arstechnica

Apple snaps up Workflow, an iOS automation app for power users [Updated] Enlarge / The Workflow app. (credit: Workflow) Late yesterday, Apple closed a deal to acquire Workflow , an app for iOS power users that lets you string a series of repetitive actions together to make them easier and quicker to accomplish. In many ways, the app accomplishes for iOS what the Automator app does for macOS. Late last year Apple laid off Sal Soghoian , the product manager in charge of¤¤¤

arstechnica

Big US companies pull YouTube ads after extremist content sparks uncertainty (credit: Rego Korosi ) The controversy surrounding Google and YouTube advertising and extremist content has spread across the pond. According to a Bloomberg report , some of YouTube's biggest advertising customers, including Verizon and AT&T, have halted spending on display and other non-search advertising on the platform. The news comes days after a stream of UK companies pulled their ads from Y¤¤¤

arstechnica

Huawei updates Mate 9 handsets with incomplete Alexa integration Enlarge (credit: Valentina Palladino) Google Now isn't the only digital assistant available on Huawei's Mate 9 anymore. Today, the company announced an over-the-air update that will bring Amazon's Alexa to all Mate 9 smartphones. The move comes not even a week after Amazon updated its Shopping app for iOS to include Alexa, allowing Apple smartphone users access to the assistant even if they don't¤¤¤

arstechnica

Group that found VW cheating says costs of fuel efficiency have been overstated It won’t cost automakers nearly as much as they said it would to fit new cars with carbon-saving technology over the next decade, a nonprofit transportation research group says. An economic analysis performed by the International Council on Clean Transportation (ICCT) found that, given recent improvements in auto technology, the EPA’s rigorous study to determine 2025 fuel efficiency standards may¤¤¤

arstechnica

Formula 1 starts this weekend, and we still don’t know who’s going to win Ferrari Good news, everyone: the 2017 Formula 1 season starts this weekend. As has become tradition, the first race of the year is in Melbourne, Australia, meaning those of us in Europe or North America can expect a late night or very early morning. This will be the first year under new management—with Liberty having purchased F1 from CVC, ousting Bernie in the process —and also the first year fo¤¤¤

arstechnica

Tesla might have real competition soon—meet the Lucid Air Jonathan Gitlin It's still surprising that Tesla has had the high-end electric car market to itself for all these years. The Model S has existed for nearly five years, and even today, potential rivals remain in the prototype stages. Porsche is going ahead with the Mission E . Faraday Future has the FF91 under development, and then there's Lucid. Formerly known as Atieva, it's backed by the same C¤¤¤

arstechnica

1,000hp hybrid hypercars are the next big thing, and McLaren’s is called the BP23 McLaren Pity the humble hypercar. For a brief moment in time you're the hottest thing on four wheels, splashed across thousands of desktop wallpapers (and bedroom walls, if car posters are still a thing). But these days that kind of star power doesn't last long. Blame the companies that build them. You'd think it would be hard to top something like a McLaren P1 , a hybrid with 903hp (673kW) and a¤¤¤

arstechnica

Corsair One review: The best small form factor PC we’ve ever tested Enlarge (credit: Mark Walton) Specs at a glance: Corsair One Lowest Middle Best (as reviewed) OS Windows 10 Home 64-bit CPU Intel Core i7-7700 (liquid cooled) Intel Core i7-7700K (liquid cooled) Intel Core i7-7700K (liquid cooled) RAM 16GB DDR4 2,400MHz (8GBx2) 16GB DDR4 2,400MHz (8GBx2) 16GB DDR4 2,400MHz (8GBx2) GPU Nvidia GTX 1070 (air cooled) Nvidia GTX 1080 8GB (liquid cooled) Nvidia GTX 108¤¤¤

arstechnica

Early Snapdragon 835 benchmarks show mixed results from semi-custom design (credit: Qualcomm) When it announced the Snapdragon 835, Qualcomm promised that the latest in its family of ARM systems-on-chips would boost performance by 27 percent with a 40 percent reduction in power consumption. The first early benchmarks of the processor that Qualcomm doesn't want us to call a processor have been run and the results are... well, they're a little uneven. Anandtech went to Qu¤¤¤

arstechnica

Galaxy Tab S3 review: The high price of a well-rounded Android tablet Video shot/edited by Jennifer Hahn. (video link) Samsung continues to compete with Apple's iPad with the revamped Galaxy Tab S3. Two years ago, the company released 8.0-inch and 9.7-inch models of the Tab S2 , but Samsung is now simplifying with just one 9.7-inch model of the updated tablet. The $599/£599 tablet has an HDR-ready display, a sleek glass design, a faster processor, a fingerprint sen¤¤¤

arstechnica

Hands-on with Android O—A million new settings and an awesome snooze feature Android O is actually here! After diving into Google's blog post , we fired up our developer tools and loaded Android O on a sacrificial device. There are a few new interesting features, lots of UI tweaks, and plenty of odd bugs and unfinished areas. Let's dive in. Notifications: Snooze, channels, and a terrible new ambient mode My favorite new feature in Android O is the ability to do system-wid¤¤¤

arstechnica

Google Maps gets real-time location sharing Location sharing is back in Google Maps. Google announced the addition of " real-time location sharing " to the Android and iOS apps, coming soon to an app store near you. The process seems pretty simple: Open the navigation drawer and press the new "Share Location" button. You'll be able to send a sharing permission to a Google contact or send a link over a messaging app, and you'll be able to p¤¤¤

arstechnica

Capcom needs PC gamers’ help to test online Street Fighter V fixes Enlarge / Wanna try out SFV 's latest fighter, Kolin, for free? Capcom's week-long online-update beta, starting next week, will let you do just that. Ars' review of Street Fighter V in February of last year began with this simple declaration: "Definitely good, definitely unfinished." Now 13 months later, Capcom is finally tiptoeing toward the fighting game's complete state as one of the game's mo¤¤¤

arstechnica

For Honor director: We never intended for you to unlock everything Enlarge / Out of my way... that unlockable content is MINE! Over the past week or so, Ubisoft's For Honor has faced criticism for the sheer amount of unlockable content it offers players, which one Reddit user calculated would cost over $700 or 5,200 gameplay hours to access . Ubisoft Montreal Game Director Damien Kieken addressed those concerns in a lengthy livestreamed video conversation . The¤¤¤

arstechnica

Nintendo offering “simple fix” for disconnecting Switch controllers [Updated] Enlarge / The small bit of foam in the lower-right corner is apparently the only thing needed to make a Nintendo Switch left Joy-Con start working perfectly. (credit: Sean Hollister / CNet ) Update: Nintendo of America has issued the following statement to Ars Technica that seems to confirm much of what was shown in the original CNET report: There is no design issue with the Joy-Con controllers,¤¤¤

arstechnica

The arcade world’s first Easter egg discovered after fraught journey (credit: Arcade Flyer Archive ) The historical record of video games received a strange shake-up on Wednesday from Ed Fries, the ex-Microsoft executive who had a huge part in the creation of the original Xbox . Fries took to his personal blog, which typically covers the world of retro gaming, to announce a zany discovery : he had found the world's earliest known arcade game Easter egg. His hunt b¤¤¤

arstechnica

The world’s first official gaming-company newsletter, now preserved online Consider this your regularly scheduled reminder that the Internet Archive continues to host some of the coolest relics of nerd history. Now, the scan-and-upload team led by Jason Scott delivers quite the piece of video game nostalgia: the Atari Coin Connection . Long before consumer magazines and fan newsletters ruled the industry, Atari's first publication launched in 1976 to an audience of busi¤¤¤

arstechnica

“Dig once” bill could bring fiber Internet to much of the US Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | tiero) Years in the making, a proposal to mandate the installation of fiber conduits during federally funded highway projects might be gaining some new momentum. If the US adopts a "dig once" policy, construction workers would install conduits just about any time they build new roads and sidewalks or upgrade existing ones. These conduits are plastic pipes that can¤¤¤

arstechnica

With racy sperm pics on a smartphone, men can easily test fertility Enlarge / The smartphone-based semen analyzer tests for male infertility in seconds from the privacy of home with a 3D-printed setup costing less than $5, which can analyze most semen samples in less than 5 seconds. (credit: Vignesh Natarajan ) The male equivalent of the at-home pregnancy test may have just landed. With a simple smartphone device and a chip that slurps up sperm, men can easily an¤¤¤

arstechnica

Bad luck may play a big role in cancer—but prevention tactics still matter Cancer cells in culture from human connective tissue, illuminated by darkfield amplified contrast, at a magnification of 500x. (credit: NCI, Dr. Cecil Fox ) What causes cancer? High-profile culprits obviously include bum genes inherited from parents and harmful environmental and lifestyle factors, such as smoking or not wearing sunscreen. But in a new study in Science , researchers yet again say¤¤¤

arstechnica

X-rays let you see the smallest feature buried in your CPU The Apple A8 die shot as mapped out by Chipworks. (credit: Chipworks ) The semiconductor industry is beyond remarkable when it comes to the complexity and precision of processes. A modern integrated circuit is not a single layer of circuitry, but many layers, all stacked on top of each other. This is all done through photolithography, where a pattern is imaged on a silicon wafer. Each layer requi¤¤¤

arstechnica

“Startlingly effective” TV ads for testosterone helped lead to over-prescription Enlarge (credit: Getty | Marc Bruxelle ) With little evidence of health benefits, television advertisements for testosterone were very successful at persuading men to seek treatments for a questionable disorder , a new study in JAMA suggests. The potent commercials may have been a significant driver in the boom in testosterone use, which launched sales ten-fold in the US between 2000 and 2011. Th¤¤¤

arstechnica

Elon Musk on new NASA legislation: “This bill changes almost nothing” Enlarge / SpaceX and Tesla CEO Elon Musk talks with White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon at a Policy Forum in February. (credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) SpaceX founder Elon Musk criticizes NASA and Congress in public only very rarely—which isn't surprising given that NASA has supported his company with more than $3 billion in contracts for cargo and crew delivery to the International¤¤¤

arstechnica

In settlement, app makers change their tune on health benefits and privacy Enlarge / Young woman checking her running results at the smartphone (credit: Getty | AleksandarNakic ) Makers of three popular health apps are changing their tune about the capabilities and privacy policies of their products following an investigation and settlement with the New York Attorney General’s office. The makers of Cardiio, Runtastic, and My Baby’s Beat apps all agreed to pay a combined¤¤¤

arstechnica

Japanese company develops a solar cell with record-breaking 26%+ efficiency A solar cell with 26.3 percent efficiency. (credit: Photovoltaic & Thin Film Research Laboratories (Kaneka corporation)) Solar panels are cheaper than ever these days, but installation costs can still be considerable for homeowners. More efficient solar panels can recapture the cost of their installation more quickly, so making panels that are better at converting sunlight into electricity is a k¤¤¤

arstechnica

The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer has a problem with its cooling system Enlarge / A view of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the station. (credit: NASA) Launched to the International Space Station in 2011 on the penultimate flight of the Space Shuttle, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer has quietly been collecting data during the last six years, observing more than 100 billion cosmic ray events. Although it has yet to produce any major scientific findings, physicists¤¤¤

arstechnica

Photovoltaic ink could lead to easy solar panel manufacture Enlarge / Perovskite crystals in a photovoltaic cell. (credit: Los Alamos National Lab ) Currently, silicon is the dominant technology for photovoltaic solar power . There are a handful of competing thin-film technologies, which are easier to manufacture but rely on more expensive raw materials and don't reach the same efficiencies as silicon. The trade offs between these two technologies have he¤¤¤

arstechnica

Putting light in a spin generates a ring of fire on gold film Enlarge / The evolution of the vortex over femtoseconds. (credit: Spektor et. al.) The late 20th and early 21st century have seen a revolution in the study of light. Far from the old days of seeing things dimly through microscopes, we are now in the position to freeze light, use it to make materials transparent, and watch it spiral around on a gold surface. Watching light do its thing is very dif¤¤¤

arstechnica

Scammy science: 40 journals appointed a fake person as editor Enlarge (credit: Jean-Etienne Minh-Duy Poirrier ) Anna O. Szust is not a real person. She is, literally, a fraud: oszust means “fraud” in Polish. Nonetheless, Szust has been appointed as an editor at 40 bogus academic journals. After sending out her fake application for an editorial role, the researchers responsible for the world’s nerdiest sting operation began to receive responses almost immedi¤¤¤

arstechnica

Streaks on Martian slopes might not be caused by water Enlarge (credit: NASA ) The evidence for liquid water on the surface of Mars in the distant past is strong, but a discovery a few years ago provided a glimmer of hope that the wet stuff might still be making occasional appearances on the Red Planet. Fresh, dark streaks show up on steep slopes during the “warm” season, almost as if something wet is trickling downhill. To some researchers, however,¤¤¤

arstechnica

Theranos investors who pledge not to sue get Elizabeth Holmes’ shares for free Enlarge / Elizabeth Holmes, Theranos CEO. (credit: Getty | CNBC ) Theranos CEO and founder Elizabeth Holmes is planning to give up some of her personal shares to investors who pledge not to sue the disgraced blood-testing company, the Wall Street Journal reports . The deals would only involve investors from the last round of funding, which ended in 2015 and brought in more than $600 million. Thes¤¤¤

arstechnica

Google takes Symantec to the woodshed for mis-issuing 30,000 HTTPS certs Enlarge (credit: Nyttend ) In a severe rebuke of one of the biggest suppliers of HTTPS credentials, Google Chrome developers announced plans to drastically restrict transport layer security certificates sold by Symantec-owned issuers following the discovery they have issued more than 30,000 certificates. Effective immediately, Chrome plans to stop recognizing the extended validation status of all¤¤¤

arstechnica

New WikiLeaks dump: The CIA built Thunderbolt exploit, implants to target Macs Enlarge / One of these things is a CIA implant dropper. (credit: From an original image by Scott Ackerman ) WikiLeaks today dumped a smaller subset of documents from its "Vault 7" collection of files from a CIA software developer server . Yet again, these documents are more important from the perspective of WikiLeaks having them than for showing any revelatory content. The exploits detailed in th¤¤¤

arstechnica

Shielding MAC addresses from stalkers is hard and Android fails miserably at it Enlarge (credit: Christiaan Colen ) In early 2015, architects of Google's Android mobile operating system introduced a new feature that was intended to curtail the real-time tracking of smartphones as their users traversed retail stores , city streets , and just about anywhere else . A recently published research paper found that the measure remains missing on the vast majority of Android phones¤¤¤

arstechnica

17,000 AT&T technicians and call center workers go on strike [Updated] Enlarge (credit: Mike Mozart ) Update on March 23 : Less than 24 hours after it began, AT&T said that "The brief grievance strike has been resolved and employees are returning to work today." Negotiations for a new contract are still ongoing, but in the meantime AT&T agreed that it "will no longer require technicians to perform work assignments outside of their expertise and classification," the¤¤¤

arstechnica

Cheerleading company can get copyrights, pursue competitors, Supreme Court says Enlarge The Supreme Court issued a 5-2 opinion (PDF) today allowing cheerleading uniforms to be copyrighted. The case, Star Athletica v. Varsity Brands , is expected to have broad effect in the fashion world and beyond. A group of 3D printing companies had also asked the high court to take up the case, asking for clarity on how to separate creative designs, which are copyrightable, from utilitari¤¤¤

arstechnica

Man sentenced to 3 years for Facebook threat to kill Obama loses appeal Enlarge (credit: Lewis Mulatero/Getty Images) Brian Dutcher A Wisconsin man lost his bid before a federal appeals court to set aside his 3-year prison sentence for threatening to kill then-President Barack Obama. The threats first appeared on Facebook, and were then made verbally to anybody who would listen, including to Secret Service agents. Brian Dutcher, 56, posted on his Facebook page in Jun¤¤¤

arstechnica

Feds: We’re pulling data from 100 phones seized during Trump inauguration Enlarge (credit: ymgerman / Getty Images News) In new filings , prosecutors told a court in Washington, DC that within the coming weeks, they expect to extract all data from the seized cellphones of more than 100 allegedly violent protesters arrested during the inauguration of President Donald Trump. Prosecutors also said that this search is validated by recently issued warrants. The court filing¤¤¤

arstechnica

Judge rules in favor of “Drone Slayer,” dismisses lawsuit filed by pilot (credit: William H. Merideth) A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit brought against William Merideth, the Kentucky man who shot down a drone that Merideth believed was flying over his own property in 2015. During the weeks that followed the incident, Merideth dubbed himself a "drone slayer." Later, he sold orange t-shirts with that phrase printed on them. The ruling now means the lingering ques¤¤¤

arstechnica

Man who orchestrated tech-fueled kidnapping scheme given 40 years Enlarge / The Vallejo Police Department initially dismissed the kidnapping allegations as a hoax. (credit: Justin Sullivan / Getty Images News) A California man who pleaded guilty last year to a strange and elaborate kidnapping operation in 2015 has now been sentenced to 40 years in prison. The defendant, Matthew Muller, was later caught as part of a separate burglary later that month but initial¤¤¤

arstechnica

CD, DVD pirate sentenced to 5 years in prison Enlarge (credit: imbd.com ) A Senegalese man was sentenced to five years in prison and ordered Wednesday to pay the Motion Picture Association of America and the Recording Industry Association of America $71,000 in restitution for his role in an Atlanta-based DVD and CD pirating operation that unlawfully sold millions of copies of copyrighted works without authorization from rights holders. Mamad¤¤¤

arstechnica

Pope cautions youths about social media’s “false image of reality” Enlarge / Pope Francis holds his homily during his weekly audience Wednesday in St. Peter's Square in Vatican City, Vatican. Pope Francis is warning the world's youth to be wary of the "false image of reality" portrayed in social media and on reality television shows. In a written message the Vatican issued Tuesday, the pontiff cautioned followers not to let the Internet dilute the church's messa¤¤¤

arstechnica

Senate votes to let ISPs sell your Web browsing history to advertisers Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | KrulUA) The US Senate today voted to eliminate broadband privacy rules that would have required ISPs to get consumers' explicit consent before selling or sharing Web browsing data and other private information with advertisers and other companies. The rules were approved in October 2016 by the Federal Communications Commission's then-Democratic leadership, but are¤¤¤

arstechnica

Highlights doesn’t kid around when it comes to science and tech Tony Shaff, 44 Pages AUSTIN, Texas—If you ever attended a pediatric dentist or loved reading between the ages of two and 12, chances are good you've come across Highlights. The legacy kids' magazine turned 70 in the summer of 2016, and throughout the decades it has been a cultural constant. Everyone knows about hidden picture searches or the long-running Goofus and Gallant comic, but poetry from¤¤¤

arstechnica

Ars Technica Live: California’s floods and droughts are just the beginning Ars Live #10, filmed by Chris Schodt and produced by Jennifer Hahn. (video link) UC-Berkeley environmental scientist Lynn Ingram joined us for the one-year anniversary episode of Ars Technica Live, and she gave us a broad historical perspective on climate change. Ingram's special focus is paleoclimatology, or the study of Earth's ancient ecosystems. She explained that she spends a lot of time in¤¤¤

BBC

Fake data threat Not all cyber-attacks are about theft, some seek to undermine the trust placed in data and documents.¤¤¤

BBC

How an obscure seed is helping to save the elephant A look at how the seed of a South American tree is increasingly being used as an alternative to ivory.¤¤¤

BBC

Europa: Our best shot at finding alien life? After years of planning, scientists are set now to send missions to explore the ocean world of Europa.¤¤¤

BBC

Major shake-up suggests dinosaurs may have 'UK origin' Scientists reclassify dinosaurs, putting British fossils at the base of their family tree.¤¤¤

BBC

'New' wave-like cloud finally wins official recognition The new clouds include the rare, wave-like asperitas, after a long campaign by skywatchers.¤¤¤

BBC

Dinosaur crater's clue to origin of life The crater made by the asteroid that killed off the dinosaurs reveals clues to the origins of life on Earth.¤¤¤

BBC

Kaikoura: 'Most complex quake ever studied' 2016's big quake in New Zealand will likely prompt a rethink about how such events are expected to behave.¤¤¤

BBC

Bloodhound record bid slips again The British-led effort to break the World Land Speed Record is delayed by cash-flow problems to 2018.¤¤¤

BBC

Fruit-shaped sensor 'can improve freshness' The sensor comes in orange, apple, banana and mango varieties and alerts to cooling problems.¤¤¤

BBC

UK schoolboy corrects Nasa data error The A-level student noticed something odd in radiation levels from the International Space Station.¤¤¤

BBC

Virtual reality could spot concussion in footballers New technology which could be used by club doctors is being trialled, a BBC investigation finds.¤¤¤

BBC

British scientists claim major advance in TB treatment Researchers are using genome sequencing to make sure patients get the right drugs more quickly.¤¤¤

BBC

Paleo artist An award-winning artist brings ancient fossil discoveries to life through illustrations.¤¤¤

bigthink

Is Technology Uniting or Destroying Us? Guy Garcia tackles the future of technology in his new novel, Swarm. Read More¤¤¤

bigthink

The Danger of Only Seeing What You Already Believe In his new book, Atlantic senior editor Derek Thompson argues for more disfluent feeds in our social media diet. Read More¤¤¤

bigthink

Blame China? Amazon Could Be the One Killing More American Jobs Despite our focus on China, Amazon may be displacing more American workers. How do we create a human-first economy when what is beneficial to us as consumers may not align with what's best for American workers? Read More¤¤¤

bigthink

Stephen Hawking, Given Two Years to Live in 1963, Is Going To Space Over 50 Years Later Stephen Hawking has accepted an offer to go to space. He's one of the world's most famous scientists, who's been paralyzed due to ALS for much of his life. Read More¤¤¤

bigthink

Half of All Languages Come from One Root Language. How it Spread Is Something of Debate Compelling evidence makes the case for both the Steppe and Anatolian Hypotheses. Read More¤¤¤

bigthink

Nobody Heard or Saw This Landslide. What’s the Big Deal? A huge landslide and tsunami no one witnessed may foreshadow many more to come in the aftermath of climate change. Read More¤¤¤

bigthink

The Scientific Reason Flow Obliterates Time Steven Kotler talks about the neuroscience about how flow state turns off time. Read More¤¤¤

bigthink

The Planetary Society Has a Few Tips for the President Bill Nye, CEO of The Planetary Society, offers an important 5-point plan for President Trump on space exploration and NASA's budget. Read More¤¤¤

blogs.scientificamerican

Good Science Is Usually Good Business When it comes to global business expansion, why not inject some science into the art of the deal? .

blogs.scientificamerican

No Hidden Figures A new film shows how essential female scientists and engineers are to India’s burgeoning space program .

dagensmedicin.dk

Amgros og Janssen afviser at have indgået kritisabel Darzalex-aftale Dansk Hæmatologisk Selskab kritiserer, at Amgros' rabataftale om Daratumumab betinger prisreduktion med at firmaet skal have udleveret forbrugsdata for hver enkelt patient. Men sådan en aftale findes slet ikke, siger Amgros og Darzalex-producenten Jannsen.¤¤¤

dagensmedicin.dk

Kroniske sygdomme presser kommunekasserne Ny rapport fra Region Hovedstaden viser, at de kroniske sygdomme i høj grad belaster kommunernes økonomi. Udgifterne stiger markant, når borgere bliver ramt af flere sygdomme på en gang.¤¤¤

dagensmedicin.dk

Kun 4 ud af 80 databaser får data fra Sundhedsplatformen Koncerndirektørerne i Region Hovedstaden og Region Sjælland advarer nu via et notat, hospitalsdirektioner, databasernes fællessekretariatat (RKKP) og Databasernes fællessekretariat om, at de kliniske kvalitetsdatabaser ikke modtager relevante data fra det nye IT-system Sundhedsplatformen.¤¤¤

dagensmedicin.dk

Lægeforeningen Hovedstaden: Fejlindberetning i Sundhedsplatformen er for tungt Region Hovedstaden har modtaget et brev fra Lægeforeningen Hovedstaden, der efterlyser større gennemsigtighed af, hvordan Sundhedsplatformen håndterer indberettede fejl.¤¤¤

dagensmedicin.dk

Lægemiddelstyrelsen på udkig efter facebookmedarbejder Lægemiddelstyrelsen søger en ny medarbejder til at aflive misforståelser og nuancere debatten om medicinsk behandling på de sociale medier.¤¤¤

dagensmedicin.dk

LVS: Hul i hovedet at indberette manuelt De læger, der arbejder med Sundhedsplatformen, har allerede hænderne fulde. Så hvis de nu også skal til at bruge tid på at indberette data per håndkraft, er der fare for, at det hele vil bryde sammen, advarer formanden for Lægevidenskabelige Selskaber, Henrik Ullum.¤¤¤

dagensmedicin.dk

Regionspolitikere til læger: Fjern jeres tørklæder og kristne kors Det skal være slut med at bære kristne kors, politiske emblemer og muslimske tørklæder som sundhedsansat i Region Syddanmark. I hvert fald hvis det står til Liberal Alliance og Nye Borgerlige. Lægeforeningen: »Det er ikke behov for et forbud, når der ikke er et problem.«¤¤¤

dagensmedicin.dk

Nyt universitetssygehus sendt tilbage til start En ny totalentreprenør skal bygge s Region Sjællands nye Universitetshospital i Køge.¤¤¤

dagensmedicin.dk

Overdragelse af vaccineproduktion fører til lang restordreliste Statens Serum Instituts liste af vacciner i restordre har vokset sig længere end normalt, fordu instituttets vaccinationsproduktion netop er overdraget til anden aktør, forklarer vicedirektør.¤¤¤

dagensmedicin.dk

Robot skal give kol-patienter tryghed Ledende overlæge Ejvind Frausing har fået syv mio. til at udvikle ilt-robot¤¤¤

dagensmedicin.dk

Sektorgrænser skal nedbrydes ved Thisted Sygehus Samarbejde mellem Morsø og Thisted kommuner, almen praksis og andre samarbejdspartnere centralt i nyt forslag.¤¤¤

danablog

Video Games and the Brain: Action, Strategy, and Pac-Man Playing some video games can cause serious harm, while others might improve or restore skills, suggested three panelists at the American Association for the Advancement of Science this week. “Not all games are created equal,” said Chandramallika Basak, a researcher at the University of Texas at Dallas. She and her colleagues study how memory and other skills change across our lifespan; part of th¤¤¤

deals.kinja

Anker's Fitness-Focused Bluetooth Headphones Are $8 Off Today Anker SoundBuds NB10 , $32 with code FHSPSNJG Anker’s SoundBuds are your favorite affordable Bluetooth earbuds , and the most sport-centric model in the lineup is $8 off today . The highlight feature here is the NB10's wraparound design ; once these things are in your ears, they’re not going anywhere until you take them out. They’re also IPX5 water-resistant (an improvement from the original’s IP¤¤¤

deals.kinja

iClever's Surprisingly Excellent Folding Keyboard Is Just $24 Today iClever Folding Keyboard , $24 with code TMTFT97H iClever’s new folding Bluetooth keyboard is the only mobile keyboard I’ve ever actually enjoyed using , and a great investment for anyone that needs to work on an airplane, or just wants to get some typing done at the coffee shop without lugging around a laptop. It’s a bargain at its usual $30, but for a limited time, promo code TMTFT97H will knoc¤¤¤

deals.kinja

Navigate the USB-C Transition With These Affordable Adapters 3-Pack MicroUSB to USB-C Adapter , $7 with code AUKEYCBA | 2-Pack USB 3.0 to USB-C Adapters , $7 with code AUKEYCBA USB-C will be the only cable we ever have to use before too long, but until that day comes, you’ll need some adapters to ease the transition.¤¤¤

deals.kinja

ThinkGeek's Sale Is Practically Out of This World 30-60% off select items Tomorrow is Kim Stanley Robinson’s, author of the award-winning Mars trilogy, 65th birthday , and ThinkGeek is marking down a bunch of stuff from this galaxy and beyond (and a whole lot of other stuff) for up to 60% off . There is tons of merch from all levels of geekery waiting for you. Here are a few cool pieces to pick up with the discount: Radiant Light Mill - Solar Ra¤¤¤

deals.kinja

This $15 Emergency Weather Radio Can Also Recharge Your Phone Esky Solar Hand Crank Radio , $15 with code RZH3GBJQ You never want to be in a situation where you need a solar and hand crank-powered weather radio with a flashlight and USB port for charging your phone, but when you can get one for $15, you probably should buy it just in case. More Deals¤¤¤

deals.kinja

This Boring-Looking Thermostat Includes Most of the Features of a Nest for $75 Honeywell Wi-Fi Thermostat , $75 No, this Honeywell thermostat doesn’t look like a futuristic work of art like a Nest or Ecobee. But that’s easy to forgive when you realize that it still includes Wi-Fi, meaning you can program it from your phone, order it around with your Echo, and even program it with IFTTT recipes for just $75.¤¤¤

deals.kinja

Today's Best Deals: Amazon Levi's Sale, Rubbermaid FreshWorks, Anker SoundBuds, and More Amazon’s one-day Levi’s sale , Crocs shoes (which aren’t all hideous!), and a Rubbermaid FreshWorks container lead off Wednesday’s best deals. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Twelve South HiRise , $17 Twelve South’s HiRise is the most attractive smartphone stand you can buy, and the black model is down to an all-time low $17 today. Just note that¤¤¤

deals.kinja

Today's Best Deals: Folding Keyboard, Emergency Radio, USB-C Adapters A folding Bluetooth keyboard , Amazon’s new protein sample box , and Reebok clearance items lead off Thursday’s best deals. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals iClever Folding Keyboard , $24 with code TMTFT97H iClever’s new folding Bluetooth keyboard is the only mobile keyboard I’ve ever actually enjoyed using , and a great investment for anyone that¤¤¤

deals.kinja

Upgrade Your House With USB Power Receptacles For the Lowest Prices Ever TOPGREENER 15A Receptacle With 4.8A USB Ports , $15 with code 2H7LEAFT | 20A , $16 with code B62UE6DM These days, you probably charge as many things over USB as you do over standard AC outlets, so it only makes sense to add some semi-permanent USB ports to your home. For a limited time TOPGREENER is taking all-time low prices off 15A and 20A receptacles with two USB ports built right in. You’ll n¤¤¤

dr.dk

Klimaekspert: Det er logisk, at vejret bliver voldsommere Jesper Theilgaard fortæller, hvorfor vores klima forandrer sig.¤¤¤

dr.dk

Flyv med på en 3D-rejse henover Mars Tusindvis af Mars-billeder er blevet til fascinerende video af, hvordan en fiktiv flyvetur forbi planeten ser ud.¤¤¤

dr.dk

Influenzakrig: Vi er midt i en lovende vaccine-revolution Men influenzavirusser ændrer sig hele tiden. Derfor har et universelt våben mod influenza endnu lange udsigter.¤¤¤

dr.dk

NASA, ESA, Aarhus: Universitet lancerer eget rumprogram Programmets første mini-satellit, en cubesat med navnet AUSAT-1, skal sendes i kredsløb fra ISS i starten af næste år.¤¤¤

dr.dk

Spionfrugt skal sikre frisk banan og mango Et schweizisk firma har udviklet en sensor på en chip, der skal sikre at frugt ikke fordærves under transport.¤¤¤

dr.dk

Video: Kom helt tæt på planters mikroskopiske bevægelser Østrigske forskere har udviklet et program, der kan spore mikroskopiske ting, mens de bevæger sig.¤¤¤

dr.dk

WikiLeaks-lækagen: Sådan fungerer CIAs værktøjskasse Analyse: Lækkede CIA-dokumenter fortæller om typiske spionværktøjer til brug mod enkeltpersoner og ikke om brud på app-kryptografi.¤¤¤

economist

KAL's cartoon¤¤¤

economist

Business this week¤¤¤

economist

Politics this week¤¤¤

eurekalert

Brief module effective in teaching hemorrhage control basics to staff in a large workplace A medical team has developed a way to effectively provide a large group of people with basic knowledge and skills to locate and use bleeding control equipment to stop life-threatening bleeding in severely injured people.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Accounting for sex differences in biomedical research When it comes to health, a person's sex can play a role. More women in the US have autoimmune diseases than men, for example, whereas boys are more likely to be diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder than girls. Yet biomedical research on disease and possible new treatments often studies only one sex. The cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American C¤¤¤

eurekalert

'Lab-on-a-glove' could bring nerve-agent detection to a wearer's fingertips (video) There's a reason why farmers wear protective gear when applying organophosphate pesticides. The substances are very effective at getting rid of unwanted bugs, but they can also make people sick. Related compounds -- organophosphate nerve agents -- can be used as deadly weapons. Now researchers have developed a fast way to detect the presence of such compounds in the field using a disposable 'lab-o¤¤¤

eurekalert

Plenaries at American Chemical Society meeting focus on energy, materials, partnerships Scientists, in four plenary talks, will explore a variety of subjects related to the 'Advanced Materials, Technologies, Systems & Processes' theme of the 253rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society. The meeting will take place April 2 to 6 in San Francisco.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Sea urchin spines could fix bones More than 2 million procedures every year take place around the world to heal bone fractures and defects from trauma or disease, making bone the second most commonly transplanted tissue after blood. To help improve the outcomes of these surgeries, scientists have developed a new grafting material from sea urchin spines. They report their degradable bone scaffold, which they tested in animals, in t¤¤¤

eurekalert

AMP issues best practice guidelines for next-generation sequencing-based oncology panel validation AMP has published consensus recommendations that will help clinical laboratory professionals achieve high-quality sequencing results and deliver better care for cancer patients¤¤¤

eurekalert

Physician adherence to clinical decision tools suggests potential benefit to PE patients A review paper published in the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) suggests a potential benefit to the use of clinical decision tools in the diagnostic work-up of suspected pulmonary embolism (PE) patients.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Making 'mulch' ado of ant hills Research undertaken by scientists in China reveals that ants are hardworking and beneficial insects. In the activities of their daily lives, ants help increase air, water flow, and organic matter in soil. The work done by ants even forms a type of mulch that helps hold water in the soil.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Promising results obtained with a new electrocatalyst that reduces the need for platinum A group of Aalto University researchers led by professors Tanja Kallio and Kari Laasonen has developed a manufacturing method for electrocatalysts that only uses one hundredth of the amount of platinum generally used in commercial products. The activity achieved using the new material is similar to that of commercial electrocatalysts. The method is based on the special characteristics of carbon na¤¤¤

eurekalert

When people prepare for conflict, dominant leaders take the stage One popular theory holds that dominant leaders are supported by those who fear new situations and threats. However, new research from Aarhus BSS shows that support for dominant leaders is not born of fear, but of a wish to handle the country's problems by aggressive means. The research was recently published in the journal Political Psychology.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Using a smartphone to screen for male infertility Investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital set out to develop a home-based diagnostic test that could be used to measure semen quality using a smartphone-based device. New findings by the team indicating that the smartphone-based semen analyzer can identify abnormal semen samples based on sperm concentration and motility criteria with approximately 98 percent accuracy are published online on Ma¤¤¤

eurekalert

Effective one-shot vaccination of newborns moves closer to reality Newborns are highly vulnerable to infections and don't respond optimally to most vaccines because their young immune systems typically mount weak antibody responses. Now, researchers at Boston Children's Hospital report achieving strong vaccine responses in newborn animals, including monkeys -- the final preclinical model before human trials -- by adding compounds known as adjuvants that boost the¤¤¤

eurekalert

Largest survey to date of patient and family experience at US children's hospitals A survey of more than 17,000 parents of hospitalized children, conducted by the Center of Excellence for Pediatric Quality Measurement at Boston Children's Hospital, gives mixed responses about the quality of the inpatient experience at 69 US children's hospitals.¤¤¤

eurekalert

OTUD6B gene mutations cause intellectual and physical disability An international team of researchers from institutions around the world, including Baylor College of Medicine, has discovered that mutations of the OTUD6B gene result in a spectrum of physical and intellectual deficits.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Scientists assemble Zika virus mosquito genome from scratch A team of scientists has developed a new way to sequence genomes, which can assemble the genome of an organism, entirely from scratch, dramatically cheaper and faster.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Scientists use new technology to assemble genome of Zika virus mosquito A team spanning Baylor College of Medicine, Rice University, Texas Children's Hospital and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard has developed a new way to sequence genomes, which can assemble the genome of an organism, entirely from scratch, dramatically cheaper and faster.¤¤¤

eurekalert

A tale of 2 states Researchers have identified a set of molecular 'flags' that are present on the surface of human stem cells. By recognizing the flags, researchers can now accurately track and investigate stem cells as the cells transition between different states. This approach has revealed new insights into the timing and coordination of the changes in gene activity and modifications to the DNA that occur as cell¤¤¤

eurekalert

Moderate drinking linked to lower risk of some -- but not all -- heart conditions Moderate drinking is associated with a lower risk of several, but not all, cardiovascular diseases, finds a large study of UK adults published by The BMJ today.¤¤¤

eurekalert

New 'budget impact test' an unpopular and flawed attempt to solve a political problem A new 'budget impact test', to be applied by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), is an unpopular and flawed attempt to solve a fundamentally political problem, argue experts in The BMJ today.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Climate change and an 'overlooked' nutrient: Silica Sugar maples may have far greater silica pumping power than expected, and also may be more profoundly affected by climate change as warmer winters damage their vulnerable roots.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Silence is golden -- Suppressing host response to Ebola virus may help to control infection The Ebola virus causes a severe, often fatal illness when it infects the human body. Initially targeting cells of the immune system called macrophages, white blood cells that absorb and clear away pathogens, a new study has found a way to potentially 'silence' these Ebola virus-infected macrophages.The findings, which appear in the Journal of Virology, could lead to new treatment options for Ebola¤¤¤

eurekalert

Study: Pharmacies should proactively offer naloxone to all patients who meet evidence-based criteria Pharmacies should proactively offer naloxone, a drug that blocks or reverses the effects of overdose, to patients taking opioid medications through universal opt-out strategies in an effort to get the life-saving drug into the hands of more people who need it, according to a new study out of Boston Medical Center (BMC).¤¤¤

eurekalert

People afraid of robots much more likely to fear losing their jobs, suffer anxiety 'Technophobes' -- people who fear robots, artificial intelligence and new technology that they don't understand -- are much more likely to be afraid of losing their jobs due to technology and to suffer anxiety-related mental health issues, a Baylor University researcher says.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Researchers create self-sustaining bacteria-fueled power cell Instead of oil, coal, or even solar energy, self-sustaining bacterial fuel cells may power the future.Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have developed the next step in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) with the first micro-scale self-sustaining cell, which generated power for 13 straight days through symbiotic interactions of two types of bacteria.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Researchers discover new type of memory effect in transition metal oxides A new kind of memory effect discovered in two transition metal oxides could carry important repercussions on technology and security. The multi-state nature of the memory effect, whereby more than one piece of information can coexist in the same space, could be harnessed for memory technology. And while deleted computer data can be recovered, at least partially, by talented hackers, the 'erase-upo¤¤¤

eurekalert

Study shows how brain combines subtle sensory signals to take notice New research in eLife explains how the developing brain learns to integrate and react to subtle but simultaneous sensory cues -- sound, touch and visual -- that would be ignored individually.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Weedkiller chemical (glyphosate) safety standards need urgent review Emerging evidence suggests that the safety standards for glyphosate -- a chemical widely used in common weed-killers -- may be failing to protect public and environmental health, suggest experts¤¤¤

eurekalert

Researchers make flexible glass for tiny medical devices Brigham Young University researchers have developed new glass technology that could add a new level of flexibility to the microscopic world of medical devices.Led by electrical engineering professor Aaron Hawkins, the researchers have found a way to make the normally brittle material of glass bend and flex. The research opens up the ability to create a new family of lab-on-a-chip devices based on¤¤¤

eurekalert

Scientists reveal hidden structures in bacterial DNA Researchers at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona, Spain, have described the 3D structure of the genome in the extremely small bacteria Mycoplasma pneumoniae. They discovered previously unknown arrangements of DNA within this tiny bacteria, which are also found in larger cells. Their findings suggest that this type of organisation is a universal feature of living cells.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Argon is not the 'dope' for metallic hydrogen Hydrogen is both the simplest and the most-abundant element in the universe, so studying it can teach scientists about the essence of matter. And yet there are still many hydrogen secrets to unlock, including how best to force it into a superconductive, metallic state with no electrical resistance.¤¤¤

eurekalert

It's a fish eat tree world An international team of scientists analyzed 147 northern lakes and found that many rely on nutrients from tree leaves, pine needles, and other land-grown plants to feed aquatic life. The study, published today in Science Advances, offers the most comprehensive analysis to-date on terrestrial subsidies to lake food webs.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Major new issue of CVIA on imaging Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (CVIA) journal has just published a special issue on Noninvasive Cardiac Imaging with Guest Editor Dr. Christopher Kramer of University of Virginia.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Research evaluates treatment of thyroid disease in pregnancy New research indicates that universal screening for and subsequent treatment of subclinical hypothyroidism does not result in improved health outcomes for mothers or babies. The research was conducted through the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units (MFMU) Network and has been published this month in the New England Journal o¤¤¤

eurekalert

Nature conservation as a bridge to peace in the Middle East Loss of biodiversity is a major challenge in today's world as is the quest for peace in regions engaged in conflict. But scientists writing in a Review published March 22 in Trends in Ecology & Evolution say that efforts to conserve natural resources present an opportunity to find common ground between communities at odds, building trust and renewed hope for peace.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Peptide targeting senescent cells restores stamina, fur, and kidney function in old mice Regular infusions of a peptide that can selectively seek out and destroy broken-down cells that hamper proper tissue renewal, called senescent cells, showed evidence of improving healthspan in naturally aged mice and mice genetically engineered to rapidly age. The proof-of-concept study, published March 23 in Cell, found that an anti-senescent cell therapy could reverse age-related loss of fur, po¤¤¤

eurekalert

'Spectacular-looking' endangered frog species discovered in Ecuador's cloud forests It's not every day someone gets to say, 'I've discovered a new species.' It's a claim that Colorado State University biologist Chris Funk can happily make. Funk and collaborators, who've spent years exploring the tropical climes of South America to study the region's dizzying biodiversity, have documented a new species of rainfrog they've named the Ecuadorian rainfrog (Pristimantis ecuadorensis).¤¤¤

eurekalert

Income should be the dominant factor for reforming health care says the American public A new study on reforming US healthcare showed that Americans believe a health insurance policy should be about 5 percent of household income to be affordable. They also feel that younger people could pay somewhat more for health insurance and that healthier people could afford to pay more than those in poor health. The current health reform proposal forwarded by speaker Paul Ryan offers a fixed ta¤¤¤

eurekalert

3-D bioprinted human cartilage cells can be implanted Swedish researchers at Chalmers University of Technology and Sahlgrenska Academy have successfully induced human cartilage cells to live and grow in an animal model, using 3-D bioprinting. The results will move development closer to a potential future in which it will be possible to help patients by giving them new body parts through 3-D bioprinting.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Ultrafast measurements explain quantum dot voltage drop Solar cells and photodetectors could soon be made from new types of materials based on semiconductor quantum dots, thanks to new insights based on ultrafast measurements capturing real-time photoconversion processes.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Cryo-electron microscopy achieves unprecedented resolution using new computational methods Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM)--which enables the visualization of viruses, proteins, and other biological structures at the molecular level--is a critical tool used to advance biochemical knowledge. Now Berkeley Lab researchers have extended cryo-EM's impact further by developing a new computational algorithm instrumental in constructing a 3-D atomic-scale model of bacteriophage P22 for the f¤¤¤

eurekalert

New study maps space dust in 3-D A new Berkeley Lab-led study provides detailed 3-D views of space dust in the Milky Way, which could help us understand the properties of this dust and how it affects views of distant objects.¤¤¤

eurekalert

3-D printing turns nanomachines into life-size workers Dartmouth researchers unlock the key to transforming microscopic nanorings into smart materials that perform work at human-scale.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Age at immigration influences occupational skill development Future occupations of US immigrant children are influenced by how similar their native language is to English, according to a new study from scholars at Duke University and the US Naval Postgraduate School. 'The more difficult it is for the child to learn English, the more likely they will invest in math/logic and physical skills over communications skills,' said co-author Marcos Rangel, assistant¤¤¤

eurekalert

Connected dolls and tell-tale teddy bears: Why we need to manage the Internet of Toys Action is needed to monitor and control the emerging Internet of Toys, concludes a new report by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre. Privacy and security are highlighted as main areas of concern.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Brain scans may help clinicians choose talk therapy or medication treatment for depression Researchers have found that specific patterns of activity on brain scans may help clinicians identify whether psychotherapy or antidepressant medication is more likely to help individual patients recover from depression.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Hubble detects supermassive black hole kicked out of galactic core An international team of astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have uncovered a supermassive black hole that has been propelled out of the centre of the distant galaxy 3C186. The black hole was most likely ejected by the power of gravitational waves. This is the first time that astronomers found a supermassive black hole at such a large distance from its host galaxy center.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Cracking the code of Huntington's disease Huntington's disease is caused by a gene mutation that causes a protein to build up in the brain. In a world first, EPFL scientists have synthesized and studied modified forms of a mutant part of the protein, deepening our understanding of how it contributes to the disease, and pointing to new therapeutic strategies for treating it.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Fighting malaria through metabolism EPFL scientists have fully modeled the metabolism of the deadliest malaria parasite. The model offers unprecedented tools for developing a new generation of antimalarial therapies to overcome drug resistance.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Cardiac lead extractions safer in high volume centers Cardiac lead extraction is safer in high volume centers, according to the largest study of contemporary practice in Europe published today in European Heart Journal. Extraction in a low volume center was associated with a doubled risk of death while in hospital.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Salmon with side effects Tasty, versatile, and rich in essential omega-3 fatty acids: salmon is one of the most popular edible fish of all. Shops sell fish caught in the wild, but their main produce is salmon from breeding farms which can pollute rivers, lakes and oceans. Just how big is the problem? German and Chilean scientists warning that dissolved organic compounds are placing huge strain on ecosystems and are changi¤¤¤

eurekalert

A stem's 'sense of self' contributes to shape It is well known that as plants grow, their stems and shoots respond to outside signals like light and gravity. But if plants all have similar stimuli, why are there so many different plant shapes? Using simple mathematical ideas, researchers from the Harvard SEAS constructed a framework that explains and quantifies the different shapes of plant stems.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Laser activated gold pyramids could deliver drugs, DNA into cells without harm The ability to deliver cargo like drugs or DNA into cells is essential for biological research and disease therapy but cell membranes are very good at defending their territory. Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a new method using gold microstructures to deliver a variety of molecules into cells with high efficiency and no¤¤¤

eurekalert

Male hormone plays key role in ovarian development Scientists have discovered that the male 'androgen' hormone is an important element in the ovarian development of female chicken embryos, more so than in the development of male testes.¤¤¤

eurekalert

After the epigenome: The epitranscriptome Today, an article published in Cancer Discovery by Manel Esteller explains that RNA also has its own spelling and grammar, just like DNA. These 'epigenetics of RNA' are called epitranscriptome.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Fledgling stars try to prevent their neighbors from birthing planets Stars don't have to be massive to evaporate material from around nearby stars and affect their ability to form planets, a new study suggests.¤¤¤

eurekalert

New portal to unveil the dark sector of the universe IBS scientists theorize a new portal to peek into the dark world.¤¤¤

eurekalert

High-risk medical devices: IQWiG sees no potential in 6 of 8 cases Only case series without informative value are available for most indications. A plausible mode of action is insufficient to attribute a potential.¤¤¤

eurekalert

MRI-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy for uterine fibroids has potential IQWiG has attributed a potential for a benefit to a new treatment method according to §137e SGB V. A testing study has been initiated. Numerous other assessments had no consequences.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Tonsillotomy: Fewer adverse effects at first, but renewed inflammation/surgery possible In the short term, tonsillotomy is associated with less pain, as well as fewer swallowing and sleeping problems, than tonsillectomy. But regrowing tissue can lead to renewed inflammation.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Scientists evade the Heisenberg uncertainty principle ICFO Researchers report the discovery of a new technique that could drastically improve the sensitivity of instruments such as magnetic resonance imagers (MRIs) and atomic clocks. The study, published in Nature, reports a technique to bypass the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This technique hides quantum uncertainty in atomic features not seen by the instrument, allowing the scientists to make¤¤¤

eurekalert

Beijing severe haze more frequent under global warming A new study projects a substantial increase in the frequency and persistence of conducive weather conditions to Beijing severe haze in response to climate change.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Stress may protect -- at least in bacteria Antibiotics harm bacteria and stress them. Trimethoprim, an antibiotic, inhibits the growth of the bacterium Escherichia coli and induces a stress response. This response also protects the bacterium from subsequent deadly damage from acid. Antibiotics can therefore increase the survival chances of bacteria under certain conditions. This is shown in a study by researchers at IST Austria (Karin Mito¤¤¤

eurekalert

When green means stop Optogenetics has revolutionized how researchers investigate cellular behavior and the function of large and interconnected tissues such as the brain. This successful combination of optics and genetics is powered by light-sensitive proteins, many of which have been engineered to bind to each other upon light stimulation. Scientists at IST Austria now expanded the optogenetic protein toolbox. They e¤¤¤

eurekalert

Exercising 2.5 hours per week associated with slower declines in Parkinson's disease patients Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive condition that often results in mobility impairments and can lead to decreased health-related quality of life (HRQL) and death. There is evidence that physical activity can delay decline in PD patients. In a study in the Journal of Parkinson's disease, researchers determined that that people who exercised regularly had significantly slower declines in HRQL¤¤¤

eurekalert

Insulin resistance may lead to faster cognitive decline A new Tel Aviv University study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease finds that insulin resistance, caused in part by obesity and physical inactivity, is also linked to a more rapid decline in cognitive performance. According to the research, both diabetic and non-diabetic subjects with insulin resistance experienced accelerated cognitive decline in executive function and memory.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Study compares hospice care in nursing homes, assisted living facilities and patient homes A new study from the Indiana University Center for Aging Research and the Regenstrief Institute has found only minimal differences in the intensity of hospice services provided in nursing homes as compared to hospice services provided to patients in assisted living facilities or their homes. However the mix of services did vary by site type.¤¤¤

eurekalert

NSF-funded IUPUI study of non-rainfall water in Namib Desert reveals unexpected origins In a study conducted in one of the world's oldest and most biologically diverse deserts, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis scientists explore the origins of water other than rainfall and are identifying multiple origins. The study, supported by the National Science Foundation, is the first to report that the ocean is not the sole source of life-sustaining fog and dew for numerous p¤¤¤

eurekalert

Novel gene therapy experiment offers hope for people with certain hearing loss and dizziness disorder In a first-of-its-kind study published in the March 1, 2017 edition of Molecular Therapy, researchers from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine showed that gene therapy was able to restore balance and hearing in genetically modified mice that mimic Usher Syndrome, a genetic condition in humans characterized by¤¤¤

eurekalert

New study finds that most cancer mutations are due to random DNA copying 'mistakes' Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientists report data from a new study providing evidence that random, unpredictable DNA copying 'mistakes' account for nearly two-thirds of the mutations that cause cancer. Their research is grounded on a novel mathematical model based on DNA sequencing and epidemiologic data from around the world.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Loss of spouse or partner to suicide linked to physical, mental disorders People who lose a partner to suicide are at increased risk for a number of mental and physical disorders, including cancer, depression, herniated discs and mood disorders than those in the general population, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Most dengue infections transmitted in and around home Transmission of the mosquito-borne dengue virus appears to be largely driven by infections centered in and around the home, with the majority of cases related to one another occurring in people who live less than 200 meters apart, new research led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the University of Florida suggests.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Costly curves? Overweight consumers spend more when reminded of thinness Popular media mirror Western culture's fixation with being thin. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, even subtle reminders of idealized bodies can encourage overweight consumers to overspend.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Charitable giving: How do power and beliefs about equality impact donations? Are powerful, well-to-do people more charitable? It depends. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, wealthier people are more likely to donate to charity if they endorse social inequality while less wealthy people are more likely to make donations if they endorse greater equality.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Feeling out of control: Do consumers make practical purchases or luxury buys? The common assumption about retail therapy is that it's all about indulging in things like pricey designer duds or the latest gadgets. But according to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers are actually more likely to make practical purchases than splurge on luxury items when they feel less in control.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Lack of leisure: Is busyness the new status symbol? Long gone are the days when a life of material excess and endless leisure time signified prestige. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, Americans increasingly perceive busy and overworked people as having high status.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Paying for pain: What motivates tough mudders and other weekend warriors? Why do people pay for experiences deliberately marketed as painful? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers will pay big money for extraordinary -- even painful -- experiences to offset the physical malaise resulting from today's sedentary lifestyles.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Surveiling the consumer for loyalty and profit Surveillance may be a dirty word when it comes to domestic politics, but understanding what interests the consumer and how technology may provide insights is a legitimate concern of retailers. Exactly which technologies yield the appropriate balance of potential profits and privacy can be a confounding dilemma. Marketing Professors J. Jeffrey Inman and Hristina Nikolova reviewed recent retail tech¤¤¤

eurekalert

Alzheimer's disease linked to the metabolism of unsaturated fats, new research finds A new study published in PLOS Medicine's Special Issue on Dementia has found that the metabolism of omega-3 and omega-6 unsaturated fatty acids in the brain are associated with the progression of Alzheimer's disease.¤¤¤

eurekalert

New tools to study the origin of embryonic stem cells Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have identified cell surface markers specific for the very earliest stem cells in the human embryo. These cells are thought to possess great potential for replacing damaged tissue but until now have been difficult to distinguish from classical embryonic stem cells. The study is published in the prestigious journal Cell Stem Cell.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Less is more: New moms need workout programs that are less structured, more flexible Often running on empty, new moms may need a bit more flexibility and support to ease back into exercise after giving birth, according to a Kansas State University researcher.Emily Mailey, assistant professor in kinesiology, said when a mom has survived the first several weeks of having a new baby and is ready to start adding exercise -- and all of its benefits -- back into her life, a more flexibl¤¤¤

eurekalert

Discovery of a novel chromosome segregation mechanism during cell division When cells divide, chromosomes need to be evenly segregated. This equal distribution is important to accurately pass genetic information to the next generation. Abnormal segregation can cause cell death or diseases like Down syndrome and cancer. Filamentous spindle fibers must bind to the chromosome centromere to divide equally. For the spindle fiber to be correctly joined, the chromosome must hav¤¤¤

eurekalert

Membrane lipids hop in and out of rafts in the blink of an eye New fluorescent lipids demonstrate how specialized regions in the cell membrane function.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Visualizing nuclear radiation Extraordinary decontamination efforts are underway in areas affected by the 2011 nuclear accidents in Japan. The creation of total radioactivity maps is essential for thorough cleanup, but the most common methods do not 'see' enough ground-level radiation.¤¤¤

eurekalert

New understanding of chronic lung inflammatory diseases unfolding Researchers studying chronic inflammation that can lead to the development of lung diseases such as asthma, pulmonary fibrosis, and cancer, are focusing on the role cytokines play in regulating the behavior of fibroblast cells and the extracellular matrix.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Safety of autologous Schwann cell transplantation demonstrated following SCI A Phase I clinical trial that targeted individuals with new onset paraplegia to evaluate the safety of transplanting their own potentially neuroprotective Schwann cells into a trauma-induced spinal cord lesion showed no evidence of adverse effects after 1 year.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Spreading rumors on Twitter and mistaking retweets for truth A new study of the believability of information received via Twitter and the intention to pass on a tweet -- whether news or rumor -- is influenced by the number of times the information has already been retweeted.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Are arm measurements better than BMI to assess nutrition status in child cancer survivors? Arm anthropometry is a simple method to determine if a person is overweight or obese, and because it can distinguish between fat and muscle mass, unlike body mass index (BMI), it is a valuable method for assessing muscle loss in long-term survivors of childhood cancer.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Brain 'rewires' itself to enhance other senses in blind people The brains of those who are born blind make new connections in the absence of visual information, resulting in enhanced, compensatory abilities such as a heightened sense of hearing, smell and touch, as well as cognitive functions (such as memory and language) according to a new study led by Massachusetts Eye and Ear researchers.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Mass. General team identifies mechanisms behind resistance to FGFR inhibitor drug Investigators at the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center have identified the first genetic mechanisms conferring acquired resistance to a promising group of targeted cancer drugs.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Method speeds testing of new networking protocols At the Usenix Symposium on Networked Systems Design and Implementation later this month, researchers from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory will present a system for testing new traffic management protocols that requires no alteration to network hardware but still works at realistic speeds -- 20 times as fast as networks of software-controlled routers.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Printable device points toward sensor-laden robot skin In this age of smartphones and tablet computers, touch-sensitive surfaces are everywhere. They're also brittle, as people with cracked phone screens everywhere can attest. Covering a robot -- or an airplane or a bridge -- with sensors will require a technology that is both flexible and cost-effective to manufacture in bulk. A team of researchers at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligenc¤¤¤

eurekalert

Protecting web users' privacy MIT researchers have developed a new system that uses function secret sharing to disguise database queries during web-service transactions. The system could prevent price gouging and unwanted user profiling.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Scientists identify brain circuit that drives pleasure-inducing behavior MIT neuroscientists have discovered a brain circuit that responds to rewarding events. Scientists have long believed that the central amygdala, a structure located deep within the brain, is linked with fear and responses to unpleasant events, but the new study finds that most of the neurons here are involved in the reward circuit.¤¤¤

eurekalert

AAOS 2017: Why some ACL surgeries fail Typically, orthopaedic surgeons can get athletes back to their sport with ACL reconstruction surgery. But what happens when the reconstruction surgery isn't successful?¤¤¤

eurekalert

A new approach to target an 'undruggable' prostate cancer driver When small-molecule inhibitors proved elusive, researchers developed a novel strategy: Using large molecule peptides to target a common prostate cancer driver. It may provide a path for developing new therapies against a challenging target.¤¤¤

eurekalert

After a clinical trial on Midazolam for seizures, emergency use of the drug rises A new study investigated if previous research on midazolam's efficacy as a seizure treatment affected whether ambulances nationwide were choosing the drug over other benzodiazepines for seizure patients.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Encouraging results for patients with aggressive brain cancer Patients diagnosed with a glioblastoma, and who undergo current standard treatment, have a median survival of 16 months. Based on recent information on the mechanisms of chemotherapy, a team of researchers developed a new clinical approach overcome treatment resistance that increased the median survival to 22 months -- bringing much needed hope to those affected by this aggressive disease.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Researchers use light to remotely control curvature of plastics Researchers have developed a technique that uses light to get flat, plastic sheets to curve into spheres, tubes or bowls.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Facial recognition software help diagnose rare genetic disease Researchers with NHGRI and their collaborators have successfully used facial recognition software to diagnose DiGeorge Syndrome, a rare, genetic disease in Africans, Asians and Latin Americans. This is the newest addition to the Atlas of Human Malformations in Diverse Populations launched last year. The study was published March 23, 2017, in the American Journal of Medical Genetics.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Scientists discover urinary biomarker that may help track ALS A study in Neurology suggests that analyzing levels of the protein p75ECD in urine samples from people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) may help monitor disease progression as well as determine the effectiveness of therapies. The study was supported by National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), both part¤¤¤

eurekalert

Milky Way-like galaxies in early universe embedded in 'super halos' Using ALMA, astronomers have directly observed a pair of Milky Way-like galaxies seen when the universe was only eight percent of its current age. These progenitors of today's giant spiral galaxies are surrounded by 'super halos' of hydrogen gas that extend many tens-of-thousands of light-years beyond their dusty, star-filled disks.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Gravitational wave kicks monster black hole out of galactic core Astronomers have uncovered a supermassive black hole that has been propelled out of the center of a distant galaxy by what could be the awesome power of gravitational waves.¤¤¤

eurekalert

NASA examines Peru's deadly rainfall The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM constellation of satellites provide data on precipitation rates and totals. Recently the GPM core observatory measured the heavy rainfall that caused extensive flooding and loss of life in Peru.¤¤¤

eurekalert

NASA sees formation of Tropical Cyclone Caleb near Cocos Island Shortly after Tropical Cyclone Caleb formed east of Cocos Island, NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite and NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead gathering visible and infrared data on the twelfth tropical cyclone of the Southern Indian Ocean season.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Sea ice extent sinks to record lows at both poles The Arctic sea ice maximum extent and Antarctic minimum extent are both record lows this year. Combined, sea ice numbers are at their lowest point since satellites began to continuously measure sea ice in 1979.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Lack of staffing, funds prevent marine protected areas from realizing full potential Marine protected areas (MPAs) are an increasingly popular strategy for protecting marine biodiversity, but a new global study demonstrates that widespread lack of personnel and funds are preventing MPAs from reaching their full potential. Only 9 percent of MPAs reported having adequate staff.The findings are published in the journal Nature on March 22.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Scientists identify a new way gut bacteria break down complex sugars New light has been shed on the functioning of human gut bacteria which could help to develop medicines in the future to improve health and well-being.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Asian-American students have strong academic support -- but is it too much? Despite having the strongest academic support from parents, teachers, and friends, second-generation Asian-American adolescents benefit much less from these supports than others, finds a study by NYU's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Cooking family meals, skipping TV during those meals linked to lower odds of obesity Adults who don't flip on the TV during dinner and those who eat home-cooked meals are less likely to be obese, a new study has found. But the frequency of family meals doesn't appear to make much of a difference.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Study: Oregon high schools lacking 'best practices' for athletic emergencies A survey of Oregon high school athletic directors on their school's preparedness for a catastrophic injury or health event found that only 11 percent of those responding had implemented three primary 'best-practice' recommendations for treating their student-athletes.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Huns and settlers may have cooperated on the frontier of Roman Empire Analysis of isotopes in bones and teeth from fifth-century cemeteries suggests that nomadic Huns and Pannonian settlers on the frontier of Roman Empire may have intermixed, according to a study published March 22, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Susanne Hakenbeck from University of Cambridge, United Kingdom, and colleagues.¤¤¤

eurekalert

The Cerberus Groundsnake is a Critically Endangered new species from Ecuador The snake fauna of Central and South America seems largely under-researched, since as many as thirty-three species of a single genus have been discovered in the last ten years only. Recently, a team of scientists have studied the hereditary molecular differences in this genus and described three new colubrid species in the open access journal ZooKeys. Among the new reptiles, there is a species whi¤¤¤

eurekalert

Biopesticide could defeat insecticide resistance in bedbugs A fungal biopesticide that shows promise for the control of bed bugs is highly effective even against bed-bug populations that are insecticide resistant, according to research conducted by scientists at Penn State and North Carolina State universities.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Penn State develops first-of-a-kind model to research post-malaria epilepsy A first-of-its-kind mouse model could lead to an understanding of how cerebral malaria infection leads to the development of epilepsy in children, and to the prevention of seizures. The model -- a way for researchers to simulate the effects of malaria in children by using mice -- was developed in a collaboration between researchers at Penn State's colleges of medicine, engineering, science and agr¤¤¤

eurekalert

Portland State U research shows some viruses can infect even after major mutations Portland State University researchers have found that only about half the genes in a specific virus affecting single cell organisms is needed to infect a host. This means the virus can undergo major mutations without losing its ability to survive and infect. The research shows how resilient and stable viruses can be. It also gives new insights into the structure of HIV and other viruses, how they¤¤¤

eurekalert

Olfactory receptors: New molecular targets detected in colorectal cancer cells Growth of colorectal cancer cells can be inhibited with the odorant troenan. This is reported by the research team headed by Professor Dr. Hanns Hatt and Dr. Lea Weber from Ruhr-Universität Bochum in the journal PLOS ONE. The researchers detected the olfactory receptor OR51B4 in tumor cells taken from the rectum and colon cancer cell lines. They analyzed which odorant activates the receptor and in¤¤¤

eurekalert

Diametric brain circuits switch feeding and drinking behaviors on and off in mice RIKEN-MIT scientists show that two opposing pathways within the amygdala, an important memory center, act to promote and suppress appetitive behaviors and also drive responses to fear-inducing stimuli.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Metabolites of Resveratrol (Longevinex) pass through blood-ocular barriers in humans On the heels of a study published last year that showed the red wine molecule resveratrol and its metabolites are found in human cerebrospinal fluid and therefore penetrate the blood-brain barrier, for the first time metabolites of the red wine molecule resveratrol have been detected in ocular tissues of humans as well. [Neurology Oct 2015; Journal Ophthalmology March 20, 2017]¤¤¤

eurekalert

Artificial photosynthesis steps into the light Rice University leads a project to create an efficient, simple-to-manufacture oxygen-evolution catalyst that pairs well with semiconductors for advanced solar cells. The technique could lead to unique catalysts for other applications.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Freestanding emergency departments in Texas deliver costly care, 'sticker shock' The rapid growth of freestanding emergency departments in Texas has been accompanied by an equal increase in use at relatively high prices that lead to sizable out-of-pocket costs to patients, according to new research by experts at Rice University, Baylor College of Medicine, the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, the Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center and Blue Cross and Blue¤¤¤

eurekalert

New study resolves the structure of the human protein that causes cystic fibrosis In order to better understand how genetic mutations give rise to cystic fibrosis, researchers need to map the protein responsible for the disorder. The new structure has led to new insights on how this molecular channel functions.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Study suggests new way to prevent vision loss in diabetics and premature babies Researchers at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, part of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, have identified a new molecule that induces the formation of abnormal blood vessels in the eyes of diabetic mice. The study, 'Secretogranin III as a disease-associated ligand for antiangiogenic therapy of diabetic retinopathy,' which will be published March 22 in The Journal of Experimental Medic¤¤¤

eurekalert

Rice U. refines filters for greener natural gas Rice University scientists map out the best materials for either carbon dioxide capture or balancing carbon capture with methane selectivity.¤¤¤

eurekalert

JNeurosci: Highlights from the March 22 issue Check out these newsworthy studies from the March 22, 2017, issue of JNeurosci. Media interested in obtaining the full text of the studies should contact media@sfn.org.¤¤¤

eurekalert

A 'carbon law' offers pathway to halve emissions every decade, say researchers On the eve of Earth Hour, researchers propose a solution in the journal Science for the global economy to rapidly reduce carbon emissions. The authors argue a carbon roadmap, driven by a simple rule of thumb or 'carbon law' of halving emissions every decade, could catalyze disruptive innovation. They observe that for a decade the energy sector has been doubling renewable capacity every five-six ye¤¤¤

eurekalert

Optical tool monitors brain's circulatory response to pain A study reported today in the journal Neurophotonics demonstrates that an optical imaging tool used to monitor regional blood flow and tissue oxygenation may be used to track the brain's response to acute pain in infants, children, and adults. The journal is published by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Hospital or home? Guidelines to assess older people who have fallen Guidelines to help paramedics make the right decision for older people who have fallen are safe, cost-effective and help reduce further 999 calls, according to new research led by a team at Swansea University Medical School.¤¤¤

eurekalert

New Stanford study calls for US solar policy reform Stanford researchers suggest reforming US solar policies and encourage closer collaboration between the United States and China on solar energy in a new report.¤¤¤

eurekalert

New tools to spy on raiding baboons in suburbs of Cape Town, South Africa Scientists from Swansea University's (Wales, UK) College of Science are part of an international team attempting to better understand the human-baboon conflict in Cape Town, South Africa.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Words and experience matter to surrogates making end-of-life decisions Words and experience matter to surrogates making end-of-life decisions.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Under the Dead Sea, warnings of dire drought Nearly 1,000 feet below the bed of the Dead Sea, scientists have found evidence that during past warm periods, the Mideast has suffered drought on scales never recorded by humans -- a possible warning for current times. Thick layers of crystalline salt show that rainfall plummeted to as little as a fifth of modern levels some 120,000 years ago, and again about 10,000 years ago.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Endocrine Society experts issue Clinical Practice Guideline on hypothalamic amenorrhea Female athletes and women who have eating disorders are prone to developing a condition called hypothalamic amenorrhea that causes them to stop menstruating. The Endocrine Society today issued a Clinical Practice Guideline advising healthcare providers on ways to diagnose and treat this condition.¤¤¤

eurekalert

New study shows circular RNA can encode for proteins Scientists have discovered a protein-encoding function for circular RNA, a form of RNA until now considered non-coding. This kind of RNA molecule is highly active in brain cells. By identifying the function of circRNAs, the research helps advance our understanding of molecular biology, and can be helpful in understanding aging or neuro-degenerative diseases.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Isotopic makeup of atmospheric sulfate and nitrate Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology and Université Grenoble Alpes, CNRS have conducted research in Antarctica to elucidate the chemical pathways that contribute to the formation of atmospheric sulfate and nitrate. They were able to identify seasonal changes in Δ17O values of sulfate and nitrate, and confirm that these are due not to variations in Δ17O values of the precursor ozone but to c¤¤¤

eurekalert

How does spousal suicide affect bereaved spouse mentally, physically? People bereaved by the suicide of a spouse were at increased risk for mental and physical disorders, suicidal behavior, death and adverse social events, according to a nationwide study based on registry data conducted in Denmark and published online by JAMA Psychiatry.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Many youths with diabetes not being screened as recommended for diabetic retinopathy Many youths with type 1 and 2 diabetes are not receiving eye examinations as recommended to monitor for diabetic retinopathy, according to a study published online by JAMA Ophthalmology.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Study examines birth outcomes for adolescent & young adult cancer survivors A new article published online by JAMA Oncology from Hazel B. Nichols, Ph.D., Chelsea Anderson, M.P.H., and coauthors at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill used a data linkage between the North Carolina Central Cancer Registry and state birth certificate files to examine selected birth outcomes. The study included 2,598 births to female adolescent and young adult cancer survivors and¤¤¤

eurekalert

Use of mobile app reduces number of in-person follow-up visits after surgery Patients who underwent ambulatory breast reconstruction and used a mobile app for follow-up care had fewer in-person visits during the first 30 days after the operation without affecting complication rates or measures of patient-reported satisfaction, according to a study published online by JAMA Surgery.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Spiritual retreats change feel-good chemical systems in the brain More Americans than ever are turning to spiritual, meditative and religious retreats as a way to reset their daily life and enhance well-being. Now, researchers at The Marcus Institute of Integrative Health at Thomas Jefferson University show there are changes in the dopamine and serotonin systems in the brains of retreat participants. The team published their results in Religion, Brain & Behavior¤¤¤

eurekalert

Virtual environment education reduces anxiety prior to radiation therapy Radiation therapists and physicians know that education can reduce anxiety before radiation treatment but lack a standardized tool. In an effort to solve this problem, a multidisciplinary team from Jefferson College of Health Professions and Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Thomas Jefferson University conducted a pilot study to see if a virtual environment education program could reduce some of the¤¤¤

eurekalert

The Lancet Respiratory Medicine: Global rise of multidrug resistant tuberculosis threatens to derail decades of progress The rise of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) threatens to derail decades of progress in controlling the disease, according to a new report in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine published on World TB day, March 24.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Epigenetic alteration a promising new drug target for heroin use disorder Heroin use is associated with excessive histone acetylation, an epigenetic process that regulates gene expression, and more years of drug use correlate with higher levels of hyperacetylation, according to research conducted at The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published in the journal Biological Psychiatry.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Team of scientists demonstrate path for tackling rare cancers with no effective treatment Study results indicate importance of treatment based on genetic mutation rather than location of origin.¤¤¤

eurekalert

New low-cost method to produce light-based lab-on-a-chip devices for fast medical tests A new fabrication process could make it easier and less expensive to incorporate optical sensing onto lab-on-a-chip devices. These devices integrate laboratory functions onto a plastic or glass 'chip' typically no more than a few square centimeters in size, allowing automated testing in the doctor's office or various types of chemical or biological analysis with portable instruments.¤¤¤

eurekalert

ATP hydrolysis energy explained through large-scale hybrid quantum/classical simulations Researchers have succeeded in unveiling the microscopic mechanism of AHE release in water.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Diabetes damages small coronary blood vessels and thus increases the risk of heart attacks Diabetics have a significantly higher risk of suffering a heart attack. A research team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now identified one of the causes: Diabetes is associated with the loss of small blood vessels around the heart. This in turn affects the entire cardiac muscle. A genetic therapy that promotes the growth of blood vessels may offer a remedy.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Designer proteins fold DNA Florian Praetorius and Professor Hendrik Dietz of the Technical University of Munich have developed a new method that can be used to construct custom hybrid structures using DNA and proteins. The method opens new opportunities for fundamental research in cell biology and for applications in biotechnology and medicine.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Quadruped robot exhibits spontaneous changes in step with speed A research group has demonstrated that by changing only its parameter related to speed, a quadruped robot can spontaneously change its steps.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Research consortium develops evidence-based diagnostic model for mental illness Researchers haves has developed a new, evidence-based alternative to the mental health field's long-established diagnostic tools for the classification, treatment, and research of mental disorders. The Hierarchical Taxonomy of Psychopathology (HiTOP) addresses what the authors say are limitations to the reliability and validity of traditional models.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Streamlined analysis could help people better manage their emotions The strategies people use to manage their emotions fall into three core groupings, according to newly published research from the University at Buffalo. Since a lot of psychopathology is related to difficulty in regulating emotions, the findings may benefit researchers and clinicians trying to better understand and treat a range of psychological disorders, everything from anxiety to substance abus¤¤¤

eurekalert

Livestock grazing effects on sage-grouse Effects of livestock grazing on greater sage-grouse populations can be positive or negative depending on the amount of grazing and when grazing occurs, according to research published today in Ecological Applications.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Shape of inner ear helps predict hearing loss for children with rare disorder It may be possible to predict the severity of hearing loss for children diagnosed with enlarged vestibular aqueduct, according to a new study published in JAMA-Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery. This retrospective chart review, authored by physicians and researchers within the University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children's Enlarged Vestibular Aqueduct (EVA) Research Project, is one of the first¤¤¤

eurekalert

Preterm births more common in mothers who are cancer survivors In a study published in the journal JAMA Oncology, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers report that women diagnosed and treated for cancer during their childbearing years more commonly gave birth prematurely, and to babies whose weights were below normal. Cancer survivors also had a slightly higher rate of cesarean section deliveries.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Possible new target for treatment of multiple sclerosis found by U of A researchers In the relentless battle against multiple sclerosis (MS), U of A researchers recently discovered an entirely new cellular mechanism -- an underlying defect in brain cells -- that may to be blame for the disease, and a potential hallmark that may be a target for future treatment.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Sleep deprivation impairs ability to interpret facial expressions When you're tired, your ability to interpret subtle expressions of happiness and sadness can begin to deteriorate, researchers found. However, the ability to read more primitive survival-based emotions, like anger and fear, remains intact.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Dairy farmers should rethink a cow's curfew, says UBC researchers Dairy cows housed indoors want to break curfew and roam free, suggests new research from the University of British Columbia, published today in Scientific Reports.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Inactive teens develop lazy bones, study finds Inactive teens have weaker bones than those who are physically active, according to a new study.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Egyptian ritual images from the Neolithic period Egyptologists at the University of Bonn discovered rock art from the 4th millennium BC during an excavation at a necropolis near Aswan in Egypt. The paintings were engraved into the rock in the form of small dots and depict hunting scenes like those found in shamanic depictions. They may represent a link between the Neolithic period and Ancient Egyptian culture.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Major breakthrough in the manufacture of red blood cells Researchers have generated the first immortalized cell lines which allow more efficient manufacture of red blood cells.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Astronomers observe early stages of Milky Way-like galaxies in distant universe For decades, astronomers have found distant galaxies by detecting the characteristic way their gas absorbs light from a bright quasar in the background. But efforts to observe the light emitted by these same galaxies have mostly been unsuccessful. Now, a team of astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) in Chile has observed emissions from two distant galaxies initially detected¤¤¤

eurekalert

UC researchers help map future of precision medicine in Parkinson's disease Two landmark publications with co-authors from the University of Cincinnati Gardner Neuroscience Institute outline a transformative approach to defining, studying and treating Parkinson's disease. Rather than approaching Parkinson's disease as a single entity, the international cadre of researchers advocates targeting therapies to distinct 'nodes or clusters' of patients based on specific symptoms¤¤¤

eurekalert

How chewing like a cow helped early mammals thrive In a paper published March 21, 2017, in Scientific Reports, David Grossnickle, a graduate student in the Committee on Evolutionary Biology at the University of Chicago, proposes that mammal teeth, jaw bones and muscles evolved to produce side-to-side motions of the jaw, or yaw, that allowed our earliest ancestors to grind food with their molars and eat a more diversified diet.¤¤¤

eurekalert

New study shakes the roots of the dinosaur family tree More than a century of theory about the evolutionary history of dinosaurs has been turned on its head following the publication of new research from scientists at the University of Cambridge and Natural History Museum in London. Their work suggests that the family groupings need to be rearranged, redefined and renamed and also that dinosaurs may have originated in the northern hemisphere rather th¤¤¤

eurekalert

Study identifies brain cells involved in Pavlovian response A UCLA study has traced the Pavlovian response to a small cluster of brain cells -- the same neurons that go awry during Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease and Tourette's syndrome. The research could one day help neuroscientists find new approaches to diagnosing and treating these disorders.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Strong interaction between herbivores and plants A research project conducted at the University of Cologne's Zoological Institute reveals important findings on the interaction between nutrient availability and the diversity of consumer species in freshwater environments. A better understanding of this interaction will contribute to developing possibilities to maintain biodiversity in all kinds of ecosystems.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Surprising new role for lungs: Making blood Using video microscopy in the living mouse lung, UC San Francisco scientists have revealed that the lungs play a previously unrecognized role in blood production.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Tracing aromatic molecules in the early universe A molecule found in car engine exhaust fumes that is thought to have contributed to the origin of life on Earth has made astronomers heavily underestimate the amount of stars that were forming in the early universe, a University of California, Riverside-led study has found. That molecule is called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon. On Earth it is also found in coal and tar. In space, it is a compone¤¤¤

eurekalert

Tiller the Hun? Farmers in Roman Empire converted to Hun lifestyle -- and vice versa New archaeological analysis suggests people of Western Roman Empire switched between Hunnic nomadism and settled farming over a lifetime. Findings may be evidence of tribal encroachment that undermined Roman Empire during 5th century AD, contributing to its fall.¤¤¤

eurekalert

UC biologists find surprising variability in courtship behaviors of wolf spiders Studies of wolf spiders at the University of Cincinnati found that courtship displays help preserve genetic isolation between closely related species. Another study found that the species Gladicosa bellamyi used multi-modal communication to entice females.¤¤¤

eurekalert

What does congenital Zika syndrome look like? In a new paper, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, along with colleagues in Brazil and Spain, describe the phenotypic spectrum or set of observable characteristics of congenital Zika (ZIKV) syndrome, based upon clinical evaluations and neuroimaging of 83 Brazilian children with presumed or confirmed ZIKV congenital infections.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Republicans less likely to be critical about Obamacare when thinking of their own medical needs US Republican voters are less likely to be critical about the performance of the controversial 'Obamacare' health reforms when they are reminded about their own medical needs, new research shows.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Most dengue infections transmitted in or near home The majority of dengue virus infections appear to happen very close to home and are transmitted from the same family of mosquitoes, suggests new research led by the University of Florida and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.¤¤¤

eurekalert

UF Health diabetes researchers discover way to expand potent regulatory cells For parents, storing their newborn baby's umbilical cord blood is a way to preserve potentially lifesaving cells. Now, a group of University of Florida Health researchers has found a way to expand and preserve certain cord-blood cells as a potential treatment for type 1 diabetes.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Wastewater cleaned thanks to a new adsorbent material made from fruit peels Researchers from the University of Granada, and from the Center for Electrochemical Research and Technological Development and the Center of Engineering and Industrial Development, both in Mexico, have developed a process that allows to clean waters containing heavy metals and organic compounds considered pollutants, using a new adsorbent material made from the peels of fruits such as oranges and¤¤¤

eurekalert

Clot or bleeding? Because major surgery increases the risk of venous thrombosis, patients are often treated with anticoagulant medications to prevent thrombosis after surgery. Anticoagulant prophylaxis, however, increases the risk of severe bleeding. The international research group has now studied the risk of thrombosis and severe hemorrhage after urological cancer operations and other forms of urological surgery.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Minitablets help medicate picky cats Of all pets, cats are often considered the most difficult ones to medicate. Very small minitablets with flavors or flavor coatings can help cat owners commit to the treatment and make cats more compliant to it, while making it easier to regulate dosage and administer medication flexibly.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Immune study in chickens reveals key hurdle for Campylobacter vaccine effort New University of Liverpool research reveals that the immune response of farmed chickens does not develop fast enough to fight off Campylobacter during their short lifespan. The findings have important implications in the challenge towards developing a poultry vaccine for the bug, which is the UK's leading cause of food poisoning.¤¤¤

eurekalert

The Anthropocene: Scientists respond to criticisms of a new geological epoch 'Irreversible' changes to the Earth provide striking evidence of new epoch, University of Leicester experts suggest.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Astronomers find unexpected, dust-obscured star formation in distant galaxy Pushing the limits of the largest single-aperture millimeter telescope in the world, and coupling it with gravitational lensing, University of Massachusetts Amherst astronomer Alexandra Pope and colleagues report that they have detected a surprising rate of star formation, four times higher than previously detected, in a dust-obscured galaxy behind a Frontier Fields cluster.¤¤¤

eurekalert

A 'carbon law' offers pathway to halve emissions every decade, say researchers On the eve of this year's Earth hour (March 25), researchers propose a solution in the journal Science (March 24) for the global economy to rapidly reduce carbon emissions. The authors argue a carbon roadmap, driven by a simple rule of thumb or 'carbon law' of halving emissions every decade, could catalyze disruptive innovation.¤¤¤

eurekalert

A new approach to diagnosing mental disorders could become an alternative to DSM-5 A consortium of psychiatrists and psychologists from universities around the world, co-led by Stony Brook University, University of Minnesota and University of Notre Dame researchers, has proposed a new approach to diagnosing mental disorders.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Limiting protein reduces post-heart attack injury in mice According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 735,000 Americans experience a heart attack each year. Opening a blocked coronary artery to restore blood flow to the heart prevents sudden cardiac death. However, doing so also triggers cardiac damage through oxidative stress and inflammation, which eventually can lead to heart failure. Researchers at the University of Mis¤¤¤

eurekalert

Researchers focus on cell membranes to develop Alzheimer's treatments Thin parts of the cell membranes of neurons turn out to be particularly vulnerable to a protein that collects in the brain of people with Alzheimer's disease, according to a University of Michigan researcher.¤¤¤

eurekalert

'Super sponge' promises effective toxic clean-up of lakes and more Mercury is very toxic and can cause long-term health damage, but removing it from water is challenging. To address this growing problem, University of Minnesota College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Sciences (CFANS) Professor Abdennour Abbas and his lab team created a sponge that can absorb mercury from a polluted water source within seconds.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Weight-bearing exercises promote bone formation in men Osteoporosis affects more than 200 million people worldwide and is a serious public health concern, according to the National Osteoporosis Foundation. Now, Pamela Hinton, associate professor in the Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology, has published the first study in men to show that long-term, weight-bearing exercises decrease sclerostin, a protein made in the bone, and increase IGF-1¤¤¤

eurekalert

Big-game jitters: Coyotes no match for wolves' hunting prowess As wolf populations plummeted, the eastern coyote assumed the role of apex predator in forests along the Atlantic Coast. New research, however, shows that the eastern coyote is no match for the wolf. While the eastern coyote can bring down moose and other large prey, it prefers to attack smaller animals and to scavenge.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Caught on camera -- chemical reactions 'filmed' at the single-molecule level Scientists have succeeded in 'filming' inter-molecular chemical reactions -- using the electron beam of a transmission electron microscope as a stop-frame imaging tool. They have also discovered that the electron beam can be simultaneously tuned to stimulate specific chemical reactions by using it as a source of energy as well as an imaging tool.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Poor oral health and food scarcity major contributors to malnutrition in older adults A new study by UNC School of Medicine researchers suggests that food scarcity and poor oral health are major risk factors for malnutrition that leads an older adult -- already at high risk of functional decline, decreased quality of life, and increased mortality -- to land in the emergency department.¤¤¤

eurekalert

The mechanism of mucus: Discovery could lead to better cystic fibrosis treatments University of North Carolina scientists found that mucin proteins, which make mucus thick and sticky, fail to unfold properly in the airways of people with cystic fibrosis. And they found the lack of water in the lung can trigger the misfolding mucins.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Researchers propose new diagnostic model for psychiatric disorders A consortium of 50 psychologists and psychiatrists, including Notre Dame professors Lee Anna Clark and David Watson, has outlined a new diagnostic model for mental illness.¤¤¤

eurekalert

UNSW scientists unveil a giant leap for anti-aging UNSW researchers have made a discovery that could lead to a revolutionary drug that actually reverses ageing, improves DNA repair and could even help NASA get its astronauts to Mars.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Community champions: Collaborating with communities strengthens nursing and leadership skills Service learning is a pedagogical approach that has proven valuable in helping undergraduate nursing students better understand specific needs of diverse populations and gives them opportunities to apply their knowledge to meet those needs. The University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing has provided its students with dynamic service learning opportunities since 2014 though a unique student-estab¤¤¤

eurekalert

Penn researchers call for better laws covering patient incentives to improve care Current federal anti-kickback laws prohibit pharmaceutical companies and providers from bribing patients to seek their goods and services. Unfortunately, the laws also prevent hospitals from offering services that could potentially benefit patients, such as free rides to elderly or disabled patients to help them get to their appointments. In an essay published today in the New England Journal of M¤¤¤

eurekalert

Boosting natural brain opioids may be a better way to treat anxiety: Research Boosting natural brain opioids may be a better way to treat disabling emotions, says new research revealing their role in regulating critical brain circuits affecting fear and anxiety.¤¤¤

eurekalert

New research links Gulf War Illness to gastrointestinal disturbances A new study from the University of South Carolina has linked gastrointestinal disturbances in those suffering from Gulf War illness with changes intestinal microbiota. The findings open up new treatment options that may improve both gastrointestinal and neurological symptoms among soldiers and veterans.¤¤¤

eurekalert

White families with children drawn to less diverse neighborhoods, schools Racial segregation is declining, but it remains higher for families with children than those without, a new study shows.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Molecular 'treasure maps' to help discover new materials Scientists at the University of Southampton working with colleagues at the University of Liverpool have developed a new method which has the potential to revolutionise the way we search for, design and produce new materials.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Pollination mystery unlocked by Stirling bee researchers Bees latch on to similarly-sized nectarless flowers to unpick pollen -- like keys fitting into locks, University of Stirling scientists have discovered.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Where does laser energy go after being fired into plasma? An outstanding conundrum on what happens to the laser energy after beams are fired into plasma has been solved in newly-published research at the University of Strathclyde.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Machine learning lets scientists reverse-engineer cellular control networks Researchers from Tufts University and the University of Maryland, Baltimore County used machine learning on the Stampede supercomputer to model the cellular control network that determines how tadpoles develop. Using that model, they reverse-engineered a drug intervention that created tadpoles with a form of mixed pigmentation never before seen in nature. They plan to use the method for cancer the¤¤¤

eurekalert

A robust, 2-ion quantum logic gate that operates in a microsecond is designed The theory group led by Gonzalo Muga of the UPV/EHU's Department of Physical Chemistry, has teamed up with the experimental group of the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder, United States, led by David Wineland, the 2012 Nobel Physics Laureate, to design a two-ion, robust, ultrarapid quantum logic gate capable of functioning in less than a microsecond. This study was publishe¤¤¤

eurekalert

Researchers find new gene interaction associated with increased MS risk A person carrying variants of two particular genes could be almost three times more likely to develop multiple sclerosis, according to the latest findings from scientists at The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and Duke University Medical Center.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Too much structured knowledge hurts creativity, shows Rotman study Structure organizes human activities and help us understand the world with less effort, but it can be the killer of creativity, concludes a study from the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Scientific discovery may change treatment of Parkinsons When monitoring Parkinson's disease, SPECT imaging of the brain is used for acquiring information on the dopamine activity. A new study conducted in Turku, Finland, shows that the dopamine activity observed in SPECT imaging does not reflect the number of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra, as previously assumed.¤¤¤

eurekalert

How do metals interact with DNA? Since a couple of decades, metal-containing drugs have been successfully used to fight against certain types of cancer. The lack of knowledge about the underlying molecular mechanisms slows down the search for new and more efficient chemotherapeutic agents. An international team of scientists, led by Leticia González from the University of Vienna and Jacinto Sá from the Uppsala University, have de¤¤¤

eurekalert

UVA finds ANOTHER immune system link science said didn't exist The University of Virginia School of Medicine has again shown that a part of the body thought to be disconnected from the immune system actually interacts with it, and that discovery helps explain cases of male infertility, certain autoimmune diseases and even the failure of cancer vaccines.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Ravens: Non-breeders live in highly dynamic social groups Ravens have impressive cognitive skills when interacting with conspecifics -- comparable to many primates, whose social intelligence has been related to their life in groups. An international collaboration of researchers led by Thomas Bugnyar, Professor at the University of Vienna, could uncover for the first time the group dynamics of non-breeding ravens. The results help to understand the evolut¤¤¤

eurekalert

Survey may reduce rates of malnutrition in hospitals University of Waterloo researchers have created a tool aimed at decreasing the rate of malnutrition in hospitals.The tool, known as the Mealtime Audit Tool (MAT), will help dietitians, doctors and nurses identify why a third of patients in acute care settings don't eat the food on their trays.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Yellow fever killing thousands of monkeys in Brazil In a vulnerable forest in southeastern Brazil, where the air was once thick with the guttural chatter of brown howler monkeys, there now exists silence. Yellow fever, a virus carried by mosquitoes and endemic to Africa and South America, has robbed the private, federally-protected reserve of its brown howlers in an unprecedented wave of death that has swept through the region since late 2016, kill¤¤¤

eurekalert

Humans and smartphones may fail frequently to detect face morph photos Researchers at the University of York have demonstrated that both humans and smartphones show a degree of error in distinguishing face morph photos from their 'real' faces on fraudulent identity cards.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Scientists use parasite's internal clock to attack sleeping sickness The parasite that causes deadly sleeping sickness has its own biological clock that makes it more vulnerable to medications during the afternoon, according to international research that may help improve treatments for one of Africa's most lethal diseases.¤¤¤

eurekalert

New tool for prognosis and choice of therapy for rheumatoid arthritis In rheumatoid arthritis, antibodies are formed that affect the inflammation in the joints. In an article published today in the journal Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, researchers at Uppsala University show that antibodies against the cartilage protein collagen II are associated with a good prognosis.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Study affirms premature infants in NICUs do better with light touch When premature infants were given more 'supportive touch' experiences, including skin-to-skin care and breastfeeding, their brains responded more strongly to light touch, according to an international research team from Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, Monroe Carell's Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt in Nashville, Tennessee, and Lausanne University in Switzerland.¤¤¤

eurekalert

SPICY: Discovery of new ginger species spices up African wildlife surveys Scientists from WCS have discovered a new species of wild ginger, spicing up a wave of recent wildlife discoveries in the Kabobo Massif -- a rugged, mountainous region in Democratic Republic of Congo.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Corals die as global warming collides with local weather in the South China Sea In the South China Sea, a 2°C rise in the sea surface temperature in June 2015 was amplified to produce a 6°C rise on Dongsha Atoll, a shallow coral reef ecosystem, killing approximately 40 percent of the resident coral community within weeks, according to a study published in Scientific Reports this week.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Overcoming workplace barriers to breastfeeding -- review and recommendations in The Nurse Practitioner For mothers of new infants, going back to work may pose a number of obstacles to continued breastfeeding. Workplace policies affecting the ability to breastfeed -- and the role of nurse practitioners (NPs) in helping to overcome those obstacles -- are the topic of a special article in The Nurse Practitioner, published by Wolters Kluwer.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Reduced risk of pressure injuries at hospitals with nurses certified in wound, ostomy, and continence care Hospitals that employ nurses who have specialty certification in wound, ostomy, and continence (WOC) care have lower rates of hospital-acquired pressure injuries (HAPIs), reports a study in the Journal of Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nursing. Official journal of the Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses (WOCN®) Society, the Journal of WOCN® is published by Wolters Kluwer.¤¤¤

eurekalert

WPI team grows heart tissue on spinach leaves Researchers face a fundamental challenge as they seek to scale up human tissue regeneration from small lab samples to full-size tissues and organs: how to establish a vascular system that delivers blood deep into the developing tissue. Researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI), the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Arkansas State University-Jonesboro have successfully turned to plant¤¤¤

eurekalert

Non-invasive prostate cancer diagnosing, monitoring Technology being developed at Washington State University provides a non-invasive approach for diagnosing prostate cancer and tracking the disease's progression. It could enable doctors to determine how cancer patients are responding to different treatments without needing to perform invasive biopsies.¤¤¤

eurekalert

First mutations in human life discovered The earliest mutations of human life have been observed by researchers at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators. Analyzing genomes from adult cells, the scientists could look back in time to reveal how each embryo developed. Published in Nature today, the study shows that from the two-cell stage of the human embryo, one of these cells becomes more dominant than the other and¤¤¤

eurekalert

New stem cell method produces millions of human brain and muscle cells in days Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute scientists and their collaborators at the University of Cambridge have created a new technique that simplifies the production of human brain and muscle cells -- allowing millions of functional cells to be generated in just a few days. The results published today (March 23) in Stem Cell Reports open the door to producing a diversity of new cell types that could not b¤¤¤

eurekalert

Scientists follow seeds to solve ecological puzzle A four-year study of one rare and one common lupine growing in coastal dunes showed that a native mouse steals most of the rare lupines seeds while they are still attached to the plant. The mouse is a 'subsidized species,' given cover for nocturnal forays by European beachgrass, originally planted to stabilize the dunes.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Building a market for renewable thermal technologies A Yale-led analysis concludes that renewable thermal technologies have significant market potential in the state if supported by appropriate public policy and financing tools.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Assembly of genetic sequences approaches 100 percent accuracy Researchers have greatly improved upon a technique to assemble genetic sequences from scratch, reaching more than 99 percent accuracy in assembling the human genome in the correct order.¤¤¤

eurekalert

A rapid, automated and inexpensive fertility test for men Scientists have developed a low-cost and easy-to-use smartphone attachment that can quickly and accurately evaluate semen samples for at-home fertility testing, providing a potentially helpful resource for the more than 45 million couples worldwide who are affected by infertility.¤¤¤

eurekalert

How language helps people cope with negative experiences A new study demonstrates how people use the word 'you' in a general sense to distance themselves psychologically -- and extract meaning -- from negative experiences.¤¤¤

eurekalert

Study featuring genomic sequencing & international data shows random errors... The mutations that cause human cancer have traditionally been thought to originate from two main sources -- heredity and environment -- but now, new work by researchers including Cristian Tomasetti and Bert Vogelstein emphasizes the importance of a third source of these mutations.¤¤¤

foxtrotalpha.jalopnik

Why Russia Has To Spend $350 Million Fixing Its Broken-Down Aircraft Carrier In this photo made from the footage taken from Russian Defense Ministry official web site on Wednesday, Jan. 4, 2017, the Admiral Kuznetsov aircraft carrier during its mission in the eastern Mediterranean Sea. Russia says it is withdrawing the Admiral Kuznetsov aircraft carrier and some other warships from the waters off Syria as the first step in drawing down forces in Syria. (File, Russian Defe¤¤¤

futurity

The ‘little brain’ may do lots more than we thought The cerebellum—which means “little brain”—is thought to just sit there helping us balance and breathe, like some kind of tiny heating and ventilation system. Now, however, scientists have discovered that neurons within the cerebellum respond to and learn to anticipate rewards, a first step toward a much more exciting future for the cerebrum’s largely overlooked little brother and one that could o¤¤¤

futurity

Skull holes hint at shift to walking on 2 feet A large hole at the base of the skull offers clues to the evolution of bipedalism—walking on two feet—in humans. Compared with those of other primates, the foramen magnum—where the spinal cord passes through—is shifted forward. While many scientists generally attribute this shift to the evolution of bipedalism and the need to balance the head directly atop the spine, others have been critical of¤¤¤

futurity

Will the Hyde Amendment go from rider to law? Forty years ago, the Hyde Amendment began as a single-sentence prohibition on Medicaid funding for abortion. Since then, it has provided the blueprint for expanded prohibitions. In an article in the Journal of the American Medical Association tracing the amendment’s history and impact, researchers say that the Hyde blueprint now has a renewed chance of becoming codified into law. Passed by the US¤¤¤

futurity

Busted moon could put rings around Mars Early Mars may have had rings like Saturn, and might have them again, according to a new model. The research suggests that debris, pushed into space from an asteroid or other body, slammed into the red planet around 4.3 billion years ago and alternates between becoming a planetary ring and clumping up to form a moon. A theory exists that Mars’ large North Polar Basin or Borealis Basin, which cove¤¤¤

futurity

To recycle old gadgets, crush them into nanodust Researchers have an idea to simplify electronic waste recycling: Crush it into nanodust. Specifically, they want to make the particles so small that separating different components is relatively simple compared with processes used to recycle electronic junk now. Chandra Sekhar Tiwary, a postdoctoral researcher at Rice University and a researcher at the Indian Institute of Science in Bangalore, us¤¤¤

futurity

Nanofibers turn mesh into see-through air filter A new nanofiber solution creates thin, see-through air filters that offer airflow 2.5 times better than that of conventional air filters. The researchers engineered organic molecules from phthalocyanine, a chemical compound commonly used in dyeing, which can self-organize to form nanoparticles and then nanofibers. The nanofibers are suspended in liquid and easily “cling” onto non-woven mesh. Spre¤¤¤

futurity

Neurons never quite recover from ‘Pavlov’s bell’ In the decades following the work of physiologist Ivan Pavlov and his famous salivating dogs, scientists have discovered how molecules and cells in the brain learn to associate two stimuli, such as Pavlov’s bell and the resulting food. What they haven’t been able to study is how whole groups of neurons work together to form that link. Now, researchers have observed how large groups of neurons in¤¤¤

futurity

Why sperm need to go backwards to reach the egg A sperm’s tail creates a characteristic rhythm that pushes the sperm forward, but also pulls the head backwards and sideways in a coordinated way, report researchers. They developed a mathematical formula based on these movements, which could make it easier to understand and predict how sperm make the difficult journey towards fertilizing an egg. The team aims to use these new findings to underst¤¤¤

futurity

After suicide, grieving partners live with health risks People who lose a partner to suicide are at increased risk for physical and mental problems including cancer, mood disorders like depression, and even herniated discs. The findings underscore the need for support systems for bereaved partners and others who have lost loved ones to suicide, since interventions addressing complicated grief could help mitigate some of the effects, researchers say. “¤¤¤

futurity

Pouring wine is less drippy with this groove A drip, or even a stream, of wine from the bottle can ruin your tablecloth—unless you wrap a napkin around the bottle as a sommelier would. Daniel Perlman—wine-lover, inventor, and biophysicist at Brandeis University—has figured out a solution to this age-old problem. Over the course of three years, he has been studying the flow of liquid across the wine bottle’s lip. By cutting a groove just bel¤¤¤

futurity

Do mangosteens hold the key to treating TB? Compounds called xanthones from mangosteens could provide a suitable new drug in the fight against tuberculosis, new research suggests. Researchers report that xanthones were very effective at inhibiting and killing Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the bacterium responsible for causing TB. The study also demonstrated that xanthones had a low propensity for developing drug resistance, making it a¤¤¤

gear.lifehacker

Anker's PowerLine II Might Be the Last Lightning Cable You Ever Buy Anker PowerLine II Cables Anker’s PowerLine and PowerLine+ cables were already our readers’ favorite charging cables , but the new PowerLine II line is even stronger, and comes with a hassle-free lifetime warranty . Think about that for a second. If your cable ever fails, instead of going out and buying a new one, you can just request a free replacement. Obviously, cable standards will become obs¤¤¤

gear.lifehacker

These Are the Five Best Water-Resistant Bluetooth Speakers Five water-resistant speakers made the cut after the nomination round of this week’s Co-Op , but which one will make the biggest splash? Check out the finalists below, and vote for your favorite at the bottom of the post. Oontz Angle 3 Oontz Angle 3 Great sound, battery lasts a long time - I use it in my shower daily, and the battery only needs to be charged every 3 months or so. The only thing I¤¤¤

gizmodo

Things I Managed to Do With the $250 Computer From Hell Photos: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo I’ve never been to hell, but I imagine it’s a lot like going to work and using an abysmally slow computer. That’s exactly what I’ve been doing for the past two weeks, as I’ve plodded along in my own personal nightmare using a tiny, $250 PC built for emerging markets. The Mission One comes from Endless, a company that spent the last five years selling cheap computers in¤¤¤

gizmodo

15-Year-Old Girl Allegedly Sexually Assaulted on Facebook Live While 40 People Watched Image: AP Since it debuted nearly a year ago, Facebook Live has been rife with content moderation problems. The latest in a long line of horrific examples comes from Chicago, where the Associated Press reports that a missing 15-year-old girl was allegedly sexually assaulted by up to six people while about 40 people watched the stream. A police spokesperson told the AP that of those 40 viewers, “n¤¤¤

gizmodo

A Four-Year-Old Boy Used Siri to Save His Unconscious Mother’s Life Image: Apple When a young boy identified only as Roman couldn’t wake up his unconscious mother, he did what any astute, technologically-adept four-year-old would do: He used his mother’s finger to unlock her phone, and then asked Siri to call emergency services. The boy’s actions saved his mother, but the incident exposes some dark and dangerous flaws in our increasingly landline-less world. As r¤¤¤

gizmodo

A Middle Eastern Airline Is Scorching Trump's Electronics Ban on Twitter President Trump shows everyone how he would eat a gigantic apple while meeting with members of several veterans service organizations on March 17, 2017 (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) Starting this week, anyone flying on Royal Jordanian’s routes to the United States from cities like Amman won’t be allowed to bring any electronic device bigger than a smartphone into the cabin. And Royal J¤¤¤

gizmodo

Astronauts Can See Mount Etna's Crazy Eruption From the Space Station Image: Time Seeing as the Earth is a puny nugget of metal sitting atop a nearly 2000 mile-thick mantle of high-pressure flowing rock, it’s no surprise that the rock occasionally seeps out, either slowly or explosively, through the surface. It’s pretty cool to see the magma glowing beside Sicily’s nighttime lights, though. NASA shared this image of Italy’s Mount Etna erupting today, after European¤¤¤

gizmodo

Coded 4chan Post Hinted at Westminster Attack a Day in Advance Image: screenshot via archive.4plebs.org Details are still emerging about an attack carried out near the UK’s Houses of Parliament on Wednesday. As officials try to determine the identity of a suspect who was shot by police, a 4chan thread from less than 24 hours earlier appears to announce the location of the attack that has claimed five lives so far. Shortly after the attack, 4chan users began¤¤¤

gizmodo

EpiPens Recalled For Failing to Work Mylan CEO Heather Bresch, seen lying to the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee on September 21, 2016 (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images) People around the world depend on their EpiPen to work in the case of life-threatening allergic reactions. But two people recently found out the hard way that their EpiPens were faulty. As a result, the makers of EpiPen are recalling over 81,000 EpiPe¤¤¤

gizmodo

Exxon Probably 'Lost' Those Secret Rex Tillerson Emails, They're Figuring It Out Photo: Getty If the 2016 election taught us anything, we now know that proper handling of email is the most important thing in the world. Recently, it came to light that while Rex Tillerson was CEO of ExxonMobil, he used an email account with an alias for his communications. Following a court order to turn over those documents, Exxon’s lawyers say that they’ve misplaced them . When Trump picked T¤¤¤

gizmodo

Finally, an Astrophysics Model Even Your Stoner Friend Will Love Image: Flickr user Andyspictures /Flickr The Milky Way isn’t just stars orbiting a black hole—it’s loaded with dust and debris, floating with reckless abandon in the space between solar systems. And like the stuff that accompanies wildfires or windy days in the desert, dust makes it hard to see. Think about that, bro... we’re just like, specks of dust. Scientists trying to figure out how that dus¤¤¤

gizmodo

Florida Man Accidentally Destroys at Least 10 Homes While Burning Books GIF of the fires made from a video by the Florida Fire Service (Twitter) If you’re looking to get rid of old books, there are plenty of places to donate them. Unfortunately, a man in Florida didn’t know that and has destroyed between 10 to 15 homes in a fire that’s still raging in Nassau County . The man hasn’t been identified, but his book burning has done a lot of damage. At this point the fire¤¤¤

gizmodo

Google Says Its Job Is to Promote Climate Change Conspiracy Theories Yesterday, I wrote a short post about Google’s Top Stories module. If you googled “great barrier reef” on Wednesday, you’d be presented with a Breitbart article filled with insane ravings about how climate change isn’t real, featured at the very top in the site’s highlighted “Top Stories” box. When I went to the company’s press team to see what was up, they assured me it was perfectly normal for¤¤¤

gizmodo

Google Top Stories Serves Breitbart Bullshit on Climate Science Coral reef experts and climate scientists agree that due to rising temperatures, Australia’s Great Barrier Reef is pretty much fucked. But when you search Google for “Great Barrier Reef,” that’s not all that you’ll find. Instead, at the very top of the page in the Top Stories module, you’ll see a Breitbart article dismissing the damage done to the famed coral reef that sounds like it was written¤¤¤

gizmodo

Important People Decided It Was Time for Some New Clouds The new Asperitas cloud (mage: Gary McArthur/Cloud Appreciation Society) People like giving official names to things—other groups of people, weird new animals , stars , round planets , and even the shapes that blobs of water vapor condense into in the sky. But move over, other names describing water vapor. There’s a new name in town: Asparagus Asperitas. Today, the World Meteorological Organizati¤¤¤

gizmodo

Insane Light System Blasts the Energy of 10,000 Suns Image: DPA German scientists have constructed a powerful new light system that can focus energy equivalent to the radiation of 10,000 suns onto a single spot. Eventually, they hope, this “artificial sun” could be used to produce environmentally-friendly fuels. The impressive light system is called Synlight , and it’s located in Juelich, about nine miles west of Cologne, Germany. The German Aerosp¤¤¤

gizmodo

It Sure Looks Like That Viral 'Trump Cat' Site Is a Massive Troll Image: screengrabs via YouTube and Kittenfeed Trump is, to put it mildly, oversensitive. From the bully pulpit of Twitter he lays into the source of any perceived insult, be it a union leader, Saturday Night Live , or a teenage girl . Similarly, his organizations are known for their willingness to threaten legal action. In concert, that’s what made a story about a teenage girl targeted by Trump’s¤¤¤

gizmodo

LinkedIn Picks a Losing Fight With Fake News [Updated] Image: LinkedIn blog Propagandists ramming verifiably false information into the eyeballs of credulous internet users—now dubbed “fake news”—is one of the most daunting, complicated issues facing social platforms today. Even the richest, most powerful tech companies with the brightest talent pools have yet to deploy anything resembling a solution. The great equalizer of the internet age is everyo¤¤¤

gizmodo

NASA Experiment Could Solve a Mystery About DNA in Space Image: Wikimedia Commons While we all want to travel, live, and bang in space , there are some pretty major things to consider, such as the fact that our sentient flesh cocoons were not designed to handle the harsh conditions of the cosmic void. Though research like NASA’s Twin Study will illuminate some of the potential impacts of extended spaceflight on our bodies, so many mysteries remain—part¤¤¤

gizmodo

Jason Chaffetz Wants to Use Facial Recognition to Track Immigrants Photo: AP Hey, remember Congressman Jason Chaffetz, the guy who said poor people should stop buying so many dang iPhones if they want healthcare? Well, the dingus has done it again: During a congressional hearing about the government’s use of use of facial recognition technology on Wednesday, Chaffetz suggested using that same technology to track undocumented immigrants. It was easy to miss the c¤¤¤

gizmodo

Prosecutors Say They Are Hacking Over 100 Phones Confiscated at Inauguration Protests Photo: Getty The Trump inauguration is mostly remembered for the White House’s hilarious attempt to lie about attendance numbers and a dumb nazi getting his dome rocked. But there was also that situation where hundreds of people were arrested and slapped with rioting charges. Now, prosecutors want to go through over 100 locked phones and they appear to believe they can. On January 20th , protests¤¤¤

gizmodo

Qué le pasaría a tu cuerpo si te acercas demasiado a una estrella de neutrones El espacio está lleno de objetos peligrosos. Los agujeros negros son probablemente los más populares en el imaginario colectivo, pero hay otro tipo de astros que rivaliza en peligrosidad. Se trata de las estrellas de neutrones. ¿Qué pasaría si de repente aparecieras lo bastante cerca de una de ellas? Huelga decir que la experiencia te mataría, pero no lo haría convirtiéndote en la antorcha humana¤¤¤

gizmodo

Samsung's New iPad Pro Is Just Fantastic All images: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo Coming a year after the launch of Apple’s first 9.7-inch iPad Pro, the new iteration from Samsung feels daring. While it has the same sleek lines, is just as light, and possesses the magnetic connection on one side for easy keyboard cover attachment, Samsung’s iPad Pro for 2017 is, inexplicably called the Galaxy Tab S3, and unlike previous iPads this one runs on And¤¤¤

gizmodo

Say Goodbye to Virgin America Image: Getty Alaska Airlines announced on Wednesday that it will retire the Virgin America brand sometime in 2019. The Seattle-based airline bought Virgin America last year for $2.6 billion with the hope of expanding beyond the Pacific Northwest. Richard Branson, founder of Virgin America, apparently cried when he heard the news. Why? Well, it means he’ll be losing money. Repainting Virgin Americ¤¤¤

gizmodo

Smog-Filtering Screens Will Make Our Polluted Future Slightly More Tolerable As our newly-elected leaders do everything they can to roll back environmental regulations , the future is looking more and more like a smog-filled dystopia. But not all scientific progress has ground to a halt. Scientists at National University of Singapore have created a transparent smog-filtering window screen that could make our lives a little less wheezy. The problem with traditional air fil¤¤¤

gizmodo

Sting Operation Reveals Science's Insane Fake News Problem Image: Internet Archive Book Images /Wikimedia Commons If someone applied to a top position at a company, you’d hope a hiring manager would at least Google the applicant to ensure they’re qualified. A group of researchers sent phony resumes to 360 scientific journals for an applicant whose Polish name translated to “Dr. Fraud.” And 48 journals happily appointed the fake doctor to their editorial¤¤¤

gizmodo

The 69 New Emoji Candidates, Ranked Image: Emojipedia / Gizmodo Guys, we’re getting deliciously close to a big emoji upgrade. Appropriately named Emoji 5.0, the new batch of silly symbols includes several very specific items as well as some long sought-after essentials. Do you have a favorite? We do. Emojipedia recently updated its page for Emoji 5.0 with mockups of all the proposed emoji. Don’t freak out if you don’t like the sele¤¤¤

gizmodo

The Brains of Blind People Really Are Wired to Enhance Other Senses Wiring diagram of the human brain, also known as the connectome. .

gizmodo

The Curiosity Rover's Wheels Aren't Looking So Good Two treads, or grousers, on Curiosity’s left middle wheel are broken. In this image, a torn grouser can be seen at the top of the wheel. .

gizmodo

The Greatest Scientific Breakthrough of Our Time Is This Drip-Free Wine Bottle There are several ways to prevent those inevitable wine bottle drips from staining your tablecloth. You can wrap the bottle in a napkin while you pour, just skip the wine glass altogether and drink straight from the bottle, or use your physics degrees to re-engineer the bottle’s spout so it never drips again . As a wine aficionado, Brandeis University biophysicist Daniel Perlman has almost certai¤¤¤

gizmodo

The Last Scrap of the North American Ice Sheet Is Melting Scenery at the coastline just northeast of the Barnes Ice Cap. Image: Gifford Miller The planet is warming and Arctic ice is melting. These facts are hardly news. But it’s not just habitat for polar bears that’s being lost—a piece of Earth’s history is disappearing, too. You’ve probably never heard of the Barnes Ice Cap, a Delaware-sized glacier located on a remote island in the Canadian Arctic,¤¤¤

gizmodo

Theranos Offers More Worthless Stock to Investors Who Pinky Swear Not to Sue Photo: Getty The Wall Street Journal has yet another essential report from inside the meltdown of biomedical company Theranos. The company, which is currently the subject of a criminal probe for allegedly misleading investigators and government investigators, is reportedly offering investors more shares in exchange for a promise not to sue them. The Theranos disaster-saga began after a series of¤¤¤

gizmodo

This Nest Security Flaw Is Remarkably Dumb Image: Nest The internet has made it supremely easy to install connected security cameras wherever you want. Unfortunately for Nest, that easy connectivity makes it simple for hackers to disable its cameras with just a few keystrokes. And that’s a very bad feature for a security camera. Nest’s indoor and outdoor security camera as well as Dropcams and Dropcam Pros have serious-sounding vulnerabil¤¤¤

gizmodo

Trump's Electronics Ban on Airplanes Makes Less Sense Every Day Image: Getty Here’s a riddle: If a Trump policy targets random locations in the Middle East, and nobody can explain it, does anybody really know what’s happening? It’s a tough riddle because it’s practically impossible to answer. Yet, this is our reality now. In a little less than 72 hours, the Trump administration’s ban on allowing electronic devices “larger than a smartphone” in the cabins of p¤¤¤

gizmodo

Update: Whoops, the 'Trump Cat' Site We Wrote About Appears to Be a Troll Screengrab: Kittenfeed Update: After looking into the site’s registration date and the supposed timeline of The Trump Organization’s cease and desist letters, Gizmodo has serious doubts about the veracity of this story, which appears to be a massive troll . We’re sorry, and we’ll do better. Y Combinator’s Sam Altman recently called Trump “the Silicon Valley candidate” because of his disruptive na¤¤¤

gizmodo

Two-Thirds of All Cancer Mutations Are Unavoidable, Scientists Claim Image: Shutterstock In a study that’s bound to attract considerable controversy, a pair of researchers are claiming that between 60 and 66 percent of all cancer-causing mutations are the result of random DNA copying errors, making them essentially unavoidable. The new research is offering important insights into how cancer emerges, and how it should be diagnosed and treated—but many questions rem¤¤¤

gizmodo

Yet Another Reason Bees Are Screwed: Your Damn Almonds Image: Wikimedia Commons It’s no secret that bees have been having a really rough time: Just yesterday , the rusty-patched bumble became the first bee in the continental United States officially listed under the Endangered Species Act. But that’s the tip of the iceberg for our buzzy little friends, who unlike their asshole cousins—wasps—only want to pollinate plants with their fuzzy little bodies¤¤¤

gizmodo

You Don’t Wanna Know How a Climate Change-Induced Mass Extinction Can End (Hint: Lizards) Image: Jessi Swick /Flickr It’s a widely accepted fact that we’re fucked. That’s sort of in a general sense. You, reader, are certainly not making it past 2100. And civilization? Maybe it will meet its maker from superbugs and nuclear war in 50 years, or sea level rise in a few centuries. Maybe it’ll be an asteroid in a thousand years, or the sun engulfing the planet in a few billion. Or, maybe a¤¤¤

guardian

The Nepalese women exiled for menstruation – in pictures Photographer Poulomi Basu travelled to Nepal to document the women exiled to forest shelters during their monthly periods, when they are believed to be possessed by evil spirits Continue reading...¤¤¤

guardian

Gastrophysics: The New Science of Eating by Charles Spence – review Does the size of your plate matter, or how loud your crisps crunch? A psychologist explores our multisensory experience of food One of the lesser enigmas of life is why so many people order tomato juice on aeroplanes. Like Pavlov’s dog, I often start craving it myself the minute I do my seatbelt up. Lemon, Worcester sauce, no ice (which I find dilutes the salty thickness too much). In the general¤¤¤

guardian

To Be a Machine by Mark O’Connell review – solving the problem of death A captivating exploration of transhumanism features cryonics, cyborgs, immortality and the hubris of Silicon Valley Max More runs Alcor, an American company which, in exchange for $200,000, will store your corpse in liquid nitrogen until the science exists to revive you. Tim Cannon is a computer programmer who implanted a device the size of a pack of cards into his arm, without the aid of anaesth¤¤¤

guardian

Nervous markets take fright at prospect of Trump failing to deliver | Larry Elliott US shares fell – with a knock-on effect elsewhere – as the new administration struggles to follow through on spending and tax cuts promises Shares, oil and the US dollar were all under pressure as global financial markets took fright at the prospect that Donald Trump would fail to deliver on his growth-boosting promises. In the most nervous conditions since the immediate aftermath of the presiden¤¤¤

guardian

Vladimir Putin has one reliable set of allies: Russia’s iron ladies | Ekaterina Sokirianskaia The president’s useful anti-feminists legitimise a slide towards a patriarchal society – and offer no political challenge to his macho leadership Strength, patriotism, patriarchal values and a macho leadership style characterise Vladimir Putin’s current term as president. Strangely, this traditionalist authoritarian agenda has often been promoted by women. The few Russian women who are represented¤¤¤

guardian

Does the 'Cyrus prophecy' help explain evangelical support for Donald Trump? | James S Gordon The Persian king might have been a pagan, but he still served God’s plans. For some Christians, Donald Trump does just that “Donald Trump is anointed by God,” my Indianapolis Uber driver confided. I’d asked why she had Trump/Pence stickers on her rear bumper. It was the day before the presidential election and I would have asked anyone, but I was particularly interested because she was a decorous¤¤¤

guardian

The Guardian view on biotechnologies: rewriting our future | Editorial The creation of synthetic yeast chromosomes is a breathtaking feat by scientists – but the whole of society needs to engage with the implications of such research DNA is often described as a long string of letters, each representing a particular chemical. The metaphor is about to become much more powerful: scientists are reaching the point where they can arrange these chemical letters with as much¤¤¤

guardian

Arctic ice falls to record winter low after polar 'heatwaves' Extent of ice over North pole has fallen to a new wintertime low, for the third year in a row, as climate change drives freakish weather The extent of Arctic ice has fallen to a new wintertime low, as climate change drives freakishly high temperatures in the polar regions. The ice cap grows during the winter months and usually reaches its maximum in early March. But the 2017 maximum was 14.4m sq¤¤¤

guardian

Europe poised for total ban on bee-harming pesticides Exclusive: Draft regulations seen by the Guardian reveal the European commission wants to prohibit the insecticides that cause ‘acute risks to bees’ The world’s most widely used insecticides would be banned from all fields across Europe under draft regulations from the European commission, seen by the Guardian. The documents are the first indication that the powerful commission wants a complete b¤¤¤

guardian

Rotavirus vaccine could save lives of almost 500,000 children a year Positive outcome of trials in Niger fuels hope that vaccine can protect children in sub-Saharan Africa and beyond from infection that causes often fatal diarrhoea A vaccine capable of enduring scorching temperatures for months at a time could strike a decisive blow in the fight against rotavirus, preventing nearly half a million children around the world from dying of diarrhoea each year. Médecin¤¤¤

guardian

I sell degrees – but don't tell students they might be worthless At open days I pitch my university to young people, even though fewer graduate jobs and high tuition fees means their qualifications may not pay off Although I love a lot of things about my job as a lecturer in the social sciences at a mid-ranked post-92 university, there is one aspect that really troubles me – I often feel like a reluctant salesperson. Potential students come to open days, or we¤¤¤

guardian

Less than half of women breastfeed after two months, survey finds Poll for Public Health England reveals many feel embarrassed to feed their babies in front of strangers and family members Almost three-quarters of women in England start breastfeeding after giving birth but less than half are still doing so two months later, according to NHS and Public Health England data. PHE recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months, as does the World Health¤¤¤

guardian

How atheist campaigner Madalyn Murray O’Hair became America's most-hated woman Melissa Leo stars in Netflix’s upcoming biopic of the contentious figure who was ridiculed and largely forgotten about – but who often talked sense This week, the film The Most Hated Woman in America comes to Netflix, with Melissa Leo playing Madalyn Murray O’Hair, the atheist who campaigned against the church’s influence in public and political life (the title comes from the headline on a 1964 i¤¤¤

guardian

Radical shakeup of dinosaur family tree points to unexpected Scottish origins Cat-sized Scottish fossil proposed as candidate for common dinosaur ancestor in controversial study that could overthrow a century of dinosaur classification The most radical shakeup of the dinosaur family tree in a century has led scientists to propose an unlikely origin for the prehistoric beasts: an obscure cat-sized creature found in Scotland. The analysis, which has already sparked controver¤¤¤

guardian

Smartphone app could allow men to test their fertility at home Gadget designed to clip onto a smartphone able to detect abnormal sperm samples with 98% accuracy in trials Men may soon be able to measure their own sperm count and quality at home, using a smartphone app developed by scientists. In early tests the gadget, designed to clip onto a smartphone, detected abnormal sperm samples with an accuracy of 98%. Continue reading...¤¤¤

guardian

Purging the body of 'retired' cells could reverse ageing, study shows Findings raise possibility that a future therapy that rids the body of senescent cells might protect against the ravages of old age Purging retired cells from the body has been shown to undo the ravages of old age in a study that raises the prospect of new life-extending treatments . When mice were treated with a substance designed to sweep away cells that have entered a dormant state due to DNA¤¤¤

guardian

Let there be light: Germans switch on 'largest artificial sun' Scientists hope experiment, which can generate temperatures of around 3,500C, will help to develop carbon-neutral fuel German scientists are switching on “the world’s largest artificial sun” in the hope that intense light sources can be used to generate climate-friendly fuel. The Synlight experiment in Jülich, about 19 miles west of Cologne, consists 149 souped-up film projector spotlights and pr¤¤¤

guardian

Passengers in awe of Aurora Australis on first charter flight to see southern lights ‘We’ve travelled two-thirds of the way to the south pole, seen an incredible display and were home for breakfast,’ says organiser The first commercial flight to view the Aurora Australis landed in New Zealand early on Friday, with 130 star-struck passengers sharing the experience on social media. The eight-hour charter flight took off from the South Island on Thursday and flew to a latitude of 62¤¤¤

guardian

Why virtual reality could be a mental health gamechanger We’re still a long way from from being able to provide timely treatment to everyone who needs it, but we could be on the brink of change thanks to VR Few tech topics are hotter right now than virtual reality (VR). Though it’s been around for decades, VR has at last entered the world of consumer electronics via devices like the Oculus Rift and HTC Vive and, increasingly, headsets that can be used¤¤¤

guardian

Living and looking for lavatories – why researching relief is so relevant Toilets are a source of interaction, social structures, organisation, norms and values. So why aren’t sociologists discussing them more? It may be a turn of the stomach, a nervous flutter, a morning coffee or a sudden, unpredictable rush. You may look for a sign, if you are lucky enough to live in a society where they are readily available. There may or may not be a queue, often depending on the¤¤¤

guardian

How the media warp science: the case of the sensationalised satnav Reports of research that shows that satnavs “switch off” parts of the brain are a perfect example of how the media distorts science, often unintentionally There’s a famous cliché which says “If you like sausage, you should never see one being made”. Well, earlier this week I saw how a science news story occurred, from experiment to media coverage, and I think the same applies here. A UCL study ti¤¤¤

guardian

Stunning 'new' cloud formations captured in updated atlas – in pictures Roll clouds and wave-like asperitas are among the additions to the new digital International Cloud Atlas, that dates back to the 19th century. It features hundreds of images captured by meteorologists and cloud lovers from around the world Have you seen any of the “new” cloud formations? Continue reading...¤¤¤

guardian

Moderate drinking can lower risk of heart attack, says study Drinking in moderation helps protect heart, with study finding it lowers risk of many conditions compared with not drinking Moderate drinking can lower the risk of several heart conditions, according to a study that will further fuel the debate about the health implications of alcohol consumption. The study of 1.93 million people in the UK aged over 30 found that drinking in moderation – defined¤¤¤

guardian

Decades of TB progress threatened by drug-resistant bacteria, warn experts Rise of multi-drug resistant strains of tuberculosis could derail global efforts to eradicate the disease, according to a new report The rise of multi-drug resistant bacteria threatens to overturn decades of progress on tuberculosis (TB) , experts are warning. Continue reading...¤¤¤

guardian

Former Trump campaign chief 'offered to help Putin advance interests' Paul Manafort proposed strategy in 2005 where he would influence US politics in a way that would benefit Russia, AP reports Donald Trump’s former campaign manager Paul Manafort once offered to help Vladimir Putin advance Moscow’s interests as part of a multimillion-dollar contract agreed with a Russian billionaire with close ties to the Kremlin, it has been reported. According to a report by the¤¤¤

guardian

Germany to overturn convictions of gay men prosecuted after war Men who are still alive will get compensation for what they suffered under Paragraph 175 against homosexuality Germany’s cabinet has approved a bill to overturn the convictions of thousands of gay men who were prosecuted after the second world war. Gay men convicted between 1949 and 1969 who are still alive are expected to be given financial compensation for the suffering they endured under the l¤¤¤

ing.dk

Amerikanske storbyer trodser Trump: Vil stor-shoppe elbiler Byer som Los Angeles, New York og Chicago vil indkøbe store mængder af elbiler i de kommende år. Byerne vil have forureningsfri biler for at være på forkant med fremtidens klimaudfordringer.¤¤¤

ing.dk

Danske elmålere kan være ramt af hollandsk målerfejl Et ukendt antal danske elmålere benytter samme princip, som i en hollandsk test var skyld i fejl på op til 582 pct. Ingen ved, om danske målere er ramt af fejlen.¤¤¤

ing.dk

Dansk robotvirksomhed får stor kinesisk investor Med en investering på et tocifret millionbeløb er den samarbejdende håndteringsrobot 'Ragnar' fra robotproducenten Blue Workforce klar til det internationale marked.¤¤¤

ing.dk

Eksisterer vi kun i en computersimulation? Debatten er blusset op på ny Ugens videnskabelige nyhedsstrøm bragte os desuden nyt om de ældste dele af Jordens skorpe og dinosaurernes slægtskab samt indblik i, hvordan kostændringer har forandret vores gener og stofskifte – og hvordan hjernen opererer, når den skal finde vej fra et sted til et andet.¤¤¤

ing.dk

Eksperter dumper elselskabers frikendelse af målere Et elmålerproblem, der blev løst i 2011, er blevet fremhævet af danske elselskaber som løsning på opsigtsvækkende elmålerproblemer. Målere i den nye test lever imidlertid op til samme krav som danske elmålere.¤¤¤

ing.dk

Elektronikforbud kan udgøre sikkerhedsrisiko Lithium-ion-batterier kan skabe utilsigtede konsekvenser, hvis passagerenes elektronik havner i flyenes lastrum. Forbuddet kan dog være med til at forhindre terror, vurderer ekspert.¤¤¤

ing.dk

Europa trækker i bremsen for patenter på biologisk materiale En bred front af europæiske myndigheder og organisa­tioner går nu imod patenter på planter, der primært bygger på traditionel forædling. Det europæiske patent­kontor har stoppet sagsbehandlingen og er på vej med forslag til nye retningslinjer.¤¤¤

ing.dk

Forskere uenige om mikroplast: For tidligt at frikende karkluden og fleecetrøjen Et hold forskere på RUC afviser konklusionen fra kolleger på Aalborg Universitet om, at mikroplast fra tekstiler og kosmetik ikke er en væsentlig kilde til forurening.¤¤¤

ing.dk

Gigantrenovering af vitalt naturgasfelt lukker dansk produktion over to år En ny aftale mellem staten og Mærsk sikrer Tyra-feltet, hvor stort set al dansk naturgas går igennem. Feltet skal igennem en ombygning for et tocifret milliardbeløb, og det indebærer, at Danmark i to år må importere naturgas.¤¤¤

ing.dk

Her er dinosaurernes nye stamtræ Den gamle tanke om, at dinosaurer kan opdeles i to hovedlinjer - fugleagtige eller reptilagtige - holder ikke, mener britiske forskere. Det er originalt og provokatorisk, mener ekspert, der forudser langvarig diskussion mellem palæontologer.¤¤¤

ing.dk

Ikoniske biler bliver nu elektrificeret Retrobølgen er nu også kommet til elbiler. Historiske biler bliver bygget i nye fortolkninger med batterier i stedet for fossilt brændstof. Senest er det to modeller, hvoraf den ene deler vandene, mens den anden har sin helt egen karakter, som snart vil tøffe rundt helt uden motorstøj.¤¤¤

ing.dk

ING BAGSIDEN: Pas på - livsfarlig væske! Bagsiden er kommet på nettet. Denne gang med ugens risikovurdering¤¤¤

ing.dk

Kan man tage patenter på naturen - eller blot opdage den? Miljøorganisation er klart imod patenter på planter. Men landmænd må vænne sig til patenter, siger landbrugsorganisation.¤¤¤

ing.dk

Kronik: Derfor er spildtid på byggepladser en god nyhed Lean¤¤¤

ing.dk

Fra kulde til varme: Rosetta-kometen forandrer sig på rejsen gennem rummet Billeder fra Den Europæiske Rumorganisation ESA’s spektakulære mission ud til komet 67P giver for første gang en fornemmelse af, hvordan objekter ændrer sig i rummet.¤¤¤

ing.dk

Kvote 2-ansøgere strømmer mod ingeniørfaget 28 procent flere end sidste år vil læse til civilingeniør og 14 procent flere vil være diplomingeniør. Ingeniørstudets kombination af teori og praksis samt de gode jobmuligheder lokker, lyder det fra to studerende. Resultatet vækker glæde hos minister og IDA.¤¤¤

ing.dk

Leder: Giv nu vores skolebørn luft til at lære¤¤¤

ing.dk

Lemvig bygger endnu en mur mod havet En højvandsmur har holdt Limfjorden ude af Lemvig siden 2012. Men muren beskytter kun en del af byen. Nu skal muren udvides mod øst, hvor blød jordbund og sluseport giver udfordringer.¤¤¤

ing.dk

Minister: Vindmøllemedarbejdere skal beskyttes bedre mod farlig kemi Bedre uddannelse, mere information og bedre tilsynsføring skal forhindre nye arbejdsmiljøskandaler forbundet med kemi i vindmøllebranchen.¤¤¤

ing.dk

Økonomisk vismand: Nordsøaftale kan give Mærsk skatterabat på 5 milliarder I den nye Nordsøaftale får olieselskaberne en skattelempelse, som siden hen skal betales tilbage. Men kun hvis oliepriserne stiger – og det er ifølge økonomisk vismand usikkert.¤¤¤

ing.dk

På trods af kulegravning: Forskere står fast på, at nitrat-opgørelse er korrekt Efter anklager om misvisende data varsler miljø- og fødevareministeren kulegravning af opgørelser over nitrat-forurening af grundvandet. Forskere holder fast i opgørelsens korrekthed.¤¤¤

ing.dk

Stor søgning til ny ingeniøruddannelse i Kalundborg Antallet af kvote 2-ansøgere til Kalundborgs nye diplomingeniørstudie i bioteknologi lover godt for studiets fremtid.¤¤¤

ing.dk

GALLERI: Se den kommende arkitektskole i Aarhus Vargo Nielsen Palle, ADEPT og Rolvung og Brøndsted Arkitekter har i samarbejde med ingeniørerne Tri-Consult og Steensen Varming vundet konkurrencen om den første, nybyggede arkitektskole i Danmark nogensinde. Den nye arkitektskole forventes indviet i 2020. Den bliver på ca. 13.000 kvm og er budgetteret til i alt 261 mio. kr.¤¤¤

insidescience

Chaos Theory May Help Predict Red Tides Chaos Theory May Help Predict Red Tides Harmful algal blooms could be linked in unexpected ways to water mixing and nutrient levels. LaJollaRedTide_topNteaser.jpg Red tide off the Scripps Institution of Oceanography pier Image credits: Alejandro Díaz via Wikimedia Commons Rights information: Public domain Earth Wednesday, March 22, 2017 - 12:45 Gabriel Popkin, Contributor (Inside Science) -- It’s¤¤¤

io9.gizmodo

Batman v Superman Funder Claims Rotten Tomatoes Is Ruining Movies, Mostly the One He Paid For Image: DC Brett Ratner, the Rush Hour and Hercules director who co-financed Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice , thinks the real problem with Hollywood isn’t that people don’t like bad movies. It’s the damn Rotten Tomatoes score that confirms it. While speaking at the Sun Valley Film Festival, Ratner called Rotten Tomatoes the worst thing in movie culture, saying it’s “the destruction of our busi¤¤¤

io9.gizmodo

Get an Even Better Look at the Justice League Ahead of the New Trailer (Updated) Image: Warner Bros via Geeks of Color This weekend, DC and Warner Bros. will reveal the next trailer for Justice League —and they’re going to spend the next two days reminding you of that with a ton of new posters and little snippets of footage. Here’s the first batch, focusing intensively on Atlantis’ king, Aquaman himself, followed by Batman and the Flash. The new footage is very brief, but fea¤¤¤

io9.gizmodo

Legion Finally Reveals the Truth About the Monster in David's Head... and His Father, Too All Photos Courtesy FX The latest episode of Legion was full of shocking twists and startling revelations. The first, of course, was confirming the Yellow-Eyed Demon’s true identity (since that news had unfortunately trickled out last week) . However, we also got a Maury Povich-style “You Are the Father” moment that... well, let’s just say it opens up a lot of possibilities. In the penultimate ep¤¤¤

io9.gizmodo

The First Trailer for the Return of Mystery Science Theater 3000 Is Cheesy in All the Right Ways Still: YouTube In the not-too-distant future (next month, to be exact), the new Mystery Science Theater 3000 reboot comes to Netflix, and the first epic trailer has arrived. The Kickstarter-funded and now Netflix-supported series puts Jonah Ray, Hampton Yount, and Baron Vaughn in the theater seats so they can take part in Kinga Forrester’s (Felicia Day) and Son of TV’s Frank’s (Patton Oswalt) evi¤¤¤

io9.gizmodo

The Han Solo Movie Covers Six Formative Years in the Smuggler's Life Harrison Ford as Han Solo in The Empire Strikes Back. Image: Lucasfilm We now know just how young the young Han Solo will be—and the key moments in his early life the film will explore. At a discussion in Los Angeles Thursday, Disney CEO Bob Iger revealed that the Han Solo Star Wars Story will take place as Han ages from 18 to 24. It will show him acquiring his iconic ship the Millennium Falcon,¤¤¤

io9.gizmodo

The Mystery That Made Thor Unworthy Has Been Revealed A few years ago, an omnipotently powered Nick Fury spoke a single sentence to Thor. It was something so profoundly soul-stirring that his ability to wield Mjolnir was wrenched from him, and he became nothing more than the Odinson rather than the God of Thunder. Now we finally know what those words were. The Unworthy Thor series has been following the Odinson in the pursuit of a new hammer to clai¤¤¤

io9.gizmodo

The Next Six Entries in the Power Rangers Movie Franchise Will Be One Big Arc Image: Lionsgate/Kimberly French, via CBR The Power Rangers movie reboot hits theaters this week , and it’s not going to be the last time we see these teenagers with attitude if the man who brought Power Rangers into existence has anything to say about it. In fact, there are plans already under way for a six- part saga. Speaking to Variety , Haim Saban—who, full disclosure, has ownership interest¤¤¤

io9.gizmodo

There Was Yet Another Ending Planned for Rogue One and It Was Absolutely Insane Cassian Andor almost did something incredible in an alternate ending for Rogue One. All Images: Disney Here’s a hint: it involved carbon freezing. As we all know, Rogue One: A Star Wars Story went through innumerable iterations; some of them you saw in trailers and on the big screen, others never made it that far. Recently, Rogue One ’s first writer Gary Whitta revealed an alternate, happier endi¤¤¤

io9.gizmodo

The Teaser for Netflix's Death Note Adaptation Is the Most Netflix Thing Ever Made I really, really wish there was something more interesting going on in the footage from Netflix’s adaptation of Death Note . Instead, it looks exactly like every other drama from Netflix: angsty leads, washed out colors, and the occasional flash of a CG effect. It not only doesn’t really stand out, it feels like it could take its place right next to the promos for any of Netflix’s Marvel shows an¤¤¤

io9.gizmodo

Voltron Legendary Defender's Creators Look Back at the Original Show and the Timeless Appeal of Giant Robot Lions Image: Netflix Netflix is bringing a new collection of episodes from the original Voltron , hand-picked by the creative team that’s brought the iconic series back to life. To celebrate, we sat down with Legendary Defender executive producers Joaquim Dos Santos and Lauren Montgomery to reflect on the original show, and exactly how it has—and hasn’t—inspired the new series. The 12-episode collectio¤¤¤

io9.gizmodo

Watch the Major Go Into Another Mind in This Exclusive Ghost in the Shell Clip Inside another mind is not a good place for the Major in Ghost in the Shell. Image: Paramount Much has already been said about Rupert Sanders’ live-action take on Ghost in the Shell . And with the film out next week, there’s more discussion yet to come. We haven’t seen it yet, but no matter what the verdict ends up being on the movie itself, it at least has a really great visual language. Case in¤¤¤

io9.gizmodo

We Could Get More Movies From the Live-Action Beauty and the Beast Universe The Terminator franchise might not be as in a dire state as we thought. Woody Harrelson hypes up the Han Solo spinoff. Doctor Who ’s next season has a big three-parter with some new villains. Plus, speedy set pictures from Black Panther , and a new look at Ward’s return on Agents of SHIELD . To me, my spoilers! Beauty & the Beast Deadline reports there will be no direct sequels to the live-action¤¤¤

io9.gizmodo

We Have to Talk About Tonight's Crazy Reveals on Legion Photo Courtesy FX Legion is getting all the pieces in place for next week’s season finale, and tonight we got a couple pieces of shocking news, including one that confirms David’s ties to the X-Men. This Photo Courtesy FX + This Still: FX = SHADOW KING!! So yeah, the Yellow-Eyed Demon is actually Amahl Farouk, the Shadow King. If you read our spoilers reveal earlier this week, this didn’t come as¤¤¤

io9.gizmodo

We Know the Name of Woody Harrelson's Character in the Han Solo Movie Gwendoline Christie joins the Darkest Minds adaptation. Laura Dern offers the vaguest of hints about her role in The Last Jedi . Assassin’s Creed is heading to television. Plus, a boatload of new Transformers posters, a new set picture from Infinity War , and new pictures from Orphan Black ’s final season. Spoilers now! Han Solo Woody Harrelson appeared on last night’s Tonight Show with Jimmy Fal¤¤¤

io9.gizmodo

Which Movie Franchise Is the Most Screwed Up? Image: Skydance Welcome, my post-keteers! This week’s irradiated mailbag is just heaving with questions waiting to be answered by your equally irradiated postman. Should the DC movies introduce New Gods other than Darkseid? Why is Daredevil ’s Stick so badass? Plus, Valiant’s movie efforts, half-Vulcan virility, and more. Let’s get to it! Term Limits Tonyc: Hello, Man of the Future - In reading t¤¤¤

io9.gizmodo

You Can Watch the First Five Minutes of Ghost in the Shell Right Here Still: Paramount UK Whatever else might be true of the live-action Ghost in the Shell movie, it’s also true that the filmmakers have put as much of the budget on the screen as humanly possible. And as you can tell when you watch the film’s opening scene—available here and now for your viewing pleasure—it has paid off, at least in in the visuals department. While the scenes are highly reminiscent¤¤¤

jalopnik

American Farmers Are Turning To Ukraine To Hack Into Their Own Tractors: Report photo: John Deere Modern John Deere tractors are outfitted with dozens of sensors and computers, many of which cannot be serviced by owners because of a stupid licensing agreement John Deere forces upon its customers. Since farmers have neither the time nor money to waste on a technician’s visit, some are taking matters into their own hands with eastern European software hacks, Vice’s Motherboard¤¤¤

jalopnik

Local Chevy Dealer Claims Electric Car Will 'Wring Every Last Mile Out Of A Drop Of Fuel' Chevy is already a few months into its gradual roll out of its new Chevy Bolt electric car, and the local dealerships are excited to get people scuttling about in them with an onslaught of ads—even if they don’t all quite understand exactly how an electric car works. As Automotive News reported earlier this week, dealerships are pricing the new Bolt EV all over the place, some thousands of dollar¤¤¤

jalopnik

Uber Employees Use Secret Tools To Target Drivers And Undercut Competition Illustration credit Jason Torchinsky Three years ago, ride-hailing giant Uber came under investigation for a tool called “God View” that allowed employees to track drivers and customers in real-time. Uber has since scaled that ability back, but Jalopnik has learned the company still deploys a revamped version of it, along with other secret internal tools, to target its drivers who also work for c¤¤¤

jezebel

I Took a Nap in a $65,000 Bed of Lights to Get Skin Like Kate Beckinsale Images via the author. Over the past few months, you may have seen commercials for a Phantom of the Opera-esque beauty treatment, a plastic mask full of glowing lights that promises clearer skin. Like glycolic acid peels or at-home laser hair removal, it is the latest product to act as a holy grail: something that was once relegated to the realm of those who could afford a trip to the dermatologi¤¤¤

kinjaroundup.kinja

Kotaku The Last Naruto Episode Is Tomorrow | io9 We Could Get More Movies From the Live-Action Beau Kotaku The Last Naruto Episode Is Tomorrow | io9 We Could Get More Movies From the Live-Action Beauty and the Beast Universe | Truck Yeah The Ridiculously Cheap Mercedes ML55 AMG Has One Trick Left | Two Cents You Don’t Need More Money Advice, You Just Need Advice You Can Relate To |¤¤¤

kinjaroundup.kinja

Kotaku Here’s How Mass Effect: Andromeda Handles Sex and Romance | io9 The Mystery That Made Thor Un Kotaku Here’s How Mass Effect: Andromeda Handles Sex and Romance | io9 The Mystery That Made Thor Unworthy Has Been Revealed | Jalopnik Consumer Reports’ Worst Cars Of 2017 List Is Brutal And Accurate | Lifehacker All the Best Movies Coming to and Leaving Netflix in April 2017 |¤¤¤

kinjaroundup.kinja

Lifehacker How to Stop Destroying Your Clothes in the Wash | io9 We Know the Name of Woody Harrelson Lifehacker How to Stop Destroying Your Clothes in the Wash | io9 We Know the Name of Woody Harrelson’s Character in the Han Solo Movie | Kotaku Leaked Image Gives A First Look At Destiny 2 , Out This September | Jalopnik Uber Employees Use Secret Tools To Target Drivers And Undercut Competition |¤¤¤

kotaku

Defeated League Of Legends Player Rams Head Through Computer Monitor [Image via Ifeng ] Goodness. After losing a match, a League of Legends player in the Chinese city of Lanzhou, one player apparently got angry and slammed his head through the computer screen. According to Ifeng , he was pissed at how poorly his teammates played and took it out on an internet cafe monitor. [Image via Ifeng ] While other players snapped photos to share online, the net cafe staff he¤¤¤

kotaku

Here's How Mass Effect: Andromeda Handles Sex and Romance When Bioware first showed off Mass Effect: Andromeda , some fans didn’t care about the premise, the story, or the combat. The question many of us had was, “what aliens can I fuck this time?” Fear not, thirsty reader, you can indeed fuck some aliens in Andromeda. Like many Bioware games before it, Andromeda allows you to build relationships with your crewmates, some of which culminate in strong fr¤¤¤

kotaku

Switch Controller Cosplays As GameCube Pad Image: Boss Fight Props Boss Fight Props , normally in the business of making cosplay gear, decided to take his Switch controller and dress it up like a GameCube pad. Image: Boss Fight Props I would buy this, if only for the colour-coded buttons. I would buy multiples if it was the GameCube’s old “spice” colour scheme . Image: Boss Fight Props While the images look like renders, it’s the real dea¤¤¤

lifehacker

All the Best Movies Coming to and Leaving Netflix in April 2017 Netflix is about to rain down on April with some nerd-friendly original content, but that’s coming at the cost of some of the best nerd-friendly classic TV. The Highlights Let’s get the bad news out first. Several classic series are leaving Netflix. From my probably incorrect memory, a few of these have been with Netflix since the start of streaming. Okay, here we go then, you ready? Because this¤¤¤

livescience

A Brief History of Dinosaurs Dinosaurs ruled the Earth for 135 million years. There were many types of dinosaurs, in all shapes and sizes.¤¤¤

livescience

11 Ways Your Beloved Pet May Make You Sick Just like other members of your family, pets can also give you their germs.¤¤¤

livescience

Babies Understand More About the World Than Once Thought A revolution in the tools and techniques developmental psychologists use to investigate kids' knowledge and capabilities is rewriting what we know about how and when children understand their world.¤¤¤

livescience

Sea Turtle 'Bank' Dies After 915 Coins Removed from Stomach The turtle died after 915 coins were removed from her stomach.¤¤¤

livescience

Shhh: A Gallery of Secretive Ground Snakes Check out these photos of Atractus snakes, which typically live in burrows and eat insect larvae.¤¤¤

livescience

Rare 'Snakes from Hell' Lurk Near Petrochemical Plant in Ecuador A secretive new ground snake gets a mythology-inspired name.¤¤¤

livescience

Earth's Magnetic Cocoon Mapped in Extreme Detail Satellites have provided a detailed view of the small but vitally important magnetic signals emitted by Earth's outer shell, known as the lithosphere, the European Space Agency (ESA) said.¤¤¤

livescience

AI Investors Rack Up Massive Returns in Stock Market Study A international team of researchers showed that artificial intelligence can make a killing on the stock market, and some real-world hedge funds are already trying it.¤¤¤

livescience

Survival of the Great Barrier Reef Depends on Halting Warming |Video After record temperatures and massive bleaching in 2016, scientists fear that the Great Barrier Reef has again experienced deadly coral bleaching. Researchers warn that the only way to save the Reef is to stop global warming.¤¤¤

livescience

Private Dives to Explore Titanic Shipwreck Announced More than 100 years after the RMS Titanic ran into an iceberg and sank, adventurers will be able to get a close-up look at the fabled shipwreck inside a deep-diving submersible.¤¤¤

livescience

'Revolutionary' Study Shakes Up Dinosaur Family Tree | Video A shake up to the dinosaur family tree suggests that ornithischian dinosaurs, such as stegosaurus, and theropod dinosaurs, such as Tyrannosaurs, are more closely related that previously thought.¤¤¤

livescience

Arctic Sea Ice Hits Record Low - Again! | Video On March 7, 2017, the sea ice reached its wintertime extent and is officially the “lowest ever recorded by satellites at the end of summer in the Southern Hemisphere,” according to NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center.¤¤¤

livescience

Shrine Over Jesus' Tomb in Danger of 'Catastrophic' Collapse The shrine is built over the cave where Jesus was supposedly buried. Scientists say it could fail catastrophically without further repair.¤¤¤

livescience

Scent of a Kitten: Perfumer Debuts 'Kitten Fur' Fragrance How did a fragrance company distill and bottle the elusive and delicious scent of the fur at the back of a kitten’s neck?¤¤¤

livescience

Toilet to Tap: Brewery Creates Beer from Recycled Wastewater The brewery's "Full Circle" ale is made from recycled wastewater.¤¤¤

livescience

Harmful Cocktail: Alcohol Plus Energy Drinks May Raise Injury Risk People who mix alcohol with energy drinks may be at a greater risk of getting hurt while they are intoxicated than those who drink alcohol by itself.¤¤¤

livescience

Why Other Senses May Be Heightened in Blind People People who are blind really do have enhanced abilities in their other senses, according to a new, small study.¤¤¤

livescience

The Dinosaur Family Tree Has Been Uprooted The dinosaur family tree, used by paleontologists and dinosaur buffs for the past 130 years, has just been transformed.¤¤¤

livescience

There Is Now An App for Sperm Testing A new smartphone device could make some awkward doctor visits a thing of the past.¤¤¤

livescience

Breast Implants Linked to Cancer: How Does It Happen? Women with breast implants are at increased risk of developing a rare type of cancer, the FDA said. But how do these implants increase the risk of cancer?¤¤¤

livescience

Threat to Birth Control Access Should Transcend Politics (Op-Ed) Birth control access should transcends politics.¤¤¤

livescience

Astronaut in Space Sees Mount Etna Volcano Eruption (Photo) One of the world's most active volcanoes lights up the night in a spectacular new astronaut photo.¤¤¤

livescience

Facts About Gila Monsters Gila monsters are the largest lizards native to the United States and one of only two venomous lizards in the world.¤¤¤

livescience

Archaeologists Reconstruct Face of Medieval Man Who Died 700 Years Ago The face of a British man who died about 700 years ago has been brought to life using reconstructive technology.¤¤¤

livescience

Cloud Atlas Now Online: See All the Bizarre Formations Around the World The bizarre roll cloud and the beautiful asperitas cloud are among the additions to the latest International Cloud Atlas.¤¤¤

livescience

Record-Low Ice Confirmed at North and South Poles Sea ice at Earth's poles is dwindling, and it reached record lows this month, scientists report.¤¤¤

livescience

Hippie Monkeys Rebound as Yellow Fever Wipes Out a Competitor With one monkey species all but wiped out by yellow fever, what will happen to its hug-loving competitor?¤¤¤

livescience

Putting a Face on a Man Who Died 700 Years Ago | Video Archaeologists used reconstructive technology to recreate the face of a British man who died 700 years ago.¤¤¤

livescience

Photos: The Monkeys of Brazil's Atlantic Forest Howler monkeys and muriquis both call the gorgeous forest of Brazil home.¤¤¤

livescience

Can You Be Obese And Healthy? | Video Some obese people don't have any of the typical risk factors for heart disease or diabetes.¤¤¤

livescience

Senate Votes to Allow Hunting of Grizzly Bears in Alaska Refuges The U.S. Senate voted, mostly along party lines, on Tuesday (March 21) to abolish a regulation that prohibited certain types of hunting in Alaska national wildlife refuges.¤¤¤

livescience

Human-Caused Climate Change Made 2016 Way Too Hot The year 2016 was one for the record books, at least when it comes to the weather. Last year had the highest global temperature in modern history and extremely high levels of carbon dioxide and sea level rise.¤¤¤

livescience

King George's Letters Betray Madness, Computer Finds Hundreds of letters written by King George III of England support a modern diagnosis of madness during his later years.¤¤¤

livescience

US Military's 'Gremlin' Program Lets Pilots Launch and Snag Drones in Midair The fairy-tale-inspired "Gremlin" program aims to launch and retrieve drones in midair.¤¤¤

livescience

Alcohol & Heart Health: New Study Untangles the Effects When it comes to alcohol and heart health, the back and forth between findings can leave you feeling dizzy.¤¤¤

livescience

Nearly Two-Thirds of Cancers Are Due to Random DNA 'Mistakes' Cancer is a disease cause by mistakes in DNA, and now a new study finds that majority of these mistakes are completely random — they're not due to heredity or environmental factors, but rather the result of random errors.¤¤¤

livescience

Facts About Newts Newts are small semi-aquatic amphibians that possess some interesting characteristics. For example, their skin is toxic and they can regenerate amputated limbs. "Astronewts" have also flown in space.¤¤¤

nature

Nuclear-test films, smoking declines and five new particles The week in science: 17–23 March 2017. Nature 543 468 doi: 10.1038/543468a¤¤¤

nature

Dinosaur family tree poised for colossal shake-up 'Textbook-changing' analysis of dinosaur bones upends long-accepted relationships among major groups. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21681¤¤¤

nature

Dinosaur Family Tree Poised for Colossal Shake-Up “Textbook-changing” analysis of dinosaur bones upends long-accepted relationships among major .

nature

DNA typos to blame for most cancer mutations Environment and heredity might not contribute as much to cancer risk as researchers thought. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21696¤¤¤

nature

Zika mosquito genome mapped – at last ‘Breakthrough’ technique used to piece together genome sequence of Zika vector, Aedes aegypti, 10 years after publication of draft sequence. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21697¤¤¤

nature

Canada budget falls flat with scientists Emphasis on innovation overshadowed by funding freeze for key research councils. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21699¤¤¤

nature

Gates Foundation announces open-access publishing venture Global health charity is latest funder to start its own publishing ‘channel’ — and the European Commission is considering its own service. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21700¤¤¤

neurocritic.blogspot

What's Popular at #CNS2017? Memory wins again ! Word cloud for 835 poster titles at CNS 2017. The 2017 Cognitive Neuroscience Society annual meeting will start tomorrow, March 25. To no one's surprise, memory is the most popular topic in the bottom-up abstract submission sweepstakes. In contrast, the top-down selections of the Cognosenti are light on memory, with a greater emphasis on attention, speech, mind-wandering, and¤¤¤

neuwritesd

Are computers like brains? [En español] A few weeks ago I stumbled upon an article, after a friend of mine (and fellow neuroscientist) posted it on one of the multiple social media outlets we manage these days. I felt immediately curious about its content, with a title that cleverly teases neuroscientists: Could a neuroscientist understand a microprocessor? After reading […]¤¤¤

newscientist

Quarter of California’s snowpack loss is from human-made warming California’s reservoirs depend on the gradual melting of winter snow in the Sierra Nevada mountains, but the snowpack is dwindling and may not return¤¤¤

newscientist

First dinosaurs may have been omnivores in the north hemisphere Largest shake-up of dinosaur family tree in 130 years puts T. rex in a group with herbivores and uproots what we thought we knew about the reptiles¤¤¤

newscientist

Female fish with bigger brains choose better mates Colourful male guppies are healthier and better foragers. But using this information to pick a good mate requires female guppies to use more brainpower¤¤¤

newscientist

Moderate drinking may be ‘heart healthy’ but exercise is safer Another study has found that drinking 14 units or less a week is linked to better cardiovascular health. But drinking alcohol for health is a risky strategy¤¤¤

newscientist

Oddball star could be home to long-sought superheavy elements One of the most chemically strange stars we know could chart a path to the so-called "island of stability", where massive yet relatively stable atoms exist¤¤¤

newscientist

Shock mass coral die-off in Asia sounds alarm for world’s reefs An unexpected coral bleaching event in the South China Sea shows that reefs can heat up substantially more than the surrounding ocean¤¤¤

newscientist

Best evidence yet that hypnotised people aren’t faking it It’s hard to tell whether hypnotism is real. Now researchers have used a trick of the mind to show that hypnotised people’s actions really do feel involuntary¤¤¤

newscientist

Robots are stronger, faster, more durable… and hackable Some of today's best known robots turn out to be easily hijacked, a sign that this burgeoning tech industry must make security a top priority, says Paul Marks¤¤¤

newscientist

Edited live vaccine could stop harmful polio outbreaks We’re on the brink of eradicating polio, but the virus used as a vaccine can evolve to become dangerous. Now a team has figured out how, and plan to stop it¤¤¤

newscientist

Phone learns to send app notifications only when you want them Knowing when you don’t want to be interrupted will help systems manage the deluge of smartphone notifications and wait for a good time¤¤¤

newscientist

Chronic pain and depression are linked by brain gene changes At least 40 per cent of people with severe chronic pain develop depression. A mouse study has found changes in brain gene activity that may explain the link¤¤¤

newscientist

How free speech can become censorship – and how to solve it The more free speech, the better – or so we thought. But in a world of bots and misinformation, the online free-for-all is ruining debate¤¤¤

newscientist

Can data save rhinos? How to attack wildlife crime at source By the time surveillance technology catches a poacher, it's already too late. Now researchers are training a new generation of technology on the demand for endangered animals, not the supply¤¤¤

newscientist

A little less ET, a little more astrophysics, if you please The role of science is to rule out the boring and tedious before we embrace the extraordinary, like alien signals or "megastructures", says Geraint Lewis¤¤¤

newscientist

Old blood can be made young again and it might fight ageing A protein can boost blood stem cells, making them behave like those of younger people. Is it the key to harnessing young blood’s rejuvenating power?¤¤¤

newscientist

Robots could help children give evidence in child abuse cases Even trained police interviewers find it hard to stay neutral when talking to children who have been abused. Could robots help collect better evidence?¤¤¤

newscientist

Atomic clocks make best measurement yet of relativity of time Einstein's relativity has survived another test, carried out using a network of synchronised atomic clocks in three European cities¤¤¤

npr

How The 'Scarcity Mindset' Can Make Problems Worse Researchers had a hypothesis that when you really want something, you start to focus on it obsessively. It produces a kind of tunnel vision and creates problems for thinking in the long-term.¤¤¤

npr

Powdered Vaccine Raises Hopes Of Stopping A Top Killer Of Kids It's aimed at rotavirus, a nasty pathogen that can cause diarrhea and kills more than 500 children a day. The secret to the vaccine is the same thing that makes space ice cream so cool. .

npr

Science-Loving Teens From Ghana And D.C. Geek Out Together They competed in the first World Smarts STEM Challenge. We got to know the team that worked on a water purifier using neem leaves and ... cilantro. .

npr

A Smartphone Can Accurately Test Sperm Count Measuring the quality of those little swimmers usually requires a trip to the doctor. Researchers have come up with a smartphone accessory that would let men do that at home in less than five seconds. .

npr

Social Media, Math And The Mystery Of A Mumps Outbreak Since August 2016, there have been nearly 3,000 cases of mumps diagnosed in Arkansas. A epidemiologist explains how her team used online data and mathematical modeling to understand the outbreak. .

npr

The Forces Driving Middle-Aged White People's 'Deaths Of Despair' Middle-aged white people without college degrees are increasingly likely to die of suicide or drug and alcohol abuse. The lack of a pathway to solid jobs is one reason, two economists say. .

npr

Doctor Turns Up Possible Treatment For Deadly Sepsis Research hasn't yet confirmed the early hints that a mix of IV vitamins and steroids might stop the fatal organ failure of sepsis. But an effective treatment for sepsis would be a really big deal. .

npr

Cancer Is Partly Caused By Bad Luck, Study Finds Researchers have long known behavior, environment and genetics play a role in cancer. A study in Science finds luck is also a major factor. Nearly two-thirds of cancer mutations arise randomly. .

npr

Kids Who Suffer Hunger In First Years Lag Behind Their Peers In School When infants and young kids grow up in homes without enough to eat, they're more likely to perform poorly in kindergarten, a study shows. The younger they experienced hunger, the stronger the effect. .

npr

The U.S. Can't Really Know If Farmers Are Cutting Back On Antibiotics, GAO Says New FDA rules limit how farmers can give antibiotics to animals raised for meat. But a Government Accountability Office report says the FDA doesn't collect the data to know if that policy is working. .

npr

Congress Rolls Back Obama-Era Rule On Hunting Bears And Wolves In Alaska The Senate voted Tuesday to lift a 2016 ban on certain hunting practices — like trapping and aerial shooting — on national wildlife refuges there. Now the bill heads to President Trump to be signed. .

nyheder.ku.dk

Antallet af kvote 2-ansøgninger falder Københavns Universitet kan registrere et fald i antallet af kvote 2-ansøgere i forhold...¤¤¤

nyheder.ku.dk

Nyt vaccinekoncept skal udrydde frygtet bakteriesygdom hos fisk Forskere fra Københavns Universitet har sammen med en dansk biotekvirksomhed udviklet en ny type...¤¤¤

nytimes

Arctic’s Winter Sea Ice Drops to Its Lowest Recorded Level Much of the ice also appears to be thinner than normal — further signs of climate change’s effects on the region.¤¤¤

nytimes

As Rivals Stand Silent, One Health Insurer Protests G.O.P. Plan Dr. J. Mario Molina, one of the few insurance executives to criticize the House bill publicly, says it could harm insurers and patients alike.¤¤¤

nytimes

New Vaccine Could Slow Disease That Kills 600 Children a Day A lower-cost vaccine provides strong protection against rotavirus, a diarrheal disease, and could be particularly useful in poorer countries, researchers said.¤¤¤

nytimes

Shaking Up the Dinosaur Family Tree A Ph.D candidate and a computer program that took five minutes to run may upend the dinosaur classification system that has been used for more than a century.¤¤¤

nytimes

A Scholarly Sting Operation Shines a Light on ‘Predatory’ Journals A group of researchers created a ruse to draw attention to the seamy side of open-access journals, some of which will publish just about anything for a fee.¤¤¤

nytimes

A Space Odyssey: Making Art Up There The artist Eduardo Kac and Thomas Pesquet, a Frenchman on the International Space Station, have created art in space.¤¤¤

nytimes

Lewis Rowland, Leading Neurologist on Nerve and Muscle Diseases, Dies at 91 Dr. Rowland, who had a special interest in A.L.S., or Lou Gehrig’s disease, refused to be interrogated by investigators in the McCarthy era.¤¤¤

nytimes

Trilobites: How Comet 67P’s Face Changed During Its Trip Around the Sun During the two years that the Rosetta spacecraft stalked the comet, it observed cliffs that collapsed, boulders that moved and eruptions of dust and gas.¤¤¤

paleofuture.gizmodo

US Diplomat Was Investigated for Spying as a Kid Because He Kept Writing Boeing Asking for Photos Military historian and US diplomat Robert F. Dorr in a photo from October of 2003 (Photo by Jon Smythe) By most standards, Robert F. Dorr lived the most all-American, patriotic life anyone possibly could. He served in the Air Force, he was a diplomat with the State Department from the 1960s to the 1980s, and he went on to be a successful author and TV pundit about military affairs. But as a teena¤¤¤

phys

ABC News says three of its Twitter accounts were hacked ABC News said three of its Twitter accounts were hacked Thursday morning, sending out profanity-filled tweets to its millions of followers.¤¤¤

phys

Accounting for sex differences in biomedical research When it comes to health, a person's sex can play a role. More women in the U.S. have autoimmune diseases than men, for example, whereas boys are more likely to be diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder than girls. Yet biomedical research on disease and possible new treatments often studies only one sex. The cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American¤¤¤

phys

Age at immigration influences occupational skill development The future occupations of U.S. immigrant children are influenced by how similar their native language is to English, finds a new study by scholars at Duke University and the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School.¤¤¤

phys

How A.I. captured a volcano's changing lava lake One of our planet's few exposed lava lakes is changing, and artificial intelligence is helping NASA understand how.¤¤¤

phys

An algorithm that knows when you'll get bored with your favourite mobile game Researchers from the Tokyo-based company Silicon Studio, led by Spanish data scientist África Periáñez, have developed a new algorithm that predicts when a user will leave a mobile game. This information is useful for game studios so that they can design strategies to maintain the player's interest.¤¤¤

phys

The development of amphibians and reptiles through twelve million years of geological history Together with an international team, Senckenberg scientist Professor Dr. Madelaine Böhme studied the development of the amphibian and reptile fauna in Western Siberia during the past twelve million years. In their study, published today in the scientific journal Peer J, the scientists demonstrate that the species diversity of both groups of animals was noticeably higher in the past than it is toda¤¤¤

phys

Analysis of letters written by 'Mad' King George III supports psychiatric diagnosis of mania Researchers have concluded that King George III was probably suffering from a mental illness after computer analysis of hundreds of his letters.¤¤¤

phys

Analysis: Building a market for renewable thermal technologies Though a mature technology, renewable thermals occupy a small niche in Connecticut—and in the U.S. at large. A new Yale-led study analyzes the market potential of this technology across the state and provides key insights into spurring consumer demand.¤¤¤

phys

Ancient fossil reveals the evolution of bird legs for the first time Researchers from the UK and China have found that living birds have a more crouched leg posture than their ancestors, who are generally thought to have moved with straighter limbs similar to those of humans. The study, published in Nature Communications, highlights how birds shifted towards this more crouched posture.¤¤¤

phys

Andromeda's bright X-ray mystery solved by NuSTAR The Milky Way's close neighbor, Andromeda, features a dominant source of high-energy X-ray emission, but its identity was mysterious until now. As reported in a new study, NASA's NuSTAR (Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array) mission has pinpointed an object responsible for this high-energy radiation.¤¤¤

phys

AP Interview: Emirates defends security as laptop ban looms The president of Emirates, the Middle East's biggest airline, defended security measures at the carrier's Dubai hub on Wednesday and said the ban on personal electronics onboard U.S.-bound flights came without warning.¤¤¤

phys

Aquaculture is polluting Chile's rivers with a cocktail of dissolved organic substances Tasty, versatile, and rich in essential omega-3 fatty acids: salmon is one of the most popular edible fish of all. Shops sell fish caught in the wild, but their main produce is salmon from breeding farms which can pollute rivers, lakes and oceans. Just how big is the problem? German and Chilean scientists are working to answer this question under the leadership of the Helmholtz Centre for Environm¤¤¤

phys

Arctic sea ice dips to record low for winter (Update) The frigid top of the Earth just set yet another record for low levels of sea ice in what scientists say is a signal of an overheating world.¤¤¤

phys

Argon is not the 'dope' for metallic hydrogen Hydrogen is both the simplest and the most-abundant element in the universe, so studying it can teach scientists about the essence of matter. And yet there are still many hydrogen secrets to unlock, including how best to force it into a superconductive, metallic state with no electrical resistance.¤¤¤

phys

Tracing aromatic molecules in the early universe A molecule found in car engine exhaust fumes that is thought to have contributed to the origin of life on Earth has made astronomers heavily underestimate the amount of stars that were forming in the early Universe, a University of California, Riverside-led study has found.¤¤¤

phys

Artificial photosynthesis steps into the light Rice University scientists have created an efficient, simple-to-manufacture oxygen-evolution catalyst that pairs well with semiconductors for solar water splitting, the conversion of solar energy to chemical energy in the form of hydrogen and oxygen.¤¤¤

phys

Asian-American students have strong academic support—but is it too much? Despite having the strongest academic support from parents, teachers, and friends, second-generation Asian American adolescents benefit much less from these supports than others, finds a study by NYU's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development.¤¤¤

phys

Astronomers observe early stages of Milky Way-like galaxies in distant universe For decades, astronomers have found distant galaxies by detecting the characteristic way their gas absorbs light from a bright quasar in the background. But efforts to observe the light emitted by these same galaxies have mostly been unsuccessful. Now, a team of astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) in Chile has observed emissions from two distant galaxies initially detected¤¤¤

phys

Astronomers study a rare multi-eclipsing quintet of stars (Phys.org)—A team of astronomers led by Krzysztof Hełminiak of the Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center in Toruń, Poland, has investigated an interesting bright quintuple stellar system in which each of the stars is eclipsed. The quintet, designated KIC 4150611 (also known as HD 181469), given its peculiar pulsations, eclipses, and high-order multiplicity, could provide important information on¤¤¤

phys

Astronomers find unexpected, dust-obscured star formation in distant galaxy Pushing the limits of the largest single-aperture millimeter telescope in the world, and coupling it with gravitational lensing, University of Massachusetts Amherst astronomer Alexandra Pope and colleagues report that they have detected a surprising rate of star formation, four times higher than previously detected, in a dust-obscured galaxy behind a Frontier Fields cluster.¤¤¤

phys

With Astronomy Rewind, citizen scientists bring zombie astrophotos back to life A new citizen-science project will rescue tens of thousands of potentially valuable cosmic images that are mostly dead to science and bring them fully back to life. Called Astronomy Rewind, the effort, which launches today (22 March 2017), will take photographs, radio maps, and other telescopic images that have been scanned from the pages of dusty old journals and place them in context in digital¤¤¤

phys

ATP hydrolysis energy explained through large-scale hybrid quantum / classical simulations In ATP hydrolysis, water is used to split apart adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to create adenosine diphosphate (ADP) to get energy. ATP hydrolysis energy (AHE) is then used in the activities of living cells.¤¤¤

phys

AT&T, Verizon join Google ad boycott AT&T and Verizon on Wednesday joined global firms pulling ads from Google, saying they did not want their brands associated with inappropriate content on the internet giant.¤¤¤

phys

17,000 AT&T workers will come back on the job Thursday Some 17,000 AT&T workers in California and Nevada are returning to their jobs after a one-day walkout. They had been protesting changes in job duties for some employees.¤¤¤

phys

New research may beat back bedbug epidemic A new biopesticide developed by Penn State scientists has the potential to turn the bedbug control market on its ear, thanks to a robust entrepreneurial ecosystem taking root at Penn State that's helping to push crucial discoveries out of the laboratory and into the marketplace.¤¤¤

phys

Bee expert discusses bumblebee, now officially listed as endangered Populations of the rusty patched bumblebee, a once-common bee species, have dramatically declined during the past three decades. Many scientists who study bees believe the species may be headed toward extinction¤¤¤

phys

Big-game jitters: Coyotes no match for wolves' hunting prowess It may have replaced the dwindling eastern wolf atop many food chains, but the eastern coyote lacks the chops to become the big-game hunter of an ecosystem, new research led by a University of Nebraska-Lincoln ecologist shows.¤¤¤

phys

Biologists say wolf spiders have a wider range of personality than once believed Charming might not be the best way to describe a spider, but researchers at the University of Cincinnati are finding a wide spectrum of personality in a creature whose behavior was thought to be inflexible and hardwired in its genes.¤¤¤

phys

Biopesticide could defeat insecticide resistance in bedbugs A fungal biopesticide that shows promise for the control of bed bugs is highly effective even against bed-bug populations that are insecticide resistant, according to research conducted by scientists at Penn State and North Carolina State universities.¤¤¤

phys

Biophysicists construct complex hybrid structures using DNA and proteins Florian Praetorius and Prof. Hendrik Dietz of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have developed a new method that can be used to construct custom hybrid structures using DNA and proteins. The method opens new opportunities for fundamental research in cell biology and for applications in biotechnology and medicine.¤¤¤

phys

Bird flu confirmed in 3 Southern states; poultry not at risk Bird flu has now been confirmed in three Southern states, but officials say the nation's poultry supply isn't at risk.¤¤¤

phys

How birthplace and education influence marriage choices in China Many people choose their spouse based on shared values and interests. But in China, another important, relatively unknown factor plays a role: hukou, and it may be contributing to growing socioeconomic disparity in the country's largest city, according to a new UBC study.¤¤¤

phys

California fuel standards to get critical review A state review has found California is on track to meet its tougher car-emission standards and urges regulators to draft more ambitious environmental targets for the future.¤¤¤

phys

A 'carbon law' offers pathway to halve emissions every decade, say researchers On the eve of this year's Earth hour (25 March), researchers propose a solution in the journal Science for the global economy to rapidly reduce carbon emissions. The authors argue a carbon roadmap, driven by a simple rule of thumb or "carbon law" of halving emissions every decade, could catalyse disruptive innovation.¤¤¤

phys

Researchers develop a new model to unlock catalytic powers of gold Until 1985, gold was widely believed to be chemically inert. But once researchers discovered that nano-sized gold particles can act as remarkable and selective catalysts, a world of possibility opened up.¤¤¤

phys

CEO of Silicon Valley networking firm looks to future At least on the surface, networking products aren't the most exciting tech gadgets. But they're what make the internet - and all the devices, apps and services that communicate through it - work.¤¤¤

phys

The Cerberus Groundsnake is a Critically Endangered new species from Ecuador With as many as 140 species, Atractus is the most diverse snake genus in the world, even though it can be found exclusively in Central and South America. However, these colubrid ground snakes seem largely under-researched, since there have been thirty-three species discovered in the last ten years only.¤¤¤

phys

Charitable giving: How do power and beliefs about equality impact donations? Are powerful, well-to-do people more charitable? It depends. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, wealthier people are more likely to donate to charity if they endorse social inequality while less wealthy people are more likely to make donations if they endorse greater equality.¤¤¤

phys

Chemical reactions 'filmed' at the single-molecule level Scientists have succeeded in 'filming' inter-molecular chemical reactions – using the electron beam of a transmission electron microscope (TEM) as a stop-frame imaging tool. They have also discovered that the electron beam can be simultaneously tuned to stimulate specific chemical reactions by using it as a source of energy as well as an imaging tool.¤¤¤

phys

Chemists ID catalytic 'key' for converting CO2 to methanol Capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) and converting it to useful chemicals such as methanol could reduce both pollution and our dependence on petroleum products. So scientists are intensely interested in the catalysts that facilitate such chemical conversions. Like molecular dealmakers, catalysts bring the reacting chemicals together in a way that makes it easier for them to break and rearrange their ch¤¤¤

phys

One in four children will live with water shortages by 2040: UNICEF Approximately one in four children worldwide will live in regions with extremely scarce water resources by 2040, UNICEF said in a report Wednesday.¤¤¤

phys

China's Geely opens UK plant for electric London taxis Chinese carmaker Geely, owner of the London Taxi Company, opened Wednesday a £300-million UK factory making only electrical versions of the iconic London black cab for use worldwide.¤¤¤

phys

China's ZTE pleads guilty to violating US sanctions on Iran, N.Korea Chinese telecom giant ZTE has pleaded guilty in a US court to violating US export controls by selling goods to Iran and North Korea over several years.¤¤¤

phys

Research shows that circular RNAs, until now considered non-coding, can encode for proteins A group of scientists in Israel and Germany, led by Prof. Sebastian Kadener from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, have discovered a protein-encoding function for circular RNA. This kind of RNA molecule is highly active in brain cells and could play an important role in neurodegenerative diseases.¤¤¤

phys

Climate change and an 'overlooked' nutrient: silica Among ecologists, carbon gets all the glory. Scientists examine its critical role in plant growth and decay, they chart its contributions to greenhouse gases, and they measure its sequestration in earth, sea, and sky.¤¤¤

phys

Cloud spotters help 'wave-like' formation secure official recognition A new cloud formation first spotted by citizen scientists and verified by University of Reading weather experts is set to join the official register of cloud types.¤¤¤

phys

Feeling out of control: Do consumers make practical purchases or luxury buys? The common assumption about retail therapy is that it's all about indulging in things like pricey designer duds or the latest gadgets. But according to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers are actually more likely to make practical purchases than splurge on luxury items when they feel less in control.¤¤¤

phys

Corals die as global warming collides with local weather in the South China Sea In the South China Sea, a 2°C rise in the sea surface temperature in June 2015 was amplified to produce a 6°C rise on Dongsha Atoll, a shallow coral reef ecosystem, killing approximately 40 percent of the resident coral community within weeks, according to a study published in Scientific Reports this week.¤¤¤

phys

Costly curves? Overweight consumers spend more when reminded of thinness Popular media mirror Western culture's fixation with being thin. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, even subtle reminders of idealized bodies can encourage overweight consumers to overspend.¤¤¤

phys

How chewing like a cow helped early mammals thrive You probably haven't given much thought to how you chew, but the jaw structure and mechanics of almost all modern mammals may have something to do with why we're here today. In a new paper published this week in Scientific Reports, David Grossnickle, a graduate student in the Committee on Evolutionary Biology at the University of Chicago, proposes that mammal teeth, jaw bones and muscles evolved t¤¤¤

phys

Cryo-electron microscopy achieves unprecedented resolution using new computational methods Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM)—which enables the visualization of viruses, proteins, and other biological structures at the molecular level—is a critical tool used to advance biochemical knowledge. Now Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) researchers have extended cryo-EM's impact further by developing a new computational algorithm that was instrumental in constructing a 3-D at¤¤¤

phys

Dairy farmers should rethink a cow's curfew Dairy cows housed indoors want to break curfew and roam free, suggests new research from the University of British Columbia, published today in Scientific Reports.¤¤¤

phys

Dark tourism has grown around myth of prison tree ew research involving the University of Adelaide is helping to expose a myth about a significant Australian "prison tree," which researchers say has become a popular tourism attraction for the wrong reasons.¤¤¤

phys

Under the dead sea, warnings of dire drought Nearly 1,000 feet below the bed of the Dead Sea, scientists have found evidence that during past warm periods, the Mideast has suffered drought on scales never recorded by humans—a possible warning for current times. Thick layers of crystalline salt show that rainfall plummeted to as little as a fifth of modern levels some 120,000 years ago, and again about 10,000 years ago. Today, the region is d¤¤¤

phys

Discovery of a novel chromosome segregation mechanism during cell division When cells divide, chromosomes need to be evenly segregated between daughter cells. This equal distribution of chromosomes is very important to accurately pass on genetic information to the next generation. Abnormal chromosomal segregation, on the other hand, can cause cell death (apoptosis) or diseases like Down syndrome and cancer. In order for chromosomes to equally divide, it is necessary firs¤¤¤

phys

Discovery of new ginger species spices up African wildlife surveys Scientists from WCS have discovered a new species of wild ginger, spicing up a wave of recent wildlife discoveries in the Kabobo Massif - a rugged, mountainous region in Democratic Republic of Congo.¤¤¤

phys

3-D printing turns nanomachines into life-size workers Using advanced 3-D printing, Dartmouth College researchers have unlocked the key to transforming microscopic nanorings into smart materials that perform work at human-scale.¤¤¤

phys

Connected dolls and tell-tale teddy bears: Why we need to manage the Internet of Toys Action is needed to monitor and control the emerging Internet of Toys, concludes a new report by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC). Privacy and security are highlighted as main areas of concern.¤¤¤

phys

Egyptian ritual images from the Neolithic period Egyptologists at the University of Bonn discovered rock art from the 4th millennium BC during an excavation at a necropolis near Aswan in Egypt. The paintings were engraved into the rock in the form of small dots and depict hunting scenes like those found in shamanic depictions. They may represent a link between the Neolithic period and Ancient Egyptian culture. The discovery earned the scientists¤¤¤

phys

The ethics of research—how to end the exploitation of vulnerable communities Vulnerable indigenous communities across the world have long fallen victim to plundering "bioprospectors" who have raided and commercialised their biological resources and given them little or nothing in return.¤¤¤

phys

Expert: Bird flu outbreak nation's worst since 2015 A bird flu outbreak that has led officials to euthanize more than 200,000 animals in three Southern states already is the nation's worst since 2015 and new cases are still popping up, an expert said Wednesday.¤¤¤

phys

Experts in social support hope to help Cuba with its demographic dilemma A plummeting birthrate and scarcity of resources have left Cuba facing a demographic dilemma.¤¤¤

phys

Exploring the negative consequences of stereotyping Social mythologies, like the old saw that "white men can't jump," may in fact have some negative consequences for those being stereotyped. And even if the majority of people do not openly endorse these negative beliefs, recent research suggests that just the mere awareness of these stereotypes can have negative consequences for individuals who are targeted by them, according to two social psycholo¤¤¤

phys

Faster cellular signals could mean slower Wi-Fi You may soon see faster connections on your cellular service. But your Wi-Fi connection may pay the price.¤¤¤

phys

Female guppies with larger brains found to favor more colorful mates (Phys.org)—A team of researchers with members from Sweden and the U.K. has found that female guppies with larger than average brains preferred to mate with males that were more colorful than average compared to smaller brained females. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the team describes how they bred guppies to develop larger brains and used them for comparison purposes in¤¤¤

phys

It's a fish eat tree world: Study finds widespread support that lakes are fed by their watersheds Most of the planet's freshwater stores are found in the northern hemisphere, a region that is changing rapidly in response to human activity and shifting climatic trends. An international team of scientists analyzed 147 northern lakes and found that many rely on nutrients from tree leaves, pine needles, and other land-grown plants to feed aquatic life.¤¤¤

phys

Fledgling stars try to prevent their neighbors from birthing planets Newly formed stars are surrounded by a disc of dense gas and dust. This is called the protoplanetary disc, as material sticks together within it to form planets.¤¤¤

phys

Researchers make flexible glass for tiny medical devices Brigham Young University researchers have developed new glass technology that could add a new level of flexibility to the microscopic world of medical devices.¤¤¤

phys

Another reason to flip the off switch: light pollution For the 11th year running, cities worldwide will turn their lights off Saturday to mark Earth Hour in a global call to action on climate change.¤¤¤

phys

Research looks at friction properties of material Normally, bare metal sliding against bare metal is not a good thing. Friction will destroy pistons in an engine, for example, without lubrication.¤¤¤

phys

Ghosts of past diseases shape species evolution Parasites and diseases are major elements of the environment that affect animal populations. The new findings show evidence that infections in one generation can affect the survival and growth of a subsequent generation that is not directly exposed to the disease.¤¤¤

phys

Google ad boycott could aim ire at ad-serving software Google's money-making foundation is strong enough to endure a current boycott by advertisers, but the movement could rattle the practice of software "programmed" ad placement, analysts said on Thursday.¤¤¤

phys

Google Street View cars are eyes on the ground for urban methane leaks A set of Google Street View mapping cars, specially equipped with cutting-edge methane analyzers, are allowing Colorado State University researchers to "see" invisible methane leaks from natural gas lines beneath our streets.¤¤¤

phys

Google Maps already tracks you; now other people can, too Google Maps users will soon be able to broadcast their movements to friends and family—the latest test of how much privacy people are willing to sacrifice in an era of rampant sharing.¤¤¤

phys

Heavy metal binding domain in a cysteine-rich protein may be sea snail adaptation to metal stress A special type of small sulfur-rich protein, metallothioneins, have an extraordinary capability for binding heavy metals. An international team of scientists has now discovered that the marine common periwinkle, which is widely considered a delicacy, contains the largest version of the protein found yet, with one additional cadmium-binding domain and a one-third higher detoxification capacity. As¤¤¤

phys

Study shows public wants researchers held accountable for data fraud Whether it is falsification, fabrication or selective reporting, the general public views these research practices as immoral and believes scientists should be held accountable, according to a new study by researchers at the University at Albany.¤¤¤

phys

Research highlights potential way to combat toxoplasmosis parasite It lives inside one third of the UK population and is a common infection in cats, however until now scientists knew little about how the toxoplasmosis parasite communicated with its host.¤¤¤

phys

Gravitational wave kicks monster black hole out of galactic core Astronomers have uncovered a supermassive black hole that has been propelled out of the center of a distant galaxy by what could be the awesome power of gravitational waves.¤¤¤

phys

Ice in Ceres' shadowed craters linked to tilt history Dwarf planet Ceres may be hundreds of millions of miles from Jupiter, and even farther from Saturn, but the tremendous influence of gravity from these gas giants has an appreciable effect on Ceres' orientation. In a new study, researchers from NASA's Dawn mission calculate that the axial tilt of Ceres—the angle at which it spins as it journeys around the sun—varies widely over the course of about¤¤¤

phys

Image: Space Station view of Mount Etna erupting The Expedition 50 crew aboard the International Space Station had a nighttime view from orbit of Europe's most active volcano, Mount Etna, erupting on March 19, 2017.¤¤¤

phys

Imprinting nano-patterns in metals Materials scientists at the TU Darmstadt are imprinting nano-patterns in metals, a technology that could give metallic surfaces permanent functionality, like a lotus effect or reduced frictional properties.¤¤¤

phys

Insights pave way for solar cells and photodetectors based on tunable nanoparticles Solar cells and photodetectors could soon be made from new types of materials based on semiconductor quantum dots, thanks to new insights based on ultrafast measurements capturing real-time photoconversion processes.¤¤¤

phys

Insights may lead to design and development of superior metallic alloys An international research collaboration led by scientists at City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has explained a long-standing thermodynamic inconsistency in the formation of a class of metallic glass that may lead to the development of new, better metallic alloys.¤¤¤

phys

Isotopic makeup of atmospheric sulfate and nitrate Oxygen has three stable isotopes (16O, 17O and 18O). Enrichment of 17O relative to the dominant 16O is normally about half of that of 18O for various physicochemical processes, except for ozone (O3) production, which uniquely enriches 17O. This anomalous enrichment of 17O (Δ17O) is inherited by other photochemical oxidants and oxidation products derived from the precursor ozone through various atm¤¤¤

phys

Japan culls 280,000 more birds for avian flu Japan deployed hundreds of soldiers to help cull more than 280,000 chickens on Friday, officials said as they try to contain further outbreaks of a highly contagious strain of avian flu.¤¤¤

phys

Kaikoura quake may prompt rethink of earthquake hazard models internationally Last November's magnitude 7.8 Kaikoura earthquake was so complex and unusual that it is likely to lead to changes in the way scientists think about earthquake hazards in plate boundary zones worldwide, a new study says.¤¤¤

phys

Kenya sells first ever mobile government bonds Kenya, a pioneer in mobile money, on Thursday began selling the first ever government bonds via mobile phone, allowing anyone from teachers to shop owners to invest and fund infrastructure projects.¤¤¤

phys

Inventing a new kind of matter Imagine a liquid that could move on its own. No need for human effort or the pull of gravity. You could put it in a container flat on a table, not touch it in any way, and it would still flow.¤¤¤

phys

Too much structured knowledge hurts creativity, study shows Structure organizes human activities and help us understand the world with less effort, but it can be the killer of creativity, concludes a study from the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management.¤¤¤

phys

Lab researchers boost truck fuel efficiency through improved aerodynamics Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers, as part of a Navistar SuperTruck I team, helped design a new type of tractor trailer truck that improves fuel economy by 124 percent, compared to heavy vehicles on the road today.¤¤¤

phys

'Lab-on-a-glove' could bring nerve-agent detection to a wearer's fingertips There's a reason why farmers wear protective gear when applying organophosphate pesticides. The substances are very effective at getting rid of unwanted bugs, but they can also make people sick. Related compounds—organophosphate nerve agents—can be used as deadly weapons. Now researchers have developed a fast way to detect the presence of such compounds in the field using a disposable "lab-on-a-gl¤¤¤

phys

Lack of leisure: Is busyness the new status symbol? Long gone are the days when a life of material excess and endless leisure time signified prestige. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, Americans increasingly perceive busy and overworked people as having high status.¤¤¤

phys

Lack of staffing, funds prevent marine protected areas from realizing full potential Marine protected areas (MPAs) are an increasingly popular strategy for protecting marine biodiversity, but a new global study demonstrates that widespread lack of personnel and funds are preventing MPAs from reaching their full potential. Only 9 percent of MPAs reported having adequate staff. The findings are published in the journal Nature on March 22.¤¤¤

phys

Laptop ban creates turbulence for airline profits A carry-on ban by Washington and London for laptops on flights from some airports will hit the profits of affected airlines, especially the lucrative business class segments of Gulf carriers, analysts said Thursday.¤¤¤

phys

Where does laser energy go after being fired into plasma? An outstanding conundrum on what happens to the laser energy after beams are fired into plasma has been solved in newly-published research at the University of Strathclyde.¤¤¤

phys

Laser activated gold pyramids could deliver drugs, DNA into cells without harm The ability to deliver cargo like drugs or DNA into cells is essential for biological research and disease therapy but cell membranes are very good at defending their territory. Researchers have developed various methods to trick or force open the cell membrane but these methods are limited in the type of cargo they can deliver and aren't particularly efficient.¤¤¤

phys

Livestock grazing effects on sage-grouse Effects of livestock grazing on greater sage-grouse populations can be positive or negative depending on the amount of grazing and when grazing occurs, according to research published today in Ecological Applications. The research was conducted by scientists from the United States Geological Survey, Colorado State University and Utah State University.¤¤¤

phys

New low-cost method to produce light-based lab-on-a-chip devices for fast medical tests A new fabrication process could make it easier and less expensive to incorporate optical sensing onto lab-on-a-chip devices. These devices integrate laboratory functions onto a plastic or glass "chip" typically no more than a few square centimeters in size, allowing automated testing in the doctor's office or various types of chemical or biological analysis with portable instruments.¤¤¤

phys

Designing lunar equipment to survive long periods of sunless cold Designers of future moon missions and bases have to contend with a chilling challenge: how might their creations endure the fortnight-long lunar night? ESA has arrived at a low-cost way of surviving.¤¤¤

phys

The 'time machine' that replicates three years of weather in three days Climate change is wreaking havoc on the environment. While the main culprit is carbon emissions, urban heat islands—exacerbated by dark roofs and pavements—make the effect of global warming even worse on the urban dwellers.¤¤¤

phys

Machine learning lets scientists reverse-engineer cellular control networks The flow of information between cells in our bodies is exceedingly complex: sensing, signaling, and influencing each other in a constant flow of microscopic engagements. These interactions are critical for life, and when they go awry can lead to the illness and injury.¤¤¤

phys

Major breakthrough in the manufacture of red blood cells Researchers have generated the first immortalised cell lines which allow more efficient manufacture of red blood cells.¤¤¤

phys

Mathematical framework explains diverse plant stem forms It is well known that as plants grow, their stems and shoots respond to outside signals like light and gravity. But if plants all have similar stimuli, why are there so many different plant shapes? Why does a weeping willow grow downwards while nearby poison ivy shoots upwards?¤¤¤

phys

Membrane lipids hop in and out of rafts in the blink of an eye Researchers in Japan, India and France have found that molecules move into and out of a specialized region of the cell membrane, called the 'raft domain', at unexpectedly fast rates. The discovery was made possible by developing fluorescent compounds that are structurally similar to a special class of lipids called sphingomyelins, and by using a home-built fluorescent microscope sensitive enough t¤¤¤

phys

Researchers discover new type of memory effect in transition metal oxides Transition metal oxides (TMO) are extensively studied, technologically important materials, due to their complex electronic interactions, resulting in a large variety of collective phenomena. Memory effects in TMO's have garnered a huge amount of interest, being both of fundamental scientific interest and technological significance.¤¤¤

phys

How do metals interact with DNA? For a couple of decades, metal-containing drugs have been successfully used to fight against certain types of cancer. The lack of knowledge about the underlying molecular mechanisms slows down the search for new and more efficient chemotherapeutic agents. An international team of scientists, led by Leticia González from the University of Vienna and Jacinto Sá from the Uppsala University, have deve¤¤¤

phys

Microbes could make drug production more efficient Alkaloid-based pharmaceuticals derived from plants can be potent treatments for a variety of illnesses. But getting these powerful therapeutic agents from plants can take a long time and cost plenty of money, because it often takes a lot of plants to make a small amount of drug product.¤¤¤

phys

Mineralogists identify a group of minerals that owe their existence to human activity No other species in Earth's history has left a mark on the planet as profound and lasting as Homo sapiens. So much so that scientists are increasingly making a case for designating a new geological time period: the Anthropocene. In a paper published this month in the journal American Mineralogist, two UA scientists lend further merit to this idea by identifying for the first time a group of 208 mi¤¤¤

phys

Minitablets help medicate picky cats Of all pets, cats are often considered the most difficult ones to medicate. Very small minitablets with flavours or flavour coatings can help cat owners commit to the treatment and make cats more compliant to it, while making it easier to regulate dosage and administer medication flexibly.¤¤¤

phys

Molecular 'treasure maps' to help discover new materials Scientists at the University of Southampton working with colleagues at the University of Liverpool have developed a new method which has the potential to revolutionise the way we search for, design and produce new materials.¤¤¤

phys

Sensing harmful molecules with light Ultra-sensitive devices are being developed to detect biological and chemical compounds.¤¤¤

phys

Making 'mulch' ado of ant hills: Ant hill mulch improves soil moisture Ants can be annoying little insects. In your home, they make army-like lines to any crumbs on your floor. In your home's frame, carpenter ants can do a job of eating away your walls. But what about outside? Do ants play a positive role in your yard? Your garden? What about in a farm field?¤¤¤

phys

NASA selects CubeSat, SmallSat mission concept studies NASA has selected ten studies under the Planetary Science Deep Space SmallSat Studies (PSDS3) program, to develop mission concepts using small satellites to investigate Venus, Earth's moon, asteroids, Mars and the outer planets.¤¤¤

phys

NASA sees formation of Tropical Cyclone Caleb near Cocos Island Shortly after Tropical Cyclone Caleb formed east of Cocos Island, NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite and NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead gathering visible and infrared data on the twelfth tropical cyclone of the Southern Indian Ocean season.¤¤¤

phys

NASA taking first steps toward high-speed space 'internet' NASA is developing a trailblazing, long-term technology demonstration of what could become the high-speed internet of the sky.¤¤¤

phys

NASA Participates in the NOAA GOES-16 Field Campaign NOAA's GOES-16 satellite is ready to embark on another major milestone— The GOES-16 Field Campaign. During a three month long event, a combination of NOAA and NASA planes, sensors and satellites will fine-tune GOES-16's brand new instruments.¤¤¤

phys

NASA examines Peru's deadly rainfall The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM constellation of satellites provide data on precipitation rates and totals. Recently the GPM core observatory measured the heavy rainfall that caused extensive flooding and loss of life in Peru.¤¤¤

phys

Planting native vegetation for productive crops The University of Adelaide, working with South Australian industry groups, is helping farmers and growers design and implement native plantings to support bee and other insect populations needed to pollinate their crops and orchards.¤¤¤

phys

Nature conservation as a bridge to peace in the Middle East Loss of biodiversity is a major challenge in today's world as is the quest for peace in regions engaged in conflict. But scientists writing in a Review published March 22 in Trends in Ecology & Evolution say that efforts to conserve natural resources present an opportunity to find common ground between communities at odds, building trust and renewed hope for peace.¤¤¤

phys

Non-breeding ravens live in highly dynamic social groups Ravens have impressive cognitive skills when interacting with conspecifics – comparable to many primates, whose social intelligence has been related to their life in groups. An international collaboration of researchers led by Thomas Bugnyar, Professor at the Department of Cognitive Biology, University of Vienna, could uncover for the first time the group dynamics of non-breeding ravens. The resul¤¤¤

phys

Non-invasive prostate cancer diagnosing, monitoring Technology being developed at Washington State University provides a non-invasive approach for diagnosing prostate cancer and tracking the disease's progression.¤¤¤

phys

Study of non-rainfall water in Namib Desert reveals unexpected origins In a study conducted in one of the world's oldest and most biologically diverse deserts, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis scientists explore the origins of water other than rainfall and are identifying multiple origins. The study, supported by the National Science Foundation, is the first to report that the ocean is not the sole source of life-sustaining fog and dew for numerous p¤¤¤

phys

Single nucleotide change responsible for allowing H7N9 flu to jump from birds to humans found (Phys.org)—A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Hong Kong and mainland China has isolated a change in a single nucleotide that is responsible for allowing the H7N9 flu virus to replicate in both birds and humans. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the team describes their efforts in searching for the factors involved when avian flu jumps to huma¤¤¤

phys

'Mean blind spot' leaves organisations vulnerable to cyber attack New research has identified a 'mean blind spot', which leaves organisations vulnerable to cyber attack – particularly in the months of April and October.¤¤¤

phys

Overeating and 'throwaway mentality' reduce global food security and damage the environment Thirty-nine percent of adults worldwide are overweight, 13 percent even obese – with the trend increasing, says the World Health Organization (WHO). At the same time, 795 million people are starving. Still, 1.3 billion tons of food are thrown away every year according to the Welthungerhilfe. Almost 20 percent of the food made available to consumers worldwide is lost through overeating or waste alo¤¤¤

phys

Paying for pain: What motivates tough mudders and other weekend warriors? Why do people pay for experiences deliberately marketed as painful? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers will pay big money for extraordinary—even painful—experiences to offset the physical malaise resulting from today's sedentary lifestyles.¤¤¤

phys

When people prepare for conflict, dominant leaders take the stage Throughout history there are examples of broad public support for dominant leaders. Hitler and Churchill are prominent examples - although with distinctly different legacies. Similarly, Trump in the US, Erdogan in Turkey and Duterte in the Philippines are all examples of contemporary leaders with an authoritarian leadership style who enjoy broad public support. But what causes a large part of soci¤¤¤

phys

People afraid of robots much more likely to fear losing their jobs, suffer anxiety "Technophobes"—people who fear robots, artificial intelligence and new technology that they don't understand—are much more likely to be afraid of losing their jobs to technology and to suffer anxiety-related mental health issues, a Baylor University study found.¤¤¤

phys

Research work on peregrine falcons inspires future aircraft technologies Scientists at BAE Systems and City, University of London have revealed how research work on how falcons fly is inspiring new technologies for aircraft that could contribute to their safety in the air, aerodynamics and fuel efficiency. The technologies could be applied within the next 20 years.¤¤¤

phys

Physicist develops drip-free wine bottle Drips are the bane of every wine drinker's existence. He or she uncorks a bottle of wine, tips it toward the glass, and a drop, or even a stream, runs down the side of the bottle. Sure, you could do what sommeliers in restaurants do, wrapping a napkin around the neck of the bottle to catch the liquid, but who has time for that? Much more likely, you'll ruin the tablecloth.¤¤¤

phys

Physicists prove that it's impossible to cool an object to absolute zero (Phys.org)—In 1912, chemist Walther Nernst proposed that cooling an object to absolute zero is impossible with a finite amount of time and resources. Today this idea, called the unattainability principle, is the most widely accepted version of the third law of thermodynamics—yet so far it has not been proved from first principles.¤¤¤

phys

Pollination mystery unlocked by bee researchers Bees latch on to similarly-sized nectarless flowers to unpick pollen – like keys fitting into locks, University of Stirling scientists have discovered.¤¤¤

phys

New portal to unveil the dark sector of the Universe Once upon a time, the Universe was just a hot soup of particles. In those days, together with visible particles, other particles to us hidden or dark might have formed. Billions of years later scientists catalogued 17 types of visible particles, with the most recent one being the Higgs boson, creating the 'Standard Model'. However, they are still struggling to detect the hidden particles, the ones¤¤¤

phys

'Pay to publish' schemes rampant in science journals Dozens of scientific journals appointed a fictive scholar to their editorial boards on the strength of a bogus resume, researchers determined to expose "pay to publish" schemes reported Wednesday.¤¤¤

phys

Quadruped robot exhibits spontaneous changes in step with speed The research group of Professor Akio Ishiguro and Assistant Professor Dai Owaki of Tohoku University have, for the first time, successfully demonstrated that by changing only its parameter related to speed, a quadruped robot can spontaneously change its steps between energy-efficient patterns (gait transition phenomena).¤¤¤

phys

Rare frog discovery has researchers hopping for joy A discovery involving a rare California frog has researchers hopping for joy.¤¤¤

phys

Study finds refugee entrepreneurship has significant economic benefit Refugee entrepreneurs have the potential to make a significant economic contribution, with a new study of a pilot start-ups program showing their ability to generate jobs, tax revenue and a significant reduction in welfare support.¤¤¤

phys

Researchers use light to remotely control curvature of plastics Researchers at North Carolina State University have developed a technique that uses light to get two-dimensional (2-D) plastic sheets to curve into three-dimensional (3-D) structures, such as spheres, tubes or bowls.¤¤¤

phys

Promising results obtained with a new electrocatalyst that reduces the need for platinum Platinum is a very expensive metal and it is therefore one of the bottlenecks hindering the growth of renewable energy. Platinum is used as the catalyst in electrolysers that store electric energy as chemical compounds, and it also plays an important role in fuel cells, catalytic converters and many chemical processes used in industry.¤¤¤

phys

Study reveals mass extinction event 35 million years ago Australian National University biologists have found the first evidence of mass extinction of Australian animals caused by a dramatic drop in global temperatures 35 million years ago.¤¤¤

phys

Study reveals wetlands are susceptible to rapid lowering in elevation during large earthquakes A California State University, Fullerton faculty-student study shows evidence of abrupt sinking of the wetlands near Seal Beach, Calif., caused by ancient earthquakes that shook the area at least three times in the past 2,000 years—and it could happen again, the researchers say.¤¤¤

phys

A robust, two-ion quantum logic gate that operates in a microsecond is designed The theory group led by Gonzalo Muga of the UPV/EHU's Department of Physical Chemistry has teamed up with the experimental group of the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder, United States, led by David Wineland, the 2012 Nobel Physics Laureate, to design a two-ion, robust, ultrarapid quantum logic gate capable of functioning in less than a microsecond. This study was published¤¤¤

phys

New study shakes the roots of the dinosaur family tree More than a century of theory about the evolutionary history of dinosaurs has been turned on its head following the publication of new research from scientists at the University of Cambridge and Natural History Museum in London. Their work suggests that the family groupings need to be rearranged, re-defined and re-named and also that dinosaurs may have originated in the northern hemisphere rather¤¤¤

phys

A round-trip flight just for the view—the Southern Lights They took an eight-hour flight just to look out the airplane's window, but it was an extraordinary view.¤¤¤

phys

Spreading rumors on Twitter and mistaking retweets for truth A new study of the believability of information received via Twitter and the intention to pass on a tweet—whether news or rumor—is influenced by the number of times the information has already been retweeted. Number of retweets can serve as a normative cue that leads a person to presume that an unverified rumor is true, increasing the likelihood that they will share it with others, according to th¤¤¤

phys

Saiga antelopes much more flexible than originally thought Senckenberg scientists have discovered that the Saiga Antelope, which is currently threatened with extinction, used to be much more flexible in its habitat and food choices in the past than previously assumed. Based on carbon and nitrogen isotopes in the collagen from the antelopes' bones, the scientists compared the diets of fossil versus modern-day Saiga. In their study, recently published in th¤¤¤

phys

Salvage of South Korea's Sewol ferry: the facts South Korea's sunken Sewol ferry emerged from the waters on Thursday, nearly three years after it sank with the loss of more than 300 lives in one of the country's worst maritime disasters.¤¤¤

phys

Sand flow theory could explain water-like streaks on Mars (Phys.org)—A team of researchers from France and the Slovak Republic has proposed a theory to explain the water-like streaks that appear seasonally on the surface of Mars, which do not involve water. In their paper published in the journal Nature Geoscience, the team describes their theory as instances of sand avalanches caused by sunlight with resulting changes to shadowing.¤¤¤

phys

Spreading the cost to transform sanitation Developing countries struggling to cope with huge volumes of human waste may finally get some relief – and a new business opportunity.¤¤¤

phys

Satellite launch shelved over strikes After three days of delays caused by worker strikes in French Guiana, rocket firm Arianespace opted Thursday to postpone indefinitely the launch of satellites for South Korean and Brazilian clients.¤¤¤

phys

How scarce funding shapes young scientists Ask any young science faculty member what keeps them up at night, and you're likely to get the same response every time: funding research. It is no secret that modern scientific research depends on receiving sufficient funding. In fact, grants have become so essential that the entire trajectory of one's career in academic science is tightly linked with the ability to obtain funding. Readers who ca¤¤¤

phys

How science is helping the police search for bodies in water Police divers have started searching a canal in North Lanarkshire, Scotland, hoping to find the remains of schoolgirl Moira Anderson who disappeared, suspected murdered, in 1957. The operation follows an investigation by my colleagues and me, identifying five areas of interest in the canal.¤¤¤

phys

Scientists switch on 'artificial sun' in German lab Scientists in Germany are flipping the switch on what's being described as "the world's largest artificial sun," hoping it will help shed light on new ways of making climate-friendly fuel.¤¤¤

phys

Scientists respond to criticisms of proposed Anthropocene A team of academics led by the University of Leicester has responded to criticisms of the proposal to formalise a new geological epoch – the Anthropocene.¤¤¤

phys

Scientists evade the Heisenberg uncertainty principle ICFO Researchers report the discovery of a new technique that could drastically improve the sensitivity of instruments such as magnetic resonance imagers (MRIs) and atomic clocks. The study, published in Nature, reports a technique to bypass the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This technique hides quantum uncertainty in atomic features not seen by the instrument, allowing the scientists to make¤¤¤

phys

Scientists identify a new way gut bacteria break down complex sugars New light has been shed on the functioning of human gut bacteria which could help to develop medicines in the future to improve health and wellbeing.¤¤¤

phys

Scientists use parasite's internal clock to attack sleeping sickness The parasite that causes deadly sleeping sickness has its own biological clock that makes it more vulnerable to medications during the afternoon, according to international research that may help improve treatments for one of Africa's most lethal diseases.¤¤¤

phys

Scientists reveal hidden structures in bacterial DNA DNA contains the instructions for life, encoded within genes. Within all cells, DNA is organised into very long lengths known as chromosomes. In animal and plant cells these are double-ended, like pieces of string or shoelaces, but in bacteria they are circular. Whether stringy or circular, these long chromosomes must be organised and packaged inside a cell so that the genes can be switched on or¤¤¤

phys

Scientists use new technology to assemble genome of Zika virus mosquito A team spanning Baylor College of Medicine, Rice University, Texas Children's Hospital and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard has developed a new way to sequence genomes, which can assemble the genome of an organism, entirely from scratch, dramatically cheaper and faster. While there is much excitement about the so-called "$1000 genome" in medicine, when a doctor orders the DNA sequence of a p¤¤¤

phys

Sea ice extent sinks to record lows at both poles Arctic sea ice appears to have reached on March 7 a record low wintertime maximum extent, according to scientists at NASA and the NASA-supported National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) in Boulder, Colorado. And on the opposite side of the planet, on March 3 sea ice around Antarctica hit its lowest extent ever recorded by satellites at the end of summer in the Southern Hemisphere, a surprising tu¤¤¤

phys

Sea urchin spines could fix bones More than 2 million procedures every year take place around the world to heal bone fractures and defects from trauma or disease, making bone the second most commonly transplanted tissue after blood. To help improve the outcomes of these surgeries, scientists have developed a new grafting material from sea urchin spines. They report their degradable bone scaffold, which they tested in animals, in t¤¤¤

phys

Secretive billionaire reveals how he toppled Apple in China Duan Yongping is convinced Tim Cook didn't have a clue who he was when they first met a couple years ago. The Apple boss probably does now.¤¤¤

phys

Researchers create self-sustaining bacteria-fueled power cell Instead of oil, coal, or even solar energy, self-sustaining bacterial fuel cells may power the future.¤¤¤

phys

Senate votes to undo privacy rules that protect user data The Republican-led Senate moved Thursday to undo Obama-era regulations that would have forced internet service providers like Comcast and Verizon to ask customers' permission before they could use or sell much of their personal information.¤¤¤

phys

Senior's published research could enhance water treatment processes Jenna Bishop, a senior majoring in environmental systems engineering in the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (EMS), has taken advantage of several opportunities as an undergraduate. From serving as president of the EMS Student Council, to playing the role of captain for Relay For Life, to dancing for THON, a student run philanthropy at Penn State, Bishop has no shortage of memorable moments.¤¤¤

phys

Innovative sensor monitors fruit cargo On the long journey from the fruit plantation to the retailer's shelf, fruits can quickly perish. In particular, the refrigeration inside the cargo containers is not always guaranteed and existing methods for measuring the temperature are not sufficiently reliable. A sensor developed at Empa solves this problem. It looks like a piece of fruit and acts like a piece of fruit – but is actually a spy.¤¤¤

phys

Rescuing data and shoring up environmental agencies in the Trump era A few days after the presidential election, Lindsey Dillon and a handful of like-mined scientists, lawyers, archivists, and academics got on email and brainstormed themselves into action, forming a network to respond quickly to any Trump administration efforts to dismantle environmental policies and agencies.¤¤¤

phys

'Smart' leg mobility device could provide hands-free, comfortable, effective alternative to conventional crutches Individuals with lower leg injuries could soon be saying goodbye to traditional crutches with the development of a hands-free alternative that is more comfortable and potentially more effective. The device, developed by Purdue University graduates, could provide ergonomic and natural movement and transmit real-time recovery data to physicians.¤¤¤

phys

A novel 'soft' magnetic material could enable faster computer memory Magnetic materials are a vital ingredient in the components that store information in computers and mobile phones. Now, A*STAR researchers have developed a material that could help these magnetic-based memory devices to store and retrieve data faster while using less power.¤¤¤

phys

South Africa is no longer the poster child for providing access to safe water South Africa was rightly proud of its water supply achievements in the first decade of democracy after the 1994 elections.¤¤¤

phys

Study maps space dust in 3-D, raises new questions about its properties in local and distant reaches of Milky Way Consider that the Earth is just a giant cosmic dust bunny—a big bundle of debris amassed from exploded stars. We Earthlings are essentially just little clumps of stardust, too, albeit with very complex chemistry.¤¤¤

phys

Spacewalking French, US astronauts to upgrade orbiting lab A French and an American astronaut are scheduled to float outside the International Space Station Friday for a spacewalk aimed at upgrading the orbiting outpost for the arrival of future space crews.¤¤¤

phys

'Spectacular-looking' endangered frog species discovered in Ecuador's cloud forests It's not every day someone gets to say, "I've discovered a new species."¤¤¤

phys

Live sports broadcasting in US braces for disruption The business of live sports, seen as perhaps the last great firewall for traditional US broadcasters, is facing deepening challenges in the era of mobile and live streaming options.¤¤¤

phys

Stress may protect—at least in bacteria Antibiotics harm bacteria and stress them. Trimethoprim (TMP), an antibiotic, inhibits the growth of the bacterium Escherichia coli and induces a stress response. This response also protects the bacterium from subsequent deadly damage from acid. Antibiotics can therefore increase the survival chances of bacteria under certain conditions. This is shown in a study by researchers at the Institute of¤¤¤

phys

Strong interaction between herbivores and plants A research project conducted at the University of Cologne's Zoological Institute reveals important findings on the interaction between nutrient availability and the diversity of consumer species in freshwater environments. A better understanding of this interaction will contribute to developing possibilities to maintain biodiversity in all kinds of ecosystems.¤¤¤

phys

'Super sponge' promises effective toxic clean-up of lakes and more Mercury is very toxic and can cause long-term health damage, but removing it from water is challenging. To address this growing problem, University of Minnesota College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Sciences (CFANS) Professor Abdennour Abbas and his lab team created a sponge that can absorb mercury from a polluted water source within seconds. Thanks to the application of nanotechnology, the te¤¤¤

phys

Surveiling the consumer for loyalty and profit Surveillance may be a dirty word when it comes to domestic politics, but understanding what interests the consumer and how technology may provide insights is a legitimate concern of retailers. Exactly which technologies yield the appropriate balance of potential profits and privacy can be a confounding dilemma. Marketing Professors J. Jeffrey Inman and Hristina Nikolova reviewed recent retail tech¤¤¤

phys

Synthetic physiologists engineer new receptor switched off by green light Optogenetics, the approach to use light to control key processes, has revolutionized how researchers investigate cellular signaling pathways, cellular behavior and the function of large and interconnected tissues such as the brain. This highly successful combination of optics and genetics is powered by light-sensitive proteins, many of which have been engineered to bind to each other upon light st¤¤¤

phys

'Synthetic skin' could lead to advanced prosthetic limbs capable of returning sense of touch to amputees Engineers from the University of Glasgow, who have previously developed an 'electronic skin' covering for prosthetic hands made from graphene, have found a way to use some of graphene's remarkable physical properties to use energy from the sun to power the skin.¤¤¤

phys

Team refines filters for greener natural gas Natural gas producers want to draw all the methane they can from a well while sequestering as much carbon dioxide as possible, and could use filters that optimize either carbon capture or methane flow. No single filter will do both, but thanks to Rice University scientists, they now know how to fine-tune sorbents for their needs.¤¤¤

phys

Technology enhances role-playing scenarios for managing sudden oak death When making management decisions about complex environmental issues, it's wise to give stakeholders with different points of view a seat at the table – preferably a landscape-shaped table with a computer-generated surface that participants can control with hand motions to get immediate feedback about possible solutions.¤¤¤

phys

Tiller the Hun? Farmers in Roman Empire converted to Hun lifestyle—and vice versa Marauding hordes of barbarian Huns, under their ferocious leader Attila, are often credited with triggering the fall of one of history's greatest empires: Rome.¤¤¤

phys

T-Mobile moves the needle in its research lab to compete with larger rivals For a couple of minutes in a small, nondescript T-Mobile US conference room, the future of wireless is here.¤¤¤

phys

New tools to increase the accuracy of biodiversity monitoring An EU funded project, has created a range of tools to give a more accurate picture of current biodiversity, aiding efforts for sustainable governance of natural resources.¤¤¤

phys

New tools to study the origin of embryonic stem cells Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have identified cell surface markers specific for the very earliest stem cells in the human embryo. These cells are thought to possess great potential for replacing damaged tissue but until now have been difficult to distinguish from classical embryonic stem cells. The study is published in the prestigious journal Cell Stem Cell.¤¤¤

phys

New tools to spy on raiding baboons in suburbs of Cape Town, South Africa Scientists from Swansea University's College of Science are part of an international team attempting to better understand the human-baboon conflict in Cape Town, South Africa.¤¤¤

phys

Heat treatment offers precise control over catalytic activity of metal sulfide nanoparticles Nanoparticle catalysts developed by A*STAR researchers can help split water to produce hydrogen, a clean-burning fuel that provides a convenient way to store renewable energy.¤¤¤

phys

Building an underground savings account to bolster water supply If the sight of this winter's torrential rains left you pining for a way to capture the precious overflows, you are not alone.¤¤¤

phys

Video games encourage Indigenous cultural expression Video games are robust forms of creative expression merging design, code, art and sound. Unfortunately, many games misrepresent or appropriate from Indigenous communities by falling back on stereotypes or including cultural content without involving Indigenous people in the development process.¤¤¤

phys

Novel virus breaks barriers between incompatible fungi Scientists have identified a virus that can weaken the ability of a fungus to avoid pairing with other incompatible fungi, according to new research published in PLOS Pathogens. By promoting fungal pairing, the virus could aid transmission of additional unrelated viruses between fungi.¤¤¤

phys

Research shows some viruses can infect even after major mutations Portland State University researchers have found that only about half the genes in a specific virus affecting single cell organisms is needed to infect a host. This means the virus can undergo major mutations without losing its ability to survive and infect.¤¤¤

phys

Visualizing nuclear radiation: Team images gamma rays to help decontaminate Fukushima Extraordinary decontamination efforts are underway in areas affected by the 2011 nuclear accidents in Japan. The creation of total radioactivity maps is essential for thorough cleanup, but the most common methods, according to Kyoto University's Toru Tanimori, do not 'see' enough ground-level radiation.¤¤¤

phys

In war-scarred Gaza, water pollution behind health woes More and more Gazans are falling ill from their drinking water, highlighting the humanitarian issues facing the Palestinian enclave that the UN says could become uninhabitable by 2020.¤¤¤

phys

Wastewater cleaned thanks to a new adsorbent material made from fruit peels A collaborative of researchers has developed a process to clean water containing heavy metals and organic pollutants using a new adsorbent material made from the peels of oranges and grapefruits.¤¤¤

phys

A new web of life For the first time biologists have made a full family tree of the world's spiders, giving us knowledge about venoms that can be useful in medicine. And we might be able to develop silk just as good as the spider's.¤¤¤

phys

Protecting web users' privacy Most website visits these days entail a database query—to look up airline flights, for example, or to find the fastest driving route between two addresses.¤¤¤

phys

White families with children drawn to less diverse neighborhoods, schools White families with children continue to live in predominantly white neighborhoods, in part to send their children to predominantly white schools, according to a new study on racial segregation in 100 metropolitan areas.¤¤¤

phys

WikiLeaks releases CIA hacks of Apple Mac computers The Central Intelligence Agency is able to permanently infect an Apple Mac computer so that even reinstalling the operating system will not erase the bug, according to documents published Thursday by WikiLeaks.¤¤¤

phys

The world's first international race for molecular cars, the Nanocar Race Nanocars will compete for the first time ever during an international molecule-car race on April 28-29, 2017 in Toulouse (south-western France). The vehicles, which consist of a few hundred atoms, will be powered by minute electrical pulses during the 36 hours of the race, in which they must navigate a racecourse made of gold atoms, and measuring a maximum of a 100 nanometers in length. They will¤¤¤

phys

Yellow fever killing thousands of monkeys in Brazil In a vulnerable forest in southeastern Brazil, where the air was once thick with the guttural chatter of brown howler monkeys, there now exists silence.¤¤¤

popsci

5 ways to use AI in your own home DIY The revolution is already here While you may not have access to a supercomputer or a deep neural network, basic artificial intelligence (AI) systems are built into many of the gadgets and apps you use…¤¤¤

popsci

The early Earth wasn’t green, but it did recycle itself Environment Some surprisingly old rocks give scientists a peek into the past The Earth is about 4.5 billion years old, give or take a few million years. But most of the rocks we see today are far younger than that.

popsci

Get more from your Apple TV with these 7 tricks DIY Use Apple's black box like an expert Find out how to search smarter, connect other devices, customize the interface, chat to Siri, and more with your fourth-generation Apple TV device.¤¤¤

popsci

How California is saving rainwater for a sunny day Environment Meet Helen Dahlke, a water banker Outside Helen Dahlke’s office, at the University of California at Davis, the clouds hang low, their edges seeming to brush against the building.

popsci

A lumbar support pillow for 78 percent off? I'd buy it. Gadgets Protect your back for less than $18 A lumbar support pillow for 78 percent off? I'd buy it.

popsci

Banning large electronics may make flying safer—but not for the reason you're thinking Aviation The recent restriction hints at a complex security situation A new travel regulation affecting 10 airports in the Middle East puts the focus on laptops, cameras, and other large electronics as possible explosives.

popsci

Save hundreds on an expert education in full-stack development Sponsored Post Name your price for over 122 hours of premium instruction Save hundreds on an expert education in full-stack development.

popsci

22 products to make spring cleaning a whole lot easier Gadgets Put on a good podcast and get to work. Spring cleaning products to make your house shine.

popsci

Stand out at the water cooler with this customizable toy mug Sponsored Post The perfect cup for Lego fans and procrastinators, now at half price Ah, Legos: who doesn't love using them to flex those creative juices? Thanks to the Build-On Brick Mug, grownups can find some playtime during their coffee break. Read…¤¤¤

popsci

The secret of successful marine protected areas? People. Environment Shocking: the reserves only thrive when properly staffed and funded A new study finds that proper staffing is the key to high performing marine protected areas.

popsci

NASA observatory captures a rare stretch of our sun without spots Space Like a giant egg yolk in the sky How often does the sun show itself without a spot to be seen? Read on.¤¤¤

popsci

There’s a whole new species of cloud Science Celebrate with some amazing photos of the fluffy stuff. With 31 species to chose from, there are plenty of spectacular images to choose from—we curated the best of the best.¤¤¤

popsci

Two thirds of cancer mutations result from completely random DNA mistakes Health An increased focus on early detection will be needed to effectively treat the disease About two thirds of all cancer mutations happen not because of factors in our environments or what we inherit from our parents, but rather as a direct result of how…¤¤¤

popsci

How to make sewage drinkable Technology The water (re)cycle Some U.S. cities, like the perpetually parched San Diego, are beginning to combat drought by reclaiming millions of gallons of would-be waste daily.¤¤¤

popsci

Fitness trackers can be addictive—and dangerous Entertainment Book excerpt: Irresistible This is a book excerpt adapted from Irresistible by Adam Alter. …¤¤¤

popsci

10 weird little aliens you can find right here on Earth Animals The strangest creatures already live among us The weirdest creatures in the universe may already be here on Earth. Here are a few of our favorites.¤¤¤

popsci

Why we say "you" even when we mean "I" Science People choose the "general you" when trying to distance themselves from things with a negative things. Why we sometimes use the word you to refer to our own experiences.¤¤¤

quantamagazine

A New Blast May Have Forged Cosmic Gold Across history and folklore, the question of where Earth’s gold came from — and maybe how to get more of it — has invited fantastical explanation. The Inca believed gold fell from the sky as either the tears or the sweat of the sun god Inti. Aristotle held that gold was hardened water, transformed when the sun’s rays penetrated deep underground. Isaac Newton transcribed a recipe for making it wit¤¤¤

reddit

A paper in JPSP explores paltering--when people mislead by making a truthful statement. .

reddit

Science Behind Arrival: Can Language Determine the Way We Think? .

reddit

Exploring how deaf people ‘hear’ voice-hallucinations .

reddit

Translational Psychiatry - Circumcision does not alter long-term glucocorticoids accumulation or psychological effects associated with trauma- and stressor-related disorders .

reddit

Anyone here interested in the idea of systematically improving critical thinking (globally) through a simple change that can be made to the web? .

reddit

Psychosis, Love & a .22 Calibre Revolver .

science.sciencemag

[Editorial] UK science, post-Brexit Nine months since the British vote to exit the European Union (“Brexit”), the UK science community's initial dismay has given way to hard-boiled determination to limit the damage it will do to universities and research. On 29 March, Prime Minister Theresa May is expected to give formal notification of the UK's intention to withdraw under Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty, the constitutional basis of¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[In Brief] News at a glance In science news around the world, the San people of Southern Africa release a code of ethics to guide researchers wanting to study their culture or genes, a series of films documenting nuclear tests from the 1945 to 1962 is released on YouTube, U.K. regulators grant the first license for mitochondrial replacement therapy, a researcher is accused of putting his name to a paper partially ghost-writt¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[In Depth] Trump's 2018 budget proposal ‘devalues’ science The 2018 budget proposal that President Donald Trump unveiled last week confirms two things that U.S. scientists have long suspected: The new president is no fan of research, and his administration has no overarching strategy for funding science. Deep proposed cuts to research at several agencies offer evidence that Trump doesn't see science—of any kind—as a spending priority. And along with negle¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[In Depth] Can flu shots help women get pregnant? Two new clinical trials are testing whether flu vaccines increase the effectiveness of in vitro fertilization (IVF). The studies draw on new discoveries about the immune system's role in reproduction. Doctors used to think that the immune system had to shut down during pregnancy so that it wouldn't destroy the embryo. Now, researchers realize that the immune system remains active but learns to acc¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[In Depth] Ma, where did they put T. rex? A new study gives the long-standing dinosaur family tree an overhaul. Based on analyses of hundreds of traits gleaned from existing studies and fossils, the study strikes down a fundamental split of dinosaurs into "bird-hipped" and "reptile-hipped"; it also shifts the charismatic theropods—the group that includes Tyrannosaurus rex and eventually gave rise to birds—to a new spot on the tree, closer¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[In Depth] New Zealand temblor points to threat of compound quakes A reassuring rule of thumb about earthquakes is breaking down. For decades, seismologists had assumed that individual faults—as well as isolated segments of longer faults—rupture independently of one another. That limits the maximum size of the potential earthquake that a fault zone can generate. But the magnitude-7.8 earthquake that struck New Zealand just after midnight on 14 November 2016—among¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[In Depth] In search for unseen matter, physicists turn to dark sector Scientists hunting unseen dark matter are looking deeper into the shadows. With searches for a favored dark matter candidate—weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs)—coming up empty, physicists are now turning to the hypothetical "dark sector": an entire shadow realm of hidden particles. This week, physicists will meet at the University of Maryland in College Park for a workshop, sponsored by¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[In Depth] Tweak makes U.S. nukes more precise—and deadlier A small fix made in the name of "stockpile stewardship" is turning U.S. submarine–launched missiles into more precise weapons. An improved mechanism installed in aging warhead now makes it possible to adjust the height at which they detonate, according to three experts writing in The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. This vastly increases the weapons' efficiency, the experts say, creating the imp¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Feature] Fishy business Two Swedish fish researchers, with the aid of five colleagues elsewhere in the world, have alleged fraud in a study on the effects of microplastics on larval fish published in Science by two scientists at Uppsala University (UU) in June 2016. The study supposedly took place at the Ar Research Station in Gotland, but the whistleblowers say it never happened, based on eyewitness testimony and other¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Perspective] Macrophage, a long-distance middleman Macrophages were first identified in transparent starfish larvae (Astropecten pentacanthus) more than a century ago, so it is fitting that a new function for macrophages would again be discovered in transparent marine larvae, this time from zebra fish (Danio rerio). On page 1317 of this issue, Eom and Parichy (1) reveal a wholly unexpected tissue-specific function of macrophages—their cardinal rol¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Perspective] Powering up perovskite photoresponse The most notable scientific milestone in photovoltaics in the past several years is the emergence of solar cells based on hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite materials. While conventional silicon and thin-film solar cells have seen steady improvements in their power-conversion efficiencies (PCEs) spanning several decades, hybrid perovskite solar cells have already reached a certified 22.1% PCE (1)¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Perspective] Bringing proteins into the fold Molecular engineers have become increasingly adept at repurposing life's building blocks to make custom self-assembled shapes. Because a single drop of solution contains billions of such shapes, DNA origami smiley faces (1), RNA stars (2), and designer protein polyhedra (3) may vastly outnumber most other human-made objects on Earth. These shapes lack immediate practical utility, but they transmit¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Perspective] From chaos to order in active fluids There are few sights more spectacular than the swarming of a school of fish or a flock of birds that suddenly gives way to a directional motion. Arguably, our admiration is rooted in the surprise that individual organisms, capable of self-propulsion on their own, organize to move en masse in a coherent fashion. Coherent motion is common in a large class of biological and synthetic materials that a¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Perspective] Using fire to promote biodiversity Fire profoundly influences people, climate, and ecosystems (1). The impacts of this interaction are likely to grow, with climate models forecasting widespread increases in fire frequency and intensity because of rising global temperatures (2). However, the relationship between fire and biodiversity is complex (3, 4). Many plants and animals require fire for their survival, yet even in fire-prone e¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Perspective] Genes, environment, and “bad luck” It is a human trait to search for explanations for catastrophic events and rule out mere “chance” or “bad luck.” When it comes to human cancer, the issue of natural causes versus bad luck was raised by Tomasetti and Vogelstein about 2 years ago (1). Their study, which was widely misinterpreted as saying that most cancers are due neither to genetic inheritance nor environmental factors but simply b¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Retrospective] Hans Rosling (1948–2017) Like a lot of Hans Rosling's admirers, we discovered his work via his famous 2006 TED talk, “The Best Stats You've Ever Seen.” It was a mind-blowing speech (with more than 11 million views to date) with innovative graphics, good jokes, and a profound message: The world is getting better, and even some of the poorest countries are making progress. Hans was a showman, but he didn't sacrifice an ounc¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Policy Forum] A roadmap for rapid decarbonization Although the Paris Agreement's goals (1) are aligned with science (2) and can, in principle, be technically and economically achieved (3), alarming inconsistencies remain between science-based targets and national commitments. Despite progress during the 2016 Marrakech climate negotiations, long-term goals can be trumped by political short-termism. Following the Agreement, which became internation¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Book Review] Rain check Make It Rain, Kristine Harper's detailed history of weather control in the United States, includes colorful details of cloud-seeding experiments, but the book is not so much about attempts to control the weather as it is about the political battles waged over the harnessing of the atmosphere: the control of weather control itself. Rather than revealing a history of what we might today call evidenc¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Letter] Patent pools for CRISPR technology Author: Lawrence Horn¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Letter] Patent pools for CRISPR technology—Response Authors: Jorge L. Contreras, Jacob S. Sherkow¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Letter] Specimen collection crucial to taxonomy Authors: Eliécer E. Gutiérrez, Ronald H. Pine¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[This Week in Science] Identifying the hosts of quasar absorbers Author: Keith T. Smith¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[This Week in Science] Making magma chambers from mush Author: Brent Grocholski¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[This Week in Science] Dendrites are more active than expected Author: Peter Stern¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[This Week in Science] Added complexity in an asymmetric receptor Author: Valda Vinson¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[This Week in Science] Protein-folded DNA nanostructures Author: Phil Szuromi¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[This Week in Science] Go with the changing flow Author: Marc S. Lavine¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[This Week in Science] How perovskites have the edge Author: Phil Szuromi¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[This Week in Science] Chromatin state dictates drug response Author: Paula A. Kiberstis¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[This Week in Science] Lysosomal cholesterol activates mTORC1 Author: L. Bryan Ray¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[This Week in Science] NAD+ binding modulates protein interactions Author: L. Bryan Ray¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[This Week in Science] Tugging on Notch receptor tunes signaling Author: L. Bryan Ray¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[This Week in Science] Cell projections set up pigment pattern Author: Beverly A. Purnell¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[This Week in Science] Fire management, made to measure Author: Julia Fahrenkamp-Uppenbrink¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[This Week in Science] Influenz-ing IFN responses in dendritic cells Author: Lindsey Pujanandez¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[This Week in Science] It's easier to see green Author: Shahid Naeem¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[This Week in Science] Nanograined metals avoid going soft Author: Brent Grocholski¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[This Week in Science] Metal-oxide synergy Author: Phil Szuromi¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[This Week in Science] Using “you” to generalize from me to others Author: Gilbert Chin¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[This Week in Science] Estimating transmission chains for dengue Author: Caroline Ash¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[This Week in Science] Helping T cells feel at home in the liver Author: Angela Colmone¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[This Week in Science] Why pain and stress lead to depression Author: Leslie K. Ferrarelli¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[This Week in Science] Cancer and the unavoidable R factor Author: Paula A. Kiberstis¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Editors' Choice] A new angle on streams Author: H. Jesse Smith¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Editors' Choice] Turning toys into tools Author: Megan Eldred¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Editors' Choice] Stronger pancreas through starvation Author: L. Bryan Ray¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Editors' Choice] The evolution of edited RNA transcripts Author: Laura M. Zahn¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Editors' Choice] Recovering galaxy images from noisy data Author: Keith T. Smith¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Editors' Choice] Notch1 promotes cancer spread Author: Priscilla N. Kelly¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Editors' Choice] Dirac cones in a boron monolayer Author: Jelena Stajic¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Report] [C ii] 158-μm emission from the host galaxies of damped Lyman-alpha systems Gas surrounding high-redshift galaxies has been studied through observations of absorption line systems toward background quasars for decades. However, it has proven difficult to identify and characterize the galaxies associated with these absorbers due to the intrinsic faintness of the galaxies compared with the quasars at optical wavelengths. Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Arra¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Report] Extremely efficient internal exciton dissociation through edge states in layered 2D perovskites Understanding and controlling charge and energy flow in state-of-the-art semiconductor quantum wells has enabled high-efficiency optoelectronic devices. Two-dimensional (2D) Ruddlesden-Popper perovskites are solution-processed quantum wells wherein the band gap can be tuned by varying the perovskite-layer thickness, which modulates the effective electron-hole confinement. We report that, counterin¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Report] Grain boundary stability governs hardening and softening in extremely fine nanograined metals Conventional metals become harder with decreasing grain sizes, following the classical Hall-Petch relationship. However, this relationship fails and softening occurs at some grain sizes in the nanometer regime for some alloys. In this study, we discovered that plastic deformation mechanism of extremely fine nanograined metals and their hardness are adjustable through tailoring grain boundary (GB)¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Report] Active sites for CO2 hydrogenation to methanol on Cu/ZnO catalysts The active sites over commercial copper/zinc oxide/aluminum oxide (Cu/ZnO/Al2O3) catalysts for carbon dioxide (CO2) hydrogenation to methanol, the Zn-Cu bimetallic sites or ZnO-Cu interfacial sites, have recently been the subject of intense debate. We report a direct comparison between the activity of ZnCu and ZnO/Cu model catalysts for methanol synthesis. By combining x-ray photoemission spectros¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Report] How “you” makes meaning “You” is one of the most common words in the English language. Although it typically refers to the person addressed (“How are you?”), “you” is also used to make timeless statements about people in general (“You win some, you lose some.”). Here, we demonstrate that this ubiquitous but understudied linguistic device, known as “generic-you,” has important implications for how people derive meaning fr¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Report] Dengue diversity across spatial and temporal scales: Local structure and the effect of host population size A fundamental mystery for dengue and other infectious pathogens is how observed patterns of cases relate to actual chains of individual transmission events. These pathways are intimately tied to the mechanisms by which strains interact and compete across spatial scales. Phylogeographic methods have been used to characterize pathogen dispersal at global and regional scales but have yielded few insi¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Report] Lysosomal cholesterol activates mTORC1 via an SLC38A9–Niemann-Pick C1 signaling complex The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) protein kinase is a master growth regulator that becomes activated at the lysosome in response to nutrient cues. Here, we identify cholesterol, an essential building block for cellular growth, as a nutrient input that drives mTORC1 recruitment and activation at the lysosomal surface. The lysosomal transmembrane protein, SLC38A9, is required fo¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Report] A conserved NAD+ binding pocket that regulates protein-protein interactions during aging DNA repair is essential for life, yet its efficiency declines with age for reasons that are unclear. Numerous proteins possess Nudix homology domains (NHDs) that have no known function. We show that NHDs are NAD+ (oxidized form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) binding domains that regulate protein-protein interactions. The binding of NAD+ to the NHD domain of DBC1 (deleted in breast cancer 1)¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Report] A macrophage relay for long-distance signaling during postembryonic tissue remodeling Macrophages have diverse functions in immunity as well as in development and homeostasis. We identified a function for these cells in long-distance communication during postembryonic tissue remodeling. Ablation of macrophages in zebrafish prevented melanophores from coalescing into adult pigment stripes. Melanophore organization depends on signals provided by cells of the yellow xanthophore lineag¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Report] Notch-Jagged complex structure implicates a catch bond in tuning ligand sensitivity Notch receptor activation initiates cell fate decisions and is distinctive in its reliance on mechanical force and protein glycosylation. The 2.5-angstrom-resolution crystal structure of the extracellular interacting region of Notch1 complexed with an engineered, high-affinity variant of Jagged1 (Jag1) reveals a binding interface that extends ~120 angstroms along five consecutive domains of each p¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Report] PI3K pathway regulates ER-dependent transcription in breast cancer through the epigenetic regulator KMT2D Activating mutations in PIK3CA, the gene encoding phosphoinositide-(3)-kinase α (PI3Kα), are frequently found in estrogen receptor (ER)–positive breast cancer. PI3Kα inhibitors, now in late-stage clinical development, elicit a robust compensatory increase in ER-dependent transcription that limits therapeutic efficacy. We investigated the chromatin-based mechanisms leading to the activation of ER u¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Report] Stem cell divisions, somatic mutations, cancer etiology, and cancer prevention Cancers are caused by mutations that may be inherited, induced by environmental factors, or result from DNA replication errors (R). We studied the relationship between the number of normal stem cell divisions and the risk of 17 cancer types in 69 countries throughout the world. The data revealed a strong correlation (median = 0.80) between cancer incidence and normal stem cell divisions in all cou¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[New Products] New Products A weekly roundup of information on newly offered instrumentation, apparatus, and laboratory materials of potential interest to researchers.¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Working Life] Learning from rejections Author: Andy Tay¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Review] Vertically extensive and unstable magmatic systems: A unified view of igneous processes Volcanoes are an expression of their underlying magmatic systems. Over the past three decades, the classical focus on upper crustal magma chambers has expanded to consider magmatic processes throughout the crust. A transcrustal perspective must balance slow (plate tectonic) rates of melt generation and segregation in the lower crust with new evidence for rapid melt accumulation in the upper crust¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Research Article] Dynamics of cortical dendritic membrane potential and spikes in freely behaving rats Neural activity in vivo is primarily measured using extracellular somatic spikes, which provide limited information about neural computation. Hence, it is necessary to record from neuronal dendrites, which can generate dendritic action potentials (DAPs) in vitro, which can profoundly influence neural computation and plasticity. We measured neocortical sub- and suprathreshold dendritic membrane pot¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Research Article] Transition from turbulent to coherent flows in confined three-dimensional active fluids Transport of fluid through a pipe is essential for the operation of macroscale machines and microfluidic devices. Conventional fluids only flow in response to external pressure. We demonstrate that an active isotropic fluid, composed of microtubules and molecular motors, autonomously flows through meter-long three-dimensional channels. We establish control over the magnitude, velocity profile, and¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Research Article] Cryo-EM structures of the triheteromeric NMDA receptor and its allosteric modulation N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are heterotetrameric ion channels assembled as diheteromeric or triheteromeric complexes. Here, we report structures of the triheteromeric GluN1/GluN2A/GluN2B receptor in the absence or presence of the GluN2B-specific allosteric modulator Ro 25-6981 (Ro), determined by cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM). In the absence of Ro, the GluN2A and GluN2B amino¤¤¤

science.sciencemag

[Research Article] Self-assembly of genetically encoded DNA-protein hybrid nanoscale shapes We describe an approach to bottom-up fabrication that allows integration of the functional diversity of proteins into designed three-dimensional structural frameworks. A set of custom staple proteins based on transcription activator–like effector proteins folds a double-stranded DNA template into a user-defined shape. Each staple protein is designed to recognize and closely link two distinct doubl¤¤¤

sciencebasedmedicine

The floor is yours Open thread for topic suggestions, and anything else SBM-related.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

New species discovered: Protist parasites contribute to the stability of rainforest ecosystems Tropical rainforests are one of the most species-rich areas on earth. Thousands of animal and plant species live there. The smaller microbial protists, which are not visible to the naked eye, are also native to these forests, where they live in the soils and elsewhere. A team of researchers has examined them more closely by analyzing their DNA. They discovered many unknown species, including many¤¤¤

sciencedaily

New Insights Into Side Effects Can Help Prostate Cancer Patients Choose Treatments A new study identifies distinct patterns of side effects for prostate cancer treatments that patients could use to guide their choices.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Tanning dependence linked to other addictive behaviors, new study finds Despite the known dangers of exposure to ultraviolet light, many people continue to sunbathe and use indoor tanning beds with some users exhibiting a dependence to tanning. A new study finds that such dependence is also associated with other addictive behaviors.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Changes in the vascular system may trigger Alzheimer's disease In some people whose cognitive functions are weakened due to Alzheimer's, the disease can be traced back to changes in the brain's blood vasculature. Scientists have found that a protein involved in blood clotting and inflammation might offer a potential path to new drugs.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Researchers close to identifying crucial gene for human cleft lip and palate A group of researchers has found that three siblings born with cleft lip and palate share a common gene mutation associated with the birth defect.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Pre-pregnancy BMI directly linked to excess pregnancy weight gain It's well known that excessive weight gain during pregnancy can have a lasting negative impact on the health of a mother and her baby. A new study finds that for young mothers (women who gave birth between the ages of 15 and 24), pre-pregnancy body mass index, or BMI, and ethnicity might signal a likelihood for obesity later in life.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Antenatal screening in Europe: How to avoid mother-to-child transmission of infections Transmission of infections with HIV, hepatitis B, syphilis or rubella from mother to child before and during birth as well as in infancy still occur across Europe -- despite existing prevention methods. A new report outlines the cornerstones for effective antenatal screening programs across the EU/EEA countries.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Asthma: Researchers discover how exposure to microbes protects against asthma The incidence of asthma is increasing steadily. One of the reasons given for this rise is the excessive level of hygiene in our environment. Studies have indeed shown that exposure to a so-called "non-hygienic" environment, rich in microbes, plays a protective role against the development of allergies, including asthma. New research shows that exposure to bacterial DNA drastically amplifies a popu¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Genetic assessment developed to determine risk for age-associated Alzheimer's disease An international team of scientists has developed a novel genetic score that allows individuals to calculate their age-specific risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease, based upon genetic information.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

New software tool powers up genomic research A group of computational biological researchers has developed a new software tool, Salmon — a lightweight method to provide fast and bias-aware quantification from RNA-sequencing reads.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Rare-earths become water-repellent only as they age Surfaces that have been coated with rare earth oxides develop water-repelling properties only after contact with air. Even at room temperature, chemical reactions begin with hydrocarbons in the air. Researchers report that it is these reactions that are responsible for the hydrophobic effect.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Loss of smell linked to increased risk of early death In a study of adults aged 40 to 90 years who were followed for 10 years, poor smell was linked with an increased risk of dying.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

People's romantic choices share characteristics, but for different reasons The people one dates share many similarities -- both physically and personality-wise -- a new study has found.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

How reliable are traditional wildlife surveys? To effectively manage a wildlife species, one of the most basic things you need to know is how many of them are out there. However, it's almost never feasible to count every single individual -- so how do the results of wildlife surveys compare to true population size? A new study tests this using the results of more than thirty years of surveys of the Rocky Mountain population of sandhill cranes.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Endangered ibises benefit from joining egret flocks Birds benefit from flocking together -- even when they're not of a feather. According to a new study, China's endangered crested ibises benefit from joining forces with other, more visually-oriented bird species while searching for food.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Non-invasive prostate cancer diagnosing, monitoring Technology under development will provide a non-invasive approach for diagnosing prostate cancer and tracking the disease's progression. It could enable doctors to determine how cancer patients are responding to different treatments without needing to perform invasive biopsies.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Scientists follow seeds to solve ecological puzzle A four-year study of one rare and one common lupine growing in coastal dunes showed that a native mouse steals most of the rare lupines seeds while they are still attached to the plant. The mouse is a 'subsidized species,' given cover for nocturnal forays by European beachgrass, originally planted to stabilize the dunes.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Comet 67P full of surprises: Growing fractures, collapsing cliffs and rolling boulders Images returned from the European Space Agency's Rosetta mission indicate the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko was a very active place during its most recent trip through the solar system, says a new study.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Gene mutation may be linked to unexplained female infertility Researchers have uncovered a gene mutation that may provide answers to unexplained female infertility.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Weekend surgery has no impact on death risk, study shows Day of the week did not affect the survival chances of people undergoing emergency surgery, research in Scotland has found. The findings challenge the results of previous studies, which had suggested that those who undergo elective surgery at the end of the week are at a greater risk of dying.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

430 million-year-old fossil named in honor of Sir David Attenborough A new 430 million-year-old fossil has been discovered by scientists, and has been named in honor of Sir David Attenborough. The discovery is a unique example of its kind in the fossil record, say the authors of a new report.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Visualizing nuclear radiation Extraordinary decontamination efforts are underway in areas affected by the 2011 nuclear accidents in Japan. The creation of total radioactivity maps is essential for thorough cleanup, but the most common methods do not 'see' enough ground-level radiation.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Alzheimer's disease linked to the metabolism of unsaturated fats A new study has found that the metabolism of omega-3 and omega-6 unsaturated fatty acids in the brain are associated with the progression of Alzheimer's disease.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Quadruped robot exhibits spontaneous changes in step with speed A research group has demonstrated that by changing only its parameter related to speed, a quadruped robot can spontaneously change its steps.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Universe's ultraviolet background could provide clues about missing galaxies Astronomers have developed a way to detect the ultraviolet background of the universe, which could help explain why there are so few small galaxies in the cosmos.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Gluten free rice-flour bread could revolutionize global bread production 100% natural, 100% gluten free - get ready for the battle of the grain. Researchers have resolved the science behind a new bread-baking recipe. The method for making gluten-free bread uses rice-flour to produce bread with a similar consistency and volume to traditional wheat-flour loaves.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

New Hope for the Saiga Antelope? The Saiga Antelope, which is currently threatened with extinction, used to be much more flexible in its habitat and food choices in the past than previously assumed, scientists have discovered. Based on carbon and nitrogen isotopes in the collagen from the antelopes’ bones, the scientists compared the diets of fossil versus modern-day Saiga. In their study, they reached the conclusion that today’s¤¤¤

sciencedaily

New rare muscle disorder discovered A new rare muscle disorder has been identified by researchers. This hereditary disease is caused by a defect in the BICD2 gene that manifests itself in altered cellular transport processes in skeletal muscle cells. Patients suffer from muscle weakness in the legs, an unsteady gait and permanent risk of stumbling. BICD2 had been known as a disease trigger, but only for disorders originating in the¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Scientific discovery may change treatment of Parkinson When monitoring Parkinson's disease, SPECT imaging of the brain is used for acquiring information on the dopamine activity. A new study shows that the dopamine activity observed in SPECT imaging does not reflect the number of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra, as previously assumed.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Pollination mystery unlocked by bee researchers Bees latch on to similarly-sized nectarless flowers to unpick pollen – like keys fitting into locks, scientists have discovered.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Caught on camera: Chemical reactions 'filmed' at the single-molecule level Scientists have succeeded in ‘filming’ inter-molecular chemical reactions – using the electron beam of a transmission electron microscope (TEM) as a stop-frame imaging tool. They have also discovered that the electron beam can be simultaneously tuned to stimulate specific chemical reactions by using it as a source of energy as well as an imaging tool.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Salmon with side effects: Aquacultures are polluting Chile's rivers with a cocktail of dissolved organic substances Tasty, versatile, and rich in essential omega-3 fatty acids: salmon is one of the most popular edible fish of all. Shops sell fish caught in the wild, but their main produce is salmon from breeding farms which can pollute rivers, lakes and oceans. Just how big is the problem? Scientists are working to answer this question by examining the dissolved organic compounds which enter Chile’s rivers from¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Egyptian ritual images from the Neolithic period Egyptologists have discovered rock art from the 4th millennium BC during an excavation at a necropolis near Aswan in Egypt. The paintings were engraved into the rock in the form of small dots and depict hunting scenes like those found in shamanic depictions. They may represent a link between the Neolithic period and Ancient Egyptian culture. The discovery earned the scientists the award for one of¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Consumption of 'cannibal drug' in adolescence has prejudicial effects on adulthood Consumption of the synthetic drug MDPV – a powerful psychostimulant known as ‘cannibal drug’- in adolescence, can increase vulnerability of cocaine addiction during adulthood, according to a study carried out with laboratory animals.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

The global tobacco control treaty has reduced smoking rates in its first decade, but more work is needed Despite worldwide progress since the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO-FCTC) came into effect in 2005, not all key demand-reduction measures have been fully implemented at the same pace, but doing so could reduce tobacco use even further, say researchers.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

New cell membrane fusion model challenges dogma Membrane fusion lies at the heart of many cell functions—from the secretion of antibodies to the release of neurotransmitters. For more than two decades, one view of the process by which membrane fusion occurs has been accepted as dogma; now recent studies indicate that fusion is more complex. These discoveries are being regarded by at least one leading cell biologist as “textbook changing” and co¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Sinking of seal beach wetlands tied to ancient quakes When geologists went in search for evidence of ancient tsunamis along Southern California’s coastal wetlands, they found something else. Their discoveries have implications for seismic hazard and risk assessment in coastal Southern California.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Single-angle ptychography allows 3D imaging of stressed materials Scientists have used a new X-ray diffraction technique called Bragg single-angle ptychography to get a clear picture of how planes of atoms shift and squeeze under stress.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Premature infants in NICUs do better with light touch, study affirms When premature infants were given more 'supportive touch' experiences, including skin-to-skin care and breastfeeding, their brains responded more strongly to light touch, according to new research.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Diabetes researchers discover way to expand potent regulatory cells For parents, storing their newborn baby's umbilical cord blood is a way to preserve potentially lifesaving cells. Now, a group of researchers has found a way to expand and preserve certain cord-blood cells as a potential treatment for type 1 diabetes.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Minitablets help medicate picky cats Of all pets, cats are often considered the most difficult ones to medicate. Very small minitablets with flavors or flavor coatings can help cat owners commit to the treatment and make cats more compliant to it, while making it easier to regulate dosage and administer medication flexibly.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

'Lab-on-a-glove' could bring nerve-agent detection to a wearer's fingertips There's a reason why farmers wear protective gear when applying organophosphate pesticides. The substances are very effective at getting rid of unwanted bugs, but they can also make people sick. Related compounds -- organophosphate nerve agents -- can be used as deadly weapons. Now researchers have developed a fast way to detect the presence of such compounds in the field using a disposable 'lab-o¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Sea urchin spines could fix bones More than 2 million procedures every year take place around the world to heal bone fractures and defects from trauma or disease, making bone the second most commonly transplanted tissue after blood. To help improve the outcomes of these surgeries, scientists have developed a new grafting material from sea urchin spines.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

After the epigenome: The epitranscriptome A new article explains that RNA also has its own spelling and grammar, just like DNA. These 'epigenetics of RNA' are called epitranscriptome.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

How do metals interact with DNA? Since a couple of decades, metal-containing drugs have been successfully used to fight against certain types of cancer. The lack of knowledge about the underlying molecular mechanisms slows down the search for new and more efficient chemotherapeutic agents. Scientists have now developed a protocol that is able to detect how metal-based drugs interact with DNA.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

A new web of life: First full family tree of the world's spiders For the first time biologists have made a full family tree of the world's spiders, giving us knowledge about venoms that can be useful in medicine. And we might be able to develop silk just as good as the spider's.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

'First in human' trial defines safe dosage for small molecule drug ONC201 for solid cancer tumors A ‘first in human’ clinical trial examining the small molecule drug ONC201 in cancer patients with advanced solid tumors shows that this investigational drug is well tolerated at the recommended phase II dose. That’s according to investigators whose research also showed early signs of clinical benefit in patients with advanced prostate and endometrial cancers.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Study suggests new way to prevent vision loss in diabetics, premature babies A new molecule that induces the formation of abnormal blood vessels in the eyes of diabetic mice has been discovered by researchers. Their study suggests that inhibiting this molecule may prevent similarly aberrant blood vessels from damaging the vision of not only diabetics, but also premature infants.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

'Super sponge' promises effective toxic clean-up of lakes and more Mercury is very toxic and can cause long-term health damage, but removing it from water is challenging. To address this growing problem scientists have created a sponge that can absorb mercury from a polluted water source within seconds.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Method speeds testing of new networking protocols Researchers present a system for testing new traffic management protocols that requires no alteration to network hardware but still works at realistic speeds -- 20 times as fast as networks of software-controlled routers.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Fledgling stars try to prevent their neighbors from birthing planets Stars don't have to be massive to evaporate material from around nearby stars and affect their ability to form planets, a new study suggests.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Ultrafast measurements explain quantum dot voltage drop Solar cells and photodetectors could soon be made from new types of materials based on semiconductor quantum dots, thanks to new insights based on ultrafast measurements capturing real-time photoconversion processes.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Self-sustaining bacteria-fueled power cell created Researchers have developed the next step in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) with the first micro-scale self-sustaining cell, which generated power for 13 straight days through symbiotic interactions of two types of bacteria.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Lack of leisure: Is busyness the new status symbol? Long gone are the days when a life of material excess and endless leisure time signified prestige. According to a new study, Americans increasingly perceive busy and overworked people as having high status.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Scientists identify brain circuit that drives pleasure-inducing behavior Neuroscientists have discovered a brain circuit that responds to rewarding events. Scientists have long believed that the central amygdala, a structure located deep within the brain, is linked with fear and responses to unpleasant events, but the new study finds that most of the neurons here are involved in the reward circuit.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Study identifies brain cells involved in Pavlovian response A new study has traced the Pavlovian response to a small cluster of brain cells -- the same neurons that go awry during Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease and Tourette's syndrome. The research could one day help neuroscientists find new approaches to diagnosing and treating these disorders.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Making 'mulch' ado of ant hills Ants are hardworking and beneficial insects, research reveals. In the activities of their daily lives, ants help increase air, water flow, and organic matter in soil. The work done by ants even forms a type of mulch that helps hold water in the soil.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Upper part of Earth’s magnetic field reveals details of a dramatic past Satellites have been mapping the upper part of the Earth magnetic field by collecting data for three years and found some amazing features about the Earth’s crust. The result is the release of highest resolution map of this field seen from space to date. This ‘lithospheric magnetic field’ is very weak and therefore difficult to detect and map from space. But with the Swarm satellites it has been p¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Machine learning lets scientists reverse-engineer cellular control networks Researchers have used machine learning on the Stampede supercomputer to model the cellular control network that determines how tadpoles develop. Using that model, they reverse-engineered a drug intervention that created tadpoles with a form of mixed pigmentation never before seen in nature. They plan to use the method for cancer therapies and regenerative medicine.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

3-D printing turns nanomachines into life-size workers Researchers have unlocked the key to transforming microscopic nanorings into smart materials that perform work at human-scale.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Mapping the future of precision medicine in Parkinson's disease A new transformative approach to defining, studying and treating Parkinson's disease has been revealed by investigators. Rather than approaching Parkinson's disease as a single entity, the international cadre of researchers advocates targeting therapies to distinct 'nodes or clusters' of patients based on specific symptoms or molecular features of their disease.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Weight-bearing exercises promote bone formation in men Osteoporosis affects more than 200 million people worldwide and is a serious public health concern, according to research. Now, newly published work is the first in men to show that long-term, weight-bearing exercises decrease sclerostin, a protein made in the bone, and increase IGF-1, a hormone associated with bone growth. These changes promote bone formation, increasing bone density.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Under the Dead Sea, warnings of dire drought Nearly 1,000 feet below the bed of the Dead Sea, scientists have found evidence that during past warm periods, the Mideast has suffered drought on scales never recorded by humans -- a possible warning for current times. Thick layers of crystalline salt show that rainfall plummeted to as little as a fifth of modern levels some 120,000 years ago, and again about 10,000 years ago.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Light used to remotely control curvature of plastics Researchers have developed a technique that uses light to get flat, plastic sheets to curve into spheres, tubes or bowls.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Sea ice extent sinks to record lows at both poles The Arctic sea ice maximum extent and Antarctic minimum extent are both record lows this year. Combined, sea ice numbers are at their lowest point since satellites began to continuously measure sea ice in 1979.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Scientists identify a new way gut bacteria break down complex sugars New light has been shed on the functioning of human gut bacteria which could help to develop medicines in the future to improve health and well-being.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Molecular 'treasure maps' to help discover new materials Scientists have developed a new method which has the potential to revolutionise the way we search for, design and produce new materials.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Brief module effective in teaching hemorrhage control basics to staff in a large workplace A medical team has developed a way to effectively provide a large group of people with basic knowledge and skills to locate and use bleeding control equipment to stop life-threatening bleeding in severely injured people.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

New study shakes the roots of the dinosaur family tree More than a century of theory about the evolutionary history of dinosaurs has been turned on its head following the publication of new research. The work suggests that the family groupings need to be rearranged, redefined and renamed and also that dinosaurs may have originated in the northern hemisphere rather than the southern, as current thinking goes.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

First mutations in human life discovered The earliest mutations of human life have been observed by researchers. Analyzing genomes from adult cells, the scientists could look back in time to reveal how each embryo developed. The study shows that from the two-cell stage of the human embryo, one of these cells becomes more dominant than the other and leads to a higher proportion of the adult body.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Surprising new role for lungs: Making blood Using video microscopy in the living mouse lung, scientists have revealed that the lungs play a previously unrecognized role in blood production.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Tiller the Hun? Farmers in Roman Empire converted to Hun lifestyle -- and vice versa New archaeological analysis suggests people of Western Roman Empire switched between Hunnic nomadism and settled farming over a lifetime. Findings may be evidence of tribal encroachment that undermined Roman Empire during 5th century AD, contributing to its fall.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Use of mobile app reduces number of in-person follow-up visits after surgery Patients who underwent ambulatory breast reconstruction and used a mobile app for follow-up care had fewer in-person visits during the first 30 days after the operation without affecting complication rates or measures of patient-reported satisfaction, according to a study.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

How does spousal suicide affect bereaved spouse mentally, physically? People bereaved by the suicide of a spouse were at increased risk for mental and physical disorders, suicidal behavior, death and adverse social events, according to a nationwide study based on registry data conducted in Denmark.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Lack of staffing, funds prevent marine protected areas from realizing full potential Marine protected areas (MPAs) are an increasingly popular strategy for protecting marine biodiversity, but a new global study demonstrates that widespread lack of personnel and funds are preventing MPAs from reaching their full potential. Only 9 percent of MPAs reported having adequate staff.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Silence is golden: Suppressing host response to Ebola virus may help to control infection The Ebola virus causes a severe, often fatal illness when it infects the human body. Initially targeting cells of the immune system called macrophages, white blood cells that absorb and clear away pathogens, a new study has found a way to potentially 'silence' these Ebola virus-infected macrophages.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Scientists evade the Heisenberg uncertainty principle Researchers report the discovery of a new technique that could drastically improve the sensitivity of instruments such as magnetic resonance imagers (MRIs) and atomic clocks. The study reports a technique to bypass the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This technique hides quantum uncertainty in atomic features not seen by the instrument, allowing the scientists to make very high precision measure¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Brain 'rewires' itself to enhance other senses in blind people The brains of those who are born blind make new connections in the absence of visual information, resulting in enhanced, compensatory abilities such as a heightened sense of hearing, smell and touch, as well as cognitive functions (such as memory and language) according to a new study.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

'Spectacular-looking' endangered frog species discovered in Ecuador's cloud forests It's not every day someone gets to say, 'I've discovered a new species.' It's a claim that biologist Chris Funk can happily make. Funk and collaborators, who've spent years exploring the tropical climes of South America to study the region's dizzying biodiversity, have documented a new species of rainfrog they've named the Ecuadorian rainfrog (Pristimantis ecuadorensis).¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Optical tool monitors brain's circulatory response to pain A new report demonstrates that an optical imaging tool used to monitor regional blood flow and tissue oxygenation may be used to track the brain's response to acute pain in infants, children, and adults.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Too much structured knowledge hurts creativity, shows study Structure organizes human activities and help us understand the world with less effort, but it can be the killer of creativity, concludes a new study.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Humans, smartphones may fail frequently to detect face morph photos Both humans and smartphones show a degree of error in distinguishing face morph photos from their 'real' faces on fraudulent identity cards, new research has found.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Tracing aromatic molecules in the early Universe A molecule found in car engine exhaust fumes that is thought to have contributed to the origin of life on Earth has made astronomers heavily underestimate the amount of stars that were forming in the early Universe, a study has found. That molecule is called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon. On Earth it is also found in coal and tar. In space, it is a component of dust.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Heart tissue grown on spinach leaves Researchers face a fundamental challenge as they seek to scale up human tissue regeneration from small lab samples to full-size tissues and organs: how to establish a vascular system that delivers blood deep into the developing tissue. Researchers have now successfully turned to plants, culturing beating human heart cells on spinach leaves that were stripped of plant cells.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Research questions effectiveness of translocation conservation method A DNA study of endangered greater prairie chickens in Illinois indicates that supplementing the dwindling population with birds from out of state did not improve genetic diversity.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Transgender college freshmen drink more, experience more blackouts, study shows A survey of more than 422,000 college freshmen found that students who identified as transgender were more likely than their cisgender peers to experience negative consequences from drinking, including memory blackouts, academic problems and conflicts such as arguments or physical fights.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Biopesticide could defeat insecticide resistance in bedbugs A fungal biopesticide that shows promise for the control of bed bugs is highly effective even against bed-bug populations that are insecticide resistant, according to research.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Yellow fever killing thousands of monkeys in Brazil In a vulnerable forest in southeastern Brazil, where the air was once thick with the guttural chatter of brown howler monkeys, there now exists silence. Yellow fever, a virus carried by mosquitoes and endemic to Africa and South America, has robbed the private, federally-protected reserve of its brown howlers in an unprecedented wave of death that has swept through the region since late 2016, kill¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Largest survey to date of patient and family experience at US children's hospitals A survey of more than 17,000 parents of hospitalized children gives mixed responses about the quality of the inpatient experience at 69 US children's hospitals.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Biologists find surprising variability in courtship behaviors of wolf spiders Studies of wolf spiders found that courtship displays help preserve genetic isolation between closely related species. Another study found that the species Gladicosa bellamyi used multi-modal communication to entice females.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Immune study in chickens reveals key hurdle for Campylobacter vaccine effort The immune response of farmed chickens does not develop fast enough to fight off Campylobacter during their short lifespan, new research has found. The findings have important implications in the challenge towards developing a poultry vaccine for the bug, which is the UK's leading cause of food poisoning.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Spiritual retreats change feel-good chemical systems in the brain More Americans than ever are turning to spiritual, meditative and religious retreats as a way to reset their daily life and enhance well-being. Now, researchers show there are changes in the dopamine and serotonin systems in the brains of retreat participants.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Male hormone plays key role in ovarian development The male “androgen” hormone is an important element in the ovarian development of female chicken embryos, more so than in the development of male testes, scientists have discovered.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

New portal to unveil the dark sector of the universe Once upon a time, the Universe was just a hot soup of particles. In those days, together with visible particles, other particles to us hidden or dark might have formed. Billions of years later scientists catalogued 17 types of visible particles, with the most recent one being the Higgs boson, creating the 'Standard Model'. However, they are still struggling to detect the hidden particles, the ones¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Blood fatty acids reveal your child's diet Eating lots of sugary candy may strain the liver, alter the body’s fatty acid metabolism and increase the risk of cardiometabolic diseases already in childhood. Children’s blood fatty acid composition reflects their diet – but luckily this composition can be influenced by lifestyle interventions, say researchers.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Giant salamanders, geckos and olms: Vanishing species diversity in Siberia Scientists have studied the development of the amphibian and reptile fauna in Western Siberia during the past twelve million years. In their study, they demonstrate that the species diversity of both groups of animals was noticeably higher in the past than it is today. Among others, for the first time the researchers discovered an Asiatic representative of the extinct frog family Palaeobatrachidae¤¤¤

sciencedaily

A tough coat for silicon Supercritical carbon dioxide delivers protective molecules to semiconductor surfaces, report researchers in a new article.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Hand-held X-ray sources Electronic oscillations in graphene could make a tabletop — or even handheld — source of X-rays a reality, report researchers.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Strong interaction between herbivores and plants Important findings have been revealed on the interaction between nutrient availability and the diversity of consumer species in freshwater environments. A better understanding of this interaction will contribute to developing possibilities to maintain biodiversity in all kinds of ecosystems.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

When people prepare for conflict, dominant leaders take the stage One popular theory holds that dominant leaders are supported by those who fear new situations and threats. However, new research shows that support for dominant leaders is not born of fear, but of a wish to handle the country's problems by aggressive means.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Researchers find another immune system link science said didn't exist A part of the body thought to be disconnected from the immune system actually interacts with it, report investigators, and that discovery helps explain cases of male infertility, certain autoimmune diseases and even the failure of cancer vaccines.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Scientists reveal hidden structures in bacterial DNA Researchers have described the 3D structure of the genome in the extremely small bacteria Mycoplasma pneumoniae. They discovered previously unknown arrangements of DNA within this tiny bacteria, which are also found in larger cells. Their findings suggest that this type of organization is a universal feature of living cells.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Gravitational wave kicks monster black hole out of galactic core Astronomers have uncovered a supermassive black hole that has been propelled out of the center of the distant galaxy 3C 186. The black hole was most likely ejected by the power of gravitational waves.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Designer proteins fold DNA: Biophysicists construct complex hybrid structures using DNA and proteins Scientists have developed a new method that can be used to construct custom hybrid structures using DNA and proteins. The method opens new opportunities for fundamental research in cell biology and for applications in biotechnology and medicine.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

A 'carbon law' offers pathway to halve emissions every decade On the eve of this year's Earth hour (March 25), researchers propose a solution in the journal Science for the global economy to rapidly reduce carbon emissions. The authors argue a carbon roadmap, driven by a simple rule of thumb or 'carbon law' of halving emissions every decade, could catalyze disruptive innovation.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Scientists unveil a giant leap for anti-aging Researchers have made a discovery that could lead to a revolutionary drug that actually reverses ageing, improves DNA repair and could even help NASA get its astronauts to Mars.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Most cancer mutations are due to random DNA copying 'mistakes' Scientists report data from a new study providing evidence that random, unpredictable DNA copying 'mistakes' account for nearly two-thirds of the mutations that cause cancer. Their research is grounded on a novel mathematical model based on DNA sequencing and epidemiologic data from around the world.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Milky Way-like galaxies in early universe embedded in 'super halos' Astronomers have directly observed a pair of Milky Way-like galaxies seen when the universe was only eight percent of its current age. These progenitors of today's giant spiral galaxies are surrounded by 'super halos' of hydrogen gas that extend many tens-of-thousands of light-years beyond their dusty, star-filled disks.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

People often use the word 'you' rather than 'I' to cope with negative experiences Researchers say it may seem contradictory that a means of generalizing to people at large is used when reflecting on one's most personal and idiosyncratic experiences.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Chemists ID catalytic 'key' for converting CO2 to methanol Results from experiments and computational modeling studies that definitively identify the 'active site' of a catalyst commonly used for making methanol from CO2 will guide the design of improved catalysts for transforming this pollutant to useful chemicals.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Botany: A stem's 'sense of self' contributes to shape It is well known that as plants grow, their stems and shoots respond to outside signals like light and gravity. But if plants all have similar stimuli, why are there so many different plant shapes? Using simple mathematical ideas, researchers have constructed a framework that explains and quantifies the different shapes of plant stems.¤¤¤

sciencedaily

Critical step in DNA repair, cellular aging pinpointed The body's ability to repair DNA damage declines with age, which causes gradual cell demise, overall bodily degeneration and greater susceptibility to cancer. Now, research reveals a critical step in a molecular chain of events that allows cells to mend their broken DNA.¤¤¤

sciencenews

In 1967, LSD was briefly labeled a breaker of chromosomes Claims that the hallucinogenic drug damaged DNA were quickly rejected. But questions remain about how LSD works.¤¤¤

sciencenews

Anatomy analysis suggests new dinosaur family tree A new analysis rewrites the dinosaur family tree, splitting up long-recognized groups.¤¤¤

sciencenews

Deadly New Zealand quake hopscotched across faults The Nov. 14, 2016, earthquake in New Zealand was much larger than thought possible at the time, prompting a rethink of hazard assessments.¤¤¤

sciencenews

Dengue fever spreads in a neighborly way Individual strains of dengue spread locally, and new infections cluster near the home of the first person affected.¤¤¤

sciencenews

Female guppies with bigger brains pick more attractive guys A larger-brained female guppy may pick primo males, but all that mental machinery costs her in other ways.¤¤¤

sciencenews

How Pluto’s haze could explain its red spots Pluto’s collapsing atmosphere may explain the dwarf planet’s seemingly random ruddy spots.¤¤¤

sciencenews

It’s time to redefine what qualifies as a planet Astronomers can have their definition of a planet, but some planetary scientists plan to stick to the long-held meaning of the word.¤¤¤

sciencenews

It’s time to redefine what qualifies as a planet, scientists propose Astronomers can have their definition of a planet, but some planetary scientists plan to stick to the long-held meaning of the word.¤¤¤

sciencenews

Lab tests aren’t the answer for every science question Acting Editor in Chief Elizabeth Quill discusses the value of observational science.¤¤¤

sciencenews

Random mutations play large role in cancer, study finds Mistakes made while copying DNA account for more mutations in cancer cells than environment or inheritance do.¤¤¤

sciencenews

Readers question supernova physics Star-destroying neutrinos, heart-hugging robots and more in reader feedback.¤¤¤

sciencenews

Touches early in life may make a big impact on newborn babies’ brains The type and amount of touches a newborn baby gets in the first days of life may shape later responses to touch perception, a study suggests.¤¤¤

sciencenews

Arctic sea ice hits record wintertime low Warm temperatures and heat waves reduced sea ice extent in the Arctic to its smallest maximum extent ever seen.¤¤¤

scientificamerican

Anesthesia and the Elderly Brain Research paints a complex picture of how surgery and anesthesia might harm the brain, particularly for older patients .

scientificamerican

Arctic Sea Ice Sets Record-Low Peak for Third Year Sea ice was also thinner this winter than in the past four years .

scientificamerican

Astronomers Observe Milky Way–like Galaxies in Early Universe The ALMA radio observatory has seen young spiral galaxies in unprecedented detail from 12 billion light-years away .

scientificamerican

At-Home Male Fertility Test App Takes Sperm Selfies A device that interfaces with a smartphone can accurately measure sperm concentration and movement .

scientificamerican

Comet Landslide Caught in Action Images from the Rosetta spacecraft provide the first clear link between a comet's outbursts and changes upon the comet's surface .

scientificamerican

Hospitals Halt Hiring, Projects amid Uncertain Fate of Obamacare The Republican-proposed repeal bill is slated for a House vote on Thursday .

scientificamerican

Lead Poisoning Afflicts Neighborhoods across California Dozens of California communities have seen recent rates of childhood lead poisoning exceed those of Flint, Mich. .

scientificamerican

Mathematicians Create Warped Worlds in Virtual Reality Immersive experience set to become accessible to all .

scientificamerican

NASA Satellite Catches Star's Death by Black Hole The Swift telescope has charted a star's plunge into a supermassive black hole at the core of a distant galaxy .

scientificamerican

New Books about Amnesia, Empathy, ADHD and the Placebo Effect Scientific American Mind weighs in on recent titles from neuroscience and psychology .

scientificamerican

Recognizing "Mom" Works in Only One Eye at a Time in These Animals Memories for birds might be stored in only one of two hemispheres, which could bring advantages .

scientificamerican

Smog Will Choke Crops If Climate Plan Is Scrubbed Several U.S. states have adopted Obama’s Clean Power Plan, but legal threats to it could result in ongoing crop losses as smog accumulates .

scientificamerican

Why Is the Ozone Hole Shrinking? What caused the hole in the ozone layer? And how has science helped us begin to shrink the hole? .

scientificamerican

UV Rays Strip Small Galaxies of Star Stuff Researchers measured the intensity of the universe's ultraviolet background radiation, and say it may be strong enough to strip small galaxies of star-forming gas. Christopher Intagliata reports. .

sploid.gizmodo

Mountain Biking Down an Abandoned Mine Shaft Is a Dimly Lit Descent Into Hell There are lots of places to go off-road mountain biking if you’re looking for a cheap thrill (or the chance to break your neck). But one of the most dangerous has to be riding into an abandoned mine shaft. If your flashlight dies as you’re pedalling deep into the earth , you’re probably screwed. After countless rainy days foiled Kilian Bron’s outdoor cycling adventures, he decided to instead make¤¤¤

sploid.gizmodo

Pouring Random Liquids Into an Aquarium Is Equal Parts Beautiful and Disgusting Through the lens of a talented photographer, even the most haunting, disturbing, and distressing scenes can be made beautiful. But we can’t decide if photographer Brian Tomlinson’s experiments with pouring random stuff into aquariums looks like a modern masterpiece, or just someone blowing chunks. To his credit, Tomlinson created this setup primarily to capture still photographs of the resulting¤¤¤

sploid.gizmodo

Try and Watch This Bonkers Spinning Office Chair for More Than Five Seconds Without Puking What’s 15 minutes of fame worth to you? Are you willing to spend the rest of your life feeling like you just rode the Tilt-A-Whirl at the carnival for three weeks? Because strapping yourself into a spinning office chair powered by a pair of spraying nitrous tanks is likely going to scramble your brain, among other body parts. This stunt comes courtesy of Farmtruck and AZN from the Discovery Chann¤¤¤

sploid.gizmodo

Watching These Precisely Crafted Wooden Joints Fit Together Is Deeply Satisfying You probably want a carpenter using nails to build your house, so, you know, it doesn’t fall down. But for more decorative wooden creations, fasteners can result in an unsightly finish. An alternative is to rely solely on precisely engineered wooden joints that fit together so perfectly you’d swear they were optical illusions. In this video, master carpenter Theo Cook , who’s been building furnit¤¤¤

statnews

Accidental Therapists: For Insect Detectives, the Trickiest Cases Involve Bugs That Are Not There Entomologists are fielding questions from people who believe they are under attack .

statnews

Science Sting Exposes Corrupt Journal Publishers A stunt reveals the problematic practices of predatory journals .

technologyreview

Customer Service Chatbots Are About to Become Frighteningly Realistic A startup gives chatbots and virtual assistants realistic facial expressions and the ability to read yours.¤¤¤

technologyreview

Sizing Up Trump’s Cyberwar Strategy The United States is taking damage in the global cyberwar, and Trump won’t be able to fix that without help.¤¤¤

technologyreview

Machine Learning Opens Up New Ways to Help Disabled People Software that can understand images, sounds, and language is being used to help people with disabilities such as deafness and autism in new ways.¤¤¤

technologyreview

Three Weeks with a Chatbot and I’ve Made a New Friend It’s not quite Her , but an artificially intelligent chatbot from an app called Hugging Face elicits surprisingly real emotions.¤¤¤

technologyreview

The Curious Case of the Quantum Theory of Humor The cognitive processes involved in humor bear a striking relationship to quantum phenomena. So can quantum mechanics help psychologists understand the nature of humor?¤¤¤

technologyreview

The Download, Mar 22, 2017: Baidu’s AI Loss, Making Solar Pervasive, and Your Brain on Satnav The most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.¤¤¤

technologyreview

Here Is One Powerful Way the U.S. Could Boost Solar Adoption A new report suggests that playing nice with China could be the key to success.¤¤¤

technologyreview

This Is Your Brain on GPS Navigation Parts of the brain that are used to navigate and plan routes aren’t active when directions are fed to us.¤¤¤

technologyreview

A Fight Over Tractors in America’s Heartland Comes Down to Software Some farmers who own John Deere tractors are using black market code to get around software that restricts how they can repair their equipment.¤¤¤

technologyreview

The Download, Mar 23, 2017: Compelling Chatbots, Rejuvenating Old Blood, and a Coal Slow Down The most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.¤¤¤

technologyreview

Coal Power Has Taken a Tumble, But Is It the Beginning of the End? Fewer coal-powered plants are going into construction—but without harsh taxes in place, people will continue to burn the stuff.¤¤¤

technologyreview

Coal Power Has Taken a Tumble, But Will it Last? Fewer coal-powered plants are going into construction—but without harsh taxes in place, people will continue to burn the stuff.¤¤¤

technologyreview

The World’s Largest Artificial Sun Could Help Generate Clean Fuel Can a wall of light provide the key to cheap and plentiful liquid hydrogen?¤¤¤

technologyreview

New Protein Hints at a Fountain of Youth in Blood It’s another tantalizing finding in an area of anti-aging research that has had mixed results.¤¤¤

technologyreview

Protein Hints at a Fountain of Youth in Blood It’s another tantalizing finding in an area of anti-aging research that has had mixed results.¤¤¤

ted

Why civilians suffer more once a war is over | Margaret Bourdeaux War doesn't just kill people; it destroys the institutions that keep society running, like utilities, banks and hospitals. Physician and global health policy analyst Margaret Bourdeaux proposes a bold approach to post-conflict recovery that focuses on building strong, resilient health systems that protect vulnerable populations.¤¤¤

ted

Who would the rest of the world vote for in your country's election? | Simon Anholt To make the world work, we need leaders who consider the needs of every man, woman, child and animal on the planet -- not just their own voters. With the Global Vote, an online platform that lets anybody, anywhere in the world vote in the election of any country on earth, policy advisor Simon Anholt hopes to fill the gap between the few people who elect the world's most powerful leaders ... and th¤¤¤

theatlantic

Is Economic Despair What's Killing Middle-Aged White Americans? Two years ago, the Princeton economists Anne Case and Angus Deaton published an alarming revelation: Middle-aged white Americans without a college degree were dying in greater numbers, even as people in other developed countries were living longer. The husband-and-wife team argued, in a study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , that these white Americans are facing“ deaths of¤¤¤

theatlantic

Maybe the Economy Isn't the Reason Why So Many American Men Aren't Working CHARLOTTE, North Carolina—John LaRue is having a tough time of it these days. He used to move things for people, advertising his services on Craigslist. But work slowed up, and he became homeless and started sleeping in his truck, until, that is, someone stole it. Now, he told me, he’s fighting alcoholism and his health is deteriorating from living on the streets. I met LaRue at a Social Security¤¤¤

theatlantic

Is This the End of Sears? Sears, along with most other department store chains that used to serve as mall anchor stores, have been in continuous decline for a decade, with sales and profits dipping lower and lower. On Wednesday, the company released its annual SEC filing and one sentence in particular stands out as cause for concern. In the document, the company said that “substantial doubt exists related to the company’s¤¤¤

theatlantic

When Feelings About Money Have Nothing to Do With Actual Finances Americans have been feeling bad about their finances for years now. This is despite decreasing unemployment , growing GDP , and a climbing stock market. But feelings about money can often have little basis in financial fact, a point proven in a recent poll from Gallup. The poll, released on Wednesday, shows that Republicans are feeling much rosier about their financial status, while Democrats are¤¤¤

theatlantic

Trump’s Populist Mirage President Donald Trump might be consumed by half-truths and conspiracy theories, but during the campaign he brought attention to a very real phenomenon: regional inequality. He promised not only a proper swamp-draining in Washington, D.C., but also a renaissance for the Rust Belt, Appalachia, and America’s blighted heartland. Even when his prognoses were fantasies—neither trade wars nor border wa¤¤¤

theatlantic

Boston Puts a Better Map in the Classroom Fans of The West Wing might recall the infamous “ Big Block of Cheese Day ,” a fictitious day in which the show’s White House staffers honor the petitions of small interest groups. In the episode, Press Secretary C.J. Craig and Deputy Chief of Staff Josh Lyman enter a meeting fully prepared to dismiss a request from a group of cartographers to put new maps in public schools. But the pair soon bec¤¤¤

theatlantic

Do After-School Programs Positively Impact Children? After-school programs are on the chopping block in the Trump administration’s proposed budget, an issue a reporter drew attention to at a recent press conference with the director of the Office of Management and Budget, Mick Mulvaney. In response to a question about the future of these programs , Mulvaney said, “They’re supposed to be educational programs, right? And that’s what they’re supposed¤¤¤

theatlantic

Do Private School Vouchers Promote Segregation? With school-choice booster Betsy DeVos at the helm of the Department of Education, private-school vouchers are getting new life and plenty of renewed attention. Last Thursday, the Trump administration cemented vouchers’ official return by releasing its “America First” budget , which allocates $20 billion in annual funds, or about a third of the new education budget, to school-choice programs, inc¤¤¤

theatlantic

Examining Poor School Performance in the U.S. American teens spend far more time on sports than they do on their studies. At least that’s how international students see it, according to a report out Wednesday from the Brown Center on Education Policy at the Brookings Institution. In an effort to “shed light on what is peculiarly American about American high schools,” the report surveyed hundreds of foreign-exchange students for a “fresh pers¤¤¤

theatlantic

How a New Supreme Court Ruling Could Affect Special Education In a stunning 8-0 decision in the case Endrew F. v. Douglas County School District, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of a higher standard of education for children with disabilities. Advocates and parents say the case dramatically expands the rights of special-education students in the United States, creates a nationwide standard for special education, and empowers parents as they advocate f¤¤¤

theatlantic

Measuring College (Un)affordability College is unaffordable for a lot of families. That’s widely acknowledged across party lines. But a new report shows that as many as 95 percent of colleges are completely unaffordable—and thus unavailable—for huge swaths of Americans. For many would-be college students, their choices are delimited by their socioeconomic status before they have even taken the SAT. In a new report, the nonprofit In¤¤¤

theatlantic

Daniel Clowes on Creating Wilson and Translating Him to Screen Daniel Clowes’s 2010 graphic novel Wilson was a masterful joining of two of its creator’s greatest talents—his blunt, savagely funny humor and his ability to elicit sympathy for the most outwardly miserable characters. Wilson is told in single-page vignettes, following its protagonist through his seemingly dead-end life as he strikes up irritating conversations with strangers, struggles to connec¤¤¤

theatlantic

Drake's Playful More Life and the Limits of Ambition The title of Drake’s More Life comes from a Jamaican encouragement , and a lot of listeners might take it as a carpe diem or live long and prosper or another zap of inspiration. But you could read the phrase more darkly—as a reference to the drag of mortality, as a gripe at another day on this rock. Someone might sigh “more life” around big birthdays, or after big achievements. That thing your wh¤¤¤

theatlantic

Power Rangers Is Exactly as Silly as It’s Supposed to Be It’s hard to say what’s more indicative of Hollywood’s franchise-happy, nostalgia-centric present—the fact that there’s a new Power Rangers movie in theaters with a budget of over $100 million, or the fact that it’s pretty good. It seems that studios long ago hit rock bottom in their efforts to mine every marginally beloved piece of pop culture from a certain generation’s childhood to make new re¤¤¤

theatlantic

Selling What They Preach A recent ad for the InterContinental hotel brand, a lush video set in London, features an interview with Kathryn Sargent, the first woman master tailor to open her own shop on Savile Row. “The whole experience of making a beautiful garment for someone,” Sargent tells the camera, as she expertly marks a piece of wool, “empathy is at the heart of that.” The video is titled, for YouTube purposes, “S¤¤¤

theatlantic

The Ethical Minefield of Missing Richard Simmons Richard Simmons, by his own account, and by the accounts of his brother, his manager, his publicist, and officers in the Los Angeles Police Department, is fine. The former home-fitness guru and television personality is not being held hostage by his housekeeper, nor is he suffering from debilitating depressive episodes. But he does want to be left alone, to live quietly and privately, out of the¤¤¤

theatlantic

Can Old Prescription Drugs Provide New Treatments for Alcoholism? In The Drinkers , painted by Vincent van Gogh in 1890, three men and a child huddle around a table as they glug down whatever’s in the pitcher in front of them. Their faces are focused, stern. Standing together, they still seem lonely, lost in the blues and greens the Dutch artist used to color them. “They’re drinking because they’re unhappy,” says Adron Harris, the director of the Waggoner Cente¤¤¤

theatlantic

Americans Prefer Their Employers, Not the Government, to Provide Health Benefits Most Americans don’t get fully paid medical leave, but they want it. According to a massive Pew Research survey released today, only 47 percent of people who took time off from work for medical or family reasons did so while receiving their regular salary, while 36 percent took time off with no pay. (The rest received partial pay.) Those at lower incomes were much less likely to get paid leave th¤¤¤

theatlantic

Two Glimpses of a Grim Post-American Future As the United States under President Trump recedes from world leadership, things are not looking so good elsewhere on earth. Two new books—with similarly morbid titles—have arrived to warn of big trouble ahead for both the European Union and the emerging economies of Asia. The End of the Asian Century by Michael Auslin offers a point-by-point debunking of the “Asiaphoria” that gripped so many ima¤¤¤

theatlantic

London Gets On With It In the aftermath of the 2005 London bombings, which killed 52 commuters and injured hundreds of others, British Prime Minister Tony Blair delivered a statement from his office at 10 Downing Street in which he paid tribute to two very specific qualities of Londoners—their “stoicism and resilience,” vowing that citizens would “hold true to the British way of life.” “London is stronger than any amou¤¤¤

theatlantic

ISIS Will Fail, but What About the Idea of ISIS? The Islamic State is claiming responsibility for the London attack that left three people and the attacker dead on Wednesday. “It is believed that this attacker acted alone,” Prime Minister Theresa May said , adding that the British-born man, already known to authorities, was inspired by “Islamist terrorism.” For its part, ISIS called the attacker its “soldier” in a report published by its Amaq n¤¤¤

theatlantic

Why Did It Take ISIS a Full Day to Claim the London Attack? Less than 24 hours after British national Khalid Masood allegedly plowed a vehicle into bystanders on London’s Westminister Bridge and stabbed an officer outside the U.K. Parliament, the Islamic State took credit for the attack. In a statement released Thursday on Amaq, the ISIS propaganda arm, the group said the attacker was “a soldier of the Islamic State” who “carried out the operation in resp¤¤¤

theatlantic

What's Behind Israel's Diplomatic Flare-Up With Russia In the fall of 2015, Russia and Israel held their first talks on “deconfliction,” a disconcerting, vague military arrangement, the aim of which was “ preventing misunderstandings ” in the Syrian civil war. Russia had just formally entered the conflict, and Israel had already been informally participating through occasional strikes on Hezbollah targets in Syria and some cross-border exchanges of f¤¤¤

theatlantic

What London Police Learned From the Last Big Attack LONDON—Within seconds of Wednesday’s terrorist attack, the Houses of Parliament went into lockdown. Doors were bolted shut by staff, and MPs were locked into the Chamber of Commons. Minutes later, militarized police from a response team set up in the wake of the Paris attacks spread through the surrounding streets. Doctors and nurses from St. Thomas’s Hospital, on the opposite bank of the Thames,¤¤¤

theatlantic

Why Westminster? If, as police suspect, the deadly attack near the British Parliament on Wednesday proves to be an act of terrorism, it will depart from the recent pattern of terrorist attacks in the West. In the post-9/11 world of the counterterrorism surveillance state and the internet-radicalized lone-wolf attacker , terrorists typically don’t use sophisticated weapons that might tip off authorities, and it’s¤¤¤

theatlantic

Murder in Kiev MOSCOW—As he was entering a ritzy Kiev hotel, a shower of bullets descended on former Russian parliament member Denis Voronenkov and his bodyguard, who returned fire, injuring the shooter. In a matter of minutes, Voronenkov lay dead in the street, photographers snapping pictures of his splayed and bloodied body, still in its expensive blue suit. The shooter has not been identified, but the Ukrain¤¤¤

theatlantic

Steve Bannon's Would-Be Coalition of Christian Traditionalists “If we do not bind together as partners with others in other countries then this conflict is only going to metastasize,” said Steve Bannon in 2014. He was referring to a conflict he perceived between “Judeo-Christian values” and “Islamic fascism.” Speaking to a conference held at the Vatican, he seemed to call for Christian traditionalists of all stripes to join together in a coalition for the sa¤¤¤

theatlantic

Remapping the World and Nowruz in Iran: The Week in Global-Affairs Writing The Global Gag Rule: America’s Deadly Export Jill Filipovic | Foreign Policy “The order doesn’t apply to U.S.-based organizations because it violates Americans’ First Amendment rights; no such protections extend overseas. Family planning advocates from Washington, D.C., to Addis Ababa in Ethiopia worry that Trump’s Global Gag Rule will not only roll back many of the modest but critical gains Afri¤¤¤

theatlantic

London Attack: What We Know The latest on Thursday, March 23: —Metropolitan Police identified the attacker as Khalid Masood, 52 —Prime Minister Theresa May says the London attacker was British-born and known to authorities. —ISIS claimed responsibility; eight people have been arrested in connection with the attack. —Four people and the attacker were killed. At least 40 people were injured when the attacker drove a vehicle o¤¤¤

theatlantic

Today's News: March 23, 2017 —Metropolitan Police have identified the alleged London attacker as Khalid Masood. Prime Minister Theresa May has told the U.K.’s House of Commons he was British-born and was known to both the police and the country’s intelligence services. More here . —Israeli police arrested a 19-year-old Israeli-U.S. dual citizen in connection with the threats made against Jewish centers in the U.S., New Zeala¤¤¤

theatlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Terror and Foreign Ties What We’re Following Fear in London: Four people were killed and 20 wounded today in what’s being investigated as a terrorist attack near the British Parliament. Here’s what we know so far . The alleged attacker, armed with a knife, struck several people with a car on Westminster Bridge and attempted to enter Parliament, killing a policeman before being shot dead by another officer. Unlike other¤¤¤

theatlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Appeal and Delay What We’re Following Terror’s Aftermath: ISIS has claimed responsibility for yesterday’s deadly attack outside the U.K. Parliament. The suspected terrorist, a 52-year-old British national, has also been identified. We’re tracking the latest developments here . Prime Minister Theresa May urged citizens to go about their lives as usual—a philosophy of resilience that’s carried the U.K. through war¤¤¤

theatlantic

Becoming ‘Everyone’s Little Sister’ to Deal With Sexism A reader with a Ph.D. in physics has been working in the tech industry for many years, but she’s struggled to cope with the huge gender imbalance at the start-ups she’s worked for. She feels she can’t fully be herself—or a mother: When I entered the office for my interview, I saw every head in the glass-enclosed conference room pop up and look over at me. I’ve trained myself to have a sort of sma¤¤¤

theatlantic

Today Is National Puppy Day I just discovered that March 23 has been set aside as National Puppy Day —founded in 2006 by author Colleen Paige, and adopted by other groups and organizations since. The idea is to focus attention on puppies in need of adoption, and on the abuses found in puppy mills, but also to celebrate these furry little companions. In the spirit of the day, I feel obligated to share some of these adorable¤¤¤

theatlantic

An Israeli American Teen Has Been Arrested in the JCC Bomb Threats Case Updated March 23 at 12:08 p.m. EST Officials have arrested a Israeli American teenager in connection with a string of bomb threats made to U.S. Jewish Community Centers and schools over the past several months. He has also been accused of making threatening calls in New Zealand and Australia, along with a call to a commercial airline that forced it to make an emergency landing, according to The N¤¤¤

theatlantic

Trump's Former Campaign Chairman's Tight Ties to Putin During Monday’s White House briefing, Press Secretary Sean Spicer made a strange assertion. This is not unusual; in fact, Spicer makes strange assertions on such a regular basis that this one barely made a ripple outside of the press corps. James Comey had confirmed that morning that his FBI was investigating whether the Trump campaign colluded with Russia to meddle in the presidential election.¤¤¤

theatlantic

Chelsea and Ivanka Are Trading Places Be honest: Six months ago, if someone had told you that Ivanka Trump, fashion-peddling, glamour-gal scion of the Trump real-estate and branding dynasty, would be moving into her own West Wing Office, getting special security clearance which will allow her to view classified info, trying on the role of policy maven, and even receiving her own “government-issued devices,” you’d have thought they we¤¤¤

theatlantic

Conservatives Threaten to Sink Republican Health-Care Bill Updated on March 22 at 7:19 p.m. ET When President Trump summoned Representative Ted Yoho and about a dozen other lawmakers to the White House on Wednesday to hear a direct, presidential pitch for the House Republican health-care bill, the Florida conservative told Trump what he wanted: a “100 percent repeal” of the Affordable Care Act. Like most of his fellow members of the hardline House Freedo¤¤¤

theatlantic

Does Trump's Resident Intellectual Speak for His Boss? Michael Anton warned last year that 2016 was the Flight 93 election: “Charge the cockpit or you die.” Americans charged. Donald Trump became president of the United States. And Anton, the author of that now-notorious essay, is helping to fly the plane—running communications for the National Security Council. Anton cuts a curious figure through the Trump White House. A thoroughly educated dandy, h¤¤¤

theatlantic

Don't Let the Russia Probe Become the New Benghazi In January 2016, I was interviewed by the House Select Committee on Benghazi. It was the eighth investigation into the tragic events of September 11, 2012 when a diplomatic facility in Benghazi was overrun and four brave Americans were killed. The inquiry lasted over two years, reviewed 10,000 pages of documents, and interviewed over 100 witnesses, many of whom were recalled from assignments all¤¤¤

theatlantic

Devin Nunes's Curiously Selective Memory Representative Devin Nunes, a Republican, is chairman of the House Intelligence Committee. He is therefore leading a key probe into whether or not Donald Trump’s presidential campaign had ties to Russian meddling in the 2016 election. Can an inquiry he leads be trusted? The skeptics include Evan McMullin, the former CIA operative who launched an independent bid for the presidency last year, billi¤¤¤

theatlantic

First Daughters and Lifetime Achievements Be honest: Six months ago, if someone had told you that Ivanka Trump, fashion-peddling, glamour-gal scion of the Trump real-estate/branding dynasty, would be moving into her own West Wing office, getting special security clearance, trying on the role of policy maven, and even being issued her own “government devices,” you’d have thought they were bonkers, or baked, or both. Now consider that, on¤¤¤

theatlantic

Gorsuch: Roe v. Wade Is the 'Law of the Land' Updated at 5:42 p.m. ET Democratic senators spent most of Tuesday’s Supreme Court confirmation hearing trying to pin down nominee Neil Gorsuch’s views on abortion, campaign-finance reform, gun rights, and a host of other contentious issues. They were largely unsuccessful. So in Wednesday’s Senate Judiciary Committee session, they tried a new approach: warning Gorsuch about what they see as the co¤¤¤

theatlantic

Schiff: 'There Is More Than Circumstantial Evidence Now' Adam Schiff, the ranking Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, said on MSNBC Wednesday afternoon that there is evidence that is “not circumstantial” of collusion between the Trump campaign and the Russian government. Schiff’s statement escalates the rhetoric on Capitol Hill about allegations of ties between Russia and the president’s circle. It follows two major developments. On Monday, F¤¤¤

theatlantic

Why Banning Laura Kipnis Would Betray Wellesley's Academic Mission This week at Wellesley College, six professors who serve on the Commission on Race, Ethnicity, and Equity , a committee at the highly selective liberal arts school, sent an email to fellow faculty members urging a radical shift in campus culture. Under the status quo, the Northwestern professor Laura Kipnis , a feminist cultural critic, was invited to speak on campus, despite her controversial vi¤¤¤

theatlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Nunes-theless, He Persisted Today in 5 Lines At a news conference, House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes said that the identities and communications of Trump transition officials might have been inappropriately revealed in intelligence reports after being collected as part of “legal” and “incidental” foreign intelligence surveillance operations. The Associated Press reports that Donald Trump’s former campaign ma¤¤¤

theatlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Somewhere John Boehner Is Sipping Merlot Today in 5 Lines The U.S. House canceled tonight’s vote on the Republican plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, after the White House and the conservative House Freedom Caucus failed to reach a deal on the legislation. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer announced that Democrats will try to filibuster President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, Neil Gorsuch, saying the judge “was unab¤¤¤

theatlantic

The Dangers of Blaming Trump for Anti-Semitism At a press conference in mid-February, Donald Trump said something that was, even for him, astonishing. He predicted that when authorities discovered the perpetrators of the anti-Semitic attacks that had broken out since his election, “It won’t be my people,” who had committed them. “It will be the people on the other side.” He repeated the thought later that month, reportedly telling state attor¤¤¤

theatlantic

The Trouble With Killing Obamacare's 'Essential Health Benefits' Get ready for the “mommy tax.” One of the most powerful arguments against House Republicans’ embattled legislation to repeal the Affordable Care Act has been that it imposes an “age tax” by raising health-insurance premiums and out-of-pocket expenses for older, working adults. To woo recalcitrant conservatives whose resistance forced the House leadership to delay a vote on the legislation Thursda¤¤¤

theatlantic

Trump's Unbalanced Homeland Security Budget Last week, President Trump released the broad outlines of his budget blueprint for the Department of Homeland Security. Unsurprisingly, there is a strong focus on border security and interior immigration enforcement. As these discussions continue, however, the administration must also ensure these priorities do not come at the expense of other agencies that keep the American people safe. Indeed,¤¤¤

theatlantic

Republicans Can't Find the Votes for Their Health-Care Bill Updated on March 23 at 4:28 p.m. ET Lacking the majority needed to pass their bill to replace the Affordable Care Act, House Republican leaders have postponed a planned Thursday vote, imperiling President Trump’s first major legislative priority. The move was an indication that a series of meetings Trump and Speaker Paul Ryan had with reluctant members in the party’s conservative and centrist win¤¤¤

theatlantic

The White House Dismisses Reports of Possible Russian Collusion White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer on Thursday dismissed a recent CNN report claiming the FBI has information to suggest Trump associates may have worked with Russian operatives in an attempt to undermine Hillary Clinton’s campaign. Spicer argued that the report was flimsy and, by its own admission, offered no definitive proof of coordination. “Let’s actually look at what CNN reported: They¤¤¤

theatlantic

Trump's Obamacare Ultimatum On Thursday, the Affordable Care Act celebrated its seventh birthday. On Friday, it just might celebrate a most unlikely reprieve. In a take-it-or-leave-it message delivered by his senior advisers to Capitol Hill, President Trump late Thursday told bickering House Republicans they had one final opportunity to repeal and replace the health-care law they have decried since its enactment. At the pre¤¤¤

theatlantic

Trump: When the President Says It, That Means It’s True President Trump remains peculiarly fixated on the cover of Time magazine. He has claimed in the past that he holds the record for most covers, but in an interview with Michael Scherer for this week’s magazine, the president asked if he was the all-time leader. Scherer had to break the bad news to him: Richard M. Nixon still held the lead—though he added, “He was in office for longer, so give your¤¤¤

theatlantic

Who Can Tell the Emperor When He Has No Clothes? How can anyone convince the most powerful man in the world of something he does not wish to believe? It’s not an idle question. In a remarkable interview with Time ’s Michael Scherer, President Trump flaunted his elastic relationship with truth. Instead of weighing evidence, he explained, he prefers to trust his gut. “I’m a very instinctual person,” he said, “but my instinct turns out to be right¤¤¤

theatlantic

Can Trumpism Last Without Minority Voters? Compared with the ongoing firestorm over Russia and impending showdown over health care, President Trump’s meeting with Congressional Black Caucus leaders Wednesday might seem peripheral to a presidency careening through constant turmoil. But the session, which aired but didn’t resolve differences about the federal budget and other domestic issues, captured a critical test of his political moveme¤¤¤

theatlantic

What Devin Nunes's Bombshell Does and Doesn't Say Updated on March 22 at 5:24 p.m. In a head-spinning development on Capitol Hill on Wednesday, Representative Devin Nunes, the chair of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, revealed that … well, what Nunes revealed isn’t totally clear. Nunes held a brief press conference Wednesday afternoon saying that “on numerous occasions the Intelligence Community incidentally collected inform¤¤¤

theatlantic

The Trouble With Medicaid Work Requirements What are work requirements good for? Stretching back to the establishment of welfare in the United States, politicians have debated both the practical and moral utility of requiring people to work in order to receive government benefits. Since welfare reform in the 1990s gave states wide latitude to create work requirements in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families cash-assistance program, R¤¤¤

theatlantic

Atlantic Media Announces Finalists for the 2017 Michael Kelly Award Washington, D.C. (March 22, 2017)— Atlantic Media has selected four finalists for its 14th annual Michael Kelly Award . Atlantic Media Chairman David Bradley created the award to celebrate the life and career of Michael Kelly, a former editor of two Atlantic Media publications—The Atlantic and National Journal—who was killed in Iraq while covering the war in 2003. Selected from a highly competiti¤¤¤

theatlantic

Mosquitoes, Get Ready for Your Close-Up How does one art direct a mosquito photoshoot? James Gathany has some tricks (warm blood, etc). As a photographer for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, he has spent 30 years shooting microbes, disease-carrying insects, and the occasional celebrity that passes through the CDC. Prince Andrew and Barack Obama are the most memorable humans he’s photographed, he says. But it is as a scie¤¤¤

theatlantic

A 130-Year-Old Fact About Dinosaurs Might Be Wrong When I first read Matthew Baron ’s new dinosaur study, I actually gasped. For most of my life, I’ve believed that the dinosaurs fell into two major groups: the lizard-hipped saurischians, which included the meat-eating theropods like Tyrannosaurus and long-necked sauropodomorphs like Brontosaurus Yes, Brontosaurus . It’s a thing again. ; and the bird-hipped ornithischians, which included horned s¤¤¤

theatlantic

The Video Game That Claims Everything Is Connected I am Rocky Mountain elk. I somersault forward through the grass, toward a tower of some sort. Now I am that: Industrial Smoke Stack. I press another button and move a cursor to become Giant Sequoia. I zoom out again, and I am Rock Planet, small and gray. Soon I am Sun, and then I am Lenticular Galaxy. Things seem a little too ordinary, so I pull up a menu and transform my galaxy into a Woolly Mam¤¤¤

theatlantic

How the Diving Bell Opened the Ocean's Depths Imagine sitting on a narrow bench inside a dark room. Your feet are dangling into a floor of water. You’re vaguely aware of the room moving. Your ears start ringing. If you move too much, you feel the room sway, which could bring the floor rushing in to fill it. You take a breath and dive down, swim outside the room, groping the water, looking for its bottom, reaching for something valuable enoug¤¤¤

theatlantic

What Happens If Uber Fails? The thing about a market bubble is that you don’t really know how big it is until it pops. So it doesn’t pop, and doesn’t pop, and doesn’t pop, until one day it finally pops. And by then it’s too late. The dot-com collapse two decades ago erased $5 trillion in investments. Ever since, people in Silicon Valley have tried to guess exactly when the next tech bubble will burst, and whether the latest¤¤¤

theatlantic

Ovarian Psycos: The L.A. Bicycle Crew for Women of Color On the east side of Los Angeles, a group of women are part of a bicycle crew that aims to confront injustice and redefine identity. They call themselves the Ovarian Psycos Cycle Brigade. This short excerpt from the new documentary Ovarian Psycos profiles Xela de la X, the group’s founder. She’s a mother, artist, and activist. A survivor of sexual abuse, she formed the crew to create a community o¤¤¤

theatlantic

A Story of Redemption in Flint, Michigan Noah Patton’s childhood in Flint was difficult. His community was hit hard by the crack epidemic and the decline of the auto industry, and the city spiraled downwards. “Growing up, you hear how Flint was a thriving city. Flint was the American dream,” Patton says in this short film, Noah . “My kid got lead poisoning...you have to say to yourself, ‘It’s not right.’ We didn’t ask for the lifestyle¤¤¤

themuse.jezebel

Wolverine Has Foreskin, Without Question Image via Marvel, art via Bobby Finger, and I apologize. Folks, I’ll keep this brief-ish because it doesn’t deserve too much of anyone’s time. There have been rumblings on the internet (that’s code for “I saw at least one blog and/or tweet about this”) that we should be wondering whether Wolverine (aka Logan), a super strong and frequently brooding mutant character from Marvel’s X-Men franchise,¤¤¤

the-scientist

Researchers Argue for ?Embryoid? Ethics Revamp Scientists issue a call to reconsider the rules governing the creation of tissues, organs, and other structures made possible by recent advances in synthetic biology.¤¤¤

the-scientist

Image of the Day: Lighting Up the Sea The Hawaiian bobtail squid (Euprymna scolopes) is a nocturnal predator with a light organ full of bioluminescent bacteria attached to an ink sac, which the animal uses to control the amount of light it releases.¤¤¤

the-scientist

Q&A: Marching for Science in Memphis A conversation with activist and undergraduate student Sydney Bryant¤¤¤

the-scientist

PCSK9 Drug Reduces Heart Disease Risk A cholesterol-lowering drug significantly cut the risk of heart attack and stroke in a recent study. But is it worth the steep cost?¤¤¤

the-scientist

Enzyme Required for Mitochondrial Genome Destruction Mitochondrial DNA polymerase is necessary for the destruction of paternal mtDNA in fruit fly sperm, scientists show.¤¤¤

the-scientist

Macchiarini Retracts Another Paper The embattled thoracic surgeon blames his former employer, the Karolinska Institute, for losing data related to the retracted research.¤¤¤

the-scientist

Image of the Day: Tubular Origins Murine neural tubes, with each image highlighting a different embryonic tissue type (blue). The neural tube itself (left) grows into the brain, spine, and nerves, while the mesoderm (middle) develops into other organs, and the ectoderm (right) forms skin, teeth, and hair.¤¤¤

the-scientist

TS Picks: March 23, 2017 Reacting to the White House budget proposal; tracking “attacks on science”¤¤¤

the-scientist

DNA Replication Errors Contribute to Cancer Risk A follow-up study confirms that random mutations acquired during normal stem cell division likely play a major role in cancer incidence.¤¤¤

the-scientist

Pathway to Polio Virulence Revealed Using epidemiological and laboratory data, scientists have mapped out a sequence of mutations through which the attenuated oral polio vaccine reverts to a virulent virus.¤¤¤

the-scientist

Glia Help Regulate Circadian Behaviors Scientists confirm that astrocytes are involved in regulating molecular and behavioral circadian rhythms in mice.¤¤¤

the-scientist

Opinion: Scientists Must Think Beyond Science If we are to defend science, we must stand together with the other truth-tellers, including our non-scientist colleagues.¤¤¤

the-scientist

Smartphone Semen Assay An app-based sperm analyzer screens for signs of male infertility.¤¤¤

the-scientist

Nasser Zawia: An American Scientist Born in Yemen The University of Rhode Island neurotoxicologist and dean came to the U.S. for college in the 1980s.¤¤¤

theslot.jezebel

We Redacted Everything That's Not a Verifiably True Statement From Trump's Time Interview About Truth Image via Getty. President Trump recently participated in an interview with Time Magazine’s Michael Scherer for a cover story about his relationship with the truth. Predictably, this conversation really tested the limits of irony. In the full transcript of the interview published by Time, Trump lies a lot, says a number of half-true things, does not admit he was incorrect to link Ted Cruz’s fathe¤¤¤

wired

Astronomers Don’t Point This Telescope—The Telescope Points Them The era of big data astronomy will find stuff astronomers never even knew to look for.

wired

AutoX Slaps $50 Webcams on a Car to Make It Drive Itself The startup wants to prove that driverless cars can be more affordable.

wired

The Clever ‘DoubleAgent’ Attack Turns Antivirus Into Malware The bug potentially puts every Windows antivirus program at risk, but also hints at more fundamental problems with relying on AV.

wired

Congress Is About To Give Away Your Online Privacy Opinion: Lawmakers shouldn't revoke an FCC law that protects consumers' privacy.

wired

Don’t Buy the Latest Trump Surveillance Hype Rep. Devin Nunes made some unprecedented statements today. But even if they're true, they don't prove what the White House wishes they did.

wired

Facebook Messenger Finally Makes Group Chat Not a Total Hassle Yet another way of making Messenger the only messaging app you need.

wired

The Fight to Wrap Cheapo Cars in Luxurious Silence The joy of quiet, long reserved for the fanciest drivers, is making its way down market.

wired

5 YouTube Gaming Channels That Haven’t Gone Full PewDiePie (Yet) The world of videogame-related YouTube content can be a minefield—so we've got some family-friendly (or at least not wildly problematic) suggestions.

wired

Flight Lab: Inside the Model Plane Shop Where NASA Flies the Future Here's where NASA tests the next generation of aircraft—and the wings that could fly on Mars.

wired

Forget Bitcoin. The Blockchain Could Reveal What’s True Today and Tomorrow The technology underlying bitcoin could fuel powerful systems for forecasting the future—and create a digital feed for facts.

wired

Good News: Android’s Huge Security Problem Is Getting Less Huge According to Google's own stats, only half of Android devices received a security update any time in 2016.

wired

Google Maps Supercharges Location Sharing, Begins Drooling Over Your Data With a new feature, the mapping market heats up.

wired

The Guy Behind Ello (Remember Ello?) Just Built a Better Snapchat Wuu provides a private place for sharing stuff with friends. Nothing more. No ads, no influencers, no BS.

wired

The Hidden Breakthrough in Apple’s New Video App Clips is no mere Snapchat clone.

wired

Instagram Has Two-Factor Authentication Now, So Turn It On It takes just a few minutes to secure your Instagram account. Here's how to do it.

wired

The Battle for Top AI Talent Only Gets Tougher From Here The company has a new AI lab in the hope of becoming the chipmaker of choice for the world's smartest machines.

wired

LinkedIn Tries to Do Trending News in a Non-Disastrous Way You'd think internet companies would want to stay far, far away from "trending" news after one Menlo Park-based social giant's unfortunate history The post LinkedIn Tries to Do Trending News in a Non-Disastrous Way appeared first on WIRED .¤¤¤

wired

Phone Companies Will Soon Banish Robocalls. For Real This Time If Democrats, Republicans, and the telecommunications industry can agree on anything, it's that robocalls are the worst.

wired

The Senate Prepares to Send Internet Privacy Down a Black Hole Senators could vote as early as today to not only reverse the Obama-era FCC's action but block the agency from passing similar rules in the future.

wired

Silicon Valley Would Rather Cure Death Than Make Life Worth Living While Silicon Valley titans are drunk on the transhumanist promise to cure death, people are dying of curable problems that technologists ignore.

wired

Somebody Just Buy the ISS Already An argument for a big investment from some billionaire space lover.

wired

Kirkin’ Overtime: The Weird Late-’90s Star Trek Mashup You Didn’t Know About Thank you, 1990s videogames and creative editors, for this gloriously terrible gift.

wired

The Billionaire on a Mission to Save the Planet From Trump As a hedge fund manager, Tom Steyer turned $15 million into $30 billion. Then he learned what humanity is doing to the planet.

wired

How TV Opening Titles Got to Be So Damn Good You've probably heard television is in something of a golden age, but the same can be said of title sequences.

wired

Wall Street’s New Trick to Dodge Trump-Induced Stock Swings The Trump Tracker reveals a massive uptick in companies listing Trump among their risk factors.

wired

What’s the Point of Going to Space if You Don’t Make Booze? Here's how astronauts can make liquor without breaking the laws of physics.

wired

WikiLeaks Reveals How the CIA Can Hack a Mac’s Hidden Code The leak shows how physical access hacks can plant undetectable spying code deep in a Macbook's firmware.

wired

Silly YouTube, Don’t You Know Making the Internet Nicer Is Impossible? Heavy-handed algorithms aren't the only culprit here—there's plenty of human error too.

wired

Inside China’s Almost-Totally-Legal $400M Fishery in Africa Few things so clearly represent China's influence in West Africa as the ships pulling fish from its fisheries.

youtube

V. Narry Kim (IBS and SNU) 1: microRNA Biogenesis and Regulation https://www.ibiology.org/ibioseminars/microrna-biogenesis-regulation.html Part 1: microRNA Biogenesis and Regulation: Narry Kim takes us through the steps in microRNA biogenesis and explains the importance of microRNAs in regulating protein-coding mRNAs. Part 2: Tailing in the Regulation of microRNA and Beyond: Modifications, such as uridylation, of the 3’ tail of both microRNAs and mRNAs can reg¤¤¤

youtube

Let's Go Places: Florida | Living the Jai Alaife (360 Video) The ball speed in jai alai is the fastest in the world of sports, with balls flying 180+ mph. Want to jump in the middle of the action? Join rookies Brian Brushwood and Justin Robert Young on their Florida tour in this thrilling 360 video experience. For more immersive experiences, head to http://DiscoveryVR.com or download the app for your iPhone or Android device. ¤¤¤

youtube

Let's Go Places: Florida | Swamp Things (360 Video) Want to take a dip in a gator-infested swamp? Get the 360-degree experience with hosts Brian Brushwood and Justin Robert Young as they take an airboat ride through the Everglades. See what wildlife you can spot! For more immersive experiences, head to http://DiscoveryVR.com or download the app for your iPhone or Android device. ¤¤¤

youtube

V. Narry Kim (IBS and SNU) 2: Tailing in the Regulation of microRNA and Beyond https://www.ibiology.org/ibioseminars/tailing-regulation-microrna-beyond.html Part 1: microRNA Biogenesis and Regulation: Narry Kim takes us through the steps in microRNA biogenesis and explains the importance of microRNAs in regulating protein-coding mRNAs. Part 2: Tailing in the Regulation of microRNA and Beyond: Modifications, such as uridylation, of the 3’ tail of both microRNAs and mRNAs can¤¤¤

youtube

Why Won't Parker Kiss His Girlfriend?? | Gold Rush #GoldRush Parker's private life quickly became public when he brought his new girlfriend to the claim. Members of the Gold Rush camera crew divulge their season-long bet to catch some PDA on screen. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Fo¤¤¤

youtube

Get A Sneak Peek Inside AZN and Farmtruck's Mega Race Car in Virtual Reality! (360 Video) Mega Race | Monday March 27 at 9/8c The exterior is still under wraps but AZN and Farmtruck can at least show you the INSIDE of the car they'll be racing against the Gas Monkey team. Get revved up and vote for your favorites! http://www.discovery.com/MegaRace Catch up with full episodes streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/fast-n-loud/ https://www.discoverygo.com/street-out¤¤¤

youtube

Here's A Mega Race Surprise For Big Chief That He Never Saw Coming #StreetOutlaws | Mondays at 9/8c on Discovery Shawn goes above and beyond for the Mega Race build, getting Chief a replica of the Crow's front end and putting on the Crow's old tags. Full episodes streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/street-outlaws/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ Discovery https://www.¤¤¤

youtube

V. Narry Kim (IBS and SNU) 1 (in Korean): microRNA Biogenesis and Regulation https://www.ibiology.org/ibioseminars/microrna-biogenesis-regulation-korean.html Part 1: microRNA Biogenesis and Regulation: Narry Kim takes us through the steps in microRNA biogenesis and explains the importance of microRNAs in regulating protein-coding mRNAs. Part 2: Tailing in the Regulation of microRNA and Beyond: Modifications, such as uridylation, of the 3’ tail of both microRNAs and mRNAs¤¤¤

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.