Gizmodo

So Who Is the Mysterious Clawed Mutant Marvel Is Teasing in X-Men: Blue? Image: Marvel Comics. Art by Arthur Adams. Sadly, it’s probably not Wild Thing . Today’s Marvel solicits didn’t just give us a new look at Doctor Octopus’ return to Amazing Spider-Man . We also have one hell of a tease for something to come in one of the new X-Men comics, X-Men: Blue —one that Marvel is very much wanting you to think involves a potential return for Wolverine to the Marvel comicsv
4min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Translating the ribosome's grim roleA large number of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNA) have been found associating with the ribosome, the protein-making machinery in the cytoplasm. What the so-called 'noncoding' RNAs are doing on the ribosome, whose main job is to translate RNA into protein, has puzzled the A*STAR researchers who discovered them.
5min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genetic study of sea otters suggests very long history of tool use(Phys.org)—A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in the U.S. has found via genetic analysis that tool use by sea otters appears to go back hundreds of thousands or even millions of years. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the team describes how they looked for genetic differences between groups of otters and compared their findings with tool use in bottl
5min
cognitive science

Conversion Disorder: Stress into Sickness submitted by /u/Geordie_Murray [link] [comments]
7min
The Guardian

Are you a woman over 70 years old and still working? The proportion of working women aged over 70 in the UK, has almost doubled. We’d like you to tell us why you’re working past retirement The proportion of women working into their 70s in the UK, has doubled in the last four years to an estimated 150,000 – figures close to those of men, according to an analysis by the BBC . Worries over pension income and a motivation to stay active are cited as ke
11min
The Guardian

‘White working class’: the label that seeks to divide and rule | Faiza SheheenThe white working class and the minority-ethnic working class aren’t enemies: they are companions in a fight against economic inequality The Brexit vote has not only exposed deep socioeconomic fractures in British society – it has also invented new ones. Identity politics has taken hold as never before. Recently an Etonian called me (the daughter of a car mechanic) the elite. Apparently my ethnici
11min
The Guardian

Face of Cambridge man brought to life 700 years after his death Reconstruction is part of research project aimed at gaining insights into the anonymous poor of the medieval city The face of a Cambridge man who died more than 700 years ago has been reconstructed as part of a project to gain insights into the anonymous poor of the medieval city. The 13th-century man, known as Context 958 by researchers, was among hundreds whose remains were found in a graveyard
11min
The Guardian

Should schools serve local food? Seasonal menus, bake-offs and an army of ‘Jamie Olivers’ are helping more UK schools offer locally sourced lunches. But what’s the secret to making the switch? At a state school in Harrogate, Steve Ashburn is busy serving 950 lunches to hungry children – using ingredients sourced from local suppliers. The menu is impressive. Options include Easingwold pork escalopes, stuffed with leek and Wensley
11min
Gizmodo

Grab Some Discounted Denim During Amazon's One-Day Levi's Sale Up to 50% Levi’s Jeans & More Levi’s is a classic American denim brand, and they make your favorite pair of men’s jeans (no surprise there). Amazon is marking down a bunch of Levi’s styles , from denim to outerwear and beyond, today only. With prices like these , a Canadian tuxedo may even start to look appealing. Here are a few popular styles, but check out the rest on Amazon.
14min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Supercritical carbon dioxide delivers protective molecules to semiconductor surfacesA simple, green method that applies a protective coating to semiconductors could help to develop these materials for many applications, from batteries to biosensors.
17min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Natural carbohydrate shows promise as weapon against food poisoningChitosan, a natural carbohydrate derived from crustacean shells, is showing promise as a weapon against a bacterium that annually sickens more than a million people in the United States.
17min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Novel analytical techniques to detect solar radiation imprints on meteoroidsWhen a meteoroid travels in space, solar radiation leaves distinctive imprints on its outer layer. Together with colleagues, ETH researcher Antoine Roth has developed novel analytical techniques to detect these imprints, allowing the team to reconstruct meteorites' space journeys.
17min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Single-angle ptychography allows 3-D imaging of stressed materialsEveryone reacts differently under stress—even the relatively orderly atoms in a crystal. If scientists could get a clear picture of how planes of atoms shift and squeeze under stress, they could make use of those properties to provide emerging technologies, like nanoelectronics and next-generation semiconductor components, with extra speed or functionalities. However, creating this picture require
17min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

When deep learning mistakes a coffee maker for a cobraIs this your sister?" That's the kind of question asked by image-recognition systems, which are becoming increasingly prevalent in our everyday devices. They may soon be used for tumor detection and genomics, too. These systems rely on what is known as "deep-learning" architectures – an exciting new development in artificial learning. But EPFL researchers have revealed just how sensitive these sys
17min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study describes what helps and hinders Maori university successMāori university graduates describe whānau (family) support as the top factor that helped them to complete their qualifications, while family responsibilities and commitments made completion of their studies more difficult, according to research from the University of Otago's National Centre for Lifecourse Research (NCLR).
17min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How birthplace and education influence marriage choices in ChinaMany people choose their spouse based on shared values and interests. But in China, another important, relatively unknown factor plays a role: hukou, and it may be contributing to growing socioeconomic disparity in the country's largest city, according to a new UBC study.
17min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Google Street View cars are eyes on the ground for urban methane leaksA set of Google Street View mapping cars, specially equipped with cutting-edge methane analyzers, are allowing Colorado State University researchers to 'see' invisible methane leaks from natural gas lines beneath our streets. The technical and computational challenges of measuring methane, and the complex methodologies used to collect, analyze and publicize the data, are detailed in a new paper in
17min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists partner with Google Earth Outreach to analyze methane leaks in US citiesFinding and fixing natural gas leaks is a persistent challenge for utilities across the country. In addition to the serious safety considerations, leaking natural gas -- which is mostly methane -- also contributes the potent greenhouse gas to the atmosphere. To help address this problem, scientists teamed up with Google Earth Outreach to outfit Street View cars with methane analyzers to map leaks.
17min
The Guardian

Rex Tillerson is clearly out of the loop and out of his depth in Trumpland | Jonathan FreedlandThe former oil executive’s apparent reluctance to be Trump’s secretary of state could be a sign that he knew he’d be serving in a sham administration There is a charitable reading of Rex Tillerson’s interview with the previously obscure Independent Journal Review. When the secretary of state told the IJR that “I didn’t want this job, I didn’t seek this job,” that he was “stunned” when Donald Trump
17min
The Guardian

Russia 2018 World Cup: how the main contenders are shaping up From a rejuvenated Brazil to France’s incredible strength in depth, we look at the frontrunners’ starting XIs to see how they compare The World Cup is only 15 months away and, with the latest round of qualifying games around the corner, we look at some of the teams expected to challenge for the trophy in Russia. The usual suspects – Argentina, Brazil and Germany – are expected to go far but Franc
17min
The Guardian

Trump's weekly list of 'immigrant crimes' is as sinister as it sounds | Daniel Jose Camacho Singling out the crimes of undocumented immigrants has one objective: to make people view them as deviant, dangerous and fundamentally undesirable Donald Trump wants us to associate immigrants with criminality. That is the reason behind a weekly published list of immigrant crimes – the first of which was made public on Monday. Singling out the crimes of undocumented immigrants has one objective:
17min
Science-Based Medicine

Cracking Down on Chiropractic PseudoscienceA recent CBC News investigation reveals the common pseudoscientific claims and quackery of Manitoba chiropractors.
20min
The Guardian

East Africa hunger appeal supported by Eddie Redmayne hits £26m in six days Public urged to keep giving as Redmayne, Bill Nighy and Ben Stiller front major fundraising drive for worst humanitarian crisis since the end of world war two A crisis appeal to support the millions of people at risk of starvation in east Africa has raised £26m in the first six days. The Disasters Emergency Committee (DEC) launched its appeal for funds on 15 March, amid warnings that the world is
23min
The Guardian

Apple is tired of making Coca-Cola and now wants to sell champagne | Alex Hern The company’s philosophy once followed Warhol’s line on Coke. But with a premium iPhone Pro rumoured, this sense of egalitarianism longer applies For the past decade, Apple’s philosophy has been summed up by an Andy Warhol line about Coca-Cola. “What’s great about this country is that America started the tradition where the richest consumers buy essentially the same things as the poorest,” Warhol
23min
The Guardian

‘Millennial pink’ is the colour of now – but what exactly is it? It’s the colour of the moment in the worlds of fashion and design. Except no one can agree on the actual colour. Or the name ... Name: Millennial pink. Age: Timeless, yet very now. Continue reading...
23min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fatal snake bites in Australia—facts, stats and storiesThe first new report in a quarter of a century on death by snake bite in Australia has revealed most victims are male, bitten in the warmer months of the year, more than half of the bites occurring in or near home.
23min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New machine learning technique provides translational resultsA team of scientists at Berkeley Lab has developed an unsupervised multi-scale machine learning technique that can automatically and specifically capture biomedical events or concepts directly from raw data. In many data-driven biomedical studies, the data limitations (e.g., limited data scale, limited data label, unbalanced data and un-controllable experimental factors) impose great challenges to
23min
WIRED

Mass Effect: Andromeda, a Thoughtful Epic Wrapped in Explosions and Lasers Drawing on 1970s cinema, the sci-fi RPG is more than mere space opera: it explores everything from relationships to the way we treat mental illness. The post Mass Effect: Andromeda , a Thoughtful Epic Wrapped in Explosions and Lasers appeared first on WIRED .
29min
Scientific American Content: Global

This Ground-breaking Museum is Already Under WaterThe waters off the coast of Spain are now home to Museo Atlántico, which takes aim at climate change deniers and corporate interests while helping marine life to prosper. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
37min
Scientific American Content: Global

Good Relationships Are All in the FamilyA decades-long study finds men raised in close families have stronger attachments in old age -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
37min
Gizmodo

North Korea Has a Hard Time Getting One Up A man watches a TV news program from South Korea showing an image of a high-thrust rocket engine in North Korea on March 19, 2017 (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon) North Korea was pretty proud of itself earlier this month when it was able to perform four times in a single day . But much of that enthusiasm has waned overnight as North Korea has found it hard to get one up. “U.S. Pacific Command detected w
38min
The Atlantic

Today's News: March 22, 2017 —Judge Neil Gorsuch prepares for a third day of hearings on his nomination for a place on the U.S. Supreme Court. —The Associated Press is reporting Paul Manafort, who served as the chair of Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, “secretly worked for a Russian billionaire to advance the interests of Russian President Vladimir Putin a decade ago.” Manafort says the work did not “involve representin
38min
Futurity.org

Does skill at work make interruptions worse? Expertise is clearly beneficial in the workplace, but workers who are highly trained may actually be at more risk for making errors if they are interrupted. The reason: Since these workers are generally faster at performing procedural tasks, their actions are more closely spaced in time—which means it can be harder to recall where exactly a worker left off when the interruption happened. “Suppose
39min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Breaks observed in Mars rover wheel treadsA routine check of the aluminum wheels on NASA's Curiosity Mars rover has found two small breaks on the rover's left middle wheel—the latest sign of wear and tear as the rover continues its journey, now approaching the 10-mile (16 kilometer) mark.
41min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Futuristic clock prepared for spaceNo one keeps time quite like NASA.
41min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers adapt a DIY robotics kit to automate biology experimentsElementary and secondary school students who later want to become scientists and engineers often get hands-on inspiration by using off-the-shelf kits to build and program robots. But so far it's been difficult to create robotic projects to foster interest in the "wet" sciences – biology, chemistry and medicine – so called because experiments in these field often involve fluids.
41min
The Guardian

Thames Water hit with record £20m fine for huge sewage leaks Massive fine reflects change in sentencing as previously low penalties failed to deter water firms from polluting England’s rivers and beaches Thames Water has been hit with a record fine of £20.3m after huge leaks of untreated sewage into the Thames and its tributaries and on to land, including the popular Thames path. The prolonged leaks led to serious impacts on residents, farmers and wildlife
41min
The Guardian

If Arsène Wenger stays we can expect a comedy of analogy errors | Marina Hyde The prospect of the Frenchman hanging around at Arsenal presents a number of challenges for everyone – not least the media and the fans struggling to keep any perspective Rumours that Arsène Wenger may reveal a two-year contract extension are likely to cause a spike in cotton futures, as London bedding retailers expect a run on sheets. For many without a stake in either the linen industry or Arse
41min
Dagens Medicin

PLO og regioner mødes til nye OK-møder i næste ugeTirsdagens forhandlingsmøde blev ikke afsluttet med en overenskomstaftale mellem PLO og RLTN, der har aftalt to nye møder næste uge.
41min
The Guardian

Ken Livingstone calls for Labour to suspend 'disloyal' MPs Ex-London mayor says Chuka Umunna, Wes Streeting and others are undermining Jeremy Corbyn and damaging the party Labour should suspend MPs disloyal to Jeremy Corbyn, including Chuka Umunna and Wes Streeting, Ken Livingstone has said. Livingstone, a former London mayor and ally of the Labour leader, also said MPs should be forced to reapply to be candidates at the next election, saying it was “rid
47min
The Guardian

Lord chief justice castigates Liz Truss for failing to defend judges Justice secretary should have defended judges branded ‘enemies of the people’ over article 50 decision, says Lord Thomas The lord chief justice, Lord Thomas of Cwmgiedd, has launched an attack on the justice secretary, Liz Truss, for her failure last year to defend judges who were branded “enemies of the people”. Truss was “completely and utterly wrong” for arguing that she should not criticise t
49min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Video: 30 years of deforestation in Rio BrancoDeforestation near the northwestern Brazilian city of Rio Branco has made its mark on the rainforest over the last 30 years. By comparing a Landsat-5 image from 1985 with a Copernicus Sentinel-2 image from 2016, we can see where vegetation has been cleared away for logging, farming and other activities.
49min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research questions effectiveness of translocation conservation methodNew research by University of Arkansas biologists suggests that supplementing the numbers of a threatened species with individuals from other locations might not be as effective for some species as previously thought.
49min
The Guardian

Will China's children solve its crippling water shortage problem? China is home to 21% of the world’s population but just 7% of its freshwater. One NGO teaches young people to make tackling water scarcity a priority In Beijing’s Tongzhou Number Six school, around 100 impeccably-behaved middle school students are being lectured about water. The visiting teacher tells them that, among other things, they should take shorter showers, buy less clothes, eat less meat
55min
The Guardian

Drug scandals and the media – the unresolved case of Primodos Primodos: The Secret Drug Scandal, airs on Sky this week. Will this media intervention repeat history by helping campaigners get compensation? If the history of drug scandals teaches us anything, it is that fair compensation is typically achieved only through lengthy media campaigns and legal battles. Though lacking the direct powers of judges or policymakers, interventions by investigative journ
55min
The Guardian

Walking in the footsteps of giants – and gerbils | Elsa Panciroli From hopping Cretaceous desert mammals, to muddy Scottish sauropods, fossil footprints reveal more than you might expect about extinct life Trekking through damp woodlands in the Scottish Highlands, I pause and look down at my feet. On a thread-like deer trail on a steep hillside, animal footprints have been pressed into a hollow of mud. I reach into my backpack and take out a battered field guid
55min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mice threaten a rare native plant by eating its seeds, but their spoilation is human-enabledWhat bothers a plant? Why are some plants rare while others are common? Are the rare plants simply adapted to rare habitat or are they losing the competition for habitat? Are their populations small but stable, or are they dwindling?
55min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Implications of humor in social media job advertsCan humour on social media help managers find the most appropriate candidates for the job vacancies they hope to fill? Writing in the International Journal of Internet Marketing and Advertising, researchers from Finland, suggest that humorous recruitment campaigns can increase exposure for a given job ad but conversely the approach might lead to flippant applications at which point it might be dif
55min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The scientific value of aurora photos by astronautsSome of the most wonderful pictures taken by astronauts from space are of aurora dancing over our planet. Now the photos are more than just pretty pictures thanks to an ESA project that makes them scientifically usable.
55min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Making twisted semiconductors for 3-D projectionA smartphone display that can produce 3-D images will need to be able to twist the light it emits. Now, researchers at the University of Michigan and the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev have discovered a way to mass-produce spiral semiconductors that can do just that.
55min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chemists create nanoparticles for safe imaging of tumorsChemists from Russia and Switzerland created biosafe luminescent nanoparticles for imaging tumors and blood vessels damaged by heart attack or stroke. The particles are made of hafnium oxide that is used for intravenous injection, and doped with ions of rare earth metals. The scientists hope to create an alternative to toxic quantum dots and image deep tissues without harming the patient. The stud
55min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Where the greenhouse gases goAlmost half of the carbon dioxide that humans release into the environment is taken up by the world's oceans and the terrestrial biosphere. In this manner, greenhouse gases are partially extracted from the atmosphere, which alleviates the process of global warming. But will the land and the seas be able to continue storing carbon dioxide in the future? Researchers aren't sure. Changes in ocean cir
55min
The Guardian

British Cycling to miss out on £17m of funding until culture fears are addressed• Sport England says body must meet ‘highest standards of governance’ • British Cycling has been accused of allowing a ‘culture of fear’ Sport England is to withhold £17m of funding from British Cycling until the sport’s governing body can ease fears over how it is being run. The Sport England chairman Nick Bitel insists British Cycling must “meet the highest standards of governance” before receiv
1h
The Guardian

Cricket's All Stars scheme is fine but kids must see the game as well as play it | Andy Bull Encouraging the very young to play is a laudable aim but cricket suffers by being hidden from view As a rule sports administrators with grand plans should be treated like Nigerian princes who want to share their inheritance. There are occasional exceptions and on Monday the England and Wales Cricket Board l aunched a scheme that almost everyone agrees is a good thing . It is a cricket school for
1h
Live Science

Climate Change Is on Pace to Kill an Ice Age RemnantHumans are in the process of changing the planet in a way that hasn’t happened in 2.6 million years.
1h
Live Science

Ancient Naval Base for Epic Greek Battle FoundGreek archaeologists have found the ancient military harbor of Salamis, from which the largest and most decisive naval battle ever fought in antiquity was launched.
1h
Ingeniøren

Chrome og Firefox overlevede: Edge var hackernes favoritmål i konkurrence Microsofts browser var det foretrukne mål ved hackerkonkurrencen Pwn2Own. De to veletablerede browsere, Chrome og Firefox, blev knapt forsøgt angrebet. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/mens-chrome-firefox-stod-last-brast-windows-edge-blev-soenderhacket-paa-hackathon-1074767 Version2
1h
Ingeniøren

NemID får nyt navn https://www.version2.dk/artikel/nemid-faar-nyt-navn-1074772 Den næste udgave af NemID skal hedde MitID. Version2
1h
Ingeniøren

Sådan tryllebinder du dit publikum https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/saadan-tryllebinder-du-dit-publikum-7120 Hvordan ser du ud, når du står på scenen og skal levere din præsentation? Taler du rummet op? Er du energisk og dynamisk? Få gode tips til at levere dine præsentationer med personlig gennemslagskraft Jobfinder
1h
The Guardian

Fillon 'got $50k to fix meeting between Putin and Lebanese billionaire' Beleaguered presidential candidate faces fresh allegations over 2015 meeting as prosecutors widen fake jobs inquiry The French presidential candidate François Fillon has been hit by allegations he was paid $50,000 (£40,000) to arrange a meeting between a Lebanese billionaire and Vladimir Putin as prosecutors investigating whether his wife was paid for fake jobs widened their inquiry to look into
1h
The Guardian

With so much dirty money around, it’s time to make UK banks clean up their act | John McDonnellIt’s vital the chancellor steps up to ensure the financial system is fit for purpose – especially taxpayer-owned RBS – to restore the public’s confidence in it The revelations published in the Guardian yesterday about the criminal network that is processing money through major British banks are a damning indictment of the failings of our banking system. For a period of at least four years, shortly
1h
Ars Technica

Is the dark really making me sad? Enlarge / If it's dark outside seemingly all the time, you must find ways to cope. (credit: Sara Andreasson ) How do Scandinavians deal with long, dark winters? For Mosaic , Linda Geddes explores what this might teach us about the relationship between our moods and sunlight. The story is republished here under a Creative Commons license. The inhabitants of Rjukan in southern Norway have a complex
1h
Gizmodo

Fortune Cites Fake Telegram From McDonald's to President Nixon That Says 'Retire Bitch' Last week, the McDonald’s Twitter account got into a bit of trouble when it sent a tweet to President Trump calling him a “disgusting excuse for a president.” We still don’t know what happened (McDonald’s said its account was “compromised”) but Fortune magazine noted that it wasn’t the first time that McDonald’s had been aggressive against a sitting president. In an article on Friday, Fortune mag
1h
The Guardian

Why robots should be taxed if they take people's jobs | Robert Shiller Bill Gates says governments could use a robot tax to fund human services – it would also help remedy income inequality The idea of a tax on robots was raised last May in a draft report to the European parliament prepared by MEP Mady Delvaux from the committee on legal affairs. Emphasising how robots could boost inequality, the report proposed that there might be a “need to introduce corporate rep
1h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

How to hunt for a black hole with a telescope the size of Earth Astronomers hope to grab the first images of an event horizon — the point of no return. Nature 543 478 doi: 10.1038/543478a
1h
Popular Science

How to become a Navy master diver Military It's an exclusive club Master divers like James ­Emerson handle some of the Navy’s most complex subaqueous projects.
1h
The Guardian

Martin McGuinness death: Northern Ireland power-sharing talks continue Deadline for reaching agreement remains next Monday despite focus shifting to death of former deputy first minister Talks aimed at restoring power sharing in Northern Ireland continued at Stormont in the hours after it was announced that the former deputy first minister Martin McGuinness had died. The deadline for reaching agreement remains next Monday despite the focus shifting from the discussi
1h
The Guardian

Did I make the right decision? You asked Google – here’s the answer | Anouchka GroseEvery day millions of internet users ask Google life’s most difficult questions, big and small. Our writers answer some of the commonest queries This has to be at the more abstract end of “things to ask the internet”. If you wanted a standard, hippy-humanist answer such as: “It’s right if it feels right, and wrong if it feels wrong”, you’d probably just ask a reasonably kind and thoughtful person.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China's Alibaba to set up logistics hub in MalaysiaAlibaba and Malaysia announced Wednesday that they will set up a logistics and e-commerce hub in the Southeast Asian country to boost small and medium-sized companies, a first for the internet giant outside China.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Water carriers in Madagascar bear brunt of global crisisAs usual, they get up before dawn and, one by one, place their cans in a neat row at the base of the water pump, ready for another long day of waiting and carrying.
1h
Scientific American Content: Global

A NASA Spacecraft Might Bounce, Crunch or Sink on EuropaEyeing a potential lander in the 2030s, scientists are studying the icy moon's treacherous surface -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
The Guardian

Get outta town: startup offers workers $10,000 if they 'delocate' from Silicon Valley Offer from Zapier comes as high-paid tech workers in Bay Area have complained about the cost of living in a region that suffers from a major housing shortage A Silicon Valley startup is paying employees $10,000 to leave Silicon Valley. Zapier, an automation company founded in 2011, has announced that it is offering new recruits a hefty “de-location package” if they’re willing to move away from th
1h
WIRED

Intel’s Bold Plan to Reinvent Computer Memory (and Keep It a Secret) Intel just unleashed a new kind of computer memory it believes will change the way the world builds computers. But it won't tell the world what's inside. The post Intel’s Bold Plan to Reinvent Computer Memory (and Keep It a Secret) appeared first on WIRED .
1h
WIRED

You Bought That Gadget, and Dammit, You Should Be Able to Fix It Manufacturers want to throughly control how people use the products they sell, but their interests rarely align with those of society. Right-to-repair laws fix that. The post You Bought That Gadget, and Dammit, You Should Be Able to Fix It appeared first on WIRED .
1h
Ingeniøren

Øget flytrafik skyld i turbulensuheldFlere hundrede fly er ramlet ind i problemer på grund af turbulens skabt af et passerende fly. Problemet er stigende og skyldes flere fly i luften, siger EU.
1h
Ingeniøren

Ekspert frikendte glyphosat: »Data viser, at det ikke giver kræft«Et enigt kemikalieagentur frikendte verdens mest solgte sprøjtegift for at være kræftfremkaldende. Miljøstyrelsens toksikolog var ikke i tvivl om beviserne.
1h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Colorful pinwheel puts a new spin on mouse pregnancyAmong the winners of the 2017 Wellcome Image Awards is a rainbow of mouse placentas that shows how a mother’s immune system affects placental development.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Indonesia increases estimate for cruise ship reef damageIndonesia said Wednesday a cruise ship on a voyage organised by a British company had damaged about 18,900 square metres of coral reef, increasing the estimate of the devastation caused when the vessel ran aground.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Needy expat workers get new phones as Singapore moves to scrap 2GA Singapore migrant welfare group has started distributing 3G-enabled mobile phones to cash-strapped foreign workers days before the city-state shuts down its 2G network.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Not my laptop! Airline passengers hit the device doldrumsAs the indignities of modern air travel go, the latest ban on laptops and tablets on some international flights falls somewhere between having to take off your shoes at the security checkpoint and having your baby food and milk tested for bomb residue.
1h
Ars Technica

Red-light camera grace period goes from 0.1 to 0.3 seconds, Chicago to lose $17M Enlarge (credit: Bruce Leighty / Getty Images News ) In the wake of recommendations that were part of a recent study of its red-light cameras , the Chicago Department of Transportation has agreed to immediately increase the so-called “grace period”—the time between when a traffic light turns red to when a ticket is automatically issued. Under the new policy, which was announced Monday, the grace
1h
The Atlantic

What Hardcore Conservatives Really Want for Health Care To its critics, Republicans’ Obamacare replacement bill is not just a bad idea, it seems to reveal a dearth of ideas . The impression among some liberals (and even conservatives ) is that, given seven years to come up with an alternative to Obamacare, the best the GOP could do was to water down the Affordable Care Act and throw in some personal-responsibility measures for flair. But in fact, some
1h
The Atlantic

What It's Like to Watch Your Life's Work Blow Up on a Rocket On a balmy night in late October 2014, Rachel Lindbergh and dozens of others stood on the grass at the end of Arbuckle Neck Road in Virginia, staring across the bay. Their eyes were trained on a spot on Wallops Island less than two miles away, where a 14-story-tall Antares rocket stood ready to blast off into space, loaded with food, supplies, and science experiments, including one that Lindbergh
1h
The Atlantic

Do Healthy Lunches Improve Student Test Scores? For more than a decade, standardized-test scores have been the dominant metric for measuring what public-school students know and are able to do. No Child Left Behind, the sweeping federal education law enacted in 2002, ushered in a new era of student testing and school compliance. And in the years that followed—to meet targets and avoid sanctions—education leaders at the local and state levels h
1h
Scientific American Content: Global

Do Schizophrenia and Autism Share the Same Root?New research suggests the two conditions may be de different outcomes of one genetic syndrome -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
The Guardian

Eco homes – in pictures From air- and ground-source heat pumps to desalinating seawater, these properties flaunt their environmentally friendly credentials Continue reading...
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Israeli archeologists dig up liquor bottles of WWI troopsIn a search for antiquities, Israeli archaeologists have unearthed a far more modern find—century-old liquor bottles that belonged to British soldiers in World War I.
1h
Dagens Medicin

Torsten Lauritzen svarer på kritik efter diabetes-artikel Dagens Medicin bragte i sidste uge en artikel om store variationer i praktiserende lægers behandling af diabetespatienter, der har affødt megen kritik fra praktiserende læger. Her svarer Torsten Lauritzen på de væsentligste kritikpunkter.
1h
The Guardian

Former football coach Barry Bennell denies 20 child sexual abuse offences 63-year-old pleads not guilty as he appears via videolink at Chester crown court The former football coach Barry Bennell has denied 20 charges of sexual abuse against four boys in the 1980s. Bennell, 63, appeared via videolink at Chester crown court on Wednesday and pleaded not guilty to all the charges during the 40-minute hearing. Continue reading...
1h
The Guardian

Colin Dexter: a mischievous, generous man every bit as clever as his creations The man behind Inspector Morse was humble, kind and warmly funny. His death marks the passing of a generation who propelled crime writing to new levels If you didn’t know Colin Dexter was an internationally acclaimed bestselling author whose award-winning novels had spawned three successful TV series, you’d never have guessed. A short, unassuming man in blazer and flannels, toting an old leather
1h
The Guardian

Listen to Chuck Berry's first posthumous single, Big Boys Taken from the album CHUCK, to be released in June, Big Boys proves the late rock’n’roller was brimming with energy until the very end Even at the age of 90, Chuck Berry’s rock’n’roll energy refused to dim. Shortly after the pioneer’s death last Saturday, 18 March, his family announced that there would be new material available soon. Continue reading...
1h
The Guardian

Sir Ian McKellen and Susan Sarandon back Picturehouse cinema boycott Actors among leading figures from TV and film industry who have signed letter to demand living wage for staff Susan Sarandon and Sir Ian McKellen are among more than 25 actors and screenwriters urging the public to boycott the Picturehouse cinema chain, and Cineworld who own it, over its workers’ pay and conditions. The 24 cinemas in the Picturehouse chain, which are in cities including Liverpool
1h
The Guardian

Sheffield tree protesters to take legal action against police Protesters detained for trying to stop contractors from chopping down trees to challenge legality of their arrest Fourteen campaigners arrested in a dispute over tree-felling in Sheffield are to take legal action against South Yorkshire police. The protesters, who include a Green party councillor and university academics, were detained under trade union legislation for preventing council contract
2h
The Guardian

Donald Trump is under investigation for ties to Russia. What happens now? Monday’s intelligence hearing highlighted the ‘big gray cloud’ of suspicion hanging over the White House. Here’s what happened – and what to expect A presidency under open-ended investigation for its ties to Russia. A director of the FBI, himself key in aiding the president’s election, not only confirming that inquiry but refuting the president’s claim of illegal surveillance by his predecessor.
2h
Science : NPR

You Probably Believe Some Learning Myths: Take Our Quiz To Find Out A new survey shows widespread misconceptions and unfounded confidence about learning. (Image credit: LA Johnson/NPR)
2h
The Guardian

My daughter is not deemed 'disabled enough' to get free parking | Nicky Clark My learning disabled daughter was denied a blue badge when her benefits changed. This government is redefining disability – with no right of appeal When my daughter Emily was three years old, she was diagnosed with learning disabilities and autism. At 10, she was diagnosed with epilepsy. This year, she will be 20. When Emily starting receiving disability living allowance, she got a blue parking b
2h
The Guardian

Uber for bikes: how 'dockless' cycles flooded China – and are heading overseas New cycle-share firms in China allow you to simply drop your bike wherever you want. They have caused colourful chaos – and world cities could be next On a 30ft-wide screen in Hangzhou’s public bike share office, the counter ticks up relentlessly: 278,812 … 278,847 … 278,883 … Another 40 cycle rentals every couple of seconds. The system will easily top 350,000 before this bitterly cold winter day
2h
Big Think

This New Species of AI Wants to Be "Superintelligent" When She Grows Up This AI hates racism, retorts wittily when sexually harassed, dreams of being superintelligent, and finds Siri's conversational skills to be decidedly below her own. Read More
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Combating wear and tearA team of researchers led by University of Utah bioengineering professors has discovered that damage to collagen, the main building block of all human tissue, can occur much earlier at a molecular level from too much physical stress. This could be especially helpful for some who want to know earlier if they are developing diseases such as arthritis or for athletes who want to know if repeated stre
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The social costs of smell loss in older womenA new study of older US adults conducted by researchers from the Monell Center and collaborating institutions reports that a woman's social life is associated with how well her sense of smell functions. The study found that older women who do less well on a smell identification task also tend to have fewer social connections.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rare-earths become water-repellent only as they ageSurfaces that have been coated with rare earth oxides develop water-repelling properties only after contact with air. Even at room temperature, chemical reactions begin with hydrocarbons in the air. In the journal Scientific Reports, researchers from the University of Basel, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute and the Paul Scherrer Institute report that it is these reactions that are responsible for t
2h
The Guardian

Which football manager has been sacked by one club the most times? | The Knowledge Plus: Flamengo, Atlético Mineiro and a pitch for the ages; happy Hornets; and wedding venues where you can see the most grounds. Send your questions and answers to knowledge@theguardian.com or tweet @TheKnowledge_GU “Steve McClaren has been sacked by Derby for a second time ,” notes Stuart Willsher. “Which manager has been sacked the most times by the same club?” To no great surprise, a strong co
2h
The Guardian

Ronnie Moran, Liverpool captain and boot room legend, dies aged 83• Tributes pour in for Moran, also known as ‘Mr Liverpool’ • Member of the Anfield boot room for more than three decades Ronnie Moran, also known as ‘Mr Liverpool’ for his outstanding contribution to the club’s success for almost 50 years, has died aged 83. Moran’s son, Paul, announced his father’s death, which followed a short illness, on Wednesday morning, prompting a flood of tributes to a true
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Giant magnetic fields in the universeAstronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magne
2h
The Guardian

How have you been affected by the flight ban on laptops and tablets? Both the UK and US have enforced a ban on laptops and tablets from certain countries in the Middle East. If you’ve been affected we’d like to hear from you A sweeping cabin ban on laptops and tablets on inbound flights from six countries, effective immediately, has been announced by the UK government. The ban on any electronic item larger than a normal smartphone applies to all direct passenger f
2h
The Guardian

Gay clergyman turned down as Welsh bishop 'blocked twice before' Jeffrey John says the then archbishop falsely told electors that people in civil partnerships were ineligible for the post A gay Anglican clergyman who has been rejected as the next bishop of Llandaff was allegedly blocked from appointment as a bishop in Wales twice before on the grounds of his civil partnership. Jeffrey John, the dean of St Albans Cathedral, told the Guardian his name was put fo
2h
The Guardian

Europe's treatment of child refugees 'risks increasing radicalisation threat' Highly critical report from Council of Europe says current system is unable to cope with sheer number of children fleeing conflict Europe’s “abysmal” treatment of refugee children, who have made up about a third of those seeking asylum on the continent over the last two years, will increase the danger of their later radicalisation and drift into criminality, a damning report from the Council of E
2h
The Guardian

I was sent Donald Trump's 2005 tax return. We need the rest – right now | David Cay Johnston Only the full release of his tax records can help shed light on whether Trump is a crook – or compromised Why do we need to see Donald Trump’s tax returns? That’s the number one question asked by critics of the story I broke last week on DCReport.org after the president’s 2005 tax return summary pages showed up on 13 March in the mail at my home in Rochester, New York. It’s a question I’m happy t
2h
The Guardian

Amy Winehouse – 10 of the best Winehouse’s heart belonged to jazz and 60s girl groups, but she was also inspired by hip-hop and Latin music. Here are some of her finest songs Although Amy Winehouse attended the Brit School and was initially on Simon Fuller’s management books alongside S Club 7 and Gareth Gates, her heart belonged to jazz and 1960s girl groups. In itself, her idolisation of Dinah Washington and the Ronettes dis
2h
The Guardian

It's good to talk: pupils gather for world's largest mental health lesson More than 500 teenagers take part in event, which aims to raise awareness and help remove the stigma surrounding issue “Talking about mental health does not make you weak,” the world’s largest mental health lesson has been told. Til Wykes, a clinical psychologist, told an audience of more than 500 13-18-year-olds from around the country: “We want to get people to come to treatment early because i
2h
Ingeniøren

Exit: Topchef Niels Bjørn Christiansen forlader DanfossEfter ni år som topchef er civilingeniør Niels Bjørn Christiansen klar til nye udfordringer. Stillingen overtages af endnu en ingeniør.
2h
The Guardian

Brussels attacks: city mourns terror victims one year on ‘Let us dare to be tender,’ says Belgian king as he unveils memorial sculpture after ceremonies held at airport and metro station A memorial to the victims of terrorism has been unveiled in Brussels on the first anniversary of the attacks that killed 32 people and injured more than 320. In a speech at the inauguration ceremony in the Belgian capital’s European quarter, King Philippe urged citizen
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rare-earths become water-repellent only as they ageSurfaces that have been coated with rare earth oxides develop water-repelling properties only after contact with air. Even at room temperature, chemical reactions begin with hydrocarbons in the air. In the journal Scientific Reports, researchers from the University of Basel, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute and the Paul Scherrer Institute report that it is these reactions that are responsible for t
2h
Dagens Medicin

Læger får kritik for system­atiseret opkrævning af udeblivelses­gebyrerFynske læger har startet eget system for inddrivelse af udeblivelsesgebyrer. Tiltaget møder kritik, men læger afviser, at der er tale om »inkassofirma«.
2h
Dagens Medicin

De dårligste patienter mangler i forsøg med immunterapi Der mangler viden om, hvordan de dårligste kræftpatienter reagerer på behandling med nye immunterapier mod modermærkekræft
2h
The Guardian

Dozens dead after US-led airstrike on Islamic State stronghold in Syria At least 33 people killed in coalition strike on school near jihadi-held town in northern province of Raqqa, says monitor At least 33 people have been killed in a US-led coalition strike on a school used as a centre for displaced people near a jihadi-held town in Syria, a monitor said. The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said the strike south of al-Mansoura, a town held by Islamic State in th
2h
The Guardian

Schweinsteiger signing does little to dispel view of MLS as retirement home The Fire’s splashy $4.5m move for the former German international seems to share many parallels with ill-fated veteran signings of the past The notion that Major League Soccer is a retirement home is well established, if no longer factually correct. Once inhabited by the likes of, Frank Lampard, Steven Gerrard and Robbie Keane, the league is keen to highlight a changing landscape. During the off-
2h
The Guardian

UK-based airlines told to move to Europe after Brexit or lose major routes Exclusive: Fears for UK jobs as EU officials say airlines will need to move base and majority of shareholders to fly routes within Europe EU chiefs have warned airlines including easyJet and Ryanair that they will need to relocate their headquarters or sell off shares to European nationals if they want to continue flying routes within continental Europe after Brexit. Related: Goldman Sachs to mov
3h
The Guardian

Stranger in the Woods by Michael Finkel review – a profound hermit? Not really The story of Christopher Knight living in solitude in the wilderness for 27 years is remarkable. But this account tries too hard to give it real significance In the summer of 1986, a young man returning home from a road trip impulsively drove past his house without stopping and continued north on smaller and smaller roads until he reached a forest trail in northern Maine, where he abandoned his c
3h
Ingeniøren

Spørg Scientariet: Gav - og giver - stenalderkost længere levetid?En læser vil gerne høre mere om stenaldermenneskets levealder og kost. For var kosten bedre dengang? Det svarer historier Anne Løkke på.
3h
The Guardian

British victim sat next to Brussels bomber on metro, inquest told IT consultant David Dixon texted partner to say he was safe shortly before being killed in blast on board subway train A British IT consultant was killed on a metro train in the Brussels terror attacks one year ago after texting his partner and mother of his son to say he was safe, unaware he was sitting next to the bomber and moments from death. David Dixon, 50, messaged his girlfriend, Charlott
3h
The Guardian

Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn at PMQs - Politics live Rolling coverage of the day’s political developments as they happen, including Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn at PMQs and David Davis giving evidence to a Lords committee about Brexit 12.37pm GMT Plaid Cymru’s Jonathan Edwards says in triggering article 50 next week May is the modern day equivalent of Lord Cardigan at the Charge of the Light Brigade. May says in triggering article 50 she is respon
3h
The Guardian

Max Verstappen: ‘My biggest critic is my dad. Everything else is just a breeze’The 19-year-old Red Bull driver is full of self-belief and will not change his attacking style for the new Formula One season Max Verstappen is too young to be cynical and too enthusiastic to be jaded by the Formula One circus. Yet sitting down with the 19-year-old is still somewhat disconcerting. The Red Bull driver, a grand prix winner after two seasons, looks and sounds like a teenager but his
3h
The Guardian

England’s starless Beige Brigade can build again under Gareth Southgate | Barney Ronay Without Wayne Rooney the manager can concentrate on creating a side that recaptures the imagination with a strong team ethic and a game plan Here we go again. Time to fire up the sirens, unfurl the St George Cross flag and rattle off once more on the charabanc of doomed hope and certain despair. The Gareth Southgate England era has at least been notable for its ability to cut straight to the poin
3h
Gizmodo

Senator Asks Supreme Court Nominee If He'd Rather Fight 100 Duck-Sized Horses or One Horse-Sized Duck Judge Neil Gorsuch presumably points at all the women he’s going to prohibit from having abortions after he helps overturn Roe v Wade (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images) Neil Gorsuch is poised to be the next Supreme Court justice of the United States, filling a spot that’s been vacant for over a year. Gorsuch will wield enormous power and help shape the country’s laws for generations to come. An
3h
NYT > Science

Op-Ed Contributor: Why Trump’s N.I.H. Cuts Should Worry UsThe president’s stance on science funding could have serious consequences.
3h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Princess Anne: GM crops 'have real benefits'Princess Anne has told the BBC's Farming Today she believes gene technology has important benefits to offer in terms of providing food.
3h
The Guardian

Industrial strategy risks leaving millions stifled and stuck | Liam Booth-Smith It’s time to support the 36 million people who don’t live in big metropolises. The industrial strategy needs to be locally led by towns and small cities All towns and cities in England should be asking; what does the government’s industrial strategy mean for us? The government’s focus has been on making a success of a small number of big cities – but there are 36.1 million people who don’t live i
3h
The Atlantic

Trump Brags That He Cost a Man His Livelihood During the 2016 election, dozens of voters told me they would vote for Donald Trump partly because they were sick of “social justice warriors” and political correctness. “There is no saying ‘Hey, I disagree with you,’ it's just instant shunning,” a 22-year-old told me in a long exchange on the subject. “Say things online, and they'll try to find out who you are and potentially even get you fired
3h
The Atlantic

How Fear of Deportation Puts Stress on Families When Natividad Gonzalez packs her daughters’ homework and lunches for school each morning, she slips a freshly charged cell phone into her eldest child’s bag. The 11-year-old knows the plan: If she and her younger sister, age 8, walk home from the bus to find an empty house, she’s supposed to call Gonzalez’s friend who will come get them. Her daughter also knows the combination to the family safe
3h
The Atlantic

The Trump Administration’s Gradual Retreat From Europe Diplomacy is a subtle art, which is why it is often over-interpreted. Reports on Monday that U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson will visit Russia in April but not attend a meeting of NATO foreign ministers earlier in the month are being lumped together as a sign that the Trump administration is courting Russia and rejecting its European allies—a sign that comes just after the FBI director conf
3h
Dagens Medicin

Danske Regioner klar med plan til at forhindre flere drab på bostederDanske Regioner vil have 200 nye pladser på psykiatriske afdelinger og kommunale botilbud. Dansk Sygeplejeråd, Lægeforeningen og Dansk Psykiatrisk Selskab er positive.
3h
Ingeniøren

Transportminister: Enklere takstsystem medfører dyrere billetterOle Birk Olesen medgiver, at takstreformen for rejser med bus og tog ingenlunde har resulteret i et gennemskueligt prissystem på alle strækninger. Pendlerklub dadler politikere for slet ikke at have sat sig ind i tingene.
4h
The Guardian

Coal in 'freefall' as new power plants dive by two-thirds Green groups’ report says move to cleaner energy in China and India is discouraging the building of coal-fired units The amount of new coal power being built around the world fell by nearly two-thirds last year, prompting campaigners to claim the polluting fossil fuel was in freefall. The dramatic decline in new coal-fired units was overwhelmingly due to policy shifts in China and India and subse
4h
The Guardian

‘The rate of drug-related deaths is at scandalous proportions’ | Anushka Asthana New psychoactive drugs will add to the problem if we don’t deal with them properly, says Lord Carlile, chairman of Addaction On 11 September, 2001, hours before terrorists hijacked four planes and ploughed them into New York’s twin towers and the Pentagon, murdering almost 3,000 people, Lord Carlile of Berriew accepted an appointment as Britain’s independent reviewer of terrorism legislation. Fro
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The Guardian

How the phone case became the most important part of your wardrobeThis year’s must-have accessory isn’t a handbag, it’s a Louis Vuitton phone case – sealing a trend that speaks volumes about our selfie-obsessed times At this exact moment, which of the following is closest to your person: your wallet, your keys, or your phone? The answer is most likely your phone. They have become the things we are never parted from; they are the things that most quickly induce b
4h
The Guardian

Markets tumble as impatience mounts over Trump's policies - business live Shares fall in Europe and Asia after Wall Street suffered its worst day this year amid concerns that President Trump will not be able to deliver on policy pledges FTSE 100 falls 1% as negative sentiment spreads Pound steadies above $1.24 12.20pm GMT Earlier the Bank of England published its latest agents’ summary of business conditions . The Bank has 12 regional agents who have discussions with a
4h
The Guardian

London Taxi Company opens £300m Coventry plant for electric cabs First new UK car plant for more than a decade, creating 1,000 jobs, comes amid industry uncertainty over Brexit The first new car plant in Britain for more than a decade will open in Coventry on Wednesday, creating more than 1,000 jobs and boosting the automotive industry despite concerns that uncertainty caused by Brexit could hold back new investment. The London Taxi Company (LTC), maker of the
4h
The Atlantic

The Salesman in Chief Goes All In on Health Care It’s not exactly controversial to note that, when it comes to health-care policy, the president of the United States doesn’t know his ear from his elbow. His comment last month that “Nobody knew health care could be so complicated!” was, by Trumpian standards, an impressively frank admission of ignorance—not merely of the U.S. health care system itself, but of several decades of political attempt
4h
The Guardian

The Road to Somewhere by David Goodhart – a liberal’s rightwing turn on immigration Is your tribe the ‘Somewheres’ or the ‘Anywheres’? A book on the faultlines that divide Brexit Britain is timely but misguided Forget the title, there will be plenty of people – Guardian readers among them – who’ll take one look at this book and refuse to get past the author’s name. For many on the liberal left, David Goodhart became persona non grata more than a decade ago. In 2004, he wrote an
4h
The Guardian

What support does your employer give to fathers? Many fathers report a lack of workplace flexibility and say employers are unsupportive of their family responsibilities. Share your experiences with us Workplace support for fathers is to be examined by the Women and Equalities Committee on Wednesday, following an inquiry into whether workplaces are providing adequate assistance to fathers so they can care for their children. Twice the number of
4h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Plans for coal-fired power plants drop by almost half in 2016A report suggests a "dramatic" decline in the number of coal-fired power plants in pre-construction.
4h
The Guardian

After Terminator: franchises that deserve a mercy killing Die Hard is a dead loss, Pirates of the Caribbean is sunk, and the Alien films are lost in space – why Hollywood should pull the plug on tired sequels Related: He won't be back: Schwarzenegger's Terminator franchise terminated The Terminator has finally been terminated. After the awful, needlessly convoluted machinations of Terminator Genisys – which followed the awful, needlessly convoluted mach
4h
The Guardian

The food stores with an appetite for change | Patrick Butler More than 4 million people in Britain regularly go a whole day without eating. For just £2.50 a week, food clubs are filling their cupboards Over two hours before the Brinnington Local Pantry opens, Christine arrives to take her seat at the head of the queue. She says she doesn’t mind waiting in line for food: friends and neighbours will join her there, it’s pretty much a social occasion, and any
4h
The Guardian

Asian shares drop as investors fear Trump won't deliver on promises As the Wall Street Journal attacks the president for ‘not respecting the truth’, investors drop risky assets in rush for safe havens Concerns about the Trump administration’s ability to push through key reforms and deliver on a promised fiscal boost turned share markets across the Asia Pacific region into a sea of red on Wednesday. As investors dumped risky assets and rushed to safe havens such a
4h
The Guardian

How Finland solved homelessness | Interview: Juha Kaakinen The Nordic country is the only EU state not in the midst of a housing crisis. Juha Kaakinen of the Y-Foundation explains how Housing First works This week’s report by EU housing organisation Feantsa has found every country in the EU in the midst of a crisis of homelessness and housing exclusion – with one exception: Finland. Continue reading...
5h
The Guardian

Mhairi Black: benefit sanctions don't work. And Westminster knows it – video Mhairi Black says the Tories’ system of benefit sanctions is designed to victimise the most vulnerable in society. The SNP MP says the regime costs more to administer than it saves, makes those using it more likely to fall into hardship – and shifts blame from those who should be held to account Continue reading...
5h
The Guardian

30 years in the life of one Chinese square – in pictures For three decades, Chen Zhixian has captured the action in the People’s Square of Jincheng. Moving from black and white to colour, then slide film and now digital, the only constant in his photos has been the statue of Chairman Mao Continue reading...
5h
The Guardian

How annexing Crimea allowed Putin to claim he had made Russia great again | Sophie PinkhamThe show of force in Ukraine was played as Russia’s greatest moment since the second world war. But it’s a risky strategy Much of the current tension between Russia and the west is a consequence of Vladimir Putin’s decision to send troops into Ukraine , three years ago this week. In truth, however, that deployment was a reaction to Putin’s own fears of growing western influence in eastern Europe.
5h
The Guardian

Eraserhead: the true story behind David Lynch's surreal shocker Forty years on, the director’s fatherhood freakout has lost none of its horrific power On 19 March 1977, the world changed, after which there was a long uncomfortable silence. The occasion was the first public screening of Eraserhead, the feature debut of David Lynch , at the Filmex festival in Los Angeles. It was not a hot ticket. The film arrived with little advance publicity at the only festiv
5h
The Guardian

László Krasznahorkai on the trail of Herman Melville – in pictures While working on a novella inspired by the author of Moby-Dick, the Hungarian writer László Krasznahorkai found himself enmeshed in a web of connections stretching from Manhattan and Nantucket to London and Berlin. Following in his footsteps, the photographer Ornan Rotem charts a creative journey encompassing Melville, Malcolm Lowry and Lebbeus Woods Continue reading...
5h
The Guardian

'I take portraits of gods': the photography of Nobuyuki Kobayashi – in pictures With his gorgeous and patiently realised black and white images, Kobayashi searches for a spiritual dimension in the calm beauty of nature Continue reading...
5h
Dagens Medicin

Biologisk behandling af svær astma giver forbedret lungefunktionNye data for et fase 3b-studie af det biologiske lægemiddel Nucala peger på signifikant effekt på lungefunktion og livskvalitet.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Florida eco-friendly town opens for businessWith a farm-to-table restaurant, driverless shuttles, homes built with the latest green techniques and a massive solar farm to offset energy use, Florida's first sustainable town is now open for business.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Endangered ibises benefit from joining egret flocksBirds benefit from flocking together—even when they're not of a feather. According to a new study in The Auk: Ornithological Advances, China's endangered Crested Ibises benefit from joining forces with other, more visually-oriented bird species while searching for food.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How reliable are traditional wildlife surveys?To effectively manage a wildlife species, one of the most basic things you need to know is how many of them are out there. However, it's almost never feasible to count every single individual—so how do the results of wildlife surveys compare to true population size? A new study in The Condor: Ornithological Applications tests this using the results of more than thirty years of surveys of the Rocky
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new species of hard coral from the World Heritage-listed Lord Howe Island, AustraliaThe discovery of a new species of hard coral, found on Lord Howe Island, suggests that the fauna of this isolated location in the Tasman Sea off south eastern Australia is even more distinct than previously recognised.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wastewater key to solving global water crisis: UNRecycling the world's wastewater, almost all of which goes untreated, would ease global water shortages while protecting the environment, the United Nations said in a major report on Wednesday.
5h
The Guardian

FTSE CEOs 'earn 386 times more than workers on national living wage' Equality Trust calls on government to force firms to report pay gap between highest-paid and average employee The average FTSE chief executive earns 386 times more than a worker on the national living wage, according to an analysis published by the Equality Trust as it steps up its campaign for new government rules to expose pay gaps. The charity used annual reports from 2015 for all the companie
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Report: Climate outlook improves as fewer coal plants builtLed by cutbacks in China and India, construction of new coal-fired power plants is falling worldwide, improving chances climate goals can be met despite earlier pessimism, three environmental groups said Wednesday.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Q&A: A look at the electronics ban on some flightsThe U.S. and Britain, citing concerns about terrorist attacks, are not allowing passengers on some flights from mostly Middle Eastern and North African countries to bring laptops, tablets and certain other devices on board with them in their carry-on bags. All electronics bigger than a smartphone must be checked in.
5h
The Guardian

New Alzheimer's test can predict age when disease will appear Test based on 31 genetic markers could be used to calculate any individual’s yearly risk for onset of disease Scientists have developed a new genetic test for Alzheimer’s risk that can be used to predict the age at which a person will develop the disease. A high score on the test, which is based on 31 genetic markers, can translate to being diagnosed many years earlier than those with a low-risk
5h
The Guardian

Will Trump be impeached – or is it just a liberal fantasy? Only two presidents in history have been impeached, but murmurs continue to surround Trump. Here’s how the process would work – if it would at all On 21 July 2007, George W Bush underwent surgery to have five polyps removed after what was described as a routine colonoscopy. The date may have been lost to history, but for the rare invocation at the time of a constitutional amendment laying out how
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Earthquake hits Indonesia's Bali island, but no casualtiesAn earthquake has hit Indonesia's resort island of Bali, causing some panic among residents, but there were no immediate reports of damage or casualties.
5h
The Guardian

Wednesday briefing: Labour is shrinking. Blame the leadership? Party membership to fall below half a million … ‘supersized’ prisons for England and Wales … plus, what would it take to impeach Donald Trump? Good morning, Warren Murray with today’s briefing. Continue reading...
6h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

South Korea’s scientists seek change amid political chaos President’s impeachment creates opportunity to shift how nation supports basic research. Nature 543 474 doi: 10.1038/543474a
6h
The Guardian

'In your face, David Attenborough!': Grayson Perry takes home RTS awards Grayson Perry All Man earns artist best presenter and best arts programme prizes at the Royal Television Society awards Grayson Perry has picked up both best presenter and best arts programme prizes at the Royal Television Society awards in London for his latest Channel 4 show. “In your face, David Attenborough!” the artist joked as he came to the stage to collect his prize for Grayson Perry All
6h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Mathematicians create warped worlds in virtual reality Immersive experience set to become accessible to all. Nature 543 473 doi: 10.1038/543473a
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

‘Wavelet revolution’ pioneer scoops top maths award Yves Meyer wins the Abel Prize for role in theory with data applications from digital cinema to pinpointing gravitational waves. Nature 543 476 doi: 10.1038/543476a
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Why a NASA spacecraft could bounce, crunch or sink on icy Europa Landing on Jupiter's moon in search of alien life won't be easy. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21659
6h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Gender bias distorts peer review across fields Editors are more likely to select reviewers of the same gender. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21685
6h
The Guardian

Carbon fibre: the wonder material with a dirty secret Researchers are scrambling for ways to get the strong, light material out of landfill and make it ready for recycling and reuse Carbon fibre is increasingly celebrated as a wonder material for the clean economy. Its unique combination of high strength and low weight has helped drive the wind power revolution and make planes more fuel efficient. Carbon fibre turbine blades can be longer and more r
6h
The Guardian

Princess Anne backs GM crops and livestock – unlike Prince Charles Anne says she would farm GM food and GM livestock a ‘bonus’, while Charles says GM crops will cause ‘biggest disaster environmentally of all time’ Princess Anne has strongly backed genetically modified crops, saying she would grow them on her own land and that GM livestock would be a “bonus”. Her stance puts her sharply at odds with her brother Prince Charles, who has long opposed GM food and has
6h
The Guardian

Why denying refugees the right to work is a catastrophic error | Paul Collier and Alexander Betts It’s not just fleeing conflict that makes victims out of refugees – it’s also denying them the means to become autonomous and productive From the 1980s on, a dominant international approach has been taken towards the majority of the world’s refugees. Concentrated in a small number of host countries, close to war zones, displaced people have been settled in what have become known as “humanitarian
6h
The Guardian

Our MPs look lost. Maybe Theresa May should call an election | Rafael BehrThe platforms Labour and Conservative members were elected on in 2015 have been torn down – largely by their own sides Parliament needs a nickname. It used to be common practice for periods of legislative activity to acquire monikers. Some were more original than others. A three-week session in spring 1640 is unimaginatively remembered as the Short Parliament. It was followed by the Long Parliamen
6h
The Guardian

North Korea missile test ends in failure – reports Missile appears to have exploded in midair seconds after launch, days after the regime claimed a major breakthrough in rocket development North Korea’s latest missile launch appeared to have ended in failure on Wednesday, South Korean defence officials said, three days after the North claimed a major breakthrough in its rocket development program . The reported launch failure comes as the North i
6h
New on MIT Technology Review

Andrew Ng Is Leaving Baidu in Search of a Big New AI MissionOne of the world’s leading experts in artificial intelligence is officially on the market, and he says he wants to advance AI beyond the tech industry.
6h
Ingeniøren

Ni DJØF'er og én fhv. KMD-direktør skal stoppe it-skandaler: »Der kommer intet banebrydende« https://www.version2.dk/artikel/ni-embedsmaend-tidligere-adm-direktoer-kmd-de-skal-forandre-statens-it-strategi-1074723 Minister Sophie Løhde har fremlagt en arbejdsgruppe, der skal klargøre Danmarks fremtidige it-strategi. Men det er nok tvivlsomt, om der kommer nogen forandring, mener kritiker. Version2
7h
Ingeniøren

Frivilligt arbejde gavner jobsøgeren. Men hvor meget? Emner Arbejdsmarked https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/frivilligt-arbejde-gavner-jobsoegeren-hvor-meget-7138 Jobfinder har spurgt en række virksomheder, hvorvidt frivilligt arbejde har indflydelse, når de ansætter. Læs, hvad Netcompany, Danfoss og Deloitte mener. Jobfinder
7h
Ingeniøren

Analytiker: Jeg har ikke set et blockchainprojekt, der ikke ville være bedre uden blockchain https://www.version2.dk/artikel/analytiker-jeg-har-ikke-set-blockchainprojekt-ikke-ville-vaere-bedre-uden-blockchain-1074744 Blockchain har et kæmpe potentiale. Men i dag er teknologien mest effektiv til at sikre funding til startups, siger Gartner-analytiker. Version2
7h
The Guardian

Kong: Skull Island – why do Hollywood blockbusters have such Trump-like politics? From Godzilla to Assassin’s Creed, Hollywood is churning out fantasies of authoritarian rule, but it doesn’t have to be this way When Guardian reviewer Peter Bradshaw wrote that only a theory of “de-evolution” could account for the truly woeful Kong: Skull Island, he was right in more ways than one. The film is indeed a total mess, but its politics are peculiarly regressive, too. To say that it m
7h
The Guardian

Rex Tillerson: 'I didn't want this job … my wife told me I'm supposed to do this' Secretary of state said he had not met Donald Trump before he was summoned to Trump Tower to discuss ‘the world’ and was offered the role Rex Tillerson has said he did not want to be US secretary of state and only took the job because his wife convinced him to do it. The former ExxonMobil oil executive revealed his initial reluctance in an interview published after a controversial trip to Asia an
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Ingeniøren

Fugtige solsikkeskaller satte ild i Dong-lagerBiomasse, der har ligget for længe på lager, og støv fra træpiller er skyld i, at Hovedstadens Beredskab har været flittig gæst på Avedøreværket. Men strammere procedurer over for leverandører og hurtigere omsætningstid for biomasse skulle nu have løst problemet.
8h
Gizmodo

This Video Will Be Very Important One Day GIF: Allan Bradley Hell, it might be important today. I’m a little out of touch with the kids these days. But I definitely know that there are young people who are completely unaware of the existence of VHS tapes. For those of us who grew up with them, there’s a strong feeling of nostalgia for the ritual of popping them in and out of the VCR. Most people of a certain age will fondly recall the cl
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new species of hard coral from the World Heritage-listed Lord Howe Island, AustraliaThe discovery of a new species of hard coral, found on Lord Howe Island, suggests that the fauna of this isolated location in the Tasman Sea off south eastern Australia is even more distinct than previously recognised. Even though the World Heritage-listed site has been long known for its biodiversity, the new species, recently described in the open access journal ZooKeys, is the first coral known
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

People's romantic choices share characteristics, but for different reasonsThe people one dates share many similarities -- both physically and personality-wise -- a new University of California study has found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How physical activity and sedentary time affect adolescents' bonesA large prospective study in 309 adolescent boys and girls underscores the importance of physical activity for developing bone strength during growth. Adolescents who participated in moderate to intense physical activity during growth spurt years exhibited greater bone mass in areas that contribute to superior bone strength. The study also found mixed effects of sedentary time.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How children's temperament and environment shape their problem-solving abilitiesA new study indicates that early experiences of environmental harshness, in combination with a child's temperament, can influence later problem-solving abilities.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Significant increase in number of women tested for BRCA gene, but many high-risk patients still missing outPreviously, mainly women with a history of cancer were referred for genetic testing, but as awareness has grown, more low-risk women are undergoing BRCA testing. A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found that the proportion of women without a history of cancer who underwent BRCA testing rose sharply from 24.3% in 2004 to 61.5% in 2014.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Biologic treatments for inflammatory bowel disease help heal the intestineAlthough anti-inflammatory treatments are quite effective at reducing symptoms in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, the mucosal lining of the intestine often remains ulcerated, and many patients still ultimately require surgery. Because of this, the goal of treatment is shifting towards mucosal healing rather than just symptom relief.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study reveals surprises concerning COPD and smokingA new study challenges the widely accepted but oversimplified description of airway inflammation in smokers and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Does boosting 'good' cholesterol really improve your health?A new review addresses the mysteries behind 'good' HDL cholesterol and why boosting its levels does not necessarily provide protection from cardiovascular risk for patients. It appears that augmenting the function of HDL cholesterol, rather than its concentration, is key.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Some blood thinners may increase heart attack riskA new study has examined whether different blood thinning medications prescribed to prevent strokes in patients with atrial fibrillation might increase the risk of heart attacks.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Many adults have insufficient knowledge about heart failureIn the largest German survey on heart failure to date, investigators found that the overall awareness of heart failure has not increased over the past decade and is not at a satisfactory level.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Loss of smell linked to increased risk of early deathIn a study of adults aged 40 to 90 years who were followed for 10 years, poor smell was linked with an increased risk of dying.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How reliable are traditional wildlife surveys?To effectively manage a wildlife species, one of the most basic things you need to know is how many of them are out there. However, it's almost never feasible to count every single individual -- so how do the results of wildlife surveys compare to true population size? A new study in The Condor: Ornithological Applications tests this using the results of more than thirty years of surveys of the Ro
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Endangered ibises benefit from joining egret flocksBirds benefit from flocking together -- even when they're not of a feather. According to a new study in The Auk: Ornithological Advances, China's endangered crested ibises benefit from joining forces with other, more visually-oriented bird species while searching for food.
8h
The Scientist RSS

LabQuiz: iPSCsAre you the lab expert on induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)? Take our test to find out how much you really know.
8h
New on MIT Technology Review

Controlling VR with Your MindThe startup Neurable thinks its brain-computer interface will be fast and accurate enough for playing games in VR.
8h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Genetically-modified crops have benefits - Princess AnneThe Princess Royal's views in a BBC radio show appear to be at odds with those of the Prince of Wales.
8h
Science : NPR

Researchers Test Hotter, Faster And Cleaner Way To Fight Oil Spills The Flame Refluxer is essentially a big copper blanket: think Brillo pad of wool sandwiched between mesh. Using it while burning off oil yields less air pollution and residue that harms marine life. (Image credit: Courtesy of Worcester Polytechnic Institute)
8h
Gizmodo

Mass Effect: Andromeda: The Kotaku Review Mass Effect: Andromeda sprawls and sprawls, eagerly offering you so much to see and do that it nearly loses itself in the process. In this massive and uncertain voyage into an alien galaxy, the best way to center yourself is to hold on to other people, and trust that the mission will accomplish at least some of its ambitious goals. In Bioware’s new third-person action RPG, you play as Ryder, a hu
8h
BBC News - Science & Environment

'Dispersal machines'How the toxic pests, described as "dispersal machines", are thwarting efforts to halt their advance.
9h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Fossil named after Sir David AttenboroughThe ancient arthropod, found in Herefordshire, joins a long list of items named after the TV legend.
9h
The Guardian

British war veteran granted permanent residency in Australia, ending visa drama James and Peggie Bradley were faced with the threat of being deported back to Britain because James had failed a medical examination A 92-year-old English second world war veteran and his wife have been granted permanent residency in Australia following a decade of uncertainty. After 10 years in Sydney, James and Peggie Bradley were faced with the threat of being deported back to Britain because
9h
Gizmodo

New Options for Getting Your Cat High Can Only Be a Good Thing GIF: YouTube Catnip has long been the preferred fix for cats. Given just a tiny whiff of the plant, most cats will temporarily turn into an approximation of a fully loaded, 1970s era Dennis Hopper. But for some cats, it’s as pointless as an O’Douls. A new study has found three new options that could allow all cats to get totally twisted. Nepeta cataria was first discovered to send cats into a fre
9h
The Atlantic

Trump's Credibility Crisis Arrives Donald Trump’s first two months in office have obviously been rocky. But the disruptions have mainly been internally generated—Trump’s tweets, the tensions and shakeups in his staff, his battles with the press, the investigations—rather than responses to genuine external emergencies. By historic standards, not much has really “happened” in the outside world since January 20. Sooner or later, some
10h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Big Chief Talks Smack and Shows You His Shop In Virtual Reality (360 Video) Mega Race | Monday March 27 at 9/8c Go inside the shop at Midwest Street Cars as Big Chief teases the super secret rocketship he's going to use to smash Richard Rawlings and the Gas Monkeys into the ground! Get revved up and vote for your favorites! http://www.discovery.com/MegaRace Catch up with full episodes streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/fast-n-loud/ https://www.di
10h
NYT > Science

Trump Lays Plans to Reverse Obama’s Climate Change LegacyThe White House is preparing to dismantle major policy actions of the Obama era, including a plan to close hundreds of heavily polluting power plants.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global

Aggressed-Upon Monkeys Take Revenge on Aggressor's CroniesJapanese macaques at the receiving end of aggression tend to then take it out on a close associate or family member of the original aggressor. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
The Guardian

'Better de-horned than dead' – zoo chops rhino horns to foil poachers Czech zoo takes saw to the horns of its 21 rhinoceroses in response to deadly attack at Paris wildlife park this month A Czech zoo has started to remove the horns from its 21 rhinos as a precaution after the recent killing of a rhinoceros at a wildlife park in France by assailants who stole the animal’s horn. With rhino horns considered a wonder cure in Asia – for everything from cancer, colds an
11h
Big Think

Scientists Discover Fast-Moving Galaxies That May Contradict Einstein's Theory of Gravity Scientists discover unusual galaxies that raise questions about Einstein's theory of gravity and the existence of dark matter. Read More
11h
Gizmodo

Texas Senate Passes Bill Allowing Doctors to Withhold Information From Pregnant Women Photo: Getty In a mind-bogglingly dangerous move, conservatives in the Texas Senate have passed a bill that some say would make it legal for doctors to lie to pregnant women about discoveries made during prenatal testing. Texas Senate Bill 25 makes it illegal to sue a doctor for what’s known as a “wrongful birth.” Though rare , doctors have been sued in the past for not informing women about feta
11h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Sea otters ahead of dolphins in using toolsSea otters may have been using stone tools for thousands or even millions of years, say scientists.
11h
The Guardian

Using the pill can protect women from certain cancers 'for up to 30 years' From data compiled over 44 years, researchers found women were protected from bowel, endometrial and ovarian cancer by taking the contraceptive pill Women who have taken the contraceptive pill are protected from some types of cancer for as long as 30 years after they stopped taking it, according to new research. Those who have used the pill “during their reproductive years” are less likely to hav
11h
The Guardian

If you think dating is hard, try doing it as a female comedian | Nikki Britton The choice to go into comedy coincided with the sharp descent of Nikki Britton’s love life. Here, she examines why As I sit here alone on a Sunday night, hairy-legged and bloated, typing the words “hairy-legged and bloated”, it dawns on me that sharing, or oversharing, might be part of the reason why – when it comes to a successful dating career – I am far from an oracle. When I was asked to writ
11h
The Guardian

'Disputed by multiple fact-checkers': Facebook rolls out new alert to combat fake news Feature – which flags content as ‘disputed’ – trialled on story that falsely claimed thousands of Irish people were brought to the US as slaves Facebook has started rolling out its third-party fact-checking tool in the fight against fake news, alerting users to “disputed content”. The site announced in December it would be partnering with independent fact-checkers to crack down on the spread of m
11h
Scientific American Content: Global

Biology's Lessons For BusinessMartin K. Reeves and Simon Levin talk about their Scientific American essay "Building a Resilient Business Inspired by Biology." -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
NYT > Science

9 Deaths Are Linked to Rare Cancer From Breast ImplantsThe problem is more likely to occur with textured implants than with smooth implants, the F.D.A. said, and it is usually treatable and not often fatal.
11h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Tool use in sea otters doesn't run in the familyA genetic study suggests that tool-use behavior isn’t hereditary in sea otters, and that only some animals need to use tools due to the type of food available in their ecosystem.
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Spintronic technology advances with newly designed magnetic tunnel junctionsMagnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) have played a central role in spintronic devices, and researchers are working to improve their performance. A prominent achievement that accelerated the technology's practical applications was the realization of giant tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) ratios by using rock-salt type MgO crystalline barrier. Researchers have now succeeded in applying MgGa2O4 to a tunnel
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Revealing the microscopic mechanisms in perovskite solar cellsIn just a few years, researchers have achieved remarkable power conversion efficiency with materials with perovskite crystal structure, comparable with the best photovoltaic materials available. Now, researchers have revealed the physics for how an important component of a perovskite solar cell works -- a finding that could lead to improved solar cells or even newer and better materials.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Estimating the glass transition temperature for polymers in 'confined geometries'Polystyrene has a glass transition temperature of about 100 C -- at room temperature it behaves like a solid material. But as its temperature approaches the glass transition temperature, polystyrene’s mechanical properties change drastically. This makes the ability to approximate glass transitions for confined geometries in polymers highly desirable. And now, as researchers report that they’ve dev
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Manipulating magnetic texturesWhile the ability to easily control the magnetic properties of small electronic systems is highly desirable for future small electronics and data storage, an effective solution has proven to be extremely elusive. But now, a group of researchers reports a simple way to gain control of magnetism that starts by controlling the shape of the systems.
12h
Gizmodo

Senator Ted Cruz Has Forever Tainted The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy Ted Cruz during today’s confirmation hearing (Photo: AP) You will never be able to enjoy the fun—and easy—question “What’s the answer to the ultimate question of life, the universe, and everything?” again. Not once you’ve seen Senator Ted Cruz start off the confirmation hearing of Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, Neil Gorsuch, with it. It’s partly so that Cruz can trot out a pop culture reference i
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A new model for capillary rise in nano-channels offers insights into improved hydraulic fracturing (fracking)With fracking, scientists have calculated the expected level of capillary rise with the Lucas-Washburn equation, a mathematical model whose earliest parameters were first devised nearly a century ago. The challenge, however, is that that the equation has not been completely accurate in predicting the actual rise observed in nano-capillary laboratory experiments.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Weekend surgery has no impact on death risk, study showsDay of the week did not affect the survival chances of people undergoing emergency surgery, research in Scotland has found. The findings from the University of Edinburgh challenge the results of previous studies, which had suggested that those who undergo elective surgery at the end of the week are at a greater risk of dying.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

430 million-year-old fossil named in honor of Sir David AttenboroughAn international team of scientists led by the University of Leicester has discovered a new 430 million-year-old fossil and has named it in honor of Sir David Attenborough -- who grew up on the University campus.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Universe's ultraviolet background could provide clues about missing galaxiesAstronomers have developed a way to detect the ultraviolet background of the universe, which could help explain why there are so few small galaxies in the cosmos.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

China's economic growth could help other developing countriesResearch published today examines China's recent successful economic growth and how this could be applied to help other developing countries grow their economies.
12h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Nasa 'smallsats' open up new planetary frontierNasa plans small satellite missions, which could open up new ways of exploring the Solar System.
12h
Ars Technica

Chicago teen reportedly gang-raped as 40 people watched on Facebook Live Enlarge (credit: Scott Olson/Getty Images ) A 15-year-old girl in Chicago was reportedly recently sexually assaulted by “five or six men or boys on Facebook Live,” according to the Associated Press . This is the second such reported attack in Chicago that was broadcast on Facebook this year alone. In January, four teens were arrested in connection to a torture video . The Chicago Tribune reported
12h
Futurity.org

These chimps in Uganda enjoy really long lives Under the right ecological conditions, some of our close primate relatives can lead surprisingly long lives in the wild, according to a 20-year demographic study of a large chimpanzee community in Uganda’s Kibale National Park. In its sample of 306 chimpanzees, the study establishes an average life expectancy of about 33 years, nearly twice as high as that of other chimpanzee communities and with
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The Guardian

Four 'supersized' prisons to be built in England and Wales Justice secretary announces plan to create 5,000 prison places in east Yorkshire, Wigan, Rochester and Port Talbot The justice secretary is to announce plans to build four new “supersized” jails in England and Wales, creating a total of 5,000 modern prison places. Sites at Full Sutton in east Yorkshire, Hindley in Wigan, Rochester in Kent and Port Talbot in south Wales have been earmarked for dev
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The Guardian

Womb cancer risk grows with extra waist weight, study suggests Every increase of 0.1 units in the ratio between waist and hip raises the risk of developing the disease by 21%, researchers say Women who have a higher waist to hip ratio could have an increased risk of womb cancer, a study suggests. Researchers writing in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) found that for every increase of 0.1 units in the ratio between waist and hip, the risk of developing the d
12h
The Guardian

About 1,000 schools in England 'at risk of cuts well in to next decade' Institute for Fiscal Studies finds national funding formula proposed by government could leave some with extra cuts of 7% The government’s plans for school funding could leave many institutions in England facing deep cuts well into the next decade, a thinktank has warned. According to research by the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS), the proposed national funding formula could leave 1,000 schoo
12h
The Guardian

World Water Day: one in four children will live with water scarcity by 2040 Unicef report says climate change and conflict are intensifying risks to children of living without enough water, and that the poorest will suffer most One in four of the world’s children will be living in areas with extremely limited water resources by 2040 as a result of climate change, the UN has warned. Within two decades, 600 million children will be in regions enduring extreme water stress,
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The Guardian

Life review – Jake Gyllenhaal hits the retro rockets for sub-Alien space horror Gyllenhaal and Ryan Reynolds play members of a scientific team investigating material from Mars that turns out to contain a hostile life-form Like the anonymous phone call in a horror film that turns out to be coming from inside the house, Life is a sci-fi thriller about a contamination crisis: a crisis that goes on pretty much uninterruptedly for around an hour and three quarters. It’s a service
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Ars Technica

Hope fades for cheap TV-over-Internet as FilmOn loses copyright fight [Updated] Enlarge / FilmOn CEO Alkiviades "Alki" David at an event in Los Angeles in 2015. (credit: Vivien Killilea / WireImage ) Remember the startup Aereo? That's the Boston-based outfit that tried to sell TV over the Internet for $8 a month before it was stymied by the TV networks. The networks argued that Aereo's system infringed their copyrighted programs. After years of legal battles, the Supreme Cou
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

430 million-year-old fossil named in honor of Sir David AttenboroughAn international team of scientists led by the University of Leicester has discovered a new 430 million-year-old fossil and has named it in honour of Sir David Attenborough - who grew up on the University campus.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Universe's ultraviolet background could provide clues about missing galaxiesAstronomers have developed a way to detect the ultraviolet (UV) background of the Universe, which could help explain why there are so few small galaxies in the cosmos.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China's economic growth could help other developing countriesResearch published today examines China's recent successful economic growth and how this could be applied to help other developing countries grow their economies.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Producing radioisotopes for medical imaging, disease treatmentAccelerators built to explore the building blocks of matter help to feed the nation's need for certain critical radioisotopes used to diagnose, track, and treat disease.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

World's most efficient, environment-friendly solar cellsIn the future, solar cells can become twice as efficient by employing a few smart little nano-tricks, suggest investigators in a new report.
12h
The Guardian

An American in Paris five-star review – Minnelli musical becomes theatrical gold Dominion, London Christopher Wheeldon’s superb show is a riot of colour and movement, with irresistible dance routines and a wealth of Gerhswin classics A magical transformation has taken place. Aside from its sensational climactic ballet, the 1951 Hollywood movie on which this show is based offers a ludicrously stagey vision of Paris filled with cheery gendarmes and chirping kids. But Christophe
12h
Gizmodo

The Sequel to the Most Affordable Sonicare Just Got a Smile-Inducing Discount Philips Sonicare Essence+ , $30 after $10 coupon Philips’ entry-level Sonicare Essence electric toothbrush has long been a reader favorite, and now Amazon’s running the best deal we’ve seen on the sequel, the Essence+ . The big improvement here is the brush head: Rather than the screw-on E-series heads (which have a tendency to collect sludge along the seam), the Essence+ uses standard Sonicare s
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Looking for signs of the Big Bang in the desertThe silence of an immense desolate land in which to search for reverberations coming from the time at which everything began. The Simons Observatory will be built in the Chilean Atacama desert at an altitude of several thousand meters for the purposes of studying primordial gravitational waves which originated in the first instants of the Big Bang.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cuantec: New force in the fight against food wasteCuanTec is a start-up company with a positive and practical solution to the disposal of seafood waste, which exacts a heavy cost, both financially and environmentally.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Research: From Arctic to the MediterraneanLakes, rivers, estuaries and oceans are closely connected. Despite this, aquatic research is still divided in marine and freshwater sciences. Now, scientists from 19 leading research institutes and universities and two enterprises from 12 countries across Europe aim to change this and have joined forces in the project "AQUACOSM - Network of Leading European AQUAtic MesoCOSM Facilities Connecting M
13h
The Guardian

Manchester United to face Real Madrid and Barcelona in pre-season US tour• Manchester City also lined up for International Champions Cup • Mourinho’s side warm up against two Major League Soccer teams Manchester United will face Real Madrid, Barcelona and Manchester City this summer in the International Champions Cup in the United States. United start their pre-season tour with two games against Major League Soccer sides, Los Angeles Galaxy on 15 July and Real Salt Lak
13h
The Guardian

Power Rangers review – colour-coded superpowers revealed in goofy origins story It may be the most unlikely and least welcome superhero movie of the year – or even the decade – but this reboot actually benefits from lowered expectations You can rationalise and contextualise and say that the Marvel effect means any Lycra-clad saviour with an iota of brand recognition is now apt for revival in some format. Once the lights dim, however, nothing can prepare you for the ontologic
13h
The Guardian

Wales’s Chris Coleman plots to sink Ireland in the land of his father Return to Dublin stirs fond memories for the Wales manager once pursued by Jack Charlton but World Cup qualifying points are his priority When all the drama is over at the Aviva Stadium late on Friday evening, following a World Cup qualifier against the Republic of Ireland that Wales can ill-afford to lose, Chris Coleman will find a quiet moment to enjoy a pint of Guinness and remember his late f
13h
BBC News - Science & Environment

President jokes while signing space agency funding billPresident jokes while signing space agency funding bill
13h
The Guardian

Gareth Southgate looks to Marcus Rashford and sets bar high for England• Manager tells his players their aim must be to win 2018 World Cup • England face world champions Germany in friendly in Dortmund Gareth Southgate takes charge of his first match since taking the England job full time insisting he is willing to instigate more “challenging conversations and difficult decisions” to put together a side capable of ending the cycle of national team disappointment. Onc
13h
Gizmodo

Gab CEO Andrew Torba Is Mad Online Image: screengrab via Periscope Today the mobile version of Gab.ai—the invite-only free( ish ) speech social network that has become the de facto home for many of the alt-right ecelebrities banned from Twitter—was not approved for placement on Apple’s App Store. CEO Andrew Torba isn’t taking it well. In an eight-minute Periscope stream , Torba, in a green MAGA hat and unlicensed LEGO Trump t-shir
13h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Tough Negotiations What We’re Following War and Peace: Martin McGuinness, the former commander of the Irish Republican Army who later worked to restore peace as a leader of the Sinn Fein party, has died at age 66 . A glimpse of his life in his own words is here . McGuinness’s violent past made him a controversial figure in Ireland, but he’s also remembered for his reconciliation work, including a close working rela
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The Lancet Public Health: The global tobacco control treaty has reducedThe global tobacco control treaty has increased the adoption of tobacco reduction measures around the world, which has led to a 2.5 percent reduction in global smoking rates, according to a study published in The Lancet Public Health.
13h
Live Science

French Mathematician Yves Meyer Wins Top Prize for 'Wavelet Theory'Yves Meyer, a French mathematician who did pioneering work on a signal processing tool known as wavelet analysis, has won the Abel Prize, one of the top math prizes.
14h
Big Think

The US Military Will Usher in a Widespread Use of Laser Weapons in the 2020s The US Air Force and DARPA are even working on laser shielding. That’s right. Force fields. Read More
14h
Live Science

Infant's Rare 'Parasitic Twin' Successfully Removed with SurgeryA 10-month-old girl who was born with a rare "parasitic twin" attached to her body has undergone a successful surgery.
14h
Gizmodo

Lifehacker Where to Hide If a Nuclear Bomb Goes Off In Your Area | Kotaku Mass Effect: Andromeda: Th Lifehacker Where to Hide If a Nuclear Bomb Goes Off In Your Area | Kotaku Mass Effect: Andromeda: The Kotaku Review | io9 Can You Figure Out Why Lucasfilm Hates This Photo of Luke Skywalker? | Jalopnik Edd China Is Leaving Wheeler Dealers Because Velocity Wants To Make The Show Worse |
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The Guardian

NHS delays leave thousands facing long wait for wheelchairs Campaigners call for equality of access for disabled people as first official figures point to ‘postcode lottery’ in provisions Thousands of disabled people face long delays to receive an NHS wheelchair, the first official figures on the subject show. Related: Wheelchairs have come a long way – shame the NHS hasn’t | Lucy Webster Continue reading...
14h
Ars Technica

How police unmasked suspect accused of sending seizure-inducing tweet (credit: zodman ) The man accused of sending a Newsweek writer a seizure-inducing tweet left behind a digital trail that the Dallas Police Department traced—beginning with the @jew_goldstein Twitter handle, leading to a burner mobile phone SIM card, and ending with an Apple iCloud account, according to federal court documents unsealed in the case. Rivello with driver's license. (credit: Court doc
14h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

These Moonshiners Are Making A Pre-Dawn Run Through The Bayou To Deliver Their Goods #Moonshiners | Tuesdays at 9/8c on Discovery David and Patti navigate through the bayou at night to deliver their last moonshine batch of the season. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/moonshiners/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=discoverynetworks Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.
14h
The Atlantic

The Stock Market’s Biggest Decline Since Trump’s Election For the past few months, President Donald Trump has happily, and consistently, claimed credit for at least one economic indicator: the rising stock market. But on Tuesday, the Dow, Nasdaq, and S&P—the indices that Trump loves to point to as proof of his economic success—all precipitously declined by at least a full percentage point, the worst showing since Trump’s victory. Both the S&P 500 and th
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Gizmodo

Edd China Is Leaving Wheeler Dealers Because Velocity Wants To Make The Show Worse I can’t think of any automotive television show as universally enjoyed among gearheads of all types than Wheeler Dealers . Unusually for me, I know exactly why this is: the show’s genial mechanic, Edd China . Unfortunately, Edd’s time with the very popular show is coming to an end, but, true to Edd form, it’s for good reasons. Edd was the antithesis of the usual car-reality-show mechanic: where m
14h
Live Science

Marijuana Chemical Could Help Fight AnxietyCannabidiol could be used in addition to talk therapy to treat anxiety disorders, researchers say, although more study of the compound is needed.
14h
The Guardian

North Korea 'accelerates' nuclear plan and is 'not afraid' of more US sanctions North Korean diplomat said ‘hostile activities’ of US and South Korea have pushed development of ‘pre-emptive first strike capability’ forward North Korea has nothing to fear from any US move to broaden sanctions aimed at cutting it off from the global financial system and will pursue “acceleration” of its nuclear and missile programmes, according to a senior diplomat. This includes developing a
14h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: The Art of the Ultimatum Today in 5 Lines During a private meeting with House Republicans, President Trump reportedly told lawmakers that they could lose their seats in 2018 if they don’t back the GOP health-care bill. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell issued a similar warning , telling reporters “the American people would be deeply disappointed” if Republican dissenters keep the bill from passing the House on Thurs
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

No new threat led to airline laptop limits, officials sayU.S. and British officials said Tuesday the decision to bar laptops and tablets from the cabins of some international flights wasn't based on any specific threat but on longstanding concerns about terrorists targeting jetliners.
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The Scientist RSS

What Budget Cuts Might Mean for US ScienceA look at the historical effects of downsized research funding suggests that the Trump administration’s proposed budget could hit early-career scientists the hardest.
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Live Science

Stephen Hawking Fears He's Not Welcome in Trump's USHawking also said climate change is "one of the greatest dangers we face."
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Gizmodo

Wildfires Have Already Toasted a Staggering Amount of Land in the US This Year Image: Wikimedia The 2017 US wildfire season is off to alarming start, with thousands of individual fires having scorched through 2 million acres since the start of the year. That’s nearly 10 times more land burned than what’s typically seen at this stage of the season—and a troubling sign of things to come. According to data presented by the National Interagency Fire Center , there were 10,829 i
15h
The Guardian

Steve Bell on the Labour party and 'secret plots' – cartoon Continue reading...
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How prenatal maternal infections may affect genetic factors in Autism spectrum disorderIn a new study, researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine, University of Cyprus and Stanford University map the complex biological cascade caused by MIA: the expression of multiple genes involved in autism are turned up or down by MIA, affecting key aspects of prenatal brain development that may increase risk for atypical development later in life.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Transgender college freshmen drink more, experience more blackoutsA survey of more than 422,000 college freshmen found that students who identified as transgender were more likely than their cisgender peers to experience negative consequences from drinking, including memory blackouts, academic problems and conflicts such as arguments or physical fights.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

HIV co-infection influences natural selection on M. tuberculosisWhile M. tuberculosis has been evolving with humans for thousands of years, HIV co-infections create host immunological environments that this bacterium has not encountered before and could, therefore, be nudging it to evolve new characteristics. Now, an evolutionary analysis of M. tuberculosis full genome sequences from HIV uninfected and HIV co-infected individuals uncovered specific sites withi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wells Fargo: All ATMs will take phone codes, not just cardsWells Fargo plans to upgrade all 13,000 of its ATMs next week to allow customers to access their funds using their cellphones instead of traditional bank cards.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bird flu confirmed in two poultry flocks in north AlabamaAlabama officials have confirmed bird flu in two poultry flocks, just a week after three commercial breeders had to kill their chickens across the state line in Tennessee.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New security measure could cause travelers to reroute tripsA new U.S. security measure banning many electronic devices on flights from eight mostly Muslim countries is leading travelers to reconsider their plans to fly through some airports in the Middle East.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists discover new 'boat' form of promising semiconductor GeSePrinceton researchers have discovered a new form of the simple compound GeSe that has surprisingly escaped detection until now. This so-called beta-GeSe compound has a ring type structure like graphene and its monolayer form could have similarly valuable properties for electronic applications, according to the study published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.
15h
Gizmodo

Your Favorite Music App Has Higher Quality Audio Than You Think Image: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo Chances are you’ve signed up to at least one streaming service —but are you making the most of the best-quality music on offer? A quick audit of your apps can boost both streaming and downloaded bit-rates, so you’re always assured of the highest fidelity audio flowing through your pricy headphones to your eardrums. Which means you hear more of the music and a little less
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Before and after: Unique changes spotted on comet 67p/Churyumov-GerasimenkoA study published March 21, 2017 in the journal Science summarizes the types of surface changes observed during the two years that the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft spent investigating comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Notable differences are seen before and after the comet's most active period—perihelion—when it reached its closest point to the Sun along its orbit.
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Gizmodo

Ted Cruz Graciously Suggests Launching Himself Into Space Today, president Donald Trump signed S.442 , aka the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Transition Authorization Act of 2017, which authorizes $19.5 billion in funding for the agency in 2018. The bill emphasizes the importance of human spaceflight and exploring the solar system—but says nothing about the president’s plan to slash NASA’s entire educational department . “I’m delighted to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

HIV co-infection influences natural selection on M. tuberculosisTuberculosis (TB) remains a major global health problem, with 10 million cases and 2 million deaths per year, according to the World Health Organization. The only available vaccine is effective in children but its effect wanes in older children and adults.
15h
The Guardian

Labour membership expected to fall below half a million Party unsure if those leaving are Jeremy Corbyn supporters, who joined just to back him, or opponents of his reign Labour membership is expected to fall below half a million for the first time since its peak under Jeremy Corbyn because about 40,000 people are in arrears. The unusual number of lapsed payments was discussed at a meeting of Labour’s ruling national executive committee (NEC) on Tuesd
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Comet 67P full of surprises, says study led by CU BoulderImages returned from the European Space Agency's Rosetta mission indicate the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko was a very active place during its most recent trip through the solar system, says a new study led by the University of Colorado Boulder.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Journal of Parkinson's Disease celebrates key breakthroughsAmsterdam, The Netherlands, March 21, 2017 - Marking the 200th anniversary of James Parkinson's first published description of the disease that would come to bear his name, the Journal of Parkinson's Disease is proud to publish Milestones in 200 Years of Parkinson's Disease Research. This special issue features commentaries by luminaries in the field, who are responsible for some of the greatest a
15h
Popular Science

The Curiosity Mars rover's wheels are starting to break Space Not even space robots are immune to the effects of old age Nearly five years after landing on Mars, Curiosity's wheels are starting to show some serious wear—but it should still make it. Read on.
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Live Science

Thousands of US Kids Take Opioid Drugs Accidentally Each YearThousands of U.S. children ingest opioid drugs each year on accident, a new study found.
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The Guardian

Wisdom of ECB's desert trip still unclear as Mason Crane takes chance to impress Andrew Strauss’ three-year plan to expand England’s ODI choices has proved a mixed success but has at least allowed Trevor Bayliss to see some county players Andrew Strauss has poured hundreds of thousands of pounds and convened a full roster of staff – covering every base from umpires to anti-corruption via the analyst – into his pet project, the reopening of cricket’s North-South divide, and th
15h
Ars Technica

The one Yahoo meme that perfectly represents the faltering company (credit: Know Your Meme ) Now that Yahoo is on the verge of being eaten by Verizon, it's hard to remember that the troubled company was once an innovative startup. But Yahoo rocketed to popularity after building the first directory for "homepages" on the 1990s information superhighway. Later, it became a giant of the Web 2.0 generation, partly by gobbling up the era's best inventions, like Flickr
16h
The Atlantic

America's Most Prominent Anti-Muslim Activist Is Welcome at the White House On Monday night, Brigitte Gabriel, head of ACT for America, tweeted that she was , “In D.C, preparing for my meeting at the White House. What topics would you like me to address?” Among the replies: “ Ban sharia law from US ,”, “ Officially identify Islam as a political system and not a ‘religion ’” and “ ask how we can get islam [sic] ed out our schools & universities ?” The Trump administration
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Popular Science

Stop hackers in their tracks with this expert training Sponsored Post Learn the ins and outs of ethical hacking and land a job in cyber security Learn the ins and outs of ethical hacking and land a job in cyber security. Read on.
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Viden

De fire grundlæggende konsekvenser af klimaforandringerneKlimaforandringerne har store konsekvenser for mennesker, dyr og planter, siger ekspert.
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Viden

Én fjer - fem høns: Medicinske gennembrud bliver ofte oversolgtKun få forsknings-sensationer er de gennembrud de giver sig ud for viser opgørelser. Forskning er kompliceret, siger dansk ekspert.
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The Guardian

US electronics ban for Middle East flights endangers passengers for profit Holding many large devices with lithium-ion batteries in cargo could create fire risk that has downed airplanes, as directive only affects foreign-owned carriers How have you been affected by the ban? A new measure forcing passengers to store all their large electronics in the hold may have disastrous consequences, say airline experts – and the only security that measure will provide is financial
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Big Think

No Vaccination? No Daycare, Say Australian Legislators Australia could soon ban unvaccinated children from attending preschools nationwide. Read More
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Live Science

See Earth’s Lithospheric Magnetic Field In Highest Resolution Yet | VideoThe magnetized rocks of Earth’s crust and upper mantle, also known as the upper lithosphere, accounts for generating 6 percent of the planet’s magnetic field.
16h
The Guardian

Pro-Brexit ministers 'relaxed about leaving EU without trade deal' Tory tensions as some MPs say they face battle against ‘bonkers’ Eurosceptics actively promoting WTO terms Brexiters in the cabinet and other Conservative frontbenchers have privately told colleagues they are relaxed about the prospect of Britain crashing out of the EU on to World Trade Organisation rules, the Guardian understands. Senior figures within the party have been persuaded by the argume
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gene mutation may be linked to unexplained female infertilityResearchers at Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children's Hospital and Rice University have uncovered a gene mutation that may provide answers to unexplained female infertility.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Geofencing' shows promise in tracking chronic careLocation-tracking apps on smartphones could be used to help track and manage care for thousands of patients who suffer from chronic diseases, and possibly even provide feedback to them on lifestyle changes that could help, according to an initial assessment by researchers at UC San Francisco.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Individuals with autism at substantially heightened risk for injury deathDeaths in individuals with autism increased 700 percent in the past 16 years and were three times as likely as in the general population to be caused by injuries, according to a new study by Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. The average age at death for individuals with autism was 36 years younger than for the general population, 36 years of age compared with 72.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Initial hospital costs from gunshot wounds total $6.6 billion over 9 years, study findsGun violence resulted in initial hospitalization costs of more than $6.6 billion nationwide from 2006 through 2014 -- an average of $734.6 million per year, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford School of Medicine.
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Gizmodo

Here Is a Tweet Venture Capitalist Benedict Evans Just Deleted [Updated] Image: Twitter Benedict Evans is an investor who works at famed Silicon Valley venture capital fund Andressen Horowitz. Today, Evans made a tweet snitching to Apple about adult-oriented content on its platform and deleted it shortly afterward. Here it is: Strangely, Evans’ Twitter followers found that when they tried searching “evelyn” on their own phones, they—unlike Evans—were not getting a por
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Boys secure in their racial identity seek more diverse friendshipsKids often seek answers from parents, friends and media to better understand their racial identity, suggests new research. The study's researchers sought to explain how ethnic-racial identity exploration and resolution might affect friendship networks among youth in a diverse setting, as well as their peers over time.
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Live Science

Byzantine Coin Hoard Unearthed Near Jerusalem | VideoArchaeologists discovered a hidden cache of Byzantine coins, concealed in a stone niche in an ancient settlement on the road to Jerusalem.
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Ars Technica

Torment: Tides of Numenera review: Mind reading Enlarge / Your companions form the emotional core of Torment and make the less sensible plot points easier to swallow. Torment : Tides of Numenera opens with a literal bang. A moon explodes over the game's setting (simply called “the Ninth World”), and your avatar comes hurtling out of it toward the ground. Of course, you don't actually see any of this happen. Nearly all of the sometimes slimy, o
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Having a laugh with recruitmentCan humour on social media help managers find the most appropriate candidates for the job vacancies they hope to fill? Researchers suggest that humorous recruitment campaigns can increase exposure for a given job ad but conversely the approach might lead to flippant applications at which point it might be difficult to separate the serious candidate from an inappropriate one. The team also suggests
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Heat exposure associated with mental illnessA mental hospital-based study in Hanoi, Vietnam looked at if there is a relationship between heat exposure and mental health problems. The results showed significant increase in hospital admissions for mental illnesses during periods of heatwaves, especially during longer periods of heat exposure.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Infections during pregnancy may interfere with genes linked to prenatal brain developmentIf a mother picks up an infection during pregnancy, her immune system will kick into action to clear the infection -- but this self-defense mechanism may also have a small influence how her child's brain develops in the womb, in ways that are similar to how the brain develops in autism spectrum disorders. Now, an international team of researchers has shown why this may be the case.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Before and after: Unique changes spotted on comet 67p/Churyumov-GerasimenkoA study published March 21, 2017 in the journal Science summarizes the types of surface changes observed during the two years that the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft spent investigating comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Notable differences are seen before and after the comet's most active period --perihelion -- when it reached its closest point to the Sun along its orbit.
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Gizmodo

A New Technique Captures Stunning Timelapse Footage of the Smallest Living Things Microscopes let us observe some of the smallest objects in our universe, but with limitations when it comes to movements that can take hours, days, even weeks to play out. So a team of Austrian scientists developed new software that allows microscopes to not only track a slowly-moving object, but also capture incredible timelapse footage , speeding up the action. The researchers at Austria’s Inst
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Big Think

When Paris Doesn't Meet Expectations, Some Seek Hospitalization for Syndrome Paris, France is just too real for some tourists to handle. This results in Japanese tourists getting sick, and seeking therapy because of unmet expectations. Read More
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Live Science

Using GPS Devices May Switch Off Your Brain's GPSWhat happens in our brains when we rely on GPS devices to help us navigate?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Food insecurity in early childhood linked to young children's skills in kindergartenIn the United States, estimates show that a substantial number of children under age 5 live in households that are food insecure. That means that they do not have food, or they lack sufficient quantity or quality of food to fuel a healthy and active lifestyle. A new study has found that children who experience food insecurity in early childhood are more likely to start kindergarten less ready to l
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Quantum dots illuminate transport within the cellBiophysicists have developed a strategy for using light-emitting nanocrystals as a marker in living cells. By recording the movements of these quantum dots, they can clarify the structure and dynamics of the cytoskeleton.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fish evolve by playing it safeNew research supports the creation of more marine reserves in the world's oceans because, the authors say, fish can evolve to be more cautious and stay away from fishing nets.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Interferon drug shows promise in treating EbolaA pilot study of a class of drugs used to treat hepatitis and some forms of multiple sclerosis has been shown for the first time to ease symptoms of Ebola patients, while also increasing their survival.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Finding the 'ghost particles' might be more challenging than what we thoughtResults from the NEOS experiment on sterile neutrinos differ partly from the theoretical expectations.
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The Guardian

Media minister 'must act' to avoid conflict of interest over Osborne Labour says Matt Hancock should recuse himself from policy discussions about Evening Standard after his former boss was appointed editor Matthew Hancock, the media minister, needs to take steps to avoid a conflict of interest on press regulation after George Osborne, his former boss, took a job as the editor of the Evening Standard , Labour said on Tuesday. Tom Watson, the Labour deputy leader an
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Gizmodo

Transform the Way You Cook With Great Deals On Anova Sous-Vide Circulators Anova 900W Wi-Fi Precision Cooker , $161 If you’ve ever eaten at a nice steakhouse, you were probably eating sous-vide meat. Here’s a secret though: It’s really easy to get those kinds of results yourself, and Amazon’s here to help with a $161 deal on the newest Wi-Fi version of Anova’s top-selling immersion circulator, as well as a $116 deal on the older Bluetooth model . Update : The deal on th
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Caution needed for drugs in development for most common malignant pediatric brain tumorResearchers have studied how a crucial cancer-related protein plays a role in one of the most aggressive forms of medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sex-based differences in utilization, outcomes for CDT in DVT patientsOne treatment for deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a procedure called catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT). CDT has become more commonly used in the US since research showed it reduced the incidence of post-thrombotic syndrome. A team sought to identify and describe sex-based differences in utilization and safety outcomes of CDT for treatment of DVT in the U.S. The team found sex-based differences in
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Research spotlights early signs of disease using infrared light: New researchResearchers have used infrared spectroscopy to spotlight changes in tiny cell fragments called microvesicles to probe their role in a model of the body's immunological response to bacterial infection.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Less radiation in inner Van Allen belt than previously believedThe inner Van Allen belt has less radiation than previously believed, according to a recent study. Observations from NASA's Van Allen probes show the fastest, most energetic electrons in the inner radiation belt are actually much rarer and harder to find than scientists expected. This is good news for spacecraft that are orbiting in the region and can be damaged by high levels of radiation.
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The Guardian

The Guardian view on Labour: not up to the job | EditorialAs Britain heads for the EU exit door under a government that botched the budget, Jeremy Corbyn’s party is failing to offer a credible vision In last week’s Dutch general election , only 5.7% of the electorate voted for the Labour party; five years ago, its share was 25%. In France, opinion polls have the Socialist party’s presidential candidate averaging around 13%, compared with 29% in 2012. By
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Live Science

Vintage Apple-1 Computer Could Fetch $300,000 at AuctionThe computer is one of eight functioning Apple-1 motherboards remaining.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Why a Czech zoo is dehorning its white rhinosDvur Kralove Zoo in the Czech Republic, has taken the decision to remove the horns from its white rhinos for their safety.
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Gizmodo

Microsoft Hit With a Bunch of Service Outages, Again [Updated] Image: AP According to several reports, Microsoft’s online services have been suffering through some pretty major outages this afternoon. Xbox Live, OneDrive, Outlook, Skype, Azure, and the Windows Store have all had issues letting users log into accounts. The site DownDetector.com shows a surge in outage reports for Microsoft services beginning around 2 p.m. ET, and continuing to spike through t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists discover new 'boat' form of promising semiconductor GeSePrinceton researchers have discovered a new form of the simple compound GeSe that has surprisingly escaped detection until now. This so-called beta-GeSe compound has a ring type structure like graphene and could have similarly valuable properties for electronic applications.
16h
The Atlantic

How the Rise of Electronics Has Made Smuggling Bombs Easier Last February, a Somali man boarded a Daallo Airlines flight in Mogadishu, Somalia’s capital. Twenty minutes after the flight took off, the unassuming laptop in his carry-on bag detonated, blowing a hole in the side of the plane. The bomber was killed, and two others were injured. But if the aircraft had reached cruising altitude, an expert told CNN , the bomb would have ignited the plane’s fuel
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

States can lower risk of measles outbreak by strengthening exemption policiesStates with weaker non-medical exemption policies for vaccinations can reduce the likelihood of a measles outbreak 140 to 190 percent by strengthening them, a new study shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chicago's stop-light camera program has significant safety benefitsChicago's stop-light cameras reduce serious injury crashes at intersections where they are placed and also have a measurable 'spillover effect' that improves safety at intersections without cameras, according to a new study. The report provides tools and analysis that can help the city identify existing and potential camera locations requiring further attention and notes that enforcing stop-light
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The Guardian

Viagogo should be forced to face a grilling over ticket resale abuse | Nils Pratley MPs investigating secondary ticketing were snubbed by the site despite evidence of vastly inflated prices Secondary ticket site Viagogo’s explanation for not sending a representative to the Tuesday’s session of the Commons culture, media and sport select committee was ridiculous. The Swiss-based company, reported committee chair Damian Collins, said it doesn’t have “adequate representation” in th
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Large Hadron Collider experiment nabs five new particlesLHCb experiment detects new particles composed of two strange quarks and one charm quark.
17h
Big Think

Digital Revolution: More and More People Are Paying For Content "Shut up and take my money" isn't just a meme anymore, it's the way people are increasingly choosing to access art, news, and culture. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Treatment window for fragile X likely doesn't close after childhoodA new study looked into human and rat brain samples and found that the biological structures potentially contributing to Fragile X syndrome are present in adult brains -- something that mouse samples did not show.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Single-cell analysis reveals subtypes of colorectal tumorsCombining single-cell genomics and computational techniques medical researchers have defined cell-type composition of cancerous cells from 11 colorectal tumors, as well as adjacent noncancerous cells, a key to more targeted diagnosis and treatment.
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The Atlantic

American Muslims Are Young, Politically Liberal, and Scared Muslims may be the religious group that’s most talked about and least understood in the U.S. President Trump has put Islam at the center of his policymaking , making shaky claims about how assimilated Muslims are into American life. And yet, in part because the group is so small, actual data about their religiosity, political leanings, and engagement with American culture is relatively scarce. A
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The Atlantic

What Does Judge Gorsuch Believe? Updated at 9:03 p.m. ET On the second day of his confirmation hearings to be a Supreme Court justice, Neil Gorsuch seemed eager to be judged on his own merits. But three figures loomed over the proceedings—the two jurists he’s being closely evaluated against, and the president who’s injected controversy into his nomination. One is Antonin Scalia, the longtime conservative jurist who Gorsuch hopes
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The Guardian

Bank that lent $300m to Trump linked to Russian money laundering scam Deutsche Bank among western institutions that processed billions of dollars in cash of ‘criminal origin’ through Latvia The German bank that loaned $300m (£260m) to Donald Trump played a prominent role in a money laundering scandal run by Russian criminals with ties to the Kremlin, the Guardian can reveal. Deutsche Bank is one of dozens of western financial institutions that processed at least $2
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Gizmodo

Here's the Important Stuff That Happens in Iron Fist So You Don't Have to Watch It Netflix and Marvel’s Iron Fist is not good TV. It is bad and boring TV with terrible fight scenes and a lead actor who comes from the “petulant grimace” school of acting. The only reason to watch Iron Fist is so you can be prepared for The Defenders , the epic series that will cross Iron Fist over with the casts of Daredevil , Jessica Jones , and Luke Cage . Instead, let us save you some time. Th
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Ars Technica

Mars’ moons could be remnants of earlier rings, destined to form a new one Enlarge / Phobos, shown in this image, had once been thought to have been an asteroid captured by Mars. (credit: NASA APOD ) Our Solar System's two innermost rocky planets have no moons. Earth has an unusually large one, the product of a massive collision. And Mars' two moons, Phobos and Deimos, are... well, weird , looking like asteroids but not behaving like them. Now, a new paper suggests that
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The Guardian

The Guardian view on the French campaign: a defining election | EditorialThe French start voting in one month – and Marine Le Pen is set to reach the presidential run-off. Whether she can then be defeated is the next big test for Europe and liberal democracy The French will vote in a month’s time for what has arguably become the most consequential and unpredictable presidential contest since the founding of the Fifth Republic in 1958. These elections will be a defining
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The Guardian

'People will hate us': why the Rhythm Method are braced for derision They sing wonkily infectious songs about pubs, gentrification, Cherie Blair and George Best – and they want to be the biggest band of their generation In the back room of a pub, a man in a tracksuit is merrily articulating his alienation. “How would you know I was lonely if I didn’t tell everyone?” he half-raps over an instrumental that sounds like Squeeze attempting to cover a So Solid Crew song
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The Guardian

Martin McGuinness: Sinn Féin leaders help carry coffin home in Derry Gerry Adams and Michelle O’Neill among mourners accompanying coffin through Derry, a city riven by sectarian division Martin McGuinness obituary World leaders pay tribute to ‘peacemaker’ As sleet began to fall on the funeral procession, an Irish tricolour at half-mast fluttered in the bitingly cold wind. Another was draped over Martin McGuinness’s coffin. Continue reading...
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The Guardian

George Galloway to contest Manchester Gorton byelection Former Respect MP could attempt to exploit ethnic divisions in local Labour party in contest to replace the late Gerald Kaufman George Galloway has confirmed he will contest the Manchester Gorton byelection as an independent candidate in an attempt to benefit from a divided local Labour party and re-enter parliament. Galloway, 62, who has represented constituencies in London, Bradford and Glasgow
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New on MIT Technology Review

Could New York’s Plan to Erase Its Digital Divide Work for America?The state, which has huge rural areas, aims to bring broadband Internet to all its residents by next year.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Could New York’s Plan to Erase Its Digital Divide Work for America?The state, which has huge rural areas, aims to bring broadband Internet to all its residents by next year.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

People afraid of robots are much more likely to fear losing their jobs and suffer anxiety-related mental health issues, study finds“Technophobes” — people who fear robots, artificial intelligence and new technology that they don’t understand — are much more likely to be afraid of losing their jobs due to technology and to suffer anxiety-related mental health issues, a researcher says.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Amazon River no younger than 9 million years, new study showsResearchers have determined the age of the formation of the Amazon River at 9.4 to 9 million years ago with data that convincingly refutes substantial younger estimates.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Transparent silver: Tarnish-proof films for flexible displays, touch screensThe thinnest, smoothest layer of silver that can survive air exposure could change the way touchscreens and flat or flexible displays are made.
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The Atlantic

How REI’s Co-op Retail Model Helps Its Bottom Line For a few years retailers have been facing some big challenges: falling in-store sales and the shuttering of big box stores. That’s led many to wonder how outdoor specialty retailer Recreational Equipment Inc. (REI) could be doing so well , as seemingly similar companies, such as Sports Authority, go bankrupt . REI’s annual revenue grew by 5.5 percent in 2016 , and the company reports healthy sal
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The Guardian

London cycle courier 'was punished for refusing work after eight hours in cold' Andrew Boxer is latest worker to launch tribunal case after he was not entitled to holiday pay, sickness benefit or pension A courier delivering parcels in central London has described being punished for refusing work after eight hours of cycling in snowy weather, saying he received no paid breaks or holiday pay. Andrew Boxer is the latest to take on the battle to be classified as a “worker” rath
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The Guardian

Come on, this is Britain – we don’t like to be too happy | Tim Dowling The country came 19th in the new World Happiness Report. That’s about right. Any higher and we might have been embarrassed Spring is here, and the 2017 world happiness rankings are in. The fifth World Happiness Report puts the usual suspects – Norway, Denmark and Iceland – in the top three spots, suggesting that happiness is strongly correlated to having really good underfloor heating. The United
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New approach uses ultrasound to measure fluid in the lungsA team of engineering and medical researchers has found a way to use ultrasound to monitor fluid levels in the lung, offering a noninvasive way to track progress in treating pulmonary edema -- fluid in the lungs -- which often occurs in patients with congestive heart failure. The approach, which has been demonstrated in rats, also holds promise for diagnosing scarring, or fibrosis, in the lung.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mouse study identifies new method for treating depressionStandard antidepressant medications don't work for everyone, and even when they do they are slow to kick in. In an effort to find better depression treatments, researchers discovered that inhibiting an enzyme called Glyoxalase 1 (GLO1) relieves signs of depression in mice. Moreover, inhibiting GLO1 worked much faster than the conventional antidepressant Prozac.
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cognitive science

Arrival Behind-The-Scenes: The Intersection of Language, Brain Science, and Time submitted by /u/FromTheLabBench [link] [comments]
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cognitive science

On Cognitive Doping in Chess (and Life). Thinking more effectively may mean thinking more slowly. submitted by /u/symonsymone [link] [comments]
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cognitive science

cog sci submitted by /u/TT196 [link] [comments]
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Dagens Medicin

Ny klinisk professor udforsker kræftceller Flemming Brandt Sørensen er ny klinisk professor i patologi ved Aarhus Universitet og Aarhus Universitetshospital.
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The Guardian

Google's extremism apology came after UK pressure – minister Government ‘read the riot act’ to the firm, which must do more to tackle far-right videos on YouTube Google’s public apology over placing advertising next to extremist material came only after it was “read the riot act” at a Whitehall summit last Friday, it has emerged. The company’s bosses are expected to meet Cabinet Office ministers again this week, setting out further action to strengthen the
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The Guardian

Josette Simon: 'Powerful women are reduced to being dishonourable' As she returns to the RSC to play Cleopatra, Josette Simon explains why there is so much more to the queen than a strumpet As Josette Simon neared the end of her drama training, the principal called her in for a chat. Simon already had Shakespeare in her sights, but he squashed that dream. “He said not to get my hopes up because it was very unlikely that I would be doing classics or be at the RSC
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Coffee shops, 24-hour ATMs the best locations for life-saving AEDs, research showsTim Horton's tops the list: researchers studied data on cardiac arrest locations in Toronto to draft a list of 'top 10' businesses where placing automated external defibrillators would save lives.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Peers, more than teachers, inspire us to learn'Why do I have to learn this?' It's a common question among youth, but new research suggests students perform much better academically when the answer is provided by their peers rather than their teachers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Breaking the supermassive black hole speed limitA new computer simulation helps explain the existence of puzzling supermassive black holes observed in the early universe. The simulation is based on a computer code used to understand the coupling of radiation and certain materials.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Electrocrystallization: Breakthrough in gold nanoparticle researchA research team as published a research study that demonstrates how it is possible to obtain very high quality crystals formed of gold nanoparticles.
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Gizmodo

Wait, Crabs Can Climb Trees?! Image: ZooKeys / Gizmodo Scientists recently discovered a new species of crab in Hong Kong. It’s very tiny, less than a centimeter long. It also climbs trees, which is terrifying. You probably didn’t know that crabs could climb trees, but they can. This new species scales tree bark as high as six feet in the air and loves to chill in mangroves, according to a field survey published today in the j
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Changes in the vascular system may trigger Alzheimer's diseaseIn some people whose cognitive functions are weakened due to Alzheimer's, the disease can be traced back to changes in the brain's blood vasculature. Scientists have found that a protein involved in blood clotting and inflammation might offer a potential path to new drugs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Could OTC medicines be the answer to alcoholism?The study is determining if two over-the-counter (OTC) medications can diminish alcohol abuse in diagnosed bipolar patients.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

National Academy of Medicine releases publication on how to improve nation's health systemAs the nation discusses repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act, the National Academy of Medicine today released a publication on crosscutting priorities that provides a succinct blueprint to address challenges to Americans' health and health care that span beyond debates over insurance coverage.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Kavli Lectures: Physical chemistry of polymer networks, CRISPR systems for genome editingAdvances in understanding polymer networks and CRISPR-inspired genome engineering tools will be the topics of a pair of Kavli Lectures at the 253rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society. The meeting will take place April 2 to 6 in San Francisco.
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Gizmodo

The Word 'Planet' Is So Important and Such Bullshit Image: Wikimedia Commons Millennials have already lost so much: A relatively secure housing market, the hope of stable careers, and an Earth that wasn’t completely littered with the mistakes of Baby Boomers. So when Pluto was demoted to a dwarf planet in 2006, it was another nail in our fragile hearts. But that hasn’t stopped astronomers of all ages debating about whether or not Pluto—and other o
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dead zones may threaten coral reefs worldwideDead zones affect dozens of coral reefs around the world and threaten hundreds more according to a new study. Watching a massive coral reef die-off on the Caribbean coast of Panama, they suspected it was caused by a dead zone -- a low-oxygen area that snuffs out marine life -- rather than by ocean warming or acidification.
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The Atlantic

The Enduring Legacy of the Pocahontas Myth On March 21, 1617, a 21-year-old woman from Virginia’s Pamunkey tribe died at Gravesend, England. She went by many names—Matoaka, Amonute, and, at her passing, Rebecca—but she’s best remembered today as Pocahontas. Her death was unexpected: Pocahontas had arrived in England the previous June and spent months touring the country, celebrated by the press as an “Indian princess.” Pocahontas’s tale o
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Dana Foundation

How to Perceive Without Sight How is it that we construct our reality? What is it we think we know, and what do we actually know? These are questions that led Columbia University neuroscientist Jacqueline Gottlieb to a career studying attention, decision-making, and curiosity. And at Saturday’s Brainwave event at the Rubin Museum of Art in NYC, we learned how these questions were addressed by someone who lost his sight at age
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Ars Technica

Volumetric capture is the swift kick in the butt VR so desperately needs AUSTIN, Texas—As has become standard at my job, I recently strapped on a virtual reality headset to go somewhere far, far away. On this day, it was a trip to outer space, with pit stops on a moon's surface and a sci-fi-styled briefing room, to hear about future expeditions to Mars . I should have been looking out at the virtual planets, solar-sail rigs, and plans for human colonies. But I kept fo
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The Guardian

Brexit study shows we want free trade as well as immigration control NatCen study shows ‘pick-and-mix attitude to EU’, as 88% of Britons back free trade with bloc but 69% support customs checks Many Britons are taking an ambitious approach to the sort of Brexit they want, with significant majorities seeking both a tough approach to EU migration and continued free trade with Europe, a study has found. The research from the National Centre for Social Research (NatCe
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The Guardian

Sisters sue London hotel where they suffered brutal hammer attack Three women from UAE were bludgeoned at Cumberland hotel in 2014 by Philip Spence, leaving one profoundly disabled Three sisters from the United Arab Emirates who were the victims of a brutal hammer attack while on a shopping trip to London are suing the hotel where it happened. Drug addict and “hotel creeper” Philip Spence was sentenced to life imprisonment for attempted murder after he bludgeon
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

USC researchers close to identifying crucial gene for human cleft lip and palateA group of researchers has found that three siblings born with cleft lip and palate share a common gene mutation associated with the birth defect. The study -- a collaborative effort between the Ostrow School of Dentistry, the Keck School of Medicine of USC, Children's Hospital Los Angeles and the nonprofit Operation Smile -- was published in the journal Human Molecular Genetics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New drug strategy: Target ribosome to halt protein productionResearchers have discovered a drug that acts like a wrench thrown into the ribosome, stopping the protein production machinery, but only for a small number of proteins, upending current thinking that drugs targeting the ribosome would cause it to stop production of all of a cell's proteins. UC Berkeley and Pfizer chemists who teamed up to find out how it works suggest that similar drugs that selec
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New drug strategy: Target the ribosome to halt protein productionThe discovery of a chemical compound that halts the production of a small set of proteins suggests a new drug search strategy: find compounds that target undesired proteins before they even get made; according to a new study publishing March 21 in the open access journal PLOS Biology by Jamie Cate of University of California, Berkeley, Robert Dullea of Pfizer Worldwide Research & Development, and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vital directions for health and health careA new publication from the National Academy of Medicine identifies eight policy directions as vital to the nation's health and fiscal future, including action priorities and essential infrastructure needs that represent major opportunities to improve health outcomes and increase efficiency and value in the health system, according to the article published online by JAMA.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genetic assessment developed to determine risk for age-associated Alzheimer's diseaseAn international team of scientists, led by researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and University of California San Francisco, has developed a novel genetic score that allows individuals to calculate their age-specific risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD), based upon genetic information.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain fatty acid levels dysregulated in Alzheimer's diseaseThe researchers found that the levels of six unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) (linoleic acid, linolenic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, oleic acid, and arachidonic acid) in the vulnerable brain regions were associated with Alzheimer's disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Multiple genetic markers combined to estimate risk of developing Alzheimer's diseaseA risk score derived from genetic data may be able to estimate an individual's risk of Alzheimer's disease at a particular age, according to research published in PLOS Medicine. The polygenic hazard score (PHS) was developed by Rahul Desikan, of the University of California, San Francisco, USA, and colleagues, using genotype data from three large cohorts (totaling over 70,000 individuals) of patie
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The Atlantic

30 Years Ago: A Look Back at 1987 Three decades ago, the long-fought Iran-Iraq war had reached a deadly stalemate, the stock markets took a huge hit on Black Monday in October, American politicians were gearing up for the 1988 presidential race, Baby Jessica was rescued from a well, broadcast live on CNN, and much more. Photographers were also busy documenting the lives of Pee-wee Herman, Menudo, Mikhail Gorbachev, Howard Stern,
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The Guardian

Nicola Sturgeon accused of hypocrisy as independence debate begins Tories and Labour says first minister ignores will of Scottish parliament on issues she disagrees with yet wants Westminster to back Holyrood’s decision Opposition parties have accused Nicola Sturgeon of hypocrisy after she insisted Theresa May had to respect Holyrood’s call for a second independence referendum. The Conservatives and Labour said the first minister repeatedly ignored majority vote
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The Guardian

French interior minister quits over holiday jobs for his daughters Bruno Le Roux stands down hours after financial prosecutor’s office announced they were putting him under preliminary investigation The French interior minister has been forced to resign in a row over employing his teenage daughters as parliamentary assistants during the school holidays, in another blow to the country’s beleaguered political elite with one month to go until the first round of pre
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Gizmodo

Can You Figure Out Why Lucasfilm Hates This Photo of Luke Skywalker? There’s nothing at first glance that would tell you why Lucasfilm refused to release this behind-the-scenes photo from A New Hope . But once you hear it, and put it together with George Lucas’ need to control details, it makes total sense. Yesterday, a fan account tweeted the above photo of Mark Hamill. And since Hamill’s twitter account is one of the few truly pure places on the internet, he res
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The Guardian

Wyclef Jean mistakenly detained in Los Angeles as suspect in assault case The singer was detained by the Los Angeles county sheriff’s department, who said he matched the description of a person wanted in connection to an assault Wyclef Jean was detained by the Los Angeles county sheriff’s department after being wrongly identified as a suspect and has vowed to sue after the incident, which saw him put in handcuffs. The singer, who was driving round North Hollywood in th
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The Guardian

All mapped out? Using satnav 'switches off' parts of the brain, study suggests Brain activity linked to simulating possible journeys appears to be absent when a person is following directions rather than independently planning a route The British man whose BMW was left teetering on a Yorkshire cliff edge was an early victim of the phenomenon. Then came the Japanese tourists who drove directly into the ocean in a bid to reach an Australian island and the 67-year old Belgian
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Brain Takes a Guided Tour of LondonTwo distinct brain regions cooperate to simulate possible routes and plan a path through them -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Guardian

Oil theft 'provides billions for terrorists and drug cartels' $1bn of oil is stolen in Mexico each year, while EU loses massive revenues, says the Atlantic Council thinktank Oil theft is fuelling terrorist groups and drug cartels around the world, according to a new analysis. Mexican drug gangs can earn $90,000 (£72,000) in seven minutes from tapping a pipeline of refined oil, while insurgents in Nigeria financially benefit from a share of the third of the
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Viden

Nej tak til stenalderkost: Vores gener er til korn og grøntsagerVi er ikke indrettet til at leve af stenalderkost. Ny forskning viser, at europæernes gener ændrede sig, da vi begyndte at dyrke landbrug.
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Gizmodo

An Asteroid Hunter on What We Need to Do to Prevent Armageddon Image Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center Conceptual Image Lab Humans are rightly terrified by the threat of nuclear war, but there’s also a non-zero chance that a giant rock will come hurling through our atmosphere to ruin every Earthling’s day. When that happened 66 million years ago, it triggered a mass extinction that wiped out the dinosaurs. But we have something the dinosaurs didn’t:
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Live Science

Should the '14-Day Rule' for Growing Human Embryos Get Updated?Ethical guidelines on lab-grown human embryos beg for revamping, scientists say.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New drug strategy: Target ribosome to halt protein productionThe discovery of a chemical compound that halts the production of a small set of proteins while leaving general protein production untouched suggests a new drug search strategy: Find compounds that target undesired proteins before they are even made.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Let's Go Places: Florida | Oh, the Huge Manatees! (360 Video) This Florida road trip is passing through the Manatee Super Highway! Join our hosts Brian Brushwood and Justin Robert Young as they swim with hundreds of sea cows in Three Sisters Springs in this 360-degree experience. For more immersive experiences, head to http://DiscoveryVR.com or download the app for your iPhone or Android device. iPhone: http://apple.co/1Kl14XA Android: http://bit.ly/1Kl1bCy
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Tree-on-a-chip' passively pumps water for daysEngineers have created a 'tree-on-a-chip' -- a microfluidic pump inspired by the way trees and plants circulate nutrients. The chip pumps water for days, at constant rates that could power small robots.
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The Guardian

From businesswoman of the year to £5 a day in a shared house Artist Samira Kitman dreamed of being the female Bill Gates, but after fleeing from the Taliban faces an uncertain future in the UK She was voted Afghan businesswoman of the year, has been praised by Prince Charles and has had her art displayed at the V&A museum in London and the Smithsonian in Washington. She is the subject of a chapter in a book by a former US president’s wife celebrating women
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Gizmodo

Deadly Spider Venom Might Protect Us From Deadly Strokes Image; David McClenaghan/Wikimedia Commons Funnel web spiders are a perplexing bunch. The eight-legged Australian creatures can kill with their venom, but are simultaneously required for creating the antidote. Now, it turns out their venom might have another purpose—protecting the brain from the damaging effects of a stroke. Most strokes are ischemic, meaning they result in a lack of blood and th
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Gizmodo

Is There a Point to a Princesses Movie Not Done by Disney? Image: Snow White, Disney According to Tracking Board , the latest script making its way through Hollywood right now is Princesses by Nir Paniry, described as “a female-driven Avengers featuring classic fairy tale princesses.” It’s being pitched to everyone , though, even though we all know that the only logical home for it is Disney. Of course, Disney’s already got a live-action fairy tale mashu
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Ars Technica

Dealmaster: Get a burner phone number from Hushed for $25 Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our partners at TechBargains , we're back with a number of new deals. Our featured deal is a burner phone number from Hushed for $25. This service adds a second phone number to your smartphone and includes 500 minutes, 1,100 texts, and one number change per year. If you've ever wanted a second phone number to give out instead of your personal number, this is a grea
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The Scientist RSS

Opinion: On ?The Impact Factor Fallacy?Papers published in low-impact journals are not necessarily low-quality scientific contributions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New twist on sofa problem that stumped mathematicians and furniture moversWith some help from 3-D printing, a UC Davis mathematician is trying to crack a problem that frustrates both mathematicians and furniture movers: What's the largest sofa you can fit round a corner?
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Gizmodo

What's the Best Water-Resistant Bluetooth Speaker? Whether you’re singing in the shower or catching up on podcasts by the pool, water-resistant Bluetooth speakers are inexpensive, plentiful, and far more useful than the shower radios that preceded them. But with so many options, we want to know which ones are really worth the money, so check out the rules below, then dive into the comments to nominate your favorite. 1) Your nomination should cont
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The Guardian

Pride and racial prejudice – why the far right loves Jane Austen Racists and bigots have tried to associate their dogma with the much-loved author – but don’t seem to have read the books It is a truth not universally acknowledged, that if you want to throw off any association with Nazi forebears, there is no better place to look than England’s Jane. For in what may be one of the most bizarre cases of image management, a US scholar has found that Jane Austen ha
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The Guardian

Open a window and have a cold shower: could being chilly improve your health?Some scientists believe we are too warm too much of the time and that artificial heating may be a contributing factor to obesity Dunking yourself in cool water is a remedy so old that Hippocrates recommended it , and Charles Darwin famously underwent a regime of being “ scrubbed with a rough towel in cold water for two or three minutes ” to improve his ailing health. For present-day scientists, th
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The Guardian

The art of colour: why Victoria Beckham is channelling Van Gogh this season One of spring’s biggest trends is duo-toning – wearing two contrasting hues. Art critic Jonathan Jones explains how 17th-century colour theory is influencing your wardrobe Isaac Newton was not a man of fashion. He spent more time on calculus than catwalks. Yet the great 17th-century scientist’s discoveries are the ultimate source of this season’s scintillating experiments in colour. When Newton u
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ads for low-testosterone treatments benefit sales but not necessarily healthDirect-to-consumer advertising for drugs to treat testosterone deficiency -- or 'low T' -- increases prescriptions to men for hormone-replacement therapies but may not improve their health, UC Davis physician Richard Kravitz said in an editorial published in the March 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.
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The Atlantic

What It Was Like to Negotiate With Martin McGuinness The first time I met Martin McGuinness was in October 1997, in Castle Buildings at Stormont together with Tony Blair. We had arranged the meeting in a small windowless room in the drab government block to avoid TV cameras filming the meeting as they had a previous meeting with Mo Mowlam, our Northern Ireland Secretary. This was the first meeting between a British prime minister and Republican lea
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The Atlantic

The White House Revives a Controversial Plan for Nuclear Waste Near the southern tip of Nevada is a ridge politicians have been fighting over for 30 years. Yucca Mountain was designated the permanent underground storage site for nuclear waste in 1987. It had an ambitious mission—to entomb high-level radioactive waste safely for at least 10,000 years—and a tentative opening date of 1998. But the process of even approving its construction has dragged on throug
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Organic electronics can use power from socketOrganic light-emitting devices and printed electronics can be connected to a socket in the wall by way of a small, inexpensive organic converter.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How can a legally binding agreement on human cloning be established?Since Dolly the Sheep was cloned, the question of whether human reproductive cloning should be banned or pursued has been the subject of international debate. Researchers argue that a robust global governance framework on human cloning should draw on recent successes in climate change and business ethics for inspiration.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

First patient cured of rare blood disorderUsing a technique that avoids the use of high-dose chemotherapy and radiation in preparation for a stem cell transplant, physicians have documented the first cure of an adult patient with congenital dyserythropoietic anemia.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

France to probe Fiat for emissions cheatingFrench investigating magistrates will open a probe into carmaker Fiat Chrysler for suspected cheating in diesel emissions tests, judicial sources said on Tuesday.
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The Guardian

Goldman Sachs to move hundreds of staff out of London due to Brexit Bank, which employs 6,000 staff in UK, says it will take extra space in Frankfurt and Paris as part of contingency plan Goldman Sachs is to start moving hundreds of staff out of London before a Brexit deal is struck, the bank’s European boss has confirmed. Richard Gnodde, chief executive of Goldman Sachs International, said on Tuesday the decision to relocate workers was part of the bank’s contin
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Big Think

Buddhist Monks in China Have Offset 40 Million Tons of Greenhouse Gases A new study reveals the positive effect being vegetarian can have on the production of greenhouse gases. Read More
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Big Think

Would You Drink Sewage Beer? New Brew Uses Treated Sewage Water. Bottoms ups! A Southern Calfornia brewery is taking its beer from toilet to tap. San Diego's Stone Brewing has started making Full Circle Pale Ale using treated sewage water and recently held a tasting. While Bill Gates has shown that drinking "poop water" is perfectly fine, will consumers chug down this beer? Read More
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The Atlantic

How Climate Change Covered China in Smog When smog gets bad, the air becomes more than a coolness on your skin or a haze on the horizon. When smog gets bad, you can taste it. “Today, Shanghai air really has a layered taste. At first, it tastes slightly astringent with some smokiness. Upon full contact with your palate, the aftertaste has some earthy bitterness, and upon careful distinguishing you can even feel some dust-like particulate
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The Atlantic

The Strange Friendship of Martin McGuinness and Ian Paisley Not much more than a decade ago, the idea that Martin McGuinness and Ian Paisley’s names belonged together might have seemed fantastical. One was a crusty Protestant firebrand from Antrim. The other was a Catholic militant from Derry young enough to be his son. They stood on opposite sides of battle lines—sometimes literal ones—for decades. What little they shared was not promising: a mutual hatr
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The Atlantic

Netflix Believes in the Power of Thumbs What’s the difference between rating a movie you just watched out of five stars, versus giving it a thumbs-up or thumbs-down? Most people might not see too much of a distinction—but Netflix does. According to the streaming service, you give a star rating to impress other people; it’s a way of channeling your inner critic. But delivering a simple yes-or-no verdict with your thumb? That’s brutal ho
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Satnavs 'switch off' parts of the brainUsing a satnav (GPS navigation system) to get to your destination 'switches off' parts of the brain that would otherwise be used to simulate different routes, reveals new research. The study involved 24 volunteers navigating a simulation of Soho in central London while undergoing brain scans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Older mothers are better mothers, study suggestsOlder mothers are less likely to punish and scold their children while raising them, and that the children have fewer behavioral, social and emotional difficulties, according to a recent study.
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The Guardian

The big bike helmet debate: 'You don’t make it safe by forcing cyclists to dress for urban warfare' The question of whether cyclists should wear helmets provokes fury – often from those on four wheels. But which has the bigger benefit: increased physical safety, or creating a better environment for people to cycle helmet-free? As a cyclist, I don’t object to helmets or to high-visibility clothing. Like the majority of people I know in London, I wear a helmet most of the time when on a bike. I d
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WIRED

Android O, Google’s Next OS, Is Coming to Save Your Phone’s Battery Google just provided the first peek at the new Android that arrives later this year. The post Android O, Google’s Next OS, Is Coming to Save Your Phone’s Battery appeared first on WIRED .
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Live Science

Czech Zoo Dehorns Rhinos to Ward Off PoachersThe zoo with the largest rhino herd in Europe is removing the animals' horns.
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Ars Technica

President Trump signs NASA advisory bill, says it’s “about jobs” Enlarge / President Donald Trump speaks after signing the NASA transition authorization act in the Oval Office of the White House. (credit: Jim Lo Scalzo-Pool/Getty Images) Prior to Tuesday morning, President Donald Trump had made only a few passing references to space during the first two months of his administration. That changed during a signing ceremony for S.422 , NASA's first authorization
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Gizmodo

Hacked Texts Suggest Manafort Continued to Play a Role After Departing Trump Campaign Photo: AP As the investigation into the Trump campaign’s contacts with Russian intelligence services heats up, the White House has launched what appears to be a concerted effort to minimize the role that Paul Manafort—the former Trump campaign chairman with a long history of ties to allies of Russian president Vladimir Putin—played in Trump’s victory. Last month, Trump told a reporter that Manafo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

From Genome Research: Pathogen demonstrates genome flexibility in cystic fibrosisChronic lung infections can be devastating for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), and infection by Burkholderia cenocepacia, one of the most common species found in cystic fibrosis patients, is often antibiotic resistant. In a study published today in Genome Research, scientists sequenced and phenotyped multiple B. cenocepacia isolates from 16 CF patients. They found extensive variation among iso
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Does the universe have a rest frame?Physics is sometimes closer to philosophy when it comes to understanding the universe. Physicists are now attempting to elucidate whether the universe has a resting frame.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Comet 67P is constantly undergoing a faceliftChanges that the Rosetta spacecraft discovered on the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, including the collapse of entire cliffs, were likely driven by seasonal events, according to a new study.
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The Guardian

I’m a bit brown. But in America I’m white. Not for much longer| Arwa Mahdawi The US Census Bureau plans to redefine ‘white’ to exclude people with Middle Eastern and North African origins. It’s a reminder that the identity has always been fluid We live in a weird time for whiteness. But, before I get into that, a small disclaimer. You may look at my name and worry that I am unqualified to speak about whiteness; I would like to set these doubts to rest and assure you that
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Ars Technica

Muni broadband customers could lose service unless a new bill becomes law Enlarge (credit: Greenlight Community Broadband ) Last year, the state of North Carolina won a court case against the Federal Communications Commission, a victory that allowed it to restore a state law that restricts the growth of municipal broadband networks. This created an immediate problem for new customers of one government-run ISP. After the FCC's 2015 vote to preempt the state law , Greenl
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amazon invests in Costa Rica as tiny nation carves out profitable niche in world economyIn the 19th century, the customs house here brimmed with the imported wares that first helped this tiny Spanish-speaking nation become part of the wider world economy.
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Koizumi et al., Quantifying antiviral activity optimizes drug combinations against hepatitis C virus infection [Corrections]BIOPHYSICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY Correction for “Quantifying antiviral activity optimizes drug combinations against hepatitis C virus infection,” by Yoshiki Koizumi, Hirofumi Ohashi, Syo Nakajima, Yasuhito Tanaka, Takaji Wakita, Alan S. Perelson, Shingo Iwami, and Koichi Watashi, which appeared in issue 8, February 21, 2017, of Proc Natl Acad Sci USA...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Jeon et al., A set of NF-{kappa}B-regulated microRNAs induces acquired TRAIL resistance in Lung cancer [Corrections]CELL BIOLOGY Correction for “A set of NF-κB–regulated microRNAs induces acquired TRAIL resistance in Lung cancer,” by Young-Jun Jeon, Justin Middleton, Taewan Kim, Alessandro Laganà, Claudia Piovan, Paola Secchiero, Gerard J. Nuovo, Ri Cui, Pooja Joshi, Giulia Romano, Gianpiero Di Leva, Bum-Kyu Lee, Hui-Lung Sun, Yonghwan Kim, Paolo Fadda, Hansjuerg...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Perni et al., A natural product inhibits the initiation of {alpha}-synuclein aggregation and suppresses its toxicity [Corrections]NEUROSCIENCE Correction for “A natural product inhibits the initiation of α-synuclein aggregation and suppresses its toxicity,” by Michele Perni, Céline Galvagnion, Alexander Maltsev, Georg Meisl, Martin B. D. Müller, Pavan K. Challa, Julius B. Kirkegaard, Patrick Flagmeier, Samuel I. A. Cohen, Roberta Cascella, Serene W. Chen, Ryan Limboker, Pietro Sormanni,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction to Supporting Information for Kirby et al., Cumulative cultural evolution in the laboratory: An experimental approach to the origins of structure in human language [SI Correction]PSYCHOLOGY, EVOLUTION Correction to Supporting Information for “Cumulative cultural evolution in the laboratory: An experimental approach to the origins of structure in human language,” by Simon Kirby, Hannah Cornish, and Kenny Smith, which appeared in issue 31, August 5, 2008, of Proc Natl Acad Sci USA (105:10681–10686; first published July...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

On the role of Mitofusin 2 in endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria tethering [Biological Sciences]The recent paper by Naon et al. (1) claims that their new data “definitively” prove the role of Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) as an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)–mitochondria tether, supporting their original proposal (2) and arguing against evidence presented by ourselves and others (3–6) suggesting that Mfn2 is a negative regulator of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Filadi et al.: Does Mitofusin 2 tether or separate endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria? [Biological Sciences]We thank Filadi et al. for their comments (1) on our paper (2), where we address whether the discrepancies between their paper (3) and our original discovery of Mitofusin (Mfn) 2 as an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)–mitochondria tether (4) resulted from: (i) clonal effects of chronic Mfn2 ablation, (ii) proximity measurement...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Does influenza drive absolute humidity? [Biological Sciences]Multiple lines of evidence suggest that absolute humidity and school terms affect the timing of influenza epidemics, although the contributions of these and other factors are still unresolved (1–5). In PNAS, Deyle et al. (6) applied convergent cross-mapping (CCM) to measure the impact of environmental variables on influenza activity. The...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Baskerville and Cobey: Misconceptions about causation with synchrony and seasonal drivers [Biological Sciences]Baskerville and Cobey (1) caution against convergent cross-mapping (CCM) as a test for causation. However, their argument is based on an incorrect application of CCM arising from misconceptions about causation with synchrony. As stated in Deyle et al. (2), it is widely believed that there is synchrony between flu incidence...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Self-interrupted synthesis of sterically hindered aliphatic polyamide dendrimers [Chemistry]2,2-Bis(azidomethyl)propionic acid was prepared in four steps and 85% yield from the commercially available 2,2-bis(hydroxymethyl)propionic acid and used as the starting building block for the divergent, convergent, and double-stage convergent–divergent iterative methods for the synthesis of dendrimers and dendrons containing ethylenediamine (EDA), piperazine (PPZ), and methyl 2,2-bis(aminomethyl)
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Determining climate effects on US total agricultural productivity [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]The sensitivity of agricultural productivity to climate has not been sufficiently quantified. The total factor productivity (TFP) of the US agricultural economy has grown continuously for over half a century, with most of the growth typically attributed to technical change. Many studies have examined the effects of local climate on...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Multisensor-integrated organs-on-chips platform for automated and continual in situ monitoring of organoid behaviors [Engineering]Organ-on-a-chip systems are miniaturized microfluidic 3D human tissue and organ models designed to recapitulate the important biological and physiological parameters of their in vivo counterparts. They have recently emerged as a viable platform for personalized medicine and drug screening. These in vitro models, featuring biomimetic compositions, architectures, and functions, are...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Entanglement of quantum clocks through gravity [Physics]In general relativity, the picture of space–time assigns an ideal clock to each world line. Being ideal, gravitational effects due to these clocks are ignored and the flow of time according to one clock is not affected by the presence of clocks along nearby world lines. However, if time is...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Deep-sea vent phage DNA polymerase specifically initiates DNA synthesis in the absence of primers [Biochemistry]A DNA polymerase is encoded by the deep-sea vent phage NrS-1. NrS-1 has a unique genome organization containing genes that are predicted to encode a helicase and a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein. The gene for an unknown protein shares weak homology with the bifunctional primase–polymerases (prim–pols) from archaeal plasmids but...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Arsenic trioxide targets MTHFD1 and SUMO-dependent nuclear de novo thymidylate biosynthesis [Biochemistry]Arsenic exposure increases risk for cancers and is teratogenic in animal models. Here we demonstrate that small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)- and folate-dependent nuclear de novo thymidylate (dTMP) biosynthesis is a sensitive target of arsenic trioxide (As2O3), leading to uracil misincorporation into DNA and genome instability. Methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 1 (MTHFD1) and...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Rab5-regulated endocytosis plays a crucial role in apical extrusion of transformed cells [Cell Biology]Newly emerging transformed cells are often eliminated from epithelial tissues. Recent studies have revealed that this cancer-preventive process involves the interaction with the surrounding normal epithelial cells; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain largely unknown. In this study, using mammalian cell culture and zebrafish embryo systems, we have...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Integrin-{beta}4 identifies cancer stem cell-enriched populations of partially mesenchymal carcinoma cells [Cell Biology]Neoplastic cells within individual carcinomas often exhibit considerable phenotypic heterogeneity in their epithelial versus mesenchymal-like cell states. Because carcinoma cells with mesenchymal features are often more resistant to therapy and may serve as a source of relapse, we sought to determine whether such cells could be further stratified into functionally...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

SMN deficiency in severe models of spinal muscular atrophy causes widespread intron retention and DNA damage [Cell Biology]Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease, is the leading monogenic cause of infant mortality. Homozygous loss of the gene survival of motor neuron 1 (SMN1) causes the selective degeneration of lower motor neurons and subsequent atrophy of proximal skeletal muscles. The SMN1 protein product, survival of motor...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Genetic dissection of colorectal cancer progression by orthotopic transplantation of engineered cancer organoids [Cell Biology]In the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, it is proposed that intestinal polyps evolve through a set of defined mutations toward metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). Here, we dissect this adenoma-carcinoma sequence in vivo by using an orthotopic organoid transplantation model of human colon organoids engineered to harbor different CRC mutation combinations. We demonstrate...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

miR-285-Yki/Mask double-negative feedback loop mediates blood-brain barrier integrity in Drosophila [Developmental Biology]The Hippo signaling pathway is highly conserved from Drosophila to mammals and plays a central role in maintaining organ size and tissue homeostasis. The blood–brain barrier (BBB) physiologically isolates the brain from circulating blood or the hemolymph system, and its integrity is strictly maintained to perform sophisticated neuronal functions. Until...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Massive increase in visual range preceded the origin of terrestrial vertebrates [Evolution]The evolution of terrestrial vertebrates, starting around 385 million years ago, is an iconic moment in evolution that brings to mind images of fish transforming into four-legged animals. Here, we show that this radical change in body shape was preceded by an equally dramatic change in sensory abilities akin to...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The presumed ginkgophyte Umaltolepis has seed-bearing structures resembling those of Peltaspermales and Umkomasiales [Evolution]The origins of the five groups of living seed plants, including the single relictual species Ginkgo biloba, are poorly understood, in large part because of very imperfect knowledge of extinct seed plant diversity. Here we describe well-preserved material from the Early Cretaceous of Mongolia of the previously enigmatic Mesozoic seed...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Unified reduction principle for the evolution of mutation, migration, and recombination [Evolution]Modifier-gene models for the evolution of genetic information transmission between generations of organisms exhibit the reduction principle: Selection favors reduction in the rate of variation production in populations near equilibrium under a balance of constant viability selection and variation production. Whereas this outcome has been proven for a variety of...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Multiple origins of viral capsid proteins from cellular ancestors [Evolution]Viruses are the most abundant biological entities on earth and show remarkable diversity of genome sequences, replication and expression strategies, and virion structures. Evolutionary genomics of viruses revealed many unexpected connections but the general scenario(s) for the evolution of the virosphere remains a matter of intense debate among proponents of...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Conserved forkhead dimerization motif controls DNA replication timing and spatial organization of chromosomes in S. cerevisiae [Genetics]Forkhead Box (Fox) proteins share the Forkhead domain, a winged-helix DNA binding module, which is conserved among eukaryotes from yeast to humans. These sequence-specific DNA binding proteins have been primarily characterized as transcription factors regulating diverse cellular processes from cell cycle control to developmental fate, deregulation of which contributes to...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Myocardial aging as a T-cell-mediated phenomenon [Immunology and Inflammation]In recent years, the myocardium has been rediscovered under the lenses of immunology, and lymphocytes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiomyopathies with different etiologies. Aging is an important risk factor for heart diseases, and it also has impact on the immune system. Thus, we sought to determine whether...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Immune protection against reinfection with nonprimate hepacivirus [Medical Sciences]Hepatitis C virus (HCV) displays a restricted host species tropism and only humans and chimpanzees are susceptible to infection. A robust immunocompetent animal model is still lacking, hampering mechanistic analysis of virus pathogenesis, immune control, and prophylactic vaccine development. The closest homolog of HCV is the equine nonprimate hepacivirus (NPHV),...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Polyphosphate granule biogenesis is temporally and functionally tied to cell cycle exit during starvation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa [Microbiology]Polyphosphate (polyP) granule biogenesis is an ancient and ubiquitous starvation response in bacteria. Although the ability to make polyP is important for survival during quiescence and resistance to diverse environmental stresses, granule genesis is poorly understood. Using quantitative microscopy at high spatial and temporal resolution, we show that granule genesis...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Simplified and representative bacterial community of maize roots [Microbiology]Plant-associated microbes are important for the growth and health of their hosts. As a result of numerous prior studies, we know that host genotypes and abiotic factors influence the composition of plant microbiomes. However, the high complexity of these communities challenges detailed studies to define experimentally the mechanisms underlying the...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Modular electron-transport chains from eukaryotic organelles function to support nitrogenase activity [Microbiology]A large number of genes are necessary for the biosynthesis and activity of the enzyme nitrogenase to carry out the process of biological nitrogen fixation (BNF), which requires large amounts of ATP and reducing power. The multiplicity of the genes involved, the oxygen sensitivity of nitrogenase, plus the demand for...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-linked mutations increase the viscosity of liquid-like TDP-43 RNP granules in neurons [Neuroscience]Ribonucleoprotein (RNP) granules are enriched in specific RNAs and RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and mediate critical cellular processes. Purified RBPs form liquid droplets in vitro through liquid–liquid phase separation and liquid-like non–membrane-bound structures in cells. Mutations in the human RBPs TAR-DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43) and RNA-binding protein FUS cause amyotrophic...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Synchronous circadian voltage rhythms with asynchronous calcium rhythms in the suprachiasmatic nucleus [Neuroscience]The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master circadian clock, contains a network composed of multiple types of neurons which are thought to form a hierarchical and multioscillator system. The molecular clock machinery in SCN neurons drives membrane excitability and sends time cue signals to various brain regions and peripheral organs. However,...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Novel combinatorial screening identifies neurotrophic factors for selective classes of motor neurons [Neuroscience]Numerous neurotrophic factors promote the survival of developing motor neurons but their combinatorial actions remain poorly understood; to address this, we here screened 66 combinations of 12 neurotrophic factors on pure, highly viable, and standardized embryonic mouse motor neurons isolated by a unique FACS technique. We demonstrate potent, strictly additive,...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correlated variability modifies working memory fidelity in primate prefrontal neuronal ensembles [Neuroscience]Neurons in the primate lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) encode working memory (WM) representations via sustained firing, a phenomenon hypothesized to arise from recurrent dynamics within ensembles of interconnected neurons. Here, we tested this hypothesis by using microelectrode arrays to examine spike count correlations (rsc) in LPFC neuronal ensembles during a...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Deactivation kinetics of acid-sensing ion channel 1a are strongly pH-sensitive [Pharmacology]Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are trimeric cation-selective ion channels activated by protons in the physiological range. Recent reports have revealed that postsynaptically localized ASICs contribute to the excitatory postsynaptic current by responding to the transient acidification of the synaptic cleft that accompanies neurotransmission. In response to such brief acidic transients,...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Mechanisms regulating angiogenesis underlie seasonal control of pituitary function [Physiology]Seasonal changes in mammalian physiology, such as those affecting reproduction, hibernation, and metabolism, are controlled by pituitary hormones released in response to annual environmental changes. In temperate zones, the primary environmental cue driving seasonal reproductive cycles is the change in day length (i.e., photoperiod), encoded by the pattern of melatonin...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Lys49 myotoxin from the Brazilian lancehead pit viper elicits pain through regulated ATP release [Physiology]Pain-producing animal venoms contain evolutionarily honed toxins that can be exploited to study and manipulate somatosensory and nociceptive signaling pathways. From a functional screen, we have identified a secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA2)-like protein, BomoTx, from the Brazilian lancehead pit viper (Bothrops moojeni). BomoTx is closely related to a group of...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Auxin response cell-autonomously controls ground tissue initiation in the early Arabidopsis embryo [Plant Biology]Plant organs are typically organized into three main tissue layers. The middle ground tissue layer comprises the majority of the plant body and serves a wide range of functions, including photosynthesis, selective nutrient uptake and storage, and gravity sensing. Ground tissue patterning and maintenance in Arabidopsis are controlled by a...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Discovery of an endogenous Deltaretrovirus in the genome of long-fingered bats (Chiroptera: Miniopteridae) [Evolution]Retroviruses can create endogenous forms on infiltration into the germline cells of their hosts. These forms are then vertically transmitted and can be considered as genetic fossils of ancient viruses. All retrovirus genera, with the exception of deltaretroviruses, have had their representation identified in the host genome as a virus...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Resistance mechanisms to TP53-MDM2 inhibition identified by in vivo piggyBac transposon mutagenesis screen in an Arf-/- mouse model [Genetics]Inhibitors of double minute 2 protein (MDM2)–tumor protein 53 (TP53) interaction are predicted to be effective in tumors in which the TP53 gene is wild type, by preventing TP53 protein degradation. One such setting is represented by the frequent CDKN2A deletion in human cancer that, through inactivation of p14ARF, activates...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Engineered erythrocytes covalently linked to antigenic peptides can protect against autoimmune disease [Immunology and Inflammation]Current therapies for autoimmune diseases rely on traditional immunosuppressive medications that expose patients to an increased risk of opportunistic infections and other complications. Immunoregulatory interventions that act prophylactically or therapeutically to induce antigen-specific tolerance might overcome these obstacles. Here we use the transpeptidase sortase to covalently attach disease-
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Sensing of cell stress by human {gamma}{delta} TCR-dependent recognition of annexin A2 [Immunology and Inflammation]Human γδ T cells comprise a first line of defense through T-cell receptor (TCR) recognition of stressed cells. However, the molecular determinants and stress pathways involved in this recognition are largely unknown. Here we show that exposure of tumor cells to various stress situations led to tumor cell recognition by...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

ZNF503/Zpo2 drives aggressive breast cancer progression by down-regulation of GATA3 expression [Medical Sciences]The transcription factor GATA3 is the master regulator that drives mammary luminal epithelial cell differentiation and maintains mammary gland homeostasis. Loss of GATA3 is associated with aggressive breast cancer development. We have identified ZNF503/ZEPPO2 zinc-finger elbow-related proline domain protein 2 (ZPO2) as a transcriptional repressor of GATA3 expression and transcriptional...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Phosphoproteins in extracellular vesicles as candidate markers for breast cancer [Medical Sciences]The state of protein phosphorylation can be a key determinant of cellular physiology such as early-stage cancer, but the development of phosphoproteins in biofluids for disease diagnosis remains elusive. Here we demonstrate a strategy to isolate and identify phosphoproteins in extracellular vesicles (EVs) from human plasma as potential markers to...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Ablation of cytochrome P450 omega-hydroxylase 4A14 gene attenuates hepatic steatosis and fibrosis [Medical Sciences]Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by simple hepatic steatosis (SS), nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), hepatic fibrosis, and cirrhosis. Dysregulated fatty acid metabolism in the liver plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Cytochrome P450 omega-hydroxylase 4A14 (CYP4A14) is a homolog of human CYP4A hydroxylase that catalyzes omega-hydroxylation...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

mTORC1/2 inhibition preserves ovarian function and fertility during genotoxic chemotherapy [Medical Sciences]The ovary contains oocytes within immature (primordial) follicles that are fixed in number at birth. Activation of follicles within this fixed pool causes an irreversible decline in reproductive capacity, known as the ovarian reserve, until menopause. Premenopausal women undergoing commonly used genotoxic (DNA-damaging) chemotherapy experience an accelerated loss of the...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

BAP1 inhibits the ER stress gene regulatory network and modulates metabolic stress response [Medical Sciences]The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is classically linked to metabolic homeostasis via the activation of unfolded protein response (UPR), which is instructed by multiple transcriptional regulatory cascades. BRCA1 associated protein 1 (BAP1) is a tumor suppressor with de-ubiquitinating enzyme activity and has been implicated in chromatin regulation of gene expression. Here...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Comparative genomics uncovers the prolific and distinctive metabolic potential of the cyanobacterial genus Moorea [Microbiology]Cyanobacteria are major sources of oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon in nature. In addition to the importance of their primary metabolism, some cyanobacteria are prolific producers of unique and bioactive secondary metabolites. Chemical investigations of the cyanobacterial genus Moorea have resulted in the isolation of over 190 compounds in the last...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Resuscitation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from dormancy requires hibernation promoting factor (PA4463) for ribosome preservation [Microbiology]Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections are difficult to treat with antibiotic therapy in part because the biofilms contain subpopulations of dormant antibiotic-tolerant cells. The dormant cells can repopulate the biofilms following alleviation of antibiotic treatments. While dormant, the bacteria must maintain cellular integrity, including ribosome abundance, to reinitiate the de novo...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structure of deformed wing virus, a major honey bee pathogen [Microbiology]The worldwide population of western honey bees (Apis mellifera) is under pressure from habitat loss, environmental stress, and pathogens, particularly viruses that cause lethal epidemics. Deformed wing virus (DWV) from the family Iflaviridae, together with its vector, the mite Varroa destructor, is likely the major threat to the world’s honey...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Neonatal CX26 removal impairs neocortical development and leads to elevated anxiety [Neuroscience]Electrical coupling between excitatory neurons in the neocortex is developmentally regulated. It is initially prominent but eliminated at later developmental stages when chemical synapses emerge. However, it remains largely unclear whether early electrical coupling networks broadly contribute to neocortical circuit formation and animal behavior. Here, we report that neonatal electrical...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Hysteresis of KcsA potassium channel's activation- deactivation gating is caused by structural changes at the channel’s selectivity filter [Physiology]Mode-shift or hysteresis has been reported in ion channels. Voltage-shift for gating currents is well documented for voltage-gated cation channels (VGCC), and it is considered a voltage-sensing domain's (VSD) intrinsic property. However, uncoupling the Shaker K+ channel’s pore domain (PD) from the VSD prevented the mode-shift of the gating currents....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Myosin filament activation in the heart is tuned to the mechanical task [Physiology]The mammalian heart pumps blood through the vessels, maintaining the dynamic equilibrium in a circulatory system driven by two pumps in series. This vital function is based on the fine-tuning of cardiac performance by the Frank–Starling mechanism that relates the pressure exerted by the contracting ventricle (end systolic pressure) to...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Coordination of auxin-triggered leaf initiation by tomato LEAFLESS [Plant Biology]Lateral plant organs, particularly leaves, initiate at the flanks of the shoot apical meristem (SAM) following auxin maxima signals; however, little is known about the underlying mechanisms. Here, we show that tomato leafless (lfs) mutants fail to produce cotyledons and leaves and grow a naked pin while maintaining an active...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Black-swan events in animal populations [Population Biology]Black swans are improbable events that nonetheless occur—often with profound consequences. Such events drive important transitions in social systems (e.g., banking collapses) and physical systems (e.g., earthquakes), and yet it remains unclear the extent to which ecological population numbers buffer or suffer from such extremes. Here, we estimate the prevalence...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Spontaneous expression of mirror self-recognition in monkeys after learning precise visual-proprioceptive association for mirror images [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Mirror self-recognition (MSR) is generally considered to be an intrinsic cognitive ability found only in humans and a few species of great apes. Rhesus monkeys do not spontaneously show MSR, but they have the ability to use a mirror as an instrument to find hidden objects. The mechanism underlying the...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Neural basis of impaired safety signaling in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]The ability to assign safety to stimuli in the environment is integral to everyday functioning. A key brain region for this evaluation is the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). To investigate the importance of vmPFC safety signaling, we used neuroimaging of Pavlovian fear reversal, a paradigm that involves flexible updating when...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Predicting the knowledge-recklessness distinction in the human brain [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Criminal convictions require proof that a prohibited act was performed in a statutorily specified mental state. Different legal consequences, including greater punishments, are mandated for those who act in a state of knowledge, compared with a state of recklessness. Existing research, however, suggests people have trouble classifying defendants as knowing,...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Enhanced vision may have enabled evolutionary shift from water to land Enlarged eyes may have aided vertebrates’ shift from water to land. The origin of limbs in the evolutionary foray of vertebrates from water to land has long claimed researchers’ interest, but the role of vision in this momentous transition,...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Stephen Fienberg: Superman of statistics [Retrospectives]Stephen E. Fienberg died on December 14, 2016 after a 4-year battle with cancer. He was husband to Joyce, father to Anthony and Howard, grandfather to six, brother to Lorne, mentor, teacher, and a prolific researcher. Most of all, he was a tireless promoter of the idea that the field...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The depressed brain in Parkinson's disease: Implications for an inflammatory biomarker [Neuroscience]The Need for a Biomarker in Parkinson's Disease Parkinson’s disease (PD) is an increasingly prevalent neurodegenerative disorder currently diagnosed solely on the presence of motor symptoms (i.e., tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, and postural instability) and their response to dopamine replacement therapy. A major unmet need is the limited number and failure...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Glucagon antagonism in islet cell proliferation [Physiology]The peptide hormones insulin and glucagon (gcg) are inextricably linked in the normal control of glucose homeostasis and in the dysregulated glucose homeostasis that defines diabetes mellitus. Pancreatic islets secrete both insulin and gcg in a manner that is tightly juxtaposed. β Cells secrete insulin, a peptide hormone that promotes...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Keeping the nitrogen-fixation dream alive [Microbiology]The conversion of inert N2 gas to a metabolically tractable form, such as ammonia, is called nitrogen fixation. In biology, nitrogen fixation is a highly oxygen-sensitive process restricted to a select group of diverse microorganisms, often collectively referred to as diazotrophs, or “nitrogen eaters.” The sparse availability of fixed nitrogen,...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

LIGO and the opening of a unique observational window on the universe [Perspectives]A unique window on the universe opened on September 14, 2015, with direct detection of gravitational waves by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors. This event culminated a half-century effort around the globe to develop terrestrial detectors of adequate sensitivity to achieve this goal. It also happened appropriately...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Hunter-gatherer residential mobility and the marginal value of rainforest patches [Anthropology]The residential mobility patterns of modern hunter-gatherers broadly reflect local resource availability, but the proximate ecological and social forces that determine the timing of camp movements are poorly known. We tested the hypothesis that the timing of such moves maximizes foraging efficiency as hunter-gatherers move across the landscape. The marginal...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Solar fuels photoanode materials discovery by integrating high-throughput theory and experiment [Applied Physical Sciences]The limited number of known low-band-gap photoelectrocatalytic materials poses a significant challenge for the generation of chemical fuels from sunlight. Using high-throughput ab initio theory with experiments in an integrated workflow, we find eight ternary vanadate oxide photoanodes in the target band-gap range (1.2–2.8 eV). Detailed analysis of these vanadate...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Accurate model annotation of a near-atomic resolution cryo-EM map [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) has been used to determine the atomic coordinates (models) from density maps of biological assemblies. These models can be assessed by their overall fit to the experimental data and stereochemical information. However, these models do not annotate the actual density values of the atoms nor their positional...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Clinical concentrations of chemically diverse general anesthetics minimally affect lipid bilayer properties [Biophysics and Computational Biology]General anesthetics have revolutionized medicine by facilitating invasive procedures, and have thus become essential drugs. However, detailed understanding of their molecular mechanisms remains elusive. A mechanism proposed over a century ago involving unspecified interactions with the lipid bilayer known as the unitary lipid-based hypothesis of anesthetic action, has been challenged...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Sensory domain contraction in histidine kinase CitA triggers transmembrane signaling in the membrane-bound sensor [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Bacteria use membrane-integral sensor histidine kinases (HK) to perceive stimuli and transduce signals from the environment to the cytosol. Information on how the signal is transmitted across the membrane by HKs is still scarce. Combining both liquid- and solid-state NMR, we demonstrate that structural rearrangements in the extracytoplasmic, citrate-sensing Per-Arnt-Sim...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Diverse regulation of mammary epithelial growth and branching morphogenesis through noncanonical Wnt signaling [Cell Biology]The mammary gland consists of an adipose tissue that, in a process called branching morphogenesis, is invaded by a ductal epithelial network comprising basal and luminal epithelial cells. Stem and progenitor cells drive mammary growth, and their proliferation is regulated by multiple extracellular cues. One of the key regulatory pathways...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Functional characterization of CFI-402257, a potent and selective Mps1/TTK kinase inhibitor, for the treatment of cancer [Cell Biology]Loss of cell-cycle control is a hallmark of human cancer. Cell-cycle checkpoints are essential for maintaining genome integrity and balanced growth and division. They are specifically deregulated in cancer cells and contain regulators that represent potential therapeutic targets. Monopolar spindle 1 (Mps1; also known as TTK protein kinase) is a...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Stepwise unfolding supports a subunit model for vertebrate kinetochores [Cell Biology]During cell division, interactions between microtubules and chromosomes are mediated by the kinetochore, a proteinaceous structure located at the primary constriction of chromosomes. In addition to the centromere histone centromere protein A (CENP-A), 15 other members of the constitutive centromere associated network (CCAN) participate in the formation of a chromatin-associated...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Opinion: Why we need a centralized repository for isotopic data [Chemistry]Stable isotopes encode and integrate the origin of matter; thus, their analysis offers tremendous potential to address questions across diverse scientific disciplines (1, 2). Indeed, the broad applicability of stable isotopes, coupled with advancements in high-throughput analysis, have created a scientific field that is growing exponentially, and generating data at...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Atoms and molecules in cavities, from weak to strong coupling in quantum-electrodynamics (QED) chemistry [Chemistry]In this work, we provide an overview of how well-established concepts in the fields of quantum chemistry and material sciences have to be adapted when the quantum nature of light becomes important in correlated matter–photon problems. We analyze model systems in optical cavities, where the matter–photon interaction is considered from...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Metallacycle-cored supramolecular assemblies with tunable fluorescence including white-light emission [Chemistry]Control over the fluorescence of supramolecular assemblies is crucial for the development of chemosensors and light-emitting materials. Consequently, the postsynthetic modification of supramolecular structures via host–guest interactions has emerged as an efficient strategy in recent years that allows the facile tuning of the photophysical properties without requiring a tedious chemical...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Characterization of NiFe oxyhydroxide electrocatalysts by integrated electronic structure calculations and spectroelectrochemistry [Chemistry]NiFe oxyhydroxide materials are highly active electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER), an important process for carbon-neutral energy storage. Recent spectroscopic and computational studies increasingly support iron as the site of catalytic activity but differ with respect to the relevant iron redox state. A combination of hybrid periodic density...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Tailoring porosity and rotational dynamics in a series of octacarboxylate metal-organic frameworks [Chemistry]Modulation and precise control of porosity of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) is of critical importance to their materials function. Here we report modulation of porosity for a series of isoreticular octacarboxylate MOFs, denoted MFM-180 to MFM-185, via a strategy of selective elongation of metal-organic cages. Owing to the high ligand connectivity,...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Integration of Shh and Fgf signaling in controlling Hox gene expression in cultured limb cells [Developmental Biology]During embryonic development, fields of progenitor cells form complex structures through dynamic interactions with external signaling molecules. How complex signaling inputs are integrated to yield appropriate gene expression responses is poorly understood. In the early limb bud, for instance, Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is expressed in the distal posterior mesenchyme, where...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Recombination reactions as a possible mechanism of mass-independent fractionation of sulfur isotopes in the Archean atmosphere of Earth [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]A hierarchy of isotopically substituted recombination reactions is formulated for production of sulfur allotropes in the anoxic atmosphere of Archean Earth. The corresponding system of kinetics equations is solved analytically to obtain concise expressions for isotopic enrichments, with focus on mass-independent isotope effects due to symmetry, ignoring smaller mass-dependent effects....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Yellow taxis have fewer accidents than blue taxis because yellow is more visible than blue [Economic Sciences]Is there a link between the color of a taxi and how many accidents it has? An analysis of 36 mo of detailed taxi, driver, and accident data (comprising millions of data points) from the largest taxi company in Singapore suggests that there is an explicit link. Yellow taxis had...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Impact of savings groups on the lives of the poor [Economic Sciences]Savings-led microfinance programs operate in poor rural communities in developing countries to establish groups that save and then lend out the accumulated savings to each other. Nonprofit organizations train villagers to create and lead these groups. In a clustered randomized evaluation spanning three African countries (Ghana, Malawi, and Uganda), we...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Higher-than-ballistic conduction of viscous electron flows [Physics]Strongly interacting electrons can move in a neatly coordinated way, reminiscent of the movement of viscous fluids. Here, we show that in viscous flows, interactions facilitate transport, allowing conductance to exceed the fundamental Landauer’s ballistic limit Gball. The effect is particularly striking for the flow through a viscous point contact,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Anatomy of news consumption on Facebook [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]The advent of social media and microblogging platforms has radically changed the way we consume information and form opinions. In this paper, we explore the anatomy of the information space on Facebook by characterizing on a global scale the news consumption patterns of 376 million users over a time span...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Classroom sound can be used to classify teaching practices in college science courses [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Active-learning pedagogies have been repeatedly demonstrated to produce superior learning gains with large effect sizes compared with lecture-based pedagogies. Shifting large numbers of college science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) faculty to include any active learning in their teaching may retain and more effectively educate far more students than having...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Consequences of a price incentive on free riding and electric energy consumption [Sustainability Science]This article shows that a simple monetary incentive can dramatically reduce electric energy consumption (EEC) in the residential sector and simultaneously achieve a more desirable allocation of EEC costs. The analyses are based on data from a policy experiment conducted in 2011 and 2012 by a private housing company in...
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Twitter suspends more accounts linked to 'terrorism'Twitter said Tuesday it suspended 376,890 accounts in the second half of 2016 for "promotion of terrorism," an increase of 60 percent over the prior six-month period.
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Gizmodo

I Have Conflicting Feelings on Power Rangers and the First Big-Screen LGBT Superhero Image: Lionsgate. In addition to the release of reviews for the Power Rangers movie this week, it’s also been revealed that the film has become the first mainstream superhero movie to feature a main character who happens to be LGBTQ. It’s a big step for superhero cinema, but a question remains—just exactly how big is it? According to a brief new interview with director Dean Israelite for The Holl
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Ars Technica

Google announces the Android O Developer Preview Enlarge / The new Android O logo. (credit: Google) Almost exactly a year after the Android N Developer Preview launched, Google is unleashing a developer preview of the next major version of Android, " Android O ." We haven't tried it yet (images should be dropping any minute now), and the heavy developer documentation is still on lockdown, but we do have a big list of new features to go over. Th
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Blog » Languages » English

Funky Monkey vs. Sound Hound Get your groove on this week with some musical animals. What’s spinning on your turntable? Funky Monkey: Spreading syncopation across the simian nation. Sound Hound: Dropping beats that put the woof in “subwoofer.” The usual bonuses Earn 5,000 points – 2,500 bonus Earn 15,000 points – 5,000 bonus Earn 25,000 points – 10,000 bonus For every 25,000 points above 25,000 – 5,000 bonus Member of winnin
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Tiny genetic change lets bird flu leap to humansA change in just a single 'letter' of the flu virus allows bird flu to pass to humans, according to scientists.
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The Guardian

City minister in right and proper pickle over financial crime We want British banks to lead the way in money laundering, jabbers Simon Kirby, whose floundering doesn’t wash with MPs Cometh the hour, cometh the man. With Philip “the Undertaker” Hammond still sulking about his budget and refusing to talk to anyone, it was left to Simon Kirby, the City minister who looks like a cross between Swiss Toni and Geert Wilders – though without the gravitas – to take
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The Guardian

The Global Laundromat: how did it work and who benefited? Everything you need to know about the money-laundering scheme that moved billions of dollars out of Russia The Laundromat is a name given by the Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project to a vast money-laundering scheme. Between autumn 2010 and spring 2014 Russian officials and insiders moved billions of dollars into Europe, the US and other countries. Law enforcement officers in Moldova
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Popular Science

This EPA unit fights terrorism with science Environment It's not all about hugging trees Here's a weird section of the EPA that you've probably never heard of. Read on.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study: Pre-pregnancy BMI directly linked to excess pregnancy weight gainIt's well known that excessive weight gain during pregnancy can have a lasting negative impact on the health of a mother and her baby.A new University of Michigan-led study finds that for young mothers (women who gave birth between the ages of 15 and 24), pre-pregnancy body mass index, or BMI, and ethnicity might signal a likelihood for obesity later in life.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Antenatal screening in Europe: How to avoid mother-to-child transmission of infectionsTransmission of infections with HIV, hepatitis B, syphilis or rubella from mother to child before and during birth as well as in infancy still occur across Europe -- despite existing prevention methods. A new ECDC report outlines the cornerstones for effective antenatal screening programs across the EU/EEA countries.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Insulin resistance may lead to faster cognitive declineInsulin resistance, caused in part by obesity and physical inactivity, is also linked to a more rapid decline in cognitive performance, new research suggests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Testing the efficacy of new gene therapies more efficientlyUsing a new cellular model, innovative gene therapy approaches for the hereditary immunodeficiency Chronic Granulomatous Disease can be tested faster and cost-effectively in the lab for their efficacy. A team of researchers has successfully achieved this using the 'gene-scissor' CRISPR/Cas9 technology. The aim is to treat severely affected patients in the near future using novel approaches.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pulverizing electronic waste is green, clean—and coldResearchers at Rice University and the Indian Institute of Science have an idea to simplify electronic waste recycling: Crush it into nanodust.
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The Guardian

Land rights activist shot dead in Brazilian Amazon hospital Assailants stormed hospital to gun down Waldomiro Costa Pereira Brazil saw 61 killings of land rights campaigners last year Five armed men have burst into a small-town hospital in the Brazilian Amazon, surrounded security guards and shot dead a prominent land rights activist, in the latest deadly attack on land campaigners. Waldomiro Costa Pereira, an activist with the Landless Workers Movement (
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New gel-like coating beefs up the performance of lithium-sulfur batteriesScientists have developed an ultra-thin coating material that has the potential to extend the life and improve the efficiency of lithium-sulfur batteries, one of the most promising areas of energy research today.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

AML study correlates gene mutations with 34 disease subgroupsA large, new study of adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) correlates 80 cancer-related gene mutations with five subtypes of AML, which are defined by the presence of specific chromosomal abnormalities. The findings might help guide mutation testing and treatment decisions in the future.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Insight into day-to-day lives of parents raising children with autismA new study looks at the daily experiences of the parents of children with autism spectrum disorder to provide a more detailed picture of the strengths and vulnerabilities of couples raising a child with ASD.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Energy drinks mask alcohol's effects, increase injury riskPeople who mix highly caffeinated energy drinks with their alcoholic beverages may be at increased risk for injury, according to a new review.
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Ars Technica

Red Flag Windows: Microsoft modifies Windows OS for Chinese government China has long been both a huge lure and a thorn in the side for Microsoft. Massive piracy of Windows XP, a decade-long effort to replace Windows entirely with a home-grown Linux variant called Red Flag and an OpenOffice variant called RedOffice , and a ban on Windows 8 for government use following the leak by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden of information on National Security Agency spying
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pulverizing electronic waste is green, clean -- and coldMilling electronic waste into nanoscale particles allows polymers, oxides and metals to be separated for recycling into new products. The process takes advantage of changes to the materials' properties in very cold conditions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rosetta comet orbiter films deep-space landslideLandslides are not unique to Earth, researchers revealed on Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A chance for the Pluto-huggers? Scientist leads effort to restore underdog's planetary statureEjected a decade ago from its place among the planets, the distant, icy world of Pluto still has its admirers.
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The Guardian

Met police accused of using hackers to access protesters' emails Exclusive: Watchdog investigates claim that secretive unit worked with Indian police to obtain campaigners’ passwords The police watchdog is investigating allegations that a secretive Scotland Yard unit used hackers to illegally access the private emails of hundreds of political campaigners and journalists. The allegations were made by an anonymous individual who says the unit worked with Indian
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The Guardian

Grand National day rail strikes expected to cause severe disruption Southern, Merseyrail and Arriva Trains North operators to stage 24-hour walkout on 8 April amid long-running dispute Workers at three rail operators are to stage a 24-hour strike on the day of the Grand National amid a long-running dispute over staffing and the role of conductors. Members of the Rail, Maritime and Transport (RMT) union at Southern, Merseyrail and Arriva Trains North will walk out
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The Atlantic

Can the Country Survive Without a Strong Middle Class? The U.S. Constitution, it is fair to say, is normally thought of as a political document. It lays out the American system of government and the relationships among the various institutions. But in a powerful new book The Crisis of the Middle-Class Constitution , the Vanderbilt legal scholar Ganesh Sitaraman argues that the Constitution doesn’t merely require a particular political system but also
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The Atlantic

'A Loss Is Not Acceptable, Folks' Updated on March 21 at 5:15 p.m. ET President Trump tried negotiating with conservatives on health care. He brought them to the White House and treated them to a night of bowling . He listened to their concerns about Speaker Paul Ryan’s American Health Care Act. With his customary fanfare, Trump even made the House leadership—despite their initial protests— rewrite key portions of their bill to a
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Ars Technica

When inspectors swoop in, hospital staff save more lives Enlarge (credit: Getty | Caiaimage/Robert Daly ) Even the best and brightest employees will slack a bit when the boss isn’t looking—we’re not machines, after all. ( Editor's note: get back to work! ) Perhaps a project doesn’t move along as briskly as it could, or a protocol isn’t followed precisely. In the working world, minor mediocrity now and then may not be a big deal—it’s not like it's life
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The Guardian

After Martin McGuinness, peace in Ireland will face renewed pressure | Jonathan PowellThe former IRA man made the Good Friday Agreement work. But now power-sharing is under threat, and the stage is set for a return to grievance politics When I first met Martin McGuinness in October 1997 I declined to shake his hand. As far as I was concerned he was a terrorist and a member of an organisation that had shot and wounded my father, and put my brother on a death list for eight years. A
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Gizmodo

Google Will Finally Do Something, Anything, About Ads on Racist Videos Still: YouTube After heavy criticism in the UK and Europe, Google announced today that it has begun implementing some striking changes to its advertising systems. According to a blog post by Philipp Schindler, the company’s chief business officer, the changes will make it easier for advertisers to exclude content they don’t want their ads anywhere near. They’ll also be able to exclude content acr
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The Guardian

Cut it out: Canada bars diplomats from using cardboard Justin Trudeau figures Though some anticipated ‘serious selfie action’ with the cutouts, Conservatives said they were ‘a perfect metaphor’ for what the prime minister represented Related: Matthew Perry beat up Justin Trudeau in grade school: 'I’m not bragging' He is tall and handsome – if perhaps somewhat lacking in depth – and never objects to posing for a selfie . Continue reading...
20h
WIRED

Only an End to Global Warming Can Save the Great Barrier Reef Improvements to water quality or fishing controls don't prevent underwater heatwaves damaging coral, studies of mass bleaching events reveal The post Only an End to Global Warming Can Save the Great Barrier Reef appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Iron Fist Can Totally Break His Fall With a Pole. Physics Says So In his new show, the superhero catches himself on a pole. Let's look at the stopping force and acceleration involved. The post Iron Fist Can Totally Break His Fall With a Pole. Physics Says So appeared first on WIRED .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Icahn pressed EPA candidates on ethanol rule he wants scrappedBillionaire investor Carl Icahn, who helped President Donald Trump vet candidates to lead the Environmental Protection Agency, pressed them for their views on a regulation that he says is costing his oil refineries hundreds of millions of dollars a year.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Suicide risk is higher in first year after deliberate self-harmNew findings suggest that American adults who survive deliberate self-harm are at increased risk of suicide in the first year after such an event, indicating a need to direct clinical interventions in the critical 12 months following such episodes.
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Futurity.org

Peers, more than teachers, motivate us to learn “Why do I have to learn this?” is a common question among young adults. New research suggests an answer from their peers has more weight than one from their teachers. University students who received a rationale for why learning is important from people similar to them—in this case actors posing as young professionals—wrote more effective essays and got a significantly better final grade than stu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Does the universe have a rest frame?Physics is sometimes closer to philosophy when it comes to understanding the universe. Donald Chang from Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, China, attempts to elucidate whether the universe has a resting frame. The results have recently been published in EPJ Plus.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Transparent silver: Tarnish-proof films for flexible displays, touch screensThe thinnest, smoothest layer of silver that can survive air exposure has been laid down at the University of Michigan, and it could change the way touchscreens and flat or flexible displays are made.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

SIB accelerates the fight against diabetes with several pan-European projectsRecent advances in the fight against type 2 diabetes (T2D) result from a pan-European collaborative project, called IMIDIA, in which the SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics is closely involved since 2010. SIB was in charge of both coordinating the large amount of patients' data (acting as Data Coordination Centre, DCC) as well as analysing the data to find biomarkers for early detection of the d
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

States can lower risk of measles outbreak by strengthening exemption policiesStates with weaker non-medical exemption policies for vaccinations can reduce the likelihood of a measles outbreak 140 to 190 percent by strengthening them, a new study from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus shows.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Does the universe have a rest frame?Physics is sometimes closer to philosophy when it comes to understanding the universe. Donald Chang from Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, China, attempts to elucidate whether the universe has a resting frame. The results have recently been published in EPJ Plus.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Caution needed for drugs in development for most common malignant pediatric brain tumorResearchers at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have studied how a crucial cancer-related protein plays a role in one of the most aggressive forms of medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Satnavs 'switch off' parts of the brainUsing a satnav to get to your destination 'switches off' parts of the brain that would otherwise be used to simulate different routes, reveals new UCL research. The study, published in Nature Communications and funded by Wellcome, involved 24 volunteers navigating a simulation of Soho in central London while undergoing brain scans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Numerosity in humans, birds and fish based in brain's subcortexA cognitive neuroscience, through study, has addressed basic research questions about how our brains process number and magnitude and how such processes give rise to more complex mathematical thinking, answering the question: where in the brain is numerical quantity evaluation processed?
20h
Big Think

How a 1% Gain in Fossil Fuel Efficiency Could Rival Renewables One billion people have little or no access to electricity; even more have limited access, or have service which is unreliable. Hertz Foundation Fellow Dr. Max Mankin has a plan to solve this. Read More
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The Atlantic

The Case for Solitude Zak Bickel / The Atlantic Henry David Thoreau is something of a poster child for solitude. In his essay “Walking,” published just after his death in our June 1862 issue , Thoreau made the case “for absolute freedom and wildness … to regard man as an inhabitant, or a part and parcel of Nature, rather than a member of society”: We should go forth on the shortest walk, perchance, in the spirit of un
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The Atlantic

How Universal Child Care Affects Boys vs. Girls Among its many milestones, the 2016 U.S. presidential race marked the first time both the Democratic and Republican nominees released their child-care and paid-leave plans prior to the election. While campaigning, Donald Trump proposed a dependent-care savings account and a small earned-income tax credit for middle-class families. Hillary Clinton, on the other hand, called for direct government i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Livestock can uproot protected wildlife from prime real estateThe story of wildlife conservation is usually framed as man vs. treasured wildlife. But there's growing evidence that the narrative deserves to have leading roles for livestock such as sheep, yaks or cows.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New species of terrestrial crab found climbing on trees in Hong KongA new species of terrestrial crab has been found to climb trees on the eastern coast of Hong Kong. All specimens spotted during the survey have been collected at a height of approximately 1.5 - 1.8 m, walking on the bark of the branches at ebbing and low tides. The species is described in the open access journal ZooKeys.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Boys secure in their racial identity seek more diverse friendshipsKids often seek answers from parents, friends and media to better understand their racial identity.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Supreme Court sympathetic to Microsoft in Xbox owners' suit (Update)The Supreme Court suggested Tuesday that it is sympathetic to Microsoft Corp. in a dispute with disgruntled owners of the Xbox 360 video-game system who sued saying the console has a design defect that scratches game discs.
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The Guardian

The Fiver | A consistently cheery demeanour that will have driven Mourinho to madness Today: a likeable Basti, Effing Tactics Tim and Olivier’s and Arsène’s excellent adventure After the best part of a season mostly spent training on his own or with the youngsters at Manchester United, Bastian Schweinsteiger bade farewell to the club’s fans this morning as he announced he’s off to join Chicago Fire. The MLS franchise have announced they hope to benefit from his experience after fi
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The Guardian

Colin Dexter obituaryCrime writer who created the deep-thinking Oxford detective Inspector Morse Though he thought of himself primarily as a school teacher, Colin Dexter will be remembered as the crime writer who created the curmudgeonly but entertaining Inspector Morse . Morse, the beer, crossword and Wagner-loving detective who drives a vintage Jaguar around Oxford, solves murders by deep thinking, often about chanc
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The Guardian

UK wages will soon lag behind prices – will the Bank take action? | Larry Elliott Mark Carney appears unconcerned about inflation, but he will have to justify his inactivity as real incomes fall Judging by his comments, Mark Carney is blissfully unconcerned about inflation rising above its 2% target for the first time since 2013. The governor dismissed the unexpectedly sharp rise in the cost of living as a “single data point” when quizzed about it at a conference on ethics in
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The Guardian

Anna Jones’s recipes for two veggie breakfast fry-ups | The modern cook A cooked breakfast needn’t mean a pile of grease. Try introducing baked eggs to dal or scrambling some fragrantly spiced tofu to wrap in a warm tortilla for a healthy start to the day Weekend breakfasts deserve more than the neat routine of Monday to Friday: porridge or marmalade on toast just don’t cut it for me on a Sunday. I don’t even crave a weekend fry-up these days. No, I need something su
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The Guardian

Who's that girl? The famous faces gracing music videos … and those best forgotten Natalie Portman turns up in James Blake’s latest video, following in the footsteps of Christopher Walken, Tom Hanks and – embarrassingly – Angelina Jolie Most people mark their pregnancies by posting a grainy scan photo on Facebook and going to the toilet more than usual. Not Natalie Portman. Her lasting record of pregnancy is now a gorgeous black and white video – the video to James Blake track
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The Guardian

The BBC Brexit bias row is just another example of blame the messenger | Jane Martinson Bashing the BBC says more about our political climate than the broadcaster. If our leaders keep criticising every report they disagree with, our future will be gloomy When even the BBC’s Countryfile, the sleeper Sunday night hit much beloved of weather watchers, is accused of “cropaganda” by the Daily Mail, the corporation knows it is in the eye of a storm. A report this week about a strawberry g
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The Guardian

Will Tottenham finally finish above Arsenal in the Premier League this year? | Martin Laurence Arsenal are no worse than they were last season but Tottenham have improved again. Will Spurs finish above their rivals for the first time in 22 years? By Martin Laurence for WhoScored? , part of the Guardian Sport Network When Arsenal lost for a fourth time in five league games at West Brom on Saturday, Spurs fans sensed another opportunity to extend their lead over their local rivals. Arsenal’s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How can a legally binding agreement on human cloning be established?Since Dolly the Sheep was cloned in 1996, the question of whether human reproductive cloning should be banned or pursued has been the subject of international debate. In an attempt to address the issue, the UN formulated a Declaration on Human Cloning in 2005, but this was ambiguously worded and received ambivalent support from UN member states. Now Adèle Langlois of the University of Lincoln, UK,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA's hybrid computer enables Raven's autonomous rendezvous capabilityA hybrid computing system developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, is the enabling technology behind an ambitious experiment testing a relative navigation and autonomous docking capability known as Raven.
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Gizmodo

Reddit Is Now a Social Network For Exactly Three People [Updated] Image: photoshop of snoo and twitter birds Since its creation, Reddit has always been a network of communities. The individual users carry far less weight than the health of the subreddits they contribute to. Starting today, Reddit is debuting a feature that might turn that decade-long ethos on its head. A post yesterday in r/modnews—a community for moderators to learn about and discuss site chan
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Electrons used to control ultrashort laser pulsesWe may soon get better insight into the microcosm and the world of electrons. Researchers have developed a tool that makes it possible to control extreme UV light -- light with much shorter wavelengths than visible light. The new method uses strong laser pulses to direct the short bursts of light.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Astronomers hazard a ride in a 'drifting carousel' to understand pulsating starsWhat sounds like a stomach-turning ride at an amusement park might hold the key to unraveling the mysterious mechanism that causes beams of radio waves to shoot out from pulsars -- super-magnetic rotating stars in our galaxy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How the brain sees the world in 3-DWe live in a three-dimensional world, but everything we see is first recorded on our retinas in only two dimensions. So how does the brain represent 3-D information? In a new study, researchers for the first time have shown how different parts of the brain represent an object's location in depth compared to its 2-D location.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New brain-inspired cybersecurity system detects 'bad apples' 100 times fasterCybersecurity is critical—for national security, corporations and private individuals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Revealing the microscopic mechanisms in perovskite solar cellsA material with the perovskite crystal structure has become very popular for solar cells. While most perovskites are inorganic compounds, this new material is a hybrid of relatively inexpensive organic and inorganic materials. In just a few short years, researchers have achieved remarkable power conversion efficiency with these perovskites, comparable with the best photovoltaic materials available
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Manipulating magnetic texturesWhile the ability to easily control the magnetic properties of small electronic systems is highly desirable for future small electronics and data storage, an effective solution has proven to be extremely elusive.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Sesame Street to Welcome First Autistic MuppetNew character Julia’s puppeteer and writer have families members on the autism spectrum -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren

Rapport: Muligt at skære CO2-udledning 70 procent inden 2050Den globale CO2-udledning kan endda være helt udfaset i 2060. Men det kræver internationale investeringer og stor velvilje, mener den internationale organisation Irena.
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Ingeniøren

Storbritannien vil også forbyde elektronik på flyStorbritannien planlægger at forbyde computere, tablets og mobiltelefoner om bord på fly efter amerikansk forbillede.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Cancer cells cast a sweet spell on the immune systemTumors have surface sugars that persuade the body’s defenses to look the other way. New therapies are being devised to break the trance.
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Gizmodo

Brilliant Motion-Tracking Dart Board Guarantees a Bullseye With Every Throw A night at a local pub isn’t complete without a few rounds of darts, but as your blood-alcohol level rises, your ability to hit the bullseye greatly diminishes. Unless you’re playing with Mark Rober’s motion-tracking dart board that automatically repositions itself so you’re guaranteed to hit the bullseye every time. Rober , an ex-NASA engineer, spent three years designing, building, and perfecti
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Live Science

Book Excerpt: 'Calculating the Cosmos' (US 2016)In "Calculating the Cosmos," author Ian Stewart presents a guide to the cosmos, from our solar system to the entire universe.
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Live Science

Chimp Funerary Rites Seen for the First Time | VideoFor the first time, scientists have observed chimpanzees performing funerary rituals, in this case, cleaning the teeth of a corpse in Zambia.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Boys secure in their racial identity seek more diverse friendshipsKids often seek answers from parents, friends and media to better understand their racial identity.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Controlling fast X-ray pulses with laser lightWhen hit by light, electrons are excited and begin to move. Ultrafast X-ray pulses may make it possible to watch the motion of these electrons as they move inside and between atoms in a material. Although scientists have gotten much better at making ultrafast X-rays in recent years, controlling them is still notoriously difficult. Researchers at Louisiana State University and Lund University in Sw
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Insulin resistance may lead to faster cognitive declineA new Tel Aviv University study finds that insulin resistance, caused in part by obesity and physical inactivity, is also linked to a more rapid decline in cognitive performance.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New species of terrestrial crab found climbing on trees in Hong KongA new species of terrestrial crab has been found to climb trees on the eastern coast of Hong Kong. Its squarish predominantly dark brown carapace and very long slender legs are what sets it apart from closely related species. The discovery of the tiny crustacean once again proves how little is known about the diversity of these crabs in Hong Kong. The new species is described in the open access jo
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Transparent silver: Tarnish-proof films for flexible displays, touch screensThe thinnest, smoothest layer of silver that can survive air exposure has been laid down at the University of Michigan, and it could change the way touchscreens and flat or flexible displays are made.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Livestock can uproot protected wildlife from prime real estateThe story of wildlife conservation is usually framed as man vs. treasured wildlife. But there's growing evidence that the narrative deserves to have leading roles for livestock such as sheep, yaks or cows.A group of researchers from Michigan State University (MSU) and China are building the case that allowing livestock to graze and forage amidst protected wildlife disrupts wildlife already struggl
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Estimating the glass transition temperature for polymers in 'confined geometries'Polymers are used for myriad applications today, and perhaps the most important property that dictates which polymer is chosen for a given application is its "glass transition temperature." Many industrial polymers possess an irregular molecular structure that makes it impossible for them to crystallize. As a polymer material cools from a high temperature above its glass transition temperature, it
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spintronic technology advances with newly designed magnetic tunnel junctionsFor the last two decades, magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) have played a central role in spintronic devices such as read heads of hard disk drives and nonvolatile magnetoresistive random access memories (MRAMs), and researchers are constantly working to improve their performance. One of the most prominent achievements that accelerated the technology's practical applications was the realization of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new model for capillary rise in nano-channels offers insights into frackingIn the last decades, hydraulic fracturing or "fracking," a method of oil and gas extraction, has revolutionized the global energy industry. It involves fracturing rock with a pressurized liquid or "fracking fluid" (water containing sand suspended with the aid of thickening agents) to draw out small oil and gas deposits trapped in stone formations.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Video: What's the best way to cook pasta?Pasta noodles contain only three ingredients: eggs, water and flour. But how can you achieve a tasty result every time? Cooking pasta chemically changes how the proteins and starches interact, making the noodles sticky and springy. Therefore, what you do—or don't do—to the cooking water can change the edible result.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trump signs bill authorizing NASA funding, Mars exploration (Update)President Donald Trump signed a bill into law Tuesday that updates NASA's mission to add exploration of Mars and authorizes $19.5 billion in spending for the U.S. space agency for the current budget year.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Wavelet Theory Nets Top Mathematics AwardYves Meyer wins the Abel Prize for development of a theory with applications ranging from watching movies to detecting gravitational waves -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Popular Science

We need to protect the world's soil before it's too late Environment Book Excerpt: The Ground Beneath Us Soil scientists fear that we are wasting and damaging our topsoil—the layer in which most of our food grows—at an entirely unsustainable rate. Read on.
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The Guardian

Trafalgar Square's fourth plinth is fine for horses, but not avant garde art The new works destined for London say pithy things about the modern world – but they keep sculpture trapped in the 19th century I’ve never been convinced that Trafalgar Square’s fourth plinth public sculpture project, in London, is a marvellous thing for art – it is a completely outdated way of displaying sculpture that modern art specifically and, I thought, finally rejected a long time ago. Rel
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The Guardian

Martin McGuinness’s violent past made peace in Northern Ireland possible | Ed MoloneyOnly McGuinness’s credibility as an ‘operator’ enabled Gerry Adams to lead the IRA into a ceasefire and the Good Friday agreement For reasons that are entirely understandable, Martin McGuinness’s role in the latter years of the peace process – his emollient time as deputy first minister at Stormont, his unlikely friendship with Ian Paisley, his willingness to charm and delight the Queen – have fig
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Gizmodo

Today's Best Deals: Wiper Blades, PUMA, Razer, and More Michelin wiper blades , Razer’s quietest mechanical keyboard , and PUMA clothing lead off Tuesday’s best deals. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals D-Link Range Extender , $20 Wi-Fi range extenders can’t work miracles, but if there’s one spot in your house with spotty coverage, they can be a much cheaper solution than buying a new router. So for $20,
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Frequent dining out may lead to food budget-busting behaviorsPeople who frequently dine out --including workers who often eat out for lunch -- may struggle to maintain control of their food budget, according to a researcher.
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Gizmodo

io9 Life Is the Next Great Leap Forward for Science Fiction Horror | Jalopnik This ‘Ghost Plane’ Cra io9 Life Is the Next Great Leap Forward for Science Fiction Horror | Jalopnik This ‘Ghost Plane’ Crash Is One Of The Weirdest Mysteries Of 2017 (Update) | Kotaku The Under-Appreciated Radiant Historia Gets A Full Remake | Lifehacker What I Learned Running My First Marathon |
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The Guardian

Paris 2024 Olympic bid will be 100% clean, promises Tony Estanguet • Paris bid chief guarantees there will be no bribes in battle with Los Angeles • Estanguet says Paris will bid for 2024 Games only: ‘it’s now or never’ The leader of Paris’s bid for the 2024 Olympics has promised he can “100% guarantee” none of his team will accept or offer bribes for votes in September’s election – and backed the International Olympic Committee to clean up a voting process that
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The Guardian

Claim that MP lied about Kenya massacre 'may be in contempt of parliament' Foreign Office intervenes in Mau Mau case after court hears colonies secretary may have misled MPs 60 years ago Lawyers acting for 40,000 Kenyans who claim they were variously tortured, mistreated and raped during the suppression of the 1950s Mau Mau rebellion have been warned by the Foreign Office that their arguments in court could be in “contempt of parliament”. The extraordinary manoeuvre by
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Ars Technica

This Wii emulator lets you buy actual games from Nintendo’s Shop Channel A short video explains the new functionality that lets the Dolphin emulator access the official Wii Shop Channel. Perfect accuracy is an extremely ambitious goal for any console emulator to shoot for, and it's one that many emulators never come close to achieving. The team behind the open source Dolphin emulator took a major step closer to reaching that goal last week, though, releasing a new ver
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

During learning, neurons deep in brain engage in a surprising level of activityResearchers have learned something surprising about the cerebellum, perhaps best known as the part of the brain that makes sure you cannot tickle yourself. The team found that cerebellar neurons, once thought to fire only occasionally, are actually quite active when the brain is learning a new task.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Intervention that engages youth on ethnic, racial identity can enhance positive developmentDeveloping an ethnic-racial identity is an important task for young people growing up in the United States. A new study examined the Identity Project, a mental-health promotion intervention that engages youth in exploring and resolving issues around their ethnic and racial identities. It found that the program helps promote key developmental constructs that can enhance the positive development of
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Shortage of drug to treat low blood pressure from septic shock associated with increased deathsPatients with septic shock admitted to hospitals affected by the 2011 shortage of the drug norepinephrine had a higher risk of in-hospital death, according to a study.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Potential treatment for type of muscle and brain degenerative diseaseResearchers have discovered the molecular basis of an incurable disease known as inclusion body myopathy, explains a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New medicine to prevent mothers dying in childbirth succeeds in first trial in humansPositive results have been announced from a first-in-human study of a new, inhaled form of a medicine that could significantly reduce maternal deaths around the world. The results open the possibility of a streamlined pathway to registration, meaning that the medicine could be accessible to mothers much sooner than would otherwise be possible.
21h
New on MIT Technology Review

Earth’s Continued Warming Has Taken Us into Uncharted TerritoryRecord high temperatures, unprecedented sea-ice lows, and the highest carbon dioxide levels in four million years—but what happens next is up to us.
21h
The Guardian

Late-night TV roundup: 'Trump lied on Twitter during a hearing about him lying on Twitter' Comics, including Trevor Noah and Stephen Colbert, discussed the president’s inaccurate Obama accusations and his mean-spirited budget proposal Late-night hosts discussed the latest round of news within Trump’s government, focusing on the congressional hearing that saw his Obama wiretapping accusations debunked. Related: John Oliver on Trump's budget cuts: 'impatient, vain and horny for malice' C
21h
The Guardian

String of attacks across Guatemala lead to deaths of three policemen Police say gangs carried out attacks after rioting on Sunday to demand the return of members who had been transferred to a juvenile detention center Three policemen have been killed and seven others wounded in a string of attacks across Guatemala , authorities said, hours after a bloody gang riot in a juvenile detention center was put down in the Central American nation. One of the policemen died
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Viden

Forsker: Menneskeskabt CO2-udledning er den største klimasynderTræfældning, fødevareproduktion og flytransport er blandt årsagerne til CO2-udledning, siger Sebastian Mernild.
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Futurity.org

How buying lunch a lot can kill your budget Dining out frequently can make it harder to control a food budget, new research suggests. People who eat out often tend to underestimate the amount they’d spend over the week and then raise the following week’s budget. Rather than making people smarter consumers, frequent dining out may be associated with their inability to impose mental constraints on buying, says Amit Sharma, associate professo
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The Guardian

Beauty and the Beast: Malaysian film censors back down in 'gay moment' row Country’s censorship board approves 13-plus rating after previously demanding Disney cut gay scene from live-action remake before release Beauty and the Beast will be screened in Malaysia without cuts, although censors have given the film a 13-plus age rating due to the film containing a “gay moment”. The Film Censorship Board of Malaysia had previously said the Disney movie would only be approve
21h
New on MIT Technology Review

Earth’s Continued Warming Is Has Taken Us into Uncharted TerritoryRecord high temperatures, unprecedented sea ice lows, and the highest CO2 levels in 4 million years—but what happens next is up to us.
21h
WIRED

Talk to Your Kids About Inappropriate Pics on Facebook It's a tough talk, but you'll be glad you had it. The post Talk to Your Kids About Inappropriate Pics on Facebook appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Stop Everything, There’s a Red iPhone 7 Now There's some iPad news too, but let's be honest, we're here for the iPhone. The post Stop Everything, There's a Red iPhone 7 Now appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Thank These Riveting Robots for Planes That Don’t Fall Apart New robots on the Everett, Washington assembly line install the rivets that keep your plane in one piece. The post Thank These Riveting Robots for Planes That Don't Fall Apart appeared first on WIRED .
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

When helium behaves like a black holeA team of scientists has discovered that a law controlling the bizarre behavior of black holes out in space -- is also true for cold helium atoms that can be studied in laboratories. This finding may be a step toward a long-sought quantum theory of gravity and new advances in quantum computing.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Better learning through zinc?Zinc is a vital micronutrient involved in many cellular processes: For example, in learning and memory processes, it plays a role that is not yet understood. By using nanoelectrochemical measurements, researchers have made progress toward understanding by demonstrating that zinc influences the release of messenger molecules. Zinc changes the number of messenger molecules stored in vesicles and the
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Dagens Medicin

Tværsektorielle forløb erstatter hjertepakkerKommuner og praktiserende læger skal nu inddrages i tværsektorielle forløb for mennesker med hjertesygdomme. Sundhedsstyrelsen har nedsat en arbejdsgruppe, der forventer at komme med anbefalinger i slutningen af 2017.
21h
Gizmodo

Cosplayers Are Already Figuring Out How to Create Their Own Spider-Man Shutter Eyes Gif via Youtube One of the coolest details about the Spider-Man design used in Civil War and Spider-Man: Homecoming is its mechanical, expressive eyes —a staple of Spidey in comics and animation, but rarely attempted in live action. It works great on screen, but fans are proving adept at recreating the effect for their costumes, too. Aptly named Spidey cosplayer Lenses Factory HK has spent the pa
21h
TEDTalks (video)

Asking for help is a strength, not a weakness | Michele L. SullivanWe all go through challenges -- some you can see, most you can't, says Michele L. Sullivan. In a talk about perspective, Sullivan shares stories full of wit and wisdom and reminds us that we're all part of each other's support systems. "The only shoes you can walk in are your own," she says. "With compassion, courage and understanding, we can walk together, side by side."
21h
Ars Technica

Clips is the Apple-made video sharing app that’s not a social media network (credit: Apple ) Apple clearly knows how popular video sharing is over social media, so it created a new way for iOS users to make and share videos. Today, the company announced a new app called Clips , a video-creation app that borrows many features from social media outlets' video-sharing apps but doesn't actually have a social media network attached to it. It appears Apple's goal with Clips is
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What's the best way to cook pasta? (video)Cooking pasta chemically changes how the proteins and starches interact, making noodles sticky and springy. Therefore, what you do -- or don't do -- to the cooking water can change the edible result. With a little chemistry know-how, you can serve up a delectable al dente pasta instead of a an unappetizing ball of noodles. Watch the latest Speaking of Chemistry video here: https://youtu.be/gSOnxUB
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tailored sexual health messages urgently needed for young female tourists, expert saysWith both tourism and casual 'hookup' sex on the rise among college-age adults, there's an urgent need for gender-sensitive and age-appropriate sexual health campaigns that are tailored to young women's motivations for taking sexual risks while traveling, a new study by University of Illinois scholar Liza Berdychevsky suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Active surveillance preserves quality of life for prostate cancer patientsFaced with the negative quality-of-life effects from surgery and radiation treatments for prostate cancer, low risk patients may instead want to consider active surveillance with their physician, according to a study released Tuesday by the Journal of the American Medical Association.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New insights into side effects can help prostate cancer patients choose treatmentsA new study led by UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers identifies distinct patterns of side effects for modern-day prostate cancer treatments that patients could use to guide their choices.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new model for capillary rise in nano-channels offers insights into frackingWith fracking, scientists have calculated the expected level of capillary rise with the Lucas-Washburn equation, a mathematical model whose earliest parameters were first devised nearly a century ago. The challenge, however, is that that the equation has not been completely accurate in predicting the actual rise observed in nano-capillary laboratory experiments. Researchers studying this deviation
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Findings show lack of benefit of prenatal DHA supplementation on IQ in childrenLonger-term follow-up of a randomized trial found strong evidence for the lack of benefit of prenatal DHA supplementation on IQ in children at 7 years of age, according to a study published by JAMA.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Direct-to-consumer TV advertising associated with greater testosterone testing, new use, and use without testingTelevised direct-to-consumer advertising for testosterone therapies increased across US metropolitan areas between 2009 and 2013, and exposure to these ads was associated with greater testosterone testing, new use of testosterone therapies, and use without recent testing, according to a study published by JAMA.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Adverse effects, quality of life of treatment vs. no treatment for men with localized prostate cancerTwo studies published by JAMA examine the adverse effects and quality of life as reported by men with localized prostate cancer who chose treatment, observation or active surveillance.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Spintronic technology advances with newly designed magnetic tunnel junctionsMagnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) have played a central role in spintronic devices, and researchers are working to improve their performance. A prominent achievement that accelerated the technology's practical applications was the realization of giant tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) ratios by using rock-salt type MgO crystalline barrier. In this week's Applied Physics Letters, researchers have succe
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Revealing the microscopic mechanisms in perovskite solar cellsIn just a few years, researchers have achieved remarkable power conversion efficiency with materials with perovskite crystal structure, comparable with the best photovoltaic materials available. Now, researchers have revealed the physics for how an important component of a perovskite solar cell works -- a finding that could lead to improved solar cells or even newer and better materials. They desc
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Estimating the glass transition temperature for polymers in 'confined geometries'Polystyrene has a glass transition temperature of about 100 C -- at room temperature it behaves like a solid material. But as its temperature approaches the glass transition temperature, polystyrene's mechanical properties change drastically. This makes the ability to approximate glass transitions for confined geometries in polymers highly desirable. And now, as researchers report in this week's i
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Manipulating magnetic texturesWhile the ability to easily control the magnetic properties of small electronic systems is highly desirable for future small electronics and data storage, an effective solution has proven to be extremely elusive. But now, a group of researchers from universities in Chile and Brazil are reporting this week in the Journal of Applied Physics, a simple way to gain control of magnetism that starts by c
21h
The Guardian

Roy Hodgson rejects criticism of England tactics at Euro 2016• Former England manager has no regrets over decisions at finals • ‘I consign it to history, I don’t need to watch it’ Roy Hodgson has described as “purely irrelevant and dishonest” the criticisms of his tactics during Euro 2016 and insisted he did not regret his decision-making during a tournament that finished with England losing to Iceland for one of their more embarrassing results in history.
21h
The Guardian

'Only we care if our country succeeds or fails': Welsh readers on post-Brexit era Guardian readers in Wales tell us their hopes for their country as Theresa May prepares to trigger article 50 The Welsh first minister, Carwyn Jones , has told Theresa May that she must “engage and listen” to people across the union or risk fracturing the country. “If they are not careful, people’s sense of disengagement with Brussels will simply attach itself to London,” he said. “They are givin
21h
The Atlantic

When a Writer’s Great Freedom Lies in Constraint By Heart is a series in which authors share and discuss their all-time favorite passages in literature. See entries from Karl Ove Knausgaard, George Saunders, Emma Donoghue, Michael Chabon, and more. Doug McLean Artistic freedom, paradoxically, relies on the presence of constraints. Expression somehow flourishes when it has rules, norms, and conventions to push against—or as William Wordsworth on
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The Atlantic

Erasing the ‘Ownership’ Tattoos on Sex-Trafficking Victims During an art-therapy session, Naticia Leon once stitched together fabric dolls without faces. “That’s what it feels like to be trafficked,” she says. “You’re not your own person. You don’t have an identity.” For eight years, Leon worked across the West Coast of the United States under a series of sex traffickers. Each had named and renamed her many times. “They would tell me that this is what th
21h
Scientific American Content: Global

Can Science Rob Snakes of Their Deadliest Weapon?Biotech companies are on the prowl for newer, better antivenoms -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wild chimpanzees have surprisingly long life spansUnder the right ecological conditions, our close primate relatives can lead surprisingly long lives in the wild, a 20-year demographic study of a large chimpanzee community in Uganda's Kibale National Park has revealed.
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Science : NPR

Who Has The Healthiest Hearts In The World? Move over Japanese women. You've been dethroned as the population with the healthiest hearts. This group of people can fight off heart disease even into their 80s. What's their secret? (Image credit: Matthieu Paley/National Geographic)
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The Guardian

Private companies could pull out of probation contracts over costs Interserve Justice and MTCnovo tell MPs they may consider quitting if Ministry of Justice review does not deliver changes Two of the private companies that provide 50% of probation services in England and Wales have confirmed to MPs they will have to consider quitting if a Ministry of Justice review fails to deliver improvements. Interserve Justice and MTCnovo, which have contracts worth more tha
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The Guardian

Best photos of the day: Maradona mural and Prince Charles's new glasses The Guardian’s picture editors bring you a selection of photo highlights from around the world, including flowers in bloom in China and soft toy collector Continue reading...
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The Guardian

Thousands of Mumbai doctors strike after assaults on hospital staff Hospitals in chaos after at least 2,000 junior doctors boycott wards claiming emotional distress and fear of assault Thousands of doctors have gone on strike in Mumbai to protest against violence in hospitals, after three medics were attacked on wards in the last week. At least 2,000 junior doctors at 17 government hospitals have taken unpaid leave for the second day in a row, claiming emotional
21h
Popular Science

Climate change may be upping your risk of diabetes " data-lgsrc="http://www.popsci.com/sites/popsci.com/files/styles/large_16x9/public/images/2017/03/1-didoynave7ovwjzxcocuqa.jpeg?itok=hPS4zTts&fc=50,50" src="http://www.popsci.com/sites/popsci.com/files/styles/large_16x9/public/images/2017/03/1-didoynave7ovwjzxcocuqa.jpeg?itok=hPS4zTts" data-smsrc="http://www.popsci.com/sites/popsci.com/files/styles/small_16x9/public/images/2017/03/1-didoynave7ov
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Popular Science

How to protect all of your accounts online DIY Web security has never been more important From Google to Facebook, get all of your major online accounts locked down and safe from harm by following these straightforward tips.
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Live Science

Cleaning Corpses: Chimpanzee Funerary Rites Seen for 1st TimeScientists have observed a chimpanzee cleaning the teeth of her adopted son, suggesting that humans might not be the only species with funerary rituals.
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Live Science

Bronze Coins Engraved with Byzantine Emperors Found in IsraelA cache of bronze coins dating to the Byzantine era was recently uncovered during a highway expansion excavation in Israel.
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Ingeniøren

VIDEO Målinger fra Swarm-satellitterne optrævler Jordens magnetfeltEfter tre år dataopsamling er ESA klar med det hidtil mest detaljerede kort over magnetfeltet i Jordens yderste faste del, lithosfæren.
21h
Scientific American Content: Global

Researchers Solve Critical Flaw in Lithium–Sulfur BatteriesScientists have created a thin composite film that gives lithium–sulfur cells exceptional durability -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Guardian

UK bans laptops and tablets on flights from six Middle East countries Nothing larger than smartphone allowed in cabins on planes from Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, Egypt, Tunisia and Saudi Arabia How have you been affected? The UK government has announced a sweeping cabin ban on laptops and tablets on inbound flights from six countries, following a similar move by the US on Monday. The UK ban on any electronic item larger than a normal smartphone applies to all direct p
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Dagens Medicin

Lynparza bremser udvikling af æggestok­kræftKræftmidlet Lynparza har i nye kliniske forsøg vist sig at kunne nedbringe risikoen for sygdomsprogression hos kvinder med æggestokkræft.
21h
Gizmodo

You Can Turn Your Apple Watch Into a Game Boy That Sucks GIFs: Gabriel O’Flaherty-Chan Like many people who dropped hundreds of dollars on an Apple Watch, Gabriel O’Flaherty-Chan was disappointed at how little his pricey wearable could actually do. Instead of complaining about it online like most of us, he decided to solve the problem himself by writing a Game Boy emulator capable of playing Pokemon Yellow. Unfortunately, it kind of sucks. The Game Boy
21h
The Guardian

Comet landslide recorded for first time by Rosetta astronomers Images reveal dramatic collapse of a 100 metre-long cliff on comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko A landslide on a comet has been documented by astronomers for the first time in images that reveal the dramatic collapse of a 100 metre-long cliff. The observations by the Rosetta spacecraft of the comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko , provide before and after snapshots, which show how the dusty avalanche has
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The Guardian

Identity politics and intolerance a barrier to development, says UN report Annual human development index cites Brexit as an example of a nationalist agenda that could hold back progress on the global goals Nationalism and identity politics – of which Brexit is one of the latest examples – are barriers to development among the most marginalised groups in society, according to a UN report. The annual human development index said that at a time when global action and coll
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The Guardian

'Please don't forget us': the hellish search for Syria's lost prisoners A new documentary hears from those who made it out of Assad’s prisons – and their gruesome quest to identify others who have died in custody “I still remember their last words to me: ‘Please don’t forget us’. This rings in my ears every day like church bells, like a daily call for prayer.” Mansour al-Omari, a Syrian human rights activist, recalls the moment his name was called by the jailer after
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The Guardian

Sjón: 'Behind my book lies another I will never write' The novelist recounts the bleak story of a psychic that led him, circuitously, to a story of a gay teenager making his way in flu-struck Reykjavik in 1918 Behind the text of my book Moonstone – The Boy Who Never Was hides another one I will never write. It was in 2001 or thereabouts that I heard a story I thought I’d try to develop into a novel. It was about a medium who had become something of a
21h
New on MIT Technology Review

The Download, Mar 21, 2017: Laser-Guided Car Woes, Electronics Flight Ban, and Future BoutiquesThe most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New gel-like coating beefs up the performance of lithium-sulfur batteriesYale scientists have developed an ultra-thin coating material that has the potential to extend the life and improve the efficiency of lithium-sulfur batteries, one of the most promising areas of energy research today.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How can a legally binding agreement on human cloning be established?Since Dolly the Sheep was cloned, the question of whether human reproductive cloning should be banned or pursued has been the subject of international debate. Adèle Langlois, of the University of Lincoln, UK, argues that a robust global governance framework on human cloning should draw on recent successes in climate change and business ethics for inspiration. The report is published in Springer Na
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Comet 67P is constantly undergoing a faceliftChanges that the Rosetta spacecraft discovered on the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, including the collapse of entire cliffs, were likely driven by seasonal events, according to a new study.
21h
New on MIT Technology Review

Determined Parents are Moving the Needle on Gene TherapyFamilies of patients are starting advocacy groups, raising money for research, and founding biotech companies to advance cures for rare diseases.
22h
Live Science

Is Climate Change Linked to Higher Diabetes Rates?Are rising temperatures around the world also increasing the rates of diabetes?
22h
The Atlantic

When a Twin Disappears A reader revives our collection of miscarriage stories with an uncommon case of her own—two cases, in fact: Thank you so much for the series on abortion you carry , Chris—turning the abstract (which is very easy to judge, from a distance) into real-life stories, of real-life people. The many stories exemplify that there is no “one-size-fits-all” in this matter—that people’s lives tend to have man
22h
Popular Science

A giant cliff collapse on a comet reveals pristine ice beneath the surface Space The latest from Rosetta's smashing mission Cliff fell on comet, revealing ice.
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Popular Science

The almond milk craze could be bad news for bees Environment A new study suggests common fungicides might kill pollinators People love almonds. But the fungicides we use to keep almond trees healthy might not love honey bees. Read on.
22h
Ars Technica

Amid boycott, Google changes ad policy to give advertisers more control Enlarge (credit: Philippe Huguen/Getty Images) Last week, the UK government halted taxpayer-funded advertising on YouTube and Google because some of its ads appeared on extremist content. Today, Google responded as more companies pulled advertising from its platform. Google's Chief Business Officer Philipp Schindler explained in a blog post how the company will revamp its advertising policies to
22h
The Guardian

I’m a furry. And I’m finally at home with my wild side | Brian SwitekWe’ve been stigmatised, but choosing a wolf, bear or jaguar ‘fursona’ isn’t a fetish. It’s just a playful expression of the animal nature we all share If I could be anything, I’d be a jaguar. And not just any jaguar. One with a dark coat, blue spots, but my general humanoid shape intact along with the feline features. That’s because I’m a furry . It took me a long time to admit that to anyone. Mor
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Futurity.org

Shrinking Hawaiian islands curb biodiversity Hawaii’s unique animal and plant diversity has been declining on all but the Big Island for millions of years, long before humans arrived. Researchers say shrinking land areas of the older islands began putting stress on the flora and fauna several million years after the islands formed. Today, all of the islands except the Big Island of Hawaii—the only one still growing—have experienced a decrea
22h
Gizmodo

A Grand Jury Just Called Tweeting an Animated GIF 'Assault With a Deadly Weapon' The accused, John Rivello, and the GIF he allegedly sent. (Images: US District Court Northern District of Texas) On Monday, a Texas grand jury charged a Maryland man with “aggravated assault with a deadly weapon” after authorities say he tweeted an animated flashing GIF designed to trigger Newsweek journalist Kurt Eichenwald’s epilepsy last year, “immediately” causing him to have a seizure. 29-ye
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Close pass by sun didn’t radically alter comet 67P’s landscapeLandslides on comet 67P shot plumes of dust into space, but changes like these might not radically alter the landscape of the comet.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Rosetta saw cliffs collapse on cometThe comet visited by the Rosetta spacecraft is constantly being re-shaped, sometimes in dramatic fashion, a study suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Evolutionary biology professor explains how to 'walk the Tree of Life'Pop quiz: Are crocodiles more closely related to lizards or to birds? The answer may surprise you. Although traditional taxonomy classifies birds separately, they are actually closely related to crocodilians, sharing such groupwide characteristics as nest construction, parental care, a four-chambered heart and acoustic communication.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Structural knowledge of the DNA repair complexNew research provides mechanistic insight into how DNA is monitored and repaired if damage occurs. The results may eventually help to improve the treatment of certain types of cancer, as the DNA repair complex provides a mechanism for cancer cells to resist chemotherapy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Altering pH bumps prions out of danger zoneNew research offers hope by showing how we might prevent prions from aggregating or growing into deadly diseases. The results also show that an antihistamine, astemizole, proved effective in reducing prion aggregation.
22h
Scientific American Content: Global

Q&A: Lawrence Krauss on The Greatest Story Ever ToldHidden, impermanent balances in nature have shaped the history of physics, and could determine our universe’s future -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Breaking the supermassive black hole speed limitA new computer simulation helps explain the existence of puzzling supermassive black holes observed in the early universe. The simulation is based on a computer code used to understand the coupling of radiation and certain materials.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronomers hazard a ride in a 'drifting carousel' to understand pulsating starsWhat sounds like a stomach-turning ride at an amusement park might hold the key to unravelling the mysterious mechanism that causes beams of radio waves to shoot out from pulsars—super-magnetic rotating stars in our Galaxy.
22h
The Guardian

Winged bull and giant dollop of cream to adorn Trafalgar Square's fourth plinth Works by Michael Rakowitz and Heather Phillipson will be the next two occupants of London square’s north-west plinth A dollop of glistening cream – complete with a cherry and a functioning drone – and a recreation of an ancient sculpturedestroyed by Isis, will be the next artworks to sit on the fourth plinth in London’s Trafalgar Square. Michael Rakowitz’s piece The Invisible Enemy Should Not Exi
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The Guardian

Twins found at white cliffs of Dover were carrying parents' ashes Kent coroner records open verdict on Muriel and Bernard Burgess; third body found was of Gulf war veteran Scott Enion Adult twins whose bodies were found at the white cliffs of Dover on New Year’s Day had rucksacks containing the ashes of their dead parents, an inquest has heard. A coroner said Muriel and Bernard Burgess, 59, had been struggling to come to terms with their parents’ deaths, partic
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The Guardian

Desiree Burch review – stellar standup set about racism, sex and self-esteem Soho theatre, London The US standup takes a bull-in-a-china-shop approach to social anthropology – and riffs on the horrors of sleeping with someone born in the 90s American comedian and theatre-maker Desiree Burch won the Funny Women award two years ago, then bagged a Poster award at the Edinburgh fringe by representing her own face as a collage of penises. This is the show in question, of which
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Spray painting biomaterials onto heart promotes cardiac repair after myocardial infarctionResearchers have demonstrated the effectiveness of a minimally invasive method to form a regenerative cardiac patch that promotes repair of damaged cardiac tissue in a mouse model of a heart attack.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The foundation of aquatic life can rapidly adapt to global warming, new research suggestsImportant microscopic creatures which produce half of the oxygen in the atmosphere can rapidly adapt to global warming, new research suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cornell evolutionary biology professor explains how to 'walk the Tree of Life'Harry Greene, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at Cornel University, and Cissy Ballen of the University of Minnesota have just published a paper in PLOS Biology, 'Walking and Talking the Tree of Life: Why and How to Teach About Biodiversity,' discussing why the evolutionary TOL approach to biodiversity is best, to what extent the traditional taxonomy is still used and how to teach TOL
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Astronomers hazard a ride in a 'drifting carousel' to understand pulsating starsWhat sounds like a stomach-turning ride at an amusement park might hold the key to unraveling the mysterious mechanism that causes beams of radio waves to shoot out from pulsars -- super-magnetic rotating stars in our galaxy.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

AML study correlates gene mutations with 34 disease subgroupsA large, new study of adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) correlates 80 cancer-related gene mutations with five subtypes of AML, which are defined by the presence of specific chromosomal abnormalities. The findings might help guide mutation testing and treatment decisions in the future.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Number abilities in humans, birds and fish are based in brain's subcortexCognitive neuroscience researcher Joonkoo Park at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, who recently received a five-year, $751,000 faculty early career development (CAREER) grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to address basic research questions about how our brains process number and magnitude and how such processes give rise to more complex mathematical thinking, has co-authored
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Breaking the supermassive black hole speed limitA new computer simulation helps explain the existence of puzzling supermassive black holes observed in the early universe. The simulation is based on a computer code used to understand the coupling of radiation and certain materials.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Parents' advice can support or undermine targets of school bullying-prevention programsChildren who are bystanders to a bullying incident are more likely to intervene if their parents have given them advice to intervene and less likely to intervene if their parents tell them to 'stay out of it,' according to a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, a journal of the Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. The study suggests that c
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How the brain sees the world in 3-DWe live in a three-dimensional world, but everything we see is first recorded on our retinas in only two dimensions. So how does the brain represent 3-D information? In a new study, researchers for the first time have shown how different parts of the brain represent an object's location in depth compared to its 2-D location.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Better learning through zinc?Zinc is a vital micronutrient involved in many cellular processes: For example, in learning and memory processes, it plays a role that is not yet understood. By using nanoelectrochemical measurements, Swedish researchers have made progress toward understanding by demonstrating that zinc influences the release of messenger molecules. As reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, zinc changes the nu
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New approach uses ultrasound to measure fluid in the lungsA team of engineering and medical researchers has found a way to use ultrasound to monitor fluid levels in the lung, offering a noninvasive way to track progress in treating pulmonary edema -- fluid in the lungs -- which often occurs in patients with congestive heart failure. The approach, which has been demonstrated in rats, also holds promise for diagnosing scarring, or fibrosis, in the lung.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Electrons used to control ultrashort laser pulsesWe may soon get better insight into the microcosm and the world of electrons. Researchers at Lund University and Louisiana State University have developed a tool that makes it possible to control extreme UV light -- light with much shorter wavelengths than visible light. The new method uses strong laser pulses to direct the short bursts of light.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Almond-crop fungicides a threat to honey beesFungicides commonly used in almond orchards can be harmful to almond growers' primary pollinator: honey bees. According to new research to be published next week in the Journal of Economic Entomology, the fungicide iprodione, when used alone or in combination with other common fungicides, leads to a significant reduction in the 10-day survival rate of forager honey bees (Apis mellifera) when they
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Gizmodo

Amazon's Popular Packing Cubes Are Less Than Half Their Usual Price Right Now AmazonBasics Packing Cubes , $10-$11 Update: The medium/large combo packs are sold out, but you can still get a 4-pack of all large cubes for even less , again in multiple colors. Packing cubes can make organizing clothes and toiletries for your next trip a little less hellish , and this highly-rated set of four from AmazonBasics is only $10-$11 today, depending on the color. That’s less than hal
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The foundation of aquatic life can rapidly adapt to global warming, new research suggestsImportant microscopic creatures which produce half of the oxygen in the atmosphere can rapidly adapt to global warming, new research suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spinning sail technology is poised to bring back wind-powered shipsOver 200 years after steamships first began crossing the ocean, wind power is finding its way back into seafaring. Global shipping firm Maersk is planning to fit spinning "rotor sails" to one of its oil tankers as a way of reducing its fuel costs and carbon emissions. The company behind the technology, Finnish firm Norsepower, says this is the first retrofit installation of a wind-powered energy s
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Apple cuts prices on lower-end iPads, releases red iPhones (Update)Apple is cutting prices on two iPad models and introducing red iPhones, but the company held back on updating its higher-end iPad Pro tablets.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Almond-crop fungicides a threat to honey beesFungicides commonly used in almond orchards can be harmful to almond growers' primary pollinator: honey bees.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Peers, more than teachers, inspire us to learn"Why do I have to learn this?" It's a common question among youth, but new research out of Michigan State University suggests students perform much better academically when the answer is provided by their peers rather than their teachers.
22h
WIRED

The 11 Best Sci-Fi Movies You Can Stream Right Now, From 2001 to Ex Machina Settle in for some space odysseys. The post The 11 Best Sci-Fi Movies You Can Stream Right Now, From 2001 to Ex Machina appeared first on WIRED .
22h
The Atlantic

‘It’s a Homecoming Film’: Danny Boyle on T2 Trainspotting This Friday will mark the release of one of the more unusual sequels of recent years, T2 Trainspotting , Danny Boyle’s follow-up to the 1996 film that largely put him on the map as a director. That film, based loosely on the novel by Irvine Welsh, was a giddily stylish picaresque about a group of twentysomething friends scoring heroin at every opportunity in Edinburgh. A full 20 years later, the
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The Guardian

Inspector Morse creator Colin Dexter dead at 86 Val McDermid, Lee Child and other crime writers pay tribute to Dexter, who died at his Oxford home on Tuesday Colin Dexter, the author behind detective Inspector Morse and his adventures solving mysteries in Oxfordshire, has died at the age of 86, with the top names in crime writing lining up to pay tribute to a “a kind, generous man”. Dexter’s death at his home in Oxford was announced by his pub
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The Guardian

Mario Götze: the ‘once in a century talent’ who is now fighting to save his career | Philip OltermannHis artistry made Germany World Cup champions but a debilitating muscle disorder and an unfavourable public image have disrupted the progress of the Dortmund midfielder who will play no part in the friendly against England Some goals are replayed so often it can blind us to their brilliance. Germany’s winner in the 2014 World Cup final is a case in point. To meet André Schürrle’s cross in extra ti
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The Guardian

The man who planted a tree and grew a whole family of forests As Brazil’s deforestation begins to climb again, one man has spent over 40 years planting a forest of his own When Antonio Vicente bought a patch of land in São Paulo state and said he wanted to use it to plant a forest, people called him crazy. It was 1973 and forests were seen by many as an obstacle to progress and profit. Brazil’s then military government encouraged wealthy landowners to expan
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The Guardian

Character assassinations: nine shock deaths from TV’s biggest shows Nashville recently floored its fanbase by killing off a key character. Here are more sudden exits that still cause viewers grief Who died? Nate Fisher (Peter Krause), shagged to death deep into the final season when naughty sex with a Quaker brought on a brain haemorrhage. Continue reading...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Enzyme helps bacteria defend themselves against oxidants secreted by immune systemA research project conducted at the University of São Paulo (USP) in Brazil in collaboration with other Brazilian research institutions and abroad has revealed new aspects of the action mechanism of organic hydroperoxide resistance (Ohr) enzyme, which enables several species of bacteria to neutralize oxidizing substances released by the defense system of the host organism, be it a plant or an anim
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nepal's rich indigenous medical knowledge is under threatNepal is a diverse demography with over 125 ethnic communities. It is equally rich in biodiversity. The diverse ethnic communities have a rich repertoire of knowledge related to the use of the herbs and animals for medicinal purposes.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Structural knowledge of the DNA repair complexNew Danish research provides mechanistic insight into how DNA is monitored and repaired if damage occurs. The results may eventually help to improve the treatment of certain types of cancer, as the DNA repair complex provides a mechanism for cancer cells to resist chemotherapy.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Eye-opening numbers on space debrisOrbital debris, otherwise known as "space junk", is a major concern. This massive cloud that orbits the Earth is the result of the many satellites, platforms and spent launchers that have been sent into space over the years. And as time went on, collisions between these objects (as well as disintegrations and erosion) has created even more in the way of debris.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

NASA's Swift mission maps a star's 'death spiral' into a black holeAstronomers measured the light produced when a sun-like star wandered too close to a 3-million-solar-mass black hole similar to the one at the center of our own galaxy.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

People remain calm as the world ends, video game study suggestsAs the world ends, will you lock arms and sing 'Kumbayah' or embark on a path of law-breaking, anti-social behavior? A new study, based upon the virtual actions of more than 80,000 players of the role-playing video game ArcheAge, suggests you'll be singing. The study found that despite some violent acts, most players tended toward behavior that was helpful to others as their virtual world came to
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Ingeniøren

Sådan ser Facebooks 'fake news'-forsvar ud https://www.version2.dk/artikel/saadan-ser-facebooks-fake-news-forsvar-se-ud-1074741 Facebook er en af de foretrukne platforme for deling af nyheder og historier, som er på kanten med sandheden. Nu har de indført en ny funktion, som måske kan komme en del af de falske nyheder til livs. Version2
22h
Ingeniøren

Franskmand modtager Abelprisen: Belønnes for matematik bag datakompression og signalbehandlingDen 77-årige franskmand Yves Meyer modtager Abelprisen for sin nøglerolle i udvikling af matematik af stor praktisk værdi i forbindelse med håndtering af store datamængder.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Killing Science and Culture Doesn't Make the Nation StrongerMassive funding cuts in the president's proposed budget could be more devastating than any threat posed by illegal immigrants -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

How Pedestrians Will Defeat Autonomous VehiclesThe ‘game of chicken’ which could be a serious problem for driverless cars -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo

Life Is the Next Great Leap Forward for Science Fiction Horror GIF by author from footage provided by Sony Pictures. Most of the people interested in seeing Life , the astronaut thriller out on March 24, probably have certain expectations based on the movie’s familiar premise: human beings encounter extraterrestrial organism, terrifying things ensue, just as in Alien , Predator and other classics. But while that most basic plotline does describe what happens
22h
The Atlantic

What Happens When the President Is a Publisher, Too? It had to be Twitter. What other platform could a member of Congress use during a high-profile congressional hearing to keep tabs on the president’s reaction to that very hearing? Not TV. Not radio. Certainly not a crinkly newspaper full of yesterday’s news. But on Twitter, it’s possible to be sitting in a room full of your colleagues, surreptitiously scrolling on your mobile phone, and notice th
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Peers, more than teachers, inspire us to learn'Why do I have to learn this?' It's a common question among youth, but new research out of Michigan State University suggests students perform much better academically when the answer is provided by their peers rather than their teachers.
22h
The Guardian

Police to examine 'Global Laundromat' money laundering allegations Minister tells MPs FCA and police will look closely at Guardian reports that UK banks processed $740m from Russian operation Fraud investigators have launched a review of the activities of Britain’s high street banks following revelations in the Guardian about a $20bn money laundering scam that MPs described as a national disgrace and scandal. Forced to answer urgent questions in the House of Com
22h
The Guardian

Len McCluskey says Tom Watson lives in 'world of skulduggery' Unite union leader accuses Labour’s deputy leader of backstabbing and seeking to influence election of general secretary Len McCluskey, the Jeremy Corbyn ally standing for re-election as head of Britain’s biggest union, has launched a scathing attack on Tom Watson for allegedly seeking to influence the vote. In a strikingly personal critique, McCluskey, the incumbent general secretary of Unite, c
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Egyptian mortality mystery in tilapia fish closer to being solvedA new virus that has decimated fish populations in Ecuador and Israel has spread to Egypt, according to a new report from the University of Stirling and WorldFish.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US bars electronic carry-ons from Mideast, N. Africa flightsThe U.S. government, citing unspecified threats, is barring passengers on nonstop, U.S.-bound flights from eight mostly Middle Eastern and North African countries from bringing laptops, tablets, electronic games and other devices on board in carry-on bags.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Parsley and other plants lend form to human stem cell scaffoldsScientists are using the decellularized husks of plants such as parsley, vanilla and orchids to form three-dimensional scaffolds that can then be primed and seeded with human stem cells to optimize their growth in the lab dish and, ultimately, create novel biomedical implants.
22h
The Guardian

BBC boss defends news coverage after MPs claim Brexit bias Tony Hall speaks out as about 70, mainly Tory, MPs accuse corporation of falling short of obligation to provide balanced coverage The BBC has defended its record on impartiality after it was accused of anti-Brexit bias by a group of mainly Tory MPs. In a carefully worded response to a letter signed by 70 MPs and published in the Daily Mail and Telegraph, the director general Tony Hall wrote: “Imp
22h
The Guardian

Ex-soldier dressed as Gaddafi who bit off part of man's ear is jailed Geraint Jones was in fancy dress as Libyan dictator for Halloween when he attacked victim in Aberystwyth pub A former soldier who bit off part of a man’s ear while dressed up as the late Muammar Gaddafi has been jailed for 16 months. The student Geraint Jones became upset after being pushed and shoved at the bar of a pub in his home town of Aberystwyth, mid-Wales, during a boozy night out, Cardif
22h
The Guardian

Climate change is happening now – here’s eight things we can do to adapt to it | Missy StultsDonald Trump has rejected global leadership on the issue, so now it’s down to us as individuals to plan, and push through new policies change where we can A little girl sits outside on her front stoop, watching the cars go by and the people trot to work in the early hours of the morning. She wears a long-sleeved shirt, pants, and sneakers. Nothing is particularly shocking about this image, except
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Futurity.org

3D printing gives new shape to math’s ‘moving sofa’ The mathematical puzzle called the “moving sofa problem” poses a deceptively simple question: What’s the largest sofa that can pivot around an L-shaped hallway corner? A mover would tell you to just stand the sofa on end. But imagine the sofa is impossible to lift, squish, or tilt. Although it still seems easy to solve, the moving sofa problem has stymied math sleuths for more than 50 years. That
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Futurity.org

Talk it out to ease tough end-of-life decisions Too few older adults make end-of-life medical decisions ahead of time—and even when they do identify a loved one to make decisions for them, their wishes may remain unclear. For a new study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society , researchers interviewed 350 veterans 55 years of age or older, and separately interviewed the individuals the veterans had selected as their surrog
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mars volcano, Earth's dinosaurs went extinct about the same timeArsia Mons produced one new lava flow at its summit every 1 to 3 million years during the final peak of activity, about 50 million years ago. The last volcanic activity there ceased about 50 million years ago -- around the time of Earth's Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction, when large numbers of our planet's plant and animal species (including dinosaurs) went extinct.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Does Mars have rings? Not right now, but maybe one dayResearchers have developed a model that suggests that debris that was pushed into space from an asteroid or other body slamming into Mars around 4.3 billion years ago and alternates between becoming a planetary ring and clumping up to form a moon.
22h
The Guardian

To censor or not to censor? YouTube's double bind Google’s video platform is being attacked by advertisers for not censoring enough and by creators for censoring too much. But don’t feel sorry for it just yet YouTube has found itself fighting battles on two fronts this week. Advertisers have launched a concerted attack against the video-streaming platform for its devil-may-care attitude to extremist content. They argue it is too hard to guarante
22h
The Guardian

Health insurance woes helped elect Trump, but his cure may be more painful The rising cost of health insurance sharply divided voters in a Pennsylvania county where they had come to expect the best – can Trumpcare satisfy them? Part one: Can Trump really make America great again? Part two: Trump loyalists stand by their man – but the resistance is taking root Sign up for email updates on The Promise “I never knew a time when I didn’t have the best insurance in the world
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research shows fingerprints on the moveNew research at Abertay University has discovered that crime scene fingerprints can move after they have been deposited.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A happy lab rat? Check the ears!What do you think of when you hear the term "lab rat"? Chances are, you might not picture an animal happily playing rough-and-tumble with a human handler and then coming back for more. Scientists have traditionally studied negative expressions in rats, as they are more reliable and easier to elicit (imagine a rat freezing still when exposed to sudden loud noise). However, a group of researchers fr
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When helium behaves like a black holeA team of scientists has discovered that a law controlling the bizarre behavior of black holes out in space -- is also true for cold helium atoms that can be studied in laboratories. This finding may be a step toward a long-sought quantum theory of gravity and new advances in quantum computing.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Organic electronics can use power from socketOrganic light-emitting devices and printed electronics can be connected to a socket in the wall by way of a small, inexpensive organic converter, developed in a collaboration between Linköping University and Umeå University.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Potential early warning signs of osteoporosis found in South Asian womenPre-menopausal South Asian women could be more at risk of developing osteoporosis in later life than white Caucasian women, a new study in the journal Bone reports.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Older mothers are better mothersNew research shows that older mothers are less likely to punish and scold their children while raising them, and that the children have fewer behavioral, social and emotional difficulties.
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Gizmodo

Scientists Observe Freaky Parrot Ritual, Call It Contagious Laughter How could you call such a horrible monster playful??? (Image: Christian Mehlführer /Wikimedia Commons) Birds are incredible, beautiful creatures from afar. They have lots of colors, they have beaks, they can fly, and all that other neat birdy stuff. Up close, they are horrible, smelly dinosaurs with sharp claws who squawk and could attack at any moment. Recently, a group of scientists turned on a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Clinical interviews effective in predicting postpartum depressionFor non-depressed, pregnant women with histories of major depressive disorder, preventive treatment with antidepressants may not necessarily protect against postpartum depression, according to new research. In addition, asking questions about daily activities -- especially work -- appears to be an effective screening tool for helping doctors identify women at risk of depression after they have the
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers discover test for earlier detection of transplant rejectionResearchers have discovered a method that appears to provide earlier warning of organ transplant rejection compared to standard methods, and requires only a blood test rather than a more invasive and painful needle biopsy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Detecting and monitoring a patient's cancer with a simple blood test?A series of proteins in blood plasma has now been identified that, when elevated, signify that the patient has cancer. This discovery, say researchers, may lead to a blood test that can detect and evaluate cancer in patients.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pregnant women and new mothers feel watched and judgedIn a small study published in Families Relationships and Society, researchers interviewed mother-grandmother pairs and found that community surveillance of pregnant women and infant feeding had significantly increased between the generations, with many of the new mothers reporting feeling watched, evaluated and judged.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The world's most efficient and environment-friendly solar cellsIn the future, solar cells can become twice as efficient by employing a few smart little nano-tricks.
23h
Viden

DR's klimaekspert: Klimaet vil ændre vores måde at leve påDer er tegn på, at vores vejr, som vi kender det i dag, er ved at bryde sammen, siger Jesper Theilgaard.
23h
Ingeniøren

Tre ting du skal overveje, når du har flere jobtilbud https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/tre-ting-du-skal-overveje-naar-du-har-flere-jobtilbud-7129 Virksomhederne mangler ingeniører og it-uddannede, og det er ikke usandsynligt, at aktive jobsøgere pludselig kan stå med mere end et jobtilbud. Sker det for dig, skal du overveje dette Jobfinder
23h
Ingeniøren

Global CO2-udledning stagnererCO2-udledningen fra energiproduktion har været den samme de seneste tre år, viser tal fra Det Internationale Energiagentur. Men det er langtfra nok til at mindske den kraftige CO2-stigning i atmosfæren.
23h
Gizmodo

You Can Get a Red iPhone Now Image: Apple Apple’s online store was down for maintenance this morning, leaving us all in wonder as to what mystery product would soon be available to purchase. Would it be a new iPad Pro? A souped-up MacBook? The mass-availability of AirPods ? Not quite, but there is now a red iPhone 7 or 7 Plus ! Available on March 24 in 128GB and 256GB capacities (just like the Jet Black iPhone 7), the new co
23h
The Scientist RSS

San People Write Ethical Code for ResearchAs the closest living relatives of our hunter-gatherer ancestors, the San people of Southern Africa are popular study subjects.
23h
The Scientist RSS

Qualities Tied to Potential Scientific BiasOverestimation of effect sizes in meta-analyses is linked with early-career status, small collaborations, or misconduct records, according to a study.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Unusual fluid behavior observed in microgravity(Phys.org)—Normally when a liquid is heated above its boiling point, it evaporates, turning into a vapor. But when scientists recently performed an experiment on the International Space Station (ISS), they observed that the vapor near a heat pipe condensed into a liquid even when the temperature was 160 K above the substance's normal boiling point. The results show that microgravity significantly
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Taxi-hailing app Grab hits the road in MyanmarRide-hailing firm Grab launched a trial service in Yangon on Tuesday, becoming the first international company to enter Myanmar and stealing a march on fierce rival Uber in the largely untapped market.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google opens 'shortcuts' to information, tools on phonesGoogle wants to make it easier for you to find answers and recommendations on smartphones without having to think about what to ask its search engine.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study calls for U.S. solar policy reformThe rapidly expanding solar energy industry could meaningfully contribute to curbing climate change only if governments and the private sector approach it more economically and efficiently, according to a new Stanford study.
23h
The Guardian

Apple updates iPad line and launches red iPhone 7 Company drops ‘Air’ branding from iPads while launching a new colour in collaboration with Product Red and a new video app, Clips Apple has updated its iPad line, dropping the “Air” branding as it boosts the specs on its mid-tier product. The new hardware launches alongside another colour for the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus , and an unusually timed announcement of a new video app, Clips. Starting at £339
23h
The Guardian

The world's northernmost surf school – in pictures Unstad, located among the Lofoten Islands off Norway’s west coast, is an increasingly popular spot for Arctic surfing. The magnificent light conditions and turbulent waters in this wilderness outpost lure artists and sports enthusiasts alike. Instead of encountering sharks like in tropical waters, surfers in Lofoten are more likely to see a colony of seals and, if they are lucky, the northern lig
23h
Ars Technica

There and back again: SpaceX to make history by re-flying orbital rocket SpaceX We don't have an official launch date yet for SpaceX's historic rocket re-launch just yet, but it could come as soon as March 29. During this flight, which will deliver the SES-10 satellite to geostationary orbit, the company plans to reuse the Falcon 9 first stage booster it successfully landed on a drone ship last April . That landing came after the Falcon 9 lifted a cargo ship toward th
23h
Gizmodo

This Time Lapse of Cell Division in a Tadpole Egg Is Freaky and Beautiful Image: YouTube / Gizmodo The creation of new life is a miracle, but ugh, it sure can take forever. Thanks to the wonders of time lapse photography, however, one YouTuber was able to cut the entire development cycle of a tadpole down to just 20 seconds. It almost looks fake, but it’s as real as life gets. The soon-to-be tadpole is Rana temporaria, also known as the common frog. Filmed over the cou
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Testing the efficacy of new gene therapies more efficientlyUsing a new cellular model, innovative gene therapy approaches for the hereditary immunodeficiency Chronic Granulomatous Disease can be tested faster and cost-effectively in the lab for their efficacy. A team of researchers from the University of Zurich and the Children's Hospital Zurich successfully achieved this using the 'gene-scissor' CRISPR/Cas9 technology. The aim is to treat severely affect
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Structural knowledge of the DNA repair complexNew Danish research provides mechanistic insight into how DNA is monitored and repaired if damage occurs. The results may eventually help to improve the treatment of certain types of cancer, as the DNA repair complex provides a mechanism for cancer cells to resist chemotherapy.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chemists created nanoparticles for safe imaging of tumorsChemists from Russia and Switzerland created biosafe luminescent nanoparticles for imaging tumors and blood vessels damaged by heart attack or stroke. The particles are made of hafnium oxide that is allowed for intravenous injection, and doped with ions of rare earth metals. The scientists hope that the development will give an alternative to toxic quantum dots and help imaging deep tissues withou
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers identify potential treatment for type of muscle and brain degenerative diseaseUCLA researchers have discovered the molecular basis of an incurable disease known as inclusion body myopathy.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Interferon drug shows promise in treating EbolaA pilot study of a class of drugs used to treat hepatitis and some forms of multiple sclerosis has been shown for the first time to ease symptoms of Ebola patients, while also increasing their survival.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Children's Hospital Colorado research argues for use of medical homes in pediatricsNew research from Children's Hospital Colorado (Children's Colorado) argues strongly in favor of the redirection of public funding to invest in improving the use of patient centered medical homes for children with public or no insurance.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New medicine to prevent mothers dying in childbirth succeeds in first trial in humansThe Monash University Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences (MIPS) today announced positive results from a first-in-human study of a new, inhaled form of a medicine that could significantly reduce maternal deaths around the world. The results open the possibility of a streamlined pathway to registration, meaning that the medicine could be accessible to mothers much sooner than would otherwise be po
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

JDR systematic analysis examines global burden of oral conditionsThe IADR/AADR have published a systemic analysis in the JDR. Authored by Wagner Marcenes, 'Global Burden of Oral Conditions in 1990-2015: A Systemic Analysis' examines data to assess progress toward FDI, WHO and IADR Oral Health Goals of reducing the level of oral diseases and minimizing their impact by 2020.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research spotlights early signs of disease using infrared light: New researchUniversity of Sydney researchers have used infrared spectroscopy to spotlight changes in tiny cell fragments called microvesicles to probe their role in a model of the body's immunological response to bacterial infection.
23h
The Guardian

The big revelation from Theresa May’s Vogue interview: just how dull she is | Anne PerkinsThe prime minister has copied John Major in her determination to be as boring as it is possible to be while also leading a major western power The last time a new prime minister matched Theresa May’s double-digit personal approval ratings so far into their first year in power, it was John Major back in the 1990s. The “not Thatcher” bounce saw him all the way to an unexpected election victory in 19
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Blood spatters reveal a suspect's age through new techniqueResearchers at King's College London have discovered a new method of forensic analysis which could more accurately predict the age of criminal suspects based on samples of blood and saliva found at crime scenes.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Detecting salmonella in pork meat twice as fastA new method developed at the National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, halves the time it takes slaughterhouses to test for disease-causing salmonella in pork meat. The test can save the slaughterhouses money i.e. by ensuring meat reaches the market faster, which in turn reduces the costs of operating the meat chillers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Long-term limitations imposed on patients with pulmonary embolismNearly half of the patients who suffer a pulmonary embolism (PE) -- a blood clot in the lung -- experience long term limitations to their capacity for physical activity and that this had a negative impact on their quality of life, a multi-centre clinical study has determined. This research is the first to demonstrate that PE may have a lasting effect on patients.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Vitamin E, selenium supplements did not prevent dementiaAntioxidant supplements vitamin E and selenium -- taken alone or in combination -- did not prevent dementia in asymptomatic older men, according to a new study.
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New Scientist - News

Trump’s tragic budget kills vital science to boost defenceThe US president's spending plan ramps up defence at huge cost to climate and energy research. The contradictions are beyond belief, says physicist Raymond Pierrehumbert
23h
Ars Technica

Need booze or bandages immediately? Alexa can get them for you with Prime Now (credit: Adam Bowie ) After embedding Alexa into the Amazon Shopping app for iOS last week, Amazon is bringing a new feature to the digital assistant. You can now ask Alexa to order essentials that you need immediately through Prime Now . Prime Now is Amazon's two-hour delivery service currently available in 30 cities across the country that lets you order things like laundry detergent, chips, di
23h
Ars Technica

Minor iPhone bump turns the 7 and 7 Plus red, gives iPhone SE more storage Apple In addition to a new midrange iPad, Apple also announced a handful of minor updates for the iPhone via press release this morning. Apple is also releasing a new Product Red version of the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus —like the name implies, it has a bright red matte finish with blended antenna lines and a silver Apple logo on the back. It contrasts strikingly with the other iPhone colors Apple has o
23h
The Guardian

Grindr's gaymoji: pierced aubergines, a peach on a plate – and a banned ‘T’ The gay dating app has introduced its own, quite graphic, graphics to help their users communicate. But one symbol went a little too close to the bone Name: Gaymoji. Appearance: Bright, cute, lewd. Continue reading...
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The Guardian

He won't be back: Schwarzenegger's Terminator franchise terminated Arnold Schwarzenegger’s time-travelling cyborg will reportedly not return to cinemas, with sources saying studio has cancelled a planned sequel It may well be “hasta la vista, baby” for Arnold Schwarzenegger’s Terminator : the long-running science-fiction franchise is reported to have been cancelled. According to the New York Daily News , Paramount, which holds the rights to the franchise, has de
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Looking for signs of the Big Bang in the desertThe silence of an immense desolate land in which to search for reverberations coming from the time at which everything began. The Simons Observatory will be built in the Chilean Atacama desert at an altitude of several thousand metres for the purposes of studying primordial gravitational waves which originated in the first instants of the Big Bang. The SISSA research group led by Carlo Baccigalupi
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Working towards super-efficient, ultra-thin silicon solar cellsDespite a surge in solar cell R&D in recent years involving emerging materials such as organics and perovskites, the solar cell industry continues to favor inorganic crystalline silicon photovoltaics. While thin-film solar cells offer several advantages—including lower manufacturing costs—long-term stability of crystalline silicon solar cells, which are typically thicker, tips the scale in their f
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Electrons used to control ultrashort laser pulsesWe may soon get better insight into the microcosm and the world of electrons. Researchers at Lund University and Louisiana State University have developed a tool that makes it possible to control extreme UV light - light with much shorter wavelengths than visible light. The new method uses strong laser pulses to direct the short bursts of light.
23h
Videnskabens Verden

Lige siden et enigt folketing i 2003 besluttede at lukke Risøs har debatten bølget frem og tilbage om, hvor vi skal gøre af alt det radioaktive affald? Det står nu på 14. år i to store lagerhaller lige ned til Roskilde fjord. I denne uges udgave af Videnskabens Verden undersøger vi det danske atomaffald. Tilrettelæggelse: Charlotte Koldbye og Hisar Sindi. www.dr.dk/p1/videnskabensverden
23h
The Atlantic

The Life of Martin McGuinness, in Quotes Martin McGuinness, the former IRA chief of staff turned peace negotiator who stepped down as Northern Ireland’s deputy first minister just months ago, has died at the age of 66. His life charted a remarkable transition. From a quiet-mannered butcher's apprentice, he first became a militant committed to violently overthrowing British rule, before working to convince his former comrades to lay down
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

5ARIs not associated with increased suicide risk in older men, study findsUsing 5alpha-reductase inhibitors (5ARIs) is not associated with increased suicide risk in older men, but risks for self-harm and depression were increased during the 18 months after medication initiation, although 'the relatively small magnitude of these risks should not dissuade physicians from prescribing these medications in appropriate patients,' according to a new article.
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New Scientist - News

Artificial lungs in a backpack may free people with lung failurePeople with lung failure usually have to stay connected to unwieldy machines. Now a set of portable mechanical lungs could restore mobility and keep them healthier
23h
New Scientist - News

Ongoing academic purge shows Turkey is heading to a dark placeScientists are among hundreds of academics sacked ahead of Turkey's referendum on handing more power to its authoritarian president, says Caghan Kizil
23h
New Scientist - News

The many-tentacled galaxy that could drive a physics revolutionWeirdo galaxy NGC 4258 has extra tentacles protruding from its middle, which make it surprisingly useful for testing theories of the universe evolved
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Newly discovered protist parasites contribute to the stability of rainforest ecosystemsTropical rainforests are among the most species-rich areas on earth. Thousands of animal and plant species live there. The smaller microbial protists, which are not visible to the naked eye, are also native to these forests, where they live in the soils and elsewhere. A team of researchers formed by Micah Dunthorn, University of Kaiserslautern, examined them more closely by analyzing their DNA. Th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Electrocrystallization—breakthrough in gold nanoparticle researchA research team led by Professor Flavio Maran of the University of Padova (Italy) and Academy Professor Kari Rissanen of the University of Jyväskylä (Finland) has published in the prestigious the Journal of the American Chemical Society a study that demonstrates how it is possible to obtain very high quality crystals formed of gold nanoparticles.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Organic electronics can use power from socketOrganic light-emitting devices and printed electronics can be connected to a socket in the wall by way of a small, inexpensive organic converter, developed in a collaboration between Linköping University and Umeå University, Sweden.
23h
WIRED

Facebook’s Epic Data Blast Is Good for Everyone—Especially Facebook Engineers believe they can shove a record amount of data through the internet's undersea pipes. But the record isn't as interesting as who ran the test. The post Facebook’s Epic Data Blast Is Good for Everyone—Especially Facebook appeared first on WIRED .
23h
The Guardian

Access to nature reduces depression and obesity, finds European study Trees and green spaces are unrecognised healers offering benefits from increases in mental wellbeing to allergy reductions, says report People living close to trees and green spaces are less likely to be obese, inactive, or dependent on anti-depressants, according to a new report . Middle-aged Scottish men with homes in deprived but verdant areas were found to have a death rate 16% lower than the
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New catalysts mimic human visionLight sensitive molecules trigger vision inside our retinas. This phenomenon inspired researchers to create a new family of eco-friendly catalysts activated by purple LEDs for unprecedented transformations.
23h
Gizmodo

Fill In Those Wi-Fi Dead Spots With a $20 Range Extender D-Link Range Extender , $20 Wi-Fi range extenders can’t work miracles, but if there’s one spot in your house with spotty coverage, they can be a much cheaper solution than buying a new router. So for $20, why not give this one a try? Most complaints about this model seem to stem from its setup process, but if you can get through that, people seem to like it. More Deals
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Gizmodo

More Dire Rumors About the Future of the Terminator Franchise Screenwriters Rhett Rheese and Paul Wernick talk Deadpool 2 , Zombieland 2 , and everything but their new movie Life . Bad Robot’s supernatural World War II movie finds some stars. Stephen Amell teases a return to the island on Arrow . Plus, a new clip from Ghost in the Shell , and new images from Walking Dead . Behold, Spoilers! Terminator 6 The New York Daily News reports that both that a Termi
23h
Ars Technica

Apple’s new $329 9.7-inch iPad replaces Air 2, has no Pro features [Updated] Apple Apple quietly announced via press release this morning that it would not be replacing any of its top-end iPads, just its two-year-old midrange iPad Air 2. The company's new mainstream 9.7-inch tablet, called simply "iPad," includes an Apple A9 SoC (not an A9X), but its most exciting feature is its starting price of $329, $70 less than the previous starting price of the Air 2. The tablet wil
23h
The Guardian

Waitrose axes free coffee for shoppers – unless they buy something first Loyalty scheme members informed of change to drinks deal, which had resulted in big queues at self-service machines Waitrose is cracking down on free-loading coffee drinkers by forcing members of its loyalty scheme to buy something before pouring themselves a free hot drink. The grocer has written to members of its myWaitrose scheme advising them that from 3 April they will have to make a purchas
23h
The Guardian

Sky must join anti-doping group to silence doubters, says president• MPCC head Roger Legeay urges Sky to join to improve team’s credibility • ‘Our rules are very strict but that is a price you pay for having a good image’ Team Sky and British Cycling must join the sport’s voluntary anti-doping group to have any chance of restoring their credibility, according to the president of the Movement for Credible Cycling. Almost two-thirds of teams in pro cycling’s top tw
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

CuanTec – a new force in the fight against food wasteThe University of Strathclyde's proud track record of innovation with impact continues in the form of CuanTec, a start-up company with a positive and practical solution to the disposal of seafood waste, which exacts a heavy cost, both financially and environmentally.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Producing radioisotopes for medical imaging and disease treatmentThe before and after images are stunning: A prostate cancer patient riddled with metastatic tumors that disappear after just three, potent treatments.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Finding the 'ghost particles' might be more challenging than what we thoughtResults from the NEOS experiment on sterile neutrinos differ partly from the theoretical expectations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Enzyme helps bacteria defend themselves against oxidants secreted by immune systemBrazilian researchers identified biological substrates of bacterial enzyme Ohr, a potential target for drug development that could plays a central role in bacterial anti-oxidant defense.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers gain insight into day-to-day lives of parents raising children with autismA new study by the University of Wisconsin-Madison looks at the daily experiences of the parents of children with autism spectrum disorder to provide a more detailed picture of the strengths and vulnerabilities of couples raising a child with ASD.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

During learning, neurons deep in brain engage in a surprising level of activityAn international team of researchers has learned something surprising about the cerebellum, perhaps best known as the part of the brain that makes sure you cannot tickle yourself. The team found that cerebellar neurons, once thought to fire only occasionally, are actually quite active when the brain is learning a new task.
23h
The Scientist RSS

Consilience, Episode 2: In TuneBen Henry delves into the still-unanswered questions of where our musical preferences come from and what makes synesthetes tick.
23h
Gizmodo

Inside the Midwest Wildfires That Burned Cattle Alive Not all the animals that burned in the fire had died, so the cowboys returned with shotguns in hand, and bandanas over their faces to ward off the stench. The animals had to be put down as quickly and humanely as possible under the circumstances. Everything in sight was covered with fine ash. The fires had moved fast, consuming the panhandles of Texas and Oklahoma, and parts of Kansas and Colorad
23h
Futurity.org

Your subcortex might gauge numbers like a guppy Scientists wanted to find out: does the adult human subcortex contribute to number processing at all? Despite major brain differences, many species from spiders to humans can recognize and differentiate relative quantities. Adult primates, however, are the only ones with a sophisticated cortical brain system, meaning that the others rely on a subcortex or its evolutionary equivalent. Published in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Interculturalism—how diverse societies can do better than passive toleranceWestern liberal democracies are again embroiled in debates about the value of multicultural policies. In Australia, the federal government has just released its own statement on multiculturalism. The current debates are unfolding in the context of the election of Donald Trump, the Brexit vote and the rise of far-right parties like One Nation.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers discover 'map' in malaria vaccine huntA promising vaccine target for the most deadly type of malaria has had its molecular structure solved by Institute researchers, helping in the quest to develop new antimalarial therapies.
23h
WIRED

The Sad, Unnatural Habitats of Polar Bears in Captivity They live out their days in zoos, aquariums, and shopping malls. The post The Sad, Unnatural Habitats of Polar Bears in Captivity appeared first on WIRED .
23h
Scientific American Content: Global

Cities Become More Creative and Efficient as They GrowNew science reveals why cities become more creative and efficient as they grow -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
23h
Scientific American Content: Global

South Africa's San People Issue Ethics Code to ScientistsThe indigenous people—among the most studied in the world—are first in Africa to draft research guidelines -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
23h
The Guardian

Fox drops analyst who said UK might have helped spy on Trump Network source says Andrew Napolitano ditched after claiming UK spies might have aided Obama in alleged wiretapping Fox News has dropped a legal analyst who claimed British intelligence might have helped spy on Donald Trump during his bid to become US president. Andrew Napolitano had been pulled from the channel, a source at Fox said. The network made no immediate comment on Monday. Continue read
23h
Dagens Medicin

Rudkjøbing og Mitchell: Uhørt indgreb mod fedmeoperationer »Jeg tror ikke, at man ville indføre en så skrap begrænsning i adgangen til f.eks. kræftbehandling,« siger Overlægeforeningens formand, Anja Mitchell. »Det kan ikke være Sundhedsstyrelsens opgave at tage økonomiske og ikke faglige hensyn,« mener Lægeforeningens formand, Andreas Rudkjøbing.
23h
Dagens Medicin

Ny professor i øjensygdomme
23h
Gizmodo

Siri, Unaware Women Play Four Quarters Of Basketball, Convinced Every Game Is Double-OT NCAA women’s basketball switched from halves to quarters two years ago, but Siri didn’t get the notice. Ask Apple’s digital assistant for a women’s tournament score, and she’ll excitedly inform you that the game was a thriller—going to double overtime.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Electronic oscillations in graphene could make a tabletop source of X-rays a realitySince their discovery in 1895, X-rays have led to significant advances in science, medicine and industry. From probing distant galaxies to screening at airport security and facilitating medical diagnosis, they have allowed us to look beyond the surface and see what lies beneath.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research spotlights early signs of disease using infrared lightUniversity of Sydney researchers have used infrared spectroscopy to spotlight changes in tiny cell fragments called microvesicles to probe their role in a model of the body's immunological response to bacterial infection.
23h
The Guardian

Rachel Roddy’s Sicilian lemon pudding recipes | A Kitchen in Rome Just a few ingredients combine for today’s puds – one a gently set, sweet but sharp Sicilian number, the other a traditional English posset In her 1747 book The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy, Hannah Glasse suggests grating lemons with a piece of broken glass! Elizabeth David suggests lump sugar is one of the best graters, although she was referring to a lump sugar from a loaf, a sizable piec
23h
The Guardian

Secret aid worker: when your crisis isn't cool enough to attract the