Ingeniøren

Amerikansk kæmpelaser får følgeskab i Europa og AsienDrevet af behovet for at vedligeholde kernevåben følger Frankrig, Kina og Rusland i hælene på USA med nye store lasersystemer. Det giver også den civile forskning flere muligheder.
37min
Ars Technica

Mythos Tales: Probe Arkham’s darkest doings in this Lovecraft deduction game Enlarge (credit: 8th Summit) Welcome to Ars Cardboard, our weekend look at tabletop games! Check out our complete board gaming coverage at cardboard.arstechnica.com —and let us know what you think. You're just an ordinary 1930s inhabitant of the ordinary town of Arkham, Massachusetts—a plain New England place where nothing unusual ever happens. Well, except for that one infestation of hood-wearin
55min
Viden

Insekter på menuen: Fire ud af ti danskere er klar til kryb
1h
Live Science

What the Heaven's Gate Suicides Say About American CultureTwenty years ago, the paranoia that consumed cults like Heaven's Gate existed on the margins of American society. Such beliefs in conspiracies has moved toward the center of our culture, says one expert.
1h
Gizmodo

#GOPDnD Has the Best Dungeons & Dragons Game Ever After Trumpcare Failed Getty Images (modified, obviously) After a series of closed-door meetings , rejected promises , and thinly veiled threats from President Donald Trump, Republicans finally pulled the American Health Care Act before taking a vote on Friday. This was met with laughter by many, and a few tears by others. But the best reaction came from #GOPDnD, which ended up having the Dungeons & Dragons game of the
1h
Live Science

In Photos: Beautiful Butterflies of the American DesertsBy mid-February in the three great hot and dry deserts of the American West, wildflowers turn stark desert landscapes into a sea of color.
1h
The Atlantic

Today's News: March 25, 2017 —Iraqi government forces paused their push to retake Mosul from ISIS over concerns of high civilian casualties. —Trump’s laptop ban begins. The ban outlaws electronic devices onboard planes entering the U.S. from 10 airports in the Middle East and North Africa. —The U.S. grants asylum to Singapore blogger Amos Yee, who was jailed several times in his home country for comments he made about the Ch
1h
Live Science

How Often Do Ice Ages Happen?The last ice age led to the rise of the woolly mammoth and the vast expansion of glaciers, but it's just one of many that has chilled Earth throughout the planet's 4.5-billion-year history.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

3-D bioprinted human cartilage cells can be implantedResearchers have successfully induced human cartilage cells to live and grow in an animal model, using 3-D bioprinting. The results will move development closer to a potential future in which it will be possible to help patients by giving them new body parts through 3-D bioprinting.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ravens: Non-breeders live in highly dynamic social groupsRavens have impressive cognitive skills when interacting with conspecifics -- comparable to many primates, whose social intelligence has been related to their life in groups. An international collaboration of researchers could uncover for the first time the group dynamics of non-breeding ravens. The results help to understand the evolution of intelligence in this species.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Robust, 2-ion quantum logic gate that operates in a microsecond is designedA two-ion, robust, ultrarapid quantum logic gate capable of functioning in less than a microsecond has been designed, report the scientists involved.
1h
Scientific American Content: Global

The Bite of the Bear DogA new study estimates the predatory capabilities of a fearsome fossil beast -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

White families with children drawn to less diverse neighborhoods, schoolsRacial segregation is declining, but it remains higher for families with children than those without, a new study shows. Race appears to be a 'proxy' for school quality for many white families with children as they decide where and in which school districts they want to live, suggests a new report.
1h
Ars Technica

Roam free: A history of open-world gaming Open-world video games bear the impossible promise—offering compelling, enjoyable open-endedness and freedom within the constraints of what is, by necessity of the medium, an extremely limited set of possible actions. These games provide a list of (predominantly violent) verbs that's minuscule in comparison to the options you would face in identical real-life situations. Yet, we can't get enough
1h
Gizmodo

Saturday's Best Deals: Seamless Surround Sound, $5 Movies, Burt's Bees, and More Amazon’s one-day Under Armour sale , Burt’s Bees lip balm , and the simplest 5.1 surround sound system lead off Saturday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Refurb Vizio 40" 5.1 Sound Bar , $210 Vizio’s 5.1 channel sound bar systems are the simplest way to add surround sound to any home theater setup , and refurbs of
2h
WIRED

Only You Can Stop The Expanse From Becoming the Next Canceled Sci-Fi Classic Fans love the Syfy space drama-but they might not love it enough to keep it on the air. The post Only You Can Stop The Expanse From Becoming the Next Canceled Sci-Fi Classic appeared first on WIRED .
2h
Ingeniøren

Hullet fortov skal klimasikre gade på NørrebroHeimdalsgade på Nørrebro lægger fortov til at teste Klimaflisen, der samler og leder regnvand. Testen skal blandt andet afsløre, om systemet kan modstå den danske vinter.
2h
Scientific American Content: Global

Ornithoscelida Rises: A New Family Tree for DinosaursA novel phylogenetic hypothesis for Dinosauria!? Shock! Horror!—Say it isn't so!!! -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
The Atlantic

Escaping Office Ennui Through Painful Exercise Most office workers sit for 10 hours a day , but if they sign up for the Tough Mudder, a military-style obstacle course, they’ll certainly be on their feet—running through live electrical wires. They’ll also be on their hands, swinging from treacherous-looking monkey bars, and on their stomachs, crawling through the mud. And yet, millions of people have paid about $100 each for the privilege. Reb
2h
Ars Technica

German coal mine may be prime for pumped storage Enlarge (credit: Goseteufel ) In the German state of North Rhine-Westphalia, a coal mine will close in 2018. Aging coal infrastructure, low wholesale power prices, and a move away from the highly polluting power source all make renewable energy the political darling of the day. But that doesn’t mean the Prosper-Haniel coal mine will be shutting down completely. According to Bloomberg , North Rhin
2h
Gizmodo

Streaming Music Services, From Most Screwed to Least Screwed Image: Gizmodo Composite/Spotify/Deezer/Apple Music/Pandora/iHeartRadio/Tidal/SoundCloud/Napster SoundCloud is fucked. On Thursday, the streaming music service mostly known as a place to hear podcasts and remixes from unknown DJs confirmed that it had taken $70 million in debt funding —basically a loan from various investors—in order to stay in business. It’s never a good sign when venture-backed
2h
WIRED

Tesla’s Model 3 Is Coming. Here’s What We Know Now The latest news comes from a six second video on Elon Musk's Twitter feed. The post Tesla’s Model 3 Is Coming. Here’s What We Know Now appeared first on WIRED .
3h
Big Think

Daniel Dennett – Thinking About Thinking About Thinking – Think Again Podcast #91 Spontaneous talk on surprise topics. Philosopher of mind Daniel Dennett waxing wise and wicked on consciousness, dolphins, and more. Read More
3h
The Atlantic

Chuck Berry and Drake: The Week in Pop-Culture Writing Chuck Berry Was the Sound of 20th Century America Stephen Thomas Erlewine | Pitchfork “ Chuck will be a coda to a career that's already legend, but it may also confirm a simple truth about Chuck Berry’s art: He didn’t change his music but he did adapt with the times. He wound up documenting his era and, in turn, created the idealized version of 20th century America, from coast to shining coast. H
3h
The Atlantic

Does Being Vegan Make a Person Less Aggressive? Right now if you take the bus down 16th Street in northwest Washington, D.C., you’ll pass a banner that might not make sense at first, or after that. It shows North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un riding a missile. It says, “Don’t go ballistic. Go vegan.” The blue banner hangs outside the office of the animal-rights-advocacy organization People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, or PETA, which als
3h
Popular Science

20 ways to organize all your stuff Gadgets The sweet satisfaction of having everything in its place. For those of us yearning for the sweet satisfaction of having everything in its place. Read on.
3h
Scientific American Content: Global

Can These 2 Nutrients Help You Keep the Weight Off?New research suggests a tasty way to stop the yo-yo dieting cycle and prevent weight regain -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

Exoplanets Make Life Conversation LivelierAstronomer Caleb Scharf weighs what ever more exoplanets mean in the search for extraterrestrial life. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
WIRED

YouTube’s Ad Problems Finally Blow Up in Google’s Face Brands boycotted Google this past week when they learned their ads were appearing on hateful videos. The pressure could finally force the company to change. The post YouTube’s Ad Problems Finally Blow Up in Google’s Face appeared first on WIRED .
4h
WIRED

Space Photos of the Week: Codependent Spiral Galaxies Dunno Who They Are Anymore An up-close of Mars dunes, dwarf planets, and a massive protostar from this week in space. The post Space Photos of the Week: Codependent Spiral Galaxies Dunno Who They Are Anymore appeared first on WIRED .
4h
WIRED

Security News This Week: FedEx Offered Customers Five Bucks to Re-Install Flash Each weekend we round up the news stories that we didn't break or cover in depth but that still deserve your attention. The post Security News This Week: FedEx Offered Customers Five Bucks to Re-Install Flash appeared first on WIRED .
4h
WIRED

Meet the Woman Who Can See With Her Ears Nearly three decades after losing her sight, Pat discovers a new way to see. The post Meet the Woman Who Can See With Her Ears appeared first on WIRED .
4h
WIRED

It’s Hard Out Here For a Pigeon In this week's Gadget Lab podcast, we talk to the director of the final episode of Planet Earth II. The post It's Hard Out Here For a Pigeon appeared first on WIRED .
4h
Ingeniøren

Sådan sikrer du virksomheden mod hackereEt massivt hackerangreb på Twitter og Spotify i efteråret understregede, at et netværk aldrig er stærkere end det svageste led. ­Derfor er ­produktionsvirksomheder nødt til at tænke i basal cyberhygiejne, lyder det fra Delta, som nu åbner sine laboratorier for virksomheder­nes egne IoT-tests.
4h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Changing to BST: Will the clock change affect your kids?Research is underway to determine how clock changes affect children's sleep patterns.
4h
The Atlantic

When the Cliffhanger Takes Its Sweet Time “Somebody’s Dead.” That’s the title of the first episode of Big Little Lies , the limited series, starring Reese Witherspoon, Nicole Kidman, and Shailene Woodley, currently running on Sunday evenings on HBO. The title, for a show that is exceptionally subtle—especially in its depiction of the dramas and mundanities that shape its central women’s lives—is exceptionally unsubtle. But it’s also appr
4h
Scientific American Content: Global

Big Data Renews Fight Over the Origin of AnimalsA new study is the latest in the long-running dispute over which lineage—sponges or comb jellies—is the ancestor to all animals -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Scientific American Content: Global

National Corruption Breeds Personal DishonestyA shady government influences the moral behavior of its citizens -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Gizmodo

Stuff Your Closet With Under Armour Gear During Amazon's One-Day Sale Under Armour Gold Box Amazon’s running a new fitness-focused Gold Box to kick off the weekend, this time with a solid selection of Under Armour apparel for men, women, and kids all marked down to great low prices. Head over to Amazon , and you’ll find deals on shorts, tops, hats, and more. Just note that lots of the items have multiple color options once you get to their product pages, and that t
5h
Ingeniøren

Nyt tekstil puster sig op i koldt vejrEn ny type tekstil tilpasser sig luftens temperatur og holder på varmen, når der er koldt.
6h
The Atlantic

Obamacare Isn't Out of the Woods Yet At least for the moment, the American Health Care Act is dead. After two weeks of last-minute changes, Congressional Budget Office estimates, and an escalating tripartite skirmish between two wings of the Republican Party and the Trump White House, House Speaker Paul Ryan announced late Friday afternoon that a floor vote on the GOP’s Obamacare replacement would be canceled and the legislation pul
6h
The Atlantic

The Jordanian Airline Making Money Off the Laptop Ban Walk into the offices of Memac Ogilvy Advize, an advertising firm on the third floor of a car rental building in a business district of West Amman, Jordan, and you’ll be greeted with an immense black-and-white photo of Donald Trump’s face. The red cursive text printed across it reads: “We Trumped the awards.” The sign sits behind a reception counter boasting a large trophy won at the Dubai Lynx 2
6h
The Atlantic

What America Stood For After Donald Trump’s victory in the U.S. presidential election in November, a foreign ambassador accosted one of my deputies at the State Department, where from 2014 to early this year I served as the assistant secretary of state for democracy, human rights, and labor . “You must be so sad!” the man, a representative of a Central Asian government, said, grinning widely. “All this talk of election
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stephen Hawking appears as hologram in Hong KongRenowned physicist Stephen Hawking has spoken to a Hong Kong audience by hologram, showcasing the growing reach of a technology which is making inroads into politics, entertainment and business.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Photographer captures world's glacier melt over decadeFor the last decade, American photographer James Balog has been on a mission to document climate change through his camera lens.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Owner of Silicon Valley staffing firm charged in visa fraudThe owner of a company that supplied foreign workers to San Francisco Bay Area technology companies is facing visa fraud charges after filing fake documents to bring people to the United States, the U.S Attorney's Office announced Friday.
7h
Big Think

Raw Data from the Meat Atlas Warning: these maps might leave a strange taste in your mouth Read More
7h
New on MIT Technology Review

The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending March 25, 2017)This week’s most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.
8h
Science | The Guardian

Stem cells help some men with erectile dysfunction after prostate surgery In clinical trials, eight out of 15 men suffering from erectile dysfunction had sex six months after one-time treatment Men unable to have an erection after prostate surgery enjoyed normal intercourse thanks to stem cell therapy, scientists are to report on Saturday at a medical conference in London. In first-phase clinical trials, eight out of 15 continent men suffering from erectile dysfunction
10h
New on MIT Technology Review

Google’s AI Explosion in One ChartSurging investment in machine learning is vaulting Google into the scientific stratosphere.
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New study resolves the structure of the human protein that causes cystic fibrosisIn order to better understand how genetic mutations give rise to cystic fibrosis, researchers need to map the protein responsible for the disorder. The new structure has led to new insights on how this molecular channel functions.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study shows how brain combines subtle sensory signals to take noticeNew research explains how the developing brain learns to integrate and react to subtle but simultaneous sensory cues -- sound, touch and visual -- that would be ignored individually.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Artificial photosynthesis steps into the lightA new project aims to create an efficient, simple-to-manufacture oxygen-evolution catalyst that pairs well with semiconductors for advanced solar cells. The technique could lead to unique catalysts for other applications.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What does congenital Zika syndrome look like?Researchers describe the phenotypic spectrum or set of observable characteristics of congenital Zika (ZIKV) syndrome, based upon clinical evaluations and neuroimaging of 83 Brazilian children with presumed or confirmed ZIKV congenital infections.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Statins may provide treatment alternative for chronic liver diseaseStatin drugs are widely used to manage high cholesterol and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. But in a new review of more than 50 studies, researchers cite reductions in liver inflammation and improvements in other related factors as reasons why statins make good candidates for treating chronic liver disease.
14h
The Atlantic

Nobody Knew Governing Could Be So Complicated The Republican Party’s marquee legislative initiative had just imploded in spectacular, and humiliating, fashion Friday afternoon when Paul Ryan stepped up to a podium on Capitol Hill. The beleaguered house speaker wasted no time in diagnosing the failure of his caucus. “Moving from an opposition party to a governing party comes with some growing pains,” he said. “And, well, we’re feeling those g
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sunrise II: A second look at the Sunscillating fibrils, explosive increases in temperature, and the footprints of coronal loops: 13 articles published today provide an overview of the results of the second flight of the balloon-borne solar observatory Sunrise.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Juno spacecraft set for fifth Jupiter flybyNASA's Juno spacecraft will make its fifth flyby over Jupiter's mysterious cloud tops on Monday, March 27, at 1:52 a.m. PDT (4:52 a.m. EDT, 8:52 UTC).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

1.4M Illinois job seekers may have had personal data hackedAbout 1.4 million job seekers in Illinois may have had their personal information compromised when one of the state's employment security agency vendors was hacked, the governor's office said Friday.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

More big brands pull ads from YouTube in widening boycottAn advertising boycott of YouTube is broadening, a sign that big-spending companies doubt Google's ability to prevent marketing campaigns from appearing alongside repugnant videos.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

California air regulators vote to keep tough fuel standardsCalifornia air regulators voted Friday to keep the state's tough vehicle emissions standards through 2025.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Surprising twist in confined liquid crystals: A simple route to developing new sensorsResearchers at Georgia Institute of Technology have found a material used for decades to color food items ranging from corn chips to ice creams could potentially have uses far beyond food dyes.
15h
WIRED

Meet the Tractor Hackers, and the Week’s Other Characters We're proud to bring NextDraft—the most righteous, most essential newsletter on the web—to WIRED.com. The post Meet the Tractor Hackers, and the Week's Other Characters appeared first on WIRED .
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New gene discovered associated with Tau, a common form of brain pathologyInvestigators have reported the discovery of a new gene that is associated with susceptibility to a common form of brain pathology called Tau that accumulates in several different conditions, including Alzheimer's disease, certain forms of dementia and Parkinsonian syndromes as well as chronic traumatic encephalopathy that occurs with repeated head injuries.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Biodiversity loss shifts flowering phenology at same magnitude as global warmingResearchers have revealed that declining plant diversity -- from habitat loss, human use, and other environmental pressures -- causes plants to flower earlier, and that the effects of diversity loss on the timing of flowering are similar in magnitude to the effects of global warming. The finding could have a powerful influence on the way scientists study ecosystem changes and measure the effects o
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists make new discovery about bird evolutionA team of scientists has described the most exceptionally preserved fossil bird discovered to date, in a newly published article. The new specimen from the rich Early Cretaceous Jehol Biota (approximately 131 to 120 million years old) is referred to as Eoconfuciusornis, the oldest and most primitive member of the Confuciusornithiformes, a group of early birds characterized by the first occurrence
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

An increasing proportion of women who are 60 years of age and older are drinkingMost older Americans drink alcohol. Given that this segment of the population is projected to almost double by 2050, reaching 112 million, in the future, there will likely be many more older drinkers in the United States than currently. Importantly, older individuals are more sensitive to alcohol’s effects than their younger counterparts, and are also more likely to take prescription medications t
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Neurosurgical practices must evolve and transform to adapt to rapidly changing healthcare industryNeurosurgeons hoping to successfully navigate the rapidly changing healthcare industry must advance their strategies and adapt new ways of thinking in order to continue to thrive in an evolving environment, say authors of a new report.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Evidence-based diagnostic model for mental illnessResearchers have has developed a new, evidence-based alternative to the mental health field's long-established diagnostic tools for the classification, treatment, and research of mental disorders. The Hierarchical Taxonomy of Psychopathology (HiTOP) addresses what the authors say are limitations to the reliability and validity of traditional models.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

OTUD6B gene mutations cause intellectual and physical disabilityMutations of the OTUD6B gene result in a spectrum of physical and intellectual deficits, an international team of researchers has discovered.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sleep deprivation impairs ability to interpret facial expressionsWhen you're tired, your ability to interpret subtle expressions of happiness and sadness can begin to deteriorate, researchers have found. However, the ability to read more primitive survival-based emotions, like anger and fear, remains intact.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study refines filters for greener natural gasScientists have mapped out the best materials for either carbon dioxide capture or balancing carbon capture with methane selectivity.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Limiting protein reduces post-heart attack injury in miceAccording to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 735,000 Americans experience a heart attack each year. Opening a blocked coronary artery to restore blood flow to the heart prevents sudden cardiac death. However, doing so also triggers cardiac damage through oxidative stress and inflammation, which eventually can lead to heart failure. Researchers have identified a protei
16h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: A House Divided What We’re Following AHCA’s Debacle: This afternoon, having failed to gather enough support among Republicans, Paul Ryan withdrew his bill to replace Obamacare . Backing off from their key campaign promise marks a big defeat for both Ryan and the president, who’d pushed hard for the bill and then pressed for a vote on it. Trump is now presenting himself as a bystander to the loss, and Republican
16h
Big Think

Vets Say Marijuana Treats PTSD, but Their Doctors Can't Prescribe It Military veterans nationwide want those diagnosed with PTSD to be able to get a VA doctor's recommendation for medical marijuana. Read More
16h
Big Think

Facial Recognition Software Will Soon Replace Your Wallet Pay your bills, slip through security, and take a train, all without fumbling through your wallet. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Olfactory receptors: New molecular targets detected in colorectal cancer cellsGrowth of colorectal cancer cells can be inhibited with the odorant troenan, report scientists. The researchers detected the olfactory receptor OR51B4 in tumor cells taken from the rectum and colon cancer cell lines. They analyzed which odorant activates the receptor and in what way the activation affects the cells.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Promising results obtained with a new electrocatalyst that reduces the need for platinumA group researchers has developed a manufacturing method for electrocatalysts that only uses one hundredth of the amount of platinum generally used in commercial products. The activity achieved using the new material is similar to that of commercial electrocatalysts. The method is based on the special characteristics of carbon nanotubes.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Where does laser energy go after being fired into plasma?An outstanding conundrum on what happens to the laser energy after beams are fired into plasma has been solved in newly-published research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Encouraging results for patients with aggressive brain cancerPatients diagnosed with a glioblastoma, and who undergo current standard treatment, have a median survival of 16 months. Based on recent information on the mechanisms of chemotherapy, a team of researchers developed a new clinical approach overcome treatment resistance that increased the median survival to 22 months -- bringing much needed hope to those affected by this aggressive disease.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study shows potential of stem cell therapy to repair lung damageA new study has found that stem cell therapy can reduce lung inflammation in an animal model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cystic fibrosis.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Membrane lipids hop in and out of rafts in the blink of an eyeNew fluorescent lipids demonstrate how specialized regions in the cell membrane function, explain researchers in a new report.
16h
NYT > Science

Trilobites: Waking From Hibernation, the Hard Work of Spring BeginsEmerging from the torpor of winter means a busy spring for these bears, bees, bats and squirrels.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Virtual environment education reduces anxiety prior to radiation therapyRadiation therapists and physicians know that education can reduce anxiety before radiation treatment but lack a standardized tool. In an effort to solve this problem, a multidisciplinary team conducted a pilot study to see if a virtual environment education program could reduce some of the anxiety their patients face.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New stem cell method produces millions of human brain and muscle cells in daysScientists have created a new technique that simplifies the production of human brain and muscle cells -- allowing millions of functional cells to be generated in just a few days. The results open the door to producing a diversity of new cell types that could not be made before in order to study disease.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Astronomers find unexpected, dust-obscured star formation in distant galaxyPushing the limits of the largest single-aperture millimeter telescope in the world, and coupling it with gravitational lensing, astronomers report that they have detected a surprising rate of star formation, four times higher than previously detected, in a dust-obscured galaxy behind a Frontier Fields cluster.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New study shows circular RNA can encode for proteinsScientists have discovered a protein-encoding function for circular RNA, a form of RNA until now considered non-coding. This kind of RNA molecule is highly active in brain cells. By identifying the function of circRNAs, the research helps advance our understanding of molecular biology, and can be helpful in understanding aging or neuro-degenerative diseases.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Climate change and an 'overlooked' nutrient: SilicaSugar maples may have far greater silica pumping power than expected, and also may be more profoundly affected by climate change as warmer winters damage their vulnerable roots.
17h
Gizmodo

Reminder: The Chair of the House Science Committee Has Almost No Experience With Science Photo: AP As congresspeople deliberated yesterday—before the GOP bid to destroy the Affordable Care Act devolved into a colossal train wreck this afternoon—Lamar Smith, the Chair of the House Committee on Space, Science and Technology, slipped away from the discussions so he could go hang out with climate change deniers and remind them that the media is liberal, according to a report by Motherboa
17h
Ars Technica

Nintendo Switch “vertical” mode found in Neo-Geo games—are more coming? Sam Machkovech The Nintendo Switch may not have a full-blown Virtual Console collection yet, but its eShop has a few emulated classics already. This week, fans finally noticed that its current, small slate of '80s and '90s games had a surprise tucked inside ever since the system's launch: a vertical orientation option. The only classic games available for purchase on the Switch's eShop come from
17h
The Atlantic

It's Never Trump's Fault Speaking in the Oval Office Friday afternoon, President Trump surveyed the wreckage of the Obamacare repeal effort and issued a crisp, definitive verdict: I didn’t do it . The president said he didn’t blame Speaker Paul Ryan, though he had plenty of implied criticism for the speaker. “I like Speaker Ryan. He worked very hard,” Trump said, but he added: “I'm not going to speak badly about anybody
17h
Live Science

Why One Woman Had Oil in Her Lung for DecadesAn elderly woman in Florida had oil in her lungs for decades from a now-outdated procedure she received to treat tuberculosis.
17h
cognitive science

Greate channel on cogsci theme. submitted by /u/najakkroks [link] [comments]
17h
Gizmodo

Jalopnik Making $50 Million A Year Can Still Feel Average | Kotaku The Pewdiepie Fiasco, One Month L Jalopnik Making $50 Million A Year Can Still Feel Average | Kotaku The Pewdiepie Fiasco, One Month Later | io9 Mads Mikkelsen Can’t Complain About His ‘Super-Iconic’ Death in Rogue One | Lifehacker The Bedtime Routine That Helps Me Sleep Better When Traveling |
17h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Learn How Compressed Natural Gas Boosts A Diesel's Power And Efficiency #DieselBrothers | Mondays at 10/9c on Discovery The Diesel Brothers crew explains how a CNG kit can boost power and efficiency in a diesel engine -- and what some of the caveats are. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/diesel-brothers/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery More Diesel! http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/diesel-brothers/ Join
17h
The Scientist RSS

ProteinSimple: Milo: Single-Cell WesternMeet Milo. The world’s first Single-Cell Western platform.
18h
Live Science

Amazon Shows Its Age: Scientists Say River No Younger Than 9 MillionUnderstanding the river's origins will give scientists more information about a consequential body of water.
18h
Popular Science

Relaxing bath bombs for 70 percent off? I'd buy them. Gadgets Soak up some you time. It's time for fizzy balls. Relaxing bath bombs for 70 percent off? I'd buy it. Read on.
18h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Killed Bill Today in 5 Lines House Speaker Paul Ryan pulled the GOP’s new health-care bill, after meeting with President Trump to tell him that Republicans didn’t have the votes to pass it. During a news conference, Ryan said it is a “ disappointing day ” and that Republicans will now “move on with the rest of our agenda.” In an interview with The New York Times , Trump reportedly blamed Democrats for the bi
18h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic’s Week in Culture Don’t Miss The Enduring Legacy of the Pocahontas Myth — Gregory D. Smithers delves into the history of misperceptions of the Native American icon, which continue to shape the cultural image of indigenous peoples today. James A. Finley / AP Music Remembering Chuck Berry — David A. Graham looks back on the career of the rock ’n’ roll pioneer, who died at the age of 90. More Life Is Another Smart Ca
18h
Gizmodo

A Bunch of New Companies Just Pulled Their Google Ads Over Racist Videos Image: Getty Yet more companies are pulling their ads from Google and YouTube because of fears the ads would appear alongside offensive content, according to a new report in the Wall Street Journal. Per the Journal ’s testing, ads for companies like Coca-Cola and Microsoft showed up on five racist and anti-semitic YouTube videos, despite Google’s recent promise to overhaul its advertising system.
18h
Gizmodo

Prevenge Delivers a Great Horror Story About the Terror of Impending Motherhood So often, women get told that having a child growing inside their bodies is a sacred duty that will turn them into glowing demi-goddesses. That might be the case for some lucky people, but even if it is, becoming a mother changes everything about your life. Prevenge cuts right into the belly of those preconceptions to show how that change can be absolutely terrifying in a world where women have t
18h
Inside Science

World's Thinnest Origami Could Build Microscopic Machines Physics Japanese art inspires scientists to create self-folding structures small enough to float through the bloodstream. 03/24/2017 Devin Powell, Contributor https://www.insidescience.org/news/worlds-thinnest-origami-could-build-microscopic-machines
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Inside Science

World's Thinnest Origami Could Build Microscopic Machines World's Thinnest Origami Could Build Microscopic Machines Japanese art inspires scientists to create self-folding structures small enough to float through the bloodstream. origami_topteaser.jpg Image credits: K Kreto via shutterstock (Home page image credit: 32 pixels/Shutterstock ) Physics Friday, March 24, 2017 - 17:00 Devin Powell, Contributor (Inside Science) -- Thirty years ago, a professor
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Inside Science

BRIEF: X-ray Science Gets New 'Glasses' BRIEF: X-ray Science Gets New 'Glasses' A corrective quartz plate could improve the focus of enormous X-ray generating machines. X-ray-glasses_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Mat Hayward/Shutterstock Technology Friday, March 24, 2017 - 16:00 Catherine Meyers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- X-rays are short wavelengths of light with a long list of scientific accomplishments. Now researchers have m
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Live Science

Why People Say 'You' When They Mean 'Me'Sometimes "you" doesn't mean "you," a new study finds.
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The Atlantic

Who Will Republican Voters Blame for the Failure of the GOP Health-Care Bill? After House Speaker Paul Ryan reportedly told President Trump that Republicans lacked enough votes to pass the GOP health care bill, Republicans canceled a vote on the American Health Care Act on Friday, putting the president’s promise to repeal and replace Obamacare in jeopardy. It’s the first major setback to the president’s agenda in Congress, but Republican voters are likely to hold Republica
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Gizmodo

Uranus Is a Wonderland and We Should Go There Image: NASA Uranus is tired of being the butt of your jokes—especially that one. You see, Uranus is so sad and so very lonely; despite being discovered in 1781, it hasn’t had a visitor since 1986 , when Voyager 2 performed humanity’s one and only flyby of the planet. It’s a shame we haven’t gone back since then, because Uranus truly is fascinating. Besides being one of the coldest planets in our
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Live Science

Kentucky Woman Develops Rare Bacterial Infection After ChildbirthIn a rare case, a woman in the United States developed the bacterial infection tetanus after giving birth at home, according to a new report.
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Gizmodo

The Pewdiepie Fiasco, One Month Later It’s been a little over a month since the blow-up surrounding Felix ‘Pewdiepie’ Kjellberg, and the Wall Street Journal report leading to the cancellation of his premium show. Since then, a lot has happened to the YouTuber and to at least one of the reporters who worked on that story. For Pewdiepie, it’s been a month of roiling emotions, including anger, intentionally taboo jokes and an intensifie
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The Atlantic

The Republican Waterloo Seven years and three days ago, the House of Representatives grumblingly voted to approve the Senate’s version of the Affordable Care Act. Democrats in the House were displeased by many of the changes introduced by Senate Democrats. But in the interval after Senate passage, the Republicans had gained a 41st seat in the Senate. Any further tinkering with the law could trigger a Republican filibust
19h
WIRED

Hate to Break It to Steve Mnuchin, But AI’s Already Taking Jobs Today, in 2017, the treasury secretary said he had no worries about robots putting people out of work. The post Hate to Break It to Steve Mnuchin, But AI's Already Taking Jobs appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

How Trump’s Ultimatum Gambit Sank His Health Care Bill The GOP and White House just lost big on health care. And it's Trump's ultimatum that may have cost them the vote. The post How Trump's Ultimatum Gambit Sank His Health Care Bill appeared first on WIRED .
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Dana Foundation

Vanishing Perception With Magic Master magician Prakash Puru took out a silver coin and held it with one hand. He snapped his fingers. In seconds the coin disappeared, only to reappear later by his elbow. Over and over again the coin vanished, much to the delight of a packed audience at the Rubin Museum of Art in NYC. Tony Ro (left) and Prakash Puru (right). Photo courtesy of the Rubin Museum of Art. Puru was invited to discuss
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Surprising twist in confined liquid crystals: A simple route to developing new sensorsResearchers at Georgia Tech found that a class of water soluble liquid crystals, called lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals, exhibited unexpected characteristics that could be harnessed for use in sensors and other potential applications.
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Visualizing the Cosmic Streams That Spew Meteor ShowersResearchers recorded more than 300,000 meteoroid trajectories since 2010 to depict the drifting paths of meteor showers that Earth passes through.
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Gizmodo

How Trump's Stooge in Congress Fucked Up His Wiretapping Investigation Image: AP Meet Devin Nunes. The Republican congressman from California is the chair of the House Intelligence Committee and earned his badge of infamy this week when he claimed that President Trump and his associates were “incidentally monitored.” On Friday, Nunes backed down from that claim . Very embarrassing. This week, The New York Times called Nunes “ a lapdog in a watchdog role ,” referring
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The Atlantic

‘The Collapse of the White Working Class’ One of the defining issues of the 2016 election was the loss of jobs and economic opportunity among white, working-class Americans. As the middle class continues to shrink , so too has the labor market for those with only a high-school diploma. There’s now reason to believe that this lack of education is taking a physical toll as well: A new study released Thursday by the Brookings Institution fi
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Gizmodo

India and New Zealand Were Wrong to Recognize Rivers as Persons The Ganges River is now a person according to a new Indian law. (Image: Wikimedia) Courts in New Zealand and India have granted legal personhood status to three rivers. The strange status is meant to protect the waters from pollution, but the measure could lead to unintended consequences, while undermining efforts to grant personhood status to living beings who actually deserve it. Earlier this m
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WIRED

Power Rangers’ Gay Moment Is a Good Step, But a Small One LGBTQ characters are finally starting to come out in tentpole movies. The post Power Rangers' Gay Moment Is a Good Step, But a Small One appeared first on WIRED .
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Popular Science

Screens of the future could be made with transparent silver Technology The quest to replace indium tin oxide In the land of smartphone screens and flat-panel televisions, a material that you’ve never heard of reigns supreme. Read on.
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Gizmodo

Watch the Life Drain From Sean Spicer as He Defends Trump's Obviously Doomed Health Bill His boss may be able to sell a shit deal with a smile, but Press Secretary Sean Spicer could barely muster a grin as he defended the now mercifully dead American Health Care Act, the GOP’s rushed replacement for Obamacare. The AP confirms that Republicans, without the necessary votes, pulled the bill. Essentially, it got Old Yeller’d. During Friday’s press briefing, Spicer answered dozens of ques
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Science-Based Medicine

Anti-Vaccine Chiropractors Threaten Public HealthThe Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC)'s investigation of Manitoba chiropractors reveals widespread antivaccine sentiment. These statement are at odds with medical facts, and critics are questioning why chiropractic remains publicly funded.
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Popular Science

Duet With Your Favorite Singers with this Waterproof Shower Speaker Sponsored Post Enjoy high-quality Bluetooth audio every morning and save 83% off MSRP Duet With Your Favorite Singers with this Waterproof Shower Speaker. Read on.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Electrical 'switch' in brain's capillary network monitors activity and controls blood flowNew research has uncovered that capillaries have the capacity to both sense brain activity and generate an electrical vasodilatory signal to evoke blood flow and direct nutrients to neurons.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

An intriguing new gene candidate in the search for Alzheimer disease therapiesTau pathology is one of the defining features of Alzheimer disease (AD), which is the most common form of dementia in older age. While symptomatic treatments exist, there are currently no preventive therapies for AD. Investigators at BWH and Rush University Medical Center reported the discovery of a new gene that is associated with Tau accumulation. Published in Molecular Psychiatry, the paper des
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Ars Technica

Charter promises Trump a broadband push, but no extra Internet connections Enlarge / President Donald Trump and Charter CEO Tom Rutledge. (credit: White House) Charter CEO Tom Rutledge met with President Donald Trump today, and he made a splashy promise to "invest $25 billion in broadband infrastructure and technology in the next four years." But Charter, the second biggest US cable company after Comcast, was already planning broadband expansions during the Obama admini
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Gizmodo

The Spider-Man Homecoming Teaser Poster Is Perfect A crop of the new poster. Image: Twitter One thing no one ever wants to see again is Spider-Man’s origin. We’ve got it. And maybe you didn’t get it from the trailer, but Spider-Man Homecoming is a whole new kind of Spider-Man. It’s not about his physical origin, it’s about his mental one. And the teaser poster hammers that point home. Here’s the full reveal from Twitter . And the tagline is “Home
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Live Science

On the Lam: 10 of the Greatest Animal Escape ArtistsFrom an orangutan that broke free three times to a capybara duo that stole headlines, here are tales of some of the greatest animal escape artists.
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Viden

EU til forældre: Vær obs på sikkerhed i internet-forbundet legetøjUndersøg hvordan legetøjet fungerer, og tjek om sikkerheden er tilstrækkelig inden køb, lyder opfordringen fra EU ovenpå ny rapport.
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Gizmodo

Pizzagate Shooter Pleads Guilty as Online Conspiracy Theory Winds Down [Updated] Image: Sathi Soma via AP, File Last December, Edgar Maddison Welch—a 28-year-old who claims he had only recently installed an internet connection in his North Carolina home—crossed state lines with several firearms. After arriving at a Washington DC pizzeria to “self-investigate” a conspiracy theory that the restaurant was involved in a child sex trafficking ring, he fired a rifle inside and was
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Gizmodo

AT&T Charges Ahead With Fiber Internet While Google Languishes Photo: AP Superfast fiber internet—promising download speeds of a 1000 megabits per second—is a tantalizing but far-off prospect for many people, and even those who live in major cities often can’t access it. It’s exciting, then, when news comes along that a big internet service provider will expand its fiber access. To whit: AT&T announced yesterday that it will expand its fiber-to-the-home serv
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Gizmodo

The Best Water-Resistant Bluetooth Speaker Is the JBL Charge 3 JBL Charge 3 In our search for best water-resistant Bluetooth speaker , the JBL Charge 3 drowned out the competition to take the title. The Charge 3 can connect to three different phones simultaneously, runs for 20 hours on a charge, and can pair with other JBL Connect-enabled speakers for enhanced and multi-room listening. Here’s what our readers had to say: Is this even a competition? The JBL c
20h
The Atlantic

The Tech Industry Joins the Political Fray However expansive its ambitions to change the world might be, the tech industry is not known as a hotbed of activism. Historically, tech employees went to work, got the job done, and didn’t talk much about politics. But in the wake of Donald’s Trump’s election, political talk is nearly everywhere—at company-wide meetings, in discussions among coworkers in the cafeterias, and in employee resource-
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The Atlantic

Hosni Mubarak Is a Free Man I was in Tahrir Square on February 11, 2011, the day longtime strongman Hosni Mubarak fell. It was—and this isn’t hyperbole—one of those once-in-a-lifetime moments. You read about revolution, but it’s another thing to experience it: that tantalizing sense that everything might actually change. Later that night, I buzzed through Cairo in a cab, surrounded by crowds, watching from my window as Egyp
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The Atlantic

‘Trump Hasn't Been the Wrecking Ball I Anticipated’ In the wake of the shocking results of November’s election, readers in Notes had a robust discussion titled, “Will Trump Voters and Clinton Voters Ever Relate?” One of the most revealing and contentious entries came from a Trump supporter who “ voted for the middle finger, the wrecking ball .” He began by countering some common stereotypes about Trump voters: I have a Masters degree. My kids go t
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The Scientist RSS

UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in EuropeThe European Patent Office will grant patent rights over the use of CRISPR in all cell types to a University of California team, contrasting with a recent decision in the U.S.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bad breath: Study find array of bacteria when orcas exhaleWhen the mighty orca breaks to the surface and exhales, the whale sprays an array of bacteria and fungi in its his breath, scientists said, some good, and some bad such as salmonella.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists make new discovery about bird evolutionIn a new paper published in National Science Review, a team of scientists from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, the Shandong Tianyu Museum of Nature, and the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Paleontology (all in China) described the most exceptionally preserved fossil bird discovered to date.
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Gizmodo

Why the Hell Is This Enormous Black Hole Streaking Across Space? Image: Chiaberge et Al We don’t understand quasars all that well, but are pretty certain that these incredibly bright lights belong in the centers of galaxies. So it looked a little weird when astronomers spotted quasar 3C 186 thirty six thousand light years away from the center of its galaxy, seemingly trying to escape. Given their brightness and location in galactic centers, it’s likely that qu
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Big data renews fight over animal origins Study is the latest in the long-running dispute over which lineage — sponges or comb jellies — is the oldest branch in the animal tree. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21703
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A little vigorous exercise may help boost kids' cardiometabolic healthAs little as 10 minutes a day of high-intensity physical activity could help some children reduce their risk of developing heart problems and metabolic diseases such as diabetes, according to an international study led by a researcher at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists make new discovery about bird evolutionIn a new paper published in National Science Review, a team of scientists from China described the most exceptionally preserved fossil bird discovered to date.
20h
Popular Science

The easiest way to kick your caffeine habit DIY How to deal with everything from sluggishness to constipation Here’s a how-to guide on kicking your caffeine habit and establishing a healthy relationship with the drug. Read on:…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spacewalk a success for French, US astronautsA French and an American astronaut floated outside the International Space Station Friday on a successful spacewalk to upgrade the orbiting outpost for the arrival of future space crews.
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New Scientist - News

Stray supermassive black hole flung away by gravitational wavesThe Hubble Space Telescope has spotted a one-billion solar mass black hole fleeing its galaxy, showing supermassive black holes can probably merge
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Science : NPR

March Madness Vasectomies Encourage Guys To Take One For The Team Some urologists use March Madness as an opportunity to market vasectomy services, offering men the excuse to sit on the sofa for three days to watch college basketball while they recover. (Image credit: April Dembosky/KQED)
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The Atlantic

Holy Ethics Disaster, Batman! Updated on March 24 at 4:35 p.m. ET Before his confirmation, the most controversial part of Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin’s past was his role running a bank that critics dubbed a “foreclosure machine” at the height of the financial crisis. But it’s his role as the executive producer on The LEGO Batman Movie that is landing him in his first dustup. At an event held by the online news outlet Ax
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Scientific American Content: Global

Gravitational Waves Send Supermassive Black Hole FlyingThe billion-solar-mass object is the largest runaway black hole ever seen -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

Parrot "Giggles" Trigger PlayKea parrots have a special call that makes nearby parrots burst into play. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Citizen scientists to rescue 150 years of cosmic images Long-lost images could offer insight into rare and moving stars. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21702
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New Scientist - News

Virtual lemonade sends colour and taste to a glass of waterA tumbler that makes water look and taste like lemonade using LED lights and electrodes could allow people to share drinks on social media
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Live Science

Nom Nom Nom: Prehistoric Human Bones Show Signs of CannibalismHuman cannibals likely took a big bite out of their fellow humans about 10,000 years ago, according to a study that examined prehistoric bones with scratch and bite marks on them.
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The Atlantic

Trump's Anti-Immigrant Policies Are Scaring Eligible Families Away From the Safety Net NEW YORK CITY—As the evening rush hour peaked, Blanca Palomeque stationed herself by the carts selling roasted corn, tamales, and ice cream at the exit to the 90th Street-Elmhurst Avenue subway stop in Queens. She spotted a woman pushing a baby in a pink stroller and tugging along two school-aged girls with pigtails. “Excuse me, good afternoon, how are you?” Palomeque said in Spanish. “Do you hav
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The Atlantic

The Republicans Fold on Health Care Updated on March 24 at 6:28 p.m. ET To a man and woman, nearly every one of the 237 Republicans elected to the House last November made the same promise to voters: Give us control of Congress and the White House, and we will repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. On Friday, those lawmakers abandoned that effort, conceding that the Republican Party’s core campaign pledge of the last seven yea
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The Atlantic

Steve Mnuchin Is 'Not Worried at All' About Machines Displacing American Workers On Friday, during a conversation with Mike Allen of Axios , the newly minted Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said that there was no need to worry about artificial intelligence taking over U.S. jobs anytime soon. “It's not even on our radar screen,” he told Allen. When pressed for when, exactly, he thought concern might be warranted, Mnuchin offered “50 to 100 more years." Just about anyone who
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The Atlantic

How Will Historically Black Colleges Fare Under Trump? Last month, dozens of leaders from historically black colleges and universities across the United States met with President Trump in hopes of securing increased federal funding. During the meeting, Trump signed an executive order transferring oversight of a federal HBCU initiative from the Department of Education directly to the White House. Some saw the move as purely symbolic , others said it p
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Popular Science

Coral reefs might be in more trouble than we thought Environment A giant die-off suggests our predictions are overly-optimistic When global warming met undesirable local weather, almost half of the corals on the Dongsha Atoll of South China Sea died, scientists report. Read on.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Biodiversity loss shifts flowering phenology at same magnitude as global warmingResearchers have revealed that declining plant diversity -- from habitat loss, human use, and other environmental pressures -- causes plants to flower earlier, and that the effects of diversity loss on the timing of flowering are similar in magnitude to the effects of global warming. The finding could have a powerful influence on the way scientists study ecosystem changes and measure the effects o
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Gizmodo

Mads Mikkelsen Can't Complain About His 'Super-Iconic' Death in Rogue One Image: Lucasfilm Mads Mikkelsen stepped into the hugely important role of Galen Erso, the man who made the Death Star work. The actor also had the equally Herculean task of keeping all the details about his character secret. Now that Rogue One ’s out on Digital HD, we talked to Mikkelsen about all those details—and also about how some patrons in his local bar may have learned them a little bit ea
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The Atlantic

Life Is a Fun and Scary Creature Feature in Space Any reasonable creature feature worth its bones should have, on balance, about half a dozen scenes where a character makes a patently illogical decision. Just discovered a new form of ancient alien life? Give it some zaps with a cattle prod, just to see what happens. Now you’re fighting an alien enemy in an enclosed space station? Break out the flamethrower! Running low on fuel? Definitely vent e
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The Atlantic

Why Trump Thinks He Can Bounce Back From a Health-Care Rout In 1985, Donald Trump bought West Side Yards * , a huge real-estate parcel on the West Side of Manhattan. (Actually, it was his second try at the property, which he’d failed to develop in the 1970s.) Trump paid $115 million to buy the parcel, with huge plans to create a sparkling center on one of the few remaining undeveloped parts of the island. It didn’t work. Trump quarreled with Mayor Ed Koch
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In a quantum race everyone is both a winner and a loserOur understanding of the world is mostly built on basic perceptions, such as that events follow each other in a well-defined order. Such definite orders are required in the macroscopic world, for which the laws of classical physics apply. The current work by a team of physicists from the University of Vienna is the first experimental quantification of such a superposition. It will be published in
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Moderate drinking linked to lower risk of some -- but not all -- heart conditionsModerate drinking is associated with a lower risk of several, but not all, cardiovascular diseases, finds a large study of UK adults. The finding that moderate drinking is not universally associated with a lower risk of all cardiovascular conditions suggests a more nuanced approach to the role of alcohol in prevention of cardiovascular disease is necessary.
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New on MIT Technology Review

What If There Were a Moore’s Law for Reducing Carbon Emissions?Researchers hope that a simple rule could help governments around the world achieve the goal of zero emissions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Crop-destroying armyworm caterpillars spread to UgandaA plague of crop-destroying fall armyworm caterpillars has spread to East Africa where officials confirmed their presence for the first time in Uganda on Friday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trump approves Keystone XL pipeline, hails 'great day' for jobsTrue to his pledge, President Donald Trump gave final approval on Friday for TransCanada to build the controversial Keystone XL oil pipeline, overriding environmental concerns in favor of boosting jobs and energy supply.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Apple: Software flaws in latest WikiLeaks docs are all fixedApple said purported hacking vulnerabilities disclosed by WikiLeaks this week have all been fixed in recent iPhones and Mac computers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New gene discovered associated with Tau, a common form of brain pathologyInvestigators at Rush University Medical Center and the Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston reported the discovery of a new gene that is associated with susceptibility to a common form of brain pathology called Tau that accumulates in several different conditions, including Alzheimer's disease, certain forms of dementia and Parkinsonian syndromes as well as chronic traumatic encephalopathy that
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Caleb's heaviest rainfallTropical cyclone Caleb formed on March 23 in the South Indian Ocean southwest of the Indonesian Island of Sumatra. The GPM core observatory satellite had a fairly good view of the newly formed tropical cyclone when it flew overhead and analyzed its rainfall and found the heaviest precipitation was affected by westerly winds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA sees System 91P coming together east of QueenslandThe area of tropical low pressure designated System 91P appears to be organizing in NASA satellite imagery on March 24. Visible imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite revealed that the tropical low is consolidating and strengthening in the Coral Sea, South Pacific Ocean.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Extreme space weather: Protecting our critical infrastructureExtreme space weather has a global footprint and the potential to damage critical infrastructure on the ground and in space. A new report from the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC) calls for bridging knowledge gaps and for better coordination at EU level to reduce the potential impact of space weather events.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Land-based microbes may be invading and harming coral reefsA new study suggests that coral reefs—already under existential threat from global warming—may be undergoing further damage from invading bacteria and fungi coming from land-based sources, such as outfall from sewage treatment plants and coastal inlets. The study raised the possibility that microbes from these sources are invading reefs off of the southeastern coast of Florida. The research is pub
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Ars Technica

Analysis of meta-analyses identifies where sciences’ real problems lie (credit: Harvard University ) Science is in a phase of pretty intense soul-searching. Over the past few years, systemic problems that lead to unreliable scientific results have become more and more obvious. There’s a litany of woes for good science: publication bias leads to buried data, single studies don’t stand well on their own yet not enough people are replicating them , and flaws in the pee
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Will This Frontiersman Finish Building His Cabin Before The Snow Flies? #LastAlaskans | Wednesdays at 10/9c Following in the footsteps of his father, Charlie continues work on his very own Alaskan home. The race is on to finish before winter. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/the-last-alaskans/ More Alaskans! http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/the-last-alaskans/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on
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Gizmodo

Run to Amazon In Under 12 Parsecs to Save on the Best Star Wars Board Game Star Wars: Rebellion , $65 Much like Chewbaca, the new Star Wars: Rebellion board game is intimidating and difficult to understand at first, but the more time you spend with it, the more you’ll love it . Amazon’s marked it down to $65 today, and yeah, that’s a lot for a board game, but it’s about $10 cheaper than usual, and each play-through will keep you entertained for an entire evening. Just b
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In a quantum race everyone is both a winner and a loserOur understanding of the world is mostly built on basic perceptions, such as that events follow each other in a well-defined order. Such definite orders are required in the macroscopic world, for which the laws of classical physics apply. The current work by a team of physicists from the University of Vienna is the first experimental quantification of such a superposition. It will be published in
22h
Gizmodo

Mammals 'Battle' for Greatness in March Madness for Science Nerds Image: Katie Hinde Who among us hasn’t wondered who would win in a fight between a bear and an alligator? Or a ram and a tiger? A badger and a gopher? While these animals are all university mascots represented in the NCAA March Madness tournament, they’re also competitors in an imaginary Pokemon battle-style spinoff tournament playing out right now on Twitter. And the “fights” are absurdly scient
22h
New on MIT Technology Review

What if there was a Moore’s Law for reducing carbon emissions?Researchers hope that a simple rule could help governments around the world achieve the goal of zero emissions.
22h
Gizmodo

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2's Kurt Russell Explains How Chris Pratt Is Fulfilling His Legacy Kurt Russell as Ego in Guardians of the Galaxy Vol 2. All Images: Disney Kurt Russell is known for his iconic roles in countless movies, whether he played a badass ( The Thing, Tombstone, Escape From N.Y. ) or a goofball ( Big Trouble in Little China, Overboard , etc.) He’s one of the very rare stars who can be cool and funny simultaneously—and Russell thinks Chris Pratt is like that too, which i
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Bench to bedside to bench'It's time to update the old 'bench-to-bedside' shorthand, researchers at The Jackson Laboratory, NHGRI and institutions across the US declare.
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Ars Technica

AT&T/DirecTV give in to government demands in collusion lawsuit settlement (credit: Aurich Lawson) DirecTV and its owner, AT&T, have promised the US Department of Justice that they will not illegally share information with rival pay-TV providers in order to keep the price of TV channels down. The DOJ sued DirecTV and AT&T in November 2016 , saying the satellite-TV company colluded with competitors during contentious negotiations to broadcast Los Angeles Dodgers games. A
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Live Science

World's First Deep-Sea Mining Venture Set to Launch in 2019Remote-controlled robots will journey to the bottom of the ocean in search of copper, nickel, cobalt, gold, and platinum as global demand for minerals surges.
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Popular Science

Why you should never ever feed bread to a duck Animals Enough with this quackery Should you feed bread to a duck? No. Find out why.
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The Atlantic

The Comics Revealing Medical School's Hidden Flaws and Hard Lessons A young woman in a black suit and heels, with a leather portfolio hanging squarely at her side, stares at the wall across from the admissions office. She’s an applicant for medical school, on campus to interview with physicians, eat with first-year medical students, and tour the hospital with a docent in a pale-blue vest. At the moment, though, she’s contemplating a comic that hangs before her, a
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The Atlantic

Photos of the Week: 3/18–3/24 The "Sydney Skinny" in Australia, a terror attack in London, nursing a baby in virtual reality, Newroz in Iraq, President Trump behind the wheel, fog over Hong Kong, and much more.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The Role of Context in Ethnic/Racial Identity Among Minority YouthThis special section of Child Development, edited by Drs. Eleanor Seaton, Stephen Quintana, Maykel Verkuyten and Gilbert Gee, adds important information to the research in this area. It includes articles from national and international scholars on how policies, relationships, and locations can influence the development and content of ethnic/racial identity among youth.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Land-based microbes may be invading and harming coral reefsA new study suggests that coral reefs -- already under existential threat from global warming -- may be undergoing further damage from invading bacteria and fungi coming from land-based sources, such as outfall from sewage treatment plants and coastal inlets. The study raised the possibility that microbes from these sources are invading reefs off of the southeastern coast of Florida. The research
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Scientific American Content: Global

Bring Bronx Zoo To Your Living RoomAnimal Planet's series The Zoo shows viewers the biological, veterinary and conservation science at a modern zoo. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Popular Science

Everything you need to know about the Keystone XL pipeline Environment Guess who’s back? Well, hello, Keystone XL, it's been a while. Need a refresher? Read on.
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New Scientist - News

Maths explains how pedestrians avoid bumping into one anotherA model that takes into account sudden U-turns and other random behaviour by individuals in a crowd could be used to help prevent stampedes
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Computer program developed to diagnose and locate cancer from a blood sampleResearchers in the United States have developed a computer program that can simultaneously detect cancer and identify where in the body the cancer is located, from a patient's blood sample.
22h
Ars Technica

Low levels of simple chemical associated with aging, DNA damage Enlarge (credit: NIH ) Approximately ten thousand times each day, the DNA in our cells receives some damage, but most of that damage is repaired by our cells' built-in DNA repair systems. The efficiency of these DNA repair systems decline with age, however, and that's thought to lead to age-related health problems and cancer. A recent paper published in Science shows that a chemical used in the D
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The Atlantic

Where's the Best Place to Live Under the American Health Care Act? If you live in Cleveland County, North Carolina, make less than $40,000, and buy your own health insurance, it might be a good time to start saving. According to a new interactive from the Kaiser Family Foundation , under the Republican plan to repeal and replace Obamacare, the average monthly premium for 40-year-olds making $30,000 in your county will double from $2,480 per year to $5,060 per ye
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The Atlantic

A Migrant Farmworker's Words for Trump Reyna arrived to the United States in 1999 at the age of 14. She immediately began working on a conventional farm, where there was extensive use of chemical pesticides. “We don’t see a lot of justice for our environment,” she says in this short film, Una Mala Hierba . “So at the same time, there is no justice for the farmworkers who are working the land.” Today, she works on a smaller, organic fa
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The Atlantic

The House Intelligence Committee's Civil War The top Republican and Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee escalated their feud on Friday, with GOP Chairman Devin Nunes announcing that he wished to cancel a public hearing next week and Ranking Member Adam Schiff charging Nunes with bad faith and attempting to choke off an independent hearing. In a press conference at the Capitol Friday morning, Nunes announced that Paul Manafort, Dona
22h
WIRED

Rock Band VR Shreds the Rhythm-Game Paradigm A decade after the genre's peak, virtual reality turns out to be the perfect medium for indulging the rock-god fantasy. The post Rock Band VR Shreds the Rhythm-Game Paradigm appeared first on WIRED .
22h
WIRED

How Can You Measure How Much Pain a Baby Feels? The FDA is issuing a new warning on anesthesia for infants, and it poses a difficult question for doctors. What's more dangerous: pain or pain treatment? The post How Can You Measure How Much Pain a Baby Feels? appeared first on WIRED .
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Most Americans like science — and are willing to pay for itAmericans drastically overestimate how much the government spends on science. But when correctly informed, they want the government to spend more.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

On the trail of Parkinson's diseaseThe molecular causes of diseases such as Parkinson's need to be understood as a first step towards combating them. Chemists recently succeeded in analyzing what happens when selective mutations of the alpha-synuclein protein occur -- a protein that is closely linked to Parkinson's disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Severe psoriasis predominantly affects menThe fact that men are overrepresented in psoriasis registers and consume more psoriasis care have long led researchers to believe that the common skin disease disproportionately affects men. A unique study with 5,438 Swedish psoriasis patients now reveals that women have a statistically significant lower incidence of severe psoriasis compared to men.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

An algorithm that knows when you'll get bored with your favorite mobile gameResearchers have developed a new algorithm that predicts when a user will leave a mobile game. This information is useful for game studios so that they can design strategies to maintain the player's interest.
22h
Futurity.org

Climate change may worsen China’s winter haze Consequences of global climate change—loss of Arctic sea ice and increased Eurasian snowfall—may make China’s severe winter air pollution problems worse. Modeling and data analysis suggest that sea ice and snowfall changes have shifted China’s winter monsoon, helping create stagnant atmospheric conditions that trap pollution over the country’s major population and industrial centers. Those change
22h
Ars Technica

Azure Service Fabric takes first tentative steps toward open source (credit: Microsoft) Microsoft's embrace of open source software continues, with Azure Service Fabric making the first tentative foray into the open world. Today, the SDK was (mostly) published to GitHub under the MIT license. The team behind the move described it as the "beginning stages" of a wider use of open source. Service Fabric, first revealed in 2015 , grew out of the infrastructure Micros
23h
New Scientist - News

Enigmatic plumes from Saturn’s moon caused by cosmic collisionSaturn’s icy moon spews water and heat into space, but only from its south pole. A new model suggests that’s because it suffered a hit-and-run long ago
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Inactive teens develop lazy bonesInactive teens have weaker bones than those who are physically active, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

In a sample of blood, researchers probe for cancer cluesOne day, patients may be able to monitor their body's response to cancer therapy just by having their blood drawn. A new study has taken an important step in that direction by measuring a panel of cancer proteins in rare, individual tumor cells that float in the blood.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Clock stars: Astrocytes keep time for brain, behaviorStar-shaped cells called astrocytes, long considered boring, 'support cells,' are finally coming into their own. To everyone's surprise they even play an important role in the body's master clock, which schedules everything from the release of hormones to the onset of sleepiness.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA sees System 91P coming together east of QueenslandThe area of tropical low pressure designated System 91P appears to be organizing in NASA satellite imagery on March 24. Visible imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite revealed that the tropical low is consolidating and strengthening in the Coral Sea, South Pacific Ocean.
23h
The Atlantic

Q of the Week: What Would You Ask Gorsuch? Monday marked the beginning of what will probably be Judge Neil Gorsuch’s toughest job interview: his Supreme Court confirmation hearings. This week, we asked Politics & Policy Daily readers what they would ask Gorsuch if they were on the Senate Judiciary Committee. Here are some of our favorite questions from readers. Keli Osborn is curious about how the judge would rule on previous Supreme Cour
23h
Ars Technica

“Pizzagate” DC shooter pleads guilty, faces years in prison Enlarge / The Comet Ping Pong restaurant in Washington, DC., where Edgar Maddison Welch stormed to "self-investigate" Pizzagate. (credit: Nicholas Kamm/Getty Images) A North Carolina man pleaded guilty Friday to weapons-related charges for a December episode in which he stormed a Washington, DC pizzeria and fired rounds from a Colt AR-15 assault-style rifle. The incident was a bid to " self-inves
23h
New on MIT Technology Review

Why the Senate’s Vote to Throw Out Privacy Laws for ISPs Isn’t All BadNobody wants their data spread far and wide, but the FCC’s rules were an inconsistent solution to a much larger problem.
23h
Live Science

Female Cockroaches Sync Up Their Virgin BirthsFemale roaches are quicker to give virgin birth, or birth without sex, when in the company of other females.
23h
The Scientist RSS

Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?With its announced launch of a whole-exome sequencing service for apparently healthy individuals, Ambry Genetics is the latest company to enter this growing market. But whether these services are useful for most people remains up for debate.
23h
Scientific American Content: Global

To End Tuberculosis, It Must Be Eliminated from AnimalsPoor knowledge about this potential threat hampers human health -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Caleb's heaviest rainfallTropical cyclone Caleb formed on March 23 in the South Indian Ocean southwest of the Indonesian Island of Sumatra. The GPM core observatory satellite had a fairly good view of the newly formed tropical cyclone when it flew overhead and analyzed its rainfall and found the heaviest precipitation was affected by westerly winds.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

BRCA testing on the rise for those without breast or ovarian cancersMore women are requesting BRCA gene testing associated with certain types of cancer thanks to increased interest in the procedure. Traditionally women tested for mutations in the cancer-susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been those diagnosed with early onset breast or ovarian cancer in order to guide treatment options.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Extreme space weather: Protecting our critical infrastructureExtreme space weather has a global footprint and the potential to damage critical infrastructure on the ground and in space. A new report by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre calls for bridging knowledge gaps and for better coordination at EU level to reduce the potential impact of space weather events.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The Hierarchical Taxonomy of Psychopathology (HiTOP): A new model that addresses limitations of traditional taxonomiesAn inaugural publication from an international consortium of psychologists and psychiatrists offers a new approach to diagnosing mental disorders. The Hierarchical Taxonomy of Psychopathology (HiTOP) -- introduced by Dr. Roman Kotov and colleagues (Online First) in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology -- is a new, dimensional classification system of a wide range of psychiatric problems that was dev
23h
The Atlantic

The Timely Comforts of Craig Finn's We All Want the Same Things When Craig Finn returned from college in Boston to Minneapolis in 1994, he developed a very particular preoccupation. “I just remember thinking the whole trick of this is going to be, ‘I can’t get a DUI,’” the Hold Steady singer recently told Steven Hyden for Uproxx , adding that he realized that the guys he saw riding bikes around town weren’t necessarily doing so “for exercise.” He sings about
23h
The Atlantic

A Better Way to Argue About Politics Liberals and conservatives have fundamentally different moral codes, which makes arguing about policy complicated. Many people have found themselves locked in debates surrounding the now-suspended travel ban, with little success in convincing the other. “One reason it’s so hard to reach across the ideological divide is that people tend to present their arguments in a way that appeals to the ethic
23h
Gizmodo

The Nintendo Switch Is Back In Stock On Amazon, If You Hurry Nintendo Switch , $300 PSA: Nintendo Switch is in stock on Amazon for Prime members, for the next few seconds anyway. Go fast!
23h
Ars Technica

How ISPs can sell your Web history—and how to stop them Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | KrulUA) The US Senate yesterday voted to eliminate privacy rules that would have forced ISPs to get your consent before selling Web browsing history and app usage history to advertisers. Within a week, the House of Representatives could follow suit, and the rules approved by the Federal Communications Commission last year would be eliminated by Congress. So what ha
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BBC News - Science & Environment

The Foehn feelingFor centuries, people in the Alps have attributed health issues, headaches in particular, to the mountain wind known as the Foehn.
23h
Ingeniøren

Norsk studie: Flere miljøgifte i vildlaks end i opdrættet laksDet første store norske studier viser, at laks, der svømmer rundt i det fri farvand, har højere niveauer af organiske miljøgifte end laks klemt inde i aquakulturer.
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Gizmodo

The Hunt For The First Arcade Game Easter Egg “I was torn between the irrational fear that someone else would stumble on and publish my 40 year old discovery before me, and the very real fear that when I did, no one would care.” Former Microsoft developer Ed Fries went on one heck of a journey to try and recreate one of the earliest easter eggs in video game history, from the old arcade game Starship 1 . This is his story. It all started wit
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hydrophobic proteins on virus surfaces can help purify vaccinesThrough experimental and computational tests, new research expands on the theory of virus surface hydrophobicity. By being slightly water-repellent, the outer layers of proteins in virus capsids affect how it interacts with cells and the environment. Understanding this more can improve vaccine production and virus detection.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Big-game jitters: Coyotes no match for wolves' hunting prowessAs wolf populations plummeted, the eastern coyote assumed the role of apex predator in forests along the Atlantic Coast. New research, however, shows that the eastern coyote is no match for the wolf. While the eastern coyote can bring down moose and other large prey, it prefers to attack smaller animals and to scavenge.
23h
Ars Technica

Judge: eBay can’t be sued over seller accused of patent infringement eBay headquarters on January 22, 2014 in San Jose, California. (credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images) It's game over for an Alabama man who claims his patent on "Carpenter Bee Traps" is being infringed by competing products on eBay. Robert Blazer filed his lawsuit in 2015, saying that his US Patent No. 8,375,624 was being infringed by a variety of products being sold on eBay. Blazer believed the
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study confirms prescription weight-loss medication helps with opiate addiction recoveryResearchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have confirmed that a prescription weight-loss pill decreases the urge to use opiates such as oxycodone. In a study published in ACS Chemical Neuroscience, the researchers led by UTMB scientist Kathryn Cunningham found that the drug, lorcaserin, reduced the use and craving for the opioid oxycodone in preclinical studies.
23h
The Atlantic

Kendrick Lamar Will Battle Until the Apocalpyse “The Heart Part 4,” the song Kendrick Lamar posted online Thursday night, sounds like a preview for two things. One is the acclaimed Compton rapper’s fourth album, whose release date may or may not be tipped in the final line “Y’all got till April the 7th to get ya’ll shit together.” The other is the apocalypse. “The whole world goin’ mad / Bodies is adding up, market’s about to crash,” Lamar rap
23h
The Atlantic

The Fed's Ongoing Diversity Problem Well before the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta named Raphael Bostic as its new president last week, pressure had been mounting for the Fed to use the vacated spot as an opportunity to diversify its ranks. And for good reason: Until then, in the Fed’s 103-year history, there had never been a black or Latino president at any of its 12 regional banks. In fact, until 2009, when Narayana Kocherlakota
23h
WIRED

National Noise Map Charts Americans’ Aural Misery Work from government cartograph-ears puts transportation-related noise in perspective. The post National Noise Map Charts Americans' Aural Misery appeared first on WIRED .
23h
Gizmodo

American Company Recalls a Million Pounds of Cafeteria Chicken Just a gross picture of chicken to accompany a gross chicken article (Image: Evan-Amos /Wikimedia Commons) A company producing ready-to-eat chicken is recalling 933,272 pounds of its ostensibly schoolhouse cafeteria-bound product. That’s equal to 26.5 million McNuggets , based on prior Gizmodo calculations. That is so much chicken. Oklahoma City-based OK Foods, inc.* is recalling chicken produced
23h
Scientific American Content: Global

Mind-Reading Computers That Can Translate Thoughts into WordsIn his latest book, Adam Piore explores how bioengineers are harnessing the latest technologies to unlock untapped abilities in the human body and mind, like translating neural brain patterns of... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
23h
Popular Science

A new cloud species, a fluorescent tree frog, and other amazing images of the week Entertainment Newsworthy eye candy Don't miss this week's most dazzling images from science, health, and space news. Read on:…
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Cancer CallsThe proteins drebin and EB3 are part of a “homing pathway” that helps cancer cells move from the prostate into the bloodstream or lymphatic system.
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Gizmodo

Please Enjoy Steven Moffat's 1999 Doctor Who Comedy Special Gif: From “Cure of Fatal Death,” BBC Today is Red Nose Day in the UK, an annual charity telethon organized by Comic Relief . Part of Red Nose Day is always a number of sketches and shorts from various TV shows. One of the most famous also happens to be Steven Moffat’s very first filmed Doctor Who story: “The Curse of Fatal Death.” This year, for Red Nose Day, the official Doctor Who YouTube chann
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Gizmodo

Today's Best Deals: College Apparel, Logitech Harmony, Nike Clearance, and More NCAA apparel , a $70 Logitech Harmony remote , and Nike clearance lead off Friday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Logitech Harmony Smart Control , $70 This seemingly basic remote might not look like much at first blush, but it can actually control eight of your favorite home theater devices, and even turn your sm
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Ingeniøren

Apple afviser 'naive' hackeres afpresningsplan: Kræver iTunes-gavekort i bytte for brugerdata https://www.version2.dk/artikel/apple-afviser-naive-hackeres-afpresningsplan-kraever-itunes-gavekort-bytte-brugerdata En 'uerfaren' gruppe it-kriminelle kræver iTunes-gavekort i bytte for flere hundrede millioner iPhone-konti. Version2
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The Atlantic

The History Behind the Long-Dead Space Council Trump Wants to Revive The Trump administration is planning for the future of the space program by throwing it back to the ’90s. Vice President Mike Pence said this week that President Trump will, “in very short order,” bring back a high-level advisory council on space activities that has been dead for nearly 25 years. The remarks were the first public confirmation by the White House that the administration wants to re
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The Atlantic

What Exactly Did Paul Manafort Do Wrong? MOSCOW—The reports that former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort had had a contract for tens of millions of dollars to “ greatly benefit the Putin Government ” were not exactly news here. And, in a certain sense, they didn’t have to be news in Washington, either. Manafort, who has reportedly just volunteered to testify in the House Intelligence Committee’s investigation of Russian meddling in
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The Atlantic

Who Owns Your Face? It takes a feast of facial imagery to teach a machine how to recognize an individual person. This is why computer scientists so often use the faces of Hollywood celebrities in their research . Tom Hanks, for example , is in so many publicly available photographs that it’s fairly easy to build a Hanks database for algorithm-training purposes. Depending on a researcher’s needs, there are many other
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Ancient Romans may have been cozier with Huns than they let onNomadic Huns and Roman farmers shared ways of life on the Roman Empire’s fifth century frontier.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Neurosurgical practices must evolve and transform to adapt to rapidly changing healthcare industryNeurosurgeons hoping to successfully navigate the rapidly changing healthcare industry must advance their strategies and adapt new ways of thinking in order to continue to thrive in an evolving environment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Seven months after Rio Olympics, Zika continues to plague babies in urban slumsThe near-paranoia related to Zika leading up to the 2016 Rio Games could have been avoided by heeding the lessons of previous epidemics, argues a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Astronomers identify purest, most massive brown dwarfAstronomers have identified a record breaking brown dwarf (a star too small for nuclear fusion) with the 'purest' composition and the highest mass yet known. The object, known as SDSS J0104+1535, is a member of the so-called halo -- the outermost reaches -- of our galaxy, made up of the most ancient stars.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Evolutionary advantage of the common periwinkleA special kind of small sulfur-rich proteins, the metallothioneins, have an extraordinarily large capability for binding heavy metals. An international team of scientists has now discovered that the marine common periwinkle, which is widely considered a delicacy, contains the largest version of the protein found yet, with one additional cadmium-binding domain and a one-third higher detoxification
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lighting up antibiotic resistanceCarbapenems are among the 'antibiotics of last resort' and can fight infections for which other drugs have long lost their effectiveness. However, even carbapenem-resistant pathogenic strains have emerged over the last decades.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Successful method to reduce dental implant failureScientists are evaluating the effectiveness of a new nanocoating for dental implants to reduce the risk of peri-implantitis.
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Futurity.org

Custom microscope zooms in on live synapses A custom-built microscope is giving scientists the closest view yet of living nerve synapses. The brain hosts an extraordinarily complex network of interconnected nerve cells that are constantly exchanging electrical and chemical signals at speeds difficult to comprehend. Understanding the detailed workings of a synapse—the junction between neurons that govern how these cells communicate with eac
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New on MIT Technology Review

Gut Check: Scientists are Wary of At-Home Microbiome TestsNew services that sequence the bacteria in your digestive tract can provide only limited information for now.
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Live Science

King Tut's Grandmom? Huge Alabaster Statue Unearthed Along NileA statue carved in alabaster that possibly represents King Tut's grandmother ― Queen Tiye ― has been unearthed on the west bank of Luxor along the Nile River.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Amazingly fast, cheap genome sequencing: Zika virus mosquito genome assembled from scratchA team of scientists has developed a new way to sequence genomes, which can assemble the genome of an organism, entirely from scratch, dramatically cheaper and faster.
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The Atlantic

When Fingerprints Are as Easy to Steal as Passwords How do you prove who you are to a computer? You could just use a password, a shared secret between you and the machine. But passwords are easily compromised—through a phishing scam, or a data breach , or some good old-fashioned social engineering —making it simple to impersonate you. Today, you’re often asked to produce something more fundamental and harder to imitate than a password: something t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Most Lithuanians still emigrate for economic reasonsIndependent research, initiated and carried out by Kaunas University of Technology (KTU) interdisciplinary migration research cluster shows that introduction of Euro in Lithuania coincides with the fourth wave of emigration. In 2015, more than 40 thousand people left Lithuania, and in 2016 -- around 50 thousand.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The need to reinvent primary carePrimary care is 'first-contact, continuous, comprehensive, and coordinated care provided to populations undifferentiated by gender, disease, or organ system.' High-quality primary care has been associated with improved population health, lower costs, and greater equity. Despite this evidence, primary care has been consistently under-resourced, accounting for just six to eight percent of US health
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Microwave-induced bismuth salts-mediated synthesis of molecules of medicinal interestsThe products obtained via bismuth salts-mediated reactions are medicinally active or starting materials for the synthesis of biologically active molecules including sex hormones, anticancer agents, antibacterial agents and agents for chagas diseases.
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Live Science

Americans Are Having Less Sex: By the NumbersSomething's up in bedrooms across America that's driving sexual activity down.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Trump administration approves Keystone XL pipelineThe State Department says the project, blocked by Barack Obama, is in the national interest.
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Gizmodo

Genius Behind Suicide Squad Claims Trump Has 'Perfect Genes' and Doesn't Eat McDonald's Image: Instagram / Donald Trump Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin , the Trump appointee also known as one of the executive producers of the Oscar-winning (*shudder*) film Suicide Squad , was interviewed by Axios’s Mike Allen on Friday, and he had some insane things to say about our president. The interview was ostensibly about Mnuchin’s role in the Trump cabinet, but (as is so often the case thes
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Ingeniøren

Professor: Danmark kan fint klare sig uden NordsøolieI de forgangne dage har det lydt fra næsten alle de politiske partier, at Nordsøaftalen er den bedste aftale for alle – også for klimaet. Det stiller et dansk medlem af FN's klimapanel IPCC sig kritisk over for.
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Ars Technica

GameStop expects the Switch to be hard to find through 2017 (credit: JeepersMedia ) The successful launch of the Nintendo Switch earlier this month is already creating retail shortages and steep markups on the secondary market . Now, major retailer GameStop says it expects those kinds of shortages and nearly instant sell-through of shipments to last throughout 2017 in its more than 7,000 retail stores. "The demand is incredibly strong for this [Switch] co
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The Scientist RSS

Dinosaur Phylogenetic Tree Shake-UpAn analysis of 74 dinosaur species leads a group of researchers to reorganize the extinct animals’ evolutionary history.
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The Scientist RSS

Week in Review: March 20?24What proposed budget cuts could mean for NIH; how astrocytes help control circadian behaviors in mice; how mutations confer virulence to vaccine-derived polio; why cancer risk is in part “random”
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Scientific American Content: Global

California Adopts Strict Rules for Methane EmissionsOne of the biggest challenges will be to figure out how to reduce emissions from the state's 1.4 million dairy cows -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian

Who do you think you are – and how bad could you be? Given the right (or wrong) situation, each of us might become anyone What turns good people bad? The road to depravity and corruption, we tend to assume, is a slippery slope: a few small immoral acts, then things snowball, and before you know it, the floodgates have opened. (To clarify, this slippery slope is near a hydroelectric power plant, hence the floodgates. Also, it’s snowing.) But accordi
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Gizmodo

Kotaku The Internet Reacts To The End Of Naruto Shippuden | The Garage How To Make The Lexus LS 400 Kotaku The Internet Reacts To The End Of Naruto Shippuden | The Garage How To Make The Lexus LS 400 As Reliable As Everyone Thinks It Is | io9 The Power Rangers Movie Is Already Teasing the Most Obvious Character For Its Sequel | Lifehacker How I Learned to Take Better Photos By Digging Into My Camera’s Exposure Settings |
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The Atlantic

Artificial Intelligence: The Park Rangers of the Anthropocene In Australia, autonomous killer robots are set to invade the Great Barrier Reef. Their target is the crown-of-thorns starfish—a malevolent pincushion with a voracious appetite for corals. To protect ailing reefs, divers often cull the starfish by injecting them with bile or vinegar. But a team of Australian scientists has developed intelligent underwater robots called COTSBots that can do the sam
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The Atlantic

The Next Wave of Questionable Referendums If you thought 2016 was the year of controversial referendums—Brexit, anyone?—strap in, because 2017 is going to be a bumpy ride. While the year will see some relatively straightforward votes, as on Turkey’s proposed consolidation of power in the presidency, another series of pending plebiscites will push the borders of politics, legality, and prudence. Here are some of the alternative referendum
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fingerprint' technique spots frog populations at risk from pollutionResearchers at Lancaster University have found a way to detect subtle early warning signs that reveal a frog population is at risk from pollution.
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Blog » Languages » English

Funky Monkey vs. Sound Hound: Results We want the funk! Team Funky Monkey has triumphed. Check out the leaderboard: Share This:
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TEDTalks (video)

3 ways to spot a bad statistic | Mona ChalabiPolls that predict political candidates' chances to two decimal places are a problem. But we shouldn't count out stats altogether ... instead, we should learn to look behind them. In this delightful, hilarious talk, data journalist Mona Chalabi shares handy tips to help question, interpret and truly understand what the numbers are saying.
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Gizmodo

'This Is Some Black Mirror Shit' Is the Perfect Motto for 2017 Image: Netflix Everybody knows 2016 was a weird year. But guess what: So far, 2017 is even weirder. Like dystopian, wake-me-from-this-nightmare, am-I-living-in-an-episode-of- Black-Mirror weird. We’ve got the tweets to prove it. A simple Twitter search reveals that a critical mass of people thinks the world is suddenly turning into a dark scifi reality, much like the spine-tingling, dystopian TV
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fingerprint' technique spots frog populations at risk from pollutionResearchers at Lancaster University in the UK have found a way to detect subtle early warning signs that reveal a frog population is at risk from pollution.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Jumonji' protein key to Ewing's sarcoma rampageA University of Colorado Cancer Center study published in the journal Oncogene pinpoints a protein that may be essential to Ewing's sarcoma metastasis -- when researchers knocked down the protein KDM3A in Ewing's sarcoma tumor cells, one of a family known as Jumonji proteins, they also inhibited the cancer's metastatic ability.
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Gizmodo

Smart Female Guppies Don’t Wind Up With Losers Image: Wikimedia commons Guppies might look like mindless, mouth-breathing little bastards, but it turns out some of them make better dating decisions than we do. No, really—these tiny fish, with their infinitesimal brains, are somehow more discerning with their mates than us, and we literally invented rockets. And Doritos. A new study, published on March 22nd in Science Advances, suggests that f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UTA quantifying coral species' disease susceptibility by examining immune traitsA biologist from The University of Texas at Arlington is leading a new study aimed at quantifying how susceptible coral species are to disease by examining their immunity through a series of novel experiments and approaches.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers grow a versatile diamond foil in a test reactorFriedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen Nürnberg (FAU) researchers have come a step closer to their goal of providing large diamond foils for practical applications. In a test reactor, they have succeeded in producing the world's largest diamond foil with a diameter of 28 centimetres. Diamond foils can be used as ultimate wear protection in industrial applications and for research into thermoelec
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Ingeniøren

Restaffaldet fra enzym- og insulinproduktion skal både bruges til biogas og gødningKalundborg Symbiosis bliver udvidet med et biogasanlæg, hvor råvaren er affaldet fra Novo Nordisk og Novozymes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The world's largest diamond foilMaterial researchers of Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen Nürnberg have come a step closer to their goal of providing large diamond foils for practical applications. In a test reactor, they have succeeded in producing the world's largest diamond foil with a diameter of 28 cm. Diamond foils can be used as ultimate wear protection in industrial applications and for research into thermoelectri
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Survivors of childhood brain tumors have increased body fatThese findings suggest that one of the most important risk factors for heart disease and type 2 diabetes, which is excess total and central fat in the body, is present relatively early in survivors of childhood brain tumors. This may program their future risk of these diseases and impact their outcomes.
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WIRED

Enough With the Unoriginal Sci-Fi. Looking at You, Life Even if you haven't seen this movie, you've seen this movie. The post Enough With the Unoriginal Sci-Fi. Looking at You, Life appeared first on WIRED .
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Gizmodo

Marvel Is Resurrecting Wolverine, Bruce Banner, and More in Marvel Generations Image: Marvel. Art by Alex Ross A month ago , Marvel sent its comics fans into a flurry of speculation when it dropped a teaser dubbed Generations , hinting that original legacy characters like Tony Stark, Jean Grey, and Captain Mar-Vell could be coming back alongside the heroes that have taken on their mantles. Well, now they’ve just confirmed that indeed that’s exactly what’s happening. New det
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Twitter eyes paid 'premium' service for power usersTwitter confirmed Friday it is considering a paid subscription service that would give frequent users more tools to use the social network for marketing, journalism and other fields.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

OSIRIS-REx asteroid search tests instruments, science teamDuring an almost two-week search, NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission team activated the spacecraft's MapCam imager and scanned part of the surrounding space for elusive Earth-Trojan asteroids—objects that scientists believe may exist in one of the stable regions that co-orbits the sun with Earth. Although no Earth-Trojans were discovered, the spacecraft's camera operated flawlessly and demonstrated that it
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Futurity.org

How a very dry desert ‘recycles’ fog and dew The ocean isn’t the sole source of life-sustaining fog and dew for the Namib Desert’s numerous plants and animals, report researchers. “Knowing exactly where the fog and dew come from will help us predict the availability of non-rainfall water in the future, both in the Namib and elsewhere,” says Lixin Wang, an ecohydrologist and assistant professor of Earth sciences at Indiana University-Purdue
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why do guillemot chicks leap from the nest before they can fly?It looks like a spooky suicide when small, fluffy guillemot chicks leap from the cliffs and fall several hundred metres towards the sea - long before they are fully fledged. But researchers have now discovered that there is good reason behind this seeming madness.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

On the trail of Parkinson's diseaseThe molecular causes of diseases such as Parkinson's need to be understood as a first step towards combating them. University of Konstanz chemists working alongside Professor Malte Drescher recently succeeded in analysing what happens when selective mutations of the alpha-synuclein protein occur -- a protein that is closely linked to Parkinson's disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

OSIRIS-REx asteroid search tests instruments, science teamOSIRIS-REx did not discover any Earth-Trojan asteroids during a two-week search, but the spacecraft's cameras operated flawlessly and demonstrated they can image objects two magnitudes dimmer than originally expected.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study identifies successful method to reduce dental implant failureA research team comprising scientists from the School of Biological Sciences, Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry and the School of Engineering at the University of Plymouth, have joined forces to develop and evaluate the effectiveness of a new nanocoating for dental implants to reduce the risk of peri-implantitis.
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Gizmodo

Trust Me, Living on the Moon Will Be Hell Image: Screenshot Humans (not you, you’ll be dead) are going to have to live somewhere other than Earth eventually. There might be some options for new homes on Mars , the planet orbiting Proxima Centauri, or even one of the planets in the Trappist-1 system. But what about the Moon for starters? It’s round like our Earth, it’s close, it’s got gravity—what more could you want? Well, probably a few
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Gizmodo

Command All of Your Electronics With Logitech's $70 Harmony Smart Control Logitech Harmony Smart Control , $70 This seemingly basic remote might not look like much at first blush, but it can actually control eight of your favorite home theater devices, and even turn your smartphone into a universal remote as well. You’re probably used to seeing Logitech Harmony remotes with screens built-in, but it turns out that you already carry a much better screen in your pocket. S
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Gizmodo

Can Learning To Make Video Games Help Rehabilitate Jailed Kids? “What they teach you in juvenile halls or in youth offender facilities is not about education,” researcher Dana Ruggiero told me during a recent phone interview. “It’s not about making better choices. It’s literally just a rhetoric, and then they put you back into the same system you came out of.” She started Project Tech, a program focused on teaching game design to young people in prison, to he
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Geologist for Shell says company hid Nigeria spill dangersRoyal Dutch Shell's Nigeria subsidiary "fiercely opposed" environmental testing and is concealing data showing thousands of Nigerians are exposed to health hazards from a stalled cleanup of the worst oil spills in the West African nation's history, according to a German geologist contracted by the Dutch-British multinational.
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Ars Technica

Google reportedly removing SMS texting from Hangouts on May 22 Welcome to your new Hangout. Google continues to shake up its messaging tools with the upcoming removal of a popular feature from Hangouts. According to an e-mail sent to GSuite administrators and subsequently posted to Reddit, Google will remove the SMS feature from Hangouts on May 22. Anyone using Hangouts as both a Google messaging app and their primary text messaging app won't be able to send
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Ars Technica

Power Rangers film would’ve been better as a CW series Enlarge If you think Marvel and DC superheroes receive too many reboots, you clearly haven't kept tabs on the Power Rangers TV series. What began as an excuse to reuse costumed-battling footage from the Japanese show Super Sentai has spawned 24 incarnations since 1993. Twenty-four! Who knows—if Batman had gotten close to that number, Val Kilmer might have worn the suit a second time. Despite all
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The Atlantic

March Madness, Plus Future NBA Stardom March Madness gets a charge from its immediacy. The NCAA basketball tournament, now rounding through the second of three weekends, is a single-elimination event, so every game means everything. A win signals survival—for a few more days—and a loss brings the end not only of a season but also of certain college careers. The stakes couldn’t be higher, nor could the outcomes be starker. So that’s on
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lighting up antibiotic resistanceCarbapenems are among the 'antibiotics of last resort' and can fight infections for which other drugs have longlost their effectiveness. However, even carbapenem-resistant pathogenic strains have emerged over the last decades.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hydrophobic proteins on virus surfaces can help purify vaccinesThrough experimental and computational tests, new research expands on the theory of virus surface hydrophobicity. By being slightly water-repellent, the outer layers of proteins in virus capsids affect how it interacts with cells and the environment. Understanding this more can improve vaccine production and virus detection.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Evolutionary advantage of the common periwinkleA special kind of small sulfur-rich proteins, the metallothioneins, have an extraordinarily large capability for bindingheavy metals. An international team of scientists has now discovered that the marine common periwinkle, which is widelyconsidered a delicacy, contains the largest version of the protein found yet, with one additional cadmium-binding domain anda one-third higher detoxification cap
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why do guillemot chicks leap from the nest before they can fly?It looks like a spooky suicide when small, fluffy guillemot chicks leap from the cliffs and fall several hundred meters towards the sea -- long before they are fully fledged. But researchers have now discovered that there is good reason behind this seeming madness.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists discover shared genetic origin for ALS/MND and schizophreniaThe study, conducted by scientists at Trinity College Dublin, indicates that the causes of ALS/MND and schizophrenia are biologically linked. The scientists say that the new findings have major implications for how we classify diseases and that they challenge the existing divide between neurology and psychiatry.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Severe psoriasis predominantly affects menThe fact that men are overrepresented in psoriasis registers and consume more psoriasis care have long led researchers to believe that the common skin disease disproportionately affects men. A unique study with 5,438 Swedish psoriasis patients now reveals that women have a statistically significant lower incidence of severe psoriasis compared to men. The study, conducted by researchers at Umeå Uni
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Big data approach to predict protein structureNothing works without proteins in the body, they are the molecular all-rounders in our cells. If they do not work properly, severe diseases, such as Alzheimer's, may result. To develop methods to repair malfunctioning proteins, their structure has to be known. Using a big data approach, researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now developed a method to predict protein structures
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Spread of ages is key to impact of disease, animal study findsHow a disease outbreak affects a group of animals depends on the breakdown of ages in the population, research has shown.
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Headed North, Sandhill Cranes Squeeze In Where They CanThe Platte River in Nebraska is an important layover for hundreds of thousands of the birds as they head toward their summer homes.
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WIRED

The Clever Lindlund Ruler Measures the Digital and Physical Worlds The Lindlund ruler closes the gap between analog and digital design. The post The Clever Lindlund Ruler Measures the Digital and Physical Worlds appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Rogue One’s Director Reveals the Secrets of That Crazy Vader Scene According to Gareth Edwards, the scene almost didn't happen. Here's how he pulled it off. The post Rogue One’s Director Reveals the Secrets of That Crazy Vader Scene appeared first on WIRED .
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New on MIT Technology Review

Harvard Scientists Moving Ahead on Plans for Atmospheric Geoengineering ExperimentsThe climate researchers intend to launch a high-altitude balloon that would spray a small quantity of reflective particles into the stratosphere.
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Gizmodo

Don't Get Hit by a Nerf Dart Traveling at Twice the Speed of Sound YouTuber Giaco Whatever is on a quest to build a Nerf blaster that will do more than just leave a tiny welt on someone. He’s constructed an air-powered dart cannon that generates 400 PSI of pressure, and when cranked to full power, it can apparently send a Nerf dart flying at Mach 2.3 , twice the speed of sound, or just over 1,700 miles per hour. On impact with a hard surface like a wooden board,
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Scientific American Content: Global

Women Workers Fill the Factories, 1917Reported by Scientific American, this Week in World War I: March 24, 1917 -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

How to Protect Our Disappearing Bumble BeesHomeowners, community members, school gardeners, farmers—everyone can help -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science

New Striped Rain-Frog Species Discovered in Ecuador’s Cloud ForestsThe species was discovered during an expedition to study a similar rainfrog.
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New Scientist - News

Fish that keep salmon clean and healthy risk being wiped outWrasse help remove lice from salmon, enabling farmers to use fewer pesticides. But escalating demand for these fish could be disrupting important wild ecosystems
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Exmoor gardens raided by 'wily old stag'A mature stag has learnt how to use its antlers to lift bird feeders off garden trees.
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Ingeniøren

Rumstationen gør klar til ny æra: USA’s bemandede rumfartøjerTre rumvandringer skal forberede ISS, så USA’s kommercielle partnere kan docke 400 km over Jorden.
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New on MIT Technology Review

The Download, Mar 24, 2017: Moore’s Law for CO2, Trump’s Cyberwar Strategy, and a Smart Pocket WatchThe most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Parallel computation provides deeper insight into brain functionUnlike experimental neuroscientists who deal with real-life neurons, computational neuroscientists use model simulations to investigate how the brain functions. While many computational neuroscientists use simplified mathematical models of neurons, researchers in the Computational Neuroscience Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) develop software that
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The Atlantic

Not Wanting to Be a Token in Tech Two readers are very wary of hiring practices in Silicon Valley that strongly take gender into account. Here’s Sally: This article [“ Why Is Silicon Valley So Awful to Women? ”] refers a couple times to people saying that hiring women or minorities may “lower the bar” as some kind of evidence of bias. But usually when people say that, they are referring to using gender as a criteria for hiring. W
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Astronomers identify purest, most massive brown dwarfAn international team of astronomers has identified a record breaking brown dwarf (a star too small for nuclear fusion) with the 'purest' composition and the highest mass yet known. The object, known as SDSS J0104+1535, is a member of the so-called halo -- the outermost reaches -- of our galaxy, made up of the most ancient stars. The scientists report the discovery in Monthly Notices of the Royal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chance find has big implications for water treatment's costs and carbon footprintA type of bacteria accidentally discovered during research supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council could fundamentally reshape efforts to cut the huge amount of electricity consumed during wastewater clean-up.The discovery has upended a century of conventional thinking. The microorganisms -- 'comammox' (complete ammonia oxidizing) bacteria -- can completely turn ammonia
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New lab-on-a-chip platform seeks to improve pathogen detectionResearchers from the Fraunhofer Institute have developed a new prototype lab-on-a-chip platform for the easy and versatile detection of molecular pathogens.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Parallel computation provides deeper insight into brain functionNew computational software developed by OIST researchers is hundreds of times faster than conventional tools, opening up new opportunities to understand how individual neurons and networks of neurons function.
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Gizmodo

Rediscovered 1920s Home Movies Are the First to Show the White House in Color Credit: Hoover Archives An archivist working at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library has stumbled upon color home movies taken in the late 1920s by former First Lady Lou Hoover. Incredibly, this is very likely the first color film to show a US President, the First Lady, and the White House. Audio-visual archivist Lynn Smith was working on a preservation project at the library when she realized
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Predatory lizard enters Brazil clandestinelyIt all began with a photograph of a lizard posted on Facebook in August 2015 by the Brazilian Herpetology group. It was a strange lizard that had been observed in a residential area near the Port of Santos, São Paulo State, by Ricardo Samelo, a biology student at the Santos Coast campus of the Federal University of São Paulo (UNIFESP).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New lab-on-a-chip platform seeks to improve pathogen detectionNuclear amplification testing is commonly used for pathogen detection; however, the process is currently manually intensive and complex, and requires dedicated equipment. This prevents its use in some settings, and pathogen detection in individual samples.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Rome captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2A satelliteRome and its surroundings are pictured in this image from the Copernicus Sentinel-2A satellite, captured on 17 January 2016.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Novel oil spill cleanup technology successfully testedTests conducted last week of a novel technology that can greatly accelerate the combustion of crude oil floating on water demonstrated its potential to become an effective tool for minimizing the environmental impact of future oil spills. Called the Flame Refluxer, the technology, developed by fire protection engineering researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) with funding from the Bu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study into who is least afraid of deathA new study examines all robust, available data on how fearful we are of what happens once we shuffle off this mortal coil. They find that atheists are among those least afraid of dying... and, perhaps not surprisingly, the very religious.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chance find has big implications for water treatment's costs and carbon footprintA type of bacteria accidentally discovered during research supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) could fundamentally re-shape efforts to cut the huge amount of electricity consumed during wastewater clean-up.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Steep rise of the Bernese AlpsThe striking north face of the Bernese Alps is the result of a steep rise of rocks from the depths following a collision of two tectonic plates. This steep rise gives new insight into the final stage of mountain building and provides important knowledge with regard to active natural hazards and geothermal energy. The results from researchers at the University of Bern and ETH Zürich are being publi
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Live Science

NY Court Hears 'Personhood' Case for Caged ChimpsA New York appeals court considers whether chimpanzees are entitled to a human's legal rights.
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Ars Technica

Watch Nio’s 1 megawatt EP9 smash the Nürburgring electric vehicle lap record Enlarge We're continuing this week's theme of hypercars and electric vehicles with unnecessary amounts of power thanks to a video sent to us by the nice people at Formula E. You may remember late last year that the Nio EP9 set a new EV record at the Nürburgring Nordschleife , lapping the 12.9-mile (20.7km) track in 7:05.12. Well, the complete lap has now been uploaded to YouTube for your viewing
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Controlling ice formation(Phys.org)—Researchers have demonstrated that ice crystals will grow along straight lines in a controlled way on microgrooved surfaces. Compared to the random formation of ice crystals on smooth surfaces, the ice on the microgrooved surfaces forms more slowly and melts more quickly, which could lead to improved anti-icing and deicing methods. Ice formation is currently a major problem in a wide va
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Gizmodo

This Baby Pygmy Hippo Is the Cutest Thing on Planet Earth (No Arguing Please) Gif: Taronga Zoo / Gizmodo Have you had a long week? Perhaps you’re wondering how we’re not even 100 days into the Trump administration, and it feels like the entire world has gone dark. Let this newborn pygmy hippo beam some sunshine into your life. It is the cutest thing on the planet. The female calf was born on February 21 at the Taronga Zoo in Sydney, Australia, but the first footage of her
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists get closer look at living nerve synapsesThe brain hosts an extraordinarily complex network of interconnected nerve cells that are constantly exchanging electrical and chemical signals at speeds difficult to comprehend. Now, scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report they have been able to achieve -- with a custom-built microscope -- the closest view yet of living nerve synapses.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Surprising culprit in nerve cell damage identifiedIn new research, scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have implicated a specific molecule in the self-destruction of axons, the wiring of the nervous system. Understanding just how that damage occurs may help researchers find a way to halt it.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Seven months after Rio Olympics, Zika continues to plague babies in urban slumsThe near-paranoia related to Zika leading up to the 2016 Rio Games could have been avoided by heeding the lessons of previous epidemics, argues a new study from public health researchers at UC Berkeley.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In a sample of blood, researchers probe for cancer cluesOne day, patients may be able to monitor their body's response to cancer therapy just by having their blood drawn. A new study, led by bioengineers at UC Berkeley, has taken an important step in that direction by measuring a panel of cancer proteins in rare, individual tumor cells that float in the blood.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Most remaining smokers in US have low socioeconomic statusAfter decades of declining US smoking rates overall, most remaining smokers have low income, no college education, no health insurance or a disability. About 15 percent of US adults -- more than 36 million -- continue to smoke cigarettes. Half to three-fourths of them have one or more low-socioeconomic disadvantages, and the lowest socioeconomic categories have the highest smoking rates. The study
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Predatory lizard enters Brazil clandestinelyAnolis porcatus, a species native to Cuba, has been identified in several areas near the Port of Santos on the São Paulo coast, in Brazil. Its introduction into this area may threaten the survival of local lizard populations. A DNA study suggests these lizards could have come from Florida, where they're also exotic, rather than directly from Cuba.
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Science | The Guardian

From gravity to the Higgs we're still waiting for new physics Annual physics jamboree Rencontres de Moriond has a history of revealing exciting results from colliders, and this year new theories and evidence abound I’m here again at the Rencontres de Moriond conference in Italy. Some of you might remember an update from last year from the same conference on a signal in data taken during 2015 at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), hinting at a new particle that
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Science | The Guardian

Lab notes: is tartan T. rex about to enter the textbooks? The potential for a massive shakeup of the dinosaur family tree (including a possible common ancestor from Scotland) was mooted this week – will a new classification come in and overturn over a century of evolutionary assumptions? Stay tuned, dino-lovers. In the meanwhile, I may have to reverse my personal policy on our eight-legged friends with the news that and ingredient in funnel web spider v
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Ars Technica

Decrypted: The Expanse: “Well, this is off to a good start” Enlarge / The most badass UN Deputy Undersecretary the solar system has ever seen. Shohreh Aghdashloo as Chrisjen Avasarala. In this week's episode of The Expanse , our gang wants to get to Ganymede, but the Rocinante is a little too recognizable. Pretending to be a Martian Navy boarding party, Holden and Amos commandeer a Belter freighter, the Weeping Sonambulist, which was transporting relief s
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Viden

Tyske forskere bygger verdens største - og kraftigste - kunstige solDen kunstige sol, der kan levere 10.000 gange Jordens normale solstråling, skal bruges til forskning i miljøvenlig brint.
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Futurity.org

DNA ‘typos’ may cause 66% of cancer mutations Random, unpredictable DNA copying mistakes account for nearly two-thirds of the genetic changes that cause cancer—far more mutations than those triggered by heredity or by environmental factors like smoking or pollution, a study finds. The study used a new mathematical model based on DNA sequencing and epidemiologic data from around the world. The findings do not in any way suggest that we give u
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Popular Science

Five rad and random (kitchen!) things I found this week Gadgets The end-of-week dispatch from Pop Sci's commerce editor. Vol. 4. Five rad and random things I found this week. Read on.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The surprising discovery of a new class of pulsating X-ray starsA surprising new class of X-ray pulsating variable stars has been discovered by a team of American and Canadian astronomers led by Villanova University's Scott Engle and Edward Guinan. Part of the Villanova Secret Lives of Cepheids program, the new X-ray observations, obtained by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and published Thursday, March 23rd in the Astrophysical Journal, reveal that the brigh
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Dagens Medicin

Psykiatrisk Selskab: Alle tre forslag om botilbud peger samme vej Formanden for Dansk Psykiatrisk Selskab, Torsten Jacobsen, glæder sig over, at tre fremsatte forslag om bo- og behandlingstilbud til psykiatriske svært misbrugende patienter overordnet vil det samme.
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Gizmodo

The Power Rangers Movie Is Already Teasing the Most Obvious Character For Its Sequel Bob Iger discusses Carrie Fisher’s role in The Last Jedi . Lucifer ’s showrunner explains why the current season is moving five episodes. Chris Evans talks about his future as Captain America. Plus, a set video of Vision in action for Infinity War , a look at the returning cast of Twin Peaks , and a teasing image for Gifted . Spoilers, go! Power Rangers 2 The Green Ranger—who is presumably involv
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Genforskning gør kål på resistente skadedyrVinterkarsen bliver ikke som andre kålplanter ædt af kålmøl. Nu har genforskere...
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Derfor dør bierne - 3 grunde til bidødInsektekspert Annette Bruun Jensen giver tre bud på årsager til bidødelighed.
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Ars Technica

How to get a Vulcan salute from Jake Gyllenhaal and Ryan Reynolds This actually happened. (video link) AUSTIN, Texas—I said I could work an interview with the writers into my piece . Then, the e-mail came: "Nathan, Your TV interviews will begin at 2:45pm. Ryan Reynolds and Jake Gyllenhaal are paired together." Huh? When Life was announced as the closing film for South by Southwest , I knew I'd be taking the review reins from Senior Space Terror Editor Lee Hutch
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The Atlantic

T2 Trainspotting: Older, Scarcely Wiser The last time we saw Mark Renton, in 1996’s Trainspotting , he was “choosing life.” He was going to be “just like us.” Well, maybe not just like us. He had, after all, stolen £16,000 that he and his three best mates had scored in a heroin deal. But apart from that minor bit of drug-related larceny and personal betrayal, he was going straight. Maybe. A lot has happened since then. For starters, th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rocks that tell our industrial historyResearchers in the UPV/EHU's Department of Analytical Chemistry have published a study in which they analyse cemented sand formations that contain industrial waste produced as a result of metallurgical activities. These beachrocks bear witness to the impact of industrial development and its influence on the coastal environment.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Big data approach to predict protein structureNothing works without proteins in the body, they are the molecular all-rounders in our cells. If they do not work properly, severe diseases, such as Alzheimer's, may result. To develop methods to repair malfunctioning proteins, their structure has to be known. Using a big data approach, researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now developed a method to predict protein structures
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

IT researchers break anonymity of gene databasesDNA profiles can reveal a number of details about individuals, and even about their family members. There are laws in place that regulate the trade of gene data, which has become much simpler and cheaper to analyze today. However, these laws do not apply to an equally relevant type of genetic data, so-called microRNAs, even though these can also point to serious diseases. This means that anonymity
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Manipulating plant enzymes could protect crops from floodingScientists have long understood how oxygen deprivation can affect animals and even bacteria, but until recently very little was known about how plants react to hypoxia (low oxygen). A new research collaboration between Oxford University and the Leibniz Institute for Plant Biochemistry, published this week in Nature Communications, has answered some of these questions and shed light on how understa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Curiosity captures gravity wave shaped clouds on MarsThis week, from March 20th to 24th, the 48th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference will be taking place in The Woodlands, Texas. Every year, this conference brings together international specialists in the fields of geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and astronomy to present the latest findings in planetary science. One of the highlights of the conference so far has been a presentation about Mars
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Creating materials in a novel way by 3-D printing bacteria(Phys.org)—A team of researchers at Delft University of Technology has developed a means for 3-D printing a gel containing bacteria onto a base to create materials in a novel way. In their paper published in the journal ACS Synthetic Biology, the team describes their technique and how they used it to simulate a process for creating small graphene samples.
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Science-Based Medicine

Another Child Suffers From the Effects of Anti-Vaccine Propaganda…and TetanusAs an Australian child suffers from tetanus, a horrific and virtually 100% preventable illness, a prominent local anti-vaccine propagandist goes on the attack.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

WPI, BSEE, and the US Coast Guard successfully test a novel oil spill cleanup technologyTests of a novel technology that can accelerate the combustion of crude oil floating on water demonstrated its potential to become an effective tool for minimizing the environmental impact of oil spills. The Flame Refluxer, developed by fire protection engineering researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute with funding from the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement, could make it poss
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Game-changing balloon technology enables near-global flightAfter over 20 years of tests and development, NASA's Balloon Program team is on the cusp of expanding the envelope in high-altitude, heavylift ballooning with its super pressure balloon (SPB) technology. SMD technology investments that enabled development of SPB, the first totally new balloon design in more than 60 years, include improved film and evolution in the balloon design and fabrication. T
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WIRED

Photo of the Week: Scientists Fire Up the World’s Largest Artificial Sun (Without Melting Earth) "Synlight," as it's called, puts out light 10,000 times as intense as that of the sun. The post Photo of the Week: Scientists Fire Up the World’s Largest Artificial Sun (Without Melting Earth) appeared first on WIRED .
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Popular Science

Bombing Antarctica, flying into hurricanes, and drinking your own pee: Fantastic tales from the field Science Stories from the coolest day jobs in the world Tales From the Field brings you stories about the coolest day jobs in the world. Read on.
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Science | The Guardian

Your best pictures of newly recognised cloud formations Meteorologists have consulted the International Cloud Atlas since the 19th century – now, updated with crowd-sourced images and newly categorised formations such as wave-like asperitas , it’s going online. Readers have been sharing their images via GuardianWitness Continue reading...
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New Scientist - News

Is most cancer just random bad luck? No, lifestyle matters a lotMany cancers are still preventable despite more research highlighting the role of unavoidable random DNA damage, says biologist Darren Saunders
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The physics that stops a bullet also makes your car more fuel efficientYou don't need to stand in front of a rifle to see the same physics of resistance in action – you can see it through everyday activities like riding your bike, or hopping in your car, or less everyday activities like going on a return trip to space.
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Ingeniøren

Nu skal det være slut med A++ på køleskabetEU-aftale betyder, at energimærkning af forbrugerelektronik skal ændres løbende, så der ikke længere skal tilføjes plusser for hver forbedring.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists show prediction polls can outdo prediction marketsAsk economists whether prediction markets or prediction polls fare better, and they'll likely favor the former.
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Science | The Guardian

US scientists launch world's biggest solar geoengineering study Research programme will send aerosol injections into the earth’s upper atmosphere to study the risks and benefits of a future solar tech-fix for climate change US scientists are set to send aerosol injections 20km up into the earth’s stratosphere in the world’s biggest solar geoengineering programme to date, to study the potential of a future tech-fix for global warming. Continue reading...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Opinion: Banning laptops at secure airports won't keep aircraft safe from terror attacksIntroducing new security measures for the airline industry is rarely done lightly by governments. Certainly it's underpinned by the responsibility to ensure passenger safety. But it's not clear how effective the recent ban on laptops and large electronic devices in aircraft cabin baggage on flights from certain Middle Eastern airports to the US and UK will be.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronomers identify purest, most massive brown dwarfAn international team of astronomers has identified a record breaking brown dwarf (a star too small for nuclear fusion) with the 'purest' composition and the highest mass yet known. The object, known as SDSS J0104+1535, is a member of the so-called halo – the outermost reaches - of our Galaxy, made up of the most ancient stars. The scientists report the discovery in Monthly Notices of the Royal As
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NYT > Science

Bao Bao, an American-Born Panda, Steps Out in ChinaCulture shock is fading, say the handlers of Bao Bao, the panda from the National Zoo in Washington, as she settles into the land of her ancestors.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mitigating global warming by CO2 storage? Check for continental stressIf proposed CO2 sites are not properly assessed for long-term stability, future civilisations could still suffer the consequences of global warming.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Multi-parameter microscopy aids design of improved optoelectronic devicesThe National Physical Laboratory (NPL) has developed a novel measurement method, providing simultaneous topographical, electrical, chemical and optical microscopy (STEOM) at the nanoscale for the first time. The new method can be used to optimise the performance of optoelectronic devices such as organic solar cells, sensors and transistors.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Converting water into hydrogen more efficientlyScientists have long been puzzled why it is easier to produce hydrogen from water in an acidic environment than in an alkaline environment. Marc Koper comes with an explanation: the reason is the electric field at the surface of the catalyst, which is larger in an alkaline environment, as he writes in a publication in Nature Energy on 20 March.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Using the placenta to understand how complex organs evolveConsidering how different they look from the outside, it might be surprising that all vertebrates – animals with a backbone – share the same, conserved set of organs. Chickens, fish, human beings – all have hearts, livers, brains, kidneys and so on. Each of these organs performs a specialized set of functions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study examines gender discrimination in scienceGender discrimination can be found in the most unexpected fields. An international team, involving Demian Battaglia, a CNRS researcher at the Institut de neurosciences des systèmes, as well as researchers from Yale and the Max Planck Institute (Germany), has just demonstrated that women are underrepresented in the peer review of scientific publications. This research is published in the journal eL
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Electrodeposition and annealing used to allow for adjusting hardness in nanograined metals(Phys.org)—A team of researchers from China and France have adjusted the hardness of nanograined metals by applying electrodeposition and annealing. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes their technique and suggests some applications they believe could benefit from such metal treatments.
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Gizmodo

Why the Alien From Life Should Actually Scare You Image: Sony Pictures Daniel Espinosa’s highly anticipated sci-fi thriller , Life , isn’t just 2017's answer to Alien —it’s much scarier. Unlike most movies in the genre, Life is terrifying because it taps into legitimate concerns about contaminating Earth that even NASA, ESA, and other space agencies haven’t entirely figured out—the fear that in our longing to discover alien life, we bring someth
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Managing bushfires for safety and biodiversityPeople have long used planned fires as a tool to open up access to hunting grounds, to encourage new plant growth, and to cultivate plants for cooking, heating and spiritual purposes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How our species got smarter: through a rush of blood to the headAnthropologists have been curious about the evolution of human intelligence for many decades. The main lines of research have involved archaeological finds concerning the use of fire, tools and so on.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research shows how metabolism and epigenetics play a role in cancer developmentA study published in Briefings in Functional Genomics investigated how epigenetics can modulate human's genetic program -- it can emphasize or silence genes. The new research shows that if epigenetics is disrupted, it might switch on oncogenes (genes that in certain circumstances transform cells into tumor cells) or shut down tumor suppressors. Both events will transform cells into tumor cells and
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers address disease deadly to batsThe fungus that causes white-nose syndrome in hibernating bats has been detected on three species in the Texas counties of Childress, Collingsworth, Cottle, Hardeman, King and Scurry.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Winds and sea iceIt is thought that wind changes over the Southern Ocean may have been critical in driving changes in CO2 between cold ice-world and warm-world climates.
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Popular Science

Watch a 1953 nuclear blast test disintegrate a house in high resolution Military Footage may or may not contain a flying toilet. Nuclear test footage contains object still unknown, 64 years after the test.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

'Devastating' coral loss in South China Sea - scientistsResearchers are warning of a "devastating" loss of coral at the Dongsha Atoll in the South China Sea.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Virus hydrophobicity can help purify vaccinesA person doesn't have to get sick to catch a virus. Researchers hope to catch viruses for detection and vaccinations by understanding their sticky outer layers.
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Gizmodo

Now That Your School Is Probably Out of the Tournament, Amazon's Running an NCAA Apparel Blowout NCAA Apparel Gold Box It’s a little puzzling that Amazon would run an NCAA apparel sale after all but 12 schools have been eliminated from the tournament, but better late than never, I guess. Today only , you score great low prices on team-branded hoodies, hats, and shirts. The players won’t get any of the money, but on the bright side, these are really cheap prices, so the NCAA probably won’t ge
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Nyt cluster i strukturel biologi på Københavns UniversitetKøbenhavns Universitet etablerer et nyt cluster, ISBUC, der samler forskere med interesse i cellers...
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Popular Science

3D printing is tackling what may be its biggest challenge yet: the humble book Technology Printed in one piece—binding and all. A new 3D printed book pushes the limits of 3D printing technologies. Read on.
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WIRED

Witness 60 Years of Glorious F1 Race Car Evolution From the front engined tubes to of yore to the mystic aerodynamic future. The post Witness 60 Years of Glorious F1 Race Car Evolution appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Tech Bigwigs Know How Addictive Their Products Are. Why Don’t the Rest of Us? The world's greatest technocrats follow the cardinal rule of drug dealing: never get high on your own supply. The post Tech Bigwigs Know How Addictive Their Products Are. Why Don’t the Rest of Us? appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

The Journey of NASA’s Smartest Satellite Finally Comes to an End The Earth Observing-1 satellite is retiring, and leaving behind an oddball technological legacy. The post The Journey of NASA’s Smartest Satellite Finally Comes to an End appeared first on WIRED .
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Scientific American Content: Global

How the Science of "Blue Lies" May Explain Trump's SupportThey’re a very particular form of deception that can build solidarity within groups -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

Planetary Scientists Decry Trump's Proposed Earth-Science CutsThe president's proposed budget would boost funding for NASA's planetary science division, but at what cost? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian

Can we trust the Rorschach test? – podcast To its critics, it is dangerous pseudoscience. To its supporters, it offers unique insights. What is the future of this controversial psychological test? Read the text version Continue reading...
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New Scientist - News

Pay crash expected in online gig economy as millions seek workMillions of people in South-East Asia and sub-Saharan Africa get income from online jobs. But as more get online, competition will spark a race to the bottom
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Satellite imaging breakthrough improves ability to measure plant growthSatellite images of Earth's plant life have been valuable for managing crops or detecting deforestation, but current methods are often contaminated by light reflected by other things like clouds, soil and snow. Now, researchers at Stanford and the Carnegie Institution for Science have unlocked the potential of decades-old satellites with a technological tweak to better isolate the signal from plan
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A fluorogenic probe can detect the activity of multidrug-resistant pathogens in an assay systemCarbapenems are among the "antibiotics of last resort" and can fight infections for which other drugs have long lost their effectiveness. However, even carbapenem-resistant pathogenic strains have emerged over the last decades. To find out whether a pathogen contains carbapenem-cleaving enzymes, the carbapenemases, Chinese scientists have developed a simple and fast assay based on a fluorescent pr
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Live Science

3 Rivers Just Became Legal 'Persons'New Zealand's Whanganui River and the Ganga and Yamuna Rivers in India have been given the right to "sue" over issues like pollution. The challenge now is to ensure these legal rights are enforced.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists pinpoint critical step in DNA repair, cellular agingDNA repair is essential for cell vitality, cell survival, and cancer prevention, yet cells' ability to patch up damaged DNA declines with age for reasons not fully understood.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Upgrading the CERN LHC's CMS experiment detectorSometimes big questions require big tools. That's why a global community of scientists designed and built gigantic detectors to monitor the high-energy particle collisions generated by CERN's Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, Switzerland. From these collisions, scientists can retrace the footsteps of the Big Bang and search for new properties of nature.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spacewalking astronauts prep station for new parking spotAstronauts have ventured out on a spacewalk to prep the International Space Station for a new parking spot.
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Science | The Guardian

Pigs' teeth and hippo poo: behind the scenes at London zoo The Zoological Society of London zoo is home to more than 650 animal species. Photographer Linda Nylind was given exclusive access to spend time with the keepers and find out more about their daily routines London zoo was established in 1828 and is the world’s oldest scientific zoo. Created as a collection for the Zoological Society of London (ZSL), the animals from the Tower of London’s menageri
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Live Science

The State Dept. Rewrote Its Climate Change PageNew website language provides clues for how the State Department will address climate change.
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Live Science

British WWI Stash Uncovered: Hundreds of Liquor BottlesHundreds of World War I-era liquor bottles have been uncovered at a buried British barracks in Israel. A glass expert says the bottles once held wine, beer and soda.
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Live Science

Ancient Rock Carvings Depicting Masked People Discovered in EgyptThe newly discovered rock carvings date back around 6,000 years, before there were any pharaohs.
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The Atlantic

Today's News: March 24, 2017 —Speaker Paul Ryan informed President Trump at the White House that the health care bill could not pass the House, as blocs of conservatives and moderates resisted a week of frenzied lobbying from the administration and were determined to vote no. More here —Former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, who was deposed in an uprising in 2011, has been freed from prison. More here —A jury found former
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Futurity.org

Tired people struggle to detect certain emotions Although sleepy people had trouble interpreting happiness and sadness in a recent study, they had no problem doing so with other emotions—anger, fear, surprise, and disgust. That’s likely because we’re wired to recognize those more primitive emotions in order to survive acute dangers, says lead researcher William D.S. Killgore, a professor of psychiatry, psychology, and medical imaging at the Uni
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Science | The Guardian

From smugglers to supermarkets: the 'informal economy' touches us all You may think that a smuggler in the Tunisian desert has nothing to do with your trip to the supermarket. You’re wrong As I talk to him, Ahmed pulls his chair into his store to escape the hot Tunisian sun. He is a retired teacher – the years of screaming children can be counted in the rings framing his eyes. Behind him is his merchandise. To make up for a small pension, Ahmed is selling kitchenwa
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Ingeniøren

Efter hollandsk skandaleundersøgelse: Dansk elmåler-producent laver egen testDen danske elmåler-producent Kamstrup frikender nu selskabets egne målere efter en hollandsk undersøgelse afslørede, at nogle elmålere kan vise op mod 600 pct. for højt.
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Ingeniøren

Danske kræftlæger afprøver IBM Watson https://www.version2.dk/artikel/danske-kraeftlaeger-afproever-ibm-watson-1074844 Ny rapport fremhæver mulige fordele ved kunstig intelligens i dansk sygdomsbehandling. Version2
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Ingeniøren

AI advokaten Herman behandler klagesager på under et sekund https://www.version2.dk/artikel/ai-advokaten-herman-skal-behandle-klagesager-paa-under-sekund-1074851 AirHelp har lanceret AI advokaten Herman, som ved hjælp af big data analyser skal reducere behandlingstiden for klagesager i rejsebranchen til under et sekund. Version2
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Scientific American Content: Global

Most Cancer Cases Arise from "Bad Luck"Environment and heredity are smaller players than researchers previously believed -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica

It may sound like Alien and follow Arrival, but Life is a popcorn movie We talk with Life cast members Ariyon Bakare and Rebecca Ferguson. (video link) Life , a new sci-fi thriller starring Jake Gyllenhaal and Ryan Reynolds, requires no launch countdown. An International Space Station crew of six is in the midst of retrieving a Mars soil sample as the centerpiece of an eight-month mission. And naturally, the camera starts rolling right when the probe that's supposed
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Dagens Medicin

Synkopecenteret nedlægges Region Hovedstaden får nyt center til patienter med komplekse symptomer, heriblandt piger, som mener, at de har fået skader af HPV-vaccination.
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Ars Technica

Review: The $229 Moto G5 Plus stands as the king of budget Android (for now) We’ve documented the decline of Motorola under Lenovo extensively. We still liked the phones, which had probably been developed mostly under Google’s ownership anyway, but in 2015 we started to see slower updates and shorter support lifecycles . Last year was when the wheels really started to come off. Not only did the company mostly ruin its flagship phone by swapping the inexpensive and compete
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The Atlantic

Sesame Street Diversifies and Basketball Gentrifies: This Week's Top 7 Education Stories The Gentrification of College Hoops Tom Farrey | The Undefeated Players like [Allen] Iverson and [Tremont] Waters—the first members of their families to go to college—are increasingly rare in college sports, even in the big-money, high-stakes sports of basketball and football. Indeed, most athletic scholarships are going to middle-class kids with college-educated parents, not to kids from poor fa
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Scientific American Content: Global

Trump Wants Deep Cuts in Environmental MonitoringThe administration’s proposed budget takes aim at ecosystem and climate tracking efforts across agencies -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org

Dental trouble tied to malnutrition among some seniors Food scarcity and poor oral health are the major causes that lead older adults suffering from malnutrition—and who are already at high risk of functional decline, decreased quality of life, and increased mortality—to land in the emergency department. “For patients who don’t have enough food at home, the solution is pretty obvious and likely much less expensive than paying for the medical care tha
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The Guardian's Science Weekly

Cryogenic preservation: from single cells to whole organs – Science Weekly podcastHannah Devlin looks at recent advances in the field of cryopreservation and asks how close we are to applying these technologies to whole organs
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The Guardian's Science Weekly

How to write a successful science book – Science Weekly podcastTo celebrate the announcement of the 2017 Wellcome Book Prize shortlist, Hannah Devlin asks three of its featured authors about the secrets to writing a successful science book
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The Guardian's Science Weekly

Is it time for an update to evolutionary theory? - Science Weekly podcastThe extended evolutionary synthesis is controversially proposed as an update to evolutionary theory as we know it. Nicola Davis explores the arguments
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The Guardian's Science Weekly

Exoplanets orbiting Trappist-1 and the search for life – Science Weekly podcastHannah Devlin explores the research behind the recent announcement of seven Earth-size planets and asks how we might probe their nature, including a suitability for life Exoplanet discovery: seven Earth-sized planets found orbiting nearby star
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The Guardian's Science Weekly

A neuroscientist explains: teaching morality to robots – podcastDr Daniel Glaser delves into the murky world of Artificial Intelligence and asks whether true intelligence can exist without an understanding of morality
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