autisme - kan overvinde sprogvanskeligheder når de når voksenalderen

Some adults with autism overcome language hurdles The brains of some adults with autism are able to compensate for language comprehension challenges that are a hallmark of the disorder in children, research shows. Children with autism have difficulty sorting out pairs of words that are unrelated—like “clock” and “frog”—from those that are related—like “baby” and “bottle”—making it hard for them to process written or spoken language. Scientists h

autisme - påvist ved hjernescanning i 6 måneders alderen

How Brain Scans in Infants May Predict AutismBrain scans of infants as young as 6 months old may be able to predict whether a child will develop autism, a new study suggests.

autisme: genetisk database

World's largest autism genome database shines new light on many 'autisms'An additional 18 gene variations have been identified that appear to increase the risk of autism. The study involved the analysis of 5,205 whole genomes from families affected by autism -- making it the largest whole genome study of autism to date.

autisme: MRI af spædbørn

Infant MRIs show autism linked to increased cerebrospinal fluidA national research network found that many toddlers diagnosed with autism at two years of age had a substantially greater amount of extra-axial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at six and 12 months of age, before diagnosis is possible. They also found that the more CSF at six months -- as measured through MRIs -- the more severe the autism symptoms were at two years of age.

carbon der er magnetisk

Czech scientists develop magnetic carbonA dream of many generations of researchers has been fulfilled by a discovery made by scientists at the Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials (RCPTM) at the Palacky University in Olomouc. By using graphene, an ultrathin form of carbon, these scientists prepared the first non-metallic magnet that retains its magnetic properties up to room temperature. In doing so, they disproved the

celler: Syntetisk receptor

World-first synthetic receptor mimics how cells 'talk' to the world around themResearchers from the University of Bristol have found a way to mimic the way cells in living organisms 'talk' to the world around them by creating a world-first synthetic receptor which can respond to chemical signals just like its natural equivalent.

DNA: syntetiske DNA-motorer i levende celler

How molecular machines may drive the future of disease detection and drug deliveryResearchers describe the creation of synthetic DNA motors in living cells. The process demonstrates how DNA motors can be used to accomplish specific and focused biological functions in live cells. The team believes the findings could lead to improved disease detection and drug delivery.

DNA-sekvensbestemmelse

Pushing the boundaries of DNA sequencingA young company developing technology created at the University of New Mexico (UNM) is on a mission to disrupt the landscape of DNA sequencing.

indlæring: variation i motivation

In learning, every moment countsPsychologists have uncovered strong variability in motivation in learning situations.

virusdatabase

New database of DNA viruses and retroviruses debutsThere are more microbes in, on, and around the planet than there are stars in the Milky Way. Microbes affect food production; air quality; natural breakdown of plants, trees and biomass; soil quality for agriculture; and much more. To work with these microbes, scientists need to learn more about how microbes and viruses interact. Viruses influence microbes' abilities to work. Scientists at the U.S



adfærd - vi foretrækker spontant vores egne teorier - kaldet SPOT bias

Researchers Identify a New Cognitive Bias "My theory is true, if I do say so myself." SPOT stands for “Spontaneous Preference For Own Theories,” and it’s a newly identified cognitive bias

antibiotika polymyxin resistens

Researchers discover new variant on notorious resistance genePolymyxin antibiotics are used as a last resort to treat certain multidrug resistant bacteria. A team of investigators has discovered a new variant on a well-known gene that causes resistance to polymyxins and others. More troubling, the gene containing this mechanism was found in a healthy individual during a routine medical examination, suggesting that other healthy carriers may be spreading thi

bakterier: Gram-negative bakterier kan bekæmpes med et parasitmiddel pentamidin

One-two punch may floor worst infectionsScientists have discovered the antiprotozoal drug pentamidine disrupts the cell surface of Gram-negative bacteria, even the most resistant. The anti-fungal medication was particularly potent when used with antibiotics against multidrug resistant bacteria.

berøring varmer venligt

Virtual characters that touch you are seen as being warmer and friendlierTouch is a basic need. A new study has shown that virtual characters that can touch you are seen as being warmer and friendlier. Previous research had already shown that this applies to human interaction. This new study has demonstrated that the same principle applies to interactions with virtual characters.

dopamin-belønningsystemet

Brain’s reward system earns researchers €1 million prizeThe dopamine reward system plays a role in everything from drug addiction to psychopathic behaviour, and is important for teaching us to make good decisions

Dyrs sans for tid på året

Scientists discover how animals measure time of year to reproduceAnimals need to measure the time of year so that they can anticipate and adapt to the arrival of a new season to align reproduction, as well as other vital functions critical for survival. A new study, conducted at the University of Bristol, has identified how animals measure annual time to control seasonal fertility.

elektriske fisk

Study shows how skates, rays and sharks sense electrical fieldsSharks, rays and skates can hunt for prey hidden in the sandy sea floor by "listening" for faint traces of bioelectricity—they can literally sense their prey's heart beating. The basic anatomy of the electro-sensory organs that accomplish this feat has been known for decades, but the biological mechanisms - how electrosensory cells pick up faint electrical signs of life—has remained a puzzle.

Epilepsi-hjernen har anderledes netværk

Statistics method shows networks differ in epileptic brainsA novel statistical approach to analyzing data from patients with epilepsy reveals details about their brains' internal networks.

Grønland smelter

Icy Lakes in Greenland Drain into the OceanThe discovery will help scientists better understand how the Greenland ice sheet is melting -

Havskildpadde havde slugt næsten 1000 mønter

Sea Turtle Named Bank Had 915 Coins Removed from StomachA sea turtle in Thailand had to undergo an operation to remove 915 coins from its stomach.

hjernen har muligvis master-gener som styrer talrige andre gener

Head injuries can alter hundreds of genes and lead to serious brain diseasesHead injuries can adversely affect hundreds of genes in the brain that put people at high risk for diseases including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, post-traumatic stress disorder, stroke, ADHD, autism, depression and schizophrenia, life scientists report. The researchers have identified for the first time potential master genes which they believe control hundreds of other genes that are linked to many

hjernens belønningscenter

Prize for cracking brain's 'feel good' systemThree UK-based scientists who have studied the brain’s reward centre win a prestigious prize worth 1m euros.

homeopati pseudovidenskab

Corrigendum. The week in review for 03/05/2017Canada's Bad Science Wants You. Penguins get acupuncture, tiger cubs get chiropractic. Naturopaths and homeopaths let people know they are doctors in 4 seconds. Homeopathic lead for lead toxicity. And more

indlæringlyd i klasseværelset

Researchers create new tool that measures active learning in classroomsResearchers at San Francisco State University have developed a tool that for the first time can measure the extent to which instructors use innovative teaching methods by analyzing simple audio recordings of classroom sounds, according to a study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.

kemi: Omdannelse af estere til ethere ved hjælp af palladium-katalysator

Revolutionary process to create ether from esters using metal catalystsA group of Waseda University researchers has developed a new process using palladium or nickel as a catalyst for removing carbon monoxide from esters to produce ethers. This innovation provides new opportunities for development of drugs to fight cancer, malaria and more.

materialer bygges i 3D så de efterligner træ og knogler

Novel 3-D manufacturing leads to highly complex, bio-like materialsResearchers have developed a unique, 3-D manufacturing method that for the first time rapidly creates and precisely controls a material's architecture from the nanoscale to centimeters -- with results that closely mimic the intricate architecture of natural materials like wood and bone.

medicinske gennembrud holder ofte ikke vand

Reports Of Medical Breakthroughs Often Don't Prove Out Medical breakthroughs that were covered by newspapers were often later disproved by more comprehensive research, a study finds. That's a problem for scientists and journalists.

motion frigør et fedtbrændende hormon kaldet irisin - og har betydning for knogler

Exercise-induced hormone irisin linked to new mechanisms for bone metabolismTwo weeks of voluntary wheel running induced higher expression of irisin -- a fat-burning hormone released during exercise -- in bone tissue in mice. In addition, systemic administration of irisin increased bone formation and thickness, mimicking the effects of exercise on the mouse skeletal system.

OCD

Brain’s inability to see that something is safe causes OCDPeople with obsessive compulsive disorder aren’t more afraid of things than other people, they struggle to learn that mildly risky things are generally safe

pingvin-kæmpe i New Zealand (fossil)

Paleo Profile: New Zealand's Giant Dawn PenguinFoot bones reveal one of the largest, and oldest, penguins of all time -

robot finder dine fejl

Humans control robots with their minds by watching for mistakesAn EEG-based system uses the brain signals generated when we spot an error to correct an industrial robot’s movements as it works

robot opdager din fejl

Baxter the Robot Fixes Its Mistakes by Reading Your Mind Oh good. To tell when it's made a mistake, a charming robot reads your mind

robotter

Robot uses social feedback to fetch objects intelligentlyBy enabling them to ask a question when they're confused, an algorithm helps robots get better at fetching objects, an important task for future robot assistants.

robotter der stiller spørgsmål

Robot uses social feedback to fetch objects intelligentlyIf someone asks you to hand them a wrench from a table full of different sized wrenches, you'd probably pause and ask, "which one?" Robotics researchers from Brown University have now developed an algorithm that lets robots do the same thing—ask for clarification when they're not sure what a person wants.

stamcellebehandling Aarhus

AUH får kvalitetsstempel for stamcellebehandlingStamcellebehandlingen på Aarhus Universitetshospital er så god, at de nu får et internationalt kvalitetsstempel.

Trump og klima

White House Wants to Slash Budgets of Top Climate Science AgenciesThe Trump administration's budget proposal includes a drastic 17-percent cut to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), one of the government's top weather and climate-science agencies, according to a report by The Washington Post.

==Trump og milj==ø
Congress Targets Endangered Species ActThe Trump administration and Republicans have introduced at least 11 pieces of legislation that could weaken the Endangered Species Act or prevent some threatened wildlife from being protected.

Uddøen i Perm skete måske ved en kort istid

Cold extermination: One of greatest mass extinctions was due to an ice age and not to Earth's warmingThe Earth has known several mass extinctions over the course of its history. One of the most important happened at the Permian-Triassic boundary 250 million years ago. Over 95% of marine species disappeared and, up until now, scientists have linked this extinction to a significant rise in Earth temperatures. But researchers have now discovered that this extinction took place during a short ice age

uddøen Perm

Timing of global regression and microbial bloom linked with the Permian-Triassic boundary mass extinctionThe Earth has known several mass extinctions over the course of its history. One of the most important happened at the Permian-Triassic boundary 250 million years ago. Over 95 percent of marine species disappeared and, up until now, scientists have linked this extinction to a significant rise in temperatures. But researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, working alongside the

zika i canadiske turister

Zika virus in Canadian travelers more severe than expectedA new study sheds light on the acquisition and features of Zika virus in Canadian travelers, indicating it was as commonly confirmed as dengue in people returning from the Americas and the Caribbean but more severe than expected, according to a new study.

Semi-analytical approximations to statistical moments of sigmoid and softmax mappings of normal variablesThis note is concerned with accurate and computationally efficient approximations of moments of Gaussian random variables passed through sigmoid or softmax mappings. These approximations are semi-analytical (i.e. they involve the numerical adjustment of parametric forms) and highly accurate (they yield 5% error at most). We also highlight a few niche applications of these approximations, which ari

A Restaurant Process Mixture Model for Connectivity Based Parcellation of the CortexOne of the primary objectives of human brain mapping is the division of the cortical surface into functionally distinct regions, i.e. parcellation. While it is generally agreed that at macro-scale different regions of the cortex have different functions, the exact number and configuration of these regions is not known. Methods for the discovery of these regions are thus important, particularly as

Gummy Vitamins Cure 'Pill Fatigue' – But Do They Do Anything Else? A spoonful of sugar has always made the medicine go down – but shouldn't we be asking whether we need this type of medication in the first place? Read More

Why Some Conservative Thinkers Seriously Want the Return of the Middle Ages The Middle Ages see a resurgence of interest among the alt-right and some conservative thinkers

Researchers Engineer Enforcer Cells That Will Take out Lethal Bacteria Amoebas one-tenth the width of a human hair may someday help diffuse a bioterror attack

The Fear of Supernatural Punishment and Not "Big Gods," Gave Rise to Societal Complexity Researchers used a technique from biology to illustrate how Pacific Asian cultures developed

We Need Better Maps for Our Self-Driving Cars For autonomous self-driving cars to truly take over, every road needs to be digitally mapped

How Bringing Up Politics Ruins Your Workplace Talking about politics in the office is stressing people out and hurting their productivity. Many discussions are erupting into full-blown arguments, and millennials are particularly likely to witness political escalations in the workplace

Folketinget: Drop krav om øget produktivitet på sygehuseEt politisk flertal på Christiansborg kræver, at regeringen opgiver kravet om, at sygehuse skal øge produktiviteten med to procent om året.

Langvarig brug af syrepumpehæmmere kædes sammen med uopdaget nyreskadeNy amerikansk undersøgelse understreger behovet for at følge patienter i langvarig behandling med syrepumpehæmmere tættere.

NOAK-middel får udvidet anvendelsesområdeEMA anbefaler udvidede indikationer for anvendelse af NOAK-midlet edoxaban.

Udenlandske diabetes­eksperter skal forske i Danmark Tre udenlandske diabeteseksperter er udnævnt til gæsteprofessorer i Danmark, hvor de skal forske i diabetesområdet med udgangspunkt i de danske registre.

Patent for Stimulation of Brodmann Areas 1-48 and all other structuresFig. 1 (Roskams-Edriset al., 2017). The number of patents implicating specific brain regions has risen from 1976 to the mid 2010s. Results were obtained by searching The Lens patent database (http://lens.org/). “What is the ethical value of awarding patent rights that implicate regions of the brain?” Do the applicants intend to patent the function of specific brain areas? This absurd

Biomedicinsk teknik giver gennembrud i koralforskningenForskere ved Biologisk Institut, Københavns Universitet, University of Technology Sydney (Australien)...

Ny app hjælper skoleelever med at få øje på verdenVi lever i en selfie-tidsalder, hvor de unges blik og kamera er rettet mod dem selv. Det er sjovt og...

I grew up in the Westboro Baptist Church. Here's why I left | Megan Phelps-RoperWhat's it like to grow up within a group of people who exult in demonizing ... everyone else? Megan Phelps-Roper shares details of life inside America's most controversial church and describes how conversations on Twitter were key to her decision to leave it. In this extraordinary talk, she shares her personal experience of extreme polarization, along with some sharp ways we can learn to successfu

How bad is air pollution in the UK?Air pollution is in the news - but how bad is Britain’s air?

William Shatner's guide to MarsThe Star Trek actor takes you on a fact-fuelled cosmic journey to the mysterious Red Planet.

This boy's backpack could change you14-year-old Logan is helping monitor his city's air - and the results may change your habits.

Coal collapse drives down UK carbon emissionsA collapse in the use of coal has driven UK carbon emissions down to levels barely seen since the Victorian era, new figures show.

IBM's online quantum machine gets fasterIBM wants to open out quantum computing to the business community and increase usage for programmers.

Liver transplant pioneer Thomas Starzl dies aged 90The surgeon carried out the first successful liver transplant in 1967 and helped normalise the surgery.

Forskning i hjernens belønningscenter vinder millionerVerdens største hjerneforskningspris The Brain Prize går i år til forskere, der har givet os værdifuld nøgle til at forstå bl.a. stofafhængighed og skizofreni.

Tre læger - og en jernbanearbejder - som ændrede vores syn på hjernenFor få hundrede år siden mente man, at tanker og følelser opstod i hjertet. I dag ved vi, at hjernen er kroppens kontrolrum. Det fandt vi ud gennem store opdagelser.

Robotracerløb: 320 km/t uden nogen bag rattetVerdens første førerløse racerbil Robocar er en realitet. Første test-løb er planlagt senere i år.

Poll finds most and least popular parts of ACA As House Republicans labor to define a new plan to replace the Affordable Care Act, often called “Obamacare,” public support for the 2010 legislation is at an all-time high, according to a national survey taken in January. “Among Americans in our sample, those opposing repeal now outnumber those favoring repeal, but the margin is small and the divisions are clearly defined by political affiliatio

Long gap between photos stymies facial recognition New research investigates how the aging of our faces affects the performance of automatic facial recognition systems. “We wanted to determine if state-of-the-art facial recognition systems could recognize the same face imaged multiple years apart, such as at age 20 and again at age 30,” says Anil Jain, professor of computer science and engineering at Michigan State University. “This is the first

Social media may not fill the ‘social void’ The more time a young adult spends using social media, the more likely they are to feel socially isolated, say researchers. The findings of a new study suggest that use of social media doesn’t present a panacea to help reduce perceived social isolation—when a person lacks a sense of social belonging, true engagement with others, and fulfilling relationships. Past studies have shown that social is

This ‘beautiful’ math may clarify how our bodies work Mathematicians have introduced a new way of thinking about the incredible complexity of how biological systems interact. Their work may help set the stage for better understanding of our bodies and other living things. “We need to use beautiful mathematics and beautiful biology together to understand the beauty of a tissue.” In a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of S

Can lasers make controlled nuclear fusion happen? Controlled nuclear fusion has been a holy grail for physicists who seek an endless supply of clean energy. Rather than heating atoms to temperatures found inside the sun or smashing them in a collider, say scientists, it might be possible to nudge them close enough to fuse by using shaped laser pulses: ultrashort, tuned bursts of coherent light. The team simulated reactions in two dimensions that

Tool aims to let energy companies avoid earthquakes A new, free software tool will let energy companies and regulatory agencies calculate the probability of triggering earthquakes from wastewater injection and other activities associated with oil and gas production. “Faults are everywhere in the Earth’s crust, so you can’t avoid them. Fortunately, the majority of them are not active and pose no hazard to the public. The trick is to identify which

Animal Sex: How Hummingbirds Do ItHummingbird mating involves using specialized courtship rituals, tail feathers that sing, and weaponized beaks.

Too Much Social Media Use Linked to Feelings of IsolationFans of social media may say that the online networks help connect them with others. But a new study finds otherwise.

These 208 Minerals Exist Solely Due to HumansHuman activity is responsible for the formation of 208 mineral species, representing nearly 4 percent of the 5,200 officially recognized minerals.

New York 2140: A Novelist's Vision of a Drowned CityIn his new work of climate fiction, Kim Stanley Robinson explores how civilization will muddle through to remake a world reshaped by melting ice sheets and rising sea levels.

Meet Dr. Watson: 'Jeopardy!' Champ Takes on Cancer and Land UseIBM's Watson may be most famous for winning at the game show "Jeopardy!" but from an office here in Manhattan, the celebrated computer's brains are being used to tackle even bigger challenges.

How ESA’s Sentinel-2B Will Deliver Unprecedented Earth Views | VideoThe European Space Agency satellite is equipped with a high-swath, high-resolution and multi-spectral imager will provide a “a new perspective of our planet”, according to ESA. It is scheduled to launch atop a Vega rocket on Mar. 6, 2017.

Carbon Dioxide Could Reach 410 PPM This MonthThe carbon dioxide peak is a few months away, but scientists are already expecting another record.

Why Do Peeps Oreos Turn Poop Pink?Easter eggs aren't the only things that are turning pink this spring: Some people are reporting that a special edition "Peeps-flavored" Oreos are turning poop pink.

Facebook Users Make Their Own News BubblesThe more that a Facebook user likes, shares and comments on news, the more likely he or she is to focus on just a few news sources.

New Satellite Beams Back Its 1st Photo of Lightning from SpaceA new weather satellite promises to deliver unprecedented data on Earth's lightning, and it has already captured its first spectacular images of storms from space.

Nearly 2 Million Kids Die from Pollution Each YearMore than a quarter of deaths in children under age 5 worldwide are tied to polluted environments, such as contaminated water and smoggy air.

Quantum microscope offers MRI for molecules Diamond-based imaging system uses magnetic resonance of electrons to detect charged atoms and peer at chemical reactions in real time.

IBM Will Unleash Commercial "Universal" Quantum Computers This Year The cloud-based "IBM Q" service is not expected to outperform conventional computers—yet -

IBM's quantum cloud computer goes commercial Company plans a bigger, better system aimed at creating a market for the still-immature technology.

Dakota Access Demonstrators Inspire New Pipeline Protests Opponents lost their bid to stop the Dakota Access pipeline, but their effort has energized others. Pipeline protests are expanding across the country.

Forbidding Forecast For Lyme Disease In The Northeast Lyme disease is spreading, and this summer is shaping up as a whopper. Why has the tick-borne illness gotten so bad? The answer traces back to something the colonists did more than 200 years ago.

Did You Get Bit By A Lyme-Infested Tick? Here's What To Do One scientist is predicting a risky year for tick-borne Lyme disease in the Northeast, and it's spreading.

Feeling Lonely? Too Much Time On Social Media May Be Why It's not clear whether spending a lot of time on Facebook, Snapchat or Instagram leads to social isolation, or whether the lonely seek solace in social media. (Image credit: James Whitaker/Getty Images)

Thomas Starzl, Trailblazer In Organ Transplantation, Dies At 90 The doctor, who performed the world's first liver transplant surgery in 1963, eventually earned the moniker "father of transplantation.

WATCH: Tracking Lightning Strikes, From Space NOAA's new weather satellite is carrying the first lightning detector ever parked in orbit over Earth. It has sent back its first images of real-time lightning storms in the Western Hemisphere. (Image credit: MATLAB/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)

Dr. Thomas E. Starzl, Pioneering Liver Surgeon, Dies at 90In the 1960s, Dr. Starzl performed the first successful liver transplant on a human patient and later helped advance drugs that made organ transplants more survivable.

Basics: On Galápagos, Revealing the Blue-Footed Booby’s True ColorsWith no real predators, the birds live proud, public lives. That accessibility has proved a bonanza for scientists, casting light on their mating habits and even why the shade of their feet matters.

Basics: On Galápagos, Revealing the Blue-Footed Booby’s True ColorsWith no real predators, the birds live proud, public lives. That accessibility has proved a bonanza for scientists, casting light on their mating habits and even why the shade of their feet matters.

Trilobites: Figuring Out When and Why Squids Lost Their ShellsA study suggests it became advantageous to lose a shell’s encumbering protection while gaining the speed and agility to evade predators and catch prey.

A Conversation With: Why We Can’t Look Away From Our ScreensIn a new book, the social psychologist Adam Alter warns that our devotion to digital devices has morphed into something very much like addiction.

A Conversation With: Why We Can’t Look Away From Our ScreensIn a new book, the social psychologist Adam Alter warns that our devotion to digital devices has morphed into something very much like addiction.

Ancient humans farmed the Amazon too Science They were just way better at it than we are When we think of the Amazon rainforest, we tend to think of two things; either a pristine tropical paradise bursting with biodiversity, or a threatened area that’s being…

Pandas have cute markings because their food supply sucks Animals Yet another reason that pandas are ridiculous(ly cute) Pandas are cute—there’s no two ways about it. They poop 40 times a day, but look at those eye patches! How'd they get those distinctive faces? Read on.

Will someone invent a smart lawn-watering robot that finds dry spots? Technology Never miss a spot A smart lawn-watering robot could prevent dry spots and conserve water—a system of moisture-level sensors could be the closest invention to it.

Ten of the ugliest animals threatened by climate change Environment Because not just cute critters will suffer You care about saving baby seals. But it's time to care about these funny looking animals, too

NOAA’s satellites are on the chopping block. Here's why we need them. Space Our eyes in the sky are facing budget cuts NOAA is facing sharp budget cuts. Here are 14 things that the agency's satellites help monitor, from agriculture to baseball.

Whirlpool wants you to trash your old composting methods and buy a fancy food recycler Gadgets We sort through the garbage heap This summer, W Labs’ Zera Food Recycler will hit three test cities, the engineers hope, with an eco-friendly bang.

The Mesmerizing Motions of Starfish Larvae [Video]The flow patterns starfish larvae generate while going about their business have an otherworldly beauty -

America's Long, Sordid History of Immigration BansLike the racist restrictions of the early 20th century, Trump’s executive order is based on flawed data -

Searching the Deep Biosphere for Clues to Extraterrestrial LifeIf life can thrive miles underground on Earth, it might be able to thrive in the subsurface on other worlds -

Astrobiology Roundup: Dust Traps, Juno, Mars Lava and moreWhat's happening in the universe? -

New Report: America's Energy Sector Is Growing (and Shifting) RapidlyEnergy sectors job growth is significant, according to a new report by the U.S. Department of Energy. But this growth is unevenly distributed across the 50 states due to shifts in the... -

Brain Awareness Week Partner Interview: Gal Richter-Levin This is the first in a series of Brain Awareness Week partner interviews, in which partners share their experiences and tips for planning successful events.

Danske forskere opdager nyt solstorms-fænomenDTU Space har opdaget, at rumvejr rydder store områder for elektrisk ladede partikler på Jorden. Opdagelsen kan på sigt gavne kommunikation og navigation i arktiske områder.

DTU Space indefra: Sådan finpudses den danske gravitationBrobyggere, luftfarten og medicinalindustrien er dybt afhængige dem: målinger af tyngdeaccelerationen i Danmark.

Genåbning af turbiner aflaster skadet kæmpedæmningEntreprenører har nu fået fjernet 252.000 m3 betonbrokker, klipper og grus for foden af den oversvømmelsestruede dæmning Oroville Dam, så de underjordiske turbiner kan genstartes og give vandet en ny vej ud.

IBM lancerer verdens første kvantecomputer til kommerciel brugVirksomheder og forskningsinstitutioner vil i løbet af året kunne få adgang til det cloud-baserede kvantecomputer-system IBM Q. Ifølge IBM giver Q særligt gode muligheder for udvikling af ny medicin.

Mega-batterier skyder op i CalifornienMarkedet for store batterisystemer, der lagrer overskudsstrøm, vokser kraftigt. På verdensplan forventes det at stige fra 2,3 GWh i 2016 til 15 GWh i 2020. Særligt i USA går det stærkt.

Metroselskab betaler rekordhøj erstatning for støjNaboerne til metrobyggeriet i København har foreløbig modtaget næsten 350 mio. kr. i erstatning, og den sidste regning er endnu ikke betalt.

Ombygget skib holder borerig stille i tre meter høje bølgerRådgiver og rederi har samarbejdet om at bygge et boreskib, som gør det muligt at anvende avancerede boreteknikker i forundersøgelser på 60 meter dybt vand.

Sjældne jordarter går tabt, fordi der ikke er penge i demIngen ved, hvor mange metaller fra vores elektronikaffald, der genbruges. De sjældne metaller som neodymium er ikke nødvendigvis en god forretning.

Spørg Scientariet: Er dårlig forbrænding skyld i de farlige partikler fra brændeovne?En læser vil gerne vide, hvor de farlige partikler kommer fra i forbindelse med brændeovnsfyring. Det svarer projektleder fra Force Technology på.

A new approach to improving lithium-sulfur batteriesRechargeable lithium-ion batteries are the power behind most modern portable electronics, including cell phones, tablets, laptops, fitness trackers, and smart watches. However, their energy density—that is, the amount of energy stored within a given amount of physical space, or mass—will need to be improved for these batteries to see widespread use in smart grid and electric transport applications

New approach for matching production and consumption of renewable electricityVTT Technical Research Centre of Finland is coordinating the BALANCE project, which brings together leading European research institutes in the field of electrochemical conversion. The project aims to demonstrate a technology that enables flexible storage of large amount of renewable power. Such technologies are needed for the further integration of additional wind and solar power. The European Co

Artificial data give the same results as real data—without compromising privacyAlthough data scientists can gain great insights from large data sets—and can ultimately use these insights to tackle major challenges—accomplishing this is much easier said than done. Many such efforts are stymied from the outset, as privacy concerns make it difficult for scientists to access the data they would like to work with.

Bird flu found at Tyson Foods chicken supplierTens of thousands of chickens have been destroyed at a Tennessee chicken farm due to a bird flu outbreak, and 30 other farms within a six-mile radius have being quarantined.

Bird spiders detectives: The solution to a 200-year-old hairy mysteryThree species and three genera of birdeater spiders are described as new to science in a paper recently published in the open access journal ZooKeys. In their study, the Brazilian spider experts, Drs. Caroline Fukushima and Rogério Bertani, Laboratory of Ecology and Evolution, Instituto Butantan, report the diversity of the oldest tarantula genus (Avicularia), whose name derives from a famous 18th

Breakthrough in live coral imagingCorals are calcifying animals and are the prime architects of the most diverse marine ecosystem, the coral reefs. The coral animal harbors tiny microalgae as symbionts in its tissue, where they fix CO2 via photosynthesis and provide the animal host with organic carbon for its respiration. In turn, the microalgae obtain shelter and nutrients in the coral tissue, which extends over a complex calcium

Bubble-recoil could be used to cool microchips, even in spaceThe bubbles that form on a heated surface create a tiny recoil when they leave it, like the kick from a gun firing blanks. Now researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago, under funding from NASA, have shown how this miniscule force can be harnessed to mix liquid coolant around high-power microelectronics—in space or on Earth.

Celebrated optical trick goes vibrationalA micromechanical device generates a series of precise, equally spaced vibration frequencies, analogous to the light of the "optical frequency comb," which has dramatically improved precision measurements and could lead to advancements into detecting changes on very long timescales such as measuring slow changes to the earth's gravitational field.

Researchers investigate chemical composition of globular cluster NGC 6362European astronomers have recently studied the chemical composition of the low-mass globular cluster designated NGC 6362. Their detailed analysis of chemical abundances for 17 elements in the cluster provides important insights into the nature of NGC 6362. The findings were presented March 1 in a paper published online on arXiv.org.

Chickadees lose weight in the summerIn 2016, TSU scientists studied almost 3000 birds of 67 species in the Tomsk region. At the same time, 300 big titmice (chickadees) in the university grove received individual colored labels. The intensive bird banding allowed the researchers to evaluate aspects of their lives in the autumn-winter period. For example, the scientists found that there are more females in the city than in the surroun

Compounds could be basis for devices that turn waste heat into electricityCage-like compounds called clathrates could be used for harvesting waste heat and turning it into electricity. UC Davis chemists just discovered a whole new class of clathrates, potentially opening new ways to make and apply these materials.

Cosmic environments and their influence in star formationThe scaffolding that holds the large-scale structure of the universe constitutes galaxies, dark matter and gas (from which stars are forming), organized in complex networks known as the cosmic web. This network comprises dense regions known as galaxy clusters and groups that are woven together through thread-like structures known as filaments. These filaments form the backbone of the cosmic web an

Crunching "sustainable" cookiesThe bakery industry is a large supplier of jobs and revenue, but on the other side of the coin, it is hungry for energy.

Cryovolcanism on dwarf planet CeresAmong the most striking features on the surface of Ceres are the bright spots in the center of Occator crater which stood out already as NASA's space probe Dawn approached the dwarf planet. Scientists under the leadership of the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS) have now for the first time determined the age of this bright material, which consists mainly of deposits of special m

CXBN-2 CubeSat to embark on an important X-ray astronomy missionA university-built small satellite known as the Cosmic X-Ray Background NanoSat-2 (CXBN-2) is being prepared for an ambitious upcoming science mission. The spacecraft – scheduled for launch into space on March 19 – is expected to deliver crucial data that could advance our knowledge about the cosmic X-ray background (CXB).

The Darknet protects itself by being more robust against attacksThe Darknet is a part of the internet that people can access and use anonymously. This privacy and the ability to work away from prying eyes means that the network is frequently used for anonymous exchanges of sensitive information and for illegal activities such as drug trafficking, sharing child pornography or exchanging protected intellectual property free of charge.

Study finds modern hunter-gathers relocate to maximize foraging efficiencyAs bumblebees forage for nectar from one flower to the next, at a certain point, they will move to another area once their search for food becomes too inefficient. This behavior, also observed among other animals, conforms to a prevalent model in biology called the "marginal value theorem." In like manner, groups of modern hunter-gatherers relocate their camps to maximize their foraging efficiency

Study sparks debate over relationship between compact development and drivingCompact development is often recommended as a way to get people to drive less and create more sustainable communities. However, different studies over the years have yielded different outcomes, leading to a muddled understanding about the true impact of compact development. After using meta-aggression analysis, Mark R. Stevens of the University of British Columbia, concludes that planners should n

New deep learning techniques analyze athletes' decision-makingSports analytics is routinely used to assign values to such things as shots taken or to compare player performance, but a new automated method based on deep learning techniques - developed by researchers at Disney Research, California Institute of Technology and STATS, a supplier of sports data - will provide coaches and teams with a quicker tool to help assess defensive athletic performance in an

New study delves into income inequality and inflationA new study by Edgar Ghossoub, associate professor of economics at The University of Texas at San Antonio, posits that income inequality, in varying economies, can have substantial positive and negative effects for people in all walks of life depending on what kind of financial system they live under.

Descriptions of cloud services affect our realityCloud services are now quite taken for granted in many people's everyday lives. What most people probably do not realise is that how we talk about these services is related to how they are actually perceived and taken for granted. Maria Lindh, new doctor at the University of Borås, has analysed these relationships.

The promise of driverless carsIf you happen to live Pittsburgh in the US or Milton Keynes in the UK, then you may occasionally see one of the driverless, or self-driving, cars that are currently being tested around the world.

Dutch treat: Philadelphia Flower Show celebrates HollandVisitors arriving at the Philadelphia Flower Show this year will feel as if they're stepping into the endless flower fields of Holland.

EU researchers aim to halve CO2 footprint of carbon fiber productionResearchers from across Europe, led by University of Limerick (UL), Ireland, have begun a project to produce carbon fiber from forestry by-products.

The evolution of turtle neck retractionOne of the unique and most iconic features of many modern turtles is that they can withdraw their neck and head to hide and protect them within their shells. The group name of species which do this, Cryptodira, even means 'hidden-necked turtles' to reflect this unusual adaptation.

Exploring the economic value of trees' social and environmental benefitsThe social and environmental outputs of woodlands play a much broader role in the economy than is often recognised, according to new research by the University of Exeter for the Forestry Commission.

Fitbit tracks your steps; now it wants to chart your Zs, tooFitbit, whose devices encourage people to walk 10,000 steps each day, now wants to put them to sleep as well.

Flashy first images arrive from NOAA's GOES-16 lightning mapperDetecting and predicting lightning just got a lot easier. The first images from a new instrument onboard NOAA's GOES-16 satellite are giving NOAA National Weather Service forecasters richer information about lightning that will help them alert the public to dangerous weather.

Turning food waste into tires: Eggshells, tomato peels add strength to sustainable rubberTomorrow's tires could come from the farm as much as the factory. Researchers at The Ohio State University have discovered that food waste can partially replace the petroleum-based filler that has been used in manufacturing tires for more than a century.

Gehry's Biodiversity Museum—favorite attraction for the butterflies and moths in PanamaAhead of Gehry's Biodiversity Museum's opening in October 2014, PhD candidate Patricia Esther Corro Chang, Universidad de Panama, studied the butterflies and moths which had been attracted by the bright colours of the walls and which were visiting the grounds of the tourist site.

Google vows fix for 'inappropriate' search resultsGoogle said Monday it was working to fix a search algorithm glitch that produced "inappropriate and misleading" results from its search engine and connected speaker.

Study shows US grasslands affected more by atmospheric dryness than precipitationA new study showing dryness of the atmosphere affects U.S. grassland productivity more than rainfall could have important implications for predicting how plants will respond to warming climate conditions.

Gravity wave detection with atomic clocksThe recent detection of gravitation waves (GW) from the merger of two black holes of about thirty solar-masses each with the ground-based LIGO facility has generated renewed enthusiasm for developing even more sensitive measurement techniques. Ground-based GW instruments have widely spaced sensors that can detect sub-microscopic changes in their separation—better than one part in a billion trillio

Image: BepiColombo solar wing deployment testThe BepiColombo mission to Mercury is undergoing final testing at ESA's technical centre in the Netherlands prior to its launch from Europe's Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana in October 2018.

Image: Hubble showcases a remarkable galactic hybridThis NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image showcases the remarkable galaxy UGC 12591. UGC 12591 sits somewhere between a lenticular and a spiral. It lies just under 400 million light-years away from us in the westernmost region of the Pisces–Perseus Supercluster, a long chain of galaxy clusters that stretches out for hundreds of light-years—one of the largest known structures in the cosmos.

Image: Kourou, French GuianaThe Copernicus Sentinel-2A satellite takes us over Kourou in French Guiana, with the main town of the same name visible in the lower right.

Imaging the inner workings of a sodium-metal sulfide battery for first timeSometimes understanding how a problem arises in the first place is key to finding its solution. For a team of scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory, taking this approach led them to the cause of degraded performance in an operating sodium-ion battery.

System to detect and localise all ships in European seasA European project is coming close to the validation of a prototype of 'Passive bistatic radar' (PBR) technology based on Galileo transmissions. Once finalised, the new system could help relevant authorities to assure better maritime surveillance, detecting and localising, even of non-indexed ships.

Low-cost monitoring device uses light to quickly detect oil spillsResearchers have developed a simple device that can detect an oil spill in water and then pinpoint the type of oil present on the surface. The device is designed to float on the water, where it could remotely monitor a small area susceptible to pollution or track the evolution of contamination at a particular location.

New materials could turn water into the fuel of the futureScientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have—in just two years—nearly doubled the number of materials known to have potential for use in solar fuels.

Light the way you were meant to see itMichael Siminovitch, director of the California Lighting Technology Center at UC Davis, wasn't looking for enlightenment when he wandered into a Buddhist temple in Thailand a few years ago. He was touring Thailand as a distinguished visiting professor at King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi's school of architecture. He'd never been to a temple in his life.

Computational method makes gene expression analyses more accurateA new computational method can improve the accuracy of gene expression analyses, which are increasingly used to diagnose and monitor cancers and are a major tool for basic biological research.

Michigan to offer prize in fight against invasive Asian carpFaced with the threat that Asian carp could enter the Great Lakes, Michigan is turning to the public for new ideas and plans to offer a prize to whoever comes up with a way to stop the voracious fish.

How a mineral found in Martian meteorites may provide clues to ancient abundance of waterMars may have been a wetter place than previously thought, according to research on simulated Martian meteorites conducted, in part, at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab).

Nanoparticle colloid systems in molten inorganic salts(Phys.org)—Colloidal systems are important in nanoscience and materials. A colloidal system involves the dispersion of particles within a solvent. A stable colloid has evenly dispersed solute particles while unstable colloids form aggregates of solute particles. To prevent aggregation, researchers can functionalize the surface of the solute particles so that the surface matches the polarity of the

NASA wants to create the coolest spot in the universeThis summer, an ice chest-sized box will fly to the International Space Station, where it will create the coolest spot in the universe.

NASA takes a double-look at Tropical Cyclone BlancheTropical Cyclone Blanche formed on March 5 near Australia's Top End, and made landfall the next day as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead gathering images in visible and infrared light.

NASA's plans to explore Europa and other "ocean worlds"Earlier this week, NASA hosted the "Planetary Science Vision 2050 Workshop" at their headquarters in Washington, DC. Running from Monday to Wednesday – February 27th to March 1st – the purpose of this workshop was to present NASA's plans for the future of space exploration to the international community. In the course of the many presentations, speeches and panel discussions, many interesting prop

NASA sees powerful Tropical Cyclone Enawo threatening MadagascarTropical Cyclone Enawo has continued to intensify while moving toward Madagascar. NASA's Aqua satellite showed the development of an eye, while the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM found heavy rainfall in the storm.

A new look at the nature of dark matterThe nature of the dark matter which apparently makes up 80% of the mass of the particles in the universe is still one of the great unsolved mysteries of present day sciences. The lack of experimental evidence, which could allow us to identify it with one or other of the new elementary particles predicted by the theorists, as well as the recent discovery of gravitational waves coming from the mergi

How nature creates forest diversityForests, especially tropical forests, are home to thousands of species of trees—sometimes tens to hundreds of tree species in the same forest—a level of biodiversity ecologists have struggled to explain. In a new study published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), researchers at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) and their colleagues

Norway says half of new cars now electric or hybridNorway, which already boasts the world's highest number of electric cars per capita, said Monday that electric or hybrid cars represented half of new registrations in the country so far this year.

Paleolake deposits on Mars might look like sediments in IndonesiaIn their GSA Bulletin article published online last week, Timothy A. Goudge and colleagues detail the clay mineralogy of sediment from Lake Towuti, Indonesia, using a technique called visible to near-infrared (VNIR) spectroscopy. VNIR measures the signature of reflected light from a sample across a larger wavelength range than just visible light. At Lake Towuti, the spectral record shows distinct

Pennsylvania Senate Democrats resist ransom in cyberattackPennsylvania's top state Senate Democrat said Monday that no ransom has been paid to resolve a cyberattack that shut down the caucus' network and prompted an FBI investigation.

Physicists extend quantum machine learning to infinite dimensionsPhysicists have developed a quantum machine learning algorithm that can handle infinite dimensions—that is, it works with continuous variables (which have an infinite number of possible values on a closed interval) instead of the typically used discrete variables (which have only a finite number of values).

Post-print customization of 3-D printsThree-dimensional printing makes all conceivable varieties of layered, three-dimensional objects possible, a benefit appreciated by industry and private users alike. However, once an object is printed, any freedom of design is a thing of the past and the workpiece can no longer be modified. To address this restriction, computer scientists at Saarland University are working on the integration of sp

Power lines offer environmental benefits, according to studyPower lines, long considered eyesores or worse, a potential threat to human health, actually serve a vital role in maintaining the health of a significant population, according to new research out of the University of Connecticut.

US: 11 of 27 reef fish species in Hawaii are overfishedU.S. officials say the first-ever assessment of Hawaii's reef fish shows that 11 of 27 species are experiencing some level of overfishing.

Religious participation may serve to strengthen social bondsRoughly 80 percent of people around the globe identify with some type of religion, and scientists have been seriously pursuing insight into the evolutionary benefit of religious practice since the early part of this century. In a new study published today in Nature Human Behaviour, Eleanor Power of the Santa Fe Institute writes that active religious participation may benefit practitioners by stren

One in 5 residents overuses electricity at neighbors' expenseHousehold electricity use falls by more than 30% when residents are obliged to pay for their own personal consumption. This is shown in a new study by researchers at Uppsala University's and the Research Institute of Industrial Economics (IFN), published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

New data mining resource for organic materials availableA new, freely accessible database of organic and organometallic materials' electronic structures is now available online for research with quantum materials.

Russian library digitizes collection of the oldest printed booksScientists at the TSU Research Library have digitized and issued a collection of 26 incunabula—early printed books published in Europe before 1501. One of these books, a medieval textbook about poetic dimensions published in 1500, is very rare. Only two copies of this edition are known in the world.

Scientists show cognitive enhancing drugs can improve chess playThe first study to both show and measure the effects of cognitive-enhancing drugs such as modafinil, methylphenidate (best known under the trade name Ritalin), and caffeine, on chess play is being published in the March edition of the peer-reviewed journal European Neuropsychopharmacology. This shows significant cognitive improvements for modafinil and methylphenidate, and may have influence how t

Scientists tweak seat cushion material to clean oil spillsFederal researchers have created a new tool to clean up oil spills by tinkering with the kind of foam found in seat cushions.

Maintaining an active sex life may lead to improved job satisfaction, engagement in workMaintaining a healthy sex life at home boosts employees' job satisfaction and engagement at the office, underscoring the value of a strong work-life balance, an Oregon State University researcher has found.

Shadow-loving insect named after Tuomas Holopainen of NightwishTuomas Holopainen, the multi-talented musician and founder of the symphonic metal band Nightwish, is also a full-blooded nature person. This gave conservation biologist Jukka Salmela of Metsähallitus Parks & Wildlife Finland an idea for the name of a new species he found in Finland. Discovered in eastern Lapland during an insect survey, the fungus gnat was given the scientific name Sciophila holop

More social connection online tied to increasing feelings of isolationThe more time a young adult uses social media, the more likely they are to feel socially isolated, according to a national analysis led by University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine scientists. In addition to the time spent online, the scientists found that frequency of use was associated with increased social isolation.

Space energy technology restored to make power stations more efficientSatellite-powering technology that was abandoned decades ago has been reinvented to potentially work with traditional power stations to help them convert heat to electricity more efficiently, meaning we would need less fossil fuel to burn for power. A new study in Nano Energy presents a prototype energy converter, which uses graphene instead of metal, making it almost seven times more efficient.

Star clusters discovery could upset the astronomical applecartThe discovery of young stars in old star clusters could send scientists back to the drawing board for one of the Universe's most common objects.

Surgeons remove 915 coins swallowed by Thai sea turtleTossing coins in a fountain for luck is a popular superstition, but a similar belief brought misery to a sea turtle in Thailand from whom doctors have removed 915 coins.

Synthetic biology to help colonize MarsShannon Dangle finished her PhD ready to take on a new challenge and set her sights on research to help make Mars colonization possible. But she isn't pursuing research on rocket fuels or space suits. She's using synthetic biology to improve biomanufacturing of needed resources using simple inputs like sunlight, water, and CO2.

From teenager to pensioner—the green energy crowdfundersBoosting the use of renewable energy has long been an ambition in Europe, but some efforts have powered down amid an ever-changing political landscape and dwindling finances. Now, crowdfunding is pulling in a new generation of green investors

Trans-Himalayan land of Upper Mustang in Nepal may face serious food insecurityFood security is a global challenge especially in developing countries with a growing population and less land to cultivate. Erratic weather patterns due to global warming in the recent years have increased uncertainty in the productivity of agricultural produce particularly in mountainous regions.

Tree growth model assists breeding for more woodA meeting in a forest between a biologist and a mathematician could lead to thicker, faster growing trees.

Turbulence from seafloor topography may explain longstanding question about ocean circulationAt high latitudes, such as near Antarctica and the Arctic Circle, the ocean's surface waters are cooled by frigid temperatures and become so dense that they sink a few thousand meters into the ocean's abyss.

Unique protein partly to blame for worm's digestive distressA protein unlike any other appears to be partially responsible for upsetting the stomachs of the most common animal on the planet.

Untapped potential for Ugandan beekeepersDespite the large economic potential for honey production, many beekeepers in Uganda fail to produce and market enough honey to make a living from it.

Vesicle formation findings could pave way for liquid biopsies, drug delivery devicesEngineers at Carnegie Mellon University and biomedical researchers at the University of Pittsburgh and Magee-Womens Research Institute have established a framework for understanding the mechanics that underlie vesicle formation. Their findings, published in the online early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, can be used to help develop liquid biopsies for a range of di

Virtual reality training for 'safety-critical' jobsNew virtual reality training could help prevent accidents in "safety-critical" industries like the NHS, aviation, the military and nuclear power.

Wasp offspring found to take on the personality of the queenA small team of researchers with members from the University of California and the University of Michigan has found that some personality traits unique to a queen wasp are passed down to her offspring, the worker wasps. In their paper published in the journal Animal Behaviour, the team describes how they collected wasp nests in the wild and brought them back to their lab for personality trait stud

World's 1st woman in space, Valentina Tereshkova, turns 80Russia is honoring the world's first woman in space, Valentina Tereshkova, on her 80th birthday.

The Texas Medical Board lets Stanislaw Burzynski off lightly: A cautionary tale of the failure of regulating medicineAfter three years and countless twists and turns, the final decision by the Texas Medical Board on the sanctions to be imposed on Houston cancer quack Dr. Stanislaw Burzynski were announced on Friday. Sadly, they were not enough. The Burzynski saga should serve as a cautionary tale that the regulation of physicians and medicine is too lax, not too strict.

Sponge can soak up and release spilled oil hundreds of timesA new foam material could be the first good reusable method to recover spilled oil, and would be much better for the environment

Brighter sky helped boost US crop yields – but it may not lastSome 27 per cent of the rise in maize yields over the last 30 years may be down to clearer skies and more sunshine hitting the fields, not better technology

Moon’s hidden craters detected by gravity mapperAstronomers have long suspected the existence of lunar craters filled in by ancient lava flows. A new approach could help us find all such impacts

UK’s CO2 emissions lowest since 19th century as coal use fallsEmissions of the major greenhouse gas fell almost 6 per cent year-on-year in 2016 to the lowest levels seen since 1894

Global greening may soak up less carbon dioxide than projectedEarth could warm slightly faster than we thought because a lack of phosphorus will prevent many plants taking up extra CO2 for photosynthesis

Brief Overview of Reciprocal Liking submitted by /u/CaucasianDragon [link] [comments]

Parasitic worm gene regulates behaviors used to track down new insect hostsResearchers have developed and demonstrated the potential of a method that could be used to study how genes influence host-sensing behaviors in a parasitic worm.

Genome editing: Pressing the 'delete' button on DNAUntil recently, genomics was a 'read-only' science, but scientists have developed a tool for quick and easy deletion of DNA in living cells. This software will boost efforts to understand the vast regions of non-coding DNA, or 'Dark Matter,' in our DNA and may lead to discovery of new disease-causing genes and potential new drugs.

Cause of killer cardiac disease identified by new methodA team of researchers have invented a new method to identify the origin of irregular electrical 'storm waves' in the heart. This new research could have major implications for the future treatment of a killer cardiac disease.

Brake dust may cause more problems than blackened wheel coversMetals from brakes and other automotive systems are emitted into the air as fine particles, lingering over busy roadways. Now, researchers have shown how that cloud of tiny metal particles could wreak havoc on respiratory health.

Continuous-flow, electrically-triggered, single cell-level electroporationA flow-based electroporation microdevice that automatically detects, electroporates, and monitors individual cells for changes in permeability and delivery enabling a high throughput, controlled electroporation platform.

Latest genomic technology uncovers secrets of immune system's response to malariaScientists have revealed for the first time how immature mouse immune cells, called T cells, choose which type of skills they will develop to fight malaria infection. Researchers tracked individual T cells during infection with malaria parasites. They discovered a whole network of chemical conversations between different types of cells that influenced T cell specialization.

Biological system with light switchFor the first time ever, researchers have managed to functionally characterize the three-dimensional interaction between red-light receptors and enzymatic effectors. The results have implications for optogenetics.

Cognitive enhancing drugs can improve chess play, scientists showThe first study to both show and measure the effects of cognitive-enhancing drugs such as modafinil, methylphenidate (best known under the trade name Ritalin), and caffeine, on chess play is being published. Research shows significant cognitive improvements for modafinil and methylphenidate, and may influence how these drugs are used off-label in a range of activities.

Pupil signals uncertainty during decision-makingWhether it involves stopping at a traffic light or diving into freezing water to save someone from drowning: many of our everyday problems require snap decisions in the face of uncertainty. When making decisions, it has been suggested that neurochemicals rapidly flood the brain and signal how uncertain somebody is about a choice. Researchers have now found evidence of such signalling using measure

Birth weight not a good proxy for population healthDespite dramatic improvements in human health, babies' average birth-weights have not increased over the last 150 years reveals new research.

Post-print customization of 3D prints3-D printing makes all conceivable varieties of layered, three-dimensional objects possible, a benefit appreciated by industry and private users alike. However, once an object is printed, any freedom of design is a thing of the past and the workpiece can no longer be modified. To address this restriction, computer scientists are working on the integration of specifically developed components at pr

New data mining resource for organic materials availableA new, freely accessible database of organic and organometallic materials’ electronic structures is now available online for research with quantum materials.

Trans-Himalayan land of Upper Mustang in Nepal may face serious food insecurityFood security is a global challenge especially in developing countries with a growing population and less land to cultivate. Erratic weather patterns due to global warming in the recent years have increased uncertainty in the productivity of agricultural produce particularly in mountainous regions. New research has shed light on the new aspects of climate change in Nepal's Himalayan region and has

Untapped potential for Ugandan beekeepersDespite the large economic potential for honey production, many beekeepers in Uganda fail to produce and market enough honey to make a living from it.

Study sparks debate over relationship between compact development and drivingCompact development is often recommended as a way to get people to drive less and create more sustainable communities. However, different studies over the years have yielded different outcomes, leading to a muddled understanding about the true impact of compact development. After using meta-aggression analysis, new research concludes that planners should not rely on compact development as their on

New study sheds light on the darker side of business travelIndividuals who have to travel regularly on business either 'flourish' or 'flounder,' new research concludes.

Researchers aim to cure headache during flightMany people suffer from pain when they fly but that may soon be a thing of the past. A new study may have discovered the mechanisms responsible, opening the door to developing a cure.

Isoflavones in food associated with reduced mortality for women with some breast cancersHigher intake of foods containing isoflavones, estrogen-like compounds primarily found in soy, is associated with reduced all-cause mortality in women with hormone-receptor-negative breast cancer and women not treated with hormone therapy as part of cancer treatment, report investigators.

Bird spiders detectives: The solution to a 200-year-old hairy mysteryThree species and three genera of birdeater spiders are described as new to science. In a new study, Brazilian spider experts report the diversity of the oldest tarantula genus, whose name derives from a famous 18th century illustration. Despite comprising a great number of species, the genus has remained a mystery for more than 200 years.

New deep learning techniques analyze athletes' decision-makingSports analytics is routinely used to assign values to such things as shots taken or to compare player performance, but a new automated method based on deep learning techniques will provide coaches and teams with a quicker tool to help assess defensive athletic performance in any game situation.

The Darknet protects itself by being more robust against attacksResearchers have discovered why cyberattacks usually fail against the Darknet, a part of the internet that guarantees users' privacy and anonymity. This hidden network is used for sensitive and often illegal purposes such as drug trafficking or exchanging child pornography and can counter large attacks on its own by spontaneously adding more network capacity.

Water-rich history on Mars: New evidenceMars may have been a wetter place than previously thought, according to research on simulated Martian meteorites.

Obese Democrats blame genetics; Normal weight Democrats and most Republicans blame lifestyleSelf-reported overweight people, if they were Democrats are more likely to believe genetic factors cause obesity, while Republicans who see themselves are overweight still assign eating habits and lifestyle choices as the cause, according to a new study.

Very different cities have similar potential for ride sharingUrban ride-sharing is feasible in a wide variety of cities around the globe, say researchers, and indeed that the potential 'shareability' of autos in those places is more similar, from place to place, than previously expected.

Underwater mountains help ocean water rise from abyssAt high latitudes, such as near Antarctica and the Arctic Circle, the ocean's surface waters are cooled by frigid temperatures and become so dense that they sink a few thousand meters into the ocean's abyss. Scientists have now identified a mechanism by which waters may rise from the ocean's depths to its uppermost layers.

Smartphone interruptions: Are yours relentless and annoying?Does your smartphone spew a relentless stream of text messages, push alerts, social media messages and other noisy notifications? Well, experts have developed a novel model that can predict your receptiveness to smartphone interruptions. It incorporates personality traits and could lead to better ways to manage a blizzard of notifications and limit interruptions - if smartphone manufacturers get o

Patients more likely to refuse drug therapy than psychotherapy for mental healthPeople seeking help for mental disorders are more likely to refuse or not complete the recommended treatment if it involves only psychotropic drugs, according to a review of research.

One in three Australians report health problems from fragranced consumer productsMany people report health problems -- ranging from migraine headaches to asthma attacks -- when exposed to common fragranced consumer products such as air fresheners, cleaning products, laundry supplies, and personal care products.

Early periods associated with risk of gestational diabetesGirls who have their first period before age 11 are 50 percent more likely to develop gestational diabetes according to research. It is an increasingly common pregnancy complication with long-lasting health consequences for mothers and their children. The global trend towards starting puberty at a younger age is concerning, and health professionals could start to include age of first period as a m

Revolutionary process to create ether from esters using metal catalystsA new process has been developed using palladium or nickel as a catalyst for removing carbon monoxide from esters to produce ethers. This innovation allows a choice of more inexpensive and easily obtainable materials, avoids concerns about disposal of potentially hazardous halogenated waste, and provides new opportunities for development of drugs to fight cancer, malaria and more.

Simple tool can predict serious adverse events in acute heart failure patientsA prospective clinical validation found the Ottawa Heart Failure Risk Scale (OHFRS) tool to be highly sensitive for serious adverse event in acute heart failure patients and can now be used in clinical practice to estimate the short-term risk of SAEs in acute heart failure patients.

Low-cost monitoring device uses light to quickly detect oil spillsResearchers have developed a simple device that can detect an oil spill in water and then pinpoint the type of oil present on the surface. The device is designed to float on the water, where it could remotely monitor a small area susceptible to pollution or track the evolution of contamination at a particular location.

Imaging the inner workings of a sodium-metal sulfide battery for first timeScientists discover that the iron sulfide battery material undergoes significant changes in its microstructure and chemical composition as sodium ions enter and leave the material during the first discharge/charge cycle, leading to an initial loss in battery capacity.

Space energy technology restored to make power stations more efficientSatellite-powering technology that was abandoned decades ago has been reinvented to potentially work with traditional power stations to help them convert heat to electricity more efficiently, meaning we would need less fossil fuel to burn for power. A new study presents a prototype energy converter, which uses graphene instead of metal, making it almost seven times more efficient.

Study identifies 90 genes in fat that may contribute to dangerous diseasesA sweeping international effort is connecting the dots between genes in our fat cells and our risk for obesity and cardiometabolic diseases such as heart disease and type 2 diabetes. The researchers have identified approximately 90 genes found in fat that could play important roles in such diseases -- and could be targeted to develop new treatments or cures.

Disruptive children do not inspire similar behavior in their siblingsA new study finds that the disruptive behavior of individual children does not encourage similar behavior in their brothers and sisters.

Shadow-loving insect named after Tuomas Holopainen of NightwishTuomas Holopainen of the band Nightwish is a full-blooded nature person. This gave a conservation biologist an idea for the name of a new species he found in Finland. Discovered in eastern Lapland during an insect survey, the fungus gnat was given the scientific name Sciophila holopaineni after Tuomas.

Breakthrough in live coral imagingInterdisciplinarity scientists have used a well-known biomedical imaging technique called optical coherence tomography (OCT) to obtain fascinating insights to the structural organization and dynamics of reef-building corals.

Virtual reality training for 'safety-critical' jobsNew virtual reality training could help prevent accidents in 'safety-critical' industries like the NHS, aviation, the military and nuclear power.

Two-thirds of Americans see docs who got paid by drug companiesA majority of Americans visited doctors in the past year who had been paid or given gifts by pharmaceutical or medical device companies, but very few patients knew about it, outlines new research.

Religious participation may serve to strengthen social bondsBy analyzing how peoples' religious practice correlates with their social support networks in two villages in South India, a researcher proposes an evolutionary benefit to religious participation.

Paleolake deposits on Mars might look like sediments in IndonesiaA new article details the clay mineralogy of sediment from Lake Towuti, Indonesia, using a technique called visible to near-infrared (VNIR) spectroscopy. VNIR measures the signature of reflected light from a sample across a larger wavelength range than just visible light. At Lake Towuti, the spectral record shows distinct variations in clay mineralogy over the past 40,000 years.

Computational method makes gene expression analyses more accurateA new computational method can improve the accuracy of gene expression analyses, which are increasingly used to diagnose and monitor cancers and are a major tool for basic biological research. Researchers report that their method is able to correct for the technical biases that are known to occur during RNA sequencing, the leading method for estimating gene expression.

Evidence disproving tropical 'thermostat' theoryAs the world warmed millions of years ago, conditions in the tropics may have made it so hot some organisms couldn't survive, new research findings show.

Gender bias may hamper evaluations of female emergency medicine residentsImplicit gender bias has long been suspected in many medical training programs, but until recently has been difficult to study objectively. Now, for the first time, a nationally standardized milestone evaluation system for emergency medicine residents is shining a light on these potential biases. In a new study, researchers found that although male and female emergency medicine specialists start o

Stream of surprises from the Atlantic cod genomeResearchers keep discovering surprises in the Atlantic cod genome. The most recent study has revealed an unusual amount of short and identical DNA sequences, which might give cod an evolutionary advantage.

Metabolic syndrome: Toxicology's next patientA rise in caloric consumption combined with a decrease in physical activity has contributed to a boom of metabolic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases.

You are what you eat, and who you knowBeing surrounded by high-status people may help you stay slim, but only if you're a woman, suggests new research.

Researchers study a new way to lower LDL cholesterolDrugs targeting a nuclear receptor may be able to lower LDL (bad) cholesterol in an animal model, new findings suggest.

Kidney disease's genetic clues are uncoveredResearchers have identified genes that are linked to the underlying molecular defect in people with IgA nephropathy, an autoimmune kidney disease.

Boosting your own defenses against heart diseaseA protein found in the heart that is known to be involved in cellular stress responses in cancer cells is now believed to play a critical role in the ability of cardiac cells to combat heart disease and recover from a heart attack. A new study found the protein, ATF6, appears to promote the natural ability of heart cells to ward off stress-induced damage. This finding suggests a novel treatment an

Cosmic environments and their influence in star formationAstronomers have performed an extensive study of the properties of galaxies within filaments formed at different times during the age of the universe.

Cancer 'hot spots' in Florida may be associated with hazardous waste sitesFlorida has the sixth highest number of hazardous waste sites, known as Superfund sites, in the United States. In 2016, the state was projected to have the second largest number of new cancer cases in the country. Researchers studied cancer incidence rates in relation to Superfund sites and found a possible association. Researchers believe this discovery could help direct public health efforts.

Study shows how skates, rays and sharks sense electrical fieldsSharks, rays and skates can hunt for prey hidden in the sandy sea floor by 'listening' for faint traces of bioelectricity -- they can literally sense their prey's heart beating. The basic anatomy of the electro-sensory organs that accomplish this feat has been known for decades, but the biological mechanisms -- how electrosensory cells pick up faint electrical signs of life -- has remained a puzzl

Bubble-recoil could be used to cool microchips, even in spaceThe bubbles that form on a heated surface create a tiny recoil when they leave it, like the kick from a gun firing blanks. Now researchers have shown how this miniscule force can be harnessed to mix liquid coolant around high-power microelectronics -- in space or on Earth.

New materials could turn water into the fuel of the futureCombining computational with experimental approaches, researchers identify 12 new materials with potential use in solar fuels generators.

Bats Use Body Odor to Sniff Out the Best MatesThe flying mammals use bat scents to find sexual partners who have optimum genetic compatibility -

Boost Creativity with Electric Brain StimulationThe extraordinary abilities of savants have inspired a brain-stimulation technique for enabling creative insight -

Congress Targets Species Act--and Its Climate BenefitsThe law may promote resiliency to warming by protecting habitats and natural systems -

See the Best Fossil Octopus Ever FoundPaleontologists have recently provided a new look at a beautifully preserved cephalopod -

We Mapped the Latest Science, in Case You Missed ItA replica of the famous Lascaux Cave’s ice age artwork has opened after the original was closed to the public -

How to Upgrade Judges with Machine LearningSoftware that helps judges decide whether to jail a defendant while they await trial could cut crime and reduce racial disparities amongst prisoners.

Google’s Algorithms May Feed You Fake News and Opinion as FactAs Facebook finally rolls out tools to clean up misinformation, another Internet giant must follow its lead.

DR-chef: Den største IT-sikkerhedsmæssige udfordring er de ansattes internetadfærd https://www.version2.dk/artikel/dr-chef-stoerste-it-sikkerhedsmaessige-udfordring-de-ansattes-internetadfaerd-1074102 DR bevæger sig mere og mere ud på de digitale platforme, og det øger risikoen for hacking og ransomware. Medarbejderne skal lære at få deres IT-parader op Version2

Eksplosiv stigning i angreb mod danske netbanker via social engineering Cyberkriminelle anvender i større grad social engineering forsøg for at komme i danskernes netbank.

Facebook øremærker fake news Facebook er begyndt at rulle den ventede opdatering mod fake news ud i USA, og den er også på vej til Europa op til valget i Tyskland

Politiet opgiver tanken om ny, moderne it: Udvikler i stedet på gamle systemer https://www.version2.dk/artikel/politiet-skal-fortsaette-med-de-gamle-systemer-nyt-bliver-lagt-ovenpaa-1073861 Efter flere års forsøg på at udskifte de gamle IT-systemer, som politiet har til rådighed, har man nu valgt at beholde dem, og i stedet lægge et nyt ovenpå. Dermed er ideen bag det hedegangne POLSAG endegyldigt skrinlagt. Version2

Astronomers Deploy AI to Unravel the Mysteries of the Universe Neural nets that build their own cat pics can also reveal previously unseeable details in telescope images

Baxter the Robot Fixes Its Mistakes by Reading Your Mind Oh good. To tell when it's made a mistake, a charming robot reads your mind

Facebook’s Officially a Media Company. Time To Act Like One Facebook has long pushed that it is merely a means for others to distribute content they've created. But now Facebook is effectively killing its own argument

How a Failed Experiment Could Still Be the Future of Public Transit A partnership between the Kansas City transportation authority and the Boston startup Bridj only looks like a flop

The Fed-Proof Online Market OpenBazaar Is Going Anonymous OpenBazaar is set to integrate Tor's anonymity features---but still swears it's not trying to attract the dark web's black market sales

Forget Welding. The Hottest New Vocational Schools Do Digital Design Right now, hiring managers want--- need ---UX designers. Programs like Center Centre are responding, training a new, modern kind of workforce

While You Were Offline: An Age-Old Enigma, Solved: Garfield Is a Boy … We Think Also, radio host Alex Jones took his shirt off to eat some meat

It’s a Clackdown: Top Mechanical Keyboards, Rated If you'd even think about dropping five figures on a mattress, doesn't it make sense to upgrade your computer keyboard, too?

The Race to Sell True Quantum Computers Begins Before They Really Exist The world's biggest tech companies are jockeying for quantum supremacy

The Alps’ Most Epic Photo Ops. And the Tourists Ruining Them The mountains! The lakes! The tourists! ... not paying attention

Telemedicine Could Be Great, if People Stopped Using It Like Uber Dialing a doctor has never been easier, but that doesn't mean telemedicine is working out the way policymakers hoped



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