allergi kan bekæmpes af probiotica før høfebersæsonen

Allergies? Probiotic combination may curb your symptoms, new study finds
As we head into allergy season, you may feel less likely to grab a hanky and sneeze. That's because new research shows a probiotic combination might help reduce hay fever symptoms, if it's taken during allergy season.

atomvåben - bør ikke være på high alert

Take Nukes Off a Short Fuse
For the sake of the planet, the U.S. nuclear arsenal should not be on high alert --

autisme - oftere på skadestuen

Why do teens with autism go to the ER more often?
Adolescents with autism spectrum disorder use emergency-department services four times as often as their peers without autism, according to a new study. This suggests they may need better access to primary care and specialist services. Researchers looked at private insurance healthcare claims from 2005 to 2013 in 12- to 21-year-olds. Adolescents with autism received at least two separate diagnose

autisme - sprogvanskeligheder kan der kompenseres for

Adults with autism overcome childhood language challenges
Results of a small study of adults with autism has added to evidence that their brains can learn to compensate for some language comprehension challenges that are a hallmark of the disorder in children.

digital skovtur på mobilen - inspiration i naturen

Digital skovtur: Kort og aktiviteter på mobilen giver ny inspiration i naturen
Flere kommuner laver digitale løsninger, som kan bruges i skoven.

hudceller af personer med schizofreni viser at sygdommen starter i fosteret

Skin cells suggest schizophrenia may start in the womb
The skin cells of four adults with schizophrenia provide an unprecedented “window” into how the disease began before they were born. Scientists call the findings the first proof of concept for the hypothesis that a common genomic pathway lies at the root of schizophrenia—and say the work is a step toward the design of treatments that could be administered to pregnant mothers at high risk for bear

termitter lister i myreland - men imiterer myre-tramp når de trues

Tiptoeing termites bang their heads to mimic ant footsteps
Termites have evolved super-soft footsteps that enable them to forage unnoticed alongside ants – but when threatened they imitate the heavy-footed predators

turister til Månen

Musk’s moon trip ‘tourists’ should be praised as pioneers
Fee-paying astronauts are pioneers in helping create a revolution in commercial space flight that will benefit us all, says Richard Garriott de Cayeux

vælgere rokkes ikke af de hører - pga forudfattede meninger

Study shows how information sources affect voters
For all the fact-checking and objective reporting produced by major media outlets, voters in the US nonetheless rely heavily on their pre-existing views when deciding if politicians' statements are true or not, according to a new study.

livets oprindelse tidspunkt Canadiske fossiler

Canadiske fossiler skubber tidspunkt for livets oprindelse
Nye fund tyder på, at den simpleste form for liv på Jorden opstod langt tidligere end antaget.

livets oprindelse tidspunkt Canadiske fossiler

World’s Oldest Fossils Possibly Discovered In Quebec | Video
Scientists have discovered fossil traces of primordial microbes that are at least 3.7 billion years old in a rocky outcrop in Quebec, Canada, which suggests life on Earth may have arisen shortly after the oceans cooled.

livets oprindelse tidspunkt Canadiske fossiler

World's Oldest Fossils Possibly Uncovered in Canada
Scientists have found the distinct chemical traces of ancient life in rocks from Quebec, Canada, but not everyone is convinced that they represent the earliest evidence of life on Earth.

ældste form for liv på Jorden 3770 million år

World's oldest fossils unearthed
Remains of microorganisms at least 3,770 million years old have been discovered, providing direct evidence of one of the oldest life forms on Earth.

ældste form for liv på Jorden 3770 million år

4 billion years: World's oldest fossils unearthed
Remains of microorganisms at least 3,770 million years old have been discovered by an international team led by UCL scientists, providing direct evidence of one of the oldest life forms on Earth.

200 nye mineraler skyldes menneskets tilstedeværelse

Humans help cook up mineral bounty
Scientists identify 208 new minerals that owe their existence wholly or in part to humans.

28 februar 2017 de sjældne sygdommes dag - ny døvhedssygdom

Novel syndrome highlights the importance of rare disease research
Tuesday Feb. 28, 2017 is Rare Disease Day, and this year's slogan is 'With research, possibilities are limitless'. Disease Models & Mechanisms is marking the day by spotlighting a recent paper on a newly discovered deafness-dystonia syndrome documented in a family from Pakistan.

3D print af carbonfiber-komposit - mulighed for letvægt materiale stærkere end stål

Lab researchers 3D print with high-performance carbon fiber
Researchers, for the the first time, have 3D printed aerospace-grade carbon fiber composites, opening the door to greater control and optimization of the lightweight, yet stronger than steel material.

Alexander Flemings penicilllin-petriskål solgt på auktion

This Tiny Patch Of Mold Cost One Lucky Buyer Nearly $15,000
On the mold market — which is a thing, apparently — this bit of green is a "holy relic": some of the mold that helped Alexander Fleming discover penicillin. And it sold for big bucks at auction.

Alzheimer

Amyloid-Busting Drugs for Alzheimer’s Keep Failing, but So Is Everything Else
Drug failures may be telling us that we don’t know what causes Alzheimer’s disease.

Alzheimer

Cholesterol-processing enzyme protects from debilitating brain lesions
An enzyme that helps break down cholesterol may also be a therapeutic target to stave off neurologic diseases, including Alzheimer's and a rare genetic disorder, according to a new study published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry. Researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and Karolinska Institute in Sweden discove

Alzheimer

Amyloid-Busting Drugs for Alzheimer’s Keep Failing, but So Does Everything Else
Drug failures may be telling us that we don’t know what causes Alzheimer’s disease.

Alzheimer

May smartphones help to maintain memory in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease?
May SmartPhones help to maintain memory in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease? A small trial succeeds using Google calendar application to maintain prospective memory (the ability to remember to do things in the future) in a patient with mild Alzheimer's disease.

Alzheimer

New approach to treating Alzheimer's disease
Researchers have introduced a new approach to treat Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's disease is the sixth leading cause of death among in older adults. The exact causes of Alzheimer's disease are still unknown, but several factors are presumed to be causative agents. Among these, the aggregation of amyloid-? peptide has been implicated as a contributor to the formation of neuritic plaques, which a

antibiotikaforbrug - colistin - i husdyrproduktion - regler strammes i Danmark

Efter stigende medicinforbrug: Ministerium indskrænker brug af antibiotikum
En uønsket stigning i brugen af antibiotikummet colistin får nu Miljø- og Fødevareministeriet til at stramme reglerne for brugen af denne type medicin i husdyrproduktion.

astma - ny behandling

Study brings hope of a new treatment for asthma sufferers
Improved treatments for people with severe asthma are a ‘step closer’ after a research team identified a breakthrough in the cause of airway narrowing.

bakterier og svampe som alternativer til kemisk gødning

Improving the biodiversity of green roofs
Using living organisms such as bacteria or fungi, as an alternative to chemical fertilizers, can improve the soil biodiversity of green roofs, according to new research.

bakterier og svampe som alternativer til kemisk gødning

Improving the biodiversity of green roofs
Using living organisms such as bacteria or fungi, as an alternative to chemical fertilisers, can improve the soil biodiversity of green roofs, according to new research from the University of Portsmouth.

biblioteker får børn til at læse med udstoppede dyr og overnatning

Sleepovers with stuffed animals help children learn to read
Sending stuffed animals for a sleepover at the library encourages children to read with them, even long after the sleepover took place, say researchers. For the first time, the study proves stuffed animal sleepovers are an effective way to get children to read.

biosensorer med transistor-teknologi er forbedret med silicium-nanotråde på overfladen

Silicon nanowires fabricated via imprinting technology could be the future for transistor-based biosensors
Korean researchers are improving the fabrication of transistor-based biosensors by using silicon nanowires on their surface.

blæksprutter - da de mistede deres hårde skal under evolutionen

Why the Octopus Lost Its Shell
The ancestors of octopuses and squid once sported hard shells, but when did they lose their "mobile homes" and become agile, soft-bodied swimmers? A new study finds that this change may have occurred during the Jurassic and Cretaceous periods.

blæksprutter - da de mistede deres hårde skal under evolutionen

Shedding new light on the evolution of the squid
Octopus, cuttlefish and squid are well known in the invertebrate world. With their ink-squirting decoy technique, ability to change color, bizarre body plan and remarkable intelligence they highlight that lacking a back-bone doesn't always mean lacking sophistication.

blæksprutter - da de mistede deres hårde skal under evolutionen

Squid evolved in marine wars more than 100 million years ago
Evolution of jawed vertebrates and bony fish created evolutionary pressure that boosted cephalopod diversification some 100 million years ago

blæksprutter - da de mistede deres hårde skal under evolutionen

Shedding new light on the evolution of the squid
Octopus, cuttlefish and squid are well known in the invertebrate world. With their ink-squirting decoy technique, ability to change colour, bizarre body plan and remarkable intelligence they highlight that lacking a back-bone doesn't always mean lacking sophistication.

by-batteri i Nordhavn, København

Nordhavn har tilsluttet kæmpebatteri
Danmarks første store by-batteri skal fuldt integreres i elnettet for at teste de nye forbrugsmønstre med elbiler og varmepumper.

celle-efterligning i form af kunstige vesikler imiterer molekylær crowding

Researchers imitate molecular crowding in cells
Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. These results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

celle-efterligning i form af kunstige vesikler imiterer molekylær crowding - mulighed for studier af kunstige organeller

Researchers imitate molecular crowding in cells
Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

cellekerneskelets molekylære struktur opdaget

Molecular structure of the cell nucleoskeleton revealed for the first time
Using 3-D electron microscopy, structural biologists have succeeded in elucidating the architecture of the lamina of the cell nucleus at molecular resolution for the first time. This scaffold stabilizes the cell nucleus in higher eukaryotes and is involved in organizing, activating and duplicating the genetic material. Diseases such as muscular dystrophy and premature aging, caused by mutations in

celler - nyopdaget måde hvormed celler skiller sig af med proteinklumper

In cleaning up misfolded proteins, cell powerhouses can break down
Working with yeast and human cells, researchers say they have discovered an unexpected route for cells to eliminate protein clumps that may sometimes be the molecular equivalent of throwing too much or the wrong trash into the garbage disposal.

celler kan nu nanoindsprøjtes med fremmedstoffer

Nanoinjection increases survival rate of cells
How do tumors grow? And how do bacteria transform harmless substances into medical agents? When biophysicists want to understand what is happening in living cells, they have to introduce fluorescent probes or other foreign molecules. There are several ways to overcome the cell wall without causing the cell permanent harm. Physicists have developed a particularly gentle method for this: nanoinjecti

demens hyppigere hos folk med antiimmune sygdomme som sclerose og psoriasis

Autoimmune disorders linked to an increased risk of dementia
People with conditions like multiple sclerosis and psoriasis are more likely to develop dementia, and cardiovascular problems could be to blame

dinosaur link til fugle

Lasers flesh out dino-bird profile
A chicken-sized, feathered dinosaur that scuttled around Earth 160 million years ago is helping flesh out the missing link between land-bound animals and flying ones, scientists said Tuesday.

e-cigaretter anvendes for at opnå boost af social image

Why Do People Vape? Reasons Have Changed
The reasons people use e-cigarettes are shifting, with fewer using them as a way to quit smoking, and more using them as to a way to boost their social image, a new study finds.

elefanter har kort søvn

Mysteries of elephant sleep revealed
African elephants living in the wild sleep for the shortest time of any mammal, according to a study.

farve dannet ved lys mod bittesmå metalpartikler kan ændres - plasmonisk print

Chemical reaction alters the colours of plasmonic prints
Plasmonic printing produces resolutions several times greater than conventional printing methods. In plasmonic printing, colours are formed on the surfaces of tiny metallic particles when light excites their electrons to oscillate. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Stuttgart have now shown how the colours of such metallic particles can be altered with hydrogen. The

finansverdenen - testosteron skaber finansbobler når mænd agerer men ikke når det er kvinder

Are market bubbles caused by traders' testosterone levels?
Research conducted at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) has determined that psychological momentum significantly affects performance among men but not among women, which may account for exaggerated risk-taking in financial and business endeavors among males.

frøer æder unger som ikke er deres egne

Male poison frogs become cannibals after taking over territories
Systematic 'infanticide' of unrelated young occurs in several animal species. For carnivores and primates, infanticidal actions are mainly sexually motivated. A study in Scientific Reports by researchers of Vetmeduni Vienna has shown for the first time that also male poison frogs selectively eat other males' offspring—after having taken over their rivals' territories. They were thus able to demons

gener for øjensygdom der fører til blindhed - Macular Telangiectasia type 2 MacTel

World-first genetic clues point to risk of blindness
Scientists have discovered the first evidence of genes that cause Macular Telangiectasia type 2 (MacTel), a degenerative eye disease which leads to blindness and is currently incurable and untreatable. The team's findings established five key regions -- or loci -- in the genome most likely to influence a person's risk of developing MacTel. The finding will enable researchers to better understand t

Google Street View brugt til studier af byers bæredygtighed

Using Google to map our ecosystem
Researchers have developed a method to quantify ecosystem services of street trees. Using nearly 100,000 images from Google Street View, the study helps further understanding on how green spaces contribute to urban sustainability.

havenes og atmosfærens dannelse

Study opens new questions on how the atmosphere and oceans formed
Seawater cycles throughout Earth's interior down to 2,900km, much deeper than previously thought, reopening questions about how the atmosphere and oceans formed.

hepatitic C lægemiddelpatent - retssager om tilladelse af kopiering af patentet i Indien og Argentina

Hepatitis C drugs re-energize global fight over patents
Lawsuits in India and Argentina seek to reduce drug costs by allowing generic versions of antiviral treatments

hjernen bliver snydt - hvad du ser afhænger af hvad du samtidig hører

The Strange 'McGurk' Effect: How Your Eyes Can Affect What You Hear
The brain can be fooled, the McGurk shows.

hjernescanning viser hvilke artikler der vil gå viralt

Your brain activity might predict which articles you read will go viral
Science Even if you wouldn't share them yourself Our brain has a way to determine which article is more valuable to share. A story’s virality can be predicted by brain signals, according to a new study.

hjerte og kost

3 Diet Trends That Aren't Heart-Healthy | Video
Experts attempt to dispel the hype surrounding some popular diet trends in a new review study.

hjerteanfald fremkaldt af aktiverede T-celler

Activated T-cells drive post-heart attack heart failure
Chronic inflammation after a heart attack can promote heart failure and death. Researchers have now shown that activated T-cells — part of the immune system’s inflammatory response — are both necessary and sufficient to produce such heart failure.

hjertekirurgi - lysstråle erstatter blodtest for at påvise blodproprisiko under operationen

Light beam replaces blood test during heart surgery
Light beamed into a patient's blood through an optical fiber can determine whether blood is clotting during an operation, continuously and in real time. Researchers believe it could take the place of traditional blood tests in some situations and have myriad healthcare applications.

honningbier respons for virus og parasitter

Scientists reveal core genes involved in immunity of honey bees
A core set of genes involved in the responses of honey bees to multiple diseases caused by viruses and parasites has been identified by an international team of researchers. The findings provide a better-defined starting point for future studies of honey-bee health, and may help scientists and beekeepers breed honey bees that are more resilient to stress.

hukommelse - virkning af overindlæring

The Power of Overlearning: It can help to work on something you already know how to do
submitted by /u/parrishthethought [link] [comments]

hukommelse - virkning af overindlæring

The Power of Overlearning
It can help to work on something you already know how to do --

husdyr - DNA fra udstoppede dyr afslører genetisk diversitet i landbrug

DNA from taxidermy specimens explains genetic structure of British and Irish goats
Modern-day British and Irish goats used in agriculture lack genetic diversity. DNA comparisons were made with decades-old taxidermy specimens -- the first time such specimens have been used to answer questions about livestock genetics.

husdyr - DNA fra udstoppede dyr afslører genetisk diversitet i landbrug

DNA from taxidermy specimens explains genetic structure of British and Irish goats
Intensive selective breeding over the past 200 years and high extinction rates among feral populations has greatly reduced the genetic diversity present in domestic goat breeds. The effect these pressures have had on Irish and British goat populations has been explored in a landmark DNA study that compared modern-day domestic and feral goats with museum specimens from years gone by.

højeste temperaturmåling i Antarktis

Highest temperatures recorded for antarctic region
The World Meteorological Organization announced today new verified record high- temperatures in Antarctica, ranging from the high 60s (in Fahrenheit) to the high teens, depending on the location they were recorded in Antarctica. Knowledge and verification of such extremes are important in the study of weather patterns, climate variability and human induced change, report scientists.

hårfarvning efterligner melanin

Toward a safer permanent hair dye that mimics melanin
Coloring hair has become a common practice, particularly for people who want to hide their graying locks. But an ingredient in many of today's commercial hair dyes has been linked to allergic reactions and skin irritation. Now scientists have developed a potentially safer alternative by mimicking the hair's natural color molecule: melanin. Their report appears in the journal ACS Biomaterials Scien

ikke-vævet stof - nyt software gør produkterne mere bøjelige ved at simulere fibrenes bevægelse i vindhvirvler

Simulation tool for efficient production of non-woven fabrics
Non-woven fabrics are indispensable to everyday life. A Fraunhofer Institute has developed software that makes the production of non-woven products much more efficient and flexible. With the tool FIDYST, it has been possible for the first time to simulate the movement of fibers in turbulent air currents. A real innovation – and the breakthrough in a theory that is over a hundred years old.

keramisk materiale laves med nanopulver ved stuetemperatur - f.eks. til badeværelsefliser og porcelæn

Make ceramics with a press instead of a kiln
Making ceramic materials like cement, bricks, bathroom tile, and porcelain, normally requires lots of heat—kilns used to fire the materials get to temperatures well over 1800º F. A new method, by contrast, works at room temperature. Scientists used a calcium carbonate nanopowder as the starting material and instead of firing it, they added a small amount of water and then compacted it. “The manuf

kost og brystkræft - dårlig kost øger risiko for brystkræft

Poor adolescent, early adult diet associated with increased risk for premenopausal breast cancer
Women who consumed a diet as adolescents or young adults associated with chronic inflammation had a higher risk for premenopausal breast cancer compared with those whose adolescent and early adulthood diet was not associated with chronic inflammation.

krig mindre sandsynlig mellem lande der er venners venner

War less likely between nations that are 'friends of friends': study
Even nations can have friends of friends, a new study has found.

kronisk smerte afhjælpes ved fælleslæsning

Shared reading can help with chronic pain
A study has found that shared reading (SR) can be a useful therapy for chronic pain sufferers.

kronisk smerte behandles med lysterapi

Promise in light therapy to treat chronic pain
Chronic pain afflicts over 100 million people across the United States. It diminishes their productivity, their quality of life and costs hundreds of billions of dollars each year to medically manage. It shatters people's emotional wellbeing, tears apart families and claims lives through suicides and accidental drug overdoses. But now researchers have found promise in a novel, non-pharmacological

kræft i hjernen hos børn - Københavns Universitet

Treatment of malignant brain tumour in children gets closer
Researchers at the University of Copenhagen have identified important mechanisms underlying how a special...

kræftcellers stivhed er indikator for kræft - og stivheden kan nu måles bedre

A better way to measure the stiffness of cancer cells
Biomedical engineers have discovered a way to detect signs of cancer on a cell-by-cell basis using two lasers and a camera. An increase in cell stiffness is an indicator of cancerous tissue, but current technology cannot gauge cells individually. In a study, researchers describe a technique for assessing an individual cell's stiffness using patterns that appear within its internal structure.

kunstige synapser gør computere mere hjernelignende

Artificial synapse could make computers more like brains
Scientists have created an artificial synapse, the space over which neurons communicate. It could help computers better recreate the way the human brain processes information and lead to improvements in brain-machine technologies. “It works like a real synapse but it’s an organic electronic device that can be engineered,” says Alberto Salleo, associate professor of materials science and engineeri

landsbyer i Afrika, Asien og Sydamerika er ikke bæredygtige som man har troet

In small village communities, local resources are often not used sustainably
Village communities in the tropical regions of Africa, Asia and South America have not been using local forest resources as sustainably as is often assumed. This is the conclusion of a study published by scientists from the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) together with the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) and Wageningen University in science journal Environment

melanoma-billedteknologi af to melanin molekyler er et gennembrud

Fine-tuned microscopy technique offers breakthrough imaging of melanoma
Researchers have recently refined a classic Raman-based technique and succeeded in imaging the two dominant melanin molecules -- a breakthrough that could lead to new understandings and, critically, early detection of melanoma, say investigators.

melanoma-billedteknologi af to melanin molekyler er et gennembrud

A fine-tuned microscopy technique offers breakthrough imaging of melanoma
Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, with over 232,000 new cases and 55,000 deaths per year worldwide. Those with light-skin or red hair are often prone to hard-to-detect melanomas, often caused by properties of pigments within skin called melanins. People with fair skin have a higher concentration of the melanin known as pheomelanin in their skin, and a corresponding higher probability

menneskets udvikling - spiste vi tang?

Did seaweed make us who we are today?
Millions of years ago something happened, allowing early Homo sapiens to branch out from the primitive hominoid family tree. Was this crucial turn in human evolution partly driven by seaweed and its particular content of essential nutrients?

methan findes i havsediment i Stillehavet

First direct measurements of Pacific seabed sediments reveal strong methane source
Researchers from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have discovered a major source of an important greenhouse gas in the Tropical Pacific Ocean for the first time.

migration af mennesker

Human migration
A special issue explores the intersection of science and migration

migration af mennesker - i spotlight og væk fra spotlight

What the numbers say about refugees
The biggest concentrations of displaced people lie far from the spotlight

migration af mennesker - USA

What happened when 4 million African Americans left the South to seek opportunity
The period in American history known as the Great Migration—those decades from 1940 to 1970 during which nearly 4 million African Americans left the South, hopeful that better lives awaited to the North and West—has been the subject of historical and political analysis, of literature, poetry and even song.

migræne

Migraine-Fighting Arm Patch Shows Small Effect
A device that is worn like a patch around the upper arm and stimulates the nerves could relieve migraines.

mikrobiel RODEO - mulighederne i bioteknologi

New tool, RODEO, promises to capture the breadth of microbial biosynthetic potential
In an age of booming biotechnology, it might be easy to forget how much we still rely on the bounty of the natural world. Some microbes make us sick, some keep us healthy, while others continue to give us some of our best cures in the form of naturally occurring products such as penicillin and tetracycline.

musling-aflejringer fortæller om menneskeskabte ændringer i havets økosystem

Mollusk graveyards are time machines to oceans' pristine past
Mollusk fossils provide a reliable measure of human-driven changes in marine ecosystems and shifts in ocean biodiversity across time and space, new research shows.

musling-aflejringer fortæller om menneskeskabte ændringer i havets økosystem

Mollusk graveyards are time machines to oceans' pristine past
A University of Florida study shows that mollusk fossils provide a reliable measure of human-driven changes in marine ecosystems and shifts in ocean biodiversity across time and space.

nanopartikel-belægning kan gøres igen og igen 80 gange - mulighed for papir der kan påtrykkes igen og igen

Reprintable Paper Becomes a Reality
A new nanoparticle coating may allow the material to be erased and reused more than 80 times --

nanovæv med mulighed for fremtidig udnyttelse fx over sår eller som skudsikker vest

Portable nanofiber device offers precise, point-and-shoot capability
Harvard researchers have developed a lightweight, portable nanofiber fabrication device that could one day be used to dress wounds on a battlefield or dress shoppers in customizable fabrics.The research was published recently in Macromolecular Materials and Engineering.

neanderthal-gener i vores genom

Neandertals Live On in Our Genomes
Researchers found that Neandertal gene variants still affect the way genes are turned off and on in modern humans. --

nerveskade behandlet med omsluttende nerve-nanofiber

Nerve wrapping nanofiber mesh promoting regeneration
A joint research team developed a mesh which can be wrapped around injured peripheral nerves to facilitate their regeneration and restore their functions.

non-coding RNA er ofte funktionelt alligevel

Improved gene expression atlas shows that many human long non-coding RNAs may actually be functional
Scientists have generated a comprehensive atlas of human long non-coding RNAs with substantially improved gene models, allowing them to better assess the diversity and functionality of these RNAs. Their results suggest that 19,175 of these RNAs may be functional, hinting that there could be as many -- or even more -- functional non-coding RNAs than the approximately 20,000 protein-coding genes in

non-coding RNA er ofte funktionelt alligevel

Improved gene expression atlas shows that many human long non-coding RNAs may actually be functional
While it was once believed that genes regulated biological functions almost exclusively by being transcribed to coding RNAs that were then translated into proteins, it is now known that the picture is much more complex. In fact, studies examining the association between genes and diseases have shown that most disease variants are found outside of protein-coding genes.

ombyg gammel elektronik

New uses for your old phone, tablet, or laptop
DIY How to breathe new life into an outdated device Just because one of the gadgets you own has become outdated doesn't mean you have to trash it. There are lots of ways to give your hardware a second life.

pankreas kræft - vandrende proteiner forudsiger

Two migration proteins boost predictive value of pancreatic cancer biomarker
Adding two blood-borne proteins associated with cancer cell migration increases the predictive ability of the current biomarker for pancreatic cancer to detect early stage disease, a research team reports.

Parkinson - motion hjælper mod fald

Exercise helps prevent falls in Parkinson's patients
Statistics show that 25 per cent of recently diagnosed patients suffered a fall in the first year. That came as a surprise to researchers. They had thought that falls tended to occur during later stages of the disease.

Parkinson - SV2C-protein

New target for Parkinson's disease identified by researchers
Investigators have discovered a novel link between a protein called SV2C and Parkinson's disease (PD). Prior work had suggested that the SV2C gene was associated with the curious ability of cigarette smoking to reduce PD risk.

Parkinson - toxisk protein spredes ikke som en infektion med påvirker alle dele af hjernen

Researchers suggest new theory for how Parkinson's disease develops
The toxic protein behind Parkinson’s disease may not spread like an infection from nerve cell to nerve. Instead, say researchers, the protein may simultaneously affect all parts of the nervous system inside and outside of the brain.

pingviner i Afrika trues af klimaændring og overfiskning

African Penguins Pulled into an Ecological Trap
Climate change and overfishing have made the penguins’ feeding grounds a mirage—which has led to a drop in penguin population. Jason G. Goldman reports. --

påvisning af stoffer med lysafgivende såkaldt levende handsker

Glowing, 'Living' Gloves Could Aid Crime-Scene Investigations
Researchers bioengineered a "living material" that will light up when in contact with certain chemicals.

sandheder og løgne i fransk valgkamp

International media unite against fake news
A group of 37 French and international media outlets, supported by Google, on Tuesday launched "CrossCheck", a joint fact-checking platform aimed at detecting fake information which could affect the French presidential election.

seglcelleanæmi behandlet ved genterapi

Gene therapy ‘cures’ boy of blood disease that affects millions
So far, gene therapy has only treated rare disorders. Now, for the first time, it has been used to treat a boy with sickle cell disease, a common genetic disease

software-redskab til at følge virusudbrud

Open Science Prize goes to software tool for tracking viral outbreaks
After three rounds of competition—one of which involved a public vote—a software tool developed by researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the University of Basel to track Zika, Ebola and other viral disease outbreaks in real time has won the first-ever international Open Science Prize.

stamcelle - ændringer af betydning under sårheling

Wound healing: The stem cell dynamic
One of the key questions in biology is to identify how tissues are repaired after trauma and understand how stem cells migrate, proliferate, and differentiate to repair tissue damage. Researchers define, for the first time, the changes in the stem cell dynamics that contribute to wound healing.

stamceller der vokser på en chip er alternativ til dyretest - botulismetoxin

Stem cells derived neuronal networks grown on a chip as an alternative to animal testing
Scientists have developed an in vitro stem cell-based bioassay grown on multi-electrode arrays capable of detecting the biological activity of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins. Their assay could serve in minimizing animal experiments as well as provide a physiological relevant platform for drug-screening of neuroactive compounds.

statin gavner ikke patienter med lungekræft

Statins do not benefit patients with lung cancer, new study shows
Cholesterol-lowering drugs used alongside chemotherapy have no effect on treatment outcomes for lung cancer patients, according to a new study.

tarmbakteirer ændrer individets adfærd - i mus

Intestinal bacteria alter gut and brain function, study shows
The goal of a new study was to explore whether fecal microbiota from human IBS patients with diarrhea has the ability to influence gut and brain function in recipient mice. Using fecal transplants, researchers transferred microbiota from IBS patients with or without anxiety into germ-free mice. The mice went on to develop changes both in intestinal function and behavior reminiscent of the donor IB

testosteron påvirker firben så søskende bliver forskellige

With most of the same genes, how do lizard siblings end up so different?
An evolutionary biologist suggests that hormones, such as testosterone, play a key role in shaping gene expression in ways that are unique to each sex as an organism develops to adulthood.

Trump - og støtte til kvinder i forskning via lov

Women in STEM Fields Get Boost from President Trump
President Donald Trump signed into law two bills that aim to encourage women to pursue careers in science and technology.

tuberkulose lægemiddel fundet i jordbakterier

New TB drug candidates developed from soil bacteria
A new treatment for TB set to be developed using compounds derived from bacterium that live in soil, according to international collaboration of researchers. A new compound – created from soil bacteria which prevent other bacteria growing around them – is an effective killer of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which causes TB, say the scientists.

Vejskilte taler via FM-radiosignaler

Singing posters and talking shirts: Engineers turn objects into FM stations
A new technique enables 'singing' posters and 'smart' clothing to send audio or data directly to your car's radio or your smartphone by piggybacking on ambient FM radio signals.

vibrationskader kan undgås md nye strukturer

Synthetic tooth enamel may lead to more resilient structures
Unavoidable vibrations, such as those on airplanes, cause rigid structures to age and crack, but researchers may have an answer for that -- design them more like tooth enamel, which could lead to more resilient flight computers, for instance.

zika - hvordan virusset ændrer celler

See how Zika infection changes a human cell
The Zika virus taking hold of the inner organelles of human liver and neural stem cells has been captured via light and electron microscopy. In Cell Reports on February 28, researchers in Germany show how the African and Asian strains of Zika rearrange the endoplasmic reticulum and cytoskeletal architecture of host cells so that they can build factories where they make daughter viruses. The study

zika - virus kan spredes af flere myggearter

More mosquito species than previously thought may transmit Zika
Zika virus could be transmitted by more mosquito species than those currently known, according to a new predictive model created by ecologists.

øjet hos padder - nattesyn bedre end andre dyr

Frogs have unique ability to see color in the dark
The night vision of frogs and toads appears to be superior to that of all other animals. They have the ability to see color even when it is so dark that humans are not able to see anything at all, shows a new study.

øret - medfødt fejludvikling behandlet uden kirurgi

Nonsurgical treatment can correct congenital ear malformations in infants
For infants with congenital malformations of the ear, a treatment system called EarWell can gently reshape the ear, avoiding the pain and cost of later surgery, reports a study.

The battle to save Bangkok's 'Green Lung'
Leaping out from Bangkok's vast concrete sprawl is a kidney-shaped green space, home to hundreds of plant and bird species, and where cars are outnumbered by bicyles.

Lake worshipped by Incans now littered with trash
Tucked between snow-capped mountains, Lake Titicaca was once worshipped by the Incas, who proclaimed its deep blue waters the birthplace of the sun.

KU og Region H samler indsats for teknologioverførsel
Et nyt fælles kontor skal løfte indsatsen for at skabe forretning på baggrund af opfindelser...

In a Binary World, You Can’t Have Angels Without Monsters
The moment we divided the world into opposites, we opened the gates of Hell.

Bills remove impediments to ill-advised state “right to try” laws, shield wrongdoers, and hide adverse events
Congressional bills will unleash state "right to try" laws, block terminally ill patients from redress for damages caused by negligent doctors and drug companies, and hide adverse drug events from the public.

Sydney’s Swelter Has a Climate Change Link, Scientists Say
Heat waves like those that affected southeastern Australia early this year are much more likely with human-caused global warming, a study has found.

Stribevis af sikkerhedsproblemer i kodeords-huskere
https://www.version2.dk/artikel/stribevis-sikkerhedsproblemer-populaere-kodeords-huskere-paa-android-master-password Forskere har gennemgået sikkerheden i flere kodeordshuskere på Android, og det ser skidt ud.

Fodboldspillere kan ånde lettet op: Kunstgræsbaner stort set frikendt af ny rapport
Kemikalieagentur fastslår i en længe ventet undersøgelse, at der kun af lav grund til bekymring for helbredet ved at spille fodbold på de mange nye baner af kunstgræs med granulat af gamle bildæk.

Study finds knowledge gaps on protecting cultural sites from climate change
North Carolina's Cape Lookout lighthouse has survived threats ranging from Civil War raids to multiple hurricanes, but the Outer Banks site can't escape climate-related changes such as rising sea levels, coastal erosion and flooding from stronger storms.

How a Human-Machine Mind-Meld Could Make Robots Smarter
Kindred AI is teaching robots new tasks using human virtual-reality “pilots.” The ultimate goal is to create a new kind of artificial intelligence.

Facts About Cloning
Cloning is the process of taking genetic information from one living thing and creating identical copies of it.

New Empirical Evidence on Disjunction Effect and Cultural Dependence
We perform new experiment using almost the same sample size considered by Tversky and Shafir to test the validity of classical probability theory in decision making. The results clearly indicate that the disjunction effect depends also on culture and more specifically on gender (females rather than males). We did more statistical analysis rather that putting the actual values done by previous auth

Semi-analytical approximations to statistical moments of sigmoid and softmax mappings of normal variables
This note is concerned with accurate and computationally efficient approximations of moments of Gaussian random variables passed through sigmoid or softmax mappings. These approximations are semi-analytical (i.e. they involve the numerical adjustment of parametric forms) and highly accurate (they yield 5% error at most). We also highlight a few niche applications of these approximations, which ari

Sierra Snowpack Smacks California's Drought
Despite one of the wettest winters on record, California Gov. Jerry Brown hasn't declared the five-year drought over yet. But the water shortages may to be over.

Announcing the 1200 Subjects Data Release!
The Human Connectome Project (HCP) WU-Minn consortium is pleased to announce the 1200 Subjects Release of HCP image and behavioral data, its final release of new HCP Subjects. The 1200 Subjects release includes behavioral/demographic and 3T MR imaging data from 1206 healthy young adult participants collected August 2012‒October 2015, including: 3T MR structural scans available for 1113 subjects.

Nature report should be released now - MPs
The government's long-delayed 25-year plan for improving nature in England should be published immediately, MPs say.

Lasers reveal how Big Ben 'bongs'
Scientists use lasers to analyse how the sound of Big Ben's "bongs" is created.

The FCC Graciously Sets Internet Providers Free to Sell Your Data
Comcast, Verizon, and other ISPs can now sell your personal information without your permission—at least for now. The FCC Graciously Sets Internet Providers Free to Sell Your Data appeared first on WIRED .

Birth Control Is Working Better – Or At Least, It's Failing Less
Failure rates for the most common forms of contraception are down, but it's not entirely clear whether it's due to education, availability, or other reasons.

Advokater: Vær klar til at flytte cloud data ud af Trumps USA
https://www.version2.dk/artikel/advokater-noedvendigt-at-overveje-at-flytte-clouddata-ud-usa-med-trump-praesident-1073998 Det nye politiske regime med Trump i spidsen betyder, at det er blevet vanskeligere at være sikker på, om persondatareglerne overholdes, hvis man f.eks. er Salesforce-kunde med data i USA.

Big Questions Around Facebook’s Suicide-Prevention Tools
Mental health researchers wonder if the social network’s intervention techniques will be effective.

This bot-maker wants to make a thousand interconnected AIs out of your documents
Technology Converting docs into virtual assistants isn't quite the singularity, yet Albert is a bot-creating tool that turns docs into bots. Read on.

Satellite Photos and Radar Scans Could Protect Ancient City | Video
Researchers are using radar scans to preserve stone architecture at the historic site of Angkor in Cambodia.

Understanding and predicting snow behavior
Engineers from the University of Luxembourg are working together with scientists from the WSL Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research SLF in Switzerland to better analyse mechanical properties of snow. The project has the goal to develop a computer model that can help solving typical snow-related engineering problems. The model could, for example, be used to anticipate avalanches, to determine t

Hidden figures no more: Lego honors 'Women of NASA'
Lego sets have long celebrated superheroes like Batman and Superman. But now, the Danish toy maker is honoring real-life heroines—five women pioneers for the US space agency NASA.

Tiny Fossils Could Be Oldest Evidence Of Life On Earth
Scientists say they've found the remains of tube- and string-like organisms in Canadian rocks that are at least 3.7 billion years old. But findings like these are always controversial.

Warmer Temperatures Signal Early Start To Spring Weather
Spring arrived early this year across much of the U.S. NPR's Audie Cornish talks to Jake Weltzin of the U.S. Geological Survey to find out how we know.

Heavy Rainfall Strains One Of California's Most Essential Reservoirs
Snow surveyors are measuring the health of the snow pack in the high altitude Sierra Nevada. After years of drought, much of the state is now experiencing one of its wettest years on record.

Appeals court overturns $533 mn verdict against Apple
A US appellate court Wednesday overturned a $533 million patent verdict against Apple, saying the award was based on "routine computer activities" which cannot be patented.

Oculus looks to spur VR spread with Rift price cut
Facebook-owned Oculus on Wednesday slashed the price of its Rift headsets to speed the pace at which the virtual reality technology is working its way into homes.

Game theory could improve cyberwarfare strategy
Whether a nation should retaliate against a cyber attack is a complicated decision, and a new framework guided by game theory could help policymakers determine the best strategy.

Range Rover’s New Baby SUV Will Swaddle You for $50,000
A new "just right" option for people who think they need a luxury off-roader. Range Rover's New Baby SUV Will Swaddle You for $50,000 appeared first on WIRED .

The shifting rationales for vaping
A new study harnesses social media data to explore -- in their own words -- the reasons people use e-cigarettes and why they started vaping in the first place. Nearly half of people say they began vaping in an effort to quit smoking cigarettes, while other reasons included their taste, the ability to use them indoors and their 'cool factor.'

Telephone-based collaborative care program eases anxiety
A telephone-delivered collaborative care program for treating panic and generalized anxiety disorders in primary care is significantly more effective than doctors' usual care at improving health-related quality of life, anxiety and mood symptoms, new research has found.

Magic cover crop carpet?
Organic farmers can use a combination of cover crops and no-till methods to improve soil health, suppress weeds, and retain moisture, suggests a new report.

Elderly people who choose the wrong shoes have a lower quality of life
As people get older, they experience changes in their foot morphology. If they do not change their shoe size along with these transformations, older people - most of whom choose the wrong shoes - suffer, among other things, anxiety, apathy, loss of balance and falls, according to a study.

Tailored preventive oral health intervention improves dental health among elderly
A tailored preventive oral health intervention significantly improved the cleanliness of teeth and dentures among elderly home care clients. In addition, functional ability and cognitive function were strongly associated with better oral hygiene, according to a new study.

Benefits of physical activity may outweigh impact of obesity on cardiovascular disease
The benefits of physical activity may outweigh the impact of overweight and obesity on cardiovascular disease in middle-aged and elderly people, according to research. The observational study was conducted in more than 5,000 people aged 55 years and older who were followed-up for 15 years.

New American Spy Satellite Launches on Classified Mission
The NROL-79 satellite launched atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket at 12:49 p.m. EST (1749 GMT) today, rising off a pad at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.

'Inflammatory Diet' May Boost Breast Cancer Risk
Eating an "inflammatory diet" as a teen may increase a woman's risk of breast cancer, a new study suggests.

Rapid changes point to origin of ultra-fast black hole 'burp'
Scientists have made the most detailed observation yet of a black hole outflow, from the active galaxy IRAS 13224-3809. The outflow's temperature changed on time scales of less than an hour -- hundreds of times faster than ever seen before. The rapid fluctuations in the outflow's temperature also indicated that the outflow was responding to X-ray emissions from the accretion disk, a dense zone of

Couples may miss cues that partner is hiding emotions, study suggests
Even the most blissful of couples in long-running, exclusive relationships may be fairly clueless when it comes to spotting the ploys their partner uses to avoid dealing with emotional issues, suggests new research.

In select patients with gunshot wounds, no operation is sometimes a better option
At one time, trauma surgeons considered an operation mandatory to treat gunshot wounds to the abdomen, but a study has found that in selected patients, avoiding an operation -- a practice known as nonoperative management -- is an acceptable and effective treatment.

A new cosmic survey offers unprecedented view of galaxies
Scientists have published a 'cosmic census' of a large swath of the night sky containing roughly 100 million stars and galaxies, including some of the most distant objects in the universe. These high-quality images allow an unprecedented view into the nature and evolution of galaxies and dark matter.

Scars from the Big Bang: Galaxy cluster and cosmic background
The events surrounding the Big Bang were so cataclysmic that they left an indelible imprint on the fabric of the cosmos. We can detect these scars today by observing the oldest light in the universe.

Experiment makes substantial leap forward in quest for dark matter
New research represents a significant improvement on previous detection constraints, and a substantial step forward in the search for dark matter.

A new role for an old immune cell may lead to novel therapies for infection and cancer
A new study has identified a previously undescribed role for a type of unconventional T cell with the potential to be used in the development of new therapies for infection and cancer.

Tree scars record 700 years of natural and cultural fire history in a northern forest
Distinguishing human from climatic influence on historical fire patterns is critical to forest management planning, which is guided by historical patterns of fire frequency, size, and intensity. A Norwegian forest tells a story of a surge in human-instigated fires during the 17th and 18th centuries, followed by fire suppression after AD 1800, as economic motivations changed.

First solar images from NOAA's GOES-16 satellite
The first images from the Solar Ultraviolet Imager or SUVI instrument aboard NOAA's GOES-16 satellite have been successful, capturing a large coronal hole on Jan. 29, 2017.

Advanced Radar Tech Could Save Ancient City of Angkor's Collapsing Monuments
Scientists are investigating what may be weakening the remains of ancient Angkor's stony architecture.

Cholesterol-processing enzyme protects from debilitating brain lesions
Researchers have discovered that a specific enzyme in the brain could reduce the formation of debilitating brain lesions in the two diseases.

Teens drive more safely in the months after a crash
Teens' risky driving drops considerably in the two months following a serious collision, according to new research. The research, involving data on actual driving behavior from over 250 teens, suggests that involvement in a severe crash may prompt adolescents to engage in safer driving behavior.

Highly prevalent gene variants in minority populations cause kidney disease
A team engineered mice with the G1 and G2 APOL1 gene mutations that cause human-like kidney disease to study these gene variants found almost exclusively in people of West African descent. These mutations carry an increased risk of kidney disease. The study established that these mutations are disease causing.

Hunting for giant planet analogs in our own backyard
There may be a large number of undetected bright, substellar objects similar to giant exoplanets in our own solar neighborhood, according to new work.

Astronomy: Dark matter mapped
One of the highest-resolution maps of dark matter ever created has now been revealed, offering a detailed case for the existence of cold dark matter -- sluggish particles that comprise the bulk of matter in the universe.

Watch Live Today: The James Webb Space Telescope Will Spark a New Era in Astronomy [Video]
Astronomer Amber Straughn will present a free live Webcast tonight at 7 P.M. Eastern time about NASA’s revolutionary space observatory --

The worst thing about electric cars might not be an issue for much longer
From Our Blogs: Nexus Media News Is "range anxiety" a thing of the past? In addition to nationwide volunteer peer-to-peer sharing, cities, states, utilities and private companies are setting up charging stations for the public.

The microworm of Jaén whose males have no penis
In the most arid areas where there is little to no water, there live nematodes of no more than 1 mm which feed on bacteria and help to mineralise soil and produce nutrients. In an orchard of Jaén a new species has appeared with a feature that makes them unique on the Iberian Peninsula: the males lack the copulatory organ.

What happens when patients access their mental health providers' notes?
Thanks to electronic health records and online portals, more and more patients have access to the notes their clinicians write about their health care visits. A new study offers insight into the potential for this feature, known as OpenNotes, to help -- or hurt -- patients' trust in their mental health clinicians.

Coaxing particles to form vortices using magnetic fields
Researchers have created tiny swirling vortices out of magnetic particles, providing insight into the behavior that governs such systems -- which opens up new opportunities for materials and devices with new properties.

We Really Need to Talk About That Get Out Ending
It's time to wade in a little deeper on @jordanpeele's new movie. We Really Need to Talk About That Get Out Ending appeared first on WIRED .

Nature can beat back scientific tinkering with genes of entire species
Scientists have revealed daunting challenges to changing the DNA of entire populations of species via the most promising techniques available today to produce 'gene drive.'

Risky business: calculating climate change losses in major European coastal cities
A new study that assesses potential future climate damage to major European coastal cities has found that, if, as currently, global carbon emissions continue to track the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's worst emission scenario (RCP8.5), overall annual economic losses may range from 1.2 billion USD in 2030 to more than 40 billion by 2100.

Let's use humanoid robots to grow transplant organs
Health Bio-hybrid robots could make better lab-grown tissues By and large, engineered tissues are small, simple, and kinda wimpy. That's because a petri dish is no match for the human body. Read on.

Rock solid evidence of Anthropocene seen in 208 minerals we made
Human activities like mining and building have created hundreds of minerals and spread them all over the world, leaving a significant mark on the geological record

Elephants sleep for just 2 hours a day – the least of any mammal
The sleep patterns of wild elephants have been remotely monitored for the first time, revealing they get by with little kip

China’s Bird Flu Surge Is a Low Epidemic Threat, W.H.O. Says
But the virus’s division into two strains will probably force development of a second small stockpile of emergency vaccine to be introduced if the virus becomes more transmissible.

Tweaking electrolyte makes better lithium-metal batteries
New research shows adding a pinch of chemical additive to a lithium-metal battery's electrolyte helps make rechargeable batteries that are stable, charge quickly, and go longer in between charges than lithium-ion batteries.

Desk jobs are bad for your heart and your waist
A new study shows further evidence for the view that spending too much time sitting down is bad for our health and our waistline.

The ultimate power nap: Researchers use 'Fitbits' to track elephant sleep in the wild
Why we sleep is one of the enduring unanswered mysteries of modern science. Along with such activities as eating, protecting oneself and reproducing, sleep is one of the major biological imperatives of existence.

Catalog of 208 human-caused minerals bolsters argument to declare 'Anthropocene Epoch'
Human industry and ingenuity has done more to diversify and distribute minerals on Earth than any development since the rise of oxygen over 2.2 billion years ago, experts say in a paper published today.

Ninety percent of predatory fish gone from Caribbean coral reefs due to overfishing
Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have found that up to 90 percent of predatory fish are gone from Caribbean coral reefs, straining the ocean ecosystem and coastal economy. The good news? They identified reefs, known as supersites, which can support large numbers of predator fishes that if reintroduced, can help restore the environmental and economic setback inflicted

Iron dissolved by air pollution may increase ocean potential to trap carbon
Iron particles generated by cities and industry are being dissolved by man-made air pollution and washed into the sea - potentially increasing the amount of greenhouse gases that the world's oceans can absorb, a new study suggests.

Found: Thousands of Man-Made Minerals--Another Argument for the Anthropocene
Future geologists will find thousands of human-made minerals in the ruins of our civilization --

Hunted, haunted, stateless and scared: the stories of refugee scientists
Displaced researchers face huge challenges making lives abroad, even if they find work

Singing posters and talking shirts: Engineers turn objects into FM stations
Imagine you're waiting in your car and a poster for a concert from a local band catches your eye. What if you could just tune your car to a radio station and actually listen to that band's music? Or perhaps you see the poster on the side of a bus stop. What if it could send your smartphone a link for discounted tickets or give you directions to the venue?

Old mold from penicillin discoverer auctioned for $14,617
How much is an old, dried-out piece of mold worth? Apparently more than $14,600 if it was created by the doctor who discovered penicillin.

Classified US satellite launched from California
A rocket carrying a classified U.S. satellite for the National Reconnaissance Office has been launched from California.

Cover crop prevents weeds, protects soil
Organic farmers have to make hard choices between protecting soil from erosion and controlling weeds. For example, large-scale organic farming relies heavily on tillage. Tilling breaks up the soil to kill weeds and prepare for planting. But intense tillage can compact soil, cause erosion, and deplete nutrients. As a result, some organic farmers are turning to cover crops for weed control.

Next-gen microbiome drugs are now on sale – should you buy them?
Drugs that alter the microbiome seem to be treating blood pressure and migraine in clinical trials. And thanks to a legal loophole, you can already buy some of them

Traces in rock may be the oldest evidence of life on Earth ever
Rocks that could be just 200 million years younger than Earth carry structures and signatures reminiscent of microbial activity, but some dispute that view

How we’re already seeking life on TRAPPIST-1’s rocky planets
The dim star TRAPPIST-1 hosts seven rocky worlds, at least three of which may have liquid water and atmospheres. Here’s how we’re going to find out if anyone lives there

Study finds single, escalated dose of brachytherapy radiation may be a safe and effective treatment for localized prostate cancer
Results from a new prospective clinical trial indicate that high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy administered in a single, 19 Gray (Gy) treatment may be a safe and effective alternative to longer courses of HDR treatment for men with localized prostate cancer.

Aging can be good for you (if you're a yeast)
It’s a cheering thought for anyone heading towards their golden years. Research has shown that ageing can be beneficial – albeit so far only in yeast.

Matter: Scientists Say Canadian Bacteria Fossils May Be Earth’s Oldest
Ancient rocks have yielded tiny fossil-like formations up to 4.2 billion years old, researchers reported. But some experts are skeptical.

In Images: The Oldest Fossils on Earth
From 3.8-billion-year-old fossilized bacteria to ancient stromatolites, here are some of the most controversial, and potentially oldest, fossils on Earth

Molecular structure of the cell nucleoskeleton revealed for the first time
Using 3-D electron microscopy, structural biologists from the University of Zurich succeeded in elucidating the architecture of the lamina of the cell nucleus at molecular resolution for the first time. This scaffold stabilizes the cell nucleus in higher eukaryotes and is involved in organizing, activating and duplicating the genetic material. Diseases such as muscular dystrophy and premature agin

Synthetic tooth enamel may lead to more resilient structures
Unavoidable vibrations, such as those on airplanes, cause rigid structures to age and crack, but researchers at the University of Michigan may have an answer for that—design them more like tooth enamel, which could lead to more resilient flight computers, for instance.

Earliest evidence of life on Earth 'found'
Researchers discover fossils of what may be some of earliest living organisms.

Study examines pesticides' impact on wood frogs
A new study looks at how neonicotinoid pesticides affect wood frogs, which use surface waters in agricultural environments to breed and reproduce. Neonicotinoids are widely used insecticides that are applied to a variety of crops and are relatively persistent in the environment.

Rapid changes point to origin of ultra-fast black hole 'burps'
Gas outflows are common features of active supermassive black holes that reside in the center of large galaxies. Millions to billions of times the mass of the Sun, these black holes feed on the large disks of gas that swirl around them. Occasionally the black holes eat too much and burp out an ultra-fast wind, or outflow. These winds may have a strong influence on regulating the growth of the host

Man-made earthquakes will continue to shake the country
Science Oil and natural gas drilling is still shaking things up The United States Geological Survey (USGS) announced a new earthquake forecast on Wednesday…

Toyota adds most fuel-efficient Prius
For 2017, Toyota has added its most fuel-efficient Prius ever: a plug-in gasoline-electric hybrid called Prius Prime that can travel up to 640 miles on a full electric charge and a single tank of fuel.

Humans have three times more brown body fat
Compared to white fat, brown body fat burns through energy at an extraordinary rate. However, until now the proportion of brown fat in humans was thought to be quite small. Now a study has shown that the quantity of brown fat in humans is three times greater than previously known. As a consequence, new obesity and diabetes drugs that activate brown adipose tissue are expected to be more effective.

Racial gap in children's asthma linked to social inequality
African-American and poor children in the United States suffer disproportionately from asthma. But according to a new study, racial and socio-economic gaps in the proportion of children in Houston who have asthma may be a result of social inequalities in the neighborhoods where children live.

Exploring the cause of chronic lung transplant rejection, in a quest to stop it
Researchers have investigated the scarring process in the lungs of recent lung transplant patients in hopes of finding novel therapies to stop this dangerous process that leads to graft failure.

Maps Show Where Americans Care about Climate Change
The updated Yale Climate Opinion maps suggest Americans' opinions on climate change differ sharply from that of the president --

Moon tourists risk rough ride, experts say
Non-stop vomiting, a puffy face and the constant need to pee: Volunteers for a week-long loop around the Moon may be in for a rough ride even if all goes to plan.

With most of the same genes, how do lizard siblings end up so different?
The brown anole, a prolific lizard native to Cuba and the Bahamas and now commonly found in many tropical and subtropical regions, is providing new clues to how genetics and hormones work together to shape the development of organisms.

Portable nanofiber device offers precise, point-and-shoot capability
A lightweight, portable nanofiber fabrication device has been developed that could one day be used to dress wounds on a battlefield or dress shoppers in customizable fabrics.

Forest degradation in the tropics
Village communities in the tropical regions of Africa, Asia and South America have not been using local forest resources as sustainably as is often assumed. According to the study, in 90 percent of the 233 villages analyzed at least one forest product such as firewood, timber, food or animal feed has declined over five years.

Mount Etna, Europe’s Most Active Volcano, Puts On a Show
The volcano roared to life this week on the island of Sicily in an eruption that could be seen for miles.

Drug used to treat weak bones associated with micro-cracks
A type of drug used to treat weak bones is associated with an increased risk of 'micro-cracks' in bone, according to new research.

Jackfruit seeds could help ease looming cocoa bean shortage
Chocolate lovers could soon have a harder time satisfying their sweet tooth. Worldwide demand for this mouth-watering treat is outstripping the production of cocoa beans, its primary ingredient. But in a new study, scientists report that compounds found in jackfruit seeds produce many of the same aromas as processed cocoa beans and are a potentially cheap, abundant substitute for use in chocolate

Physicists Catch Antimatter and Matter Misbehaving
Experiments at the Large Hadron Collider reveal subtle distinctions in how matter and antimatter decay --

Click for candy: How online retailers boost impulse buys
Supermarket layouts are carefully calibrated to tempt people into impulsive purchases, and now food makers are trying to adapt their strategies as people do more of their shopping online.

Research shows nature can beat back scientific tinkering with genes of entire species
Rest easy, folks. Armies of genetically modified super-species are unlikely to conquer Earth anytime soon.

Overweight mothers underestimate their children's weight
Mothers who are overweight or obese tend to underestimate the weights of their obese children, according to a new study that surveyed 230 overweight or obese mothers in St. Louis who had a preschool-aged child.

Preliminary recovery of coastal sharks in southeast US
Population gains follow enactment of fishing regulations in the early 1990s after decades of declining shark numbers.

What I learned from 2,000 obituaries | Lux Narayan
Lux Narayan starts his day with scrambled eggs and the question: "Who died today?" Why? By analyzing 2,000 New York Times obituaries over a 20-month period, Narayan gleaned, in just a few words, what achievement looks like over a lifetime. Here he shares what those immortalized in print can teach us about a life well lived.

Want to Profit Off Your Meme? Good Luck if You Aren’t White
Welcome to the meme monetization gap. Want to Profit Off Your Meme? Good Luck if You Aren't White appeared first on WIRED .

Hell Yeah It’s OK to Confront the Butt-Dialers in Your Life
It's time to stand up for your smartphone. Hell Yeah It's OK to Confront the Butt-Dialers in Your Life appeared first on WIRED .

Do cells have exotic vibrational properties?
A little-understood biological property that appears to allow cell components to store energy on their outer edges is the possible key to developing a new class of materials and devices to collect, store and manage energy for a variety of applications, a team of researchers has proposed.

Laser-altered molecules cast alchemy in a different light
Researchers have taken a different approach to alchemists' ancient goal to transmute elements by making one material behave that another. Using computational methods, they demonstrate that any two systems can be made to look alike, even if just for the flash of a laser pulse.

Exploring the mysteries of supercooled water
Despite its omnipresence, water has many physical properties that are still not completely understood by the scientific community. One of the most puzzling relates to the activity of water molecules after they undergo a process called 'supercooling.' Now there are new findings on the interactions of water molecules under these exotic conditions.

Fun facts about giraffe sex to keep you occupied while you wait for that giraffe baby
Animals Time to have the talk about the birds and the giraffe pee A giraffe in Harpursville, NY is about to give birth. Instead of just watching the live stream, learn a little about the horrifying process this giraffe went through to…

Could a graphene ‘sandwich’ improve sensors?
Scientists have modeled a nanoscale “sandwich” with two slices of atom-thick graphene around nanoclusters of magnesium oxide. This arrangement gives the super-strong, conductive material expanded optoelectronic properties. Rice materials scientist Rouzbeh Shahsavari and his colleagues built computer simulations of the compound and found it would offer features suitable for sensitive molecular sen

Bee species with little known nesting-behavior observed to use plastic instead of leaves
Little is known about the nesting activities of some lineages of megachiline bees. Two scientists made use of their earlier observations, gathered during a survey in the United Arab Emirates, to fill some gaps in the knowledge of three species from such lineages. A curious instance of a bee attempting to build brood cells using green pieces of plastic is among their findings.

Hunting for giant planet analogs in our own backyard
There may be a large number of undetected bright, substellar objects similar to giant exoplanets in our own solar neighborhood, according to new work from a team led by Carnegie's Jonathan Gagné and including researchers from the Institute for Research on Exoplanets (iREx) at Université de Montréal. It is published by The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series.

2017 forecast: Significant chance of earthquake damage in the Central and Eastern US
A one-year seismic hazard model for 2017, from the U.S. Geological Survey, forecasts lower damaging ground shaking levels in the central and eastern U.S. compared to the previous forecast, in areas where there have been numerous earthquakes induced by wastewater disposal from industrial activities.

Team puts dark matter on the map
A Yale-led team has produced one of the highest-resolution maps of dark matter ever created, offering a detailed case for the existence of cold dark matter—sluggish particles that comprise the bulk of matter in the universe.

Study examines pesticides' impact on wood frogs
A new study looks at how neonicotinoid pesticides affect wood frogs, which use surface waters in agricultural environments to breed and reproduce. Neonicotinoids are widely used insecticides that are applied to a variety of crops and are relatively persistent in the environment.

Risky business—calculating climate change losses in major European coastal cities
A new study that assesses potential future climate damage to major European coastal cities has found that, if, as currently, global carbon emissions continue to track the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's worst emission scenario (RCP8.5), overall annual economic losses may range from 1.2 billion USD in 2030 to more than 40 billion by 2100.

Keep calm and measure cats' blood pressure
A decade ago, an Editorial in The Lancet, 'Hypertension: uncontrolled and conquering the world', presented some alarming facts: the risk of becoming hypertensive during a lifetime exceeds 90% for people in developed countries, with over 1.5 billion adults expected to have hypertension by 2025. It continued: 'screening is not done systematically, and the diagnosis is often made at a late stage when

Aging can be good for you (if you're a yeast)
It's a cheering thought for anyone heading towards their golden years. Research from the Babraham Institute has shown that ageing can be beneficial - albeit so far only in yeast.

Facebook is testing AI tools to help prevent suicide
Facebook is trialling new suicide prevention tools, including using AI to identify concerning posts and making it easier to report Facebook Live videos

The ‘safer' plastics designed to replace BPA may be just as bad for you
Health What's in your water bottle? A new study finds that BHPF—a chemical used in some BPA-free plastics—causes harmful pregnancy outcomes in mice. What does that mean for humans?

Fire-scarred trees record 700 years of natural and cultural fire history in a northern forest
Until the modern era, the human mark on the northernmost forests of North America, Europe, and Asia was light. Human populations in these challenging environments were too small to make a big impact through agriculture or timber harvests. But increasing evidence indicates people influenced the northern forests indirectly, by igniting or suppressing fires.

Jackfruit seeds could help ease looming cocoa bean shortage
Chocolate lovers could soon have a harder time satisfying their sweet tooth. Worldwide demand for this mouth-watering treat is outstripping the production of cocoa beans, its primary ingredient. But in a study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists report that compounds found in jackfruit seeds produce many of the same aromas as processed cocoa beans and are a pote

Nanoinjection increases survival rate of cells
How do tumours grow? And how do bacteria transform harmless substances into medical agents? When biophysicists want to understand what is happening in living cells, they have to introduce fluorescent probes or other foreign molecules. There are several ways to overcome the cell wall without causing the cell permanent harm. Physicists at Bielefeld University have developed a particularly gentle met

Pulling the curtain back on the high cost of drugs
Extreme price hikes for a handful of pharmaceuticals in recent years have severely soured public sentiment toward the industry. Drugmakers are pushing back with a public relations campaign to highlight the new treatments they bring to the table. But industry watchers say what they might need instead is more transparency and perspective, according to the cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (

Chiral metamaterial produces record optical shift under incremental power modulation
Georgia Institute of Technology researchers have demonstrated an optical metamaterial whose chiroptical properties in the nonlinear regime produce a significant spectral shift with power levels in the milliwatt range.

Does pre-eclampsia during pregnancy increase risk to mothers' eyes?
Pre-eclampsia may be associated with retinal disease in the mother later in life, new research indicates. Pre-eclampsia is a pregnancy complication characterized by high blood pressure and large amounts of protein in the urine. According to this study, more severe and earlier-onset pre-eclampsia was associated with even higher risk.

Bee species with little known nesting-behavior observed to use plastic instead of leaves
Little is known about the nesting activities of some lineages of megachiline bees. Dr. Sarah Gess, affiliated with both Albany Museum and Rhodes University, South Africa, and Peter Roosenschoon, Conservation Officer at the Dubai Desert Conservation Reserve, United Arab Emirates, made use of their earlier observations gathered during a survey on flower visitation in the spring of 2015, to fill some

Sure, Subways Are Gross. But Antibiotics Aren’t the Answer
An on-demand pharmacy's New York subway ad promotes overuse of antibiotics—one of the leading causes of antibiotic resistance. Sure, Subways Are Gross. But Antibiotics Aren't the Answer appeared first on WIRED .

Boston Dynamics’ New Rolling, Leaping Robot Is an Evolutionary Marvel
Handle is a biped with wheels instead of feet, essentially one-upping evolution. Boston Dynamics' New Rolling, Leaping Robot Is an Evolutionary Marvel appeared first on WIRED .

Sorry, But Amazon Isn’t Actually Annihilating Retail Jobs
Opinion: The efficiencies provided by Amazon's e-commerce platform may actually have a positive impact on the economy. Sorry, But Amazon Isn't Actually Annihilating Retail Jobs appeared first on WIRED .

Facebook Employs Artificial Intelligence in Attempt to Prevent Suicides
The social media giant will offer updated contact tools --

Amateur Treasure Hunters Find 2,000-Year-Old Gold Jewelry
The jewelry was likely worn by wealthy women in Iron Age Britain.

Space tourists, nerve agent and the queen of carbon
The week in science: 24 February–1 March 2017

Thisted får 30 år til med geotermisk varme
Thisted Varmeforsyning kan fortsætte med at bruge jordens varme til at indvinde energi de kommende 30 år. Tilmed fra et større område, så den geotermiske produktion kan øges med 50 procent.

Volvo tester hybridlastbil til langdistancekørsel
Den tidligere bilproducent har udviklet en konceptlastbil med en hybridmotor, som ifølge Volvo selv vil nedbringe CO2 udslippet med 30 procent.

Nu kan batteri lagre strøm fra sol og vind
I Nordhavn indvies i dag et batteri, der kan gemme strøm nok til 60 husstande.

Study finds participants feel moral outrage toward those who decide to not have children
Data representing individuals from across the United States indicates that US adults are increasingly delaying the decision to have children or forgoing parenthood entirely. Yet evidence suggests that voluntarily child-free people are stigmatized for this decision, according to a study.

A galaxy on the edge
This colorful stripe of stars, gas, and dust is actually a spiral galaxy named NGC 1055. Captured here by ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), this big galaxy is thought to be up to 15 percent larger in diameter than the Milky Way. NGC 1055 appears to lack the whirling arms characteristic of a spiral, as it is seen edge-on. However, it displays odd twists in its structure that were probably caused by

How to monitor urine in pools, by testing sweetness
Even though Olympic swimmers have admitted doing it, peeing in the pool is not a condoned practice. Urine contributes to the formation of compounds in pool water that can be harmful to people's health. Now scientists are tackling a new way to monitor water quality: by measuring how sweet it is.

New research shows gluten contributes to the development of a very rare, but deadly, blood cancer in a small group of celiac patients
Scientists have revealed how gluten plays a role in the development of a rare form of cancer, for some people with celiac disease.

Witness the Beauty of Science: SciArt Tweet Storm Kicks Off
The SciArt Tweet Storm just kicked off today (March 1), where anyone can post their favorite imagery showing the beauty (or oddities) of science.

5 Ways to Stop Being a Control Freak
Are you the dictator of your corner of the world? If your theme song is Frank Sinatra’s My Way, check out this week’s five tips from Savvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen --

Human Cases of Bird Flu Are Surging
A wave of H7N9 infections in China is killing patients --

Ancient art suggests pointillism pre-dates van Gogh
A newly discovered trove of 16 engraved and otherwise modified limestone blocks, created 38,000 years ago, confirms the ancient origins of the pointillist techniques later adopted by 19th- and 20th-century artists such as Georges Seurat, Vincent van Gogh, Camille Pissarro, and Roy Lichtenstein. “We’re quite familiar with the techniques of these modern artists,” says Randall White, an anthropologi

VIDEO Hybrid-robot kan både kravle, køre, hoppe og bære
Boston Dynamics nyeste robot er "det bedste fra to verdener".

Colon and rectal cancer seem to be on the rise—in millennials
Health And obesity is probably a culprit Colorectal cancer is on the rise in young people. Don’t freak out.

A Sweet Way to Test for Pee in the Pool?
Testing to see if someone peed in the pool just got a little bit sweeter: Scientists in Canada have developed a new way to test for urine, and it involves measuring how sweet the water is.

Twitter (Finally!) Takes Aim at Anonymous Egg Accounts
New Twitter tools include algorithms to detect harassment, updated abuse reporting procedures, and new filters—including an egg-killer. Twitter (Finally!) Takes Aim at Anonymous Egg Accounts appeared first on WIRED .

Review: Nintendo Switch
You can play games on your commute. Just don't expect much when you get home. Review: Nintendo Switch appeared first on WIRED .

Twitter adds more safety tools, will curb abusive accounts
Twitter is adding more tools to curb abuse on its service as part of its ongoing effort to protect users from hate and harassment. Among other things, the service will attempt to identify offenders on its own, even if no one has reported them first.

Astronomers detect flickering from the star EF Aquilae
(Phys.org)—European researchers have detected optical flickering from a distant symbiotic star known as EF Aquilae (EF Aql for short). The new findings, presented Feb. 27 on the arXiv pre-print server, offer important hints on the nature and composition of this binary star.

Partnership yields better instrumentation and enables better knowledge about complex fluids
Ever wonder why you have to shake your bottle of ketchup or mustard before pouring? Or why, to get out of quicksand, you must move slowly? Or why you can run on the surface of a suspension of cornstarch in water, but you'd sink if you tried to walk on it?

WMO verifies highest temperatures for Antarctic Region
The World Meteorological Organization announced today new verified record high- temperatures in Antarctica, an area once described as "the last place on Earth." The temperatures range from the high 60s (in Fahrenheit) to the high teens, depending on the location they were recorded in Antarctica.

Scotland's non-biting midges
A new species of midge has been discovered but there is no need to reach for the insect repellent.

Security Robots Get a Designer Makeover
Startup Cobalt gives bots a warm and fuzzy look to help humans feel more comfortable around them.

When Breathing Goes Awry
Shortness of breath can arise from a bewildering number of conditions, complicating diagnosis and treatment --

What's the Best Way to Talk about Science?
The importance of biography in the scientific narrative --

Caterpillars found to use vibrations to attract other caterpillars
(Phys.org)—A small team of researchers with members from institutions in Canada and Brazil has found that one species of caterpillar uses parts of its body to create vibrational noises that attract others of its kind. In their paper published in the journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, the team describes their study of the tiny insects and the possible impact their results could have on pe

Londoners among most likely to feel ground move beneath feet
London tops the table of 52 European cities for the number of people exposed to possible ground instability, according to a new study.

Regeringen dropper omstridt lovforslag
Regeringen opgiver lovforslag om særligt sikrede socialpsykiatriske bosteder efter massivt pres fra faggrupper og patientforeninger.

The Rogue Neuroscientist on a Mission to Hack Peer Review
Niko Kriegeskorte won't review an academic paper unless he can publish it publicly on his personal blog—and his plan is forcing science to shape up. The Rogue Neuroscientist on a Mission to Hack Peer Review appeared first on WIRED .

UN sees bird flu changes but calls risk of people spread low
The World Health Organization says it has noticed changes in the bird flu virus now spreading in China, but says the risk of the disease spreading easily between people remains low.

How to monitor urine in pools—by testing sweetness
Even though Olympic swimmers have admitted doing it, peeing in the pool is not a condoned practice. Urine contributes to the formation of compounds in pool water that can be harmful to people's health. Now scientists are tackling a new way to monitor water quality: by measuring how sweet it is. Their report appears in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters.

Automated measurement system enhances quality, reduces handling in Pu-238 production
Under a collaborative partnership between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Energy (DOE), a new automated measurement system developed at DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will ensure quality production of plutonium-238 while reducing handling by workers.

When bigger mammals live longer than smaller ones, why do taller humans die younger?
The tallest man in Europe, 7ft 7in former basketball player turned actor Neil Fingleton, who played roles in Game of Thrones, and the X-Men and Avengers films, has died aged just 36. Such early death in the excessively tall is not uncommon. Robert Wadlow, the world's tallest person on record died at 22, and of the 10 tallest people ever recorded, the oldest died at 56. In people, height is negativ

Conservation of Indonesian river and forest habitats in order to protect wildlife
A new project led by a researcher from the University of Leicester is supporting the conservation of river and forest habitats in Indonesia - which are vital to the survival of a number of rare species of animal including orangutans and native fish.

Protecting engineering materials from water impact
Mark Gee, Fellow at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), discusses new ways to assess and reduce erosion from water impact in an article for Adjacent Open Access.

The ADHD Controversy
ADHD was already a controversial diagnosis; are Jerome Kagan's recent criticisms of it warranted?

This Battery Runs on the Hidden Power of Estuaries
Freshwater-saltwater ecosystems could provide bountiful renewable energy --

NASA data show California's San Joaquin Valley still sinking
Since the 1920s, excessive pumping of groundwater at thousands of wells in California's San Joaquin Valley has caused land in sections of the valley to subside, or sink, by as much as 28 feet (8.5 meters). This subsidence is exacerbated during droughts, when farmers rely heavily on groundwater to sustain one of the most productive agricultural regions in the nation.

Want to eradicate viruses? They made us who we are
It is cold and flu season so many of us are currently under the weather with a virus. But what exactly is a virus? And are they even alive?

Stuff you can buy that'll help you use less water
Gadgets Looking to be more conscious of your water intake? These things well get you started. Looking to be more conscious of your water intake? Start here.

Researchers uncover the origins of ash tree dieback and set out ways to fight it
Researchers from 35 European countries shared and analysed data on ash dieback across the entire continent over a four-year period, identifying the causes, effects and ways to counter the phenomenon. An invasive species originating from East Asia, the fungus was first seen in Eastern Europe in 1992. It is now threatening one of Europe's most common tree species, killing millions of ash trees acros

Skin Cancer from Tanning Beds Costs $343 Million per Year
The new estimate does not incorporate other problems related to these devices --

Video: Supersonic gas jets blast off
Supersonic gas jets sound like science fiction, but they are actually found throughout our solar system: for example, fast jets of sulfur dioxide stream from the surface of Jupiter's moon Io and water vapor sprays from the surface of Saturn's moon Enceladus.

Opinion: Fitbit's decline is a reflection of the end of the over-hyped promise of wearables
As the market leader, Fitbit has always been regarded as being synonymous with wearables in general. Its launch as a public company was at a point when the hype of wearables was at a peak with claims of the technology bring about a revolution in healthcare.

New report examines the integration of modern slavery survivors
A new report launched today (Wednesday, 1 March) by the University's Centre for the Study of International Slavery (CSIS) assesses an innovative solution to the problem of long-term care for survivors of modern slavery in the UK.

The Surprising History of Canada’s Most Iconic Designs
A new documentary aims to tell the untold story of Canadian graphic design.

The New FCC Chairman’s Plan to Undermine Net Neutrality
The current net neutrality rules, FCC chairman Ajit Pai seems ready to argue, will hold back a faster internet for everyone. The New FCC Chairman's Plan to Undermine Net Neutrality appeared first on WIRED .

Internet Bots Fight Each Other Because They’re All Too Human
A funny thing happens when you lock a bunch of bots in a virtual room: Sometimes they don't get along. Internet Bots Fight Each Other Because They're All Too Human appeared first on WIRED .

The Army Gets Back in the Ship-Killing Business
An Army missile converted into an anti-ship weapon could prove a powerful deterrent against China's naval power. The Army Gets Back in the Ship-Killing Business appeared first on WIRED .

Lasers reveal the secrets of a feathered dinosaur fossil
Animals Soft tissues abound Paleontologists donned dark glasses that made their surroundings even more eerie, and pulled out a small but high powered violet laser that they shone on the specimens…

Access to big data would help trucking companies improve safety and productivity
The trucking industry loses billions of dollars and wastes millions of hours each year sitting idle in traffic. Helping drivers avoid congestion would increase productivity and improve safety, says a team of Iowa State University and industry researchers.

Facebook beefs up suicide prevention focused on live video
Facebook is beefing up its suicide prevention tools, including new options for people to report if someone might harm themselves while broadcasting on Facebook Live.

Reprintable paper becomes a reality
Since its invention around 100 B.C. in China, paper as a material for spreading information has greatly contributed to the development and spread of civilization. Even in today's information age, with electronic media omnipresent in homes, offices and even our pockets, paper still plays a critical role.

Forskere finder potentiel epilepsi-behandling
Temporallapsepilepsi (TLE) er en af de mest almindelige epilepsiformer. 30 millioner mennesker verden...

Get Your STD Results in Minutes
A clinic has set up a new self-service, walk-in model that lessens patient embarrassment --

Deep-Sea Stroll: This Fish 'Walks' on the Ocean Floor
These fins are made for walking.

Mysterious 'Cosmic' Jellyfish Spotted in Remote Ocean Depths
A glowing, ethereal jellyfish was spotted about 10,000 feet below the water's surface in a remote stretch of the Pacific Ocean near American Samoa.

Ultrasound scalpel destroys liver tumors
Focused ultrasound can effectively destroy tumor cells. Until now, this method has only been used for organs such as the prostate and uterus. At the European Congress of Radiology, Fraunhofer researchers will present a method, developed as part of the TRANS-FUSIMO EU project, that enables focused ultrasound treatment of the liver, an organ that moves while breathing. In the future, this could enab

How augmented reality could find its way to the courtroom
Returning to court to give evidence against their attacker can be a harrowing experience for victims of sexual abuse, and many have described it as like having to experience the abuse all over again. However, the rise of augmented reality and holographic technology – that could bring vulnerable witnesses into court in 3-D instead – could offer a solution.

The essential tools of an underwater researcher
Science Look at this trove, treasures untold Among Hawaii’s reefs, Emily Kelly dives with surgeonfish and parrotfish. These are the tools she uses to study the underwater world. Read on.

In New Territory, Good Froggy Dads Go Cannibal
Male poison frogs are usually good dads. Usually.

Who can find the fish that makes the best sound?
Using new computer algorithms, it is possible to adjust specific properties of three-dimensional objects, such as the sounds they produce or how stable they are.

Powerful hybrid storage system combines advantages of lithium-ion batteries and supercapacitors
A battery that can be charged in seconds, has a large capacity and lasts ten to twelve years? Certainly, many have wanted such a thing. Now the FastStorageBW II project – which includes Fraunhofer – is working on making it a reality. Fraunhofer researchers are using pre-production to optimize large-scale production and ensure it follows the principles of Industrie 4.0 from the outset.

Researchers coax particles to form vortices using magnetic fields
In a new study published last week in Science Advances, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory created tiny swirling vortices out of magnetic particles, providing insight into the behavior that governs such systems—which opens up new opportunities for materials and devices with new properties.

Stronger, faster and more deadly—the ethics of developing supersoldiers
Enhancing a soldier's capacity to fight is nothing new. Arguably one of the first forms of enhancement was through improving diet. The phrase "an army marches on its stomach" goes back at least to Napoleon, and speaks to the belief that being well fed enhances the soldier's chances of winning a battle.

Southern Oregon forest restoration may take precedence over spotted owl habitat
Restoring parts of the Fremont-Winema National Forest in southern Oregon to withstand a warmer, more fire-prone future may require thinning young trees and promoting the growth of large, old ponderosa pine.

Scientists reveal new super-fast form of computer that 'grows as it computes'
Researchers from The University of Manchester have shown it is possible to build a new super-fast form of computer that "grows as it computes".

Will ARPA-E Survive Trump’s Looming Budget Cuts?
At what may be the agency’s final summit, speakers and attendees argue that federal support for energy research is critical for job creation.

System monitors soap, cotton towel and toilet paper dispensers in washrooms
Washrooms are among the highest-maintenance rooms in companies. A new Fraunhofer technology now monitors soap, cotton towel and toilet paper dispensers fully automatically, and notifies the cleaning staff when levels are running low. At the core of the "CWS Washroom Information Service" are sensors and some ingenious wireless technology.

Can Animals Acquire Language?
Despite claims that this is possible, the evidence says no --

'Cuddle chemical' oxytocin linked with distrust in new study. The reputation of oxytocin as the hormone linked to positive social bonding has been called into question.
submitted by /u/thedabarry [link] [comments]

U.S.-Mexico borderland communities are resilient, says researcher
An academic from the University of the West of England (UWE Bristol) who has extensively studied communities on the borderlands between the US and Mexico, says these communities' strong cross-border cultural identity and economic ties make them undaunted by the possibility of a physical wall.

Nordjylland siger ja til stort diabetescenter
Nyt Steno Diabetes Center i Aalborg får bred politisk opbakning i regionsrådet.

New global cybersecurity report reveals misaligned incentives, executive overconfidence create advantages for attacker
Intel Security, in partnership with the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), today released "Tilting the Playing Field: How Misaligned Incentives Work Against Cybersecurity," a global report and survey revealing three categories of misaligned incentives: corporate structures versus the free flow of criminal enterprises; strategy versus implementation; and senior executives versus

Physiological changes tracked moment to moment
Sweating it out on a treadmill, or racing to finish a half marathon, a runner might risk a potentially dangerous buildup of electrolytes in her blood.

Peer-review activists push psychology journals towards open data
Editor asked to resign from journal for saying he’ll review only papers whose data he can see

Professor examines benefits, social inequalities of voice technologies
Technology is often heralded as a great equalizer for people with disabilities, especially those who have harnessed the power of synthetic voice software to offset their inability to speak to family, friends, and others.

Science checkout continues for ExoMars orbiter
Next week, the ExoMars orbiter will devote two days to making important calibration measurements at the Red Planet, which are needed for the science phase of the mission that will begin next year.

Collaborative research shows finer raw cotton best for oil spill remediation
Cotton, a longtime staple crop on the South Plains and major part of the region's economy, is growing into a new sector: environmental cleanup following oil spills.

Study finds that mothers determine chimps' lifelong grooming behavior
Think of all the things your mom taught you—sit up straight, close your mouth when you chew, remember to say please and thank you … the list goes on.

Video: How a butterfly builds its wings
Nipam Patel started collecting butterflies when he was 8. Now an evolutionary and developmental biologist at UC Berkeley, Patel and his team are using innovative techniques to try to figure out something that's fascinated but eluded scientists for years: How butterflies develop their extraordinary colors and patterns.

How Nietzsche loved fate
One of the core concepts in the work of philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche is amor fati: the love of one's fate. PhD candidate Hedwig Gaasterland analysed the term and concluded that Nietzsche did not favour a stoical interpretation of the concept. PhD defence 1 March.

NuSTAR helps find universe's brightest pulsars
There's a new record holder for brightest pulsar ever found—and astronomers are still trying to figure out how it can shine so brightly. It's now part of a small group of mysterious bright pulsars that are challenging astronomers to rethink how pulsars accumulate, or accrete, material.

Investigation of lathanoid-based, single-molecule magnets
single molecule magnets

Distant planet systems are shaped like the solar system
Researchers at The Australian National University (ANU) have found that far-away planet systems are shaped like the solar system, with multiple planets aligning with the host star on a flat plain, in a discovery that could increase the chance of finding alien life.

Cosmic popcorn effect helps space dust survive our atmosphere
Water inside micrometeorites boils when they plunge to Earth, creating a protective parachute that helps them land intact

Luxembourg fends off cyberattack on government sites
Luxembourg

Asian pollution, heat waves worsen US smog, study shows
An influx of pollution from Asia in the western United States and more frequent heat waves in the eastern U.S. are responsible for the persistence of smog in these regions over the past quarter century despite laws curtailing the emission of smog-forming chemicals from tailpipes and factories.

A galaxy on the edge
Spiral galaxies throughout the Universe take on all manner of orientations with respect to Earth. We see some from above (as it were) or "face-on"—a good example of this being the whirlpool-shaped galaxy NGC 1232. Such orientations reveal a galaxy's flowing arms and bright core in beautiful detail, but make it difficult to get any sense of a three-dimensional shape.

Indien satser på Hyperloop
Den amerikanske virksomhed Hyperloop One har indledt de første undersøgelser med henblik på at etablere et netværk af Hyperloopforbindelser i Indien.

Fiat Chrysler efterforskes for NOx-svindel
De amerikanske myndigheder undersøger bilgiganten, som er under mistanke for at bryde miljølovgivningen med software i dieselmotorer.

Medie: Staten lander nordsøaftale med Mærsk
Den danske olieudvinding i Nordsøen tegner til at være reddet med en ny aftale mellem den danske stat og A.P. Møller-Mærsk.

Frederikshavner-klinikker går nye veje for at tiltrække yngre læger
12 klinikker i Frederikshavn Kommune vil lokke yngre læger til praksisområdet med nyt samarbejde, der skal aflaste de ældre læger og give de yngre mulighed for at afprøve forskellige prakisformer i kommunen.

'Best ever' view of what a dinosaur really looked like
Lasers reveal invisible details of the shape of a feathered dinosaur that lived 160 million years ago.

Atmospheric rivers leave California dried out and then flooded
Weeks of storms have filled California’s reservoirs. A series of atmospheric river storms is to blame, and the state’s ageing dams are feeling the strain

Scientists develop spectacles for X-ray lasers
An international team of scientists has tailored special X-ray glasses to concentrate the beam of an X-ray laser stronger than ever before. The individually produced corrective lens eliminates the inevitable defects of an X-ray optics stack almost completely and concentrates three quarters of the X-ray beam to a spot with 250 nanometres (millionths of a millimetre) diameter, closely approaching th

For at komme godt hjem, må man rejse ud
Johannes V. Jensens gamle udsagn gælder blandt yngre generationer. I hvert fald hvis man loddede...

Astronomers grapple with new era of fast radio bursts
Signals have progressed from astronomical peculiarity to mainstream research area

UK scientists welcome changes to controversial research reforms
Amendments aim to protect autonomy and the independence of research funders from political interference

Jardiance får udvidet indikation i EU
Som det første diabetesmiddel i EU, har Jardiance fået en udvidet indikationen til også at gælde behandlingen af voksne med type 2-diabetes og hjertekarsygdomme.

VIDEO: Mød KU's nye rektor
Den 1. marts 2017 overtager Henrik Caspar Wegener rektorposten på Københavns Universitet....

Diane Mathis (Harvard) 1: An Introduction to T Cell Tolerance
https://www.ibiology.org/ibioseminars/introduction-t-cell-tolerance.html Part 1: Introduction to T Cell Tolerance: When immunological tolerance fails, autoimmune diseases such as diabetes result. Mathis explains how T cell tolerance develops. Part 2: Transcription Factor Aire Orchestrates T Cell Tolerance: Mutation in the transcription factor Aire results in autoimmune attacks on numerous organs.

Cars racing to become 'mobile phones on wheels'
The car of the future will let you pay for petrol or parking directly from your vehicle and receive traffic alerts and restaurant recommendations from your onboard digital assistant.

Regions differ in Indigenous acknowledgement at Canadian universities
Acknowledgement of Indigenous lands, treaties and peoples vary at universities across Canada, finds a new study from the University of British Columbia, the first academic study of its kind.

Climate research needs greater focus on human populations
Climate change research needs a greater focus on changing population structures when assessing future human vulnerability, argue IIASA researchers in a new perspective article in the journal Nature Climate Change.

IDAs eks-formand får chefjob på DTU
Frida Frost skal udvikle og udbygge samarbejdsrelationer og synliggøre det knap et år gamle PowerLab.

Trump’s Speech to Congress Was a Peter Thiel Fever Dream
Maybe the future—at least a populist, scant-on-details version—is finally rubbing off on the president. Trump's Speech to Congress Was a Peter Thiel Fever Dream appeared first on WIRED .

Ny HPV-hjemmetest »ser meget lovende ud«
Nyt studie viser lovende tegn på, at test for HPV-smitte fremover kan klares med en urinprøve i hjemmet.

Neurofeedback Training For Insomnia No Better Than Sham
Neurofeedback training (NFT) is a procedure that tries to shape a participant's pattern of brain activity by providing real-time feedback, often in the form of a video game combined with other sensory stimuli that provide rewards when the “correct” state is achieved. The most common form of NFT uses EEG (brainwave) activity recorded non-invasively from the scalp. The EEG is a complex mixture

Trump the Divider Takes a Stab at Unity
A totally completely normal speech provides a new president's most surreal hour Trump the Divider Takes a Stab at Unity appeared first on WIRED .

Magnetiske stripperstænger skal fange mobiler i fængsler
Udvalgte fængsler er ved at blive udstyret med avancerede mobildetektorer, der ser efter magnetiske felter. Og de har fået deres eget helt særlige øgenavn.

Edward E. David Jr., Who Elevated Science Under Nixon, Dies at 92
Dr. David sought to make science more relevant and accessible to presidents and to the public, saying, “We can’t leave science and technology to the experts.”

About New York: Remembering a City Where the Smog Could Kill
With the future of the E.P.A. now in doubt, it’s worth recalling what New York City was like before the agency and the movement it represented.

Is the Whole Brain Inside a Big, Previously Unnoticed Neuron?
New 3D images of a mouse brain reveal a neuron that encompasses the entire brain.

Elon Musk Plans to Take Humans Farthest into Space They've Ever Been in 2018
Elon Musk announces that SpaceX will fly two private citizens on a mission around the moon in 2018.

Spontaneous Activity in the Visual Cortex is Organized by Visual Streams
Large-scale functional networks have been extensively studied using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging. However, the pattern, organization, and function of fine-scale network activity remain largely unknown. Here we characterized the spontaneously emerging visual cortical activity by applying independent component analysis to resting state fMRI signals exclusively within the visua

The Cognitive Model towards Contour Recognition
In this paper, we will study the following pattern recognition problem: Every pattern is a 3-dimensional graph, its surface can be split up into some regions, every region is composed of the pixels with the approximately same colour value and the approximately same depth value that is distance to eyes, and there may also be some contours, e.g., literal contours, on a surface of every pattern. For

Rare proteins collapse earlier
Some organisms are able to survive in hot springs, while others can only live at mild temperatures because their proteins aren't able to withstand such extreme heat. Researchers investigated these differences and showed that often only a few key proteins determine the life and heat-induced death of a cell.

Calculating recharge of groundwater more precisely
Current models underestimate role of subsurface heterogeneity, researchers suggest in a new article. Groundwater is a vital resource in many regions around the globe. For managing drinking water, the recharge rate is an important quantity for securing sustainable supplies.

NASA study hints at possible change in water 'fingerprint' of comet
A trip past the sun may have selectively altered the production of one form of water in a comet -- an effect not seen by astronomers before, a new study suggests.

From heroin addiction to alcohol-related problems
Methadone programs and long-term therapy using other opioids evidently work. People addicted to heroin consume less heroin, cocaine and even alcohol at the beginning of the treatment. As a long-term study reveals, however, the alcohol consumption among these patients has increased considerably since the 1990s.

Study finds new link between childhood abuse and adolescent misbehavior
An important learning process is impaired in adolescents who were abused as children, a researcher has found, and this impairment contributes to misbehavior patterns later in life. A new article details the connection between impaired associative learning capacities and instances of early childhood abuse.

Tagged animals at risk from hunters and nature-lovers
Radio signals from tags are helping hunters and harming conservation, warn scientists.

Mysterious Cosmic Jellyfish Found Near Unexplored Seamount | Video
In this psychedelic video, a bizarre, alien-like jellyfish floats through the deep, dark waters near the previously unexplored Utu Seamount near American Samoa.

Sea Robin Fish Uses Fins to ‘Walk’ Along Ocean Floor | Video
Researchers abroad the NOAA research ship Okeanos Explored captured video of an armored sea robin taking a deep sea stroll, using its fin rays to "walk" along the bottom of the ocean.

Zombie Ant Fungus Inspires Film 'The Girl with All the Gifts' | Video
In a world where most people have been transformed into flesh-eating zombies, a young girl may be the key to humanity’s survival.

Wolf Spiders Have Threesomes to Avoid Getting Eaten | Video
A male wolf spiders that engages in a ménage à trois during mating season may increase its chances of escaping cannibalism.

Liver tumor growth in mice slowed with new chemo-immunotherapy treatment
Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common form of liver cancer, but treatment options are limited and many patients are diagnosed in late stages when the disease can't be treated. Now, researchers have developed a new treatment that combines chemotherapy and immunotherapy to significantly slow tumor growth in mice. The researchers believe that with more research, the strategy could be translated

Researchers discover new combination therapy strategy for brain, blood cancers
A new potential strategy to personalize therapy for brain and blood cancers has now been discovered by researchers.

Google Takes on Cable With ‘YouTube TV’—40 Channels for $35
YouTube TV—the much-anticipated TV streaming service from the video company—is official. It's $35 a month with 40+ channels, cloud DVR, and AI-powered search. Google Takes on Cable With 'YouTube TV'—40 Channels for $35 appeared first on WIRED .

Happy notes, happy memories
Happy memories spring to mind much faster than sad, scary or peaceful ones. Moreover, if you listen to happy or peaceful music, you recall positive memories, whereas if you listen to emotionally scary or sad music, you recall largely negative memories from your past, researchers have found.

Study shows how information sources affect voters
For all the fact-checking and objective reporting produced by major media outlets, voters in the U.S. nonetheless rely heavily on their pre-existing views when deciding if politicians' statements are true or not, according to a new study co-

How social media has synchronized human civilization
Human activity, whether commercial or social, contains patterns and moments of synchronicity. In recent years, social media like Twitter has provided an unprecedented volume of data on the daily activities of humans all over the world. Observing this activity on the scale of a city, a continent, or the globe reveals the patterns. In a paper published by the Journal of the Royal Society Interface,

This Bizarre Effect Gives the Ouija Board Its “Mysterious” Power
In a 2012 study, participants used a Ouija board to get in touch with their “second intelligence.”

Why Boston Dynamics' New Robot Scares the Crap out of Us
Handle, the latest robot from Google-backed Boston Dynamics, elicits both excitement and anxiety. The company's founder has described it as "nightmare-inducing."

The Arctic "Doomsday Vault" Just Got 50,000 New Members
The Svalbard Global Seed Vault holds the world’s largest collection of seeds, for safekeeping.

Unusually Hot or Cold Weather Could Affect Babies' Weight
Unusually hot or cold weather may affect the birth weight of babies, a new study suggests.

Male poison frogs become cannibals after taking over territories
Systematic 'infanticide' of unrelated young occurs in several animal species. For carnivores and primates, infanticidal actions are mainly sexually motivated. A study has shown for the first time that also male poison frogs selectively eat other males' offspring -- after having taken over their rivals' territories. They were thus able to demonstrate that even simple decision rules can mediate a co

Study clarifies risky decision making during a heart attack
In a recent study to determine why some individuals who experience symptoms for acute coronary syndrome decide to seek medical attention more quickly than others, a researcher has identified numeracy -- the ability to understand and apply numerical concepts as the primary decision delay risk factor for individuals experiencing the medical condition. Cardiovascular disease, which includes condition

Ambiguity invokes Creativity : looking through Quantum physics
Creativity, defined as the tendency to generate or recognize new ideas or alternatives and to make connections between seemingly unrelated phenomena, is too vast a horizon to be summed up in such a simple sentence. The extreme abstractness of creativity makes it harder to quantify in its entirety. Yet, a lot of efforts have been made both by psychologists and neurobiologists to identify its signat

Cells adapt ultra-rapidly to zero gravity
Mammalian cells fully adapt to zero gravity in less than a minute. Real-time readings on the International Space Station (ISS) reveal that cells compensate ultra-rapidly for changes in gravitational conditions, an international team of scientists has found.

After Scare, Air Hoses at C.D.C. Germ Lab Are Found to Be Safe
After concerns arose about air safety at a government lab that handles deadly pathogens, tests have found no risk, officials said.

Stressed by Success, a Top Restaurant Turns to Therapy
A psychologist goes to El Celler de Can Roca, a fine-dining restaurant in Spain, each week to help employees cope with their high-tension jobs.

The Amazon S3 Outage Is What Happens When One Site Hosts Too Much of the Internet
Corporate consolidation in tech has implications for competition—but it also affects the resilience of the internet itself. The Amazon S3 Outage Is What Happens When One Site Hosts Too Much of the Internet appeared first on WIRED .

Beyond cat videos: YouTube will offer its own pay-TV service (Update)
Fed up with paying for cable the traditional way? You may soon be able to subscribe to it over the internet with ... YouTube.

Frshly uses robotics and algorithms to deliver fresh, hot food to customers
Six different cuisines with 30 combos all served hot within 90 seconds, and patrons need only pick, swipe and eat. That's what Frshly, a fully automated "vend-café" and the brainchild of NJIT alumnus Satish ChamyVelumani, provides to a growing number of hungry consumers on the move through India's railway system and airports. It's an offer the tech startup, established in 2013, calls "plated happi

Trump Orders Review Of Obama-Era Clean Water Rule
President Trump takes action to roll back another environmental regulation. The Clean Water Rule extends federal

SpaceX Moves To Launch First-Ever Private Mission To The Moon
SpaceX claims it will launch the first ever private moon mission in 2018, which would send people to the moon for the first time in 45 years. The announcement may signify the start of a new race to the moon, this time between NASA and the private space industry.

Chicago Leaders Use Cognitive Behavorial Therapy To Combat Violent Crime
Chicago is in dire need of solutions for its violent crime. A cognitive behavioral therapy program has been able to help keep teenage boys from acting out on their impulses.

Will SpaceX be ready to fly tourists around the moon?
Two private citizens are reported to have paid large deposits to fly around the moon in 2018

How Brain Scientists Forgot That Brains Have Owners: Five neuroscientists argue that fancy new technologies have led the field astray
submitted by /u/OneMansModusPonens [link] [comments]

Kinky Wolf Spiders Engage in Ménage à Trois to Avoid Cannibalism
One autumn night while searching for spiders in his backyard, Matthew Persons came across something unexpected: a wolf spider ménage à trois.

Photos: That's a Lot of Legs! Wolf Spiders Caught Having Threesomes
Courtship is hard work for a male wolf spider.

Bro. BRO! Travis Kalanick Is Totally Sorry.
This totally-not-made-up apology letter proves he's really trying. Bro. BRO! Travis Kalanick Is Totally Sorry. appeared first on WIRED .

February’s Best Gear: New Wireless Headphones and Fancy PCs
From the Microsoft Surface Studio and Beats headphones to Android Wear watches and new Samsung Chromebooks, these are the coolest gadgets we saw this month. February's Best Gear: New Wireless Headphones and Fancy PCs appeared first on WIRED .

Early bird special: Spring pops up super early in much of US (Update)
Spring has sprung early—potentially record early—in much of the United States, bringing celebrations of shorts weather mixed with unease about a climate gone askew.

A better way to measure the stiffness of cancer cells
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have discovered a way to detect signs of cancer on a cell-by-cell basis using two lasers and a camera.

Study hints at possible change in water 'fingerprint' of comet
A trip past the sun may have selectively altered the production of one form of water in a comet - an effect not seen by astronomers before, a new NASA study suggests.

Study finds preliminary recovery of coastal sharks in southeast US
A new analysis of population trends among coastal sharks of the southeast U.S. shows that all but one of the seven species studied are increasing in abundance. The gains follow enactment of fishing regulations in the early 1990s after decades of declining shark numbers.

Watch Shell’s 1991 Video Warning of Catastrophic Climate Change
A public information film unseen for years shows Shell had clear grasp of global warming 26 years ago but has not acted accordingly since, say critics. Watch Shell's 1991 Video Warning of Catastrophic Climate Change appeared first on WIRED .

Trump Aims To 'Eliminate' Clean Water Rule
The Obama-era "Waters of the United States" rule defines which small bodies of water are subject to U.S.

How to ‘rip out’ all traces of sulfur in gas and diesel
Sulfur in fuels creates air pollution when it’s burned. Oil refineries can remove a lot of it, but no all. Simulations show a new method could reduce sulfur to a fraction of that amount. Another potential bonus: it could extend the life of your vehicle’s catalytic converter. “The next step is figuring out how to streamline the process and make it work on an industrial scale,” says lead

Facebook to Telcos: Forget Hardware Empires—Let’s All Share
The social media giant hopes to catalyze a broader market that will mean more internet for more people everywhere. Facebook to Telcos: Forget Hardware Empires—Let's All Share appeared first on WIRED .

Mount Etna: Facts About Volcano's Eruptions
Mount Etna is Italy's largest active volcano. It is also the volcano with the longest record of continuous eruption.

Tiny mistakes cause inhalers to deliver half doses
People who use inhalers may be getting only about half as much medicine as they should from each puff, research shows. “Metered-dose inhalers are used every day by people with asthma, COPD, and other chronic lung diseases, and the vast majority of the time—between 70 and 90 percent—patients make mistakes that keep some of the medicine from making it to their lungs,” says Ashutosh Sabharwal, profe

Mathematician breaks down how to defend against quantum computing attacks
The encryption codes that safeguard internet data today won't be secure forever.

Road salt alternatives alter aquatic ecosystems
Organic additives found in road salt alternatives—such as those used in the commercial products GeoMelt and Magic Salt—act as a fertilizer to aquatic ecosystems, promoting the growth of algae and organisms that eat algae, according to new research published today in the Journal of Applied Ecology. Low levels of magnesium chloride—an alternative type of salt found in the commercial product Clear La

Researchers coax colloidal spheres to self-assemble into photonic crystals
Colloidal particles, used in a range of technical applications including foods, inks, paints, and cosmetics, can self-assemble into a remarkable variety of densely-packed crystalline structures. For decades, though, researchers have been trying to coax colloidal spheres to arranging themselves into much more sparsely populated lattices in order to unleash potentially valuable optical properties. T

Fastfrosset polarskib skal drive over Arktis i jagten på klimaviden
- En vigtig mission, der giver unik mulighed for at samle data til nye, præcise klimamodeller, siger dansk professor.

Great gamers can teach us the best way to practice
We all know that practice makes us better at things, but scientists are still trying to understand what kinds of practice work best. Data from online video games could hold the answer. In a pair of studies reported in the journal Topics in Cognitive Science , researchers looked at data generated from thousands of online matches of two video games, the first-person shooter game Halo: Reach and the

Gallery: Jaw-Dropping Images of Life Under the Sea
Live Science chose some of the most stunning underwater photos from a recent contest, revealing heavenly shots of clownfish, gobies and shrimp that just might change how you view the sea.

Når forskning er defineret af fag
Har vi respekt for forskellige fags forskning og de resultater, vi kommer frem til?

In U.K., A Veggie Shortage Inspires Funny Headlines And Serious Thoughts
Bad weather in southern Europe caused a brief shortage of veggies in the U.K. Prices went up and people panicked. Now they are thinking harder about where their food comes from.

Paris auction of Moroccan 'Nessie' makes waves
Geologists in Morocco on Tuesday denounced the planned auction of a 66-million-year-old marine dinosaur skeleton in Paris and demanded that the remains be repatriated.

Mathematical theorem finds gerrymandering in PA congressional district maps
Pennsylvania's congressional district maps are almost certainly the result of gerrymandering according to an analysis based on a new mathematical theorem on bias in Markov Chains developed by Carnegie Mellon University and University of Pittsburgh mathematicians. Their findings are published in the Feb. 28 online early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

Fast Radio Bursts Are Astronomy's Next Big Thing
Although still mysterious, these quirky extragalactic signals are now poised to transform mainstream research --

Study finds gender gap at Toronto research institution
A review initiated by St. Michael's Hospital found that a significant gender gap exists across all job descriptions, research disciplines and academic rankings at its research institute.

Cell 'stickiness' could indicate metastatic potential
How strongly tumor cells adhere to the surrounding tissue could indicate the likelihood that cancer will spread to other parts of the body, according to a study published February 28 in Biophysical Journal. Using a spinning disc device, the researchers found that tumor cells characterized by weak adhesion strength are more likely to migrate and invade other tissues compared with strongly adherent

Baby Watch! 'Giraffe Cam' Tracks Expectant Mother
Watch a pregnant giraffe in the last stages of her pregnancy, live on YouTube.

Juicing isn't actually good for you and your diet is probably dumb
Health And you should probably cut back on coconut oil A new study debunks the health benefits of several fad diets. Is your favorite on the list?

Common bacterium may help control disease-bearing mosquitoes
Genes from a common bacterium can be harnessed to sterilize male insects, a tool that can potentially control populations of both disease-bearing mosquitoes and agricultural pests, researchers report.

Pacemaker function may be impacted by electric appliances; tools
Electric and magnetic fields generated from everyday household appliances, electrical tools and more, used in very close proximity to the body, can interfere with the ability of pacemakers to regulate patients' heartbeats. Dedicated device programming, e.g. sensitivity level, is an effective measure to reduce the individual risk of interference.

Care by physicians, non-physician clinicians does not differ in community health centers
A new study examining patient health outcomes in community health centers found that nurse practitioners and physician assistants delivered care that was equivalent to care delivered by physicians.

How protein misfolding may kickstart chemical evolution
Researchers have demonstrated a connection between abnormal protein folding and the potential to kickstart chemical evolution.

Review: 2017 BMW 5 Series
The once supreme sporty sedan returns to its roots, with a touch of luxury. Review: 2017 BMW 5 Series appeared first on WIRED .

Turn off-the-shelf drones into an intelligent swarm
Engineers are testing a new method to program a team of drones to quickly map an oil spill. The work is inspired by nature and guided by a mathematical formula. “Nature may not proactively use mathematics, nor does it have foresight. It behaves in ways driven by feedback, implicit drive for adaptation, and a certain degree of apparent randomness,” says Souma Chowdhury, assistant professor of mech

After 3 Years, Why Gmail’s End-to-End Encryption Is Still Vapor
Is the effort to end-to-end encrypt Gmail dead, or just a lot harder than it looks? After 3 Years, Why Gmail’s End-to-End Encryption Is Still Vapor appeared first on WIRED .

Dad Leaving Embarrassing Comments on Your Feeds? Let Him
But maybe ask him—gently—to tone it down a bit. Dad Leaving Embarrassing Comments on Your Feeds? Let Him appeared first on WIRED .

Faulty genomic pathway linked to schizophrenia developing in utero, study finds
The skin cells of four adults with schizophrenia have provided an unprecedented 'window' into how the disease began while they were still in the womb, according to a recent paper.

It may not have been too late to save 'extinct' pigeon
The Passenger Pigeon, a species of pigeon that died out in the early years of the 20th century, could have been saved even after it was considered doomed to extinction. As a result of this research, conservationists now have a model to test for functional extinction -- defined as a total reproductive failure -- allowing them to question species' extinctions in the past, as well as those that may b

A sustained and controllable insulin release system
Researchers have developed an insulin release system with sustained and controllable delivery. The system combines two original technologies, SPRA and PPRX, which provide complimentary benefits for insulin delivery.

The EPA Is Bracing for Big Change
An unfavorable Trump budget and promises of “aggressive” regulation rollbacks could leave the agency a shadow of its former self.

US approves 3 types of genetically engineered potatoes (Update)
Three types of potatoes genetically engineered to resist the pathogen that caused the Irish potato famine are safe for the environment and safe to eat, federal officials have announced.

This Neural Probe Is So Thin, The Brain Doesn't Know It's There
submitted by /u/mighelo [link] [comments]

Frogs have unique ability to see color in the dark
The night vision of frogs and toads appears to be superior to that of all other animals. They have the ability to see colour even when it is so dark that humans are not able to see anything at all. This has been shown in a new study by researchers from Lund University in Sweden.

Miniature organisms in the sand play big role in our ocean
The small organisms that slip unnoticed through sand play an important role in keeping our oceans healthy and productive, according to a Florida State University researcher.

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