fugle: Struds fandtes i Indien for 25000 år siden

Evidence found of ostriches in India 25,000 years agoA team of researchers with members from several institutions in India has found evidence of ostrich relatives living in India as far back as 25,000 years ago. In their paper uploaded to the open access site PLOS ONE, the group describes finding avian eggshells, their DNA analysis of them and why they believe the finding bolsters certain aspects of continental drift theory.

hash hjælper epilepsi-patienter

Cannabis use in people with epilepsy revealed: Australian surveyThe first Australian nationwide survey on the experiences and opinions of medicinal cannabis use in people with epilepsy has revealed that 14 per cent of people with epilepsy have used cannabis products as a way to manage seizures. The study showed that of those with a history of cannabis product use, 90 per cent of adults and 71 per cent of parents of children with epilepsy reported success in ma

plutonium med uventet oxidationstrin

Unexpected oxidation state for molecular plutonium discoveredResearchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory in collaboration with the University of California - Irvine (UCI) have uncovered a significant new chemical attribute of plutonium, the identification and structural verification of the +2 oxidation state in a molecular system.

social angst kan have genetisk årsag

Social phobia: Indication of a genetic causePeople with social anxiety avoid situations in which they are exposed to judgment by others. Those affected also lead a withdrawn life. Researchers have now found evidence for a gene that is believed to be linked to the illness. It encodes a serotonin transporter in the brain. Interestingly, this messenger suppresses feelings of anxiety and depressiveness.

syntetiske gærkromosomer - tættere på kunstigt liv?

Biology team makes breakthrough in synthetic yeast projectLed by Tianjin University Professor Ying-Jin Yuan, TJU's synthetic biology team has completed the synthesis of redesigned yeast chromosomes synV and synX with the two studies .

syntetiske gærkromosomer - tættere på kunstigt liv?

Researchers assemble five new fully artificial yeast chromosomesA global research team has built five new synthetic yeast chromosomes, meaning that 30 percent of a key organism's genetic material has now been swapped out for engineered replacements. This is one of several findings of a package of seven papers published March 10 as the cover story for Science.

syntetiske gærkromosomer - tættere på kunstigt liv?

Five designer chromosomes bring synthetic life a step closerAn international effort to build a carefully edited version of the yeast genome from scratch has reached a milestone by completing five more of 16 chromosomes

syntetiske gærkromosomer - tættere på kunstigt liv?

Five new synthetic yeast chromosomes assembledA global research team has built five new synthetic yeast chromosomes, meaning that 30 percent of a key organism's genetic material has now been swapped out for engineered replacements. Like computer programmers, scientists add swaths of synthetic DNA to -- or remove stretches from -- human, plant, bacterial or yeast chromosomes in hopes of averting disease, manufacturing medicines, or making food

syntetiske gærkromosomer - tættere på kunstigt liv?

Synthetic Yeast Chromosomes Help Probe Mysteries of EvolutionTo work out how the genome evolved, bioengineers are recreating itcom

syntetiske gærkromosomer - tættere på kunstigt liv?

Designer Chromosomes Point to New Synthetic Life-FormsAn international effort aims to create baker’s yeast with laboratory-made DNA.

syntetiske gærkromosomer - tættere på kunstigt liv?

A New Lab-Built Fungus Eats Sugar and Burps Out Drugs Scientists are building the first eukaryote genome from scratch

autisme og kræft - uventt kobling (mangel på SHANK-proteinet er relateret til autisme; SHANK-proteinet forhindre brystkræftmetastaser

Unexpected link between cancer and autismResearchers have observed that a protein called SHANK prevents the spread of breast cancer cells to the surrounding tissue. The SHANK protein has been previously studied only in the central nervous system, and it is known that its absence or gene mutations are related to autism.

CRISPR - test i humane embryoner

First results of CRISPR gene editing of normal embryos releasedUntil now, CRISPR has only been tested in human embryos unable to develop into children. New results suggest the technique works much better on healthy embryos

ADHD kan give succes i forretningsverdenen (entrepreneurship.)

Harnessing ADHD for business successThe symptoms of ADHD foster important traits associated with entrepreneurship. That conclusion was reached in a study conducted by an international team of economists, who found that entrepreneurs with ADHD embrace new experiences and demonstrate passion and persistence. Their intuitive decision making in situations involving uncertainty was seen by the researchers as a reason for reassessing exis

Alzheimer efter slag mod hovedet - forslag til forklaring

Mystery brain particles may link head injuries to dementiaHead injuries cause immune cells in the brain to shed microscopic particles, which spread inflammation. This may be why head trauma is linked to dementia

Alzheimer: påvisning af placque med kemisk stof - dette stof øver levetid hos rundorme

Chemical that detects plaques in Alzheimer's brains extends lifespan of roundwormsWhile many anti-aging drugs don't live up to their claim, a tightly replicated study has discovered that a chemical used to detect amyloid plaques found in the brains of those with Alzheimer's extended the lifespan of thousands of roundworms similar in molecular form, function and genetics to humans.

biosensor til test af vand for indhold af lægemidler

Environmental researchers are developing new biosensors for testing waterBiologists from the University of Tübingen are part of an interdisciplinary team which has developed novel biosensors that enable pharmaceutical products to be detected more effectively in water. These sensors can measure two types of pharmaceutical substances – beta-blockers and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) – in real-time and in low concentrations. The research was recently publ

brystkræft og prostatakæft - nye lægemidler

Potential drug candidates halt prostate and breast cancer growthTwo new drug candidates have now been designed to target prostate and triple negative breast cancers. The new research demonstrates that a new class of drugs called small molecule RNA inhibitors can successfully target and kill specific types of cancer.

Ebola-vaccine til chimpanser

Final biomedical trial on captive chimpanzees is first oral Ebola vaccine for saving wild apesThe results from the final biomedical research trial on captive chimpanzees for the foreseeable future have been published today in the journal Scientific Reports.

Ebola-vaccine til chimpanser

Ebola vaccine promising in chimps but may never be usedA promising oral vaccine could help protect Africa’s big apes from the deadly Ebola virus, but a ban on captive ape research means it may never see the light of day

flybrændsel produceres af gær

Petrol and jet fuel alternatives are produced by yeast cell factoriesThere have been many attempts to modify this stubborn little enzyme, but none have succeeded. Until now. With new findings from Chalmers University of Technology, the fatty acid synthase (FAS) enzyme has started to produce sustainable chemicals for biofuels. The results were recently published in the journal Nature Chemical Biology.

genetisk test af arbejdere tænkes tilladt i USA

House Republicans Would Let Employers Demand Workers' Genetic Test ResultsA controversial measure may be included in future healthcare reformcom

glutenfri kost øger diabetes-risiko

That faddish gluten-free diet may be raising your diabetes riskGoing gluten-free without a diagnosis? Growing evidence of potential health harms suggests you might want to think again, says Angry Chef Anthony Warner

greenbeard gen - hvorfor organismer vil samarbejde med nogle individer i stedet for med andre

Dawkins' fabled cooperative gene discovered in microbesGeneticists from the Universities of Manchester and Bath are celebrating the discovery of the elusive 'greenbeard gene' that helps explain why organisms are more likely to cooperate with some individuals than others

hackerangreb

Assange says leaks show CIA's 'devastating incompetence'WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange on Thursday accused the CIA of "devastating incompetence" for failing to protect its hacking secrets and said he would work with tech companies to develop fixes for them.

hackerangreb

Your brain is unique – here's how it could be used as the ultimate security passwordBiometrics – technology that can recognise individuals based on physical and behavioural traits such as their faces, voices or fingerprints – are becoming increasingly important to combat financial fraud and security threats. This is because traditional approaches, such as those based on PIN numbers or passwords, are proving too easily compromised. For example, Barclays has introduced TouchID, whe

hackerangreb

Staying a heartbeat ahead of hackersNearly a million new forms of malware are unleashed on the world every day. Manufacturers of software for smartphones, laptops and security cameras, as well as banks, retailers and government agencies, release upgrades frequently to try to protect customers and assets.

hackerangreb

The WikiLeaks CIA release—when will we learn?This week's WikiLeaks release of what is apparently a trove of Central Intelligence Agency information related to its computer hacking should surprise no one: Despite its complaints of being targeted by cyberattackers from other countries, the U.S. does a fair amount of its own hacking. Multiple federal agencies are involved, including the CIA and the National Security Agency, and even friendly na

hackerangreb

This Entrepreneur Dares You to Hack His GadgetsThe author and activist Bunnie Huang explains how companies benefit when users modify their devices.

hash øger risiko for slagtilfælde og hjertefejl

Marijuana use associated with increased risk of stroke, heart failureUsing marijuana raises the risk of stroke and heart failure even after accounting for demographic factors, other health conditions and lifestyle risk factors such as smoking and alcohol use, according to new research.

hoppende gener - ny mekanisme fundet i planters genom

Novel mechanism that detains mobile genes in plant genomeA team researchers has discovered a hitherto-unknown mechanism that detains transposable elements or “mobile genes” - which can move and insert into new positions in plant genomes.

hunde kan være manipulerende

Dogs use deception to get what they want from humans (a sausage)Who needs enemies with friends like these? Human’s best friend can be sneaky and manipulative – and all for a tasty treat

klimaændring: jordbund kan frigive mere CO2 end forventet

Soils could release much more carbon than expected as climate warmsSoils could release much more CO2 than expected into the atmosphere as the climate warms, according to new research by scientists from the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab).

kradsning: det smitter at se nogle kradse sig - det er hardwired i hjernen viser ny forskning

Brain hardwired to respond to others' itchingItching is a highly contagious behavior. When we see someone scratch, we're likely to feel itchy, too. New research shows contagious itching is hardwired in the brain.

kradsning: det smitter at se nogle kradse sig - det er hardwired i hjernen viser ny forskning

This Itch Is InfectiousMany social animals start to feel itchy after watching one of their fellows scratch, and scientists now have a better understanding of why an itch can spread through a group.com

lagringsmedie: enkelt-atom-hukommelse

Single atom memory: The world's smallest storage mediumOne bit of digital information can now be successfully stored in an individual atom. This result is a breakthrough in the miniaturization of storage media and has the potential to serve as a basis for quantum computing.

læger kan testes for evne til at sy kirurgisk syning

What makes a good surgeon? Video analysis rates suturing skillsDoctors have varying styles for stitching up wounds. A machine-learning system tells doctors how well they’re doing to help improve their technique

mars kan man nok dyrke kartofler på

Kartofler kan nok sagtens gro på MarsKartofler reagerer positivt på at blive dyrket i Mars-lignende forhold. Opdagelsen kan også være en gevinst for os her på kloden med udsigt til mere ekstreme klimatiske forhold.

melatonin - risiko for forfalskning

Melatonin: What’s on the label isn’t in the bottleMelatonin is taken by millions each year. But does it work? Is it safe? And can you trust the label?

metaltræthed i stål kan nedsættes

Novel laminated nanostructure gives steel bone-like resistance to fracturing under repeated stressMetal fatigue can lead to abrupt and sometimes catastrophic failures in parts that undergo repeated loading, or stress. It's a major cause of failure in structural components of everything from aircraft and spacecraft to bridges and powerplants. As a result, such structures are typically built with wide safety margins that add to costs.

metaltræthed i stål kan nedsættes

Special steel inspired by bone is more resistant to crackingGiving steel a layered nanostructure similar to that of bone makes it more resilient to metal fatigue and could lead to safer structures

mikroskop med brug af væskedråber

Scientists make microscopes from dropletsLiquid droplets are natural magnifiers. Look inside a single drop of water, and you are likely to see a reflection of the world around you, close up and distended as you'd see in a crystal ball.

musiks fremkaldelse af følelse studeres med maskinlæring

Machine learning writes songs that elicits emotions from its listenersMusic, more than any art, is a beautiful mix of science and emotion. It follows a set of patterns almost mathematically to extract feelings from its audience. Machines that make music focus on these patterns, but give little consideration to the emotional response of their audience. Scientists have developed a new machine-learning device that detects the emotional state of its listeners to produce

prostata-kræft kan behandles med nyrekræftmedicin (forsøg i mus)

By boosting innate immunity, researchers eradicate aggressive prostate cancer in miceCabozantinib, an FDA-approved drug for patients with certain types of thyroid or kidney cancer, was able to eradicate invasive prostate cancers in mice by causing tumor cells to secrete factors that entice neutrophils -- the first-responders of the immune system -- to infiltrate the tumor. This novel approach, utilizing the innate immune system, produced near-complete clearance of invasive prostat

radioaktivt affald: giftige stoffer kan fiskes ud ved hjæp af arsenmolekyler

Potential approach to how radioactive elements could be 'fished out' of nuclear wasteManchester scientists have revealed how arsenic molecules might be used to 'fish out' the most toxic elements from radioactive nuclear waste - a breakthrough that could make the decommissioning industry even safer and more effective.

regenering af væv - ny måde

Researchers identify a new way to promote tissue regenerationHouston Methodist researchers have identified an immune pathway that promotes the formation of a cell that can develop into new tissues and organs.

regenering af væv - ny måde

Researchers identify a new way to promote tissue regenerationResearchers have identified an immune pathway that promotes the formation of a cell that can develop into new tissues and organs.

rensning af spildevand med sollys

Chemists can rapidly purify wastewater with sunlightChemists have found a way to use sunlight to purify wastewater rapidly and cheaply, and to make self-cleaning materials for buildings.

robotter - molekylære motorer kan bøjes og strækkes gentagne gange

On the path toward molecular robotsScientists in Japan have developed light-powered molecular motors that repetitively bend and unbend, bringing us closer to molecular robots.

smerte kan påvises med robot - hjælp for lægen

Robot that shows pain could teach doctors to recognise it betterDoctors are worse at spotting pain than laypeople, but a robot with realistic facial expressions could help them learn to better understand patients

stress i celler hjælpes med geler igangsat af et specielt proteinet i cellerne

Molecules form gels to help cells sense and respond to stressA specific protein inside cells senses threatening changes in its environment, such as heat or starvation, and triggers an adaptive response to help the cell continue to function and grow under stressful conditions, according to a new study by scientists from the University of Chicago.

stress i celler hjælpes med geler igangsat af et specielt proteinet i cellerne

Molecules form gels to help cells sense and respond to stressA specific protein inside cells senses threatening changes in its environment, such as heat or starvation, and triggers an adaptive response to help the cell continue to function and grow under stressful conditions, according to a new study.

tarmbakterier - immunsystemet skal lære at tolerere dem

Immunology: Live and let liveIn order to maintain the microflora in the gut, the immune system must be taught to tolerate foreign bacteria. Researches have now shown how immune surveillance cells are educated to perform this task.

tarmens stamceller er resistente for kemoterapi

The intestine has a reservoir of stem cells that are resistant to chemotherapyThe intestine has a high rate of cellular regeneration due to the wear and tear originated by its function degrading and absorbing nutrients and eliminating waste. The entire cell wall is renewed once a week approximately. This explains why the intestine holds a large number of stem cells in constant division, thereby producing new cell populations of the various types present in this organ.

Tasmanske djævel kræftsygdom kan nu behandles med immunterapi

Immunotherapy trial cures Tasmanian devils of DFTDAn international study involving multiple institutions over six years has shown that immunotherapy can cure Tasmanian devils of the deadly devil facial tumour disease (DFTD).

Tasmanske djævel kræftsygdom kan nu behandles med immunterapi

Immunotherapy trial cures Tasmanian devils of DFTDImmunotherapy can cure Tasmanian devils of the deadly devil facial tumor disease (DFTD), an international study involving multiple institutions over six years has shown.

transportproteiner i planter - udvikledes før de stoffer, de transporterer

Transport proteins evolved long before their compounds emergedDanish scientists from the DynaMo Center, University of Copenhagen, bridge an important gap that changes our understanding of the evolution of plant transport proteins.

Trump og klima

Will China take the green mantle from the U.S.?In the face of Donald Trump's campaign promise to pull the United States out of the Paris climate accord, China's President Xi Jinping told the U.N. in January, "The Paris agreement is a milestone in the history of climate governance…China will continue to take steps to tackle climate change and fully honor its obligations." Will China usurp the United States as the global leader in combating clim

virus påvirker kønnet af insekter - nedsætter hunligt afkom af inficeret hveps

Newly discovered virus affects sex ratio of insect-killing waspsScientists have identified a previously unknown virus that decreases the number of female offspring of the wasps it infects, according to a PLOS Pathogens study. The virus, discovered by Gongyin Ye's group of Zhejiang University, infects one species of a specific group of wasps known as parasitoid wasps.

virusmutationer ved spring til ny værtsart

Cross-species jumps may play unexpectedly big role in virus evolutionOn occasion, a virus may jump from one host species to another and adapt to the new host. Such cross-species transmission happens more often than expected, according to new research published in PLOS Pathogens, and it may play a much bigger role in virus evolution than previously thought.

øjet: løs retina kan limes med ny hydrogel (forsøg med kaniner)

Rabbits' detached retina 'glued' with new hydrogelA newly developed elastic gel administered in liquid form and shown to turn jellylike within minutes after injection into rabbits' eyes to replace the clear gelatinous fluid inside their eyeballs, may help pave the way for new eye surgery techniques, says an international team of researchers led by Japanese scientists.

øjet: løs retina kan limes med ny hydrogel (forsøg med kaniner)

Rabbits' detached retina 'glued' with new hydrogelA newly developed elastic gel administered in liquid form and shown to turn jellylike within minutes after injection into rabbits' eyes to replace the clear gelatinous fluid inside their eyeballs, may help pave the way for new eye surgery techniques, say scientists.

Knowledge Is a Kind of InfrastructureWe need better roads, bridges and airports—but pure, curiosity-driven science is no less vital

FN-rapport: Vi kan brødføde alle uden brug af pesticiderVerdens lande bør blive enige om at udfase brugen af farlige pesticider i landbruget, fordi pesticiderne koster tusindvis af menneskeliv hvert år og skader naturen. Det fastslår to FN-rapportører.

Gennembrud for genterapi? Dreng helbredt for almindelig blodsygdomDen arvelige og livstruende blodsygdom seglcellesygdom ser ud til at blive kureret ved hjælp af muterede stamceller fra knoglemarv.

Gratis data fra rummet: Få hjælp til at finde demDen danske rumstrategi lægger op til omfattende udnyttelse af data fra rummet, og nu står eksperter klar til at hjælpe.

København vil genanvende endnu mere plastaffaldFredag indvier Københavns Kommune et nyt testanlæg, der skal knække koden for, hvordan man bedst genanvender plast. Fra 1. maj får københavnerne derfor lov at smide blød plast i plast-containeren.

Kronik: Biomasse er ikke endestationen for fjernvarme Biomasse Fjernvarme

Leder: Ikke engang guld kan vi finde ud af at genanvende Metaller Råvarer

Spørg Scientariet: Hvorfor har mennesket ikke øjnene på siden af hovedet?En læser undrer sig over, hvorfor mange pattedyr har øjnene på siden af hovedet, mens vi ikke har. Det svarer zoolog på.

Vestager godkender nye russiske reaktorer på ungarsk A-kraftværkEfter EU-godkendelse bygger den russiske atomkraftleverandør Rosatom nu to nye reaktorer i Ungarn. Greenpeace er bekymret, fordi den ungarske regering har stækket landets uafhængige atomkrafttilsyn, mens andre frygter øget russisk indflydelse i EU.

Sådan ser skaderne på IC4 udIkke mindre end 12 gange siden 2011 har hydraulikpumpen i IC4-togets motor revet sig løs. I de sidste to tilfælde er pumpen faldet igennem togets bundplade, så plade og motordele er faldet på skinnerne. Ing.dk har været på besøg på DSB Klargøringscenter i Kastrup og set nærmere på skaderne.

The Athlete in Your BrainHow your brain may reflect your skill as an athlete.

America will meet its climate goals: BloombergThe United States will meet its climate agreement goals, UN special envoy for climate change Michael Bloomberg said in Paris on Thursday.

Archeologists in Egypt discover massive statue in Cairo slumArcheologists in Egypt discovered a massive statue in a Cairo slum that may be of pharaoh Ramses II, one of the country's most famous ancient rulers.

Artificial intelligence and robots to make offshore windfarms safer and cheaperThe University of Manchester is leading a consortium to investigate advanced technologies, including robotics and artificial intelligence, for the operation and maintenance of offshore windfarms.

Australia sees second year of Barrier Reef bleachingAustralia's Great Barrier Reef is experiencing an unprecedented second straight year of mass coral bleaching, scientists said Friday, warning many species would struggle to fully recover.

Baidu CEO defends state support of Chinese firmsState support for private firms is crucial in China's market, the head of the mainland's online search giant Baidu said Thursday, following complaints from European businesses that Beijing-backed firms are pushing out foreign competitors.

How big brains evolved could be revealed by new mathematical modelA new mathematical model could help clarify what drove the evolution of large brains in humans and other animals, according to a study published in PLOS Computational Biology.

Could Bill Gates' plan to tax robots really lead to a brighter future for all?Bill Gates has stated in an interview that robots who take human jobs should pay taxes. This has some obvious attractions. Not only, as Gates says, will we be able to spend the money to finance jobs for which humans are particularly suited, such as caring for children or the elderly, but robots are also unlikely to complain about tax levels, they don't use services financed by tax revenue such as

Biodegradable packages will keep your food freshKTU researchers are creating biodegradable food packaging materials, which, in addition, will also keep food fresh for longer. This innovation would solve two problems at once: assist in cutting down packaging waste and in reducing the number of food-borne illnesses.

New 'biomimetic' glue shows high-strength bonding under waterAn adhesive that works under water and is modeled after those created by shellfish to stick to surfaces is stronger than many commercial glues created for the purpose.

Bird flu cases revive fear of repeat of major 2015 outbreakThe detection of a highly pathogenic strain of bird flu at a Tennessee chicken farm has Midwest poultry farmers tightening procedures in an attempt to prevent an outbreak like the one in 2015 that required the destruction of millions of birds and cost at least $3 billion.

'Blurred times' in a quantum worldWhen measuring time, we normally assume that clocks do not affect space and time, and that time can be measured with infinite accuracy at nearby points in space. However, combining quantum mechanics and Einstein's theory of general relativity theoretical physicists from the University of Vienna and the Austrian Academy of Sciences have demonstrated a fundamental limitation for our ability to measu

BT Group agrees to separate broadband unitBritish telecoms giant BT Group has agreed to legally separate its broadband unit Openreach to remedy concerns over competition in the sector, the company announced Friday.

To buckle or not to buckleMagnetic balls provide exciting avenues for exploring many fundamental phenomena in physics. They can be assembled by hand into chains and more complex structures and used to model the properties of unstretchable materials that, like paper, crumple under certain loading conditions.

Carbon-based approaches for saving rainforests should include biodiversity studiesConservationists working to safeguard tropical forests often assume that old growth forests containing great stores of carbon also hold high biodiversity, but a new study finds that the relationship may not be as strong as once thought, according to a group of researchers with contributions from WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) and other organizations.

Research chemists develop lighter, field repairable transparent armorResearch chemists at U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) have developed and patented a transparent thermoplastic elastomer armor to reduce weight, inherent in most bullet-resistant glass, while maintaining superior ballistic properties.

Report: China developing advanced lunar mission spaceshipChina is developing an advanced new spaceship capable of both flying in low-Earth orbit and landing on the moon, according to state media, in another bold step for a space program that equaled the U.S. in number of rocket launches last year.

China's Didi launches Silicon Valley research hubChinese ridesharing leader Didi Chuxing has opened a Silicon Valley research hub, where it will join the race with other tech companies for autonomous driving.

Climate change puts California's snowpack in jeopardy in future droughtsSkiing in July? It could happen this year, but California's days of bountiful snow are numbered.

Detailed consumption advisories would better serve women across USAmong women of childbearing age in the U.S., fish consumption has increased in recent years while blood mercury concentrations have decreased, suggesting improved health for women and their babies, a new study shows.

Convergent con artists: How rove beetles keep evolving into army ant parasitesMarauding across the tropical forest floor, aggressive army ant colonies harbor hidden enemies within their ranks. The impostors look and smell like army ants, march with the ants, and even groom the ants. But far from being altruistic nest-mates, these creatures are parasitic beetles, engaged in a game of deception. Through dramatic changes in body shape, behavior, and pheromone chemistry, the be

Crape myrtle bark scale study reveals tree treatments to fight pestThe second year of survey data tracking crape myrtle bark scale has provided researchers information they believe will help mitigate the pest's effect on trees, said a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service expert.

Breeding crops today for an uncertain tomorrowVariable weather is creating extreme challenges for crop breeding in California. How do you develop crops that will thrive under certain conditions when you can no longer predict what those conditions will be?

Dark matter detection receives 10-ton upgradeIn an abandoned gold mine one mile beneath Lead, South Dakota, the cosmos quiets down enough to potentially hear the faint whispers of the universe's most elusive material—dark matter.

Improving defence against earthquakes and tsunamisA pioneering new computer model has been developed to simulate the whole chain of hazard events triggered by offshore mega subduction earthquakes, by a team involving UCL and Bristol engineers.

Digital publishing pays off for Axel SpringerGerman media group Axel Springer said Thursday its digital publishing empire would bring further increases in sales and profits in 2017, after meeting its forecasts last year.

How disaster relief efforts could be improved with game theoryThe number of disasters has doubled globally since the 1980s, with the damage and losses estimated at an average US$100 billion a year since the new millennium, and the number of people affected also growing.

Why the discovery of a bevy of quasars will boost efforts to understand galaxies' originsLate last year, an international team including researchers from the Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics (KIAA) at Peking University announced the discovery of more than 60 extremely distant quasars, nearly doubling the number known to science - and thus providing dozens of new opportunities to look deep into our universe's history.

Discovery of widespread platinum may help solve Clovis people mysteryNo one knows for certain why the Clovis people and iconic beasts—mastodon, mammoth and saber-toothed tiger - living some 12,800 years ago suddenly disappeared. However, a discovery of widespread platinum at archaeological sites across the United States by three University of South Carolina archaeologists has provided an important clue in solving this enduring mystery.

Diversity improves problem-solving success: Just ask songbirdsHumans seeking to improve their problem-solving and survival skills can learn a thing or two from an unlikely source—songbirds.

Dutch law enforcers access millions of encrypted messagesDutch police and prosecutors investigating underworld slayings say they have accessed data on computer servers containing millions of encrypted messages between members of organized crime gangs.

Completion of the Eastern Asia earthquake and volcanic hazards information mapShinji Takarada and members of the Caldera Volcano Research Group, the Research Institute of Earthquake and Volcano Geology, the Geological Survey of Japan, the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, have created the "Eastern Asia Earthquake and Volcanic Hazards Information Map" summarizing past disaster information on large-scale earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and the

EPA chief: Carbon dioxide not primary cause of warmingThe new chief of the Environmental Protection Agency said Thursday he does not believe that carbon dioxide is a primary contributor to global warming, a statement at odds with mainstream scientific consensus and his own agency.

Evolving toxicologyToxicology as a science has not evolved to keep pace with the chemical revolution, according to Thomas Hartung writing in the International Journal of Risk Assessment and Management, Hartung highlights ten problems that must be addressed if toxicology is to be made fit for purpose in the 21st Century.

Researchers create first exact model for diffusion in magnesium alloysThe movement of atoms in solids controls everything.

Could fast radio bursts be powering alien probes?The search for extraterrestrial intelligence has looked for many different signs of alien life, from radio broadcasts to laser flashes, without success. However, newly published research suggests that mysterious phenomena called fast radio bursts could be evidence of advanced alien technology. Specifically, these bursts might be leakage from planet-sized transmitters powering interstellar probes i

Researchers flip a magnetic memory cell with a light pulse at record speedUniversity of Minnesota electrical and computer engineering researchers have created a magnetic tunnel junction that can be switched by a pulse of light lasting one trillionth of a second—a new record. The magnetic tunnel junction is critical to information technology advances with the termination of Moore's law, a principle that has ruled the microelectronics industry for five decades.

FRED database gathers root traits to advance understanding of below-ground plant ecologyOak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) scientists have released a new global, centralized database of plant root traits, or identifying characteristics, that can advance our understanding of how the hidden structure of plants belowground may interact with and relate to life aboveground.

Researchers discovered fungus gnat paradise in Peruvian AmazoniaFinnish and Estonian researchers have discovered and identified 16 new fungus gnat species in the Amazonia. The diverse gnat species maintain exceptionally rich parasitoid wasp species, which shows the importance of interdependence between rain forest species.

The future of space colonization – terraforming or space habitats?The idea of terraforming Mars – aka "Earth's Twin" – is a fascinating idea. Between melting the polar ice caps, slowly creating an atmosphere, and then engineering the environment to have foliage, rivers, and standing bodies of water, there's enough there to inspire just about anyone! But just how long would such an endeavor take, what would it cost us, and is it really an effective use of our tim

First global maps of volcanic emissions use NASA satellite dataVolcanoes erupt, they spew ash, their scarred flanks sometimes run with both lava and landslides. But only occasionally. A less dramatic but important process is continuous gas emissions from volcanoes; in other words, as they exhale. A number of volcanoes around the world continuously exhale water vapor laced with heavy metals, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide, among many other

Why guillemot chicks leap from the nest before they can flyBefore they have the wing span to actually permit them to fly, young guillemots (also known as murres) leap hundreds of metres off towering cliffs and flutter down towards the sea, guided by their fathers. Scientists have long wondered why these tiny chicks make this remarkable leap, hoping to avoid the rocks below them, in what seems an unlikely survival strategy for a species.

The hazards of English spellingA new study of English spelling practices demonstrates that the way we spell words is much more orderly and self-organizing than previously thought. The study "Self-organization in the spelling of English suffixes: The emergence of culture out of anarchy," by Kristian Berg (University of Oldenburg) and Mark Aronoff (Stony Brook University) was published in the March, 2017 issue of the scholarly jo

High-precision calculations on supercomputers help reveal the physics of the universeOn their quest to uncover what the universe is made of, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory are harnessing the power of supercomputers to make predictions about particle interactions that are more precise than ever before.

High performance of single stage sounding hybrid rockets using design informaticsSingle-stage sounding rockets are used to transport scientific equipment into, or just beyond, Earth's atmosphere to measure phenomena such as aurora. Recently, scientists have begun designing rockets with hybrid engines, which work by alternating between different phases of solid fuel and liquid or gas oxidizers. Hybrid rockets are cheaper, safer and cleaner than those with conventional solid fue

Hubble dates black hole's last big mealFor the supermassive black hole at the center of our Milky Way galaxy, it's been a long time between dinners. NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has found that the black hole ate its last big meal about 6 million years ago, when it consumed a large clump of infalling gas. After the meal, the engorged black hole burped out a colossal bubble of gas weighing the equivalent of millions of suns, which now b

Hungarian-American Nobel winner George A. Olah dies aged 89George A. Olah, the Hungarian-American winner of the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1994, has died at age 89.

Floods and hurricanes predicted with social mediaSocial media can warn us about extreme weather events before they happen – such as hurricanes, storms and floods – according to new research by the University of Warwick.

Image: Cassini reveals strange shape of Saturn's moon PanThese raw, unprocessed images of Saturn's tiny moon, Pan, were taken on March 7, 2017, by NASA's Cassini spacecraft. The flyby had a close-approach distance of 24,572 kilometers (15,268 miles).

Image: Sentinel-3A satellite captures KamchatkaThe Sentinel-3A satellite takes us over the Sea of Okhotsk in the Russian Far East on 15 February, where clouds blend with the ice and snow beneath from our bird's-eye view.

Inefficient scientific peer review process takes 4 months on averageChecking the research of colleagues is one of the most important pillars of academic practice. However, this so-called peer review has several weak points. Academics often complain about how long it takes. On the website SciRev.sc they are sharing their experiences. A publication from Jeroen Smits and Janine Huisman from Radboud University reveals several striking observations based on these exper

New research finds infants are more exposed to harmful pollution on the way to school than on the way homeBabies in prams accompanying older siblings on the school run are twice as likely to be exposed to harmful air pollution in the morning than in the afternoon, a new study has found.

Iran and Middle East could adopt fully renewable electricity systemsIran can transition to a fully renewable electricity system and financially benefit from it by 2030. Researchers at Lappeenranta University of Technology (LUT) show that major oil-producing countries in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region could turn their abundant renewable energy resources into lucrative business opportunities in less than two decades.

New law will force some (but not all) organisations to reveal data breachesWe live in an era of big data stored digitally, and some of that data is about you. For example, the government keeps your social security and tax data, banks keep your financial data and your phone provider stores your metadata.

Study shows conservatives less likely to apologize than liberalsA team of researchers led by the University of Queensland's Matthew Hornsey has found evidence that suggests people who are conservative are less likely to apologize than are those who are more liberal. In their paper published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science, the group describes their study and offer their results and some opinions on why there may be differences betwe

Life on Earth is used to gravity – so what happens to our cells and tissues in space?There's one force whose effects are so deeply entrenched in our everyday lives that we probably don't think much about it at all: gravity. Gravity is the force that causes attraction between masses. It's why when you drop a pen, it falls to the ground. But because gravitational force is proportional to the mass of the object, only large objects like planets create tangible attractions. This is why

Keeping liquids off the wallOn Earth, liquid flows downhill thanks to gravity. Creating an effective liquid fuel tank involves little more than putting a hole at the bottom of a container.

Studying magnetic space explosions with NASA missionsEvery day, invisible magnetic explosions are happening around Earth, on the surface of the sun and across the universe. These explosions, known as magnetic reconnection, occur when magnetic field lines cross, releasing stored magnetic energy. Such explosions are a key way that clouds of charged particles—plasmas—are accelerated throughout the universe. In Earth's magnetosphere—the giant magnetic b

New material helps record data with lightRussian physicists with their colleagues from Europe have learned to generate quasiparticles—excitons, which were fully controllable and able to record information at room temperature. These particles act as a transitional form between photons and electrons, so the researchers believe they can be used to create compact optoelectronic devices for rapid recording and processing of optical signals. T

New material raises questions about theoretical models of superconductivityThe U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has successfully created the first pure, single-crystal sample of a new iron arsenide superconductor, CaKFe4As4, and studies of this material have called into question some long-standing theoretical models of superconductivity.

Maths—why many great discoveries would be impossible without itDespite the fact that mathematics is often described as the underpinning science, it is often not given enough credit when scientific discoveries are presented. But the contribution of mathematics and statistics is essential and has transformed entire areas of research – many discoveries would not have been possible without it. In fact, as a mathematician, I have contributed to scientific discover

Mexico's energy reform may increase socio-environmental conflictThe opening of Mexico's energy sector to private investment, along with more critical public attitudes on the environmental and community toll of energy extraction activities, may increase the incidence and visibility of socio-environmental conflict in Mexico, according to a new paper from the Mexico Center at Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy.

Nanoparticle-polymer composites boost holographic data prospectsHolograms offer a means of increasing data storage density that may help to meet the demands of ever decreasing device sizes and increasing memory requirements. Kohta Nagaya, Eiji Hata and Yasuo Tomita at the University of Electro-Communications in Japan demonstrate that coaxial holographic digital data storage in a thiol-ene based nanoparticle-polymer composite can achieve competitive symbol erro

NASA examines the soaking from ex-tropical Cyclone Enawo exiting MadagascarNASA's Aqua satellite observed Ex-Tropical Cyclone Enawo leaving Madagascar, while rainfall data from the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM satellite helped determine the amount of rainfall it brought to the country.

NASA Mars orbiter tracks back-to-back regional stormsA regional dust storm currently swelling on Mars follows unusually closely on one that blossomed less than two weeks earlier and is now dissipating, as seen in daily global weather monitoring by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

NASA mission named 'Europa Clipper'NASA's upcoming mission to investigate the habitability of Jupiter's icy moon Europa now has a formal name: Europa Clipper.

NASA catches newly formed Tropical Cyclone 11SJust after Tropical Cyclone 11S formed in the Southern Indian Ocean NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead gathering data using infrared light. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite looked at Tropical Cyclone 11S in infrared light. The AIRS image was taken on Mar. 8 at 20:41 UTC (3:41 p.m. EST) and showed some cloud top temperatures of thunderstorms around

NASA's Orion spacecraft parachutes tested at U.S. Army Yuma proving groundEngineers successfully tested the parachutes for NASA's Orion spacecraft at the U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground in Arizona Wednesday, March 8. This was the second test in a series of eight that will certify Orion's parachutes for human spaceflight.

New NASA radar technique finds lost lunar spacecraftFinding derelict spacecraft and space debris in Earth's orbit can be a technological challenge. Detecting these objects in orbit around Earth's moon is even more difficult. Optical telescopes are unable to search for small objects hidden in the bright glare of the moon. However, a new technological application of interplanetary radar pioneered by scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in P

Using nature to build nanomachinesFlagella are tiny rotary motors that move bacteria. A research team led by Keiichi Namba, professor at Osaka University has used electron cryomicroscopy to show that a small difference of only several amino acids can have a large impact on flagella function. The study gives new insight on the construction of synthetic nanomachines and can be read in Nature Communications.

New system to process Nepal earthquake dataOn April 25, 2015, a magnitude 7.8 earthquake struck the mountainous nation of Nepal, causing widespread destruction and loss of life. Known as the Gorkha Earthquake, the event was the largest earthquake to strike the country in over 80 years. During the initial response to the quake, scientists processed data manually, developing images called interferograms one at a time to show deformations tha

Norwegian prosecutors demand bitcoins for drug salesThree men charged in Norway with selling drugs online have to pay back 120 bitcoins ($144,300) on top of millions in Norwegian kroner—the first time the Scandinavian country has demanded to be paid in the electronic currency, a prosecutor said Friday.

Pakistan threatens to block social media over 'blasphemy'A Pakistani court has ordered the government to open an investigation into online "blasphemy", threatening to ban social media networks if they failed to censor content deemed insulting to Islam, lawyers said Thursday.

Why we should not know our own passwordsSince 2009, U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents have been allowed to search electronic devices carried by citizens or noncitizens as they cross the border into the United States from other countries. More recently, Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly suggested this digital vetting should also include harvesting social media passwords. Kelly's proposal prompted legal and technology experts

Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performanceIn the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating innovative 2D layered hybrid perovskites that allow greater freedom in designing and fabricating efficient optoelectronic devices. Industrial and consumer applications could include low cost solar cells, LEDs, laser diodes, detectors, and othe

'Photonic doping' makes class of metamaterials easier to fabricateThe field of metamaterials, an intersection of materials science, physics, nanotechnology and electrical engineering, aims to produce structures with unusual electromagnetic properties. Through the careful combination of multiple materials in a precise periodic arrangement, the resulting metamaterials exhibit properties that otherwise couldn't exist, such as a negative index of refraction. Some me

Physicists predict the existence of unusual optical compositesPhysicists from MIPT have predicted the existence of transparent composite media with unusual optical properties. Using graphics card-based simulations, scientists studied regular volume structures composed of two dielectrics with close parameters, and found that the optical properties of these structures differ from both those of natural crystals and artificial periodic composites, which are curr

System provides readers with detailed summaries of online discussionsFrom Reddit to Quora, discussion forums can be equal parts informative and daunting. We've all fallen down rabbit holes of lengthy threads that are impossible to sift through. Comments can be redundant, off-topic or even inaccurate, but all that content is ultimately still there for us to try and untangle.

Relativistic effects pack a punch in high-temperature plasma collisions"The interaction of highly charged heavy ions with electrons is one of the most important atomic processes in high-temperature plasmas," explains University of Electro-Communications researcher Nobuyuki Nakamura in his recent J Phys B topical review. These high-temperature plasmas occur in a surprisingly large range of scenarios from astrophysical plasmas and solar corona, to fusion reactors and e

The remarkable hunting ability of the robber flyA small fly the size of a grain of rice could be the Top Gun of the fly world, with a remarkable ability to detect and intercept its prey mid-air, changing direction mid-flight if necessary before sweeping round for the kill.

Studying remnants of Star Carr's early civilisation before it's too lateKnown as the richest and most important Mesolithic site in Great Britain, Star Carr is still holding many secrets that archaeologists are eager to reveal before it's too late. Indeed, peat desiccation, fluctuating water tables and unprecedented levels of acidity are deteriorating the site at a worrying pace.

Study reveals new insights into the dining habits of toucansWhile Toucans' diets consist primarily of fruit, new research co-authored by a Virginia Commonwealth University biology major suggests the bird species' dining habits are actually more opportunistic than previously believed and include the eggs of ground-nesting birds.

Safe navigation on construction sitesAutomated vehicles have to be able to reliably detect traffic signs. Previous systems, however, have had problems in understanding complex traffic management with different information about speed or the course of the lanes, as mainly occurs on construction sites. Fraunhofer researchers are developing technologies for the real-time interpretation of such signs, which they will present at the CeBIT

Sandia creates 3-D metasurfaces with optical possibilitiesMetamaterials don't exist in nature, but their ability to make ultra-thin lenses and ultra-efficient cell phone antennas, bend light to keep satellites cooler and let photovoltaics absorb more energy mean they offer a world of possibilities.

Measurements by school pupils paved way for key research findingsWith their measurements and samples, nearly 3,500 schoolchildren have assisted a research study on lakes and global warming, now published in the journal Scientific Reports. The results show that water temperatures generally remain low despite the air becoming warmer. This helps to curb the emission of greenhouse gases.

Scientists effectively disrupt communication between parasites that spread diseaseProf. Shulamit Michaeli, Dean of Bar-Ilan's Mina and Everard Goodman Faculty of Life Sciences, and member of the Bar-Ilan Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials (BINA), has demonstrated how parasite migration can be controlled by creating an unfavorable environment or by damaging cell health, since parasites under stress secrete vesicles that disrupt their socially coordinated movement

Scientists describe a function for autophagy in germline stem-cell proliferationScientists study the germline of the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans to identify the mechanisms that control stem cell proliferation and homeostasis, as well as to advance our molecular understanding of homologous signaling pathways humans. Recently, researchers have begun to describe the function of autophagy, a cellular recycling process critical for homeostasis, in germline stem-cell prolifera

Sentinel-2B satellite declared fit and ready for commissioningFollowing three days of intensive work, mission control today declared the newly launched Sentinel-2B satellite fit and ready for commissioning.

Smart flavored-beverage machines are persuading consumers nationwide to ditch their plastic bottlesMIT spinout Bevi believes it can cut the world's use of bottled drinks with a smart beverage machine of the same name that delivers high quality, flavored water—straight from the tap.

Research improves solar cell performanceThe team at SPECIFIC Innovation and Knowledge Centre at Swansea University's College of Engineering investigated Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTS) which is based on Earth-abundant-elements, has shown great potential as an alternative to conventional Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) in solar cells. The power conversion efficiency of CZTS-based solar cells has reached 12.7%, but there is still room for improvement to compet

Researchers develop new solution for independent living: the 'empathetic home'TU/e will be putting the concept of the 'empathetic home' to the test. This is a home environment that 'empathizes' with the ageing resident and thus acts as or supports the voluntary care worker, for example with smart sensors embedded in the walls or floors or solutions of an ecological nature such as an 'edible wall' in the senior's living room. This will be happening in three assisted living c

How can we share solutions to complex systems problems across domains and application areas?What do power networks, transportation hubs, weather patterns, commercial organisations and swarming robots have in common?

'Reading' songs and nurturing culture in the PhilippinesPreserving cultural heritage, including access to and use of ancestral lands, can be a real challenge for indigenous communities. A range of cultural memory recall and music workshops with the indigenous Ata of the Philippines aims to empower communities and validate legal claims related to the Indigenous People's Rights Act.

New species of tick with woylie preference may face extinctionMurdoch University researchers have discovered a new species of Australian tick, but believe it may be facing extinction because of its strong preference for critically endangered woylies.

Stressed seabird parents think only of themselvesStress is a factor not only in the best human families; it also appears among animals. To see how bird family members interact with each other in stressful situations, researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna and the University of Gdansk, Poland, studied parent-offspring interactions in a long-lived seabird, the little auk (Alle alle). The scientists gave parent and offspring birds a hormone pellet to in

Superluminous supernovaeSupernovae, the explosive deaths of massive stars, are among the most momentous events in the cosmos because they disburse into space all of the chemical elements that were produced inside their progenitor stars, including the elements essential for making planets and life. Their bright emission also enables them to be used as probes of the very distant universe. Not least, supernovae are astrophy

Synbio for bioremediation—fighting plastic pollutionPlastic pollution is one of the major problems of our times. Plastic is a durable material that can be moulded into solid objects of the most disparate shapes. Properties such as low cost, versatility and easy manufacturing are behind its overwhelming success. So much so that in just over a century – the first plastic, bakelite, was invented in NY in 1907- the world and, in particular, our oceans

Research team captures images of pathogens' tiny 'syringes'Salmonella and many other bacterial pathogens use a nano syringe-like device to deliver toxic proteins into target human cells. Now scientists at Yale and University of Texas Medical School-Houston have used cryo-electron tomography to reveal the molecular structure of this device, which is about 1/1000th the width of a human hair.

Research team presents a molecular switch so far unmatched in its reproducibilityThe theoretical physicists Junior Professor Fabian Pauly and his postdoc Dr. Safa G. Bahoosh now succeeded in a team of experimental physicists and chemists in demonstrating a reliable and reproducible single molecule switch. The basis for this switch is a specifically synthesized molecule with special properties. This is an important step towards realising fundamental ideas of molecular electroni

New technologies for astronomical researchThe "Novel Astronomical Instrumentation through Photonic Reformatting" (NAIR) project is being funded by the DFG within the "New Instrumentation for Research" call for proposals. The project is being supported by the Königstuhl State Observatory of the Centre for Astronomy of Heidelberg University, the Institute of Physics I of the University of Cologne, and the Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics

The transition from carbon energy sources to the bioeconomyThe transition from fossil-based raw materials to renewables has already begun, and tomorrow's bioeconomy is being created today. As part of its Bioeconomy Transformation spearhead programme, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has developed technologies suitable for application in new kinds of value chains; in these, the value created by Finland's agro and forest biomass is efficiently explo

New way to tune electronic energy levels may lead to valleytronic devicesFaster, more efficient data storage and computer logic systems could be on the horizon thanks to a new way of tuning electronic energy levels in two-dimensional films of crystal, discovered by researchers at MIT.

World's first test site for autonomous vehicles opensNorway's Trondheim Fjord will be the world's first technological playground for pilotless vehicles that move below, on and above the water's surface.

Medical Lore in Modern Pediatric PracticeExamples of modern medical lore that are passed down from doctor to doctor are commonplace in pediatric medicine and share similar features with the most egregious examples of medical pseudoscience

Translucent helmeted cockroach looks like an alien with a haloA new species of cockroach has been found in a lava cave in Vietnam, and has strange behaviours to match its bizarre appearance

Discovery of tiny moon completes the set for worlds past NeptuneThe third-largest dwarf planet has a small satellite, meaning every object bigger than 1000 kilometres across in the outer solar system has a moon of its own

Why overzealous breastfeeding advice can be bad for babiesAn excessive focus on breastfeeding at all costs in the first few days after birth may be harming babies when their mums can’t make enough milk

Sneaky beetles evolved disguise to look like ants, then eat themAt least a dozen species of rove beetles have independently evolved almost identical disguises to dupe their army ant prey into accepting them as one of their own

Obamacare’s replacement a giant step backwards for US healthcareA Republican overhaul of health reforms pledged by Donald Trump will turn out to be a big blow for the well-being of millions of Americans, warns Laudan Aron

EPA boss says carbon dioxide not primary cause of climate changeThe statement from Scott Pruitt, the new head of the Environmental Protection Agency, contradicts all the scientific evidence

NASA’s new budget is big on other worlds but ignores our ownThe NASA Transition and Authorization Act instructs the space agency to send humans to Mars, robots to Europa and look for life - but not to study Earth

Babies in prams are exposed to high levels of air pollutionAir pollution has been linked to asthma and pneumonia in children. Now a study has found prams are exposed to high pollution near junctions and bus stops

Never-before-seen gatherings of hundreds of humpback whalesThe marine giants are gathering to feed in super-groups of 200, and no one knows why. It could be their natural behaviour when populations are at normal levels

SpaceX follows Jules Verne – with one exceptionJules Verne predicted many technical features of the Apollo moon missions – did he’s get the politics of SpaceX’s moonshot right too?

Solution: ‘Taming Quantum Weirdness’ In last month’s Insights column, we explored a puzzle that is a simple analogue of one of the most astonishing results of quantum mechanics — Bell’s theorem. Bell showed that if quantum mechanical predictions are correct, then we have to give up one of three reasonable assumptions about the world. In a recent Quanta article Natalie Wolchover explains how: … when two particles interact, they can b

Brian Wilson: A Cork on the Ocean. The rise and fall of the Beach Boys leader shows how crucial the brain's executive function is to creativity.

Researchers take big step forward in nanotech-based drugsNew research takes a step forward in the understanding of nanoparticles and how they can best be used to deliver drugs.

Additional Arctic weather data raises forecast accuracy of cold snaps in JapanIncreased observation of meteorological conditions in the Arctic's upper atmosphere from land-based weather stations and a sea-going research vessels improves the accuracy of cold wave forecasts for Japan and North America's East Coast.

Massive drop in mortality from breast cancerThe rate of mortality from breast cancer has fallen by one third over the last 30 years. This is due to improvements in early detection, the refinement of treatment concepts and the development of new ones. Today, an important issue for breast cancer experts is also how they can improve the quality of life of their patients.

Environmental researchers are developing new biosensors for testing waterBiologists are part of an interdisciplinary team which has developed novel biosensors that enable pharmaceutical products to be detected more effectively in water. These sensors can measure two types of pharmaceutical substances – beta-blockers and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) – in real-time and in low concentrations.

Physics: To buckle or not to buckleMagnetic balls provide exciting avenues for exploring many fundamental phenomena in physics. They can be assembled by hand into chains and more complex structures and used to model the properties of unstretchable materials that, like paper, crumple under certain loading conditions.

Children’s daily life highly regulated: US and Swedish differencesChildren in Sweden and the US experience their daily life as highly structured and regulated. But while US children state that homework and long schooldays are what makes everyday life difficult, Swedish children point to the continuous nagging and stress that occur in relation to daily routines.

Studying magnetic space explosions with NASA missionsMagnetic explosions happen constantly all across the universe, and new results with NASA's ARTEMIS mission help explain how near-Earth explosions convert energy into heat and propel particles toward Earth.

Surprise: Transport proteins evolved long before their compounds emergedScientists bridge an important gap that changes our understanding of the evolution of plant transport proteins.

Asthmatics less able to fight off fluPeople with asthma are likely to have worse symptoms when they get the flu because they have weaker immune systems, new research has shown.

The prototype of a chemical computer detects a sphereChemical computers are becoming ever more of a reality. It turns out that after an appropriate teaching procedure even a relatively simple chemical system can perform non-trivial operations. In their most recent computer simulations researchers have shown that correctly programmed chemical matrices of oscillating droplets can recognize the shape of a sphere with great accuracy.

'Blurred times' in a quantum worldWhen measuring time, we normally assume that clocks do not affect space and time, and that time can be measured with infinite accuracy at nearby points in space. Combining quantum mechanics and Einstein's theory of general relativity theoretical physicists have demonstrated a fundamental limitation for our ability to measure time. The more precise a given clock is, the more it 'blurs' the flow of

Neuroscientists pinpoint key gene controlling tumor growth in brain cancersInvestigators have identified a stem cell-regulating gene that affects tumor growth in patients with brain cancer and can strongly influence survival rates of patients. The findings could move physicians closer to their goal of better predicting the prognosis of patients with brain tumors and developing more personalized treatments for them.

Researcher calls on the scientific community to defend individuals with disabilitiesThe potential repeal of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) threatens to eliminate critical mental and behavioral health services for people living with autism and other disabilities.

Beyond a reasonable doubt? Study reveals how eyewitness testimonies go wrongEyewitnesses testimonies are extremely compelling forms of evidence. But, it's not foolproof -- just ask the 242 people mistakenly identified by eyewitnesses who served years in prison for crimes they did not commit until they were exonerated thanks to the introduction of DNA testing. A study gives new meaning to the notion of 'guilt by association' and shows how memory in humans as well as police

Nurses central to getting diabetes care off to a better startGiving primary health care nurses a greater role in managing Type 2 Diabetes can significantly reduce delays in starting insulin treatment, a team of researchers has found.

Therapeutic target for diabetes-related blindnessSpecific cells in the retina trigger inflammation and vision impairment associated with diabetes, according to new research.

Long-term results of Gleevec® publishedResults from a nearly 11-year follow-up study, that showed an estimated overall survival rate of 83.3 percent, have now been published by investigators. According to the National Cancer Institute, prior to Gleevec's 2001 FDA approval, fewer than one in three CML patients survived five years past diagnosis.

How your neighborhood may impact your healthA researcher analyzed how four common neighborhood designs influence residents' physical activity and well-being. Residents of traditional neighborhoods walk the most, and residents of suburban neighborhoods report the highest levels of mental well-being.

Low gluten diets linked to higher risk of type 2 diabetesDiets higher in gluten were associated with a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Study participants who ate less gluten tended to eat less cereal fiber, a known protective factor for developing type 2 diabetes.

Discovery of widespread platinum may help solve Clovis people mysteryNo one knows for certain why the Clovis people and iconic beasts -- mastodon, mammoth and saber-toothed tiger -- living some 12,800 years ago suddenly disappeared. However, a discovery of widespread platinum at archaeological sites across the US has provided an important clue in solving this enduring mystery.

Ammonia's surprising role in cardiovascular health tracked in mice, human cellsCoronary artery disease is caused by plaque buildup in the vessels that deliver blood to the heart. Narrowed or blocked coronary arteries can result in a heart attack or sudden cardiac death. A study has now revealed that ammonia plays an important role in maintaining cardiovascular health. Researchers say that non-toxic amounts of the gas could help prevent coronary artery disease.

Convergent con artists: How rove beetles keep evolving into army ant parasitesMarauding across the forest floor, aggressive army ant colonies harbor hidden enemies in their ranks -- parasitic beetles. Through dramatic changes in body shape, behavior, and pheromone chemistry, the beetles gain their hosts' acceptance, so they can feast on their brood. These beetles arose at least a dozen separate times from non-ant-like ancestors. This discovery provides evidence that evoluti

Conformity is not a universal indicator of intelligence in childrenBecause innovation is part of the American culture, adults in the United States may be less likely to associate children's conformity with intelligence than adults from other populations, according to research from developmental psychologists.

Optimized sensors to study learning and memoryScientists are working to understand how molecules send messages throughout the neuron, constantly working to develop high-resolution imaging techniques to visualize the activity and location of the molecules involved in the process. This team has developed new molecular biosensors, which helped them to visualize the activity of two signaling proteins crucial to synaptic plasticity. The results re

The intestine has a reservoir of stem cells that are resistant to chemotherapyResearchers have discovered a new group of intestinal stem cells with very different characteristics to those of the abundant and active stem cells already known in this organ. This new group of stem cells is quiescent, that is to say, the cells do not proliferate and are apparently dormant.

Research may provide solutions for the future treatment of diabetesResearchers found that feeding resveratrol to obese mice over a period of 6 weeks altered the makeup of the bacteria in their intestines, improving glucose tolerance. A second experiment, involving fecal transplant from resveratrol fed mice to obese mice with insulin resistance, led to much more dramatic and rapid effects.

Hubble dates black hole's last big mealNASA's Hubble Space Telescope has found that the black hole at the center of our Milky Way galaxy ate its last big meal about 6 million years ago, when it consumed a large clump of infalling gas. After the meal, the engorged black hole burped out a colossal bubble of gas weighing the equivalent of millions of suns, which now billows above and below our galaxy's center.

Flame retardant chemicals may affect social behavior in young childrenSome chemicals added to furniture, electronics and numerous other goods to prevent fires may have unintended developmental consequences for young children, according to a pilot study.

Why guillemot chicks leap from the nest before they can flyBefore they have the wing span to actually permit them to fly, young guillemots (also known as murres) leap hundreds of meters off towering cliffs and flutter down towards the sea, guided by their fathers. Scientists have long wondered why these tiny chicks make this remarkable leap, hoping to avoid the rocks below them, in what seems an unlikely survival strategy for a species

How big brains evolved could be revealed by new mathematical modelA new mathematical model could help clarify what drove the evolution of large brains in humans and other animals, according to a study.

Unhealthy diets linked to more than 400,000 cardiovascular deathsEating a diet lacking in healthy foods and/or high in unhealthy foods was estimated to contribute to more than 400,000 deaths from heart and blood vessel diseases in the United States in 2015. Eating more nuts, vegetables, and whole grains, and less salt and trans fats, could save tens of thousands of lives in the US each year.

First global maps of volcanic emissions use NASA satellite dataA number of volcanoes around the world continuously exhale water vapor laced with heavy metals, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide, among many other gases. Of these, sulfur dioxide is the easiest to detect from space.

Keeping liquids off the wallOn Earth, liquid flows downhill thanks to gravity. Creating an effective liquid fuel tank involves little more than putting a hole at the bottom of a container. That won't work in space, though. In microgravity, with no gravity to force liquids to the bottom of a container, they cling to its surfaces instead. The Slosh Coating investigation tests using a liquid-repellant coating inside a container

Brain is ten times more active than previously measuredA new study could change scientists' understanding of how the brain works -- and could lead to new approaches for treating neurological disorders and for developing computers that 'think' more like humans.

Gene found to cause sudden death in young peopleA new gene that can lead to sudden death among young people and athletes has now been identified by an international team of researchers. The gene, called CDH2, causes arrhythmogenic right ventricle cardiomyopathy (ARVC), which is a genetic disorder that predisposes patients to cardiac arrest and is a major cause of unexpected death in seemingly healthy young people.

Poor sleep in early childhood may lead to cognitive, behavioral problems in later yearsA new study finds that children ages 3 to 7 who don't get enough sleep are more likely to have problems with attention, emotional control and peer relationships in mid-childhood.

The hazards of English spellingA new study of English spelling practices demonstrates that the way we spell words is much more orderly and self-organizing than previously thought.

Patients more likely to get flu shots when doctors make appointmentsDoctors who take a proactive stance and schedule flu shots for patients can dramatically increase vaccination rates, new research has found.

First public data released by hyper suprime-cam Subaru Strategic ProgramThe first massive data set of a 'cosmic census' has been released using the largest digital camera on the Subaru Telescope. With its beautiful images now available for the public at large, figuring out the fate of the Universe has come one step closer.

Researchers discovered fungus gnat Paradise in Peruvian AmazoniaResearchers have discovered and identified 16 new fungus gnat species in the Amazonia. The diverse gnat species maintain exceptionally rich parasitoid wasp species, which shows the importance of interdependence between rain forest species.

Stressed seabird parents think only of themselvesStress is a factor not only in the best human families; it also appears among animals. Scientists gave parent and offspring birds a hormone pellet to increase their "stress levels", with the result that stressed offspring not only intensified their begging but also received more food than "relaxed" chicks. Nevertheless, increased begging was not the determining factor of the parent-offspring inter

Measurements by school pupils paved way for key research findings on lakes and global warmingWith their measurements and samples, nearly 3,500 schoolchildren have assisted a research study on lakes and global warming. The results show that water temperatures generally remain low despite the air becoming warmer. This helps to curb the emission of greenhouse gases.

Gastrointestinal cancer: Physical exercise helps during chemoWalking or jogging helps patients with advanced gastrointestinal cancer to cope better with the side effects of chemotherapy, shows new research.

Brian Wilson: A Cork on the OceanThe rise and fall of the Beach Boys leader shows how crucial the brain's executive function is to creativitycom

EPA Chief Pruitt Refuses to Link CO2 and Global WanringScott Pruitt cites a need to “continue the review and analysis” despite strong pushback from scientistscom

Five of the Best-Designed Products Ever — And What Made Them GreatDesign experts explain why things such as the paper clip and a particular phone fit human use so wellcom

Full Genome Sequencing for Newborns Raises QuestionsTesting every newborn for a raft of known genetic risks is technologically feasible. Some worry the results could do more harm than goodcom

How Old Observations Are Building Hubble's LegacyData from the space telescope will yield discoveries long after the instrument is kaputcom

Living in an Imaginary WorldDaydreaming can help solve problems, trigger creativity, and inspire great works of art and science. When it becomes compulsive, however, the consequences can be direcom

Simple Blood Tests for Rapid Concussion DiagnosisPhysicians need more than the question: “How many fingers am I holding up?”com

Trump's Order May Foul U.S. Drinking Water SupplyNarrowing the Clean Water Rule could increase pollution in critical waterscom

Scrutiny Intensifies on the Warrantless Collection of Americans’ CommunicationsCivil Liberties advocates call for more transparency around a controversial foreign surveillance law that Congress must decide whether to reauthorize this year.

These Toaster-Oven-Size Radios Will Help Bring 5G to LifeWithin a few years, 5G networks could turbocharge your smartphone. But can they pass the tests cooked up by engineers at an office park in New Jersey?

Synthetic Spider Silk for Sale in a $314 NecktieCan the biological super material live up to its hype?

The Download, Mar 9, 2017: Atomic Data Bits, Blockchain Health Records, and Vegetable TechThe most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.

DeepMind’s New Blockchain-Style System Will Track Health-Care RecordsBy logging how every piece of patient data is used, the company hopes to leave behind an indelible audit trail.

DeepMind’s New Blockchain-Style System Will Track Healthcare RecordsBy logging how every piece of patient data is used, the company hopes to leave behind an indelible audit trail.

Robotic Chefs Are Getting Better—If You Like Fast FoodMachines are increasingly able to produce food you may actually be willing to eat.

The Download, Mar 10, 2017: CRISPR Viable Embryo Test, WikiLeaks’ Hollow Offer, and Safer Drone CrashesThe most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.

Facebook deler din færden med firmaer, du aldrig har hørt om Emner It-sikkerhed https://www.version2.dk/artikel/facebook-deler-din-faerden-med-firmaer-du-aldrig-har-hoert-1074280 Amerikanske forskere har bevist, at flere populære mobil-apps deler personlige oplysninger med stribevis af eksterne parter. Området er helt ude af kontrol, konkluderer privatlivsekspert.

Fagblad sender webcam-klistermærker til 18.000 journalister og mediefolk https://www.version2.dk/artikel/fagblad-sender-webcam-klistermaerker-18000-journalister-mediefolk-1074353 Digital sikkerhed bliver ikke taget alvorlig nok i mediebranchen, siger Journalistens digitale redaktør.

Forskere vil give os kontrollen over privatlivet tilbage Emner It-sikkerhed https://www.version2.dk/artikel/forskere-vil-give-os-kontrollen-privatlivet-tilbage-1074281 Folk er ikke ligeglade med, at it-giganter og annoncenetværk kortlægger deres færden, men kan intet gøre. Nu håber amerikanske forskere at udvikle værktøjer til at stoppe spredningen af vores persondata.

Google polstrer Google Drive til virksomheder med machine intelligence https://www.version2.dk/artikel/google-bolstrer-google-drive-virksomheder-med-machine-learning-1074319 Google Drive bliver bedre til at håndtere sensitive virksomheds-data, siger it-kæmpen.

Jurist: Facebooks dataspredning er fuldt lovlig Emner It-sikkerhed https://www.version2.dk/artikel/jurist-grotesk-facebooks-dataspredning-fuldt-lovlig-1074283 Et generelt samtykke til at indsamle og videresende data er tilstrækkeligt til at høste data til at kortlægge brugernes liv, konstaterer jura-forsker.

Mega-svipser: CPR-numre og skatteoplysninger frit fremme på Skats hjemmeside https://www.version2.dk/artikel/mega-svipser-cpr-numre-skatteoplysninger-frit-tilgaengelige-paa-skats-hjemmeside-1074352 Skatteoplysninger og CPR-numre har været frit tilgængelige via Skats hjemmeside som følge af en fejl.

Politiet om Yousee-nedbrud: Intet tyder på 'destruktivt cyberangreb' https://www.version2.dk/artikel/politi-saakaldt-destruktivt-cyberangreb-yousee-nedbrud-intet-tyder-paa-1074276 Politiet mener ikke, Yousee-nedbrud skyldes 'destruktivt cyberangreb', som Forsvarets Efterretningstjeneste ellers har indikeret.

Airbus Swears Its Pod/Car/Drone Is a Serious Idea Definitely The "Pop.Up" concept is a pod that can drive on wheels or fly under propellers..

America Gets a D Plus for Infrastructure, and a Big Bill to Fix it It'll take more than $1 trillion to fix America's infrastructure.

Psst, Silicon Valley. WikiLeaks Wants to Help You Fight the CIA The big question is if and when Julian Assange follows through on his latest blockbuster promise. .

What Happens When Desk Jockeys Go to Military Boot Camp Zero Day PT bootcamp gives bank tellers and loan officers the chance to sweat and suffer.

Hey, Coastal Elites: Don’t Dis ‘Flyover Country’—Fund It Steve Case travels the US urging tech's elite to look beyond their coastal enclaves. Now he wants to persuade POTUS that startups will save the economy.

Intellipedia Is Wikipedia for Spies, But Could Have Been So Much More Yes, the intelligence community crowdsources, too.

Mesmerizing Map Renames LA Streets After Your Favorite Films Film Map is a street map of Los Angeles labeled with the titles of more than 900 films..

A New Chip Makes Voice Control More Efficient, Less Creepy Voice assistants suck down a lot of battery power. MIT found a way of making them much thriftier

Don’t Wear a Fitbit Just Because Your Partner Says So It actually could drive a wedge between you

Nike’s Controversial New Shoes Made Me Run Faster My exclusive run in the Nike Zoom Vaporfly 4% made me feel like I was on wheels, not legs

The Creeping, Quiet Gaslighting of the EPA Legislation introduced in the House of Representatives appear to make the EPA more transparent and its science more relevant to you. They don't

A Portable Panic Button for Immigrants Swept Up in Raids Your daily life doesn't disappear just because ICE has detained you in a raid. A new app lets you get the word out when every second matters

Remastering the One Beatles Live Album Finally Made It Great The only multi-track recording of the Fab Four's mid-'60s Hollywood Bowl shows is marred by screaming fans. James Clarke made it sound better than ever

Review: Zepp Baseball We tested Zepp's swing-analyzing gadget on a Little League team

Travis Kalanick Doesn’t Need a New COO. He Needs a New CEO Uber's problem right now isn't operations. It's a culture that comes from the top

Upending the Space Biz With Satellites for You and You and You Most of the time, if you want to send a serious satellite to space, you commission a one-off instrument. But this company is creating a universal prototype

Vikings Stadium: Reflector of Light, Murderer of Birds The glassy stadium could be the deadliest building in the Twin Cities area
kel/gratis-data-rummet-faa-hjaelp-at-finde-dem-195229|Gratis data fra rummet: Få hjælp til at finde dem]]Den danske rumstrategi lægger op til omfattende udnyttelse af data fra rummet, og nu står eksperter klar til at hjælpe.Kartofler kan nok sagtens gro på MarsKartofler reagerer positivt på at blive dyrket i Mars-lignende forhold. Opdagelsen kan også være en gevinst for os her på kloden med udsigt til mere ekstreme klimatiske forhold.København vil genanvende endnu mere plastaffaldFredag indvier Københavns Kommune et nyt testanlæg, der skal knække koden for, hvordan man bedst genanvender plast. Fra 1. maj får københavnerne derfor lov at smide blød plast i plast-containeren.Kronik: Biomasse er ikke endestationen for fjernvarme Biomasse FjernvarmeLeder: Ikke engang guld kan vi finde ud af at genanvende Metaller RåvarerSpørg Scientariet: Hvorfor har mennesket ikke øjnene på siden af hovedet?En læser undrer sig over, hvorfor mange pattedyr har øjnene på siden af hovedet, mens vi ikke har. Det svarer zoolog på.Vestager godkender nye russiske reaktorer på ungarsk A-kraftværkEfter EU-godkendelse bygger den russiske atomkraftleverandør Rosatom nu to nye reaktorer i Ungarn. Greenpeace er bekymret, fordi den ungarske regering har stækket landets uafhængige atomkrafttilsyn, mens andre frygter øget russisk indflydelse i EU.Sådan ser skaderne på IC4 udIkke mindre end 12 gange siden 2011 har hydraulikpumpen i IC4-togets motor revet sig løs. I de sidste to tilfælde er pumpen faldet igennem togets bundplade, så plade og motordele er faldet på skinnerne. Ing.dk har været på besøg på DSB Klargøringscenter i Kastrup og set nærmere på skaderne.The Athlete in Your BrainHow your brain may reflect your skill as an athlete.Airbnb valued at $31 billion in new funding roundAirbnb raised more than a billion dollars in a fresh funding round that valued the home-sharing startup at $31 billion, a source close to the company told AFP Thursday.America will meet its climate goals: BloombergThe United States will meet its climate agreement goals, UN special envoy for climate change Michael Bloomberg said in Paris on Thursday.Archeologists in Egypt discover massive statue in Cairo slumArcheologists in Egypt discovered a massive statue in a Cairo slum that may be of pharaoh Ramses II, one of the country's most famous ancient rulers.Artificial intelligence and robots to make offshore windfarms safer and cheaperThe University of Manchester is leading a consortium to investigate advanced technologies, including robotics and artificial intelligence, for the operation and maintenance of offshore windfarms.Assange says leaks show CIA's 'devastating incompetence'WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange on Thursday accused the CIA of "devastating incompetence" for failing to protect its hacking secrets and said he would work with tech companies to develop fixes for them.Australia sees second year of Barrier Reef bleachingAustralia's Great Barrier Reef is experiencing an unprecedented second straight year of mass coral bleaching, scientists said Friday, warning many species would struggle to fully recover.Baidu CEO defends state support of Chinese firmsState support for private firms is crucial in China's market, the head of the mainland's online search giant Baidu said Thursday, following complaints from European businesses that Beijing-backed firms are pushing out foreign competitors.How big brains evolved could be revealed by new mathematical modelA new mathematical model could help clarify what drove the evolution of large brains in humans and other animals, according to a study published in PLOS Computational Biology.Could Bill Gates' plan to tax robots really lead to a brighter future for all?Bill Gates has stated in an interview that robots who take human jobs should pay taxes. This has some obvious attractions. Not only, as Gates says, will we be able to spend the money to finance jobs for which humans are particularly suited, such as caring for children or the elderly, but robots are also unlikely to complain about tax levels, they don't use services financed by tax revenue such asBiodegradable packages will keep your food freshKTU researchers are creating biodegradable food packaging materials, which, in addition, will also keep food fresh for longer. This innovation would solve two problems at once: assist in cutting down packaging waste and in reducing the number of food-borne illnesses.Biology team makes breakthrough in synthetic yeast projectLed by Tianjin University Professor Ying-Jin Yuan, TJU's synthetic biology team has completed the synthesis of redesigned yeast chromosomes synV and synX with the two studies published in Science on March 10, 2017.Final biomedical trial on captive chimpanzees is first oral Ebola vaccine for saving wild apesThe results from the final biomedical research trial on captive chimpanzees for the foreseeable future have been published today in the journal Scientific Reports.New 'biomimetic' glue shows high-strength bonding under waterAn adhesive that works under water and is modeled after those created by shellfish to stick to surfaces is stronger than many commercial glues created for the purpose.Bird flu cases revive fear of repeat of major 2015 outbreakThe detection of a highly pathogenic strain of bird flu at a Tennessee chicken farm has Midwest poultry farmers tightening procedures in an attempt to prevent an outbreak like the one in 2015 that required the destruction of millions of birds and cost at least $3 billion.'Blurred times' in a quantum worldWhen measuring time, we normally assume that clocks do not affect space and time, and that time can be measured with infinite accuracy at nearby points in space. However, combining quantum mechanics and Einstein's theory of general relativity theoretical physicists from the University of Vienna and the Austrian Academy of Sciences have demonstrated a fundamental limitation for our ability to measuYour brain is unique – here's how it could be used as the ultimate security passwordBiometrics – technology that can recognise individuals based on physical and behavioural traits such as their faces, voices or fingerprints – are becoming increasingly important to combat financial fraud and security threats. This is because traditional approaches, such as those based on PIN numbers or passwords, are proving too easily compromised. For example, Barclays has introduced TouchID, wheBT Group agrees to separate broadband unitBritish telecoms giant BT Group has agreed to legally separate its broadband unit Openreach to remedy concerns over competition in the sector, the company announced Friday.To buckle or not to buckleMagnetic balls provide exciting avenues for exploring many fundamental phenomena in physics. They can be assembled by hand into chains and more complex structures and used to model the properties of unstretchable materials that, like paper, crumple under certain loading conditions.Carbon-based approaches for saving rainforests should include biodiversity studiesConservationists working to safeguard tropical forests often assume that old growth forests containing great stores of carbon also hold high biodiversity, but a new study finds that the relationship may not be as strong as once thought, according to a group of researchers with contributions from WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) and other organizations.Research chemists develop lighter, field repairable transparent armorResearch chemists at U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) have developed and patented a transparent thermoplastic elastomer armor to reduce weight, inherent in most bullet-resistant glass, while maintaining superior ballistic properties.Chemists can rapidly purify wastewater with sunlightChemists have found a way to use sunlight to purify wastewater rapidly and cheaply, and to make self-cleaning materials for buildings.Report: China developing advanced lunar mission spaceshipChina is developing an advanced new spaceship capable of both flying in low-Earth orbit and landing on the moon, according to state media, in another bold step for a space program that equaled the U.S. in number of rocket launches last year.China's Didi launches Silicon Valley research hubChinese ridesharing leader Didi Chuxing has opened a Silicon Valley research hub, where it will join the race with other tech companies for autonomous driving.Will China take the green mantle from the U.S.?In the face of Donald Trump's campaign promise to pull the United States out of the Paris climate accord, China's President Xi Jinping told the U.N. in January, "The Paris agreement is a milestone in the history of climate governance…China will continue to take steps to tackle climate change and fully honor its obligations." Will China usurp the United States as the global leader in combating climClimate change puts California's snowpack in jeopardy in future droughtsSkiing in July? It could happen this year, but California's days of bountiful snow are numbered.Detailed consumption advisories would better serve women across USAmong women of childbearing age in the U.S., fish consumption has increased in recent years while blood mercury concentrations have decreased, suggesting improved health for women and their babies, a new study shows.Convergent con artists: How rove beetles keep evolving into army ant parasitesMarauding across the tropical forest floor, aggressive army ant colonies harbor hidden enemies within their ranks. The impostors look and smell like army ants, march with the ants, and even groom the ants. But far from being altruistic nest-mates, these creatures are parasitic beetles, engaged in a game of deception. Through dramatic changes in body shape, behavior, and pheromone chemistry, the beCrape myrtle bark scale study reveals tree treatments to fight pestThe second year of survey data tracking crape myrtle bark scale has provided researchers information they believe will help mitigate the pest's effect on trees, said a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service expert.Breeding crops today for an uncertain tomorrowVariable weather is creating extreme challenges for crop breeding in California. How do you develop crops that will thrive under certain conditions when you can no longer predict what those conditions will be?Cross-species jumps may play unexpectedly big role in virus evolutionOn occasion, a virus may jump from one host species to another and adapt to the new host. Such cross-species transmission happens more often than expected, according to new research published in PLOS Pathogens, and it may play a much bigger role in virus evolution than previously thought.Dark matter detection receives 10-ton upgradeIn an abandoned gold mine one mile beneath Lead, South Dakota, the cosmos quiets down enough to potentially hear the faint whispers of the universe's most elusive material—dark matter.Dawkins' fabled cooperative gene discovered in microbesGeneticists from the Universities of Manchester and Bath are celebrating the discovery of the elusive 'greenbeard gene' that helps explain why organisms are more likely to cooperate with some individuals than othersImproving defence against earthquakes and tsunamisA pioneering new computer model has been developed to simulate the whole chain of hazard events triggered by offshore mega subduction earthquakes, by a team involving UCL and Bristol engineers.Digital publishing pays off for Axel SpringerGerman media group Axel Springer said Thursday its digital publishing empire would bring further increases in sales and profits in 2017, after meeting its forecasts last year.How disaster relief efforts could be improved with game theoryThe number of disasters has doubled globally since the 1980s, with the damage and losses estimated at an average US$100 billion a year since the new millennium, and the number of people affected also growing.Why the discovery of a bevy of quasars will boost efforts to understand galaxies' originsLate last year, an international team including researchers from the Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics (KIAA) at Peking University announced the discovery of more than 60 extremely distant quasars, nearly doubling the number known to science - and thus providing dozens of new opportunities to look deep into our universe's history.Discovery of widespread platinum may help solve Clovis people mysteryNo one knows for certain why the Clovis people and iconic beasts—mastodon, mammoth and saber-toothed tiger - living some 12,800 years ago suddenly disappeared. However, a discovery of widespread platinum at archaeological sites across the United States by three University of South Carolina archaeologists has provided an important clue in solving this enduring mystery.Diversity improves problem-solving success: Just ask songbirdsHumans seeking to improve their problem-solving and survival skills can learn a thing or two from an unlikely source—songbirds.Dutch law enforcers access millions of encrypted messagesDutch police and prosecutors investigating underworld slayings say they have accessed data on computer servers containing millions of encrypted messages between members of organized crime gangs.Completion of the Eastern Asia earthquake and volcanic hazards information mapShinji Takarada and members of the Caldera Volcano Research Group, the Research Institute of Earthquake and Volcano Geology, the Geological Survey of Japan, the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, have created the "Eastern Asia Earthquake and Volcanic Hazards Information Map" summarizing past disaster information on large-scale earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and theEnvironmental researchers are developing new biosensors for testing waterBiologists from the University of Tübingen are part of an interdisciplinary team which has developed novel biosensors that enable pharmaceutical products to be detected more effectively in water. These sensors can measure two types of pharmaceutical substances – beta-blockers and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) – in real-time and in low concentrations. The research was recently publEPA chief: Carbon dioxide not primary cause of warmingThe new chief of the Environmental Protection Agency said Thursday he does not believe that carbon dioxide is a primary contributor to global warming, a statement at odds with mainstream scientific consensus and his own agency.Evidence found of ostriches in India 25,000 years agoA team of researchers with members from several institutions in India has found evidence of ostrich relatives living in India as far back as 25,000 years ago. In their paper uploaded to the open access site PLOS ONE, the group describes finding avian eggshells, their DNA analysis of them and why they believe the finding bolsters certain aspects of continental drift theory.Evolving toxicologyToxicology as a science has not evolved to keep pace with the chemical revolution, according to Thomas Hartung writing in the International Journal of Risk Assessment and Management, Hartung highlights ten problems that must be addressed if toxicology is to be made fit for purpose in the 21st Century.Researchers create first exact model for diffusion in magnesium alloysThe movement of atoms in solids controls everything.Could fast radio bursts be powering alien probes?The search for extraterrestrial intelligence has looked for many different signs of alien life, from radio broadcasts to laser flashes, without success. However, newly published research suggests that mysterious phenomena called fast radio bursts could be evidence of advanced alien technology. Specifically, these bursts might be leakage from planet-sized transmitters powering interstellar probes iFCC probing AT&T's Wednesday night 911 outageThe Federal Communications Commission says it is investigating why AT&T cellphone customers were unable to call 911 in several states on Wednesday night.Female pessimism about pay could sustain the gender pay gap Efforts to end the gender pay gap could be thwarted by the tendency for women to be pessimistic about their earning potential, shows new research from the University's School of Management.Researchers flip a magnetic memory cell with a light pulse at record speedUniversity of Minnesota electrical and computer engineering researchers have created a magnetic tunnel junction that can be switched by a pulse of light lasting one trillionth of a second—a new record. The magnetic tunnel junction is critical to information technology advances with the termination of Moore's law, a principle that has ruled the microelectronics industry for five decades.FRED database gathers root traits to advance understanding of below-ground plant ecologyOak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) scientists have released a new global, centralized database of plant root traits, or identifying characteristics, that can advance our understanding of how the hidden structure of plants belowground may interact with and relate to life aboveground.Researchers assemble five new fully artificial yeast chromosomesA global research team has built five new synthetic yeast chromosomes, meaning that 30 percent of a key organism's genetic material has now been swapped out for engineered replacements. This is one of several findings of a package of seven papers published March 10 as the cover story for Science.Researchers discovered fungus gnat paradise in Peruvian AmazoniaFinnish and Estonian researchers have discovered and identified 16 new fungus gnat species in the Amazonia. The diverse gnat species maintain exceptionally rich parasitoid wasp species, which shows the importance of interdependence between rain forest species.The future of space colonization – terraforming or space habitats?The idea of terraforming Mars – aka "Earth's Twin" – is a fascinating idea. Between melting the polar ice caps, slowly creating an atmosphere, and then engineering the environment to have foliage, rivers, and standing bodies of water, there's enough there to inspire just about anyone! But just how long would such an endeavor take, what would it cost us, and is it really an effective use of our timFirst global maps of volcanic emissions use NASA satellite dataVolcanoes erupt, they spew ash, their scarred flanks sometimes run with both lava and landslides. But only occasionally. A less dramatic but important process is continuous gas emissions from volcanoes; in other words, as they exhale. A number of volcanoes around the world continuously exhale water vapor laced with heavy metals, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide, among many otherWhy guillemot chicks leap from the nest before they can flyBefore they have the wing span to actually permit them to fly, young guillemots (also known as murres) leap hundreds of metres off towering cliffs and flutter down towards the sea, guided by their fathers. Scientists have long wondered why these tiny chicks make this remarkable leap, hoping to avoid the rocks below them, in what seems an unlikely survival strategy for a species.The hazards of English spellingA new study of English spelling practices demonstrates that the way we spell words is much more orderly and self-organizing than previously thought. The study "Self-organization in the spelling of English suffixes: The emergence of culture out of anarchy," by Kristian Berg (University of Oldenburg) and Mark Aronoff (Stony Brook University) was published in the March, 2017 issue of the scholarly joStaying a heartbeat ahead of hackersNearly a million new forms of malware are unleashed on the world every day. Manufacturers of software for smartphones, laptops and security cameras, as well as banks, retailers and government agencies, release upgrades frequently to try to protect customers and assets.High-precision calculations on supercomputers help reveal the physics of the universeOn their quest to uncover what the universe is made of, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory are harnessing the power of supercomputers to make predictions about particle interactions that are more precise than ever before.High performance of single stage sounding hybrid rockets using design informaticsSingle-stage sounding rockets are used to transport scientific equipment into, or just beyond, Earth's atmosphere to measure phenomena such as aurora. Recently, scientists have begun designing rockets with hybrid engines, which work by alternating between different phases of solid fuel and liquid or gas oxidizers. Hybrid rockets are cheaper, safer and cleaner than those with conventional solid fueHubble dates black hole's last big mealFor the supermassive black hole at the center of our Milky Way galaxy, it's been a long time between dinners. NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has found that the black hole ate its last big meal about 6 million years ago, when it consumed a large clump of infalling gas. After the meal, the engorged black hole burped out a colossal bubble of gas weighing the equivalent of millions of suns, which now bHungarian-American Nobel winner George A. Olah dies aged 89George A. Olah, the Hungarian-American winner of the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1994, has died at age 89.Floods and hurricanes predicted with social mediaSocial media can warn us about extreme weather events before they happen – such as hurricanes, storms and floods – according to new research by the University of Warwick.Image: Cassini reveals strange shape of Saturn's moon PanThese raw, unprocessed images of Saturn's tiny moon, Pan, were taken on March 7, 2017, by NASA's Cassini spacecraft. The flyby had a close-approach distance of 24,572 kilometers (15,268 miles).Image: Sentinel-3A satellite captures KamchatkaThe Sentinel-3A satellite takes us over the Sea of Okhotsk in the Russian Far East on 15 February, where clouds blend with the ice and snow beneath from our bird's-eye view.Immunotherapy trial cures Tasmanian devils of DFTDAn international study involving multiple institutions over six years has shown that immunotherapy can cure Tasmanian devils of the deadly devil facial tumour disease (DFTD).Inefficient scientific peer review process takes 4 months on averageChecking the research of colleagues is one of the most important pillars of academic practice. However, this so-called peer review has several weak points. Academics often complain about how long it takes. On the website SciRev.sc they are sharing their experiences. A publication from Jeroen Smits and Janine Huisman from Radboud University reveals several striking observations based on these experNew research finds infants are more exposed to harmful pollution on the way to school than on the way homeBabies in prams accompanying older siblings on the school run are twice as likely to be exposed to harmful air pollution in the morning than in the afternoon, a new study has found.The intestine has a reservoir of stem cells that are resistant to chemotherapyThe intestine has a high rate of cellular regeneration due to the wear and tear originated by its function degrading and absorbing nutrients and eliminating waste. The entire cell wall is renewed once a week approximately. This explains why the intestine holds a large number of stem cells in constant division, thereby producing new cell populations of the various types present in this organ.Iran and Middle East could adopt fully renewable electricity systemsIran can transition to a fully renewable electricity system and financially benefit from it by 2030. Researchers at Lappeenranta University of Technology (LUT) show that major oil-producing countries in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region could turn their abundant renewable energy resources into lucrative business opportunities in less than two decades.Novel laminated nanostructure gives steel bone-like resistance to fracturing under repeated stressMetal fatigue can lead to abrupt and sometimes catastrophic failures in parts that undergo repeated loading, or stress. It's a major cause of failure in structural components of everything from aircraft and spacecraft to bridges and powerplants. As a result, such structures are typically built with wide safety margins that add to costs.New law will force some (but not all) organisations to reveal data breachesWe live in an era of big data stored digitally, and some of that data is about you. For example, the government keeps your social security and tax data, banks keep your financial data and your phone provider stores your metadata.Study shows conservatives less likely to apologize than liberalsA team of researchers led by the University of Queensland's Matthew Hornsey has found evidence that suggests people who are conservative are less likely to apologize than are those who are more liberal. In their paper published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science, the group describes their study and offer their results and some opinions on why there may be differences betweLife on Earth is used to gravity – so what happens to our cells and tissues in space?There's one force whose effects are so deeply entrenched in our everyday lives that we probably don't think much about it at all: gravity. Gravity is the force that causes attraction between masses. It's why when you drop a pen, it falls to the ground. But because gravitational force is proportional to the mass of the object, only large objects like planets create tangible attractions. This is whyKeeping liquids off the wallOn Earth, liquid flows downhill thanks to gravity. Creating an effective liquid fuel tank involves little more than putting a hole at the bottom of a container.Studying magnetic space explosions with NASA missionsEvery day, invisible magnetic explosions are happening around Earth, on the surface of the sun and across the universe. These explosions, known as magnetic reconnection, occur when magnetic field lines cross, releasing stored magnetic energy. Such explosions are a key way that clouds of charged particles—plasmas—are accelerated throughout the universe. In Earth's magnetosphere—the giant magnetic bNew material helps record data with lightRussian physicists with their colleagues from Europe have learned to generate quasiparticles—excitons, which were fully controllable and able to record information at room temperature. These particles act as a transitional form between photons and electrons, so the researchers believe they can be used to create compact optoelectronic devices for rapid recording and processing of optical signals. TNew material raises questions about theoretical models of superconductivityThe U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has successfully created the first pure, single-crystal sample of a new iron arsenide superconductor, CaKFe4As4, and studies of this material have called into question some long-standing theoretical models of superconductivity.Maths—why many great discoveries would be impossible without itDespite the fact that mathematics is often described as the underpinning science, it is often not given enough credit when scientific discoveries are presented. But the contribution of mathematics and statistics is essential and has transformed entire areas of research – many discoveries would not have been possible without it. In fact, as a mathematician, I have contributed to scientific discoverMexico's energy reform may increase socio-environmental conflictThe opening of Mexico's energy sector to private investment, along with more critical public attitudes on the environmental and community toll of energy extraction activities, may increase the incidence and visibility of socio-environmental conflict in Mexico, according to a new paper from the Mexico Center at Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy.Molecules form gels to help cells sense and respond to stressA specific protein inside cells senses threatening changes in its environment, such as heat or starvation, and triggers an adaptive response to help the cell continue to function and grow under stressful conditions, according to a new study by scientists from the University of Chicago.Nanoparticle-polymer composites boost holographic data prospectsHolograms offer a means of increasing data storage density that may help to meet the demands of ever decreasing device sizes and increasing memory requirements. Kohta Nagaya, Eiji Hata and Yasuo Tomita at the University of Electro-Communications in Japan demonstrate that coaxial holographic digital data storage in a thiol-ene based nanoparticle-polymer composite can achieve competitive symbol erroNASA examines the soaking from ex-tropical Cyclone Enawo exiting MadagascarNASA's Aqua satellite observed Ex-Tropical Cyclone Enawo leaving Madagascar, while rainfall data from the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM satellite helped determine the amount of rainfall it brought to the country.NASA Mars orbiter tracks back-to-back regional stormsA regional dust storm currently swelling on Mars follows unusually closely on one that blossomed less than two weeks earlier and is now dissipating, as seen in daily global weather monitoring by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.NASA mission named 'Europa Clipper'NASA's upcoming mission to investigate the habitability of Jupiter's icy moon Europa now has a formal name: Europa Clipper.NASA catches newly formed Tropical Cyclone 11SJust after Tropical Cyclone 11S formed in the Southern Indian Ocean NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead gathering data using infrared light. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite looked at Tropical Cyclone 11S in infrared light. The AIRS image was taken on Mar. 8 at 20:41 UTC (3:41 p.m. EST) and showed some cloud top temperatures of thunderstorms aroundNASA's Orion spacecraft parachutes tested at U.S. Army Yuma proving groundEngineers successfully tested the parachutes for NASA's Orion spacecraft at the U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground in Arizona Wednesday, March 8. This was the second test in a series of eight that will certify Orion's parachutes for human spaceflight.New NASA radar technique finds lost lunar spacecraftFinding derelict spacecraft and space debris in Earth's orbit can be a technological challenge. Detecting these objects in orbit around Earth's moon is even more difficult. Optical telescopes are unable to search for small objects hidden in the bright glare of the moon. However, a new technological application of interplanetary radar pioneered by scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in PUsing nature to build nanomachinesFlagella are tiny rotary motors that move bacteria. A research team led by Keiichi Namba, professor at Osaka University has used electron cryomicroscopy to show that a small difference of only several amino acids can have a large impact on flagella function. The study gives new insight on the construction of synthetic nanomachines and can be read in Nature Communications.New system to process Nepal earthquake dataOn April 25, 2015, a magnitude 7.8 earthquake struck the mountainous nation of Nepal, causing widespread destruction and loss of life. Known as the Gorkha Earthquake, the event was the largest earthquake to strike the country in over 80 years. During the initial response to the quake, scientists processed data manually, developing images called interferograms one at a time to show deformations thaNewly discovered virus affects sex ratio of insect-killing waspsScientists have identified a previously unknown virus that decreases the number of female offspring of the wasps it infects, according to a PLOS Pathogens study. The virus, discovered by Gongyin Ye's group of Zhejiang University, infects one species of a specific group of wasps known as parasitoid wasps.Norwegian prosecutors demand bitcoins for drug salesThree men charged in Norway with selling drugs online have to pay back 120 bitcoins ($144,300) on top of millions in Norwegian kroner—the first time the Scandinavian country has demanded to be paid in the electronic currency, a prosecutor said Friday.Pakistan threatens to block social media over 'blasphemy'A Pakistani court has ordered the government to open an investigation into online "blasphemy", threatening to ban social media networks if they failed to censor content deemed insulting to Islam, lawyers said Thursday.Why we should not know our own passwordsSince 2009, U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents have been allowed to search electronic devices carried by citizens or noncitizens as they cross the border into the United States from other countries. More recently, Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly suggested this digital vetting should also include harvesting social media passwords. Kelly's proposal prompted legal and technology expertsOn the path toward molecular robotsScientists in Japan have developed light-powered molecular motors that repetitively bend and unbend, bringing us closer to molecular robots.Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performanceIn the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating innovative 2D layered hybrid perovskites that allow greater freedom in designing and fabricating efficient optoelectronic devices. Industrial and consumer applications could include low cost solar cells, LEDs, laser diodes, detectors, and othePetrol and jet fuel alternatives are produced by yeast cell factoriesThere have been many attempts to modify this stubborn little enzyme, but none have succeeded. Until now. With new findings from Chalmers University of Technology, the fatty acid synthase (FAS) enzyme has started to produce sustainable chemicals for biofuels. The results were recently published in the journal Nature Chemical Biology.'Photonic doping' makes class of metamaterials easier to fabricateThe field of metamaterials, an intersection of materials science, physics, nanotechnology and electrical engineering, aims to produce structures with unusual electromagnetic properties. Through the careful combination of multiple materials in a precise periodic arrangement, the resulting metamaterials exhibit properties that otherwise couldn't exist, such as a negative index of refraction. Some mePhysicists predict the existence of unusual optical compositesPhysicists from MIPT have predicted the existence of transparent composite media with unusual optical properties. Using graphics card-based simulations, scientists studied regular volume structures composed of two dielectrics with close parameters, and found that the optical properties of these structures differ from both those of natural crystals and artificial periodic composites, which are curr'Pokemon Go' or no? Fans glad Niantic addressing complaintsFew games have enjoyed both the meteoric rise—and subsequent fall—in popularity as "Pokemon Go."Potential approach to how radioactive elements could be 'fished out' of nuclear wasteManchester scientists have revealed how arsenic molecules might be used to 'fish out' the most toxic elements from radioactive nuclear waste - a breakthrough that could make the decommissioning industry even safer and more effective.Transport proteins evolved long before their compounds emergedDanish scientists from the DynaMo Center, University of Copenhagen, bridge an important gap that changes our understanding of the evolution of plant transport proteins.Rabbits' detached retina 'glued' with new hydrogelA newly developed elastic gel administered in liquid form and shown to turn jellylike within minutes after injection into rabbits' eyes to replace the clear gelatinous fluid inside their eyeballs, may help pave the way for new eye surgery techniques, says an international team of researchers led by Japanese scientists.System provides readers with detailed summaries of online discussionsFrom Reddit to Quora, discussion forums can be equal parts informative and daunting. We've all fallen down rabbit holes of lengthy threads that are impossible to sift through. Comments can be redundant, off-topic or even inaccurate, but all that content is ultimately still there for us to try and untangle.Relativistic effects pack a punch in high-temperature plasma collisions"The interaction of highly charged heavy ions with electrons is one of the most important atomic processes in high-temperature plasmas," explains University of Electro-Communications researcher Nobuyuki Nakamura in his recent J Phys B topical review. These high-temperature plasmas occur in a surprisingly large range of scenarios from astrophysical plasmas and solar corona, to fusion reactors and eThe remarkable hunting ability of the robber flyA small fly the size of a grain of rice could be the Top Gun of the fly world, with a remarkable ability to detect and intercept its prey mid-air, changing direction mid-flight if necessary before sweeping round for the kill.Studying remnants of Star Carr's early civilisation before it's too lateKnown as the richest and most important Mesolithic site in Great Britain, Star Carr is still holding many secrets that archaeologists are eager to reveal before it's too late. Indeed, peat desiccation, fluctuating water tables and unprecedented levels of acidity are deteriorating the site at a worrying pace.Study reveals new insights into the dining habits of toucansWhile Toucans' diets consist primarily of fruit, new research co-authored by a Virginia Commonwealth University biology major suggests the bird species' dining habits are actually more opportunistic than previously believed and include the eggs of ground-nesting birds.Safe navigation on construction sitesAutomated vehicles have to be able to reliably detect traffic signs. Previous systems, however, have had problems in understanding complex traffic management with different information about speed or the course of the lanes, as mainly occurs on construction sites. Fraunhofer researchers are developing technologies for the real-time interpretation of such signs, which they will present at the CeBITSandia creates 3-D metasurfaces with optical possibilitiesMetamaterials don't exist in nature, but their ability to make ultra-thin lenses and ultra-efficient cell phone antennas, bend light to keep satellites cooler and let photovoltaics absorb more energy mean they offer a world of possibilities.Measurements by school pupils paved way for key research findingsWith their measurements and samples, nearly 3,500 schoolchildren have assisted a research study on lakes and global warming, now published in the journal Scientific Reports. The results show that water temperatures generally remain low despite the air becoming warmer. This helps to curb the emission of greenhouse gases.Scientists effectively disrupt communication between parasites that spread diseaseProf. Shulamit Michaeli, Dean of Bar-Ilan's Mina and Everard Goodman Faculty of Life Sciences, and member of the Bar-Ilan Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials (BINA), has demonstrated how parasite migration can be controlled by creating an unfavorable environment or by damaging cell health, since parasites under stress secrete vesicles that disrupt their socially coordinated movementScientists describe a function for autophagy in germline stem-cell proliferationScientists study the germline of the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans to identify the mechanisms that control stem cell proliferation and homeostasis, as well as to advance our molecular understanding of homologous signaling pathways humans. Recently, researchers have begun to describe the function of autophagy, a cellular recycling process critical for homeostasis, in germline stem-cell proliferaScientists make microscopes from dropletsLiquid droplets are natural magnifiers. Look inside a single drop of water, and you are likely to see a reflection of the world around you, close up and distended as you'd see in a crystal ball.Sentinel-2B satellite declared fit and ready for commissioningFollowing three days of intensive work, mission control today declared the newly launched Sentinel-2B satellite fit and ready for commissioning.Smart flavored-beverage machines are persuading consumers nationwide to ditch their plastic bottlesMIT spinout Bevi believes it can cut the world's use of bottled drinks with a smart beverage machine of the same name that delivers high quality, flavored water—straight from the tap.Soils could release much more carbon than expected as climate warmsSoils could release much more CO2 than expected into the atmosphere as the climate warms, according to new research by scientists from the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab).Research improves solar cell performanceThe team at SPECIFIC Innovation and Knowledge Centre at Swansea University's College of Engineering investigated Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTS) which is based on Earth-abundant-elements, has shown great potential as an alternative to conventional Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) in solar cells. The power conversion efficiency of CZTS-based solar cells has reached 12.7%, but there is still room for improvement to competResearchers develop new solution for independent living: the 'empathetic home'TU/e will be putting the concept of the 'empathetic home' to the test. This is a home environment that 'empathizes' with the ageing resident and thus acts as or supports the voluntary care worker, for example with smart sensors embedded in the walls or floors or solutions of an ecological nature such as an 'edible wall' in the senior's living room. This will be happening in three assisted living cHow can we share solutions to complex systems problems across domains and application areas?What do power networks, transportation hubs, weather patterns, commercial organisations and swarming robots have in common?'Reading' songs and nurturing culture in the PhilippinesPreserving cultural heritage, including access to and use of ancestral lands, can be a real challenge for indigenous communities. A range of cultural memory recall and music workshops with the indigenous Ata of the Philippines aims to empower communities and validate legal claims related to the Indigenous People's Rights Act.New species of tick with woylie preference may face extinctionMurdoch University researchers have discovered a new species of Australian tick, but believe it may be facing extinction because of its strong preference for critically endangered woylies.Stressed seabird parents think only of themselvesStress is a factor not only in the best human families; it also appears among animals. To see how bird family members interact with each other in stressful situations, researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna and the University of Gdansk, Poland, studied parent-offspring interactions in a long-lived seabird, the little auk (Alle alle). The scientists gave parent and offspring birds a hormone pellet to inSuperluminous supernovaeSupernovae, the explosive deaths of massive stars, are among the most momentous events in the cosmos because they disburse into space all of the chemical elements that were produced inside their progenitor stars, including the elements essential for making planets and life. Their bright emission also enables them to be used as probes of the very distant universe. Not least, supernovae are astrophySynbio for bioremediation—fighting plastic pollutionPlastic pollution is one of the major problems of our times. Plastic is a durable material that can be moulded into solid objects of the most disparate shapes. Properties such as low cost, versatility and easy manufacturing are behind its overwhelming success. So much so that in just over a century – the first plastic, bakelite, was invented in NY in 1907- the world and, in particular, our oceansResearch team captures images of pathogens' tiny 'syringes'Salmonella and many other bacterial pathogens use a nano syringe-like device to deliver toxic proteins into target human cells. Now scientists at Yale and University of Texas Medical School-Houston have used cryo-electron tomography to reveal the molecular structure of this device, which is about 1/1000th the width of a human hair.Research team presents a molecular switch so far unmatched in its reproducibilityThe theoretical physicists Junior Professor Fabian Pauly and his postdoc Dr. Safa G. Bahoosh now succeeded in a team of experimental physicists and chemists in demonstrating a reliable and reproducible single molecule switch. The basis for this switch is a specifically synthesized molecule with special properties. This is an important step towards realising fundamental ideas of molecular electroniNew technologies for astronomical researchThe "Novel Astronomical Instrumentation through Photonic Reformatting" (NAIR) project is being funded by the DFG within the "New Instrumentation for Research" call for proposals. The project is being supported by the Königstuhl State Observatory of the Centre for Astronomy of Heidelberg University, the Institute of Physics I of the University of Cologne, and the Leibniz Institute for AstrophysicsResearchers identify a new way to promote tissue regenerationHouston Methodist researchers have identified an immune pathway that promotes the formation of a cell that can develop into new tissues and organs.The transition from carbon energy sources to the bioeconomyThe transition from fossil-based raw materials to renewables has already begun, and tomorrow's bioeconomy is being created today. As part of its Bioeconomy Transformation spearhead programme, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has developed technologies suitable for application in new kinds of value chains; in these, the value created by Finland's agro and forest biomass is efficiently exploNew way to tune electronic energy levels may lead to valleytronic devicesFaster, more efficient data storage and computer logic systems could be on the horizon thanks to a new way of tuning electronic energy levels in two-dimensional films of crystal, discovered by researchers at MIT.Unexpected oxidation state for molecular plutonium discoveredResearchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory in collaboration with the University of California - Irvine (UCI) have uncovered a significant new chemical attribute of plutonium, the identification and structural verification of the +2 oxidation state in a molecular system.The WikiLeaks CIA release—when will we learn?This week's WikiLeaks release of what is apparently a trove of Central Intelligence Agency information related to its computer hacking should surprise no one: Despite its complaints of being targeted by cyberattackers from other countries, the U.S. does a fair amount of its own hacking. Multiple federal agencies are involved, including the CIA and the National Security Agency, and even friendly naWorld's first test site for autonomous vehicles opensNorway's Trondheim Fjord will be the world's first technological playground for pilotless vehicles that move below, on and above the water's surface.Medical Lore in Modern Pediatric PracticeExamples of modern medical lore that are passed down from doctor to doctor are commonplace in pediatric medicine and share similar features with the most egregious examples of medical pseudoscienceMelatonin: What’s on the label isn’t in the bottleMelatonin is taken by millions each year. But does it work? Is it safe? And can you trust the label?First results of CRISPR gene editing of normal embryos releasedUntil now, CRISPR has only been tested in human embryos unable to develop into children. New results suggest the technique works much better on healthy embryosThat faddish gluten-free diet may be raising your diabetes riskGoing gluten-free without a diagnosis? Growing evidence of potential health harms suggests you might want to think again, says Angry Chef Anthony WarnerTranslucent helmeted cockroach looks like an alien with a haloA new species of cockroach has been found in a lava cave in Vietnam, and has strange behaviours to match its bizarre appearanceEbola vaccine promising in chimps but may never be usedA promising oral vaccine could help protect Africa’s big apes from the deadly Ebola virus, but a ban on captive ape research means it may never see the light of dayDiscovery of tiny moon completes the set for worlds past NeptuneThe third-largest dwarf planet has a small satellite, meaning every object bigger than 1000 kilometres across in the outer solar system has a moon of its ownWhy overzealous breastfeeding advice can be bad for babiesAn excessive focus on breastfeeding at all costs in the first few days after birth may be harming babies when their mums can’t make enough milkSneaky beetles evolved disguise to look like ants, then eat themAt least a dozen species of rove beetles have independently evolved almost identical disguises to dupe their army ant prey into accepting them as one of their ownObamacare’s replacement a giant step backwards for US healthcareA Republican overhaul of health reforms pledged by Donald Trump will turn out to be a big blow for the well-being of millions of Americans, warns Laudan AronFive designer chromosomes bring synthetic life a step closerAn international effort to build a carefully edited version of the yeast genome from scratch has reached a milestone by completing five more of 16 chromosomesDogs use deception to get what they want from humans (a sausage)Who needs enemies with friends like these? Human’s best friend can be sneaky and manipulative – and all for a tasty treatSpecial steel inspired by bone is more resistant to crackingGiving steel a layered nanostructure similar to that of bone makes it more resilient to metal fatigue and could lead to safer structuresEPA boss says carbon dioxide not primary cause of climate changeThe statement from Scott Pruitt, the new head of the Environmental Protection Agency, contradicts all the scientific evidenceNASA’s new budget is big on other worlds but ignores our ownThe NASA Transition and Authorization Act instructs the space agency to send humans to Mars, robots to Europa and look for life - but not to study EarthMystery brain particles may link head injuries to dementiaHead injuries cause immune cells in the brain to shed microscopic particles, which spread inflammation. This may be why head trauma is linked to dementiaBabies in prams are exposed to high levels of air pollutionAir pollution has been linked to asthma and pneumonia in children. Now a study has found prams are exposed to high pollution near junctions and bus stopsRobot that shows pain could teach doctors to recognise it betterDoctors are worse at spotting pain than laypeople, but a robot with realistic facial expressions could help them learn to better understand patientsWhat makes a good surgeon? Video analysis rates suturing skillsDoctors have varying styles for stitching up wounds. A machine-learning system tells doctors how well they’re doing to help improve their techniqueNever-before-seen gatherings of hundreds of humpback whalesThe marine giants are gathering to feed in super-groups of 200, and no one knows why. It could be their natural behaviour when populations are at normal levelsSpaceX follows Jules Verne – with one exceptionJules Verne predicted many technical features of the Apollo moon missions – did he’s get the politics of SpaceX’s moonshot right too?Solution: ‘Taming Quantum Weirdness’ In last month’s Insights column, we explored a puzzle that is a simple analogue of one of the most astonishing results of quantum mechanics — Bell’s theorem. Bell showed that if quantum mechanical predictions are correct, then we have to give up one of three reasonable assumptions about the world. In a recent Quanta article Natalie Wolchover explains how: … when two particles interact, they can bBrian Wilson: A Cork on the Ocean. The rise and fall of the Beach Boys leader shows how crucial the brain's executive function is to creativity. Researchers take big step forward in nanotech-based drugsNew research takes a step forward in the understanding of nanoparticles and how they can best be used to deliver drugs.By boosting innate immunity, researchers eradicate aggressive prostate cancer in miceCabozantinib, an FDA-approved drug for patients with certain types of thyroid or kidney cancer, was able to eradicate invasive prostate cancers in mice by causing tumor cells to secrete factors that entice neutrophils -- the first-responders of the immune system -- to infiltrate the tumor. This novel approach, utilizing the innate immune system, produced near-complete clearance of invasive prostatAdditional Arctic weather data raises forecast accuracy of cold snaps in JapanIncreased observation of meteorological conditions in the Arctic's upper atmosphere from land-based weather stations and a sea-going research vessels improves the accuracy of cold wave forecasts for Japan and North America's East Coast.Massive drop in mortality from breast cancerThe rate of mortality from breast cancer has fallen by one third over the last 30 years. This is due to improvements in early detection, the refinement of treatment concepts and the development of new ones. Today, an important issue for breast cancer experts is also how they can improve the quality of life of their patients.Environmental researchers are developing new biosensors for testing waterBiologists are part of an interdisciplinary team which has developed novel biosensors that enable pharmaceutical products to be detected more effectively in water. These sensors can measure two types of pharmaceutical substances – beta-blockers and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) – in real-time and in low concentrations.Physics: To buckle or not to buckleMagnetic balls provide exciting avenues for exploring many fundamental phenomena in physics. They can be assembled by hand into chains and more complex structures and used to model the properties of unstretchable materials that, like paper, crumple under certain loading conditions.Children’s daily life highly regulated: US and Swedish differencesChildren in Sweden and the US experience their daily life as highly structured and regulated. But while US children state that homework and long schooldays are what makes everyday life difficult, Swedish children point to the continuous nagging and stress that occur in relation to daily routines.Studying magnetic space explosions with NASA missionsMagnetic explosions happen constantly all across the universe, and new results with NASA's ARTEMIS mission help explain how near-Earth explosions convert energy into heat and propel particles toward Earth.Surprise: Transport proteins evolved long before their compounds emergedScientists bridge an important gap that changes our understanding of the evolution of plant transport proteins.Asthmatics less able to fight off fluPeople with asthma are likely to have worse symptoms when they get the flu because they have weaker immune systems, new research has shown.The prototype of a chemical computer detects a sphereChemical computers are becoming ever more of a reality. It turns out that after an appropriate teaching procedure even a relatively simple chemical system can perform non-trivial operations. In their most recent computer simulations researchers have shown that correctly programmed chemical matrices of oscillating droplets can recognize the shape of a sphere with great accuracy.'Blurred times' in a quantum worldWhen measuring time, we normally assume that clocks do not affect space and time, and that time can be measured with infinite accuracy at nearby points in space. Combining quantum mechanics and Einstein's theory of general relativity theoretical physicists have demonstrated a fundamental limitation for our ability to measure time. The more precise a given clock is, the more it 'blurs' the flow ofSingle atom memory: The world's smallest storage mediumOne bit of digital information can now be successfully stored in an individual atom. This result is a breakthrough in the miniaturization of storage media and has the potential to serve as a basis for quantum computing.Cannabis use in people with epilepsy revealed: Australian surveyThe first Australian nationwide survey on the experiences and opinions of medicinal cannabis use in people with epilepsy has revealed that 14 per cent of people with epilepsy have used cannabis products as a way to manage seizures. The study showed that of those with a history of cannabis product use, 90 per cent of adults and 71 per cent of parents of children with epilepsy reported success in maImmunotherapy trial cures Tasmanian devils of DFTDImmunotherapy can cure Tasmanian devils of the deadly devil facial tumor disease (DFTD), an international study involving multiple institutions over six years has shown.Neuroscientists pinpoint key gene controlling tumor growth in brain cancersInvestigators have identified a stem cell-regulating gene that affects tumor growth in patients with brain cancer and can strongly influence survival rates of patients. The findings could move physicians closer to their goal of better predicting the prognosis of patients with brain tumors and developing more personalized treatments for them.Researcher calls on the scientific community to defend individuals with disabilitiesThe potential repeal of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) threatens to eliminate critical mental and behavioral health services for people living with autism and other disabilities.Beyond a reasonable doubt? Study reveals how eyewitness testimonies go wrongEyewitnesses testimonies are extremely compelling forms of evidence. But, it's not foolproof -- just ask the 242 people mistakenly identified by eyewitnesses who served years in prison for crimes they did not commit until they were exonerated thanks to the introduction of DNA testing. A study gives new meaning to the notion of 'guilt by association' and shows how memory in humans as well as policeNurses central to getting diabetes care off to a better startGiving primary health care nurses a greater role in managing Type 2 Diabetes can significantly reduce delays in starting insulin treatment, a team of researchers has found.Therapeutic target for diabetes-related blindnessSpecific cells in the retina trigger inflammation and vision impairment associated with diabetes, according to new research.Long-term results of Gleevec® publishedResults from a nearly 11-year follow-up study, that showed an estimated overall survival rate of 83.3 percent, have now been published by investigators. According to the National Cancer Institute, prior to Gleevec's 2001 FDA approval, fewer than one in three CML patients survived five years past diagnosis.How your neighborhood may impact your healthA researcher analyzed how four common neighborhood designs influence residents' physical activity and well-being. Residents of traditional neighborhoods walk the most, and residents of suburban neighborhoods report the highest levels of mental well-being.Low gluten diets linked to higher risk of type 2 diabetesDiets higher in gluten were associated with a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Study participants who ate less gluten tended to eat less cereal fiber, a known protective factor for developing type 2 diabetes.Social phobia: Indication of a genetic causePeople with social anxiety avoid situations in which they are exposed to judgment by others. Those affected also lead a withdrawn life. Researchers have now found evidence for a gene that is believed to be linked to the illness. It encodes a serotonin transporter in the brain. Interestingly, this messenger suppresses feelings of anxiety and depressiveness.Unexpected link between cancer and autismResearchers have observed that a protein called SHANK prevents the spread of breast cancer cells to the surrounding tissue. The SHANK protein has been previously studied only in the central nervous system, and it is known that its absence or gene mutations are related to autism.Machine learning writes songs that elicits emotions from its listenersMusic, more than any art, is a beautiful mix of science and emotion. It follows a set of patterns almost mathematically to extract feelings from its audience. Machines that make music focus on these patterns, but give little consideration to the emotional response of their audience. Scientists have developed a new machine-learning device that detects the emotional state of its listeners to produceRabbits' detached retina 'glued' with new hydrogelA newly developed elastic gel administered in liquid form and shown to turn jellylike within minutes after injection into rabbits' eyes to replace the clear gelatinous fluid inside their eyeballs, may help pave the way for new eye surgery techniques, say scientists.Discovery of widespread platinum may help solve Clovis people mysteryNo one knows for certain why the Clovis people and iconic beasts -- mastodon, mammoth and saber-toothed tiger -- living some 12,800 years ago suddenly disappeared. However, a discovery of widespread platinum at archaeological sites across the US has provided an important clue in solving this enduring mystery.Ammonia's surprising role in cardiovascular health tracked in mice, human cellsCoronary artery disease is caused by plaque buildup in the vessels that deliver blood to the heart. Narrowed or blocked coronary arteries can result in a heart attack or sudden cardiac death. A study has now revealed that ammonia plays an important role in maintaining cardiovascular health. Researchers say that non-toxic amounts of the gas could help prevent coronary artery disease.Convergent con artists: How rove beetles keep evolving into army ant parasitesMarauding across the forest floor, aggressive army ant colonies harbor hidden enemies in their ranks -- parasitic beetles. Through dramatic changes in body shape, behavior, and pheromone chemistry, the beetles gain their hosts' acceptance, so they can feast on their brood. These beetles arose at least a dozen separate times from non-ant-like ancestors. This discovery provides evidence that evolutiHarnessing ADHD for business successThe symptoms of ADHD foster important traits associated with entrepreneurship. That conclusion was reached in a study conducted by an international team of economists, who found that entrepreneurs with ADHD embrace new experiences and demonstrate passion and persistence. Their intuitive decision making in situations involving uncertainty was seen by the researchers as a reason for reassessing exisConformity is not a universal indicator of intelligence in childrenBecause innovation is part of the American culture, adults in the United States may be less likely to associate children's conformity with intelligence than adults from other populations, according to research from developmental psychologists.Optimized sensors to study learning and memoryScientists are working to understand how molecules send messages throughout the neuron, constantly working to develop high-resolution imaging techniques to visualize the activity and location of the molecules involved in the process. This team has developed new molecular biosensors, which helped them to visualize the activity of two signaling proteins crucial to synaptic plasticity. The results reThe intestine has a reservoir of stem cells that are resistant to chemotherapyResearchers have discovered a new group of intestinal stem cells with very different characteristics to those of the abundant and active stem cells already known in this organ. This new group of stem cells is quiescent, that is to say, the cells do not proliferate and are apparently dormant.Research may provide solutions for the future treatment of diabetesResearchers found that feeding resveratrol to obese mice over a period of 6 weeks altered the makeup of the bacteria in their intestines, improving glucose tolerance. A second experiment, involving fecal transplant from resveratrol fed mice to obese mice with insulin resistance, led to much more dramatic and rapid effects.Hubble dates black hole's last big mealNASA's Hubble Space Telescope has found that the black hole at the center of our Milky Way galaxy ate its last big meal about 6 million years ago, when it consumed a large clump of infalling gas. After the meal, the engorged black hole burped out a colossal bubble of gas weighing the equivalent of millions of suns, which now billows above and below our galaxy's center.Flame retardant chemicals may affect social behavior in young childrenSome chemicals added to furniture, electronics and numerous other goods to prevent fires may have unintended developmental consequences for young children, according to a pilot study.Potential drug candidates halt prostate and breast cancer growthTwo new drug candidates have now been designed to target prostate and triple negative breast cancers. The new research demonstrates that a new class of drugs called small molecule RNA inhibitors can successfully target and kill specific types of cancer.Why guillemot chicks leap from the nest before they can flyBefore they have the wing span to actually permit them to fly, young guillemots (also known as murres) leap hundreds of meters off towering cliffs and flutter down towards the sea, guided by their fathers. Scientists have long wondered why these tiny chicks make this remarkable leap, hoping to avoid the rocks below them, in what seems an unlikely survival strategy for a speciesBrain hardwired to respond to others' itchingItching is a highly contagious behavior. When we see someone scratch, we're likely to feel itchy, too. New research shows contagious itching is hardwired in the brain.Molecules form gels to help cells sense and respond to stressA specific protein inside cells senses threatening changes in its environment, such as heat or starvation, and triggers an adaptive response to help the cell continue to function and grow under stressful conditions, according to a new study.Researchers identify a new way to promote tissue regenerationResearchers have identified an immune pathway that promotes the formation of a cell that can develop into new tissues and organs.Marijuana use associated with increased risk of stroke, heart failureUsing marijuana raises the risk of stroke and heart failure even after accounting for demographic factors, other health conditions and lifestyle risk factors such as smoking and alcohol use, according to new research.Five new synthetic yeast chromosomes assembledA global research team has built five new synthetic yeast chromosomes, meaning that 30 percent of a key organism's genetic material has now been swapped out for engineered replacements. Like computer programmers, scientists add swaths of synthetic DNA to -- or remove stretches from -- human, plant, bacterial or yeast chromosomes in hopes of averting disease, manufacturing medicines, or making foodHow big brains evolved could be revealed by new mathematical modelA new mathematical model could help clarify what drove the evolution of large brains in humans and other animals, according to a study.Unhealthy diets linked to more than 400,000 cardiovascular deathsEating a diet lacking in healthy foods and/or high in unhealthy foods was estimated to contribute to more than 400,000 deaths from heart and blood vessel diseases in the United States in 2015. Eating more nuts, vegetables, and whole grains, and less salt and trans fats, could save tens of thousands of lives in the US each year.First global maps of volcanic emissions use NASA satellite dataA number of volcanoes around the world continuously exhale water vapor laced with heavy metals, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide, among many other gases. Of these, sulfur dioxide is the easiest to detect from space.Keeping liquids off the wallOn Earth, liquid flows downhill thanks to gravity. Creating an effective liquid fuel tank involves little more than putting a hole at the bottom of a container. That won't work in space, though. In microgravity, with no gravity to force liquids to the bottom of a container, they cling to its surfaces instead. The Slosh Coating investigation tests using a liquid-repellant coating inside a containerChemical that detects plaques in Alzheimer's brains extends lifespan of roundwormsWhile many anti-aging drugs don't live up to their claim, a tightly replicated study has discovered that a chemical used to detect amyloid plaques found in the brains of those with Alzheimer's extended the lifespan of thousands of roundworms similar in molecular form, function and genetics to humans.Brain is ten times more active than previously measuredA new study could change scientists' understanding of how the brain works -- and could lead to new approaches for treating neurological disorders and for developing computers that 'think' more like humans.Gene found to cause sudden death in young peopleA new gene that can lead to sudden death among young people and athletes has now been identified by an international team of researchers. The gene, called CDH2, causes arrhythmogenic right ventricle cardiomyopathy (ARVC), which is a genetic disorder that predisposes patients to cardiac arrest and is a major cause of unexpected death in seemingly healthy young people.Poor sleep in early childhood may lead to cognitive, behavioral problems in later yearsA new study finds that children ages 3 to 7 who don't get enough sleep are more likely to have problems with attention, emotional control and peer relationships in mid-childhood.The hazards of English spellingA new study of English spelling practices demonstrates that the way we spell words is much more orderly and self-organizing than previously thought.Patients more likely to get flu shots when doctors make appointmentsDoctors who take a proactive stance and schedule flu shots for patients can dramatically increase vaccination rates, new research has found.First public data released by hyper suprime-cam Subaru Strategic ProgramThe first massive data set of a 'cosmic census' has been released using the largest digital camera on the Subaru Telescope. With its beautiful images now available for the public at large, figuring out the fate of the Universe has come one step closer.Immunology: Live and let liveIn order to maintain the microflora in the gut, the immune system must be taught to tolerate foreign bacteria. Researches have now shown how immune surveillance cells are educated to perform this task.Novel mechanism that detains mobile genes in plant genomeA team researchers has discovered a hitherto-unknown mechanism that detains transposable elements or “mobile genes” - which can move and insert into new positions in plant genomes.Researchers discovered fungus gnat Paradise in Peruvian AmazoniaResearchers have discovered and identified 16 new fungus gnat species in the Amazonia. The diverse gnat species maintain exceptionally rich parasitoid wasp species, which shows the importance of interdependence between rain forest species.Stressed seabird parents think only of themselvesStress is a factor not only in the best human families; it also appears among animals. Scientists gave parent and offspring birds a hormone pellet to increase their "stress levels", with the result that stressed offspring not only intensified their begging but also received more food than "relaxed" chicks. Nevertheless, increased begging was not the determining factor of the parent-offspring interMeasurements by school pupils paved way for key research findings on lakes and global warmingWith their measurements and samples, nearly 3,500 schoolchildren have assisted a research study on lakes and global warming. The results show that water temperatures generally remain low despite the air becoming warmer. This helps to curb the emission of greenhouse gases.Gastrointestinal cancer: Physical exercise helps during chemoWalking or jogging helps patients with advanced gastrointestinal cancer to cope better with the side effects of chemotherapy, shows new research.Brian Wilson: A Cork on the OceanThe rise and fall of the Beach Boys leader shows how crucial the brain's executive function is to creativitycomEPA Chief Pruitt Refuses to Link CO2 and Global WanringScott Pruitt cites a need to “continue the review and analysis” despite strong pushback from scientistscomFive of the Best-Designed Products Ever — And What Made Them GreatDesign experts explain why things such as the paper clip and a particular phone fit human use so wellcomFull Genome Sequencing for Newborns Raises QuestionsTesting every newborn for a raft of known genetic risks is technologically feasible. Some worry the results could do more harm than goodcomHow Old Observations Are Building Hubble's LegacyData from the space telescope will yield discoveries long after the instrument is kaputcomLiving in an Imaginary WorldDaydreaming can help solve problems, trigger creativity, and inspire great works of art and science. When it becomes compulsive, however, the consequences can be direcomSimple Blood Tests for Rapid Concussion DiagnosisPhysicians need more than the question: “How many fingers am I holding up?”comSynthetic Yeast Chromosomes Help Probe Mysteries of EvolutionTo work out how the genome evolved, bioengineers are recreating itcomTrump's Order May Foul U.S. Drinking Water SupplyNarrowing the Clean Water Rule could increase pollution in critical waterscomThis Itch Is InfectiousMany social animals start to feel itchy after watching one of their fellows scratch, and scientists now have a better understanding of why an itch can spread through a group.comHouse Republicans Would Let Employers Demand Workers' Genetic Test ResultsA controversial measure may be included in future healthcare reformcomScrutiny Intensifies on the Warrantless Collection of Americans’ CommunicationsCivil Liberties advocates call for more transparency around a controversial foreign surveillance law that Congress must decide whether to reauthorize this year.These Toaster-Oven-Size Radios Will Help Bring 5G to LifeWithin a few years, 5G networks could turbocharge your smartphone. But can they pass the tests cooked up by engineers at an office park in New Jersey?Designer Chromosomes Point to New Synthetic Life-FormsAn international effort aims to create baker’s yeast with laboratory-made DNA.Synthetic Spider Silk for Sale in a $314 NecktieCan the biological super material live up to its hype?This Entrepreneur Dares You to Hack His GadgetsThe author and activist Bunnie Huang explains how companies benefit when users modify their devices.The Download, Mar 9, 2017: Atomic Data Bits, Blockchain Health Records, and Vegetable TechThe most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.DeepMind’s New Blockchain-Style System Will Track Health-Care RecordsBy logging how every piece of patient data is used, the company hopes to leave behind an indelible audit trail.DeepMind’s New Blockchain-Style System Will Track Healthcare RecordsBy logging how every piece of patient data is used, the company hopes to leave behind an indelible audit trail.Robotic Chefs Are Getting Better—If You Like Fast FoodMachines are increasingly able to produce food you may actually be willing to eat.The Download, Mar 10, 2017: CRISPR Viable Embryo Test, WikiLeaks’ Hollow Offer, and Safer Drone CrashesThe most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.Facebook deler din færden med firmaer, du aldrig har hørt om Emner It-sikkerhed https://www.version2.dk/artikel/facebook-deler-din-faerden-med-firmaer-du-aldrig-har-hoert-1074280 Amerikanske forskere har bevist, at flere populære mobil-apps deler personlige oplysninger med stribevis af eksterne parter. Området er helt ude af kontrol, konkluderer privatlivsekspert. Fagblad sender webcam-klistermærker til 18.000 journalister og mediefolk https://www.version2.dk/artikel/fagblad-sender-webcam-klistermaerker-18000-journalister-mediefolk-1074353 Digital sikkerhed bliver ikke taget alvorlig nok i mediebranchen, siger Journalistens digitale redaktør. Forskere vil give os kontrollen over privatlivet tilbage Emner It-sikkerhed https://www.version2.dk/artikel/forskere-vil-give-os-kontrollen-privatlivet-tilbage-1074281 Folk er ikke ligeglade med, at it-giganter og annoncenetværk kortlægger deres færden, men kan intet gøre. Nu håber amerikanske forskere at udvikle værktøjer til at stoppe spredningen af vores persondata. Google polstrer Google Drive til virksomheder med machine intelligence https://www.version2.dk/artikel/google-bolstrer-google-drive-virksomheder-med-machine-learning-1074319 Google Drive bliver bedre til at håndtere sensitive virksomheds-data, siger it-kæmpen. Jurist: Facebooks dataspredning er fuldt lovlig Emner It-sikkerhed https://www.version2.dk/artikel/jurist-grotesk-facebooks-dataspredning-fuldt-lovlig-1074283 Et generelt samtykke til at indsamle og videresende data er tilstrækkeligt til at høste data til at kortlægge brugernes liv, konstaterer jura-forsker. Mega-svipser: CPR-numre og skatteoplysninger frit fremme på Skats hjemmeside https://www.version2.dk/artikel/mega-svipser-cpr-numre-skatteoplysninger-frit-tilgaengelige-paa-skats-hjemmeside-1074352 Skatteoplysninger og CPR-numre har været frit tilgængelige via Skats hjemmeside som følge af en fejl. Politiet om Yousee-nedbrud: Intet tyder på 'destruktivt cyberangreb' https://www.version2.dk/artikel/politi-saakaldt-destruktivt-cyberangreb-yousee-nedbrud-intet-tyder-paa-1074276 Politiet mener ikke, Yousee-nedbrud skyldes 'destruktivt cyberangreb', som Forsvarets Efterretningstjeneste ellers har indikeret. 11 Classic Cars to Buy Today (For Those OK With Bankruptcy) The best and shiniest of what's on offer at the big-time auction at Amelia Island this weekend. The post 11 Classic Cars to Buy Today (For Those OK With Bankruptcy) appeared first on WIRED .Airbus Swears Its Pod/Car/Drone Is a Serious Idea Definitely The "Pop.Up" concept is a pod that can drive on wheels or fly under propellers. The post Airbus Swears Its Pod/Car/Drone Is a Serious Idea Definitely appeared first on WIRED .America Gets a D Plus for Infrastructure, and a Big Bill to Fix it It'll take more than $1 trillion to fix America's infrastructure. A lot more. The post America Gets a D Plus for Infrastructure, and a Big Bill to Fix it appeared first on WIRED .Psst, Silicon Valley. WikiLeaks Wants to Help You Fight the CIA The big question is if and when Julian Assange follows through on his latest blockbuster promise. The post Psst , Silicon Valley. WikiLeaks Wants to Help You Fight the CIA appeared first on WIRED .The Fight to Legalize a Machine That Melts Flesh From Bone Yesterday Nevada's legislature held a hearing to discuss a bill that would legalize the chemical dissolution of the dead. The post The Fight to Legalize a Machine That Melts Flesh From Bone appeared first on WIRED .What Happens When Desk Jockeys Go to Military Boot Camp Zero Day PT bootcamp gives bank tellers and loan officers the chance to sweat and suffer. The post What Happens When Desk Jockeys Go to Military Boot Camp appeared first on WIRED .Hey, Coastal Elites: Don’t Dis ‘Flyover Country’—Fund It Steve Case travels the US urging tech's elite to look beyond their coastal enclaves. Now he wants to persuade POTUS that startups will save the economy. The post Hey, Coastal Elites: Don’t Dis 'Flyover Country’—Fund It appeared first on WIRED .Intellipedia Is Wikipedia for Spies, But Could Have Been So Much More Yes, the intelligence community crowdsources, too. The post Intellipedia Is Wikipedia for Spies, But Could Have Been So Much More appeared first on WIRED .Mesmerizing Map Renames LA Streets After Your Favorite Films Film Map is a street map of Los Angeles labeled with the titles of more than 900 films. The post Mesmerizing Map Renames LA Streets After Your Favorite Films appeared first on WIRED .A New Chip Makes Voice Control More Efficient, Less Creepy Voice assistants suck down a lot of battery power. MIT found a way of making them much thriftier. The post A New Chip Makes Voice Control More Efficient, Less Creepy appeared first on WIRED .Don’t Wear a Fitbit Just Because Your Partner Says So It actually could drive a wedge between you. The post Don't Wear a Fitbit Just Because Your Partner Says So appeared first on WIRED .Nike’s Controversial New Shoes Made Me Run Faster My exclusive run in the Nike Zoom Vaporfly 4% made me feel like I was on wheels, not legs. The post Nike’s Controversial New Shoes Made Me Run Faster appeared first on WIRED .The Creeping, Quiet Gaslighting of the EPA Legislation introduced in the House of Representatives appear to make the EPA more transparent and its science more relevant to you. They don't. The post The Creeping, Quiet Gaslighting of the EPA appeared first on WIRED .A Portable Panic Button for Immigrants Swept Up in Raids Your daily life doesn't disappear just because ICE has detained you in a raid. A new app lets you get the word out when every second matters. The post A Portable Panic Button for Immigrants Swept Up in Raids appeared first on WIRED .Remastering the One Beatles Live Album Finally Made It Great The only multi-track recording of the Fab Four's mid-'60s Hollywood Bowl shows is marred by screaming fans. James Clarke made it sound better than ever. The post Remastering the One Beatles Live Album Finally Made It Great appeared first on WIRED .Review: Zepp Baseball We tested Zepp's swing-analyzing gadget on a Little League team. The post Review: Zepp Baseball appeared first on WIRED .A New Lab-Built Fungus Eats Sugar and Burps Out Drugs Scientists are building the first eukaryote genome from scratch. The post A New Lab-Built Fungus Eats Sugar and Burps Out Drugs appeared first on WIRED .Travis Kalanick Doesn’t Need a New COO. He Needs a New CEO Uber's problem right now isn't operations. It's a culture that comes from the top. The post Travis Kalanick Doesn't Need a New COO. He Needs a New CEO appeared first on WIRED .Upending the Space Biz With Satellites for You and You and You Most of the time, if you want to send a serious satellite to space, you commission a one-off instrument. But this company is creating a universal prototype. The post Upending the Space Biz With Satellites for You and You and You appeared first on WIRED .Vikings Stadium: Reflector of Light, Murderer of Birds The glassy stadium could be the deadliest building in the Twin Cities area. The post Vikings Stadium: Reflector of Light, Murderer of Birds appeared first on WIRED .


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