outcomesImproving prevention and treatment services are realistic reforms to the child welfare system that could improve long-term outcomes for children while cutting $12 billion in costs. RAND developed a quantitative model to reach its recommendations. The model is the first-ever attempt to integrate risk of maltreatment, detection, paths through the system and consequences to predict the impact of poli
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Just one alcoholic drink a day increases breast cancer risk, exercise lowers riskA new report that analyzed the global scientific research on how diet, weight and exercise affect breast cancer risk finds there are steps women can take to lower their risk. The report finds that daily alcohol consumption and adult weight gain increase risk; physical activity and breastfeeding lower risk. The report also reveals, for the first time, that vigorous exercise decreases the risk of bo
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pediatricians can play a pivotal role in reducing pediatric firearm-related injuriesA review led by Children's National Health System researchers published May 23, 2017 in Hospital Pediatrics indicates that while firearms are present in 18 percent to 64 percent of US homes, almost 40 percent of parents erroneously believe that their children are unaware where weapons are stored, and 22 percent of parents wrongly think that their children have never handled household firearms.
17h
Ingeniøren

Universitet overrasker: Haler ind på DTU i Profilanalysen Aarhus Universitet er årets højdespringer i Ingeniørens Profilanalyse. Fusionen med Ingeniørhøjskolen har styrket de ingeniørstuderendes og ansattes samarbejde med erhvervslivet. Det er med til at gøre universitetet synligt i ingeniørverdenen. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/universitet-overrasker-haler-ind-pa-dtu-profilanalysen-8031 Emner Arbejdsmarked Arbejdsmiljø Jobfinder
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flight delay? Lost luggage? Don't blame airline mergers, research showsIt's often said that airline mergers lead to more headaches for travelers, including more flight delays, late arrivals and missed connections. But an analysis of 15 years of U.S. Department of Transportation statistics found that airline consolidation has had little negative impact on on-time performance.
17h
New on MIT Technology Review

Curiosity May Be Vital for Truly Smart AIMaking machines inquisitive could improve their ability to perform important complex tasks.
17h
Gizmodo

The Mist Looks Surprisingly Timely for a Show About a Monstrous Cloud Image: YouTube We’ve gotten a few evocative trailers for Spike TV’s eerie, violent Stephen King adaptation, The Mist . Now we have a behind-the-scenes featurette that explains a bit more about the characters, and how the show will focus not just how they’re affected by the titular menace, but also on how living in terror will reshape the community at its core. Oh, and of course, it’s also “a meta
17h
Ars Technica

There’s new evidence tying WCry ransomware worm to prolific hacking group Enlarge (credit: Health Service Journal) Researchers have found more digital fingerprints tying this month's WCry ransomware worm to the same prolific hacking group that attacked Sony Pictures in 2014 and the Bangladesh Central Bank last year. Last week, a researcher at Google identified identical code found in a WCry sample from February and an early 2015 version of Contopee , a malicious backdo
17h
Gizmodo

Court: Getting Naked to Protest TSA Isn't Protected Speech Screengrab: KOIN 6 The Ninth US Circuit Court of Appeals has determined that a man who got buck naked to protest an invasive search by the TSA was not within his rights. The good news is that the court went on to define how it could have been protected protest speech, so now you have a guide. The defendant, John Brennan, was arrested at Portland International Airport (PDX) in 2012 for indecent ex
18h
Ingeniøren

Landdistrikter til hovedstaden: Hold fingrene fra vores bredbåndsstøtteStatens støtte til bredbånd er sidste år blandt andet gået til adresser i København. Det får landdistrikterne til at reagere og kræve nye kriterier for uddelling af de få støttekroner.
18h
Gizmodo

According to Mel Brooks, the New Star Wars 'Explosion' Could Make Spaceballs 2 a Reality Image: Spaceballs, MGM While History of the World Part I might be the most obvious Mel Brooks movie to get a sequel (of course, there being only one of those is part of the joke), Spaceballs has aged incredibly well. Not only is science fiction huge in movies again, but the same franchises lampooned in that film are back in a big way. And it’s that phenomena that Mel Brooks says is re-kickstartin
19h
Inside Science

The Vocal Cord Movement -- 10,000 Miles The Vocal Cord Movement -- 10,000 Miles Singing is not just emotion -- it is motion as well. But how far do the vocal cords crawl in a single operatic performance? The Vocal Cord Movement -- 10,000 Miles Video of The Vocal Cord Movement -- 10,000 Miles Human Monday, May 22, 2017 - 21:30 Jason Socrates Bardi, Editor Krzysztof Izdebski of Pacific Voice and Speech Foundation talks about how far voca
19h
Gizmodo

Trump Official Met with Palmer Luckey, Chuck Johnson to Discuss the Wall, For Some Reason [Updated] Image: AP Photo/Eric Risberg On the day he assumed his new job as head of the US Interior Department (DOI), Ryan Zinke rode a horse through the streets of Washington. It seems only fitting now that we should find actual horseshit in the retired Navy SEAL’s office. Last month, Zinke, the man who runs 59 national parks and oversees more than 500 million acres of federal land, managed to squeeze in
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research could help develop drugs to better address heart problems in diabeticsResearch published in Experimental Physiology shows that diabetes-induced changes in heartbeat are primarily regulated by the β1-adrenoceptor. This discovery, once confirmed in humans, may lead to better treatment of heart problems in diabetics by enabling more targeted drugs to be produced.
20h
Science : NPR

Me, Myself, and IKEA: What Our Love For Swedish Furniture Says About Narcissism In general, people show a subtle bias toward the self. This is why we love the IKEA furniture we've built, and gravitate toward others with the same name. But there are much larger implications, too. (Image credit: Renee Klahr)
20h
The Atlantic

Trump's 'Inappropriate' Request to Intelligence Chiefs President Donald Trump reportedly tried, unsuccessfully, to enlist Admiral Michael Rogers, the director of the National Security Agency, and Daniel Coats, the director of national intelligence, to publicly refute the possibility of collusion after former FBI Director James Comey announced in March that the bureau is investigating potential links between Trump campaign associates and the Russian g
21h
New Scientist - News

EU nations set to wipe out forests and not account for emissionsThe drive for biofuels that international treaties wrongly consider to be emissions-free is driving plans to boost tree harvests in Europe, forgetting about associated emissions
21h
Gizmodo

Pick Up A Ceramic Blade For Easier Opening Of All Those Kinja Deals Purchases Slice Mini Cutter , $8 The best Kinja Deals aren’t on the products you’ve been waiting months for a price drop on (unless you’re a gamer), they’re on products you didn’t know you needed, or didn’t even know existed. I picked up this auto-retracting ceramic blade through one of our deals a few weeks ago, and it’s been fantastic. The blade goes through packing tape like butter, is only exposed when
21h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Peace and Poison What We’re Following Trump’s Trip: In Saudi Arabia yesterday, the president delivered a speech about Islam , calling for a crackdown on extremism and increased cooperation between the U.S. and the Muslim world. His comments—which, Graeme Wood writes , seemed tailored to please his Saudi audience—marked a dramatic shift in tone from the inflammatory rhetoric of his campaign. Today, he’s in Israel,
21h
The Atlantic

Why New Evidence Suggests Big Trouble Ahead for Michael Flynn In a letter to the House Oversight Committee chairman Monday, a top Democratic lawmaker suggested former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn broke the law last year by making false statements during a background-check interview for his top-secret security clearance. Lying to federal investigators during a background check can be a felony under federal law. Maryland Representative Elijah Cummi
21h
Gizmodo

Police Confirm 19 Dead, 50 Injured in Incident at Manchester Arena [Updating] Screenshot: ABC News/YouTube Initial reports indicated that it could possibly have just been a blown speaker, but it appears that an explosion has occurred at Manchester Arena in the UK this evening. Concertgoers fled what is being reported as an explosion that shook the building. Now, police have confirmed multiple fatalities and injuries occurred at a concert by the singer Ariana Grande. Detail
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

City life could present psychosis risk for adolescentsLiving in a city could significantly increase young people's vulnerability to psychotic experiences, according to a new study from King's College London and Duke University.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Raised blood platelet levels 'strong predictor' of cancerHaving a high blood platelet count is a strong predictor of cancer and should be urgently investigated to save lives, according to a large-scale study.
22h
Ars Technica

Universal’s Dark Universe risks being yet another extended universe franchise Enlarge / Not just any universe... a DARK one. (credit: Universal Studios ) If you can't beat 'em, misunderstand 'em. That appears to be the logic coming from the programming wizards at Universal Studios. The film production company took the (mummy) wraps off its "Dark Universe" initiative on Monday, and its intent is clear: to "reboot" the company's old monster-movie franchises over the next few
22h
Gizmodo

The Open Source K-Type Keyboard Makes A Fantastic First Impression As nice as some of boards you can pick up on Amazon are, the only real way to get the perfect mechanical keyboard is to build it it yourself. Engineered by a small group of enthusiasts known as Input Club , the K-Type is a fully-customizable, completely open source keyboard that’s the next best thing to DIY. The K-Type was designed from the ground up to be “the most advanced tenkeyless keyboard e
22h
Ars Technica

Daimler begins construction on a $562 million lithium-ion battery factory in Germany Enlarge / Federal Chancellor Dr. Angela Merkel in a conversation with Dieter Zetsche (Chairman of the Board of Management of Daimler AG and Head of Mercedes-Benz Cars) and others. (credit: Daimler) On Monday, German Chancellor Angela Merkel visited the site of a future lithium-ion battery factory in the eastern German town of Kamenz. The factory is being developed by Mercedes-Benz manufacturer Da
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New insight into life-threatening childhood brain cancerThe most common type of malignant childhood brain cancer has been identified as seven separate conditions each needing a different treatment, new research has revealed.
22h
The Atlantic

A Simple Act That Endeared Trump to Israelis President Trump’s trip to Israel has already been marred by awkward moments—from the minor (Melania appearing to bat his hand away on the Israeli airport tarmac) to the major (Trump telling reporters that he “never mentioned the word or name Israel” to Russian officials when he disclosed intelligence about ISIS, thereby all but confirming that the intel was Israeli). And yet, as far as some Israe
22h
The Atlantic

The Explosion in Manchester Here’s what we know on Tuesday, May 23: —Greater Manchester Police said 22 people are dead and 59 injured following reports of an explosion Monday at the Manchester Arena. —Police identified the bomber as Salman Abedi, 22. He too was killed in the attack. —ISIS claimed responsibility—though the extent of the group’s role in the attack is unclear. —The venue was the scene of an Ariana Grande conce
22h
Live Science

Jessica Simpson Has an IUD: 7 Things to Know About This Form of Birth ControlJessica Simpson recently revealed she has an intrauterine device (IUD). Here are some important facts to know about IUDs.
22h
Gizmodo

Zack Snyder Leaves Justice League After Family Tragedy Zack Snyder on the set of Batman v Superman. Image: Warner Bros. In one of the most heart-wrenching stories you’re likely to ever hear, director Zack Snyder has decided to step back from directing Justice League to be with his family after the tragic suicide of his 20-year-old daughter, Autumn. Joss Whedon will finish the film. Autumn Snyder took her life in March but the family decided to keep t
23h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Do You Get The Impression That Captain Sig Isn't Quite Ready To Talk About This? #DeadliestCatch | Tuesdays at 9/8c Greenhorn Clark Pederson asks Captain Sig for permission to marry Mandy. Sig's answer isn't exactly what he was hoping for. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/deadliest-catch/ Get the latest on your favorite captains: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery
23h
Live Science

In Science, Good Looks Don't Pay, Study FindsPeople make snap judgements about scientists too.
23h
Gizmodo

Deadspin An Attempt At Untangling The Legend Of Madison Bumgarner Dating A Girl Named Madison Bumgar Deadspin An Attempt At Untangling The Legend Of Madison Bumgarner Dating A Girl Named Madison Bumgarner | The Muse A Guide to All the Best, Worst and Weirdest 2017 TV Pilots You’ll Probably Never Watch | Fusion Democrats Are Turning to the Absolute Worst Person for Help Winning the 2018 Election | The Root Viral Video Shows Black Man Slapping White Woman for Calling Him the N-Word |
23h
Popular Science

MIT used bacteria to create a self-ventilating workout shirt Technology Next step: a garment that releases a nice aroma at the gym. Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have created a prototype of a wearable that vents itself automatically in response to sweat—and it does so…
23h
Ars Technica

Lawbreakers dev: PC/console cross-platform play is “dumb” Enlarge / All those Lawbreakers characters had better be playing on the same platform... After years of online gaming being strictly segregated by platform, recent months have seen a resurgence in the idea of playing with friends and rivals on different hardware . That includes some hesitant attempts by game makers to cross the PC/console barrier with cross-play between players using a mouse/keyb
23h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Give Peach a Chance Today in 5 Lines During a joint press conference with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Jerusalem, President Trump said he hopes to achieve “one of the toughest deals of all,” peace between the Israelis and Palestinians. (In a press release, the White House mistakenly said that one of Trump’s goals for the trip was to “promote the possibility of lasting peach.”) Trump also told reporte
23h
Big Think

MDMA and Psilocybin: The Future of Anxiety Medication? Two addiction specialists believe we need to reframe the conversation around psychedelics. Read More
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ford taps former office furniture executive to be new CEOThe job of Ford's new CEO won't be easy: He will have to shore up the 114-year-old company's traditional auto business, but also invest in self-driving cars and other projects that could one day make that business obsolete.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cultural backgrounds of media organizations affect international news coverageFor most major events around the world, public access is only available through the media. In a new study, researchers at the University of Missouri School of Journalism examined the photographic news coverage of a visit Pope Francis made to Cuba to determine how major media outlets from different countries covered the international event. T.J. Thomson, a doctoral candidate at Mizzou, found that t
23h
Ars Technica

Injustice 2 Review: Gods, monsters, and unholy beatings Enlarge / Little touches like these, before and after fights, really give the game personality. (credit: NetherRealm Studios ) There’s a lot going on in Injustice 2 —maybe more than the game itself can keep track of, at times. But thanks to developer NetherRealm’s ongoing commitment to making the most accessible fighting games this side of Divekick , Injustice 2 is only occasionally overwhelming.
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Live Science

Terrifying Video: Why a Sea Lion Pulled a Little Girl into the WaterWhy did a sea lion pull a little girl who was sitting on a dock into the water, only to release her an instant later?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cultural backgrounds of media organizations affect international news coverageResearchers examined the photographic news coverage of a visit Pope Francis made to Cuba to determine how major media outlets from different countries covered the international event. They found that the cultural values of the photojournalists' home countries affected the ways in which the pope's visit was framed by each media outlet.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Risk of interval colorectal cancers higher among African-AmericansAn American Cancer Society study of Medicare enrollees finds the risk for interval colorectal cancers, cancers that develop after a colonoscopy but before the next recommended test, is higher for blacks than whites.
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Gizmodo

A Message From Our Lawyer Photo credit: Aston Martin [ Every so often, Kavi Reddy, Gizmodo Media Group’s ever-so-cromulent attorney, has Good Car Takes. This is one of them. ] I rode in an Aston Martin over the weekend. First ride in a fancy car. It was black. The end!
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Two simple building blocks produce complex 3-D materialNorthwestern University scientists have built a structurally complex material from two simple building blocks that is the lowest-density metal-organic framework ever made.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Supercomputing helps researchers understand Earth's interiorContrary to posters you may have seen hanging on the walls in science buildings and classrooms, Lijun Liu, professor of geology at Illinois, knows that Earth's interior is not like an onion.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Humanizing, harmonizing effects of music aren't a mythJake Harwood turned his lifelong hobby as a musician into a scholarly question: Could the sharing of music help ease interpersonal relations between people from different backgrounds, such as Americans and Arabs?
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The Atlantic

Trump’s Budget Is a Cruel Con President Donald Trump’s first major budget proposal comes out on Tuesday, but many of the details are already public. The budget would reverse several of Trump’s campaign promises—like his pledge to preserve Medicaid and Social Security —by dismantling welfare for the poor and sick, while ensuring that rich Americans keep more of their income. At this point, the proposal is just that—a proposal,
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The Atlantic

Trump Goes After 'the Ultimate Deal' JERUSALEM—Is Donald Trump the last best hope for the peace process? As a candidate, Trump was an iconoclast in many ways, but by and large he hewed to the positions on Israel typical of Republican presidential candidates. Trump promised to move the United States Embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem and railed against the Iran deal. Trump’s promises reassured the Israeli right and the pro-Israel Ame
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Big Think

When Netflix Is Attacked at Cannes, Will Smith Steps Up Will Smith defends entry of non-theatrical Netflix movies at Cannes. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Intensive blood pressure can reduce risk of harm to heart muscleA new study by researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center has shown that aggressive lowering of blood pressure in people with hypertension reduced the risk of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). This condition, the enlargement and thickening of the walls of the heart's main pumping chamber, is the most common complication of high blood pressure and greatly increases the risk of developing c
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NYT > Science

U.S. Forests Shifting With Climate ChangeA warmer, wetter climate is helping push dozens of Eastern U.S. trees to the north and, surprisingly, west, a new study finds.
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The Scientist RSS

A Triple ThreatThe mosquitoes that carry Zika may be able to transmit two other viruses at the same time.
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The Scientist RSS

New FDA Pathway to Accelerate Development of Cell TherapiesFour products have already qualified for the regenerative medicine advanced therapy (RMAT) designation that provides extra interactions with the agency, and sooner.
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Gizmodo

A New UFO Documentary Suggests Marilyn Monroe Was Killed Because She Knew About Aliens Marilyn Monroe has a small but weird role in the new documentary Unacknowledged. Image: Wikipedia Every time someone releases a documentary about UFOs, we secretly hope this is the one with the smoking gun that changes the world and proves aliens exist. Well, we don’t think Unacknowledged does that, but it’s not lacking in fascinating conspiracy theories. Directed by Michael Mazzola, Unacknowledg
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Ars Technica

North Korea’s latest launch heralds mass production of “cold launch” missiles The launch of a Pukguksong-2 solid-fuel missile from a mobile launcher on May 21 may signal a new level of worries for the US, Japan, and South Korea. (credit: KCNA (North Korean state media) ) On Sunday, the North Korean military conducted a second, successful test of the Pukguksong-2, a solid-fuel intermediate range ballistic missile based on a design derived from the country's submarine-launch
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers suppress fibrosis chemical signal to block haywire healingAn injured body always seeks to heal. But that process is far from simple. A host of cells organize to restore what was damaged. Then, critically, the process tapers off. And when it doesn't, the effects can be disastrous. Fibrosis is the thickening and scarring of tissue due to an overactive healing response.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Supercomputing helps researchers understand Earth's interiorUniversity of Illinois geologist Lijun Liu and his team have created a computer model of tectonic activity so effective that they believe it has potential to predict where earthquakes and volcanoes will occur. Liu, along with doctoral student Jiashun Hu, and Manuele Faccenda from the University of Padua in Italy, published a research paper in the journal of Earth and Planetary Science Letters focu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study identifies RNA molecule that shields breast cancer stem cells from immune systemResearchers from Princeton University's Department of Molecular Biology have identified a small RNA molecule that helps maintain the activity of stem cells in both healthy and cancerous breast tissue. The study, which will be published in the June issue of Nature Cell Biology, suggests that this 'microRNA' promotes particularly deadly forms of breast cancer and that inhibiting the effects of this
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Humanizing, harmonizing effects of music aren't a mythUA professor Jake Harwood and his collaborators have found that listening to music from other cultures furthers one's pro-diversity beliefs. The findings have important implications for music education, K-12 education and efforts to improve cross-cultural intergroup dialogue and communication.
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The Atlantic

Michael Flynn Invokes the Fifth Michael Flynn, President Trump’s former national security adviser, told the Senate Intelligence Committee on Monday he won’t comply with their May 10 subpoena of materials related to the Russia investigation, invoking his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination. “The context in which the committee has called for General Flynn’s testimonial production of documents make clear that he has m
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Science : NPR

International Eel Smuggling Scheme Centers On Maine NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Bill Trotter, a fishery and environmental reporter for the Bangor Daily News , about the illegal eel fishing scheme in Maine.
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Ars Technica

Supreme Court makes it much harder for patent trolls to sue in East Texas Historic Harrison County Courthouse, Marshall, Texas. (credit: Joe Mullin) The US Supreme Court ruled (PDF) today on how to interpret the patent venue laws, and the controversial business of "patent trolling" may never be the same. In a unanimous decision, the justices held that the US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, which handles all patent appeals, has been using the wrong standard to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Discovery of an alga's 'dictionary of genes' could lead to advances in biofuels, medicineA team of plant biologists and biochemists has produced a gold mine of data by sequencing the genome of a tiny, single-celled green alga that could be used as a source of sustainable biofuel and has health implications.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Intestinal fungi worsen alcoholic liver diseaseLiver cirrhosis is the 12th leading cause of mortality worldwide and approximately half of those deaths are due to alcohol abuse. Yet apart from alcohol abstinence, there are no specific treatments to reduce the severity of alcohol-associated liver disease. Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI) have linked intestinal fungi to incr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chronic anabolic steroid use may damage heart, arteriesLong-term anabolic steroid use may impair the heart's ability to pump blood throughout the body and relax between beats. Hardening of the arteries is associated with long-term anabolic steroid use. The heart can recover pumping ability after anabolic steroid use stops, but the ability to relax between beats is less reversible.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The fungal microbiome contributes to alcohol-induced liver damage in miceAlcoholism is a leading cause of liver cirrhosis-related deaths. Although chronic alcohol consumption is known to alter the gut microbiome, the link between these changes and liver damage is not well understood. This week in the JCI, a study led by Bernd Schnabl connects alcohol-driven changes in the fungal microbiome to liver disease, supporting further study of the role fungi play in liver infla
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The Atlantic

What Does It Feel Like to Have a Slave? This article is part of a series of responses to Alex Tizon’s Atlantic article “ My Family’s Slave .” The full series can be found here . No one thinks the enslavement of Eudocia “Lola” Pulido by Alex Tizon and his parents was morally defensible, but some have condemned the family with greater sympathy than others. Among the more sympathetic is New York ’s Jesse Singal , who reads Tizon’s story a
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Gizmodo

PayPal Beats Up on Sad Sack Pandora Over New Logo Photo: AP PayPal sued Pandora on Friday, claiming that the struggling music streaming service ripped off its distinctive blue logo in the hopes of piggybacking on PayPal’s popularity. PayPal savagely disses Pandora’s business model in its complaint, basically claiming that Pandora’s user base is faltering so much that it has to trick PayPal’s customers into accidentally clicking on the streaming
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New Scientist - News

Mouse sperm sent into space produces healthy IVF babiesThe first experiment to test how space travel could affect mammals’ reproduction shows that pregnancy can smooth over DNA damage from cosmic radiation
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate change taking toll on clarity of Lake Tahoe waterClimate change is causing Lake Tahoe to warm sooner in the spring than it has historically, disrupting the normal mixing of shallow and deep water and undercutting gains made in reversing the loss of clarity of the cobalt mountain lake, scientists say.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

After 9 months in space, mouse sperm yield healthy miceAfter nine months in space, mouse sperm has yielded healthy mice, Japanese scientists reported Monday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rethinking role of viruses in coral reef ecosystemsConventional wisdom has it that within virus-bacteria population dynamics, viruses frequently kill their host bacterial cells—a process called lysis—especially when there's a large concentration of bacteria. A different dynamic called lysogeny, in which viruses lie dormant within their host cells but don't kill them, has been thought to be a relatively rare phenomenon, mostly occurring at low bact
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA lab's life-saving workSome NASA missions fundamentally change the world of science or help win Nobel prizes, but only one helps save thousands of lives worldwide every year.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research suggests eating beans instead of beef would sharply reduce greenhouse gassesA team of researchers from four American universities says the key to reducing harmful greenhouse gases (GHG) in the short term is more likely to be found on the dinner plate than at the gas pump.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study shows how radioactive decay could support extraterrestrial lifeIn the icy bodies around our solar system, radiation emitted from rocky cores could break up water molecules and support hydrogen-eating microbes. To address this cosmic possibility, a University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) and Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) team modeled a natural water-cracking process called radiolysis. They then applied the model to several worlds with known or suspecte
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Ars Technica

2018 Audi SQ5: A danger to sports sedans or window dressing over good bones? Audi There's a danger with SUVs, but not the kind you might suspect. Should any lingering doubts exist that SUVs have inherited the automotive Earth, chew on this: Audi, the most recent luxury brand to the SUV playpen in the US, now counts 24 percent of all its USA sales from the Q5 column. But that's not dangerous. One other luxury car brand offers a staggering five different SUV models. But eve
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Live Science

World's Largest Aircraft Completes Successful Test FlightThe Airlander 10, a massive blimp-like aircraft, successfully flew and landed during a reecent test of new improvements.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

SAEM 2017: EM physicians should stay current on studies to up their critical care gameReviewing studies can be a tedious task, but one Michigan Medicine physician explains the importance of staying up to date on medical literature, even outside of one's primary field of medicine.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team creates high-speed internet lane for emergency situationsIn a disaster, a delay can mean the difference between life and death. Emergency responders don't have time to wait in traffic—even on the congested information superhighway.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Rare Supernovae May Solve 40-Year-Old Antimatter MysteryMost of the Milky Way’s antimatter may come from the explosive collisions of white dwarf stars -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo

Vizio's Stupid-Simple Surround Sound System Is Just $150 Today Refurb Vizio 38" 5.1 Channel Sound Bar , $150 Vizio’s turnkey sound bar systems are the easiest way to upgrade to 5.1 surround sound , requiring relatively few wires, and no AV receiver. We haven’t seen a decent deal on them in awhile, but while supplies last, you can pick up a refurb for just $150 . I own this exact system, and absolutely love it.
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Gizmodo

Pennsylvania's New Body Camera Policy Would Allow Officers Unrestricted Access to Film in Homes Image: AP Pennsylvania state senators are pushing for a new bill that would amend the state’s body camera policy to allow officers to record in private residences and exempt all footage from the state’s “Right to Know” act—making it much harder for the public to request recorded video. If it passes, it would be among the nation’s most restrictive and invasive body camera policies. Senate Bill 560
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Ars Technica

“Yahoobleed” flaw leaked private e-mail attachments and credentials Enlarge (credit: BenGrantham ) For years, Yahoo Mail has exposed a wealth of private user data because it failed to update widely used image-processing software that contained critical vulnerabilities. That's according to a security researcher who warned that other popular services are also likely to be leaking sensitive subscriber secrets. Chris Evans, the researcher who discovered the vulnerabi
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Science : NPR

At 94, Lithium-Ion Pioneer Eyes A New Longer-Lasting Battery In 1980, John Goodenough's work led to the lithium-ion battery, now found in everything from phones to electric cars. He and fellow researchers say they've come up with a faster-charging alternative. (Image credit: Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT)
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Gizmodo

Everything You Need to Know About Michael Flynn Invoking the Fifth Amendment Photo: Getty Retired Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn will reportedly decline to testify or hand over any documents subpoenaed by the Senate Intelligence Committee as part of its ongoing probe into Russia’s 2016 election meddling. The panel issued a subpoena for documents detailing Flynn’s communications with Russian officials. The US intelligence community credits agents of the Russian government with hac
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Inside Science

Mouse Sperm Kept in Space Station Produced Healthy Young on Earth Mouse Sperm Kept in Space Station Produced Healthy Young on Earth The implications for human reproduction beyond Earth are unclear. MarsBase.jpg Artist's concept of possible colonies on future Mars missions. Image credits: NASA Ames Research Center Space Monday, May 22, 2017 - 15:30 Joel Shurkin, Contributor (Inside Science) -- To the best of anyone’s knowledge, no one has had sex in space. Only
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Ars Technica

Twin Peaks is back and somehow as strange and beautiful as ever Enlarge / Agent Dale Cooper is very much back. (credit: Suzanne Tenner / Showtime) Warning : This post contains some spoilers for Twin Peaks: The Return alongside references to details from the original series. “Is it future, or is it past?” -Mike (a benign spirit inhabiting a shoe salesman sitting in an extra-dimensional waiting room) It almost goes without saying that Twin Peaks felt like nothi
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Lean-burn physiology gives Sherpas peak-performanceNepalese mountain guides have a physiology that uses oxygen more efficiently than lowlanders.
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Gizmodo

Scientists Engineered Bacteria to Make Picture of Super Mario Image: Felix Moser Bacteria have had some pretty great PR, recently. Thanks to lots of new research about their importance to our bodies, they’re not really seen as soulless microscopic murderers anymore. They’re colorful, misunderstood beings living together outside the spotlight, freeloading in our guts in exchange for favors. In other words, they’re artists. Now they are, at least. A team of s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genes responsible for severe congenital heart disease identified by Pitt researcherGenes responsible for hypoplastic left heart syndrome identified using mouse models.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA lab's life-saving workSome NASA missions fundamentally change the world of science or help win Nobel prizes, but only one saves thousands of lives worldwide every year.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

3.3-million-year-old fossil reveals the antiquity of the human spineAn international research team has found a 3.3 million Australopithecus afarensis fossilized skeleton, possessing the most complete spinal column of any early fossil human relative. The vertebral bones, neck and rib cage are mainly intact. This new research, published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science demonstrates that portions of the human skeletal structure were establi
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WIRED

AlphaGo Is Back to Battle Mere Humans—and It’s Smarter Than Ever Google's Go-playing AI is in China to take on the world's top-ranked player, and WIRED will be there for every move. The post AlphaGo Is Back to Battle Mere Humans—and It's Smarter Than Ever appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Ford Replacing CEO Mark Fields Doesn’t Clarify Its Hazy Future If automakers want to survive, "mobility" has to be more than a buzzword. The post Ford Replacing CEO Mark Fields Doesn't Clarify Its Hazy Future appeared first on WIRED .
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New on MIT Technology Review

Trump’s Call for a Crackdown on Botnets Is a Long ShotComplicated technical and political challenges stand in the way of the president’s wish for a “dramatic” reduction in botnet attacks.
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Ars Technica

2017’s “Board Game of the Year” shortlist is out—get playing! Enlarge The shortlist for board game's biggest international award, the Spiel des Jahres (Game of the Year), has just been announced by the German critics' association that awards the prize. The main Spiel des Jahres award is currently reserved for lighter, family-style games, while the more complex Kennerspiel des Jahres honors deeper or more strategic games. The final decision will be made this
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Popular Science

Astronauts are set to perform an emergency spacewalk on Tuesday Space A computer on the ISS failed, but the station and crew were never in any danger. On Tuesday, astronauts on the International Space Station will venture forth into the harshest environment humankind has ever known—to fix a computer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ATS 2017: New COPD action plan outlines strategies for improved careA Michigan Medicine researcher is a part of the National Institutes of Health's National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute group that recently created a new COPD National Action Plan. Released at the American Thoracic Society's International Conference in Washington, D.C., it outlines key goals, including raising public awareness of COPD, advancing research, improving patient care and health deliver
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The Optical Society commemorates the rich tradition and history of Optics LettersFirst launched in 1977 as as means to quickly disseminate the latest in optics research and provide the optics and photonics community with a true Letters-style publication, Optics Letters has, over the course of its long history, published influential papers in nonlinear optics, ultrafast spectroscopy, fiber optics, optical communication, and biomedical optics among other areas. This year the Jou
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

RIT team creates high-speed internet lane for emergency situationsRochester Institute of Technology are developing a faster and more reliable way to send and receive large amounts of data through the internet. By a creating a new network protocol, called Multi Node Label Routing protocol, researchers are essentially developing a new high-speed lane of online traffic, specifically for emergency information.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Taking a closer look at genetic switches in cancerCaltech biochemists have uncovered details of a protein that controls blood cell production in an aggressive form of leukemia.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Experimental therapy for immune diseases hits Achilles heel of activated T cellsImmune diseases like multiple sclerosis and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis unleash destructive waves of inflammation on the body, causing death or a lifetime of illness and physical impairment. With safe and effective treatments in short supply, scientists report in PNAS Early Edition discovery of an experimental treatment that targets an Achilles heel of activated immune cells -- killing them
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Biofilm discovery suggests new way to prevent dangerous infectionsBy some estimates, more than 1 million people contract infections from medical devices in US hospitals each year, many of which are due to biofilms. A new study suggests a possible new way to prevent such biofilms from forming, which would sharply reduce incidents of related hospital-borne infection.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

People perceive attractive scientists as more interesting but less able, studies showA new study published today in Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) from researchers at the University of Cambridge and the University of Essex suggests that when it comes to judging scientists, we are more likely to find an attractive scientist interesting, but more likely to consider their less attractive colleagues to be better scientists.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Himalayan powerhouses: How Sherpas have evolved superhuman energy efficiencySherpas have evolved to become superhuman mountain climbers, extremely efficient at producing the energy to power their bodies even when oxygen is scarce, suggests new research published today in the Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Protective responses appear weaker in neural stem cells from Huntington disease patientsA multi-institutional team based at Massachusetts General Hospital has discovered how a potential treatment strategy for Huntington disease (HD) produces its effects, verified its action in human cells and identified a previously unknown deficit in neural stem cells from patients with HD.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The right thing to do: Why do we follow unspoken group rules?How you dress, talk, eat and even what you allow yourself to feel -- these often unspoken rules of a group are social norms, and many are internalized to such a degree that you probably don't even notice them. Following norms, however, can sometimes be costly for individuals if norms require sacrifice for the good of the group. How and why did humans evolve to follow such norms in the first place?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

3.3-million-year-old fossil reveals origins of the human spineAnalysis of a 3.3 million-year-old fossil skeleton reveals the most complete spinal column of any early human relative, including vertebrae, neck and rib cage. The findings, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, indicate that portions of the human spinal structure that enable efficient walking motions were established millions of years earlier than previously
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sleep apnea may increase atrial fibrillation riskObstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may increase the risk of developing atrial fibrillation (AF), according to new research presented at the ATS 2017 International Conference.
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Inside Science

BRIEF: Sick People Look and Smell Less Likeable BRIEF: Sick People Look and Smell Less Likeable To human brains, the sight and smell of sickness are a bigger deal than the sum of their parts. noseandtissue.jpg Image credits: nullplus via Shutterstock Human Monday, May 22, 2017 - 15:00 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- Being sick doesn't just make you feel lousy; it also makes you look and smell less likeable, according to a new stu
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New on MIT Technology Review

How Flexible IT Can Solve Complex Business ProblemsFrom the data center to the cloud and the network edge, emerging technologies are helping companies accelerate time to value
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Live Science

Why We Probably Can't Use Tech to Become More MoralCould drugs or devices make people more moral?
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New Scientist - News

Our common ancestor with chimps may be from Europe, not AfricaThe last common ancestor of chimps and humans was an eastern European, claims team that analysed fossils of a 7-million-year-old ape from Bulgaria and Greece
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Science | The Guardian

Space sperm produces healthy mice, raising prospect of future human settlement Scientists say success of freeze-dried mouse sperm stored on international station could be significant for human reproduction when ‘space age’ arrives Reproduction may be possible in space, Japanese researchers have said, after freeze-dried sperm stored on the International Space Station for nine months produced healthy offspring. The scientists said their findings could have significant ramific
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: These Baby Mice Were Born From Sperm That Went to SpaceAlthough tests did find slightly increased DNA damage, compared with freeze-dried earth sperm, the space version did the job when it came to fertilizing eggs.
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Live Science

Intact Spine of Hominin Toddler Revealed for 1st TimeFor the first time, researchers have revealed the very complete spine of Selam, a 2.5-year-old Australopithecus afarensis who lived more than 3 million years ago.
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Live Science

Image Gallery: 3-Year-Old Human Ancestor 'Selam' RevealedThe bones of "Selam" suggest early humans were tree climbers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research suggests eating beans instead of beef would sharply reduce greenhouse gassesIf Americans would eat beans instead of beef, the United States would immediately realize approximately 50 to 75 percent of its GHG reduction targets for the year 2020.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Joint UTSA-SwRI study shows how radioactive decay could support extraterrestrial lifeIn the icy bodies around our solar system, radiation emitted from rocky cores could break up water molecules and support hydrogen-eating microbes. To address this cosmic possibility, a University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) and Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) team modeled a natural water-cracking process called radiolysis. They then applied the model to several worlds with known or suspecte
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Big Think

Gruesome New Fact Makes Being Eaten by a T-Rex Even More Frightening Fewer predators were ever as formidable. Read More
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The Atlantic

The Making of Space Mice Mouse sperm exposed to cosmic radiation on the International Space Station for nearly 300 days has been used to produce healthy offspring back on Earth, according to new research. In August 2013, Japanese researchers sent samples of freeze-dried mouse spermatozoa to the space station on cargo launched by JAXA, Japan’s space agency. Researchers used freeze-dried sperm because the samples can survi
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The Atlantic

Trump Changed His Tone on Islam—Will He Change Strategy? To say that candidate Donald Trump adopted a sharply critical and un-nuanced tone on Islam would be the grossest of understatements. Campaigner-in-Chief Trump proclaimed the need to adopt specific language (“radical Islamic terrorism”), proposed banning all Muslims from entering the United States, and bemoaned that “Islam hates us.” The president’s remarkable reversal in tone (and potentially sub
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Futurity.org

Wages aren’t the only factor for British working poor Sixty percent of the people living in poverty in the UK live in a household where someone is working, the highest figure ever recorded, a new report shows. The research shows that the risk of poverty for adults living in working households rose by more than a quarter (26.5 percent), from 12.4 percent to 15.7 percent, in 10 years—from 2004-05 to 2014-15. The findings suggest that it is the number
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Mouse sperm survive space to spawnSperm freeze-dried and sent into space for months of exposure to high levels of solar radiation later produced healthy baby mice.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Unexplained Light CurvesBoyajian’s star is dimming again. This graphic shows why that’s weird. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian

Hay fever mapping? There’s an app for that | Letter from Dr Sheena Cruickshank Dr Sheena Cruickshank on how ‘citizen sensors’ can help scientists to learn of how pollen, weather and pollution interact to trigger allergy symptoms Seasonal allergies, such as hay fever and allergic asthma, are on the rise in the UK as your article ( First hay fever map of Britain offers some relief to sufferers , theguardian.com, 20 May) rightly points out, with up to one in four people now ex
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Biofilm discovery suggests new way to prevent dangerous infectionsMicrobial biofilms—dense, sticky mats of bacteria that are hard to treat and can lead to dangerous infections—often form in medical equipment, such as flexible plastic tubing used in catheters or in tubes used to help patients breathe. By some estimates, more than 1 million people contract infections from medical devices in U.S. hospitals each year, many of which are due to biofilms. A study from
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

3.3 million-year-old fossil reveals origins of the human spineAnalysis of a 3.3 million-year-old fossil skeleton reveals the most complete spinal column of any early human relative, including vertebrae, neck and rib cage. The findings, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, indicate that portions of the human spinal structure that enable efficient walking motions were established millions of years earlier than previously
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Taking a closer look at genetic switches in cancerMany things go wrong in cells during the development of cancer. At the heart of the chaos are often genetic switches that control the production of new cells. In a particularly aggressive form of leukemia, called acute myeloid leukemia, a genetic switch that regulates the maturation of blood stem cells into red and white blood cells goes awry. Normally, this switch leads to appropriate numbers of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The right thing to do: Why do we follow unspoken group rules?How you dress, talk, eat and even what you allow yourself to feel - these often unspoken rules of a group are social norms, and many are internalized to such a degree that you probably don't even notice them. Following norms, however, can sometimes be costly for individuals if norms require sacrifice for the good of the group. How and why did humans evolve to follow such norms in the first place?
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Gizmodo

We're One Step Closer to Breeding Animals (and Humans) In Space GIF Image: Image: Sam Woolley/Gizmodo, Shutterstock Lots of people really want to go to Mars. Some of them want to live on that barren litter box forever , which sounds exciting, but would probably suck. The thing about a Martian colony is that people would have to be able to reproduce there in order to keep it going—and luckily for those hopeful pioneers, a team of Japanese scientists have achie
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Ars Technica

National Geographic series Year Million explores the future of humanity Trailer for tonight's episode of Year Million . (video link) If you're interested in where science and technology might take humanity over the next million years, you might want to check out a new series from National Geographic called Year Million . Part science fiction, part speculative commentary, the show explores what could happen to humanity if we actually achieve some of today's scientific
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Live Science

Trump Meets Orb: 5 Interesting Facts About Crystal BallsFrom their origins with the Druids to their modern manufacture, here are five facts about crystal balls.
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Gizmodo

Microsoft Reportedly Wants to Use DNA for Cloud Data Storage DNA data on a computer monitor. Image: AP In the not-so-distant future, next time you want to back up your work to Microsoft’s cloud, you might be storing it on a few snippets of DNA. Over the past six years, scientists have turned to the double helix in hopes that it might one day become a more efficient storage medium for things beside hair and eye color. In 2011, Harvard University geneticist
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Popular Science

Microwaving mushrooms might be the healthiest way to eat them, but at what cost Health The most nutritious mushrooms are the ones you actually eat. How we cook our mushrooms changes the level of nutrients they contain.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Microsoft Has a Plan to Add DNA Data Storage to Its CloudTech companies think biology may solve a looming data storage problem.
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Live Science

Doomsday Seed Vault to Get Upgrade After Flooding IncidentThe permafrost "fail-safe" of the Svalbard Global Seed Vault is now becoming a danger.
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Rethinking role of viruses in coral reef ecosystemsViruses are thought to frequently kill their host bacteria, especially at high microbial density. A state called lysogeny, in which viruses lie dormant but don't kill their hosts, has been thought to be relatively rare , mostly occurring at low bacterial concentrations. A new study suggests lysogeny might be much more common than previously believed. These findings could lead to a better understan
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ukrainian hacker sentenced in stolen news releases schemeA Ukrainian hacker involved in an international scheme that used stolen unpublished news releases to make about $30 million in profits has been sentenced to more than two years in prison.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Crews cover partially-collapsed tunnel at nuclear siteWorkers this weekend finished installing a protective cover over a partially-collapsed tunnel that contained radioactive waste on the Hanford Nuclear Reservation, the U.S. Department of Energy said Monday.
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Ars Technica

Senators ask FCC why reporter was “manhandled” after net neutrality vote Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Atypeek ) Two Democratic senators have asked Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai to explain why "FCC security personnel reportedly manhandled, threatened, and ejected" a journalist who was trying to ask questions after last week's net neutrality vote . Senators Tom Udall (D-N.M.) and Maggie Hassan (D-N.H.) sent a letter to Pai Friday , one day after
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New on MIT Technology Review

Switzerland Votes to Phase Out Nuclear PowerIt’s another blow to an industry that has been hammered in the U.S. and Europe, leaving a huge opportunity for China to emerge as a global leader in nuclear technology.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Older adults may not benefit from taking statinsStatins did not reduce heart attacks, coronary heart disease deaths or deaths from any cause in people age 65 and older, a new analysis finds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research in Russia challenges widely held understanding of past climate historyThings are heating up in Russia. UNLV Geoscience Ph.D. student Jonathan Baker has found evidence that shows nearly continuous warming from the end of the last Ice Age to the present in the Ural Mountains in central Russia.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A leap for 3-D printingWhen the Space Shuttle hit the Earth's atmosphere on its return trip from the cosmos, it was traveling at 17,000 miles per hour—25 times the speed of sound. Were it not for the protection of the ceramic tiles that acted as heat shields, the entire spacecraft would have burned to nothing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Micro delivery service for fertilizersPlants can absorb nutrients through their leaves as well as their roots. However, foliar fertilization over an extended period is difficult. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, German researchers have now introduced an efficient delivery system for micronutrients based on biohybrid microgels. Special peptides anchor the "microcontainers" onto the leaf surface while binding sites inside ensure gradua
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Live Science

How the Net Neutrality Debate Affects Your InternetThe FCC voted to start dismantling 2015 rules that regulated internet service providers the same way as utilities. So what does that mean for your internet access?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Extreme preterm infant death or disease may be predicted by biomarkerTests of cells collected from the umbilical cord blood vessel walls at birth can predict death or poor pulmonary outcomes in extremely preterm infants, say researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.
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Preterm birth linked to higher risk of heart failureBabies born preterm run a higher risk of heart failure during childhood and adolescence than those born at full term, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report. The registry-based study is published in The Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC).
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Predictive models may help determine which patients benefit from ICDsTwo predictive models may help cardiologists decide which patients would most benefit from an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), suggests a new study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. According to the researchers, confirming the findings in a larger, randomized trial could lead to new national guidelines for choosing patients who are good candidates f
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Scientists find 7.2-million-year-old pre-human remains in the BalkansScientists analyzing 7.2 million-year-old fossils uncovered in modern-day Greece and Bulgaria suggest a new hypothesis about the origins of humankind, placing it in the Eastern Mediterranean and not -- as customarily assumed -- in Africa, and earlier than currently accepted. The researchers conclude that Graecopithecus freybergi represents the first pre-humans to exist following the split from the
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Lung disease patients say home oxygen delivery systems don't meet their needsAccording to a new survey, patients with lung disease report that they are unable to obtain home oxygen equipment that meets their needs thereby forcing them to become isolated. The study was presented at the 2017 American Thoracic Society International Conference.
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Investigational biologic appears to reduce oral corticosteroid use in severe asthmaAn investigational biologic may reduce the need for adults with severe asthma to take an oral corticosteroid to control their asthma, according to a randomized controlled trial presented at the ATS 2017 International Conference. Study findings are being reported simultaneously online, ahead of print in the New England Journal of Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

High levels of prenatal air pollution exposure and stress increase childhood asthma riskA new study has found that children, especially boys, whose mothers were exposed to higher levels of outdoor particulate air pollution at the same time that they were very stressed were most likely to develop asthma by age six. The study was presented at the 2017 American Thoracic Society International Conference.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Weathering of rocks a poor regulator of global temperaturesA new University of Washington study shows that the textbook understanding of global chemical weathering—in which rocks are dissolved, washed down rivers and eventually end up on the ocean floor to begin the process again—does not depend on Earth's temperature in the way that geologists had believed.
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Gizmodo

Disgraced Cheating Site Ashley Madison Claims It Has Millions of Users That Totally Aren’t Bots This Time Ashley Madison is back...supposedly. The cheating site claims it added more than 400,000 global users last month, according to a New York Post report . The supposed growth is especially surprising given that the site experienced a massive data breach in July 2015 that exposed thousands of names and addresses of adulterers including thousands of government employees and conservative reality televi
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New Scientist - News

Diabetes drug may work by changing gut bacteria makeupMetformin dramatically shifts the gut microbiome – and bacteria seem to play a key role in controlling blood sugar levels
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Gizmodo

Elon Musk On His Own Company's Technology: 'Safe, But Unpleasant' Photo: Getty Your run-of-the-mill corporate CEO couldn’t get away with this shit. In a series of tweets on Sunday, Tesla founder Elon Musk revealed that a new Autopilot software update should be ready for next month , and then went on to say that, Autopilot—of which the latest version is designed by Tesla, which, so you’re clear, is his company—is “safe, but unpleasant.” Hm. The rollout of Autopi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers propose new type of planetary objectScientists suggest in a new study the existence of a planetary object called a "synestia," a huge, spinning, donut-shaped mass of hot, vaporized rock, formed as planet-sized objects smash into each other.
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Ars Technica

Elon Musk says “hardware 2” Teslas will get better self-driving software in June Enlarge (credit: Yuriko Nakao/Bloomberg via Getty Images) Tesla CEO Elon Musk took to Twitter on Sunday night to let the world know that a revised version of the company's semi-autonomous Autopilot software would arrive on compatible cars next month. Excited about the Tesla Autopilot software release rolling out next month. New control algorithm feels as smooth as silk. — Elon Musk (@elonmusk) Ma
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Ars Technica

Baking soda shortage has hospitals frantic, delaying treatments and surgeries Enlarge (credit: Intropin ) Amid a national shortage of a critical medicine , US hospitals are hoarding vials, delaying surgeries, and turning away patients, The New York Times reports. The medicine in short supply: solutions of sodium bicarbonate—aka, baking soda. The simple drug is used in all sorts of treatments, from chemotherapies to those for organ failure. It can help correct the pH of blo
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Gizmodo

Amazon's Blowing Out Refurbished Echo Dots For the Lowest Price Ever Refurb Echo Dot , $38 Amazon usually sells certified refurbished Echo Dots for $5 less than new models, but for now at least, that discount has increased to $12. Refurbished Dots still carry the same warranty as new ones, so there’s really no downside to going this route if you want to sprinkle these around your home on a budget .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sheffield bioenergy experts collaborate with Egyptian partners to produce drinking waterSeawater in Egypt could be turned into drinking water using biomass energy as a source of heat in a new collaborative project from academics at the University of Sheffield UK and Port Said University in Egypt.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

European fossils may belong to earliest known hominidWith new analyses of Graecopithecus fossils from Greece and Bulgaria, researchers argue for possible hominid origins in Europe, not Africa.
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The Atlantic

Turkey Summons U.S. Ambassador Over Embassy Brawl Turkey summoned the U.S. ambassador to Ankara on Monday to lodge a formal complaint with the U.S. for how it handled a brawl outside the Turkish Embassy in Washington, D.C., last week . Protesters who were demonstrating against the visit of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan were beaten by members of his security detail, though it’s still unclear how the fight started. Nearly a dozen people were inju
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The Atlantic

The Finale of 'The Greatest Show on Earth' After a run of 146 years, the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus, known as "The Greatest Show on Earth," has come to an end. The final sold-out performance took place Sunday in Uniondale, New York. Years of battles with animal-rights activists had led the circus to retire its performing elephants last year, which appeared to worsen already-dropping attendance numbers, sealing its fate. One
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The Atlantic

Why So Much Is ‘Bonkers’ Right Now On Friday, as a capper to a week that included a steady stream of breaking news about the doings of the Trump administration, Mother Jones sent a note of reassurance to its readers: “It’s Not Just You,” the magazine declared : “This Week Was Bonkers.” Vox , the same day, reporting on the movies of the Cannes Film Festival, announced that “Netflix’s Okja is a bonkers corporate satire starring Tild
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Johns Hopkins study shows one of the deadliest hospital-acquired infections is preventableIn a recent paper published online in the journal Critical Care Medicine, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Armstrong Institute of Patient Safety and Quality led a study that demonstrated that health care providers can take steps to curb ventilator-associated events.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

These Last Alaskans Are Listening To Their Baby's Heartbeat For The First Time #LastAlaskans | Wednesdays at 10/9c Ashley's midwife ventures out to the Seldens' cabin for a check-up. It's the first time Ashley and Tyler will be able to hear their baby's heartbeat. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/the-last-alaskans/ More Alaskans! http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/the-last-alaskans/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDisco
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists find 7.2-million-year-old pre-human remains in the BalkansThe common lineage of great apes and humans split several hundred thousand earlier than hitherto assumed, according to an international research team headed by Professor Madelaine Böhme from the Senckenberg Centre for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment at the University of Tübingen and Professor Nikolai Spassov from the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. The researchers investigated two fossils of
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Futurity.org

Electricity turns graphene into ‘bug zapper’ for bacteria Scientists have found that laser-induced graphene (LIG) can protect against “biofouling,” the buildup of microorganisms, plants, or other biological material on wet surfaces. In addition, the team also found that, when the material is electrified, it also kills bacteria. LIG is a spongy version of graphene, the single-atom layer of carbon atoms. The Rice University lab of chemist James Tour devel
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NYT > Science

U.S. Nuclear History Offers Clues to North Korea’s ProgressClues suggest the North is developing thermonuclear fuels, particularly to enhance its atom bombs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Weathering of rocks a poor regulator of global temperaturesEvidence from the age of the dinosaurs to today shows that chemical weathering of rocks is less sensitive to global temperature, and may depend on the steepness of the surface. The results call into question the role of rocks in setting our planet's temperature over millions of years.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Obamacare support: When polls mention repeal it seals the dealDoes the American public want former President Obama's health care law repealed and replaced? It depends on how you ask the question.
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Live Science

Swiss Voters Support Renewable Energy and Ban NuclearThe Swiss voted to ban new nuclear power plants.
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Gizmodo

Bride of Frankenstein Will Be the Next Monster Movie in Universal's 'Dark Universe' Image: Universal Universal has officially unveiled the “Dark Universe,” the name for its shared universe of monster movie reboots now kicking off with The Mummy next month. It’s also confirmed some major cast members and the next ghoulish entry in the franchise. Announced in a press release today, Bride of Frankenstein , due out February 14, 2019, will be directed by Beauty and the Beast ’s Bill
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The Atlantic

A Possible Hate Crime at the University of Maryland A student visiting the University of Maryland was fatally stabbed over the weekend in an attack authorities are investigating as a possible hate crime. “We have no doubt that Sean Urbanski with a knife stabbed Richard Wilbur Collins III and killed him—we know that to be a fact,” David B. Mitchell, the university’s police chief, said Sunday in a press conference. “The question is: Well, why did th
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Popular Science

Swimming pools are full of poop, but they probably won't make you sick Health They're still gross, though. Sure, ten grams of poo can wash off a little kid's butt—but only a tiny percentage of pool-goers ever get sick from it.
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NYT > Science

Q&A: A Taste for Poison in Warmer Climates?Greater diversity in the tropics may give the appearance that animals there rely on venom more.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UNLV study: Warming news from RussiaUNLV research in Russia challenges widely held understanding of past climate history; study appears in latest issue of top journal Nature Geoscience.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Micro delivery service for fertilizersPlants can absorb nutrients through their leaves as well as their roots. However, foliar fertilization over an extended period is difficult. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, German researchers have now introduced an efficient delivery system for micronutrients based on biohybrid microgels. Special peptides anchor the 'microcontainers' onto the leaf surface while binding sites inside ensure gradua
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Canadian team finds new antibiotic resistance gene in Salmonella from broiler chickensA team of investigators from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Guelph, Ontario, has discovered a gene that confers resistance to the important broad-spectrum antibiotic, fosfomycin. The researchers found the gene in isolates of the pathogen, Salmonella enterica, from broiler chickens. The research is published in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a journal of the American Society for Microbio
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The Atlantic

How Women Mentors Make a Difference in Engineering For some women, enrolling in an engineering course is like running a psychological gauntlet. If they dodge overt problems like sexual harassment, sexist jokes, or poor treatment from professors , they often still have to evade subtler obstacles like the implicit tendency to see engineering as a male discipline. It’s no wonder women in the U.S. hold just 13 to 22 percent of the doctorates in engin
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Inside Science

Heavy Metal Singers are Big Babies Heavy Metal Singers are Big Babies Science and high speed cameras prove that heavy metal singers do intuitively what babies know instinctively -- how to protect their voices while making very loud sounds. Heavy Metal Singers are Just Big Babies Video of Heavy Metal Singers are Just Big Babies Human Monday, May 22, 2017 - 11:45 Jason Socrates Bardi, Editor (Inside Science) -- Music, for some, is m
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Live Science

Hunter Crushed by Elephant in ZimbabweA professional big-game hunter died after he was crushed by a female elephant.
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Gizmodo

How to Watch Trump's Press Conference After His Insane Comments About Israel, No Cable Required In this handout photo provided by the Israel Government Press Office (GPO), US President Donald J Trump meets with Israel Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at the King David Hotel May 22, 2017 in Jerusalem, Israel In just a few moments Donald Trump is scheduled to start his press conference with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, and it looks like it’s going to be absolutely insane. Serio
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Gizmodo

Have Gravitational Waves Scarred the Fabric of Spacetime? Hot gas surrounding a black hole (Image credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/MPE/J. Sanders et al.; Optical: NASA/STScI; Radio: NSF/NRAO/VLA) Car crashes, nuclear explosions, and even asteroid impacts are relatively puny compared with some of our universe’s other explosive events. Heck, a violent, seemingly infinitely hot explosion is probably what set the whole universe in motion in the first place. So big c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists propose synestia, a new type of planetary objectThere's something new to look for in the heavens, and it's called a 'synestia,' according to planetary scientists Simon Lock at Harvard University and Sarah Stewart at UC Davis. A synestia, they propose, would be a huge, spinning, donut-shaped mass of hot, vaporized rock, formed as planet-sized objects smash into each other.
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The Atlantic

Mother, Wife, Slave “Having a slave gave me grave doubts about what kind of people we were, what kind of place we came from,” Alex Tizon wrote in his Atlantic essay “My Family’s Slave.” A thousand objections can be leveled against that piece, and in the few days since it was published, those objections have materialized from all quarters. It’s a powerful story, and its flaws and omissions have their own eloquence. F
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The Atlantic

The Federal Prosecutors Backing Jeff Sessions on Mandatory Minimums Attorney General Jeff Sessions’s recent directive to federal prosecutors to seek the harshest charges and sentences against defendants drew swift opposition from criminal-justice reform advocates both in and outside of government. The policy contrasts sharply with recent efforts to reduce America’s prison population—a goal that’s made odd bedfellows from across the political spectrum—and effectiv
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The Atlantic

The Supreme Court Finds North Carolina's Racial Gerrymandering Unconstitutional You don’t see a Kagan-Breyer-Ginsburg-Sotomayor-Thomas majority often in U.S. Supreme Court decisions, but today that quintet joined together to deal a blow to North Carolina Republicans. In the decision in Cooper v. Harris , the eight-member pre-Gorsuch roster upheld a district court’s ruling that two congressional districts in North Carolina were unconstitutional racial gerrymanders, putting an
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team finds new antibiotic resistance gene in Salmonella from broiler chickensA team of investigators from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Guelph, Ontario, has discovered a gene that confers resistance to the important broad-spectrum antibiotic, fosfomycin. The researchers found the gene in isolates of the pathogen, Salmonella enterica, from broiler chickens. The research is published in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a journal of the American Society for Microbio
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Gizmodo

A Guide to All the Best, Worst and Weirdest 2017 TV Pilots You’ll Probably Never Watch Image screengrabs via YouTube/ABC, Fox, CBS, NBC As our favorite shows begin their descent into the void ( New Girl, Scandal, Girls ), new shows are once again out here crying for approval. This year’s TV pilots—full of mostly white male leads and showrunners—include military dramas, medical dramas, Will & Grace and a Lucifer-produced Big Bang Theory spin-off we don’t need. With attention spans p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists solve mystery of how most antimatter in the Milky Way formsA team of international astrophysicists led by The Australian National University (ANU) has shown how most of the antimatter in the Milky Way forms.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA adds up record Australia rainfallOver the week of May 15, extreme rainfall drenched northeastern Australia and NASA data provided a look at the record totals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Human-induced deforestation is causing an increase in malaria casesNearly 130 million hectares of forest—an area almost equivalent in size to South Africa—have been lost since 1990, according to a recent report by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Kepler telescope spies details of TRAPPIST-1 system's outermost planetA University of Washington-led international team of astronomers has used data gathered by the Kepler Space Telescope to observe and confirm details of the outermost of seven exoplanets or-biting the star TRAPPIST-1.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Are Advanced Biofuels for Airplanes Ready for Takeoff?Industry is working on new aircraft fuels that reduce greenhouse gas emissions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers find computer code that Volkswagen used to cheat emissions testsAn international team of researchers has uncovered the mechanism that allowed Volkswagen to circumvent US and European emission tests over at least six years before the Environmental Protection Agency put the company on notice in 2015 for violating the Clean Air Act. During a year-long investigation, researchers found code that allowed a car's onboard computer to determine that the vehicle was und
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Kepler telescope spies details of TRAPPIST-1 system's outermost planetA University of Washington-led international team of astronomers has used data gathered by the Kepler Space Telescope to observe and confirm details of the outermost of seven exoplanets or-biting the star TRAPPIST-1.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA adds up record Australia rainfallOver the week of May 15, extreme rainfall drenched northeastern Australia and NASA data provided a look at the record totals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The secret to combating pancreatic cancer may lie in suppression of a common proteinResearch indicates that in mice with a KRAS mutation, present in 90 percent of pancreatic cancer patients, expressing only half the amount of the glucose-regulated protein GRP78 is enough to halt the earliest stage of pancreatic cancer development, resulting in delayed tumor development and prolonged survival.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Human-induced deforestation is causing an increase in malaria casesA new study of 67 less-developed, malaria-endemic nations led by Lehigh University sociologist Dr. Kelly Austin, finds a link between deforestation and increasing malaria rates across developing nations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mindfulness takes practiceMindfulness meditation practice is set at 45 minutes a day at home, as well as weekly group sessions with the teacher. And the 45 minutes is every day, six days a week as long as the course lasts. These are the guidelines for students taking part in the standard Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy or Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction courses, but an average course student practices only 30 minute
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers find computer code that Volkswagen used to cheat emissions testsAn international team of researchers has uncovered the mechanism that allowed Volkswagen to circumvent U.S. and European emission tests over at least six years before the Environmental Protection Agency put the company on notice in 2015 for violating the Clean Air Act. During a year-long investigation, researchers found code that allowed a car's onboard computer to determine that the vehicle was u
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Ars Technica

Sorry, you can’t protest security screening by getting naked for the TSA An Oregon man who stripped naked at an airport security screening checkpoint must pay a $500 fine after a federal appeals court ruled that the First Amendment does not protect this method of protest. The nude protest at Portland International Airport (PDX) by a traveler named John Brennan prompted legal action by both the federal government and the state of Oregon. Portland prosecutors charged hi
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Viden

Er jagerpilotens dage talte?Næste generations jagerfly kan udføre missioner uden pilot. De kommer dog først om 20 år, vurderer ekspert.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

An elegans solution: Worm genetic screen maps cell-to-cell communication in human cancerIn the May 22, 2017, issue of Developmental Cell, researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina Hollings Cancer Center developed a cross-species genetic screen in worms to follow cell-to-cell communication in human cancer. The genome-wide screen is being used to chart a roadmap between mesodermal cells and epithelial cells in the tumor microenvironment.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wild geese in China are 'prisoners' in their own wetlandsIn many places in the world, goose populations are booming as the birds have moved out of their wetland habitats to exploit an abundance of food on farmland. But, new evidence reported in Current Biology on May 22 confirms, that's not working so well for migratory waterbirds that overwinter in China. The findings help to explain why China's waterbirds are in decline, researchers say.
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The Atlantic

Celine Dion Saved the Billboard Music Awards The Billboard Music Awards is where you can have all your worst suspicions about today’s pop music confirmed. The biggest current stars seemed disposable as they performed in Las Vegas Sunday night: Drake let waterworks replace showmanship as he rapped in the middle of the Bellagio’s fountain; Lorde took the concept of a fake karaoke bar to its least exciting conclusion; Bruno Mars and Ed Sheeran
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The Atlantic

The Westernization of Emoji When the restaurant Fortune Cookie opened in Shanghai, in 2013, local patrons were mystified. The food was Chinese, but also not Chinese at all. Crab rangoon, sticky orange chicken, and fortune cookies are staples of American Chinese food. They’re rarely found in China. Fortune Cookie’s owners wanted to introduce China to Chinese food as Americans know it—characterized by startlingly sweet flavor
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The Atlantic

How Trump Revived the Story About What He Told the Russians President Trump said Monday he “never mentioned the word or the name Israel” in his conversation with Russian officials at the White House during which he is said to have revealed sensitive intelligence from an ally about ISIS. His remarks in Israel with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, during which he stopped the press pool from leaving the room in order to clarify the incident, are all but ce
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The Atlantic

Why I Stayed on Antidepressants While Pregnant and Nursing The tropical storm whipped the palm fronds outside into a frenzy, while inside my elementary school, I was getting whipped into a frenzy, as well. I overheard someone say that if a hurricane hit, we’d all be under water. When I finally got home, my tiny, five-year-old body bolted through the house, ripped open the sliding glass doors and dragged everything from the backyard inside—my toys, even m
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Turmoil in sluggish electrons' existenceAn international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behavior of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sunflower genome sequence to provide roadmap for more resilient cropsUniversity of Georgia researchers are part of an international team that has published the first sunflower genome sequence. This new resource will assist future research programs using genetic tools to improve crop resilience and oil production.
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New Scientist - News

Bacteria engineered to produce living, full-colour photographsGut bugs have been modified to turn red, green or blue when bathed in light of the corresponding colour so they create bacterial photocopies
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Ingeniøren

Solcelle-lovforslag vil øge salget af batterianlægBåde lovforslaget selv og kilder i branchen vurderer, at overgangen fra time- til øjebliksafregning vil medføre ekstra salg af batterianlæg. Dyr og dårlig udvikling, mener politiker.
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Popular Science

Scientists are spelunking for cave gunk to fight superbugs Science Deep in caverns around the world, bacteria are laboring to make antibiotics we can discover and use for ourselves. Caves are full of microscopic creatures, bacteria and fungi at home in the gloom. These microbes, scientists are discovering, may be an untapped reservoir of new…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Smoke from wildfires can have lasting climate impactThe wildfire that has raged across more than 150,000 acres of the Okefenokee Swamp in Georgia and Florida has sent smoke billowing into the sky as far as the eye can see. Now, new research published by the Georgia Institute of Technology shows how that smoke could impact the atmosphere and climate much more than previously thought.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New findings on formation and malformation of blood vesselsIn diseases like cancer, diabetes, rheumatism and stroke, a disorder develops in the blood vessels that exacerbates the condition and obstructs treatment. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet now show how blood vessels can normally change their size to create a functional circulatory system and how vascular malformation during disease can occur. In the study, published in Nature Cell Biology, the
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Science | The Guardian

Did you solve it? The maths problem for five-year-olds 'stumping' the web The answers to today’s three puzzles Earlier today I set you the following three puzzles. 1. I n each of the four sectors of the outer circle, there is a two-digit number which is equal to the sum of the three numbers at the corners of its sector. The numbers in the individual circles can only be 1 to 9 and each number can be used only once. One number has been provided to get you started. Find t
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Big Think

Wireless Charging Road for Electric Busses Will be Built in IsraelThe technology behind wireless charging or inductive charging was discovered by Nicola Tesla in the 1890s and utilizes an electromagnetic field to transfer energy between two objects. In chargers, an induction coil is used to create an electromagnetic field, while a second induction coil in the ... Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ultrafast nanophotonics: Turmoil in sluggish electrons' existenceAn international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behavior of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wild geese in China are 'prisoners' in their own wetlandsIn many places in the world, goose populations are booming as the birds have moved out of their wetland habitats to exploit an abundance of food on farmland. But, new evidence reported in Current Biology on May 22 confirms, that's not working so well for migratory waterbirds that overwinter in China.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

ASKAP telescope to rule radio-burst huntA CSIRO telescope in Western Australia has found its first 'fast radio burst' from space after less than four days of searching.
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Futurity.org

Six ways to save California’s trout and salmon A new report indicates that almost half of native California salmon, steelhead, and trout species are on track to be extinct in the next 50 years. The report offers concerning data about the declining health of these fish populations and opportunities for stabilizing and even recovering many species. If present trends continue, 74 percent of California’s native salmon, steelhead, and trout specie
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Futurity.org

Speedy treatment of sepsis can save lives Minutes matter when it comes to treating sepsis, according to a new analysis of nearly 50,000 patients at 149 hospitals. Following the death of Rory Staunton, 12, from undiagnosed sepsis in 2012, New York became the first state to require that hospitals follow a protocol to quickly identify and treat the condition. The mandate led to widespread controversy in the medical community as to whether s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Baseball coming June 1 to virtual-reality headsetsBaseball games will soon arrive on virtual-reality headsets.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Light-sensitive E. coli paint a colourful picture Microbes have been genetically engineered to sense red, green and blue light, and to produce pictures of what they 'see'. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22026
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The Scientist RSS

Bacterial Photography Goes TechnicolorGenetically engineered "disco bacteria" sense and respond to different colors of light, creating both stunning art in the culture dish and new possibilities for synthetic biology.
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Gizmodo

The Rock Shows Off the Only Power You Need to Be a Superhero GIF NBC Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson’s charismatic charm and insane physique are part of what’s made it so easy for him to cross over from the land of wrestling into the world of big-budget superhero franchises. In this weekend’s SNL “Scorpio” sketch, though, he reveals the one thing you really need to be a hero: the ability to sew. After gaining super-strength and the ability to sting people with d
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Gizmodo

Today's Best Deals: Anker Robotic Vacuum, FitDesk 3.0, Activewear Sale, and More A $150 robotic vacuum that’s actually good, the new FitDesk 3.0 and a mouse to ease wrist pain lead off Monday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Anker Wireless Vertical Mouse , $15 Whether your current mouse is giving you chronic wrist pain, or you just want to try something different, this 4.3 star rated wireless
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Popular Science

6 quick tricks for doing more with Apple Maps DIY Never get lost again Whether you've been using Apple Maps for several days or several years, these lesser-known tips help you get the most out of the app for iOS and macOS.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

South African team performs second successful penis transplantA team from Stellenbosch University and the Tygerberg Academic Hospital has performed a second penis transplant, making it the first medical centre in the world to successfully perform this procedure twice.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New cancer drug can prevent reactions to common airborne allergensA cancer drug for patients with certain types of leukemia and lymphoma can also prevent reactions to some of the most common airborne allergies, according to a recent Northwestern Medicine study. The promising data from this pilot study could have greater implications for adults with food allergies.
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Ars Technica

Flagship Samsung Chromebook Pro finally gets a release date: May 28 Enlarge (credit: Valentina Palladino) The Samsung Chromebook Pro is finally going to be a real device. Lost in the hubbub of Google I/O Friday, Samsung quietly dropped a press release pegging the device for a May 28 release date. With the Chromebook Pixel off the market, the all-aluminum, touch-and-pen enabled, Android app-packing Samsung "Chromebook" models were immediately looked to as the flag
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Gizmodo

DJI Will Cripple Your Drone if You Don't Register It on the Company's Website Photo: Adam Clark Estes DJI just made a weird but ultimately sensible announcement. The next firmware updates for all of its drone models will require users to log into the website for a “new application activation process.” If you don’t, DJI will turn your drone into a lame hunk of plastic that barely flies. This is actually a really responsible move on DJI’s part. By impelling customers to log
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Science | The Guardian

Scientists identify 40 genes that shed new light on biology of intelligence Study significantly adds to the tally of genes connected to intellect – but researchers caution genius isn’t all down to genetics A major study into the genetics of human intelligence has given scientists their richest insight yet into the biology that underpins our cognitive skills. The research on 60,000 adults and 20,000 children uncovered 40 new genes that play a role in intelligence, a haul
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Ars Technica

How Destiny 2 is leading to gold devaluation in World of Warcraft Careful, friend... while you were sleeping, the real-world value of that gold pile just went down a bit. Activision's decision to sell Destiny 2 through Blizzard's Battle.net (or the Blizzard app , if you insist on calling it that) is already having ripple effects throughout the platform. Look no further than World of Warcraft , where the real-world value of in-game gold has sunk quickly in the w
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sunflower genome sequence to provide roadmap for more resilient cropsUniversity of Georgia researchers are part of an international team that has published the first sunflower genome sequence. This new resource will assist future research programs using genetic tools to improve crop resilience and oil production.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New findings on formation and malformation of blood vesselsIn diseases like cancer, diabetes, rheumatism and stroke, a disorder develops in the blood vessels that exacerbates the condition and obstructs treatment. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet now show how blood vessels can normally change their size to create a functional circulatory system and how vascular malformation during disease can occur. In the study, published in Nature Cell Biology, the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Smoke from wildfires can have lasting climate impactResearchers have found that carbon particles released into the air from burning trees and other organic matter are much more likely than previously thought to travel to the upper levels of the atmosphere, where they can interfere with rays from the sun -- sometimes cooling the air and at other times warming it.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists find new genetic roots for intelligenceAn international research team led by Professor Danielle Posthuma from the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands, has made a major advance in understanding the genetic underpinnings of intelligence. Using a large dataset of more than 78,000 individuals with information on DNA genotypes and intelligence scores, the team discovered novel genes and biological routes for intelligence.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ASKAP telescope to rule radio-burst huntA CSIRO telescope in Western Australia has found its first 'fast radio burst' from space after less than four days of searching.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Speeding up quality control for biologicsMIT engineers have devised a way to analyze biologics as they are being produced, which could lead to faster and more efficient safety tests for such drugs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Interrogating proteinsScientists from the University of Bristol have designed a new protein structure, and are using it to understand how protein structures are stabilized.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists identify a neural circuit that rotates a fly's internal compassResearchers have uncovered the neurons that spin a fly's internal compass when the insect turns -- the first such mechanism identified in any animal.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New heart disease risk genes point to flaws in blood vessel wallsCoronary artery disease (CAD) is a leading cause of death worldwide. Despite dozens of regions in the genome associated with CAD, most of the genetic components of heart disease are not fully understood, suggesting that more genes are out there to be found. A team found 15 new risk genes for coronary artery disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers discover hottest lavas that erupted in past 2.5 billion yearsAn international team of researchers led by geoscientists with the Virginia Tech College of Science recently discovered that deep portions of Earth's mantle might be as hot as it was more than 2.5 billion years ago.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New answers for kids with inherited kidney diseaseA new gene behind a rare form of inherited childhood kidney disease has been identified by a global research team.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study examines polyneuropathy and long-term opioid usePolyneuropathy is a common painful condition, especially among older patients, which can result in functional impairment.In a new article published by JAMA Neurology, Christopher J. Klein, M.D., and his colleagues at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn., examined the association of long-term opioid therapy with functional status, adverse outcomes and death among patients with polyneuropathy. The popu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Was a statin beneficial for primary cardiovascular prevention in older adults?Analysis of data from older adults who participated in a clinical trial showed no benefit of a statin for all-cause mortality or coronary heart disease events when a statin was started for primary prevention in older adults with hypertension and moderately high cholesterol, according to a new article published by JAMA Internal Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Next-gen computing: Memristor chips that see patterns over pixelsInspired by how mammals see, a new 'memristor' computer circuit prototype at the University of Michigan has the potential to process complex data, such as images and video orders of magnitude, faster and with much less power than today's most advanced systems.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New clues emerge about how fruit flies navigate their worldJanelia Research Campus scientists have uncovered new clues about how fruit flies keep track of where they are in the world. Understanding the neural basis of navigation in flies may reveal how humans accomplish similar feats.
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Live Science

Gender-Confirmation Surgeries on the Rise in USThe number of surgeries done to confirm a person's gender identity, also referred to as sex reassignment surgeries, has increased in recent years.
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The Atlantic

How Hassan Rouhani Won in Iran Hassan Rouhani has won a clear victory to a second term as Iran’s president. The turnout in Friday’s election was close to 73 percent, with the incumbent taking some 56 percent of the over-40 million votes cast. Turnout in the last election in 2013 was roughly the same. But that year, Rouhani won only 50.7 percent of the vote. Still, the significance of this election is not that Rouhani won, but
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The Atlantic

The Children Being Denied Due Process On June 8, 1964, Gerald Gault and Ronald Lewis were arrested when their neighbor, Mrs. Cook, alleged they had made a lewd phone call to her home. The police detained Gerald overnight and held a hearing the next day in the juvenile judge’s chambers. Gerald’s parents, who were at work at the time of his arrest, were not notified, and Gerald was not provided an attorney during his interrogation or a
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The Atlantic

Butter Is Back Butter is beautiful: Solid golden bars add the perfect flakiness to pastry, give cake a delightfully tender springiness, and melt mouth-wateringly onto toast. But unlike its cousin, cheese—another concentrated, solidified form of milk—we don’t tend to think of butter as something that’s available in hundreds of varieties, each with a different flavor, color, and texture. Nor do we necessarily con
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TEDTalks (video)

Poverty isn't a lack of character; it's a lack of cash | Rutger Bregman"Ideas can and do change the world," says historian Rutger Bregman, sharing his case for a provocative one: guaranteed basic income. Learn more about the idea's 500-year history and a forgotten modern experiment where it actually worked -- and imagine how much energy and talent we would unleash if we got rid of poverty once and for all.
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Ars Technica

Remote Pacific island is the most plastic-contaminated spot yet surveyed Enlarge (credit: University of Tasmania ) Plastic is durable—very, very durable—which is why we like it. Since it started being mass-produced in the 1950s, annual production has increased 300-fold. Because plastic is so durable, when our kids grow up and we purge our toy chests, or even just when we finish a bottle of laundry detergent or shampoo, it doesn’t actually go away. While we're recyclin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Reduced US air pollution will boost rainfall in Africa's Sahel, says studyFalling sulfur dioxide emissions in the United States are expected to substantially increase rainfall in Africa's semi-arid Sahel, while bringing slightly more rain to much of the U.S., according to a new study in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres.
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Live Science

Nuclear Explosions and Submarine Comms Distort Space Weather Near EarthSpace weather typically refers to charged particles ejected by the sun that can interact with the Earth's atmosphere and magnetic field. However, a new study shows that humans also can change the near-Earth space environment.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Female STEM leaders more likely to back policies aiding womenFor decades, higher ed administrators have talked about the need for more female professors in science, technology, engineering and mathematics departments. But what is the best way to recruit and retain those professors? On that point, men and women sometimes disagree, according to new Cornell research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Awareness of controversial Arizona immigration law influenced male students' classroom behaviorU.S.-born Latino male middle school students who had familiarity with a controversial Arizona immigration-enforcement bill had more difficulty exhibiting proper behavior in the classroom, such as following instructions and staying quiet, according to a new study that includes a University of Kansas researcher.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Paper: 'No admit-No deny' settlements undercut accountability in civil enforcementShould federal regulatory agencies such as the Securities and Exchange Commission require admissions of guilt from the targets of civil investigations? According to a new paper co-written by a pair of University of Illinois law professors, even though the federal watchdogs rely heavily on "No admit-No deny" settlements as an enforcement tool, the failure of regulatory bodies to require admissions
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA orders up urgent spacewalking repairs at space stationNASA has ordered up urgent spacewalking repairs at the International Space Station.
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WIRED

A Curious Plan to Save the Environment With the Blockchain An ecologist argues that cryptographically-sealed databases could starve out inefficiencies that are ruining the environment. The post A Curious Plan to Save the Environment With the Blockchain appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Review: HP Spectre x360 13 HP delivers a super-slim machine with solid specs. The post Review: HP Spectre x360 13 appeared first on WIRED .
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Big Think

Why Silicon Valley Titans Train Their Brains with Philosophy Studying philosophy has had a major impact on the power players of Silicon Valley. Read More
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Futurity.org

Could blowing on a bracelet predict asthma attacks? Scientists have created a sensor that monitors lung inflammation in patients with asthma and other respiratory conditions. The sensor could potentially be used to predict asthma attacks and make diagnosing the condition simpler and more accurate. The sensor paves the way for the development of devices—possibly resembling fitness trackers like the Fitbit—which people could wear and then know when
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Ingeniøren

Techtopia #1: Når din læge bliver en appPODCAST: Mange mennesker kan ikke lide at gå til lægen og blive undersøgt. Og det kan de måske undgå i fremtiden, hvis de har en tricorder i medicinskabet. Vært: Henrik Føhns.
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Ingeniøren

Ingeniøren og IDA lancerer podcast om teknologi og videnskabHenrik Føhns er tidligere vært på DR's mangeårige tech-program Harddisken. Han er nu vært på det nye program Techtopia, der kan høres som podcast.
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NYT > Science

Matter: In ‘Enormous Success,’ Scientists Tie 52 Genes to Human IntelligenceThe genes account for just a tiny fraction of the variation in test scores, experts say. Many are yet to be found, and environmental factors are also greatly important.
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NYT > Science

Some Social Scientists Are Tired of Asking for PermissionNew federal rules may make it easier for researchers to conduct behavioral experiments. Critics worry that academics cannot judge whether their studies are harmful.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nepal torches valuable wildlife partsNepal destroyed thousands of valuable animal skins and other parts seized from poachers on a giant bonfire Monday in a symbolic gesture against the illegal wildlife trade.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Zuckerberg: not running for office, but wants 'to learn'Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg says he is not running for public office but is making a series of public appearances "to learn about people's hopes and challenges."
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Live Science

'Alien Megastructure' Star Is at It Again with the Strange DimmingTabby's star, the mysterious object that has exhibited a perplexing pattern of dimming and brightening, is at it again, and telescopes around the world are heeding the call to gather data on during the event.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Reduced US air pollution will boost rainfall in Africa's Sahel, says studyFalling sulfur dioxide emissions in the United States are expected to substantially increase rainfall in Africa's semi-arid Sahel, while bringing slightly more rain to much of the US, according to a new study in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds that sleep disorders affect men and women differentlyA new study suggests that men and women are affected differently by sleep disorders. Results show that women are more likely than men to have more severe symptoms of depression, trouble sleeping at night, and excessive daytime sleepiness. Women also have a higher degree of difficulty concentrating and remembering things due to sleepiness or tiredness. In contrast, male snoring was more likely than
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Female STEM leaders more likely to back policies aiding womenA national study of college and university administrators has found that female department chairs, deans and provosts have different attitudes and beliefs than their male counterparts about how to retain women professors in STEM fields. It also supports the assertion that placing women in administrative roles creates greater emphasis on the importance of enacting policies to attract and retain wom
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Paper: 'No admit-No deny' settlements undercut accountability in civil enforcementThe failure of federal watchdog agencies to require admissions of guilt from the targets of civil enforcement can trigger calls for greater accountability from the public, says a new paper from U. of I. law professors Verity Winship and Jennifer K. Robbennolt.
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The Atlantic

Twin Peaks Returns to Terrify, Delight, and Confound “I am dead, and yet I live,” Laura Palmer (Sheryl Lee) intones in her melancholic backward-speak, proving she’s still the soul of her show after all these years. Who could have put it better? Sunday’s return of Twin Peaks was everything fans might have expected: as confounding, horrifying, and furtive as its co-creator David Lynch’s (relatively) recent work, but not entirely lacking in the homesp
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The Atlantic

Getting to Know Your Online Doppleganger Much has been made of the existence of “filter bubbles,” the information feedback loop in which our preferences and viewpoints are continually amplified. This can happen in the analog world—how many of us would go out of our way to actually spend time with people whose worldviews are radically different from ours?—but is perhaps most often referenced as an artifact of our digital lives. Therein,
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Latest Headlines | Science News

40 more ‘intelligence’ genes foundA study of nearly 80,000 people turns up 40 genes that may have a role in making brains smarter.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Conservation and nameless earthworms: Assessors in the dark?Species that live exclusively in a single region are at a particular risk of extinction. However, for them to be protected, thorough assessments of the environmental impacts need to be performed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Next-gen computing: Memristor chips that see patterns over pixelsInspired by how mammals see, a new "memristor" computer circuit prototype at the University of Michigan has the potential to process complex data, such as images and video orders of magnitude, faster and with much less power than today's most advanced systems.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers discover hottest lavas that erupted in past 2.5 billion yearsAn international team of researchers led by geoscientists with the Virginia Tech College of Science recently discovered that deep portions of Earth's mantle might be as hot as it was more than 2.5 billion years ago.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Speeding up quality control for biologicsDrugs manufactured by living cells, also called biologics, are one of the fastest-growing segments of the pharmaceutical industry. These drugs, often antibodies or other proteins, are being used to treat cancer, arthritis, and many other diseases.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists design new protein structureThis research will help to design small proteins and small molecules that could be the basis for future biotechnologies and medicines.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New clues emerge about how fruit flies navigate their worldNestled deep inside a fruit fly's brain, specialized nerve cells knit themselves into a tiny compass. New results from neuroscientists at the Janelia Research Campus illuminate the architecture of this circuit and the neural forces that collectively move the compass needle.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flexible new method for early cancer diagnosisEarlier discovery of cancer and greater precision in the treatment process are the objectives of a new method developed by researchers at Sahlgrenska Academy and Boston University. Investments are now being made to roll out this innovation across healthcare and broaden the scope of the research in this field.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Calcium dynamics regulating the timing of decision-making in C. elegansAll animals make decisions according to information, but the detailed mechanism is not known. The researchers found that, a tiny worm chooses the direction in an odor space by mathematically integrating the information of odor concentration. Moreover, they also identified a gene responsible for the integration. Because integration of information has been known to be important for decision-making o
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Gizmodo

This Week's Doctor Who Highlighted the Best and the Worst of the Steven Moffat Era Image: BBC “Extremis” was the most unique episode of Doctor Who we’ve seen so far in season 10—but only because, unlike the rest of the season, it felt like an episode we’ve seen many times before from head writer Steven Moffat. For better or worse, it was a reminder of the style that will be forever linked with his time running the show. “Extremis” itself didn’t actually do all that much on its
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Gizmodo

Defense Stocks Hit All-Time Highs After Trump Sells $110 Billion in Weapons to Saudi Arabia President Donald Trump bows to the Saudi King Salman as he’s presented with The Collar of Abdulaziz Al Saud Medal at the Royal Court Palace on May 20, 2017 in Riyadh (AP Photo/Evan Vucci) On Saturday, President Trump signed an enormous $110 billion weapons deal with Saudi Arabia. And as you might expect, America’s private military companies are crushing it on the stock market this morning . Virtu
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New Scientist - News

Citizens give up data in blockchain project to improve citiesThe DECODE project will give residents of Barcelona and Amsterdam more control over how their personal data is harnessed by local government and businesses
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers show laser-induced graphene kills bacteria, resists biofoulingScientists at Rice University and Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) have discovered that laser-induced graphene (LIG) is a highly effective anti-fouling material and, when electrified, bacteria zapper.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Physics: New Frontiers*Science fiction has imagined some pretty wild ideas about how the universe could work – from hidden extra dimensions in Interstellar to life as a mental projection in The Matrix. But these... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Awareness of controversial Arizona immigration law influenced male students' classroom behaviorUS-born Latino male middle school students who had familiarity with a controversial Arizona immigration-enforcement bill had more difficulty exhibiting proper behavior in the classroom, such as following instructions and staying quiet, according to a new study by researchers at Arizona State University and the University of Kansas.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Reimbursement for integrative health care suggests violation of non-discrimination lawA new study shows that the likelihood of health insurance reimbursement for some common clinical services differs significantly depending on whether they are provided by a complementary healthcare service provider or a primary care physician.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers uncover new gravitational wave characteristicsMonash researchers have identified a new concept - 'orphan memory' - which changes the current thinking around gravitational waves.
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Ingeniøren

International frøbank på Svalbard oversvømmet af smeltevandSidste års rekordhøje temperaturer fik permafrosten på Svalbard til at tø, hvorefter smeltevand oversvømmede tunnellen ind til den globale frøbank, der opbevarer frø fra næsten en million forskellige planter.
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Ars Technica

Gender confirmation surgeries rose 20% in the last two years Enlarge / Gearah Goldstein speaks with her plastic surgeon, Dr. Loren Schechter, about her gender confirmation surgery. (credit: ASPS ) Gender confirmation procedures are on the rise in the US, doctors reported Monday. Surgeons performed more than 3,200 transfeminine and transmasculine procedures in 2016, according to new data from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). That’s nearly a
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Gizmodo

The Fyre Festival Is Still a Damn Mess, and Now the FBI Is Involved Screengrab: Youtube/ Fyre Media Fallout from the cataclysmic Fyre Festival is still going, per a new report in the New York Times , and it’s spread from its owner and organizers to Bahamian locals. Oh, and now the FBI is apparently involved, too. If you’ll recall, Fyre Media co-owners Billy McFarland, 25, and rapper turned mojito-mogul, Ja Rule, sold 8,000 tickets to a two-weekend music festival
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Ars Technica

Lawyer who founded Prenda Law is disbarred Enlarge / John L. Steele, photographed in Chicago in 2010. (credit: Nancy Stone/Chicago Tribune/MCT via Getty Images) John Steele , one of the masterminds behind the Prenda Law "copyright trolling" scheme, has been disbarred. Court papers indicate that Steele agreed to the disbarment, which was announced by the Illinois Supreme Court on Friday. Steele pled guilty in March to federal fraud and mon
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The Atlantic

Why American Workers Now Dress So Casually Americans began the 20th century in bustles and bowler hats and ended it in velour sweatsuits and flannel shirts—the most radical shift in dress standards in human history. At the center of this sartorial revolution was business casual, a genre of dress that broke the last bastion of formality—office attire—to redefine the American wardrobe. Born in Silicon Valley in the early 1980s, business cas
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Zap! Graphene is bad news for bacteriaLaser-induced graphene made from an inexpensive polymer is an effective anti-fouling material and, when charged, an excellent antibacterial surface.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Conservation and nameless earthworms: Assessors in the dark?Earthworms help to ensure that ecosystems thrive. However, people find it hard to relate to animals that are known by their scientific names only. Meanwhile, threatened earthworms may go extinct simply because they are often excluded from environmental assessments. A recently compiled list of standardized English names for earthworms in KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa is meant to address this
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Field of 'sexting' research finds little to worry aboutA recent analysis of research into how so-called 'sexting' may affect sexual behavior finds that it has little impact on sexual activity -- but highlights significant shortcomings in the research itself.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Injecting activator of a powerful tumor suppressor directly into the cancer increases tumor destruction, decreases toxicityDirectly injecting a tumor with an agent that activates a natural, powerful tumor suppressor enhances the drug's capacity to attack the tumor both locally and where it spreads, scientists report in the journal Cancer Research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study redefines HPV-related head and neck cancersMuch of what we thought we knew about the human papilloma virus (HPV) in HPV-related head and neck cancers may be wrong, according to a newly published study by Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) researchers that analyzed data from The Human Cancer Genome Atlas. Head and neck cancers involving HPV are on the rise, and many experts believe we are seeing the start of an epidemic that will only g
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Results with new bioresorbable stent (BRS) technologies reported at EuroPCR 2017Paris, France: Promising results were reported in late-breaking trials with novel bioresorbable stent technologies at EuroPCR 2017, paving the way for ongoing developments in stents that are dissolved or reabsorbed after achieving vessel expansion in percutaneous coronary intervention procedures.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Tax plastic drinking straws, firm saysA waste disposal firm claims that plastic drinking straws are "the ultimate in human wastefulness".
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Gizmodo

Ward off Wrist Pain With This $15 Wireless Vertical Mouse Anker Wireless Vertical Mouse , $15 Whether your current mouse is giving you chronic wrist pain, or you just want to try something different, this 4.3 star rated wireless ergonomic vertical mouse from Anker is only $15 today, or $5 less than usual. In addition to the clever design, it even comes with three adjustable DPI settings and forward/back buttons, which are pretty rare at this price level
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WIRED

Your Handy Field Guide to the Many Factions of the Far Right, From the Proud Boys to Identity Evropa So many bigots, so little sense. Still, we did what we could. The post Your Handy Field Guide to the Many Factions of the Far Right, From the Proud Boys to Identity Evropa appeared first on WIRED .
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Futurity.org

Spring mismatch threatens breeding of these 9 birds A growing shift in the onset of spring left 9 of 48 species of songbirds in a new study unable to reach their northern breeding grounds at the calendar marks critical for producing the next generation of fledglings. In many regions, warming temperatures are triggering plants to begin their growth earlier or later than normal, skewing biological cycles that have long been in sync. “It’s like Silen
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New survey delves into impact of intergenerational wealth on retirementPeople with an inheritance are more than twice as likely as those without one to feel prepared for retirement (38 percent vs. 17 percent), according to a new survey of Americans age 50 or older from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.
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Gizmodo

Jezebel Katy Perry Says ‘Swish Swish’ Is an Anti-Bullying Anthem, Ruby Rose Suggests Katy Is the Rea Jezebel Katy Perry Says ‘Swish Swish’ Is an Anti-Bullying Anthem, Ruby Rose Suggests Katy Is the Real Bully | The Root White Supremacist Sean Urbanski Charged With Murder in Stabbing Death of Black Bowie State Student Richard Collins III | Fusion Donald Trump’s Budget Proposal Contains Nearly $2 Trillion in Devastating Cuts for the Poor | Deadspin This Was The Most Dominant Possession of The Play
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Ars Technica

Japan, China have extracted methane hydrate from the seafloor Enlarge / A photo from the China Geological Survey. The researchers extracted methane hydrate from the bottom of the South China Sea. (credit: China Geological Survey ) This month, teams from Japan and China have successfully extracted methane hydrate, a hydrocarbon gas trapped in a structure of water molecules, off the seafloor. The substance looks like ice but can be set on fire, and it’s energ
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Ingeniøren

Lavmælt hurra for Sundhedsplatformen: Ambulatorier kører på 93-97 pct. af fuld kraft I dag er det Sundhedsplatformens fødselsdag, og i den anledning har en række overlæger skrevet en kronik, hvori de be- og afkræfter nogle af de historier, som i den seneste tid har præget medierne. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/lavmeldt-hurra-sundhedsplatformen-fyldte-aar-gaar-1076955 Version2
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The Atlantic

So, What Was the Deal With the Orb? President Trump’s visit this weekend to Saudi Arabia was largely hailed as a success: He appeared to enjoy himself on his first foreign trip as president; he announced billions in Saudi investment in the U.S.; and his speech on terrorism was well received. But it was one photograph Sunday that got much of the attention online: #Trump 's encounter with glowing orb sets social media alight https://
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

World's first demonstration of multicolor 3-D in vivo imaging using ultra-compact Compton cameraAs represented by conventional radiograph, radiological images provide only black and white figures in 2D space. The situation is basically the same for Single photon emission tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET), which are the two most common molecular imaging techniques used in nuclear medicine. PET is used especially for early cancer and Alzheimer's disease detection, but r
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Network traffic provides early indication of malware infectionBy analyzing network traffic going to suspicious domains, security administrators could detect malware infections weeks or even months before they're able to capture a sample of the invading malware, a new study suggests. The findings point toward the need for new malware-independent detection strategies that will give network defenders the ability to identify network security breaches in a more t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Deep sleep maintains the learning efficiency of the brainFor the first time, researchers of the University of Zurich and Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich have demonstrated the causal context of why deep sleep is important to the learning efficiency of the human brain. They have developed a new, noninvasive method for modulating deep sleep in humans in a targeted region of the brain.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fat can neutralize listeriaCertain fatty acids are not just part of a healthy diet. They can also neutralize the harmful listeria bacterium, a new study shows. This discovery could eventually lead to improved methods to combat dangerous and drug-resistant bacteria.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Effective intervention for binge drinking in adolescentsAn intervention program based on school class groups has a preventive effect on subsequent drinking behavior, especially binge drinking, in adolescents who had previously consumed alcohol. This is the conclusion reached in a cluster-randomized study reported by Reiner Hanewinkel and colleagues in the current issue of the Deutsches Ärzteblatt International
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tracheotomy: Risk for fatal complicationsA tracheotomy can be associated with fatal complications for the patient. Eckard Klemm and Andreas Nowak investigated the causes and rates of deaths due to this intervention. They present the results of their study in the current issue of the Deutsches Ärzteblatt International .https://www.aerzteblatt.de/pdf.asp?id=187985
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rotavirus vaccination in infants and young childrenRotaviruses (RV) are the commonest cause of diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide. To protect against rotavirus infection, in 2013 the Standing Committee on Vaccination (STIKO, Ständige Impfkommission) in Germany recommended rotavirus vaccination for all infants. According to current studies, the efficacy of the vaccines in use may be regarded as very high.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Monash researchers uncover new gravitational wave characteristicsMonash researchers have identified a new concept -- 'orphan memory' -- which changes the current thinking around gravitational waves.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Flexible new method for early cancer diagnosisEarlier discovery of cancer and greater precision in the treatment process are the objectives of a new method developed by researchers at Sahlgrenska Academy and Boston University. Investments are now being made to roll out this innovation across healthcare and broaden the scope of the research in this field.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Calcium dynamics regulating the timing of decision-making in C. elegansAll animals make decisions according to information, but the detailed mechanism is not known. The researchers found that, a tiny worm chooses the direction in an odor space by mathematically integrating the information of odor concentration. Moreover, they also identified a gene responsible for the integration. Because integration of information has been known to be important for decision-making o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New method: Water mapping around solutesChemists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have developed a new method that allows them to map changes in the dynamics and structure of water molecules in the vicinity of solutes. With this technique, called terahertz calorimetry, they investigated the properties of the hydration shell of dissolved alcohol molecules. In the future, they want to also use the method for water mapping around more complex sy
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Female peer mentors help retain college women in engineeringA new study by social psychologist Nilanjana Dasgupta and her Ph.D. student Tara C. Dennehy at the University of Massachusetts Amherst found that early in college, young women in engineering majors felt more confident about their ability, a greater sense of belonging in engineering, more motivated and less anxious if they had a female, but not male, peer mentor.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Parasitic robot system for waypoint navigation of turtleA KAIST research team presented a hybrid animal-robot interaction called "the parasitic robot system," that imitates the nature relationship between parasites and host.
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Dagens Medicin

#18 Turen går til AfrikaInterview med Kristoffer Vogler, der har været udsendt med Læger Uden Grænser flere gange.
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The Scientist RSS

How Statistics Weakened mRNAs Predictive PowerTranscript abundance isn't a reliable indicator of protein quantity, contrary to studies' suggestions.
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Big Think

Optimism Is a Skill That Can Be Learned Pessimists see bad events in their life as part of a permanent negative state of the world. The optimist is ready to get over the disappointing outcome, often using mantras like "t his too shall pass." Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers discover mechanism behind rapid smell source localizationScientists at NERF (VIB-KU Leuven-imec) have provided fundamental insights into the mechanism of smell localization. This marks an important step in unraveling the entire neural odor localization mechanism, which is highly valuable to the study of memory diseases such as Alzheimer's. The team, led by Professor Sebastian Haesler, used mice for the experiment, which are smell identification champion
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers pinpoint how diesel fumes could cause 'flare up' of respiratory symptomsScientists have shown how diesel fumes trigger respiratory reflexes which could potentially worsen underlying conditions, such as asthma.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Abused caregivers have double chance of poor healthNearly one in 20 middle-age women face a cumulative health impact from taking on care-giving roles after experiencing intimate partner violence according to research from the University of Queensland. The women had twice the odds of experiencing depressive symptoms and stress and also had worse physical health than women without these life experiences.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Medical gamma-ray camera is now palm-sizedResearchers invented a Compton camera of 580g which visualizes gamma rays of arbitrary energies, and succeeded in achieving a high-resolution, multicolor 3-D molecular image of a live mouse administered with three different radioactive tracers in just two hours. The results of this study imply possibilities for producing new tracers of wide energy range at reduced costs and enabling the simultaneo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Finnish study: Half of patients recover to baseline function after refractory status epilepticusThree in four patients with refractory status epilepticus treated in an intensive care unit (ICU) are still alive a year later, and half of them have recovered to baseline function, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. The study was the first to show the population-based incidences for refractory and super-refractory status epilepticus and to evaluate the long-term outc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Discovery may offer hope to Parkinson's disease patientsResearch led by the University of Sydney's Brain and Mind Centre has found a protein abnormality linked to brain cell loss in people with Parkinson's disease that is also present in some inherited forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Supercomputer study unlocks secrets of brain and safer anestheticsModelling of how protein 'switches' are activated, leading to electrical signals in the brain, paves the way for understanding how brain activity can be controlled by existing and new drugs, including anesthetics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Parasitic robot system for waypoint navigation of turtleThis paper presents a 'parasitic robot system' whereby locomotion abilities of an animal are applied to a robot task. We chose a turtle as our first host animal and designed a parasitic robot that can perform 'operant conditioning.' The parasitic robot, which is attached to the turtle, can induce object-tracking behavior of the turtle toward a light-emitting diode (LED) and positively reinforce th
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Viden

Norge skruer op for klimabeskyttelsen af 'dommedags-kornkammer'En bunker, der skulle kunne overvintre selv de værste katastrofer, oplever selv problemer.
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Ingeniøren

VIDEO Mini-tsunami i Rødvig: Vandstanden steg en halv meter på få minutterLørdag morgen ramte et særligt bølgefænomen den sjællandske østkyst og forårsagede blandt andet kraftig strøm i Rødvig Havn. DMI mener, at den såkaldte meteo-tsunami opstod grundet uvejr over havet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tidal tails detected around a distant globular cluster(Phys.org)—Astronomers have found tidal tails around a distant globular cluster known as NGC 7492. The newly discovered features could provide important information about the nature of globular clusters. The findings were presented in a paper published May. 11 on the arXiv preprint repository.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Modified experimental vaccine protects monkeys from deadly malariaResearchers have modified an experimental malaria vaccine and showed that it completely protected four of eight monkeys that received it against challenge with the virulent Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite. In three of the remaining four monkeys, the vaccine delayed when parasites first appeared in the blood by more than 25 days.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sleep loss affects your waistlineSleep loss increases the risk of obesity through a combination of effects on energy metabolism. This research will highlight how disrupted sleep patterns, a common feature of modern living, can predispose to weight gain, by affecting people’s appetite and responses to food and exercise.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Air pollution may disrupt sleepHigh levels of air pollution over time may get in the way of a good night's sleep, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Standardized assessment for students graduating from UK medical schoolsA new study describes a standardized assessment that ensures that students who graduate from UK medical schools have achieved a minimum standard of knowledge and skill related to prescribing medications.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Moderate drinking may not ward off heart diseaseMany people believe that having a glass of wine with dinner -- or moderately drinking any kind of alcohol -- will protect them from heart disease. But a hard look at the evidence finds little support for that. That's the conclusion of a new research review in the May 2017 issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Magnetic order in a two-dimensional molecular chessboardAchieving magnetic order in low-dimensional systems consisting of only one or two dimensions has been a research goal for some time. Researchers now show that magnetic order can be created in a two-dimensional chessboard lattice consisting of organometallic molecules that are only one atomic layer thick.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Better, cheaper healthcare with dry blood samplesA drop of blood on filter paper, allowed to dry and stored for future diagnostic purposes -- considerably easier than the present-day, resource-consuming method using frozen blood samples in plastic tubes. In a new study, Uppsala researchers have successfully measured 92 different proteins in millimeter-sized circles punched out of dried samples. They have shown that this method has great potentia
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Modified experimental vaccine protects monkeys from deadly malariaResearchers from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of NIH, modified an experimental malaria vaccine and showed that it completely protected four of eight monkeys that received it against challenge with the virulent Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite. In three of the remaining four monkeys, the vaccine delayed when parasites first appeared in the blood by m
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Viral ARIs in infants may lead to recurrent childhood wheezingViral acute respiratory infections (ARIs) may lead to oxidative stress in some infants, and play a major role in the development of recurrent wheezing in early childhood, according to a new study presented at the 2017 American Thoracic Society International Conference. Oxidative stress is an imbalance between the production of free radicals (atoms that can cause cellular damage in the body) and th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sleep apnea may increase risk of pregnancy complicationsWomen with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) appear to be at greater risk for serious pregnancy complications, longer hospital stays and even admission to the ICU than mothers without the condition, according to a new study of more than 1.5 million pregnancies presented at the ATS 2017 International Conference.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sleep apnea and insomnia in African-Americans goes undiagnosedAfrican-Americans with sleep apnea and insomnia are rarely diagnosed with either problem, even when the severity of the two sleep disorders are likely to affect their health, according to new research presented at the ATS 2017 International Conference.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Combination of features produces new Android vulnerabilityA new vulnerability affecting Android mobile devices results not from a traditional bug, but from the malicious combination of two legitimate permissions that power desirable and commonly used features in popular apps.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Network traffic provides early indication of malware infectionBy analyzing network traffic going to suspicious domains, security administrators could detect malware infections weeks or even months before they're able to capture a sample of the invading malware, a new study suggests. The findings point toward the need for new malware-independent detection strategies that will give network defenders the ability to identify network security breaches in a more t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Penn study pinpoints accuracy of ICU doctors' and nurses' predictions of patient outcomesA new study shows that ICU physicians are better at predicting whether patients will be alive in six months than they are at predicting patients' cognitive function in six months. The study, led by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, is published online today in JAMA and will also be presented at the American Thoracic Society's 2017 International Confe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

EuroPCR issues statement on bioresorbable stent (BRS) technologiesOngoing development of bioresorbable stent (BRS) technologies that are bioresorbed after achieving vessel expansion in percutaneous coronary intervention procedures is an important option to optimise outcomes in patients whose needs are not adequately met with current devices, EuroPCR advised in a statement issued at the close of the 2017 annual course.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New survey delves into impact of intergenerational wealth on retirementPeople with an inheritance are more than twice as likely as those without one to feel prepared for retirement (38 percent vs. 17 percent), according to a new survey of Americans age 50 or older from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. The survey also found that 56 percent think it is an adult child's responsibility to provide financial assistance to a parent if needed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists identify two new proteins connected to plant developmentThe discovery of two new proteins could lead to better ways to regulate plant structure and the ability to resist crop stresses such as drought, thus improving agriculture productivity.
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Dagens Medicin

Faktabaseret mavefornemmelseBornholms Hospital er sat på fri fod og ledelsen har en stor opgave i at overbevise afdelingerne om, at de ikke får en økonomisk lussing, hvis aktiviteten falder.
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WIRED

I Can Gripe About My Ride-Sharing Company to Passengers, Right? In which our etiquette expert ponders dishing with customers about your gig economy employer. The post I Can Gripe About My Ride-Sharing Company to Passengers, Right? appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Iceland Is Beautiful Except for the 2 Million Tourists Cheap flights and 'Game of Thrones' conspired to make Iceland a trendy vacation destination. And the country's struggling to keep up. The post Iceland Is Beautiful Except for the 2 Million Tourists appeared first on WIRED .
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Ars Technica

Nissan Leaf EV enters 10,000-mile Mongol Rally Nissan With the public charging infrastructure for electric cars expanding apace and Tesla Superchargers popping up like mushrooms, the concept of driving a few hundred miles in an EV is no longer as absurd a suggestion as it was just a couple of years ago. But ten thousand miles across Europe and central Asia? Come on now. That’s exactly what Chris Ramsey of Plug In Adventures plans to do, enter
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Big Think

What the World Will Look Like 4°C Warmer Will your grandchildren live in cities on Antarctica? Read More
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Viden

Ny Vestas gigant-møllepark leverer strøm til 230.000 engelske hjemBlot én omdrejning fra en enkelt vindmølle kan sikre strøm til et hjem i et helt døgn.
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Gizmodo

Han Solo Movie Set Pics Reveal a New Suit and New Rides Universal might be close to finding its Frankenstein’s monster. Go behind the scenes of Aquman with new filming footage. Patty Jenkins discusses Diana’s view of mankind in Wonder Woman . Plus, Cheryl Blossom’s furious transformation on Riverdale , and new looks at Supergirl ’s finale and the next episode of Doctor Who . Spoilers! Han Solo TMZ has a bevy of images from filming, featuring Ehrenreic
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Ars Technica

Bludgeoned by orcs: What it’s like to die repeatedly in Shadow of War Enlarge / Like my father always said, it's always easier to climb a tower while riding a fire-breathing beast. (credit: WB Interactive / Monolith) LOS ANGELES—Having played a fair amount of Middle Earth: Shadow of Mordor , I thought I knew what I was in for with its upcoming sequel, Shadow of War . The badass, "slay orcs all around" hero of the first game, Talion, returns with some supernatural t
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Ars Technica

Facebook content moderation guidelines leaked Enlarge / A wall of user photos form a Facebook logo at the company's data center in Lulea, Sweden. (credit: JONATHAN NACKSTRAND/AFP/Getty Images) Just as the Tories—in their bid to form the next UK government—push for greater policing of free content ad networks , a trove of documents revealing the secret guidelines used by Facebook's moderators to deal with posts from child abuse to suicide to
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Ars Technica

HP gives Envy laptops an edgier look, updates Spectre x2 with Kaby Lake CPUs Enlarge (credit: Valentina Palladino) HP announced a slew of updates to its Envy laptop line today, in addition to a mildly revamped Spectre x2. Many of these changes focus on elevating overall design, but in a practical way that doesn't impede the power and efficiency of each device. Slimmer bezels, bold edges, and USB Type-C abound, giving way to a more modern-looking Envy family and Spectre x2
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Scientific American Content: Global

Science Must Clean Up Its ActOur community still struggles with diversity, equity and inclusion issues, including systemic bias, harassment, discrimination and more -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mapping changes in the dynamics and structure of water molecules in the vicinity of solutesChemists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have developed a new method that allows them to map changes in the dynamics and structure of water molecules in the vicinity of solutes. With this technique, called terahertz calorimetry, they investigated the properties of the hydration shell of dissolved alcohol molecules. In the future, they want to also use the method for water mapping around more complex sy
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study finds female students less likely to drop engineering program if female mentored(Phys.org)—A pair of researchers with the University of Massachusetts has found evidence that suggests women are more likely to continue to pursue a degree in engineering if they have a female mentor. Nilanjana Dasgupta, an instructor, and her Ph.D. student Tara Dennehy paired first-year female engineering majors with older mentors for a year and then looked at the impact mentoring had the decisio
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Futurity.org

Cancer drug may treat severe asthma A small clinical trial suggests that some patients with severe asthma may benefit from treatment with a targeted cancer drug. The findings show that imatinib (brand name Gleevec), commonly prescribed to treat chronic myeloid leukemia, also targets specific immune cells known to drive inflammation in the lungs. “We are still in the early phase of this research,” says Mario Castro, professor of pul
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Gizmodo

The Best Apps for Hearing the News Before Anyone Else Image: Gizmodo You might have noticed we’re in a crazy news cycle right now, and in these times of political and civil uncertainty, staying on top of breaking news is more important than ever. If you want the most relevant stories delivered to your phone in the shortest possible time, we’ve got the apps for you. You can pick up news apps of all shapes and sizes for Android and iOS, but here we’ve
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Dagens Medicin

Efter 12 dages forberedelser: Nordic Medicare åbner klinik i Kalundborg Mandag morgen klokken otte fik Kalundborg en ny lægeklinik. Den bliver drevet af Nordic Medicare, der på 12 dage har gjort klinikken klar til de godt 1000 tilknyttede patienter.
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The Scientist RSS

Gene Drives Achilles HeelRare genetic variants could blunt efforts to destroy pest populations.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day:Better Be . . . Gryffindor!Inspired by the Sorting Hat from the Harry Potter series, scientists aptly dubbed this pointy spider Eriovixia gryffindori, after the fictional yet formidable wizard Godric Gryffindor.
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The Scientist RSS

Antarctica Is Turning GreenAs the climate warms, moss growth dramatically spreads on the continent's peninsula.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Secondary mirror of ELT successfully cast—largest convex mirror blank ever createdThe casting of the secondary mirror blank for ESO's Extremely Large Telescope (ELT) has been completed by SCHOTT at Mainz, Germany. The completed mirror will be 4.2 metres in diameter and weigh 3.5 tonnes. It will be the largest secondary mirror ever employed on a telescope and also the largest convex mirror ever produced.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new approach to forecasting solar flaresThe emerging discipline of space meteorology aims to reliably predict solar flares so that we may better guard against their effects. Using 3-D numerical models, an international team headed by Etienne Pariat, a researcher at LESIA (Observatoire de Paris / CNRS / Université Paris Diderot / UPMC), has discovered a proxy that could be used to forecast an eruptive event. The proxy is associated with
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How data is transforming the music industryFifteen years ago, Steve Jobs introduced the iPod. Since then, most music fans have understood this has radically changed how they listen to music.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tabby's star dims again, multiple telescopes to examine its spectra(Phys.org)—Telescope operators around the world have been notified that "Boyajian's star" (officially known as KIC 8462852) has dimmed again, offering space researchers a unique opportunity to study the star, which has baffled scientists ever since its discovery by a team at Yale University in 2015 led by Tabetha Boyajian. Subsequently nicknamed Tabby's star, it has been found to dim periodically
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Ingeniøren

3D-printede æggestokke skal hjælpe kræftramte kvinder til at få børnVed hjælp af en 3D-bioprinter har amerikanske forskere printet funktionelle æggestokke. Teknologien skal hjælpe kvinder, der har haft kræft til at producere hormoner og få ægløsning.
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WIRED

Your Camera Wants to Kill the Keyboard We're interacting with our computers in more natural and emotive ways, which could mean using your camera more and your keyboard a lot less. The post Your Camera Wants to Kill the Keyboard appeared first on WIRED .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study shows the influence of immersive virtual reality on racial biasResearchers of the University of Barcelona have studied the influence of immersive virtual reality (IVR) on racial bias. The study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, has used this technology to analyse the effects of immersion in automatic behaviours towards other races.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Star-forming filamentsInterstellar molecular clouds are often seen to be elongated and "filamentary" in shape, and come in a wide range of sizes. In molecular clouds, where stars form, the filamentary structure is thought to play an important role in star formation as the matter collapses to form protostars. Filamentary clouds are detected because the dust they contain obscures the optical light of background stars whi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Humanitarian efforts could be aided by AIResearchers have developed an AI algorithm to accurately predict the gender of pre-paid mobile phone users, which could be useful in crises.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New graphene sensor to improve hepatitis diagnosisA new UK-China collaborative project is developing a sensor to provide an easy, low-cost method of diagnosing hepatitis on the spot using graphene – an advanced 2-D material known for its high electrical conductivity. The sensor will be the first to simultaneously test for three types of hepatitis – A, B and C – out of the five types that exist. The multi-partner project, supported by the UK's New
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Scientific American Content: Global

Menstrual Cycle "on a Chip" Offers a New Window into Female PhysiologyResearchers have completed the first laboratory model of the human female reproductive cycle -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Two dead whales at Felixstowe and OrfordOne is up a river estuary, the other is awaiting removal from a beach.
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Ars Technica

Diving deep into the world of emergent gravity Enlarge / The Bullet Cluster, which has been viewed as a demonstration of dark matter. (credit: APOD ) The Universe is a strange place. Apart from the normal matter that we see around us, there appears to be a far larger amount of matter that we cannot see—the infamous dark matter. Even more puzzling, the Universe seems to be bathed in a similarly invisible dark energy, which drives the Universe
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Futurity.org

Why GM mosquitoes might not work against malaria Using CRISPR to genetically modify insects as a way to fight disease or crop devastation may be more difficult than initially thought, due in part to genetic variation within insect populations. The research, published in the journal Science Advances , combines advanced genetic and statistical analyses to show how certain genetic and behavioral qualities in disease-carrying insects, like mosquito
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Gizmodo

Writer Says Dead Men Tell No Tales Had a Female Villain... Until Johnny Depp Made Them Change It Image: Disney For Oscar-nominated actor Johnny Depp, female villains are like the Highlander... apparently, there can be only one. A 2016 blog post from Pirates of the Caribbean screenwriter Terry Rossio (recently discovered by MoviePilot ) has shed some light on some production weirdness with the latest film, Dead Men Tell No Tales . Rossio, who worked on the previous Pirates films, wrote a plot
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Toward lab-grown designer babiesIt gives new meaning to the vulgarity "a piece of tail." The latest way of divorcing baby-making from the old-fashioned method not only involves no sexual relations, it doesn't even involve eggs and sperm. At least at first.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new way to imagine grid stabilityTo ensure that the US electric grid remains stable and resilient, power generators in three main regions (Eastern, Western, and Texas) must be synchronized, all operating at the frequency of 60 hertz. Because generators interact with each other through a network of transmission lines, if one generator gets out of sync, it can disrupt the stability of the entire system and lead to outages for power
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Gizmodo

Melania Swats Away Donald's Hand In Latest Viral Misery From Trumpland GIF First Lady Melania Trump swats away Donald’s hand on the tarmac after landing in Israel this morning (GIF from pool video) It’s been well documented that Donald Trump is a total dick to his wife . So it’s no surprise that when he extended his hand on the tarmac in Israel this morning Melania literally swatted it away . It’s already getting meme’d and we can expect this video to be fully viral
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Popular Science

Is there a way to move badly parked cars to free up spaces? Technology Your quick question, answered quickly. A device to move badly parked cars still won't really help, according to an urban planner. Read on.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Snapchat leads augmented reality gains: researchersAugmented reality is seeing strong gains among Americans thanks to social networks like Snapchat, Instagram and Facebook, a market research firm said Monday.
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Live Science

The Wild History of Witch HuntersWitch-finders of early modern Europe and modern Africa made themselves indispensable by showing people a threat of a growing crisis of threatening evil.
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The Atlantic

The Nomad Who’s Exploding the Internet Into Pieces Dominic Tarr is a computer programmer who grew up on a remote farm in New Zealand. Down in the antipodes, isolation is even more isolating. Getting goods, people, and information to and from Australasia for families like Tarr’s has always been difficult. Bad, unreliable internet service is a particular challenge. Australia and New Zealand are first-world countries with third-world latency. Today,
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Blog » Languages » English

Gear up for the May Scythe Marathon! It’s been a very merry month of May on Eyewire, and what better way to finish things off than one of our marathons? Based on the success of our first Scythe Marathon, we will be doing another one and continuing this pattern in odd-number months going ahead. For May, your 24 hours to grow and complete an entire cell will start at 8 AM EDT on 5/24 ! Bonuses for Normal Play Trace 20 cubes – 2,000 po
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Whales, dolphins, and seals all follow the same evolutionary patternsFrom the poles to the equator, marine mammals such as seals, dolphins, and whales, play an important role in global ecosystems as apex predators, ecosystem engineers, and even organic ocean fertilisers. They occupy a diverse range of habitats, from deep sea environments to the Earth's rivers and coastlines, and continue to astound us with their natural beauty.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Does the Brain Use More Energy During Particular Activities?Claude Messier, a psychology professor at the University of Ottawa in Ontario, and Alexandria Béland-Millar, a Ph.D. candidate in his laboratory, respond: -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dinosaur embryo returned to China, but many fossils fall victim to illegal trade and poor protectionChina's record of life's past history on Earth is second to none.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

All three chicks at Cairngorms osprey nest dieThe nest in the Cairngorms in which three osprey chicks had hatched now appears to have been abandoned.
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The Atlantic

When a Robot Names a New Color of Paint Janelle Shane had been playing with recurrent neural networks—a type of machine-learning software—for more than a couple months when the computer told her to put horseradish in a chocolate cake. The request didn’t come out of the blue. Inspired by Tom Brewe , another AI researcher, Shane had been asking her neural net to come up with recipes. She fed it thousands of cookbooks, then asked it to ge
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The Atlantic

Ford's CEO Mark Fields Is Being Replaced Updated at 9:41 a.m. ET Ford Motor Company announced Monday it was replacing Mark Fields, its CEO, with Jim Hackett, the head of its autonomous-driving unit. Ford’s stock has declined more than 30 percent since Fields became CEO in July 2014. Last week the company announced it was cutting 1,400 jobs, about 10 percent of its salaried workforce, mostly through buyouts. The move was an attempt to as
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Gizmodo

Israeli Politician Takes Awkward Selfie With Trump While Netanyahu Tries To Push Him Away Israeli politician Oren Hazan tries to take a selfie with US President Donald Trump (left) and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu tries to push Hazan away (right) Donald Trump landed in Israel today as part of his (already exhausting ) first trip abroad as president. But things got a bit awkward this morning on the receiving line where Trump was meant to shake hands with Israeli officials.
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WIRED

Medicine Is Going Digital. The FDA Is Racing to Catch Up The regulatory agency for drugs and medical devices is creating a new unit dedicated strictly to digital health. The post Medicine Is Going Digital. The FDA Is Racing to Catch Up appeared first on WIRED .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Better and cheaper healthcare with dry blood samplesDried blood on filter paper stored for future diagnostic purposes – considerably easier than the present-day, resource-consuming method using frozen blood samples in plastic tubes. In a new study, Uppsala researchers have successfully measured 92 different proteins in millimetre-sized circles punched out of dried samples. They have shown that this method has great potential to save resources, to t
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Scientific American Content: Global

Glass Spheres Forged by Volcanic Lightning Offer Clues about EruptionsScientists have developed a safe and cost-effective way to study what happens inside volcanoes -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science

Could Humans Ever Regenerate a Limb?If you cut the leg off a salamander, it grows back. Humans, however, can't manage the trick. The reasons are far from simple, and to some extent are still a bit of a mystery.
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Gizmodo

Life's Too Short For Vacuuming: Get Anker's Reader-Favorite RoboVac 11 For Just $150, Today Only Eufy RoboVac 11 , $150 The RoboVac 11 from Eufy (a division of Anker) is one of your favorite robotic vacuums , and in my own testing, it’s every bit as good (and far quieter) than my Roomba. If it’s been on your radar, today’s deal on Amazon is by far the best price we’ve ever seen. Despite its impressive performance, the RoboVac normally sells for over $100 less than the comparable Roomba 650,
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Dagens Medicin

Professor og kirurg: Indfør kontrol med kirurger »Der er jo ikke nogle der kunne drømme om, at en pilot ikke engang imellem var i en simulator, hvor de skulle øve nogle forskellige ting,« siger Peter Funch Jensen.
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Dagens Medicin

Dansk professor modtager nordisk diabetespris Peter Rossing, der er forskningschef på Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen (SDCC), bliver hædret for sin store indsats indenfor diabetesforskningen
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Semi-transparent perovskite solar cells for solar windowsScientists are exploring ways to develop transparent or semi-transparent solar cells as a substitute for glass walls in modern buildings with the aim of harnessing solar energy. But this has proven challenging, because transparency in solar cells reduces their efficiency in absorbing the sunlight they need to generate electricity.
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New Scientist - News

Weird energy beam seems to travel five times the speed of lightThe galaxy M87 emits a jet of plasma that looks like it’s breaking the cosmic speed limit – here’s how it manages the trick
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A user-controlled file security scheme for cloud servicesBy securing data files with a 'need-to-know' decryption key, researchers at Singapore's Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) have developed a way to control access to cloud-hosted data in real time, adding an extra layer of security for data sharing via the Internet.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

The moment a sea lion pulls a girl underwaterExperts warn against getting too close to wild animals after a sea lion pulls a young girl underwater.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Luminous bacteria will help to measure radioactivityIn a new study, scientists asked the following questions, which are important in the field of radiobiology: What are the effects of low-dose gamma radiation on living creatures? What are the differences between gamma, alpha and beta radiation in terms of their effects on living creatures?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Sticky' particles promise more precise drug delivery for brain cancerA Yale research team has found that by tinkering with the surface properties of drug-loaded nanoparticles, they can potentially direct these particles to specific cells in the brain.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists identify two new proteins connected to plant developmentThe discovery of two new proteins could lead to better ways to regulate plant structure and the ability to resist crop stresses such as drought, thus improving agriculture productivity, according to researchers at Texas A&M AgriLife Research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The deaf-blind can now 'watch' television without intermediariesToday Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), Telefónica and the Federation of Deaf-Blind Persons Associations has developed PervasiveSUB, groundbreaking software that allows deaf-blind persons to receive and enjoy television content without intermediaries in real time.
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Live Science

British Daredevil Aims to Break 4 World Records in Wingsuit JumpsA wingsuit pilot is hoping to break four world records in two death-defying jumps from an altitude higher than where commercial airliners fly.
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The Atlantic

What Defenders of Trump's Right to Fire Comey Are Missing Donald Trump is leading this country into new and dark places. At each new reveal, administration critics ask their version of the question satirically posed by Saturday Night Live ’s Michael Che playing NBC’s Lester Holt: “Did I get him? It’s all over?” But no, as the punchline confirms, it’s not over—and a fascinating Friday Twitter exchange shows why not. I eagerly await the flood of experts e
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The Atlantic

How People Decide Whether to Have Children Isabel Caliva and her husband, Frank, had already “kicked the can down the road.” The can, in their case, was the kid conversation; the road was Caliva’s fertile years. Frank had always said he wanted lots of kids. Caliva, who was in her early 30s, thought maybe one or two would be nice, but she was mostly undecided. They had a nice life, with plenty of free time that allowed for trips to Portuga
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The Atlantic

How One Hundred Years of Solitude Became a Classic In 1967, Sudamericana Press published One Hundred Years of Solitude ( Cien años de soledad ), a novel written by a little known Colombian author named Gabriel García Márquez. Neither the writer nor the publisher expected much of the book. They knew, as the publishing giant Alfred A. Knopf once put it, that “many a novel is dead the day it is published.” Unexpectedly, One Hundred Years of Solitude
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The Atlantic

Israeli Settlers Weren't Always So Religious—They Were Once Secular Hippies In the vast and complex Israeli-Palestinian conflict, one issue is particularly contentious: Jewish Israeli settlers living in the West Bank, territory Israel has held since the Six-Day War in 1967. As the 50th anniversary of that conflict approaches in June, it continues to complicate the relationship between the U.S. and Israel. Donald Trump visits Israel this week, but ahead of his visit, an A
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Connecting solutions for grid resilienceImagine Alexander Graham Bell's reaction if someone handed him an iPhone and told him that the device in his hand was the same as the large, cone-mounted transmitter he invented and used to call Thomas Watson in 1876.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sequencing of green alga genome provides blueprint to advance clean energy, bioproductsPlant biologists have sequenced the genome of a particularly promising species of green alga, providing a blueprint for new discoveries in producing sustainable biofuels, antioxidants, and other valuable bioproducts.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Feeding a Hot, Hungry PlanetCreating sustainable food systems in the face of a changing climate isn't easy—but innovators around the world are making real progress -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Classical synchronization indicates persistent entanglement in isolated quantum systemsAs if by magic, seemingly independent pendulum clocks can come together to tick simultaneously and in synchrony. The phenomenon of "self-organized synchronization" frequently occurs in nature and engineering and is one of the key research fields of Marc Timme's team at the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization. The physicists in Göttingen are part of a German-Italian collaboratio
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: CubeSats deployed outside station's Kibo lab moduleA pair of CubeSats, with the Earth's limb in the background, moments after being ejected from a small satellite deployer outside of the International Space Station's Kibo laboratory module on Wednesday, May 16, 2017.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Saddle-shaped' universe could undermine general relativityResearchers have shown how singularities – which are normally only found at the centre of black holes and hidden from view – could exist in highly curved three-dimensional space.
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Science | The Guardian

‘I knew they were sugar pills but I felt fantastic’ – the rise of open-label placebosIBS patient Linda Buonanno knew the pills she was given contained no active drugs, yet they had an immediate effect on her condition. So can placebos play a useful medical role? Linda Buonanno had suffered 15 years of intense cramps, bloating, diarrhoea and pain she describes as “worse than labour”. She was willing to try anything to get relief from her irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and leapt at
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ash from ancient Russian eruption found in Norwegian ArcticGeochemical fingerprinting links microscopic ash found on the bottom of a Svalbard lake to a volcanic event happening 7000 years ago and 5000 km away.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Breakthrough means fewer frogs needed for researchThe number of clawed frogs used worldwide in research could soon be a fraction of the current number, following new research at the University of Portsmouth.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Plasmonics enhances the sensitivity of smartphone microscopyAn international team of researchers from the University of California, Los Angeles and the Braunschweig University of Technology in Germany has developed an approach to enhance the sensitivity of smartphone-based fluorescence microscopes by ten-fold compared to previously reported mobile phone-based handheld microscopes. This is an important development toward the use of mobile phones for advance
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New, water-based, recyclable membrane filters all types of nanoparticlesSeparation technology is at the heart of water purification, sewage treatment and reclaiming materials, as well as numerous basic industrial processes. Membranes are used to separate out the smallest nanoscale particles and even molecules and metal ions. Prof. Boris Rybtchinski and his group of the Weizmann Institute of Science's Organic Chemistry Department have developed a new type of membrane t
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Scientific American Content: Global

Grandma's Little RobotMachines that can read and react to social cues may be more acceptable companions and caretakers -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A climate sharing system to end the Australian power crisisA University of Adelaide researcher is proposing Australia use a "climate sharing system" to help solve the current power crisis. The system will transform a national liability into a national asset.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Successful synthesis of nanomaterial that improves catalytic converter efficiencyA large international collaboration, which included ANSTO, has successfully synthesised highly porous rhodium nanoparticles that could be used as a more effective catalytic converter for vehicles.
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NYT > Science

An ‘Awesome’ View at America’s First Offshore Wind FarmTake a ride out to Block Island Wind Farm and follow an engineer to the top of a wind turbine in this 360° video. Built by Deepwater Wind, the project tests the viability of large-scale wind farming along the New England coast.
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New Scientist - News

Weak defences leave us wide open to ransom attacksLast week’s cyberattacks were small beer. The UK government must invest in NHS upgrades before a bigger threat brings it to its knees
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Ingeniøren

Bitcoins slog rekord i weekenden I weekenden nåede bitcoins værdi op på en rekordhøj værdi. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/bitcoins-slog-rekord-weekenden-1076922 Version2
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Ingeniøren

Mini-processor i hjernen skal få lamme til at gå igen Projektet er stadig på et forskningsstadie, men forskerne tror, at projektet kan afhjælpe en lang række nervesygdomme. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/mini-processor-hjernen-skal-faa-lamme-at-gaa-igen-1076919 Version2
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Ingeniøren

7.000 solcelleanlæg rammes af nyt hovsa-indgrebTirsdag fremsætter energi-, forsynings- og klimaminister Lars Christian Lilleholt atter et lovforslag, der skal bremse udbygning med solceller, fordi denne forventes at overgå embedsmændenes forventninger i 2020.
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Ingeniøren

Lækkede Facebook-manualer viser, hvor svært det er at moderere mediet Sex, dyremishandling og selvskade kan tillades, men kun under en række forudsætninger. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/laekkede-facebookmanualer-viser-hvor-svaert-at-moderere-mediet-1076918 Version2
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Ingeniøren

Her er IDAs mål frem mod 2025Lørdag middag vedtog IDAs repræsentantskab Vision 2025, som er pejlemærke for foreningens udvikling de kommende år: flere individuelle ydelser for medlemmerne og større indflydelse på samfundsdebatten.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists investigate how the sense of smell works in bacteriaScientists from MIPT, in collaboration with international colleagues, have proposed a universal mechanism for the sense of smell in bacteria. The researchers obtained the structure of the NarQ protein from Escherichia coli (E. coli), which belongs to a universal class of sensory histidine kinases that are responsible for transmitting signals to bacteria about their environment. The paper published
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wafer-thin magnetic materials developed for future quantum technologiesTwo-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard patte
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