Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rebuilding middle class is the key to preserving democracySteps must be taken to preserve middle-class America or the United States will cease to be a democracy, says a law professor in his new book.
1min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

From the room next door to the next planet overThe new Albert Chadwick Research Room inside the Roberts Proton Therapy Center is no ordinary laboratory space. In fact, there’s nothing else quite like it anywhere else in the United States, and whether it’s treating patients with cancer or helping NASA with its plans to send astronauts to Mars, the discoveries that could propel scientists forward will happen right here.
0min
The Atlantic

What If the Health-Care Collapse Saves Trump's Presidency? Friday was the worst day of Donald Trump’s young presidency—an unprecedented defeat on his first legislative priority, which also happened to be his party’s signature promise for the last seven years and one of his own top campaign promises. What’s more, the collapse undercuts the central premise of Trump’s political identity, his supposedly formidable reputation as a dealmaker . But what if, ins
4min
Gizmodo

Add a Year to Your PlayStation Plus Membership For 20% Off 1 Year PlayStation Plus Membership , $48 It’s been awhile since we’ve seen a decent PlayStation Plus deal, so if your membership is due to expire soon (or not), grab another year for $48 today , which is as low as it’s gotten on Amazon since Sony jacked up the price by $10.
7min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Microrna treatment restores nerve insulation, limb function in mice with MSScientists partially re-insulated ravaged nerves in mouse models of multiple sclerosis (MS) and restored limb mobility by treating the animals with a small non-coding RNA called a microRNA. In a new article, researchers report that treatment with a microRNA called miR-219 restarted production of a substance called myelin that is critical to normal function of the central nervous system.
7min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Can artificial intelligence detect fake news?An artificial intelligence course has been launched that includes two projects focused on using AI to detect and combat fake news articles.
7min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Kent State chemists create microscopic environment to study cancer cell growthAn online publication in Nature Nanotechnology this week by Kent State University researchers and their colleagues at Kyoto University in Japan, however, may offer new understanding about what turns good cells bad.
9min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Satellites reveal bird habitat loss in CaliforniaReduced seasonal flooding of wetlands and farm fields in California's Sacramento Valley threatens a key stopover site for migratory shorebirds, a Duke-led study shows. Landsat satellite images reveal that flooded habitat is most limited during peak spring migration when the birds urgently need resting and feeding sites. Near the peak of migration, an area of seasonally flooded land twice the size
9min
Gizmodo

Here's What It Takes To Be A Kickass Car Designer At Just 23 Darby Barber is a creative designer at General Motors, currently part of the Chevy trucks team. She joined GM at the beginning of 2016 after graduating from the College of Creative Studies. At 23, she is most likely one of the youngest female automotive designers currently in the industry. And quite possibly the most badass. I have a confession to make: it was a real treat to interview Darby beca
13min
Live Science

Entomologist Couple Donated $10M Bug Collection to University | VideoAmassed over 60 years of field work, the donation is considered one of the world’s largest and most important private insect collections.
15min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

No 'weekend admission effect' for the elderly sustaining broken hips in the NHSNHS patients admitted to hospital at the weekend with a hip fracture are at no greater risk of death compared to weekdays, new research has found.
21min
Ars Technica

A tour of iOS 10.3: Checking out APFS, the Settings app, and other tweaks Enlarge / An iPhone 5 running iOS 10. Version 10.3 is likely to be its last big update. (credit: Andrew Cunningham) Apple has just released iOS 10.3 to the general public, an update which is likely to be the last major release of iOS 10; at this point in the year, work usually begins in earnest on the next major release of iOS, which will be revealed at WWDC in June. The update is available for e
26min
New on MIT Technology Review

Elon Musk’s OpenAI Unveils a Simpler Way for Machines to LearnThe group says it has a more practical way to get software to learn tasks, such as steering robots, that require multiple actions.
26min
Big Think

The Internet of Things, Big Data & When a Nudge Becomes a Noodge Today the 24/7 nudge economy is emerging. The intense desire of nearly every organization to engage us as a client, patient, consumer, member or simple user, along with the technology to do so, may soon lead to nudge fatigue. Read More
27min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

For the birds: New prediction method sheds brighter light on flightResembling a feathered flying ace with his miniature protective goggles and chinstrap, the parrotlet named Obie stood ready to take off. On signal, Obie propelled into the air, flapped through a laser field infused with microparticles and landed on another perch three feet away.
28min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

More than hundred years of flooding and erosion in one eventSara Rathburn of Colorado State University and colleagues have developed an integrated sediment, wood, and organic carbon budget for North St. Vrain Creek in the semi-arid Colorado Front Range following an extreme flooding event in September of 2013. Erosion of more than 500,000 cubic meters, or up to ~115-years-worth of weathering products, occurred through landsliding and channel erosion during
28min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Timing a space laser with a NASA-style stopwatchTo time how long it takes a pulse of laser light to travel from space to Earth and back, you need a really good stopwatch—one that can measure within a fraction of a billionth of a second.
28min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pharmacy team develops online 'calculator' to predict risk of early hospital readmissionA new, novel web-based tool has been developed that predicts a patient’s 15-day readmission risk.
28min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Northern oceans used to pump carbon dioxide into the atmosphereNorwegian Sea acted as carbon dioxide source in the past. It pumped the greenhouse gas into the atmosphere instead of absorbing it, as it does today, report scientists.
28min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers create artificial materials atom-by-atomResearchers at Aalto University have manufactured artificial materials with engineered electronic properties. By moving individual atoms under their microscope, the scientists were able to create atomic lattices with a predetermined electrical response. The possibility to precisely arrange the atoms on a sample bring 'designer quantum materials' one step closer to reality. By arranging atoms in a
30min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Insight into cause of brain disorders may aid quest for treatmentsFresh discoveries about a range of neurological disorders may inform the development of new therapies.
30min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The economic case for wind and solar energy in AfricaTo meet skyrocketing demand for electricity, African countries may have to triple their energy output by 2030. While hydropower and fossil fuel power plants are favored approaches in some quarters, a new assessment by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has found that wind and solar can be economically and environmentally competitive options and can contribute significantly to the rising dem
30min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Renewable energy has robust future in much of AfricaAfrica's energy demand is expected to triple by 2030. A new Berkeley study shows that the continent's energy needs can be met with renewable power from wind and solar in a way that reduces reliance on undependable hydroelectric power and imported fossil fuels, while at the same time saving money and providing jobs. Good sites exist for solar and wind farms even if one avoids remote or environmenta
30min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mouse in the house tells tale of human settlementLong before the advent of agriculture, hunter-gatherers began putting down roots in the Middle East, building more permanent homes and altering the ecological balance in ways that allowed the common house mouse to flourish, new research in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences indicates. Findings suggest that the roots of animal domestication go back to human sedentism thousands of y
30min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new test to rapidly identify worldwide TB infectionsA group of scientists from Arizona, Texas and Washington, D.C., has teamed up to develop the first rapid blood test to diagnose and quantify the severity of active TB cases.Led by Tony Hu, a researcher at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute, eight research groups, including the Houston Methodist Research Institute and scientists at the National Institutes of Health, are harnessing the n
30min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Our aging scientific workforce raises concernsThe science and engineering workforce in the United States is aging rapidly, according to a new study. And it is only going to get older in coming years. Economists at The Ohio State University found that the average age of employed scientists increased from 45.1 to 48.6 between 1993 and 2010, faster than the workforce as a whole.
30min
NYT > Science

Essay: Hope Springs Early, but Not Eternal, for the Deadnettle — or for UsA naturalist in England found the early-blooming plant had moved up its schedule by nearly two months — a foreboding sign of a warming climate.
34min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA sees tiny Tropical Cyclone Caleb fadingTropical Cyclone Caleb is weakening in the Southern Indian Ocean and NASA's Aqua satellite caught one of the last bursts of strength as it passed overhead.
34min
Ars Technica

macOS 10.12.4 update brings Night Shift to the Mac and not much else Enlarge / The $1,499 MacBook Pro running macOS Sierra. Apple has just released macOS 10.12.4, the fourth major update for Sierra since the operating system was released last September. In addition to the typical bug fixes and security patches, the update brings over one minor feature from iOS: Night Shift, which can subtly change your screen's color from a cooler blue tone to warmer yellow tones
41min
New Scientist - News

Mice lived with us 15,000 years ago even before farming took offHouse mice began to associate with humans when the Natufian people started settling in the eastern Mediterranean, before the advent of farming
43min
Gizmodo

New Up-Close Image of Jupiter Is So Hypnotic It Hurts Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Roman Tkachenko NASA’s Juno spacecraft has consistently been coming through with the best close-up images of Jupiter we’ve ever seen. But a newly released, enhanced-color image of a large dark spot might be the most ethereal of all—its swirling, colorful clouds make it seem like a Jovian Van Gogh. This glorious image was captured with JunoCam on February 2nd at 8
43min
Latest Headlines | Science News

Palace remains in Mexico point to ancient rise of centralized powerAn ancient royal structure gets new life in southern Mexico.
44min
NYT > Science

Addiction Specialists Ponder a Potential Aid: PotSome clinicians think marijuana may help ease the transition out of addiction, while critics say substituting one drug for another is no solution.
46min
NYT > Science

Q&A: Recalling Early Childhood Memories, or NotRemembering events from no earlier than age 3½ or 4 is typical, studies have found. The phenomenon is known as childhood amnesia.
46min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Timing a space laser with a NASA-style stopwatchTo time how long it takes a pulse of laser light to travel from space to Earth and back, you need a really good stopwatch -- one that can measure within a fraction of a billionth of a second. That kind of timer is exactly what engineers have built at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, for the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2.
50min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Psychologists enlist machine learning to help diagnose depressionCognitive neuroscientists from The University of Texas at Austin are using the Stampede supercomputer to provide accurate predictions of risk for those with depression and anxiety.They have been able to classify individuals with major depressive disorder with roughly 75 percent accuracy using a machine learning approach. Stampede 2 --which will come online later in 2017 -- will provide the increas
51min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Renewable energy has robust future in much of Africa: studyAs Africa gears up for a tripling of electricity demand by 2030, a new Berkeley study maps out a viable strategy for developing wind and solar power while simultaneously reducing the continent's reliance on fossil fuels and lowering power plant construction costs.
52min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ancient mice teeth show settled villages made ecological impact long before agricultureLong before the advent of agriculture, hunter-gatherers began putting down roots in the Middle East, building more permanent homes and altering the ecological balance in ways that allowed the common house mouse to flourish, new research in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences indicates.
52min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Our aging scientific workforce raises concernsThe science and engineering workforce in the United States is aging rapidly, according to a new study. And it is only going to get older in coming years.
52min
WIRED

A Russian Volcano Just Erupted for the First Time in Centuries Kambalny, the southernmost volcano in Kamchatka, erupted unexpectedly over the weekend, sending ash up over the Pacific Ocean. The post A Russian Volcano Just Erupted for the First Time in Centuries appeared first on WIRED .
52min
Scientific American Content: Global

One Reason Young People Don't Go Into Science? We Don't Fail WellA single project failure drives many students to switch to other majors -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
52min
Gizmodo

Mice Have Been Mooching off Humans For an Astounding 15,000 Years Image: Wikimedia The common house mouse is one of the most recognizable creatures on the planet, yet we know surprisingly little about the origins of this crafty rodent. New research shows that house mice first entered human settlements far earlier than previously thought—but they had to fight a rival species to maintain their status as one of humanity’s most reviled pests. For decades, scientist
55min
Gizmodo

Somebody Tell Me What's Happening On The Walking Dead Because I'm Not Watching Image via AMC The last time I was emotionally invested in The Walking Dead , Negan, a straight-up terrorist, had just arrived, waving a barbed bat like a four-four. The show has since completely lost me. After the first two episodes this season, following six seasons of loyalty (half of it through binging), I finally up and quit. I am not alone in this world. As of March 12, the ratings—though st
55min
Ars Technica

Spinach leaf transforms into sheet of beating human heart cells Enlarge / In this sequence, a spinach leaf is stripped of its plant cells, a process called decellularization, using a detergent. The process leaves behind the leaf's vasculature. Researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) were able to culture beating human heart cells on such decelluralized leaves. (credit: Worcester Polytechnic Institute ) To create artificial tissue with functioning
56min
The Atlantic

How The Apprentice Manufactured Trump The first season of The Apprentice re-introduced Donald Trump to the world as an incredibly successful and intelligent businessman—it was a hit show in 2004 and boosted the Trump brand. The show was a major opportunity for producers to create his persona and sell his image to America. How did they pull this off? And what does it mean for Donald Trump to be a reality TV president?
57min
The Atlantic

Why Saturday Night Live Is Actually Going Live In its 42 seasons, Saturday Night Live has been hosted by politicians and world leaders, has spun off countless films and television shows, and has served as America’s flagship sketch-comedy series. There’s one thing it hasn’t done, though—aired live for the entire country. For all these years, SNL has been live at 11:30 p.m. Eastern and 10:30 p.m. Central Time, then showed on tape delay for view
57min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Emotion: An important link to HIV prevention in black adolescents with mental illnessesCould unique psychological factors that hamper emotional regulation help explain differences in HIV/STI risk-related sexual behaviors among heterosexually active black youth with mental illnesses?
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

More than 100 years of flooding and erosion in one eventResearchers have developed an integrated sediment, wood, and organic carbon budget for North St. Vrain Creek in the semi-arid Colorado Front Range following an extreme flooding event in September of 2013. Erosion of more than 500,000 cubic meters, or up to ~115-years-worth of weathering products, occurred through landsliding and channel erosion during this event.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Using Latin to analyse other languagesA researcher has figured out why Latin still turned up in many documents in the 17th to 19th centuries, even though it had not been a spoken language for a long time. During that period, Latin served as an instrument for translating languages that had hitherto been little known in Western culture.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research addresses the threat of Zika virus to the US blood supplyInvestigators have shown that certain screening methods that detect the genetic material of Zika virus can be used to ensure that donated blood supplies remain free of the virus.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

For the birds: New prediction method sheds brighter light on flightSponsored by the Office of Naval Research, researchers at Stanford University found a new way to precisely measure the vortices -- circular patterns of rotating air -- created by birds' wings during flight. The results shed greater light on how these creatures produce enough lift to fly.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers show p300 protein may suppress leukemia in MDS patientsScientists at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine have shown that p300, a protein that increases gene expression by attaching acetyl molecules to DNA, may stop myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) from developing into acute myeloid leukemia (AML).
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Saint Louis University researchers predict Zika hot spots in the USResearchers predicted the places in the continental US where Zika is most likely to be transmitted are along the Mississippi delta and southern states extending northward along the Atlantic coast and in southern California.
1h
Live Science

Massive Gold Coin Worth Millions Was Stolen From German MuseumThe "Big Maple Leaf" coin was produced by the Royal Canadian Mint in 2007 and could be worth millions of dollars.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Friction shapes zebrafish embryosThe biochemical signals that give an embryo its shape have been studied extensively. The role of mechanical forces on the other hand is the subject of a new study. Here the researchers show that friction between moving tissues generates force. This force shapes the nervous system of the zebrafish embryo.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New rice strain could help farmers predetermine harvest timeA new strain of rice that flowers within a certain period of time after being sprayed with commercial chemicals commonly used to protect rice from fungal diseases is now available, say scientists. This new strain could one day allow rice farmers to dictate the timing of their harvest regardless of weather, temperature and other conditions that currently affect cultivation.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Children with poor vitamin B12 status early in life struggle more with tasks, recognition and interpreting feelingsSmall children with low levels of vitamin B12 had more difficulties solving cognitive tests, such as the ability to do puzzles, recognize letters and interpret other children’s feelings.
1h
The Atlantic

What’s Next for the Keystone XL Pipeline Because that which has never lived cannot really die, the Keystone XL—the grinding, symbolic climate-change fight of the Obama era—has returned. On Friday morning, President Trump formally approved the pipeline , completing a process that he began a few days into his presidency. In the United States, the pipeline as planned will stretch hundreds of miles—from Nebraska to Texas—and allow oil from
1h
Gizmodo

Discord Has a Child Porn Problem Image: Discord logo In February, Gizmodo reported that many Discord users were facing abuse and were given no clear recourse. Among the issues endemic to the voice- and text-chat platform was the anonymous and unsolicited dissemination of child pornography, a problem which seems to have only gotten worse. Though there has been no official statement on the service’s blog or Twitter account , a num
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cells grow more naturally in 'spaghetti'The usual way of cultivating cells is to use a flat laboratory dish of glass. However, inside a human body, the cells do not grow on a flat surface, but rather in three dimensions. This has lead researchers to develop a porous “spaghetti” of tissue-friendly polymers with cavities in which the cells can develop in a more natural way.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Alzheimer's disease: On the hunt for the biomarker signal for early detectionAround 100,000 Austrians suffer from Alzheimer's disease and 16,000 from Parkinson's. Experts estimate that, in view of the ageing population, these numbers are set to triple over the next 30 years. Both Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases are progressive degenerative diseases of the brain, which start up to 30 years before the onset of symptoms. Early diagnosis would be a huge help in combating
1h
Ars Technica

Apple releases watchOS 3.2 with new Theater Mode and SiriKit Enlarge (credit: Andrew Cunningham) The latest update for the Apple Watch is now available. Apple is pushing out watchOS 3.2 today to bring two key features to its smartwatch: Theater Mode and SiriKit. This is the second addition since Apple released the huge watchOS 3 update back in September 2016. Theater Mode has been talked about a lot as Apple released betas of watchOS 3.2 over the past few
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Timing a space laser with a NASA-style stopwatchTo time how long it takes a pulse of laser light to travel from space to Earth and back, you need a really good stopwatch -- one that can measure within a fraction of a billionth of a second.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Requirements for AEDs in US schools need improvementAutomated external defibrillators are associated with increased survival of sudden cardiac arrest when installed in schools, yet only 17 out of 50 US states require AED installation in at least some of their schools, according to an analysis published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
1h
Ars Technica

Samsung’s Note 7 recycling plan includes reselling the device in some countries Greenpeace protests Samsung at MWC 2017. Samsung has announced a recycling plan for the Galaxy Note 7, which includes the possibility of the device hitting the market again as a refurbished product. The Note 7 was famously recalled shortly after launch due to faulty, potentially explosive batteries. After the recall, Samsung was left with an estimated 4.3 million Note 7s taking up space in a ware
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Implementing large-scale teleretinal diabetic retinopathy screening programCan a large-scale, primary care-based teleretinal diabetic retinopathy screening (TDRS) program reduce wait times for screening and improve the timeliness of care in the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services, the largest publicly operated county safety net health care system in the United States?
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

NASA spacecraft investigate clues in radiation beltsNASA's Van Allen Probes uncover new phenomena in our near-Earth environment with their unique double orbit. Recently, the spacecraft were in just the right place, at just the right time, to catch an event caused by the fallout of a geomagnetic storm as it happened.
1h
Gizmodo

You Can Download Night Shift For MacOS For Free Right Now Image: AP You no longer have to worry about your laptop’s bright screen disrupting your sleep schedule. Apple just released Night Shift —a feature that reduces blue light from the display in the evening—on the newest version of macOS Sierra (10.12.4). The update has been in testing since January 24, but only developers have been able to download it. Now, the update is available for everyone to us
1h
Viden

Discountkæde satser på GMO-fri mælk til kunderneForbrugerne efterspørger GMO-fri fødevarer, forklarer Aldi. Men ifølge forsker siger mærkningen ikke forbrugeren noget.
1h
Futurity.org

Grains on Titan would cling to a spacecraft ‘like packing peanuts’ Particles that cover the surface of Titan, Saturn’s largest moon, are electrically charged and can get clingy—much like packing peanuts cling to things on Earth. When the wind blows hard enough (approximately 15 mph), the granules get kicked up and start to hop in a motion referred to as saltation. As they collide, they become frictionally charged, like a balloon rubbing against your hair, and cl
1h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Will Heavy D Pony Up To Keep His Beloved BroDozer? | Diesel Brothers #DieselBrothers | Mondays at 10/9c on Discovery The BroDozer is up for sale for $99,000, but Heavy D is hesitant about losing one of his favorite builds. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/diesel-brothers/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery More Diesel! http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/diesel-brothers/ Join us on Facebook: https://www.
1h
Science | The Guardian

Weaponise! ​The meaning of 2017’s political buzzwordSex, the NHS, Brexit, loose tal​k – all have been ​described as ​‘weaponised’​. But what is the effect on the public when ​language is constantly on a war footing? In our embattled age, it seems everything can be turned into a weapon. The Scottish Tory leader, Ruth Davidson, has frequently accused Nicola Sturgeon of “weaponising Brexit” to break up the union. Donald Trump’s “loose talk about Musli
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The electric sands of TitanExperiments suggest the particles that cover the surface of Saturn's moon, Titan, are 'electrically charged.' When the wind blows hard enough, Titan's non-silicate granules get kicked up and start to hop in a motion. As they collide, they become frictionally charged, like a balloon rubbing against your hair, and clump together in a way not observed for sand dune grains on Earth -- they become resi
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Stars born in winds from supermassive black holesObservations using ESO's Very Large Telescope have revealed stars forming within powerful outflows of material blasted out from supermassive black holes at the cores of galaxies. These are the first confirmed observations of stars forming in this kind of extreme environment. The discovery has many consequences for understanding galaxy properties and evolution.
2h
Popular Science

Three ways to safely drink found water Gadgets Water is vital. Giardia infection is ... not. Found water is filled with dirt, debris, and critters that could make you sick—even kill you. Still, there are ways to make even a mud puddle potable. Read on.
2h
Gizmodo

Days After London Terror Attack, the UK Government Is Already Going After WhatsApp's Encryption UK Home Secretary Amber Rudd. (Image: Getty) After the horrifying terror attack in London last week, the familiar debate over government access to encrypted communications has reared its head again. This time, Britain’s home secretary Amber Rudd—who deals with security, terrorism, and policing, among other things— pointed the finger of blame at companies that make encrypted communications possibl
2h
Gizmodo

What's Your Favorite Everyday Backpack? Tycho Atsama/ Unsplash Plenty of people, myself included, prefer the versatility and ergonomics of backpacks to single-shoulder messenger bags when it comes to lugging laptops and other gear from A to B, so this week, we’re looking to find the best. Check out the rules below, cinch up your straps, and head down to the comments to nominate your favorite. 1) Your nomination should contain the speci
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cookbooks give readers (mostly) bad advice on food safetyA recent study finds bestselling cookbooks offer readers little useful advice about reducing food-safety risks, and much of the advice they do provide is inaccurate and not based on sound science.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

World Water Day: Fog and dew keep Africa's Namib Desert ecosystem goingThe ocean is not the sole source of the fog that sustains life for numerous plants and animals living in Africa's coastal Namib Desert. The fog also comes from groundwater and other sources, report ecohydrologists supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and affiliated with Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI).
2h
Gizmodo

Amazon's Automated Grocery Store Works Great as Long as Nobody Runs or Moves Stuff Around Image: Amazon / Gizmodo Believe it or not, Amazon is having a little bit of trouble with its “super futuristic store with no employees” idea. The latest report out of Seattle claims that the Amazon Go concept is being delayed due to some technical struggles. Basically, the computers get really confused when people shop. Honestly, the idea of an intelligent grocery store that lets you “just walk o
2h
Live Science

NASA Uses AI to Detect and Snap Images of Volcanic EruptionsA satellite headed for retirement autonomously captured photos of a volcano erupting.
2h
Live Science

Spinach Leaf Transformed into Beating Heart Tissue | VideoScientists transformed a simple spinach leaf into human heart cells that can beat and carry blood.
2h
Live Science

Mummy of Ancient Egyptian Nobleman Discovered Along Nile RiverA 3,800-year-old tomb holding the mummy of Shemai, the younger brother of a powerful governor, has been discovered along the Nile River in Egypt.
2h
New on MIT Technology Review

The FBI’s Facial Recognition Program Is Sprawling and InaccurateAround half of all adult Americans are on the agency’s image database, and its software is incorrect 15 percent of the time.
2h
Ars Technica

Uncovered iPad bomb plot blamed for electronics ban on some flights (credit: Travis Olbrich ) The US-UK ban on electronic devices larger than a mobile phone for some flights from Africa and the Middle East stems, in part, from the discovery of a terror plot to use an iPad to blow up an airliner. The Guardian , citing an anonymous "security source," said Monday that the uncovered plot involved explosives hidden in a fake iPad "that appeared to be as good as the re
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists discover new class of anti-diabetes compounds that reduce liver glucose productionA team of scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School and the Yale University School of Medicine, among others, have identified a new class of compounds that reduce production of glucose in the liver.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A little nudge may provide a big boost to flu vaccination ratesCurrently, only 44 percent of adults in the United States receive an annual flu vaccination. But, a new study suggests that a simple behavioral economics technique may be able to help. In the study, researchers programmed electronic health records (EHR) to alert care providers when a patient was eligible, and prompt them to choose to 'accept' or 'decline' a flu vaccination order. Results showed a
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Minority colorectal cancer patients report higher burden of poor quality-of-lifeA study of racial disparities in health-related quality of life of colorectal cancer patients revealed among several findings, that Hispanics and blacks had a higher burden of poor health-related quality-of-life (HR-QoL) than white patients and that poor HR-QoL resulted in shorter median survival. Yet Hispanics had an average survival time of 85.4 months as compared to blacks at 47.8 months and wh
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA sees tiny Tropical Cyclone Caleb fadingTropical Cyclone Caleb is weakening in the Southern Indian Ocean and NASA's Aqua satellite caught one of the last bursts of strength as it passed overhead.
2h
Popular Science

How to choose safe passwords—and remember them too DIY Cyber security 101 Your online passwords are your first line of defense against hackers, so it pays to make sure you're well-protected. Here's how to go about it.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists discover mechanism that causes cancer cells to self-destructA new study reveals the role of three proteins in killing fast-duplicating cancer cells while they're dividing. The research finds that these proteins can be specifically modified to unleash an inherent 'death mechanism' that self-eradicates duplicating cancer cells.
2h
Gizmodo

Here's the First Look at Hollywood's New Version of Tomb Raider Heroine Lara Croft Photo by Graham Bartholomew The upcoming Tomb Raider movie is due out next March. This film’s iteration of Lara Croft is a dead ringer for her video game counterpart. Photo by Graham Bartholomew Images of lead star Alicia Vikander have debuted in an interview in GQ , showing the actress all bandaged up and holding a pick-ax and a bow, with a quiver slung over her shoulder. When Tomb Raider 2013 c
2h
Big Think

Virtual Reality and Psychedelics are Opening New Pathways to Treating Mental Health Disorders Virtual reality and psychedelics are paving new paths for treating mental health. Read More
2h
The Atlantic

The Closing of the Republican Mind on For-Profit Colleges In Congress, on the presidential campaign trail, and in the editorial pages of The Wall Street Journal , Republicans have been unified in the belief that the Obama administration badly overreached in its attempts to regulate for-profit career colleges that leave graduates unable to pay off student debt with income from the jobs for which they were trained. Rolling back the Obama administration’s
2h
The Atlantic

Turning to Baby Registries to Subsidize Parental Leave In the U.S., the challenge of financially preparing for a child is exacerbated by the the lack of a federally mandated paid maternity leave. The U.S. remains the only developed country without such a policy . And while some states have implemented paid leave funded by state insurance, and more companies are making such policies a priority for their most competitive talent, generous paid-leave ben
2h
The Atlantic

Breitbart's Fight to Prove It’s a Legitimate News Outlet Breitbart News ’s quest to obtain permanent congressional press credentials is forcing the secretive company to disclose more information about its operations, staff, and its links to White House chief strategist Steve Bannon. The U.S. Senate Daily Press Gallery’s standing committee of correspondents is so far still refusing to grant a permanent press pass to the outlet, which was led by Bannon a
2h
Popular Science

Living with a lynx—for science Entertainment Book Excerpt: Inner Life of Cats He had an idea for how to observe an animal in the wild with greater precision and intimacy than had ever been done before. Read on.
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Popular Science

AI and deep learning can now help you be more popular on Twitter Technology Post Intelligence is a project by two ex-Google execs to help you know what and when to Tweet. Post Intelligence is a sort of training wheels for tweeting.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why are primates big-brained? Researchers' answer is food for thoughtBrain size in primates is predicted by diet, an analysis by a team of anthropologists indicates. These results call into question “the social brain hypothesis,” which has posited that humans and other primates are big-brained due to factors pertaining to sociality.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Drug development: Subtle steric differences reveal a model for Ni cross-coupling successResearchers have developed a predictive model may enable challenging metal-catalyzed cross couplings reactions that are indispensable to drug development.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cancer therapy: Tracking real-time proton induced radiation chemistry in waterProton therapy is a promising form of radiation treatment used to kill cancerous cells and effectively halt their rapid reproduction, and the fundamental understanding for it is contained in the radiation induced water chemistry that occurs immediately after the interaction. The ensuing processes are therefore a subject of considerable scientific interest.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Farming becoming riskier under climate changeClimate change is predicted to impact agriculture, but a new study puts these changes in terms that are directly applicable to farmers. For Illinois, the corn planting window will be split in two to avoid wet conditions in April and May. Each planting window carries increased risk -- the early planting window could be thwarted by frost or heavy precipitation, and the late window cut short by inten
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ant-plant symbioses: Adapting to changes in partner abundanceMany ant species live in often highly specific symbiotic relationships with plants from which both partners benefit. Researchers now reveal that such selective interactions can break down over the course of evolution.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Transgenic plants against malariaScientists have discovered a gene that allows to double the production of artemisinin in the Artemisia annua plant. The artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is the standard treatment for malaria worldwide. The new article presents an important step towards reducing artemisinin production costs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

France's classic 2CV car gets special edition—in woodA wooden replica of Citroen's iconic "2CV", crafted by a French cabinetmaker using a mix of lumbers including apple, pear and cherry, is ready to hit the road.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How do some opioids cause severe itching?With a more accurate understanding of the characteristics and function of the receptor MRGRPX2, University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers were also able to create chemical probe that will allow them study the receptor more precisely.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

More than 100 years of flooding and erosion in 1 eventSara Rathburn of Colorado State University and colleagues have developed an integrated sediment, wood, and organic carbon budget for North St. Vrain Creek in the semi-arid Colorado Front Range following an extreme flooding event in September of 2013. Erosion of more than 500,000 cubic meters, or up to ~115-years-worth of weathering products, occurred through landsliding and channel erosion during
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Futurity.org

Snow protects tree roots as they ‘pump’ silica Among ecologists, carbon gets all the glory. Humble silicon, or “silica,” as it’s called when combined with oxygen, doesn’t get the same attention. If ecologists (or biologists or biogeochemists) think of silica at all, they regard it as a bit player, a ho-hum component of rocks and sand. “Silica gets no love,” says Wally Fulweiler, associate professor of earth and environment, and biology at Bos
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Live Science

Reel Threat: How Recreational Fishing Endangers Freshwater TurtlesSwallowed fishhooks are a deadly and unexplored threat to freshwater turtles, and a new study is the first to estimate the impact of fishhook deaths on turtle populations.
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Ars Technica

Uber quickly resumes self-driving tests despite weekend traffic crash [Updated] Enlarge / Uber is hitting the big red "Stop" button after a crash in Tempe, Ariz., left one of its self-driving Volvos beached on its side. (credit: ANGELO MERENDINO/AFP/Getty Images) Update (3/27, 12:55p ET): That didn't take very long— according to Engadget , Uber resumed autonomous testing on Monday morning. The company had previously told Reuters it would be suspending the program while Uber
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Scientific American Content: Global

Tracing a Gaze to Understand Language DelaysResearchers use eye-tracking software to peek inside a child's mind when words fail, reading eye patterns to understand language production and combat conditions such as specific language impairment. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cell biology: The quickest route to the tip for protein transportAccording to a new theoretical model, in cell protrusions and cargo-transporting motor proteins often get in each other's way. The upshot is that freely diffusing proteins reach the leading edge faster.
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Ars Technica

Millimeter telescope array spots early galaxies in “super halos” of gas Enlarge / Artist's impression of a progenitor of galaxies like the Milky Way, seen when the Universe was only 1.5 billion years old. New observations reveal that these galaxies are surrounded by massive halos of hydrogen gas. (credit: A. Angelich (NRAO/AUI/NSF)) The early Universe can be studied by looking at light coming from distant galaxies. The farther away the galaxy is, the longer its light
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The Atlantic

Collecting DNA from Sex Workers to One Day Identify Their Bodies Sara Katsanis, a bioethicist at Duke University, studies the complications that arise when DNA databases are used to combat crime, especially human trafficking. If a child is kidnapped and illegally placed into adoption, for example, DNA is a reliable constant for identification. From this work, she is familiar with the ethical questions that come up when a victim is asked to give up their DNA to
3h
The Atlantic

Anti-Corruption Protests Across Russia On March 26, 2017, thousands of Russians rallied across the country to protest government corruption, in one of the largest opposition demonstrations in years. Demonstrators defied bans by authorities and were arrested by the hundreds. Alexei Navalny, a prominent critic of Russia’s President Putin and Prime Minister Medvedev, called for the protests after posting reports accusing Medvedev of cont
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate-addled jet streams boost drought, flood: studyGlobal warming amplifies severe droughts and floods by disrupting jet streams, the powerful high-altitude air currents that move west-to-east across the northern hemisphere, researchers said Monday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Manufacturer: Drones should transmit identifier for securityThe world's largest manufacturer of civilian drones is proposing that the craft continually transmit identification information to help government security agencies and law enforcement figure out which might belong to rogue operators.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uber suspends self-driving car program in 2 statesUber says its self-driving cars remains suspended in Arizona and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, following a crash over the weekend.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Basic microbiology research study unexpectedly uncovers practical findings for growersCover cropping, or the practice of growing unharvested crops to protect and enrich the soil during off-season periods, is a promising approach to reducing some of the negative environmental impacts of production agriculture.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Debbie approaching Queensland for landfallNASA's Aqua satellite passed over the storm early on March 27, 2017 as Tropical Cyclone Debbie had intensified into a powerful hurricane already affecting the coast of eastern Queensland, Australia.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Planetary waves, first found on Earth, are discovered on sunThe same kind of large-scale planetary waves that meander through the atmosphere high above Earth's surface may also exist on the sun, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Improving memory with magnetsThe ability to remember sounds, and manipulate them in our minds, is incredibly important to our daily lives -- without it we would not be able to understand a sentence, or do simple arithmetic. New research is shedding light on how sound memory works, and is even demonstrating a means to improve it.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Language learning: 'Say it fast, fluent and flawless'A researcher explores the different functions of prefabricated phrases in young learners' oral language production. These phrases provided learners with an instrument to overcome their lack of knowledge, to improve their fluency, and to enjoy some language play.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

People who watch entertainment TV are more likely to vote for populist politiciansPeople exposed to entertainment television are more likely to vote for populist politicians according to a new study. The researchers investigated the political impact of entertainment television in Italy over the last 30 years during the phased introduction of Silvio Berlusconi's commercial TV network Mediaset.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Are tree nut allergies diagnosed too often?About 50 percent of those who thought they were allergic to all tree nuts were able to pass an oral food challenge without a reaction, new research shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Children, youth born in Canada at higher risk of unintentional gun injury than immigrantsChildren and youth born in Canada are at higher risk of unintentional injury from guns compared with immigrant children and youth, although certain subgroups of immigrants and refugees are at higher risk of assault-related injury, found a new study.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Debbie approaching Queensland for landfallNASA's Aqua satellite passed over the storm early on March 27, 2017 as Tropical Cyclone Debbie had intensified into a powerful hurricane already affecting the coast of eastern Queensland, Australia.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain activity can be used to predict reading success up to 2 years in advanceBy measuring brainwaves, it is possible to predict what a child's reading level will be years in advance, according to research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Basic microbiology research study unexpectedly uncovers practical findings for growersSeveral USDA-ARS researchers initially set out to describe the microbiology of rye cover crop roots and how they changed over time in a field setting. Among the many microorganisms detected, they found several poorly understood oomycetes, microorganisms often responsible for plant diseases. Because these organisms were also able to cause corn seedling disease, what they unexpectedly discovered was
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Conflict between the sexes maintains diversity in brain hormonesMen are from Mars and women are from Venus? Whiles this stereotype is extreme and controversial, gender differences in behavior nonetheless are common in nature. Much variation in animal, including human, behavior is regulated by expression of hormones and their receptors in brains.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Children prenatally exposed to alcohol more likely to have academic difficultiesDespite greater awareness of the dangers of prenatal exposure to alcohol, the rates of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders remain alarmingly high. This study evaluated academic achievement among children known to be prenatally exposed to maternal heavy alcohol consumption as compared to their peers without such exposure, and explored the brain regions that may underlie academic performance.
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The Atlantic

The Soul of Big Little Lies Is in Its Music The latest Big Little Lies episode begins like a lot of Big Little Lies scenes do: with an Apple device being used to cue up a song. This time, the song is the Temptations’ “Papa Was a Rolling Stone,” and the occasion is an impromptu living-room party of gradeschoolers and parents. Viewers see Ziggy Chapman (Iain Armitage) and Chloe MacKenzie (Darby Camp) grooving around while Chloe’s parents Mad
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Gizmodo

Intel Claims Its Magical New Memory Will Speed Your Computer Up for Cheap All images: Intel For a decade now, one of the biggest factors in choosing a computer has been the choice between traditional hard drive and solid state drive. The former is cheap, bulky, and slow. The latter is expensive, light, and fast. There has been zero middle ground. You’ve had to compromise between price and speed. But Intel’s hoping to eradicate that compromise with its new Intel Optane
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Gizmodo

For Some Reason, Samsung Might Sell Refurbished Versions of Its Exploding Phones Image: Reddit.com/ Crushader The Galaxy Note 7 is a huge black mark for Samsung—an exploding embarrassment that cost the company tons of money and kicked off one of the biggest PR nightmares in recent memory. But despite the global recall , the jokes on late night TV, and the fact that the FAA and other agencies banned the phone from air travel , Samsung might sell refurbished Galaxy Note 7s in t
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Gizmodo

You Love Trucks. Do You Love People? Photo: AP Donald Trump loves trucks , I guess. Also, the trucking industry is poised to be decimated by technological change. Here we have an opportunity. There is no better example of an industry teetering on the precipice of destruction than truck driving. Trucks themselves will be fine; it’s just the jobs that will go away. There are about 3.5 million professional truck drivers in America. All
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physicists settle controversy over identical particle entanglement(Phys.org)—In a new study, physicists have shown a way to establish real entanglement between two identical particles—a topic that has been disputed until now. The results provide a better understanding of the fundamental nature of entanglement between identical particles and have potential applications in quantum information processing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study finds social media course impacts online behavior in first-year medical studentsResearchers at the George Washington University (GW) School of Medicine and Health Sciences found a majority of first-year medical students changed their online behavior after participating in a social media and professionalism course. The study results show that a formal education on responsible social media use is beneficial to medical students as they develop professional habits that are inclus
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Ars Technica

Four years later, Xbox exec admits how Microsoft screwed up disc resale plan (credit: Orin Zebest / Flickr ) We're now approaching the four-year anniversary of Microsoft's rollout (and subsequent reversal ) of a controversial plan to let game publishers limit resale of used, disc-based games. Looking back on that time recently, Microsoft Corporate Vice President for Windows and Devices Yusuf Mehdi acknowledged how that rollout fell flat and discussed how hard it was for t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Graphene-based neural probes probe brain activity in high resolutionMeasuring brain activity with precision is essential to developing further understanding of diseases such as epilepsy and disorders that affect brain function and motor control. Neural probes with high spatial resolution are needed for both recording and stimulating specific functional areas of the brain. Now, researchers from the Graphene Flagship have developed a new device for recording brain a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Self-assembly technique could lead to long-awaited, simple method for making smaller microchip patternsFor the last few decades, microchip manufacturers have been on a quest to find ways to make the patterns of wires and components in their microchips ever smaller, in order to fit more of them onto a single chip and thus continue the relentless progress toward faster and more powerful computers. That progress has become more difficult recently, as manufacturing processes bump up against fundamental
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

GW study finds social media course impacts online behavior in first-year medical studentsResearchers at the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences found a majority of first-year medical students changed their online behavior after participating in a social media and professionalism course, with results published in the Teaching and Learning in Medicine journal.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Paid medical malpractice claims decreaseResearchers report that the overall rate of claims paid on behalf of all physicians dropped by 55.7 percent. Pediatricians had the largest decline, at 75.8 percent, and cardiologists had the smallest, at 13.5 percent. After adjusting for inflation, researchers found that the amount of the payment increased by 23.3 percent and was also dependent on specialty. Neurosurgery had the highest mean payme
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Graphene-based neural probes probe brain activity in high resolutionGraphene-based transistors enable a flexible neural probe with excellent signal-to-noise ratio. Such probes are useful for examining neural activity for understanding diseases, as well as in neuroprosthetics for control of artificial limbs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Health problems may increase as young people infected with HIV at birth get olderA Massachusetts General Hospital study has found that US youth infected with HIV around the time of their birth are at higher risk throughout their adolescence and young adulthood for experiencing serious health problems, poor control of the HIV virus or death.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Emotion: An important link to HIV prevention in Black adolescents with mental illnessesCould unique psychological factors that hamper emotional regulation help explain differences in HIV/STI risk-related sexual behaviors among heterosexually active black youth with mental illnesses?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A big leap toward tinier linesA new interface control technique for block co-polymer self-assembly developed at MIT could provide long-sought method for making even tinier patterns on microchips with lines just 9 nanometers wide.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

MicroRNA treatment restores nerve insulation, limb function in mice with MSScientists partially re-insulated ravaged nerves in mouse models of multiple sclerosis (MS) and restored limb mobility by treating the animals with a small non-coding RNA called a microRNA. In a study published online March 27 in Developmental Cell, researchers report that treatment with a microRNA called miR-219 restarted production of a substance called myelin that is critical to normal function
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Ars Technica

Feds: Brooklyn prosecutor forged judges’ signatures to wiretap lover Enlarge / Old-school wiretapping gear A former county prosecutor in New York was indicted Monday on federal charges of illegally wiretapping two phones. Tara Lenich is set to be arraigned before a federal magistrate on Monday afternoon in Brooklyn. Lenich first faced state charges last fall when she was accused of orchestrating the surveillance of an unnamed male police detective and one of Lenic
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The Atlantic

The Ever-Deepening Mystery of Devin Nunes Updated on March 27 at 12:55 p.m. As House Intelligence Committee chairman, Representative Devin Nunes’s job is to oversee American spycraft. But Nunes’s own actions over the last few days suggest more the cloak-and-dagger actions of a would-be John Le Carré character than those of a sober government investigator. Amid accusations from Democrats on the panel that Nunes is acting as a surrogate fo
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Live Science

Fishhooks Threaten Freshwater Turtles | VideoA new study takes a first look at how animal deaths caused by swallowed fishhooks affect freshwater turtle populations.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why are primates big-brained? Researchers' answer is food for thoughtBrain size in primates is predicted by diet, an analysis by a team of New York University anthropologists indicates. These results call into question "the social brain hypothesis," which has posited that humans and other primates are big-brained due to factors pertaining to sociality.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Planetary waves, first found on Earth, are discovered on SunThe same kind of large-scale planetary waves that meander through the atmosphere high above Earth's surface may also exist on the Sun, according to a new study led by a scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR).
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Ars Technica

Intel’s first Optane SSD for regular PCs is a small but super-fast cache Intel Intel is positioning its new Optane technology as the next big advancement in computer storage after SSDs, and today it's announcing the first consumer product based on the technology. The "Intel Optane Memory" drives are 16GB and 32GB M.2 sticks that can be paired with a larger SSD or HDD to speed up total system performance. Intel's Rapid Storage Technology allows your PC to see the two d
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Gizmodo

Shoppers Fly Down Staircase After 150-Foot Escalator Is Thrown Into Reverse Image: Wikicommons Are you afraid of escalators? Would you like to be? Just watch this CCTV footage of an escalator malfunction at the Langham Place mall in Hong Kong. When the 15-level shopping center was packed with people on Saturday, a 150-foot-tall escalator abruptly changed directions , sending bodies hurdling towards the lower level at twice the machine’s normal speed. The accident injured
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA spacecraft investigate clues in radiation beltsHigh above Earth, two giant rings of energetic particles trapped by the planet's magnetic field create a dynamic and harsh environment that holds many mysteries—and can affect spacecraft traveling around Earth. NASA's Van Allen Probes act as space detectives, to help study the complex particle interactions that occur in these rings, known as the Van Allen radiation belts. Recently, the spacecraft
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Farming becoming riskier under climate changeScientists the world over are working to predict how climate change will affect our planet. It is an extremely complex puzzle with many moving parts, but a few patterns have been consistent, including the prediction that farming as we know it will become more difficult.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nanocages dramatically facilitate structure formation of biomoleculesMacromolecules regularly fold and unfold themselves inside cells. Their diverse three-dimensional structures help determine their functions. Understanding molecule folding can shed light on complex physical processes that may influence diseases, cancers and allergies.
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New Scientist - News

Exclusive: menopausal women become pregnant with their own eggsTwo women thought to be infertile seem to have had their fertility restored using a technique to rejuvenate their ovaries, and one is now six months pregnant
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New Scientist - News

Putting bigger brains down to our social nature is half-bakedNew work on primates bolsters the idea that diet – rather than social complexity – was key to evolution of our big brains, says chimp expert Richard Wrangham
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Friction shapes zebrafish embryosA simple ball of cells is the starting point for humans—and zebrafish. At the end of embryonic development, however, a fish and a human look very different. The biochemical signals at play have been studied extensively. How mechanical forces on the other hand shape the embryo is the subject of a study by Carl-Philipp Heisenberg, Professor at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Aus
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The Atlantic

The Mysterious Origin of Our Galaxy’s Gold Across history and folklore, the question of where Earth’s gold came from—and maybe how to get more of it—has invited fantastical explanation. The Inca believed gold fell from the sky as either the tears or the sweat of the sun god Inti. Aristotle held that gold was hardened water, transformed when the sun’s rays penetrated deep underground. Isaac Newton transcribed a recipe for making it with a
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The Atlantic

The Search for Standing Merely because of her proximity to the White House, Ivanka Trump is engaged in unfair business practices. This, at least, is the accusation Modern Appealing Clothing is lodging against the elder first daughter in a recently filed lawsuit . The San Francisco-based clothing retailer alleges that Ivanka’s company has an unfair advantage over its competition due to the apparent use of her father’s po
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Popular Science

Electrically charged sands on Titan would make seriously sturdy sandcastles Space No water required Magic? No, you’re just on Saturn’s moon Titan, where the seas are filled with hydrocarbons and the sand is electrically charged. Read on.
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Gizmodo

New Spider-Man: Homecoming Footage Teases a Major Change to the Spidey Suit When Civil War chose to lay the groundwork for Spider-Man’s costume at the feet of Tony Stark rather than Peter Parker, we all knew it meant there was going to be some techy-upgrades to the classic Spidey Spandex. But new footage from Homecoming gives Peter a new trick up his... well, not-sleeve that’s straight out of the Iron Man playbook. Released ahead of a new trailer coming tomorrow, the sho
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Gizmodo

Today's Best Deals: $4 Phone Cases, Bed Frames, Battery Backups, and More $4 phone cases , an APC battery backup , and attractive wooden bed frames lead off Monday’s best deals. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Ringke $4 Phone Cases If your current phone case has seen better days, you can slip on a new one from Ringke for $4 today . There are too many to list here, but head over to this post for all of the options and p
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Ars Technica

House could vote tomorrow to let ISPs sell your Web browsing history Enlarge / US House of Representatives on October 29, 2015. (credit: Getty Images | Chip Somodevilla ) The US House of Representatives could vote tomorrow on whether to eliminate privacy rules that would have forced ISPs to get your consent before selling Web browsing history and app usage history to advertisers. The Senate voted to kill the rules on Thursday , so all that's left are decisions by
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NYT > Science

Take a Number: A 7.4 Quake in Southern California? A Long Fault Could Make It LikelierThe Newport-Inglewood/Rose Canyon fault, extending from San Diego to Los Angeles, could rupture along its entire length, scientists have found.
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Scientific American Content: Global

California Forges Ahead with Clean Cars RulesThe move sets up a clash with the EPA -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica

Doxed by Microsoft’s Docs.com: Users unwittingly shared sensitive docs publicly Enlarge On March 25, security researcher Kevin Beaumont discovered something very unfortunate on Docs.com , Microsoft's free document-sharing site tied to the company's Office 365 service: its homepage had a search bar. That in itself would not have been a problem if Office 2016 and Office 365 users were aware that the documents they were posting were being shared publicly. Unfortunately, hundred
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New on MIT Technology Review

Next Up for Amazon’s Mall Takeover: Furniture and Home AppliancesThe e-tailer’s bricks-and-mortar vision is starting to resemble its digital approach—try everything once, because you can always shut it down.
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Live Science

There Are at Least 79 Obesity 'Syndromes'When it comes to obesity, there's more than meets the eye: A new review of studies from Canada suggests that obesity comes in at least 79 different forms that are linked to people's genes, and many are very rare.
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New Scientist - News

Diabetes drug could be the first to reverse the diseaseRising obesity is leading to a boom in type 2 diabetes. A drug that reverses the condition in obese mice could make it much easier to control the disease
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Science | The Guardian

Fruit foraging in primates may be key to large brain evolution Findings support view that big brains have evolved from diet rather than long-held theory it is due to social interaction Foraging for fruit may have driven the evolution of large brains in primates, according to research attempting to unpick the mystery of our cerebral heftiness. The finding appears to be a blow to a long-held theory that humans and other primates evolved big brains largely as a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA spacecraft investigate clues in radiation beltsNASA's Van Allen Probes uncover new phenomena in our near-Earth environment with their unique double orbit. Recently, the spacecraft were in just the right place, at just the right time, to catch an event caused by the fallout of a geomagnetic storm as it happened.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rocks that tell our industrial historyResearchers in the UPV/EHU's Department of Analytical Chemistry have published a study in which they analyze beachrocks, cemented sand formations that have industrial waste, produced as a result of metallurgical activities, trapped inside them. These strange rocks bear witness to the impact of industrial development and its influence on the coastal environment.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Protein transport: The quickest route to the tipAccording to a theoretical model developed by physicists of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich, in cell protrusions, cargo-transporting motor proteins often get in each other's way. The upshot is that freely diffusing proteins reach the leading edge faster.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ant-plant symbioses: Adapting to changes in partner abundanceMany ant species live in often highly specific symbiotic relationships with plants from which both partners benefit. Researchers of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich now reveal that such selective interactions can break down over the course of evolution.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Farming becoming riskier under climate changeClimate change is predicted to impact agriculture, but a new study puts these changes in terms that are directly applicable to farmers. For Illinois, the corn planting window will be split in two to avoid wet conditions in April and May. Each planting window carries increased risk -- the early planting window could be thwarted by frost or heavy precipitation, and the late window cut short by inten
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New genetic risk factors identify 2 distinct glioma subtypesAn international consortium of researchers led by Dr. Melissa Bondy, professor of medicine at Baylor College of Medicine, has conducted the largest study to date of malignant brain tumors looking for genetic markers of glioma, a highly aggressive form of brain cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The electric sands of TitanExperiments suggest the particles that cover the surface of Saturn's moon, Titan, are 'electrically charged.' When the wind blows hard enough, Titan's non-silicate granules get kicked up and start to hop in a motion. As they collide, they become frictionally charged, like a balloon rubbing against your hair, and clump together in a way not observed for sand dune grains on Earth -- they become resi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How randomness helps cancer cells thriveIn a research effort that merged genetics, physics and information theory, a team at the Schools of Medicine and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University has added significantly to evidence that large regions of the human genome have built-in variability in reversible epigenetic modifications made to their DNA.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study provides path for new immunotherapy approaches to prostate cancerProstate cancer, notoriously resistant to immunotherapy due to its immunologically cool nature, triggers two pathways to chill an immune attack after one immunotherapy drug fires up the immune system, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report in Nature Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Enzyme structures illuminate mechanism behind bacteria's bioremediation prowessIn a publication in the journal Nature released today (March 27, 2017), scientists from the Department of Biochemistry and Department of Chemistry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have solved the structure of an enzyme caught in the act of attacking toluene -- a chemical derived from wood and oil.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New tool allows analysis of single-cell RNA data in pre-malignant tumoursWellcome Trust Sanger Institute scientists and their collaborators have developed a new analysis tool that showed, for the first time, which genes were expressed by individual cells in different genetic versions of a benign blood cancer. Reported in Nature Methods today, the new computer tool -- Single Cell Consensus Clustering -- was shown to be more accurate and robust than existing methods of a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Largest ever brain cancer study reveals new secrets to inherited riskScientists have uncovered a treasure trove of information about the genetic causes of brain cancer in the largest ever study of the disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stars born in winds from supermassive black holesObservations using ESO's Very Large Telescope have revealed stars forming within powerful outflows of material blasted out from supermassive black holes at the cores of galaxies. These are the first confirmed observations of stars forming in this kind of extreme environment. The discovery has many consequences for understanding galaxy properties and evolution. The results are published in the jour
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New rice strain could help farmers predetermine harvest timeA new strain of rice that flowers within a certain period of time after being sprayed with commercial chemicals commonly used to protect rice from fungal diseases is now available, say Japanese scientists. This new strain could one day allow rice farmers to dictate the timing of their harvest regardless of weather, temperature and other conditions that currently affect cultivation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Analysis of antibiotics, appendectomy for uncomplicated appendicitis in kidsAn analysis of several studies including 404 pediatric patients suggests antibiotic treatment for acute uncomplicated appendicitis was safe and effective in the majority of patients but the risk that antibiotic treatment would fail increased in patients with appendicolith, a calcified deposit in the appendix, according to a new article published online by JAMA Pediatrics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Medicinal food' diet counters onset of type 1 diabetesMonash University's Biomedicine Discovery Institute researchers have led an international study that found -- for the first time -- that a diet yielding high amounts of the short-chain fatty acids acetate and butyrate provided a beneficial effect on the immune system and protected against type 1 or juvenile diabetes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gastric medications increase risk for recurrence of Clostridium difficile infectionResearchers at Mayo Clinic have found patients who use gastric suppression medications are at a higher risk for recurrent Clostridium difficile (C-diff) infection. C-diff is a bacterium that can cause symptoms ranging from diarrhea to life-threatening inflammation of the colon. The study is published in JAMA Internal Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Friction shapes zebrafish embryosThe biochemical signals that give an embryo its shape have been studied extensively. The role of mechanical forces on the other hand is the subject of a study by Carl-Philipp Heisenberg, Professor at IST Austria, and his group, including first author and postdoc Michael Smutny. In their study, published today in Nature Cell Biology, the researchers show that friction between moving tissues generat
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Implementing large-scale teleretinal diabetic retinopathy screening programCan a large-scale, primary care-based teleretinal diabetic retinopathy screening (TDRS) program reduce wait times for screening and improve the timeliness of care in the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services, the largest publicly operated county safety net health care system in the United States?
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Major genetic study identifies 12 new genetic variants for ovarian cancerA genetic trawl through the DNA of almost 100,000 people, including 17,000 patients with the most common type of ovarian cancer, has identified 12 new genetic variants that increase risk of developing the disease and confirmed the association of 18 of the previously published variants.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why are primates big-brained? NYU researchers' answer is food for thoughtBrain size in primates is predicted by diet, an analysis by a team of NYU anthropologists indicates. These results call into question 'the social brain hypothesis,' which has posited that humans and other primates are big-brained due to factors pertaining to sociality.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nanocages dramatically facilitate structure formation of biomoleculesNano-size space help faster folding of molecules and stabilize the structure, which regulates enzyme reactions.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Planetary waves, first found on Earth, are discovered on sunThe same kind of large-scale planetary waves that meander through the atmosphere high above Earth's surface may also exist on the sun, according to a new study led by a scientist at NCAR.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Planet-sized 'waves' spotted in the Sun's atmosphere Long-sought features may help researchers to improve models of solar activity and predict space weather. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21704
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Popular Science

How to turn a spinach leaf into a human heart Science Step one: detergent Spinach could be good for your heart in more ways than one—bioengineers have figured out how to turn a leaf into a beating bit of human heart.
4h
Ars Technica

Critical thinking is one for the history books Bigfoot cares for its young. (credit: Katy Kristin ) The world as a whole has become increasingly reliant on science to provide its technology and inform its policy. But rampant conspiracy theories, fake news, and pseudoscience like homeopathy show that the world could use a bit more of the organized skepticism that provides the foundation of science. For that reason, it has often been suggested
4h
TEDTalks (video)

A young inventor's plan to recycle Styrofoam | Ashton CoferFrom packing peanuts to disposable coffee cups, each year the US alone produces some two billion pounds of Styrofoam -- none of which can be recycled. Frustrated by this waste of resources and landfill space, Ashton Cofer and his science fair teammates developed a heating treatment to break down used Styrofoam into something useful. Check out their original design, which won the Scientific America
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Gizmodo

The Most NSFW Site For Streaming Every Star Wars Movie Is Pornhub All images: Screenshot via Pornhub As far as accidental comedy goes, few things beat watching a PG-rated Disney film on a site with the ads for penis enlargement guides and “Tinder for MILFs.” And while I didn’t specifically seek out Pornhub or 2014's animated adventure Big Hero 6 today, both came into view thanks to the Reddit community r/FullMoviesOnPornhub. The subreddit’s name is a clear nod
4h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Testing for 'defectives'After years of protest, the University of Melbourne has removed the name of a controversial figure.
4h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Cardboard cribsWhat evidence is there that Finland's famous baby boxes actually reduce infant mortality rates?
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Futurity.org

Brain scan may predict best depression treatment Specific patterns of activity on brain scans may help clinicians identify whether psychotherapy or antidepressant medication is more likely to help a patient recover from depression. For a new study, researchers randomly assigned patients to 12 weeks of treatment with one of two antidepressant medications or with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). At the start of the study, patients underwent a
4h
WIRED

Scientists Hack a Human Cell and Reprogram It Like a Computer By hijacking the DNA of a human cell, they showed it's possible to program it like a simple computer. The post Scientists Hack a Human Cell and Reprogram It Like a Computer appeared first on WIRED .
4h
New Scientist - News

Electrified sand could explain Titan’s odd backward-facing dunesSaturn’s largest moon is similar to Earth in many ways – but its dunes face the wrong direction. It could be because static electricity has greater clout there
4h
The Atlantic

Black Holes Caught in the Act of Cosmic Creation In the universe, the places with the most extreme, destructive conditions can sometimes spawn something new. A group of European astronomers have spotted new stars flaring to life inside the cosmic wind blasts expelled by a supermassive black hole. The black hole sits at the center of two merging galaxies 600 million light-years away, according to a study published Monday in Nature . The astronom
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Carnegie Mellon's CyLab challenges high school students to give hacking a tryCarnegie Mellon University aims to build a talent pipeline into the cyber workforce by introducing computer security skills to middle and high school students through picoCTF, a free, online hacking contest that starts March 31, 2017. Now in its third year, the virtual game of capture the flag (CTF) has previously drawn nearly 30,000 people.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The first crowdfunded study in Japan: Micro X-ray observation of a fleshy brittle starNot only have scientists from Japan performed the first non-destructive morphological observations on the Fleshy brittle star, Asteronyx loveni, using micro X-ray tomography, but they also published their research as the first study supported via crowdfunding in the Asian country.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tracking real-time proton induced radiation chemistry in waterProton therapy is a promising form of radiation treatment used to kill cancerous cells and effectively halt their rapid reproduction. While this treatment can also be delivered in different modalities (i.e. electrons and X-rays), proton therapy limits damage to healthy tissue by depositing energy in a highly localized dose volume.
4h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Planet Nine: Astronomers want help from amateur stargazersAn Australian university has asked amateur stargazers to help find a possible ninth planet.
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Science | The Guardian

High fibre diet 'could prevent type 1 diabetes' Animal trials hint that short-chain fatty acids produced by a fibre-rich diet could protect against early-onset diabetes Scientists have raised hope for the prevention of early-onset diabetes in children after a fibre-rich diet was found to protect animals from the disease. More than 20 million people worldwide are affected by juvenile, or type 1, diabetes, which takes hold when the immune system
4h
Viden

Lamme styrer robotarm med ganebøjle og tungepiercingTungestyring hedder teknologien, som giver Bente Fey, der er lam fra halsen og ned, håb om en mere selvstændig hverdag.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New rice strain could help farmers predetermine harvest timeA new strain of rice that flowers within a certain period of time after being sprayed with commercial chemicals commonly used to protect rice from fungal diseases is now available, say Japanese scientists. This new strain could one day allow rice farmers to dictate the timing of their harvest regardless of weather, temperature and other conditions that currently affect cultivation.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stars born in winds from supermassive black holesObservations using ESO's Very Large Telescope have revealed stars forming within powerful outflows of material blasted out from supermassive black holes at the cores of galaxies. These are the first confirmed observations of stars forming in this kind of extreme environment. The discovery has many consequences for understanding galaxy properties and evolution. The results are published in the jour
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Enzyme structures illuminate mechanism behind bacteria's bioremediation prowessBacteria, like humans and animals, must eat. Sometimes, they consume a pollutant in the environment that humans want to get rid of, a process called bioremediation. Investigating the enzymes used by bacteria to carry out that process is important for scientists to understand and possibly improve on these powerful reactions. However, until now, having a snapshot of one of these important enzymes in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The electric sands of Titan: The grains that cover Saturn's moon act like clingy packing peanutsExperiments led by researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology suggest the particles that cover the surface of Saturn's largest moon, Titan, are "electrically charged." When the wind blows hard enough (approximately 15 mph), Titan's non-silicate granules get kicked up and start to hop in a motion referred to as saltation. As they collide, they become frictionally charged, like a balloon rub
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

High burden of iodine deficiency found in Israel's first national surveyThe first national iodine survey conducted in Israel has revealed a high burden of iodine deficiency among Israelis, posing a high risk of maternal and fetal hypothyroidism and impaired neurological development of the fetus in Israel. Addressing iodine deficiency will require government funding and legislation, and a government-regulated program of salt or food iodization, say scientists.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tracking real-time proton induced radiation chemistry in waterProton therapy is a promising form of radiation treatment used to kill cancerous cells and effectively halt their rapid reproduction, and the fundamental understanding for it is contained in the radiation induced water chemistry that occurs immediately after the interaction. The ensuing processes are therefore a subject of considerable scientific interest. Researchers describe their work exploring
4h
Gizmodo

Groundbreaking Sun Observation Could Help Us Prepare for Massive Solar Storms Image: Scott McIntosh Space weather forecasting—predicting the kind of energetic particles the Sun will throw at us—is years behind weather forecsting here on Earth. As solar physicist Scott McIntosh put it, “Our current model of space weather forecasting is, ‘oh shit a sunspot happened eight minutes ago, now we have to figure out what’s going to happen.” It’s a shame we’re not better at predicti
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Ingeniøren

Ny rapport anbefaler: Begræns ekstern censur til en enkelt eksamenBåde DI og talsmanden for de 2.800 ingeniørcensorer frygter, at det vil forringe uddannelserne og betyde, at universiteterne lukker sig om sig selv, hvis uddannelses- og forskningsminister Søren Pind lytter til anbefalingerne fra regeringens censorudvalg.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wall lizard becomes accustomed to humans and stops hidingHabituating to predators or fleeing and hiding are tactics that vary between species. Scientists have observed that adult male common wall lizards sharing their living spaces with humans become accustomed to them and hide less when humans approach them. Yellow lizards were the most 'daring.'
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Unique wheat passes the testA unique, patented wheat can have significant importance to agriculture, the environment and undernourished people in developing countries. Animal tests recently demonstrated that this special wheat increases P and Ca digestibility.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Liver fully recovers from a low protein dietDamage caused to the liver by a low protein diet can be repaired, according to new research.
4h
The Atlantic

Is Trump Still Tweeting From His Unsecured Android Phone? There are two personalities on display in Donald Trump’s Twitter feed . One Trump generally spells things correctly, tweets flattering news stories, and politely thanks visitors for meeting with him. The other Trump is easily provoked, capitalizes random words, and lashes out in real time at things that annoy him. These two genres of tweets generally come from two different devices—an Android pho
4h
The Atlantic

The Marine Photo Scandal and the Cost of Indifference Early this month, news broke on a military website called the War Horse that nude photos of women service members had been posted on a closed Facebook group called Marines United. In the days that followed, the Marine Corps announced that the Naval Criminal Investigation Service was launching an investigation. The Marine Corps leadership addressed the issue in a video and in Capitol Hill testimon
4h
New Scientist - News

Why breaking encryption is a bad idea that could never workUK home secretary Amber Rudd says WhatsApp’s end-to-end encryption is "completely unacceptable" – but breaking encryption would be unhelpful and unworkable
5h
Popular Science

Popular foods that grow in somewhat startling ways Science You think you know, but you have no idea As less and less of us farm, few of us actually know what our food looks like when it's grown. Here's a gallery of some of our favorites.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Of Star Trek, Mark Twain and helmets: 15 new species of wasps with curious namesA total of fifteen new species of parasitic wasps have been described from across the Neotropical region. Apart from belonging to a peculiar group of wasps distinct with large and elongated bodies, the new insects also draw attention with the curious names they have been formally assigned with.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rare genetic forms of obesity more numerous, diverse than previously thoughtIn their search of seven databases and analysis of 161 papers, researchers found that 79 obesity syndromes have been previously reported. Of the 79 syndromes, 19 have been genetically solved, to the point where a lab test could confirm a doctor's suspicions. Another 11 have been partially clarified, and 27 have been mapped to a chromosomal region. For the remaining 22 syndromes, neither the gene(s
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Travelling-wave ion mobility mass spectrometry elucidates structures of gold fingersDrugs containing gold have been used for centuries to treat conditions like rheumatoid arthritis. In addition, they might be effective against cancer and HIV. One mechanism by which they work could occur because gold ions force the zinc ions out of zinc fingers -- looped, nucleic acid binding protein domains. American researchers have characterized such 'gold fingers' using ion mobility mass spect
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Is personal adversity contributing to political polarization?Unexpected life events can lead to political polarization, pushing moderates toward the spectrum's extremes, according to a new study co-authored by a University at Buffalo psychologist.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Of Star Trek, Mark Twain and helmets: 15 new species of wasps with curious namesFifteen new species of parasitic wasps have been described from the Neotropics. Apart from being quite distinct with their large and elongated bodies, the new insects also draw attention with their curious formal names. Among them, there are species named after characters from Star Trek and Mark Twain's The Prince and the Pauper, and five wasps bearing names translating to 'helmet' in three differ
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Improving memory with magnetsThe ability to remember sounds, and manipulate them in our minds, is incredibly important to our daily lives -- without it we would not be able to understand a sentence, or do simple arithmetic. New research is shedding light on how sound memory works, and is even demonstrating a means to improve it.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The first crowdfunded study in Japan: Micro X-ray observation of a fleshy brittle starNot only have scientists from Japan performed the first non-destructive morphological observations on the fleshy brittle star, Asteronyx loveni, using micro X-ray tomography, but they also published their research as the first study supported by crowdfunding in the Asian country. The team leader Dr. Masanori Okanishi, Ibaraki University, managed to raise part of the funds via Japan's pioneering cr
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New collaboration looks for trans-Atlantic common ground in geriatricsTop research journals launch international editorial series tackling the latest in geriatrics clinical practice & public policy. Up first: commonalities 'across the pond' for older adults with multimorbidity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Australia's Jurassic Park' the world's most diverseAn unprecedented 21 different types of dinosaur tracks have been identified on a 25-kilometer stretch of the Dampier Peninsula coastline dubbed 'Australia's Jurassic Park.' A team of paleontologists has unveiled the most diverse assemblage of dinosaur tracks in the world in 127 to 140 million-year-old rocks in the remote Kimberley region of Western Australia.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists overcome inaccessibility of caves through molecular genetic approachAn international group of scientists has used a novel highly sensitive method for detection of environmental DNA in groundwater to extend the poorly known range of the rare subterranean amphibian from the Dinaric Karst. With this highly sensitive non-invasive method they discovered 12 new localities of the olm (Proteus anguinus).
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Transport of molecular motors into ciliaMolecular motors produce the force that powers the beat of sperm cell tails to generate movement toward the egg cell for fertilization. New research now shows how the molecular motors that power the movement of sperm cells are recognized and specifically transported into the tail region of the cell. This knowledge can pave the way for a better understanding of disease causing mutations causing ste
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Color change test to help cancer research advanceA simple color changing test to help scientists investigate potential cancer drugs has been developed, allowing research to progress at a much greater speed than has been possible until now.
5h
New on MIT Technology Review

Uber’s Woes Show the Difficulty of Commercializing AIThe recent departure of key research figures is a troubling development for a company with grand ambitions for self-driving cars.
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Science | The Guardian

Are Devon’s road-wrecking badgers a match for the German cows who blew up a barn?Badger tunnels under a road in Braunton have been blamed for a road collapsing. They’ve got some work to do before they belong in this rogue’s gallery of chaos-causing creatures We are destroying their homes and their kin so it was, perhaps, only a matter of time before the animals started fighting back. Until evolution gives them opposable thumbs, they have to use whatever nature has equipped the
5h
Gizmodo

io9 Another Familiar Star Wars Vehicle Is Being Updated For The Last Jedi | Kotaku The Hell Just Hap io9 Another Familiar Star Wars Vehicle Is Being Updated For The Last Jedi | Kotaku The Hell Just Happened On Dragon Ball Super With Bulma’s Baby?! | Jalopnik Have You Bought A Ford Lately? Sources Say Probably No | Lifehacker How I Stop Jet Lag From Ruining My Travels |
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Gizmodo

A Super Slow Mo Rocket Launch Reveals a Spectacular Fireworks Show As fun as building your own six-foot model rocket might be, launching it is no where near as impressive as watching one of NASA’s towering rockets blast into orbit—unless you point a high-speed camera at it. At 28,000 frames per second, a wonderful pyrotechnics show is revealed as it leaves the launch pad. The Slow Mo Guys used a Phantom V2511 high-speed camera to record the explosive launch, and
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hydrogen production: This is how green algae assemble their enzymesResearchers have analyzed how green algae manufacture complex components of a hydrogen-producing enzyme. The enzyme, known as the hydrogenase, may be relevant for the biotechnological production of hydrogen.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genetics reveal mysteries of hard-to-treat bacterial infection in cystic fibrosisNew research on bacteria that cause major problems for those with cystic fibrosis reveals clues as to how it proliferates for so long in the lungs and offers new ideas for treatments to explore.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nitrogen foraging ability of plants relies on mobile shoot-root hormone signalResearchers have discovered the molecular mechanisms underlying the shoot-to-root stage of nitrogen-demand signaling in plants. The team found that genes encoding CEPD polypeptides are switched on in the shoots in response to nitrogen starvation in the roots. These polypeptides then descend into the roots, and activate a nitrate transporter gene only if sufficient nitrate is available in the surro
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Unique wheat passes the testA unique, patented wheat can have significant importance to agriculture, the environment and undernourished people in developing countries. Animal tests recently demonstrated that this special wheat increases P and Ca digestibility.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Litter is present throughout the world's oceans: 1,220 species affectedWhere is marine litter concentrated, and which species and ecosystems does it affect? Researchers at the Alfred Wegener Institute have for the first time compiled all scientific data published on marine litter in a single, comprehensive database, now accessible from the online portal AWI Litterbase. Here, both the distribution of litter and its interactions with organisms are presented in global m
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Subtle steric differences reveal a model for Ni cross-coupling successA new strategy for ligand design may enable challenging metal-catalyzed cross couplings reactions that are indispensable to drug development, according to a study published in Nature Chemistry. Based on subtle differences between ligand parameters, Princeton researchers have developed a predictive model for the success of a novel Ni-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction.
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Gizmodo

Four, Five, or Six Ports? Your Favorite USB Charging Hubs Are Back On Sale. Anker PowerPort+ 6 , $29 with code MULTI777 | PowerPort 5 , $17 with code BEST2124 | PowerPort 4 , $21 with code MULTI777 Our readers recently named Anker’s PowerPort line as their favorite USB charging hubs , and three different models are on sale for 20-30% off their usual prices today. Just pick your model below, and be sure to note the promo codes.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Subtle steric differences reveal a model for Ni cross-coupling successPrinceton researchers have developed a predictive model may enable challenging metal-catalyzed cross couplings reactions that are indispensable to drug development.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists discover mechanism that causes cancer cells to self-destructA new Tel Aviv University study discloses the role of three proteins in killing fast-duplicating cancer cells while they're dividing. The research finds that these proteins can be specifically modified to unleash an inherent 'death mechanism' that self-eradicates duplicating cancer cells.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hydrogen production: This is how green algae assemble their enzymesResearchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have analyzed how green algae manufacture complex components of a hydrogen-producing enzyme. The enzyme, known as the hydrogenase, may be relevant for the biotechnological production of hydrogen.
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Gizmodo

The Walking Dead's Biggest Problem Is Back Again All images: AMC On last night’s penultimate episode of season seven, our heroes completed their final step in trying to stop the bad guys who are forcing them to give up their stuff… by attacking another community and forcing them to give up their stuff. Yeah . Some people may feel that The Walking Dead ’s biggest problem is its occasional habit to waste copious amounts of time for obnoxiously la
5h
New on MIT Technology Review

A New Direction for Artificial Intelligence?OpenAI will describe a new machine-learning approach at MIT Technology Review ’s EmTech Digital conference.
5h
WIRED

The New Justice League Trailer Packs In Everything Wrong with DC’s Dark Movie Universe Who left the lights out? The post The New Justice League Trailer Packs In Everything Wrong with DC's Dark Movie Universe appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Stentors: The Tiny Giants That Ink Like Squid and Regenerate Like Wolverine The stentor is one of the strangest, most mysterious organisms on Earth, and it just might be swimming in a pond near you. The post Stentors: The Tiny Giants That Ink Like Squid and Regenerate Like Wolverine appeared first on WIRED .
5h
New Scientist - News

Changing clocks twice a year is bad for health and energy useAre you feeling tired today? Much of the UK got up an hour earlier this morning, a change that has been linked to heart attacks and strokes in some countries
5h
Gizmodo

Largest-Ever Dinosaur Footprint Found in Australia's Jurassic Park Image Courtesy of Steven Salisbury Nineties kids who’ve always wanted to visit Jurassic Park to meet Jeff Goldblum—and dinosaurs—are in for a treat: A team of paleontologists from the University of Queensland in Brisbane is claiming to have found the largest-ever dinosaur footprint in a region dubbed “Australia’s Jurassic Park.” While there hasn’t been a Jeff Goldblum sighting (yet), the research
5h
The Atlantic

How Right-Wing Media Saved Obamacare As the Republican Party struggled and then failed to repeal and replace Obamacare, pulling a wildly unpopular bill from the House without even taking a vote, a flurry of insightful articles helped the public understand what exactly just happened. Robert Draper explained the roles that Stephen Bannon, Paul Ryan, and others played in deciding what agenda items President Trump would pursue in what o
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The Atlantic

Sage, Ink: Moving On ...
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

High burden of Iodine deficiency found in Israel’s first national survey62% of school-age children and 85% of pregnant women in Israel have low iodine intakes, according to the country's first national iodine survey. Government funding and legislation, and a government-regulated program of salt or food iodization, are essential to reducing the deficiency, which poses a high risk of impaired neurological development.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Can robots write meaningful news?Robots and computers are replacing people everywhere; doctors, pilots, even journalists. Is this leading to a dystopian society, or could it be something positive?
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Futurity.org

Lego robot squirts liquids in DIY lab for kids A new set of liquid-handling robots—made from the Lego Mindstorms robotics kit and a cheap, easy-to-find syringe—can transfer precise amounts of fluids among flasks, test tubes, and experimental dishes. The robot approaches the performance of automation systems found at university at biotech labs. “We really want kids to learn by doing,” says Ingmar Riedel-Kruse, assistant professor of bioenginee
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Justices won't hear appeal in music copyright disputeThe Supreme Court won't hear an appeal from record companies that want to pursue copyright infringement claims against music site Vimeo for hosting unauthorized recordings from the Beatles, Elvis Presley and other classic artists.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How do we get young men in vocational schools to eat healthy?There are several challenges associated with getting young men in vocational schools to eat healthy. According to a new study from Aarhus University, the students overall dislike it when someone interferes with their dietary habits.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Do patients want complementary and alternative treatments and will they pay cash for them?While complementary, alternative, and integrative medicine treatments such as acupuncture and massage therapy are usually offered in outpatient settings, a new study has shown that the majority of hospitalized patients perceived such integrative services to be helpful.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Unique wheat passes the testA unique, patented wheat can have significant importance to agriculture, the environment and undernourished people in developing countries. Animal tests recently demonstrated that this special wheat increases P and Ca digestibility.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mobile gold fingersDrugs containing gold have been used for centuries to treat conditions like rheumatoid arthritis. In addition, they might be effective against cancer and HIV. One mechanism by which they work could occur because gold ions force the zinc ions out of zinc fingers -- looped, nucleic acid binding protein domains. American researchers have characterized such 'gold fingers' using ion mobility mass spect
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Liver fully recovers from a low protein dietDamage caused to the liver by a low protein diet can be repaired, a new study just published in the prestigious journal Nutrition has found.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers crack structure of key protein in Zika virusThe genomic replication of the Zika virus (ZIKV) is made possible by its 'NS5' protein. Scientists report that they have determined the crystal structure of the entire ZIKV NS5 protein and demonstrated that NS5 is functional when purified in vitro. Knowing the structure of ZIKV NS5 helps the researchers understand how ZIKV replicates itself. Further, the researchers identified the inhibitor-bindin
5h
Ingeniøren

Zoo gør klar til pandaer med anlæg til 150 millionerI 2018 flytter to pandaer fra Kina til Zoologisk Have i København. Nu kan du se tegningerne af det anlæg, der bliver pandaernes nye hjem.
5h
Ingeniøren

Britiske forskere kan masseproducere kunstigt blodOpdagelsen skal især hjælpe mennesker med meget sjældne blodtyper, som det kan være svært at skaffe donorblod nok til.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Transgenic plants against malariaScientists have discovered a gene that allows to double the production of artemisinin in the Artemisia annua plant.The artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is the standard treatment for malaria worldwide, endorsed by the World Health Organization (WHO).The paper, published in The Plant Journal, represents an important step towards reducing artemisinin production costs.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Transport of molecular motors into ciliaMolecular motors produce the force that powers the beat of sperm cell tails to generate movement toward the egg cell for fertilization. New research now shows how the molecular motors that power the movement of sperm cells are recognized and specifically transported into the tail region of the cell. This knowledge can pave the way for a better understanding of disease causing mutations causing ste
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New international banking rules would not prevent another financial crisisCurrent regulations aimed at reducing risk of crisis in the financial sector will not effectively reduce that risk, according to new research from the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), published in the Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control. Introducing regulations that aim to increase the system network resilience would be more effective, the study shows.
5h
Gizmodo

25,000 Residents Told to Evacuate as Massive Cyclone Threatens Australian Coast Image: Bureau of Meteorology/Australian Government Around 25,000 people living in north Queensland are being asked to flee as a powerful cyclone is set to make landfall. Tropical storm Debbie is expected to hit the coastline tomorrow with 170 mile-per-hour gusts and storm surges as high as eight feet. Debbie was upgraded to a Category 4 storm earlier today , and it’s intensifying quickly. The cyc
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wall lizard becomes accustomed to humans and stops hidingHabituating to predators or fleeing and hiding are tactics that vary between species. Scientists from two research centres in Italy and Spain have observed that adult male common wall lizards sharing their living spaces with humans become accustomed to them and hide less when humans approach them. Yellow lizards were the most "daring".
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rising flood insurance costs growing burden to communities and homeowners in New York CityFlood insurance is already difficult to afford for many homeowners in New York City, and the situation will only worsen as flood maps are revised to reflect current risk and if the federal government continues to move toward risk-based rates, according to a first-of-its-kind study by the RAND Corporation.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wall lizard becomes accustomed to humans and stops hidingHabituating to predators or fleeing and hiding are tactics that vary between species. Scientists from two research centers in Italy and Spain have observed that adult male common wall lizards sharing their living spaces with humans become accustomed to them and hide less when humans approach them. Yellow lizards were the most 'daring.'
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Unrestricted improvements in fishing technology threaten the future of seafoodA study conducted by ICTA-UAB (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona) researcher Eric Galbraith shows that future improvement of fishing technology poses a threat for the global fishery that could be greater than climate change. The results suggest that we may have recently passed the peak of global catch, but could potentially maintain present levels through improved regulation of fisheries.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The skin cancer screening paradigm: Reviewing current guidelines for detecting melanomaA new perspective piece brings together the opinions of over 50 leading experts in the skin cancer field to assess controversies in current melanoma screening guidelines, as well as provide their own data-derived recommendations.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rising flood insurance costs growing burden to communities and homeowners in New York CityFlood insurance is already difficult to afford for many homeowners in New York City, and the situation will only worsen as flood maps are revised to reflect current risk and if the federal government continues to move toward risk-based rates, according to a first-of-its-kind study by the RAND Corporation.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Color change test to help cancer research advanceA simple color changing test to help scientists investigate potential cancer drugs has been developed by University of Bath scientists, allowing research to progress at a much greater speed than has been possible until now.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cells grow more naturally in 'spaghetti'The usual way of cultivating cells is to use a flat laboratory dish of glass. However, inside a human body, the cells do not grow on a flat surface, but rather in three dimensions. This has lead researchers at Lund University in Sweden to develop a porous 'spaghetti' of tissue-friendly polymers with cavities in which the cells can develop in a more natural way.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Transgenic plants against malariaScientists have discovered a gene that allows to double the production of artemisinin in the Artemisia annua plant.The artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is the standard treatment for malaria worldwide, endorsed by the World Health Organization (WHO).The paper, published in The Plant Journal, represents an important step towards reducing artemisinin production costs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Proteomics helps to understand the influence of genetic variationsHow does type 2 diabetes develop? A team of researchers headed by the Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich has come closer to finding an answer to this problem. The team examined the functional effects of exemplary genetic variations relevant for type 2 diabetes. Their approach can be applied to many clinical pictures.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Transport of molecular motors into ciliaMolecular motors produce the force that powers the beat of sperm cell tails to generate movement toward the egg cell for fertilization. New research now shows how the molecular motors that power the movement of sperm cells are recognized and specifically transported into the tail region of the cell. This knowledge can pave the way for a better understanding of disease causing mutations causing ste
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Patent analysis highlights importance of bioactives of saffronIncreased stress levels, sleep disorders and obesity have become hallmarks of present lifestyle. These conditions are often correlated with serious health problems such as cancer, diabetes, cerebral ischemia, stroke, etc.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A novel hybrid UAV that may change the way people operate dronesHybrid UAVs with vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) capability as well as cruise flying capabilities have attracted the worldwide research interest. However, it is a great challenge to combine the two functionalities effectively into one single UAV, not to mention automating it. In 2016, the research group led by Professor Ben M. Chen from NUS have conquered the difficulty by designing a novel r
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Identifying genes key to human memory: Insights from genetics and cognitive neuroscienceResearchers have identified more than 100 genes important for memory in people. The study is among the first to identify correlations between gene data and brain activity during memory processing, providing a new window into human memory. It is part of the nascent but growing field of 'imaging genetics,' which aims to relate genetic variation to variation in brain anatomy and function.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Polar front’s oceanographic barrier is not as impermeable for bryozoans of the Southern Ocean as thoughtThe polar front, an oceanographic barrier between the Austral Ocean and its surrounding water masses, is not the impermeable biogeograpgical barrier it was thought to be, according to a new article.
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Ars Technica

New report: NASA spends 72 cents of every SLS dollar on overhead costs Enlarge / An artist's conception of an SLS launch. (credit: NASA) After President George W. Bush announced a plan to return to the Moon and move on to Mars in 2004, NASA began to consider how best to carry out that vision. Although there were some promising private-sector rockets even then, administrator Michael Griffin set the agency on the course of building its own rockets and spacecraft. Thos
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

MIT professor creates reality TV series of his daily life(Phys.org)—"What if the Kardashians were physicists?" asks César Hidalgo, an associate professor at MIT and director of the Collective Learning group at the MIT Media Lab.
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Futurity.org

Did a collision leave Earth with its iron anomaly? Scientists are challenging the prevailing theory that the unique nature of Earth’s iron was the result of how its core formed billions of years ago. Certain heavy forms of iron, known as isotopes, are higher on Earth than in other bodies in the solar system. A new study, published in Nature Communications , suggests that the iron’s isotopic signature developed later in Earth’s history, possibly c
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Ingeniøren

Se Zoos nye pandaanlægI 2018 flytter to kinesiske pandaer til Danmark. Se tegningerne af det nye pandaanlæg, som er udarbejdet i samarbejde mellem Zoologisk Have, BIG Architects og Schønherr Landskabsarkitekter.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Why Do We Cry?Oriana Aragón, an assistant professor of marketing at Clemson University, answers -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New international banking rules would not prevent another financial crisisThe Basel III regulatory framework, as planned, will not reduce systemic risk in the financial sector, according to new research. Instead, regulations should aim to increase the resilience of financial networks.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

No 'weekend admission effect' for the elderly sustaining broken hips in the NHSNew research has found NHS patients admitted to hospital at the weekend with a hip fracture are at no greater risk of death compared to weekdays.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nitrogen foraging ability of plants relies on mobile shoot-root hormone signalNagoya University researchers discovered the molecular mechanisms underlying the shoot-to-root stage of nitrogen-demand signaling in plants. The team found that genes encoding CEPD polypeptides are switched on in the shoots in response to nitrogen starvation in the roots. These polypeptides then descend into the roots, and activate a nitrate transporter gene only if sufficient nitrate is available
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NUS Pharmacy team develops 'calculator' to predict risk of early hospital readmissionA team of researchers from the National University of Singapore has developed a novel web-based tool that predicts a patient's 15-day readmission risk.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers warn of hazards of smoking and need for wider use of varenicline to quitMore than 35 million Americans are trying to quit smoking. Researchers reassure clinicians and their patients that varenicline, whose brand name is Chantix, is a safe and effective way to achieve smoking cessation and that failure to use this drug has caused preventable heart attacks and deaths from cardiovascular disease. Just a few months ago, the FDA removed the black box warning from varenicli
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rare genetic forms of obesity more numerous, diverse than previously thoughtIn their search of seven databases and analysis of 161 papers, Meyre and his colleagues found that 79 obesity syndromes have been previously reported. Of the 79 syndromes, 19 have been genetically solved, to the point where a lab test could confirm a doctor's suspicions. Another 11 have been partially clarified, and 27 have been mapped to a chromosomal region. For the remaining 22 syndromes, neith
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chinese scientists discovered tip induced unconventional superconductivity on Weyl semimetalsBy using hard point contact measurement on Weyl semimetal TaAs single crystal, Chinese scientists discovered tip induced unconventional superconductivity around contact region on TaAs, which may have nontrivial topology. The cover article of Science Bulletin 2017(6) issue reported this discovery.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

From the classroom to the NICU: Real-world neuroscience opening new avenuesWhen going to the movies with friends, one small action can make a big difference to be on the same page after the movie: eye contact. A simple conversation before the movie sets you up to be more in sync with your friends after the movie. These findings come from an unlikely place -- not the lab, or even a movie theater, but a classroom.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Extreme weather events linked to climate change impact on the jet streamUnprecedented summer warmth and flooding, forest fires, drought and torrential rain -- extreme weather events are occurring more and more often, but now an international team of climate scientists has found a connection between many extreme weather events and the impact climate change is having on the jet stream.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Playing to beat the blues: Video games viable treatment for depressionVideo games and 'brain training' applications are increasingly touted as an effective treatment for depression. A new study carries it a step further, though, finding that when the video game users were messaged reminders, they played the game more often and in some cases increased the time spent playing.
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Gizmodo

Another Familiar Star Wars Vehicle Is Being Updated For The Last Jedi James Gunn teases Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 's opening. Some potentially major supernatural weirdness is coming to Riverdale for season two. Get a better look at Thor’s new armor in Thor: Ragnarok . An acting legend joins The Punisher . Plus, a new clip from the Walking Dead ’s season finale. Spoilers now! Star Wars: The Last Jedi Making Star Wars has a new report discussing the First Order’
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Men with learning difficulties four times more likely to die of testicular cancerPeople with learning difficulties are 4 times more likely to die of testicular cancer than the general population. This is the first work relating cancer deaths to learning difficulties, with researchers now testing if this finding applies to all cancers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Concern over high US prescribing levels of common drug linked to dementiaA new analysis raises concern over high prescription rates in the USA of a common drug used to treat overactive bladder. The drug, oxybutynin, when taken orally, is consistently linked with cognitive impairment and dementia in the elderly. The analysis shows that oxybutynin, is prescribed in more than a quarter of cases of overactive bladder (27.3%), even though other more suitable drugs are avail
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WIRED

Beautiful Renderings Resurrect Frank Lloyd Wright’s Demolished Buildings Spanish architect David Romero is resurrecting Frank Lloyd Wright's lost buildings one hyper-realistic rendering at a time. The post Beautiful Renderings Resurrect Frank Lloyd Wright's Demolished Buildings appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

The Walking Dead Recap Season 7 Episode 15: Can People Just Start Fighting Already, Please? We know where this season is going—let's pump the brakes on all these mini-cliffhangers and just get to the catharsis. The post The Walking Dead Recap Season 7 Episode 15: Can People Just Start Fighting Already, Please? appeared first on WIRED .
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New Scientist - News

A nuclear ghost town in Japan welcomes back residents this weekNamie was evacuated in the aftermath of the meltdown at Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station – six years later, people are being encouraged to return
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Ars Technica

In Sylvio, anthropomorphic ape scenery stretches from six seconds to 80 minutes SXSW, a place where Joe Biden speaks and movies about Vine-star gorillas exist. Ars' Joe Mullin, Nathan Mattise, and Sam Machkovech share some highlights (film and otherwise). (video link) AUSTIN, Texas— South by Southwest 's film schedule refuses to hold your hand. While projects like Nobody Speaks ("the Gawker trial documentary") or Life (a modern sci-fi thriller, à la Alien ) have loglines tha
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Night-time urination reduced by cutting salt in dietThe need to pee at night (nocturia) – which affects most people over the age of 60 – is related to the amount of salt in your diet, according to new research presented at the European Society of Urology congress in London.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Does disturbed breathing while asleep make some people urinate more at night?A new study has found that reducing obstructive sleep apnea (where patients have difficulty in breathing while asleep -often associated with loud snoring) can reduce the need to get up and pee at night (nocturia). This study confirms the link between apnea and nocturia, and supports the idea that lifestyle management may contribute to reducing nocturia in certain cases. Nocturia affects more than
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists report genetic test to help predict men at most risk from aggressive prostate cancerScientists are reporting a test which can predict which patients are most at risk from aggressive prostate cancer, and whether they suffer an increased chance of treatment failure.
6h
New on MIT Technology Review

The Download, Mar 27, 2017: Uber’s Self-Driving Smash, FBI Facial Recognition, and a Geoengineering TestThe most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists overcome inaccessibility of caves through molecular genetic approachAn international group of scientists has used a novel highly sensitive method for detection of environmental DNA in groundwater to extend the poorly known range of the rare subterranean amphibian from the Dinaric Karst. With this highly sensitive non-invasive method they discovered 12 new localities of the olm (Proteus anguinus). Their findings were published on 27th March 2017 in the journal Scie
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Debbie form and strengthenThe tropical low pressure area previously known as System 91P has developed into a tropical cyclone named Debbie in the Southern Pacific Ocean and threatens eastern Queensland, Australia. NASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared look at the storm that revealed powerful thunderstorms quickly developed around the center. Debbie has already triggered warnings in Queensland.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronomers investigate the curious case of PDS 11 binary system(Phys.org)—A team of Indian astronomers has recently studied a peculiar binary system designated PDS 11, revealing new insights into the nature of its stars. The findings, presented Mar. 17 in a paper published on arXiv.org, allowed the researchers to reclassify PDS 11 as an old, dusty, wide binary classical T Tauri system in which both components are actively accreting.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genetics reveal mysteries of hard-to-treat bacterial infection in cystic fibrosisNew UBC research on bacteria that cause major problems for those with cystic fibrosis reveals clues as to how it proliferates for so long in the lungs and offers new ideas for treatments to explore.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists overcome inaccessibility of caves through molecular genetic approachAn international group of scientists has used a novel highly sensitive method for detection of environmental DNA in groundwater to extend the poorly known range of the rare subterranean amphibian from the Dinaric Karst. With this highly sensitive non-invasive method they discovered 12 new localities of the olm (Proteus anguinus). Their findings were published on March 27, 2017 in the journal Scien
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Australia's Jurassic Park' the world's most diverseAn unprecedented 21 different types of dinosaur tracks have been identified on a 25-kilometre stretch of the Dampier Peninsula coastline dubbed 'Australia's Jurassic Park.' A team of palaeontologists from The University of Queensland's School of Biological Sciences and James Cook University's School of Earth and Environmental Sciences have unveiled the most diverse assemblage of dinosaur tracks in
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Debbie form and strengthenThe tropical low pressure area previously known as System 91P has developed into a tropical cyclone named Debbie in the Southern Pacific Ocean and threatens eastern Queensland, Australia. NASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared look at the storm that revealed powerful thunderstorms quickly developed around the center. Debbie has already triggered warnings in Queensland.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Northern oceans pumped CO2 into the atmosphereThe Norwegian Sea acted as CO2 source in the past. It pumped the greenhouse gas into the atmosphere instead of absorbing it, as it does today.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Which drugs effectively treat diabetic nerve pain?A federal health agency has found certain antidepressants and anti-seizure drugs are among medications that effectively treat diabetic nerve pain. The research is being published simultaneously in the March 24, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) and in a more comprehensive report by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).
6h
Ars Technica

Fitbit Alta HR review: $150 for a true all-day, all-night fitness tracker Video shot/edited by Jennifer Hahn. (video link) Making an accurate wristband heart rate monitor, let alone one that's also comfortable and stylish, is challenging. Fitbit's latest attempt to strike that balance is the $150 Alta HR. A near mirror-image of the original Alta, the Alta HR is an updated model with slight design differences, improved sleep-tracking features, and a tiny optical heart-r
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Gizmodo

Fitbit Alta HR Is the Best Fitness Tracker for Normal People All Images: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo Let’s face it, the world of fitness trackers has plateaued . Most people who want a fitness tracker already have one, and more than a few of us have old trackers shoved away in a drawer, useless because the charging cable mysteriously disappeared, or because the company who made it decided it didn’t care anymore and killed the software (RIP Nike FuelBand ). For peop
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Gizmodo

Stay Connected During a Power Outage With This Deeply Discounted UPS APC Back-UPS 850 VA UPS Battery Backup , $73 This 850VA/450W APC UPS battery backup gives you a few options during a power outage: Power multiple PCs long enough to save your work and shut them down safely Run your router and modem for several hours to stay online Recharge your phones and tablets for days on end, if it’s a really bad outage So needless to say, people don’t think they need a UPS u
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Ingeniøren

Glem ikke dimittenderne i kampen om talenterne https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/glem-ikke-dimittenderne-kampen-talenterne-7213 Virksomhederne skal blive bedre til at gafle de studerende tidligt på studiet og lave karriereplaner for dem, så de kan se sig selv i virksomheden, mener konsulent Jobfinder
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Ingeniøren

Skandale ved renovering af det norske storting: Byggeteknisk udredning eksisterer slet ikkeOmbygningen og renoveringen af Stortinget i Oslo er et skandaleprojekt baseret på ‘en større byggeteknisk udredning’. Problemet er bare, at den aldrig har fundet sted.
6h
Scientific American Content: Global

Using Nature's Telescopes to Locate the Earliest GalaxiesWe don't know when they formed, but a phenomenon first proposed by Einstein could help us find out -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new report summarizes how climate change is affecting the water cycle in GermanyClimate change not only involves rising temperatures – it also causes changes in the hydrological balance. Precipitation, evaporation and groundwater formation will follow a new rhythm in future. The consequences of these changes for water levels, ecosystems and sectors that depend on water, like agriculture, are presented in a new report by researchers from the Climate Service Center Germany (GER
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Potential of stem cell therapy to repair lung damageA new study has found that stem cell therapy can reduce lung inflammation in an animal model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cystic fibrosis. Although, still at a pre-clinical stage, these findings have important potential implications for the future treatment of patients.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Stem cells shown to restore erection capability in men with erectile dysfunctionNew clinical trial results show that stem cells can restore sufficient erectile function to allow previously impotent men to have spontaneous intercourse. This is the first time stem cell therapy has produced patients who have recovered sufficient erectile function to enable intercourse. This is an early trial, which was primarily addressing safety and dosage (a Phase 1 trial), so the results need
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

4 in 10 men may not be receiving adequate prostate cancer treatment in EnglandAlmost 4 in 10 men with high-risk or locally advanced prostate cancer (prostate cancer that is likely to or that has already spread beyond the prostate) may be “undertreated” by the failure to use radiotherapy or in some circumstances surgery, according to new results. The most common form of under-treatment is the use of hormonal treatments alone without additional radiotherapy or surgery. This m
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bigger brains help social primates to make up after a fight, study saysSocial primates with bigger brains are likely to use their added cerebral power to cope with conflict, a study from The University of Manchester has revealed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Breakthrough in 'amphibian plague': Deadly fungus genes identifiedScientists have identified the genes of a deadly fungus that is decimating salamander and newt populations in Northern Europe.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New safety technology enables teamworkUntil now, heavy-duty robots have always been housed in separate work areas to safeguard factory employee safety. Researchers at Fraunhofer want to change that with an ingenious security concept and intelligent robot control. This technology will enable people and robots to collaborate as a team. The researchers will present this concept at the Hannover Messe from April 24-28 (Hall 17, Booth C18).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Is personal adversity contributing to political polarization?Unexpected life events ranging from illness to relationship stress can lead to political polarization, pushing moderates toward the spectrum's extremes, according to a recently published study that's breaking new ground on personally-experienced adversity and its effect on political attitudes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Evidence of giant tsunami on Mars suggests an early ocean(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with members from France, Italy and the U.S. has found what they believe is evidence of a giant tsunami occurring on Mars approximately 3 billion years ago due to an asteroid plunging into an ocean. In their paper published in the Journal of Geophysical Research, the group outlines the evidence and why they believe a tsunami is the most likely factor that led to th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flowing transition between design and simulationThe individualized mass production up to the individual item is a promise of the future delivered by Industrie 4.0. It can only be implemented if there are suitable test methods for the feasibility of individual designs. At the Hannover Messe 2017 from April 24 to 28, 2017, Fraunhofer researchers will present a simulation solution that automatically determines whether the customer's desired design
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The Atlantic

What Russia's Latest Protests Mean for Putin MOSCOW— It’s not a rare sight in this city to see tens of thousands of people pour into the streets to express their opposition to the government that makes its home here. Moscow was the epicenter of the massive pro-democracy protests of 2011-2012, and many others since, including rallies to commemorate slain opposition leader Boris Nemtsov. This is the city where Vladimir Putin lives, along with
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flexible working increases job satisfaction but it depends on how you arrange itResearch from Cass Business School and Cranfield School of Management has confirmed that flexible working can increase employee job satisfaction and organisational commitment.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Color change test to help cancer research advanceA simple colour changing test to help scientists investigate potential cancer drugs has been developed by University of Bath scientists, allowing research to progress at a much greater speed than has been possible until now.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Discovery that 'size matters' in cell-to-cell communication could unlock new methods for disease diagnosis and treatmentSize really does matter when it comes to the mechanisms that cells use to communicate with each other, according to pioneering new nanobiotechnology research which has important implications for the diagnosis and treatment of disease.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cells grow more naturally in 'spaghetti'The usual way of cultivating cells is to use a flat laboratory dish of glass. However, inside a human body, the cells do not grow on a flat surface, but rather in three dimensions. This has lead researchers at Lund University in Sweden to develop a porous "spaghetti" of tissue-friendly polymers with cavities in which the cells can develop in a more natural way.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nitrogen foraging ability of plants relies on mobile shoot–root hormone signalNagoya University researchers discovered the molecular mechanisms underlying the shoot-to-root stage of nitrogen-demand signaling in plants. The team found that genes encoding CEPD polypeptides are switched on in the shoots in response to nitrogen starvation in the roots. These polypeptides then descend into the roots, and activate a nitrate transporter gene only if sufficient nitrate is available
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How green algae assemble their enzymesResearchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have analysed how green algae manufacture complex components of a hydrogen-producing enzyme. The enzyme, known as the hydrogenase, may be relevant for the biotechnological production of hydrogen.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Adapting to changes in partner abundanceMany ant species live in often highly specific symbiotic relationships with plants from which both partners benefit. LMU researchers now reveal that such selective interactions can break down over the course of evolution.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Freely diffusing cellular proteins reach the leading edge fasterAccording to a theoretical model developed by LMU physicists, in cell protrusions, cargo-transporting motor proteins often get in each other's way. The upshot is that freely diffusing proteins reach the leading edge faster.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Unrestricted improvements in fishing technology threaten the future of seafoodA study conducted by ICTA-UAB (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona) researcher Eric Galbraith shows that future improvement of fishing technology poses a threat for the global fishery that could be greater than climate change. The results suggest that we may have recently passed the peak of global catch, but could potentially maintain present levels through improved regulation of fisheries.
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The Scientist RSS

White-Nose Syndrome Fungus Infects Bats in TexasThe pathogenic fungus that has decimated populations of bats throughout the eastern United States has surfaced in the state for the first time, although none of the bats appear diseased.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Seabed conditions key to survival of juvenile cod, haddock and whitingLinks between seabed type and quality are closely related to the abundance and size of young commercially fished species such as cod, haddock and whiting.
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Ingeniøren

Nordsøaftale: Politikere i jobrus - men tallet er det rene gætværkPolitikere landet over er begejstrede over de tusindvis af job, der vil følge med Nordsøaftalen. Men hverken Finansministeriet eller Mærsk vil give bud på antallet af nye arbejdspladser.
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The Scientist RSS

Canadian Researchers Disheartened Over Draft BudgetResearchers in the country speak out as a second version of Canada’s national budget retains freezes spending at key science funding councils.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Extreme weather events linked to climate change impact on the jet streamUnprecedented summer warmth and flooding, forest fires, drought and torrential rain—extreme weather events are occurring more and more often, but now an international team of climate scientists has found a connection between many extreme weather events and the impact climate change is having on the jet stream.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Development of image-analysis technology with AI for real-time identity detection and trackingHitachi, Ltd. today announced the development of a detection and tracking technology using artificial intelligence (AI) which can distinguish an individual in real-time using features from over 100 categories of external characteristics such as sex, color of clothing or carried items, and immediately detect and track the person sought after individual. Using this technology, it will be possible to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research group developing a rechargeable magnesium/iodine battery for daily consumer useBatteries – can you image how cumbersome the world would be without them? Without any moving parts, batteries convert chemical energy into electricity, making everyday life more expedient. However, lengthy charging times and short overall battery life can be a burden.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers tackle hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites based on methylammonium leadOne of the biggest challenges to society today is finding clean, safe and affordable forms of energy. Scientists at the University of Maryland are working on developing novel technologies to solve such challenges, including Marina Leite, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering and in the Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, and her team.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What about a mission to Titan?As you probably know, NASA recently announced plans to send a mission to Jupiter's moon Europa. If all goes well, the Europa Clipper will blast off for the world in the 2020s, and orbit the icy moon to discover all its secrets.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA test fires new engine controlling 'brain' for first SLS megarocket missionEngineers carried out a critical hot fire engine test firing with the first new engine controlling 'brain' that will command the shuttle-era liquid fueled engines powering the inaugural mission of NASA's new Space Launch System (SLS) megarocket.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Momentum isn't magic – vindicating the hot hand with the mathematics of streaksIt's NCAA basketball tournament season, known for its magical moments and the "March Madness" it can produce. Many fans remember Stephen Curry's superhuman 2008 performance where he led underdog Davidson College to victory while nearly outscoring the entire determined Gonzaga team by himself in the second half. Was Curry's magic merely a product of his skill, the match-ups and random luck, or was
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Dagens Medicin

Danske forskere samarbejder med israelsk biotekfirma om at udvikle kræftmedicinDen israelske biotekvirksomhed RedHill Biopharma har forlænget sit samarbejde med forskere ved Aarhus Universitet med henblik på at udvikle et potentielt lovende lægemiddel til behandling af kræft.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

During late life, what's important changesSupportive late life care improves experience and cost, and model can be replicated.
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WIRED

Social Media Influencers Finally Come to … Medicine The gig economy isn't just for website designers and juice cleanse diet diehards anymore. The post Social Media Influencers Finally Come to ... Medicine appeared first on WIRED .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Quantum computers may have higher 'speed limits' than thoughtHow fast will a quantum computer be able to calculate? While fully functional versions of these long-sought technological marvels have yet to be built, one theorist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has shown that, if they can be realized, there may be fewer limits to their speed than previously put forth.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sun's impact on climate change quantified for first timeFor the first time, model calculations show a plausible way that fluctuations in solar activity could have a tangible impact on the climate. Studies funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation expect human-induced global warming to tail off slightly over the next few decades. A weaker sun could reduce temperatures by half a degree.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New 5G transmitter 20 times more efficient than the previous onesIn the future, the coverage of a single base station has to be reduced because of the rapidly increasing number of mobile devices. This reduces the size of base stations, but increases their number, which makes the price, size and power consumption requirements of base stations and mobile phones converge.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Northern oceans once pumped CO2 into the atmosphereNorwegian Sea acted as CO2 source in the past. It pumped the greenhouse gas into the atmosphere instead of absorbing it, as it does today.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Conflict between the sexes maintains diversity in brain hormonesMen are from mars and women are from venus? Whiles this stereotype is extreme and controversial, gender differences in behaviour nonetheless are common in nature. Much variation in animal, including human, behaviour is regulated by expression of hormones and their receptors in brains.
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Gizmodo

North Korea Preparing For New Nuclear Tests in April According to Experts GIF made from the end of a new propaganda video released by North Korea on Sunday showing rockets hitting the US (NPRK Today) With each passing week, the rhetoric about nuclear war between the United States and North Korea becomes more bold from each side. And this weekend was no different. There has been increased activity at the Punggye-ri nuclear test site in North Korea, leading most experts
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NYT > Science

ScienceTake: Wonders of a Marine National MonumentA research cruise in the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument produced video of alien-looking deep sea life.
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NYT > Science

Wonders of the DeepThe research vehicle Okeanos Explorer is collecting video and data from the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

35 years of chiptune's influence on electronic musicIt can be hard to write about the music of videogames while we are bathed in the projected glory of today's high-definition, 4K, 60-frames-per-second photorealistic graphics. And given that in the roots of videogaming we find an often eerily quiet world, perhaps it's not surprising that we sometimes forget that there's an audio in audio-visual.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Something big exploded in a galaxy far, far away—what was it?At 10:49pm Western Australian time on February 2 this year, cosmic gamma rays hit the NASA satellite, Swift, orbiting the Earth.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Regression to the mean, or why perfection rarely lastsStatistics is a useful tool for understanding the patterns in the world around us. But our intuition often lets us down when it comes to interpreting those patterns. In this series we look at some of the common mistakes we make and how to avoid them when thinking about statistics, probability and risk.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: See-Through EmbryosScientists have created a high-resolution, 3-D atlas of human embryonic development during the first trimester of gestation.
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The Scientist RSS

Aedes aegypti Genome Assembled From ScratchScientists use a new technique to piece together the mosquito’s full genome.
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Blog » Languages » English

March madness: our first Scythe Marathon! March: in like a lion, out like… a lion? That’s right, we think there’s a rather fierce competition coming up. It’s time for a marathon, and we’re putting a wild spin on it by trying out something new: having coordinated with our Scythes, we’re going to put the whole cell in their highly capable hands! That means the cell will be grown through normal play, but the Scythes will be responsible for
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Estonia is putting its country in the cloud and offering virtual residencyEstonia is a small country in the Baltic region of Northern Europe with a population of 1.3 million and a GDP of US $23 billion, roughly 10% of Apple's annual earnings.
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Popular Science

No one knows what to do with the International Space Station Space Congress has only approved funding through 2024. What happens then? In 2024 the clock will run out on the International Space Station. Maybe. Read on.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Galactica stellaris: Astronomers Build a Family Tree for the Milky Way's StarsMethods borrowed from biology are revealing previously hidden details about our galaxy’s history of star formation -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica

Cloud computing pushes into the classroom, but not without challenges Enlarge / Seth Erdman, center, and his fellow students use Chromebooks while working on a lesson in a third grade class on Friday, January 16, 2015, at Walden Elementary School in Deerfield, Illinois. (Anthony Souffle) (credit: Chicago Tribune / Contributor ) When you think about a traditional school workflow, it's not unlike that of a business: paper is generated and moved in a systematic way be
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New Scientist - News

It’s time new media companies admitted that that’s what they areSocial media titans like Facebook claim to exercise no control over their content. It’s time they dropped the pretence and picked up their responsibilities
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Futurity.org

Unknown features of liquid crystals could improve screens Liquid crystals are used in everything from tiny digital watches to huge television screens, from optical devices to biomedical detectors. Yet little is known of their precise molecular structure when portions of such crystals interact with air. New research led by Juan de Pablo, professor at the Institute for Molecular Engineering, uncovers previously unknown features that develop from the inter
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Proteins hiding in proteins take an evolutionary shortcutHow a drug-like protein ring evolved in sunflowers has been pieced together by Australian and US scientists in a study published in Molecular Biology and Evolution. Although the evolutionary process took some 45 million years, the researchers are still calling it a shortcut.
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The Atlantic

Today's News: March 27, 2017 —President Trump and congressional Republicans will seek to overhaul the U.S. tax code, just days after they abandoned their effort to repeal the Affordable Care Act. More here —South Korean prosecutors have sought an arrest warrant for Park Geun-hye in connection with the former president’s role in a corruption scandal. More here —We’re tracking the news stories of the day below. All updates are
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Ingeniøren

Internetopkoblet Miele opvaskemaskine sårbar for hacking https://www.version2.dk/artikel/miele-opvaskemaskine-har-usikker-indbygget-webserver-1074929 Intelligente hårde hvidevarer åbner for et væld af nye sikkerhedsproblemer. Tag for eksempel Mieles professionelle opvaskemaskiner. Version2
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Ingeniøren

Amerikansk professor: Trumps åndsfælle er ingeniørSarkastisk blogger: Som forskerforagter og infrastrukturjunkie bør Donald Trump udpege en ingeniør som sin videnskabelige rådgiver. For sådan en får tingene gjort og praler ikke.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Artificial soils could be key in rehabilitation of Latrobe Valley coal minesWith Hazelwood Power Station commencing its staged shutdown, creating artificial soils from waste materials could provide an environmentally friendly option for rehabilitating the adjoining mine, according to a leading mining researcher from Monash University.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Paper documents self-healing membrane for fuel cell applicationsFuel cells are energy efficient and clean. However, a major challenge to commercialization of this technology is the durability of a vital component of each cell, the membrane, which is typically made from a polymer called Nafion. During fuel cell operation, the membrane undergoes chemical and mechanical degradation, leading to cracks and pinholes that shorten its life.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Undetermined whether odd-even car trials can combat air pollution in IndiaA team of UK and Indian researchers, led by Dr Prashant Kumar from the University of Surrey, assessed the impact of 'odd-even' car trials on air pollution in Delhi. The trials involved personal vehicles allowed to drive in the city on alternating days between 8 am and 8 pm depending on whether their registration ended with an odd or even number.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Archival photos offer research valueA crowdmapping project developed by EPFL and HEIG-VD gives volunteers the chance to compare the Switzerland of the 1960s with that of today through archival photos. An exhibition organized by EPFL's Modern Construction Archives will show the research implications of these historical photos.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Travelling-wave ion mobility mass spectrometry elucidates structures of gold fingersDrugs containing gold have been used for centuries to treat conditions like rheumatoid arthritis. In addition, they might be effective against cancer and HIV. One mechanism by which they work could occur because gold ions force the zinc ions out of zinc fingers—looped, nucleic acid binding protein domains. American researchers have characterized such "gold fingers" using ion mobility mass spectrom
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bacteria, deadwood and climate change—forest floor as carbon sinkWith the support of the Austrian Science Fund FWF, an international group of researchers is investigating to what extent the forest floor serves as a carbon sink and how bacteria and fungi interact in this context. The researchers have found deadwood to be populated by a great diversity of life.
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Live Science

How Did Celibacy Become Mandatory for Priests?Recent comments of Pope Francis suggest an openness to priestly marriage. A scholar shows how early church practices did not include mandatory celibacy for priests.
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Live Science

Flying Through Auroras: Airline Carries Passengers into Southern LightsOn March 23, the first charter flight to see the aurora australis — the southern lights — took flight from Dunedin Airport in New Zealand.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research shows that teachers benefit from proximityTeachers have long been portrayed as independent contractors, working alone and behind closed doors.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Poor communication main cause of marriage, cohabitation breakdownThe most common reasons given for the breakdown of marriages or live-in partnerships in Britain are communication problems and growing apart, according to analysis by UCL researchers of the latest National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-3).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Signature of one-dimensional electronic behaviour detected in K2Cr3As3 crystalsThe recently-discovered material K2Cr3As3 has a structure consisting of parallel Cr-As chains, which gives an opportunity to study the exotic behaviour which is predicted to occur when electrons are effectively confined to move only in one-dimension. Its peculiar properties, having an unusual metallic state before superconducting at 7 K, have made researchers curious about how best to describe the
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WIRED

The Eternal Search for a Gun That Doesn’t Kill Even amid controversy over effectiveness and dangers, the spring-loaded electrified Taser remains pretty much the only option. The post The Eternal Search for a Gun That Doesn't Kill appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

I Took the AI Class Facebookers Are Literally Sprinting to Get Into Internet giants have vacuumed up the world's AI talent, but they still need more. Now they're trying to cultivate it in-house. The post I Took the AI Class Facebookers Are Literally Sprinting to Get Into appeared first on WIRED .
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Grows International Presence Across the Atlantic Washington, D.C. (March 27, 2017)— The Atlantic today announced a major expansion across the Atlantic, with plans for 10 editorial and business employees to fill a new office in London. The initiative, announced by Atlantic President Bob Cohn , will help the brand deliver its journalism, live events, and marketing partnerships to larger audiences worldwide. Leading the international bureau is Nat
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The Atlantic

When Nuns Tried to Kickstart India's First Transgender School On a sunlit day in mid-December, humid and ripe as South India winters tend to be, six Carmelite nuns invited the transgender activist Vijayaraja Mallika over for tea. They sat inside the Provincial House of the Congregation of the Mother of Carmel (CMC) to discuss Mallika’s new venture: a school for transgender people in the state of Kerala. The sisters knew Mallika was still looking for a build
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Hubble spots two interacting galaxies defying cosmic conventionSome galaxies are harder to classify than others. Here, Hubble's trusty Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) has captured a striking view of two interacting galaxies located some 60 million light-years away in the constellation of Leo (The Lion). The more diffuse and patchy blue glow covering the right side of the frame is known as NGC 3447—sometimes NGC 3447B for clarity, as the name NGC 3447 can apply to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA selects mission to study churning chaos in the Milky Way and beyondNASA has selected a science mission that will measure emissions from the interstellar medium, which is the cosmic material found between stars. This data will help scientists determine the life cycle of interstellar gas in our Milky Way galaxy, witness the formation and destruction of star-forming clouds, and understand the dynamics and gas flow in the vicinity of the center of our galaxy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trail cams used to monitor predators of deer fawnsDeer fawns in Pennsylvania face a cruel reality—only half of them survive until their first birthday, and much of that mortality results from predation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Weather extremes: Humans likely influence giant airstreamsThe increase of devastating weather extremes in summer is likely linked to human-made climate change, mounting evidence shows. Giant airstreams are circling the Earth, waving up and down between the Arctic and the tropics. These planetary waves transport heat and moisture. When these planetary waves stall, droughts or floods can occur. Warming caused by greenhouse gases from fossil fuels creates f
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Millions of atoms entangled in record-breaking quantum testsScientists make advance in the quest to take quantum effects to larger scales.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Opening a Window into the Minds of Language-Impaired ChildrenResearchers are using eye-tracking technology to learn more about children afflicted with specific language impairment -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo

What Will Elon Musk and Tim Cook Do For Trump's New 'Office of American Innovation'? Donald Trump in the Oval Office on Friday showing how big the fish was that voted against his healthcare bill, completely destroying it singlehandedly (Photo by Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images) Tech titans like SpaceX’s Elon Musk, Apple’s Tim Cook, and IBM’s Gini Rometty have all met with President Trump during his first two months in office. But it was always under a cloud of suspicion about
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Science | The Guardian

Is a Jägerbomb more dangerous than a gin and tonic? Research seems to link energy drink cocktails with higher alcohol consumption and an increase in negative consequences. How bad can a vodka Red Bull be? The majority of research suggests that people who drink alcohol mixed with energy drinks (AmED) consume higher quantities of alcohol than non-AmED drinkers. This is then associated with an increase in behaviours with potentially very serious nega
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Live Science

Book Excerpt: 'Surviving Death' (US 2017)In "Surviving Death," Leslie Kean reveals stunning and wide-ranging evidence suggesting that consciousness survives death.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA tests observing capability on Hawaii's coral reefsNASA pulled off a scientific double play in Hawaii this winter, using the same instruments and aircraft to study both volcanoes and coral reefs. Besides helping scientists understand these two unique environments better, the data will be used to evaluate the possibility of preparing a potential future NASA satellite that would monitor ecosystem changes and natural hazards.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How graphene could cool smartphone, computer and other electronics chipsWith graphene, Rutgers researchers have discovered a powerful way to cool tiny chips – key components of electronic devices with billions of transistors apiece.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A focus on quadratic equationsOxford researchers are taking part in an international study to film the teaching of quadratic equations for secondary school pupils. The hope is that lessons will be learned on how to bring out the best in pupils learning about mathematics.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

CryoSat reveals Antarctica in 3-DAround 250 million measurements taken by ESA's CryoSat over the last six years have been used to create a unique 3-D view of Antarctica, offering a snapshot of the undulating surface of this vast ice sheet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: ESA's ExoMars rover and Russia's stationary surface science platformESA's ExoMars rover (foreground) and Russia's stationary surface science platform (background) are scheduled for launch in July 2020, arriving at Mars in March 2021. The Trace Gas Orbiter, which has been at Mars since October 2016, will act as a relay station for the mission, as well as conducting its own science mission.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Supersonic plasma jets discoveredInformation from ESA's magnetic field Swarm mission has led to the discovery of supersonic plasma jets high up in our atmosphere that can push temperatures up to almost 10 000°C.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The fate of exomoonsWhen a star like our sun gets to be very old, after another seven billion years or so, it will shrink to a fraction of its radius and become a white dwarf star, no longer able to sustain nuclear burning. Studying the older planetary systems around white dwarfs provides clues to the long-term fate of our Sun and its planetary system. The atmosphere of a white dwarf star is expected to break up any
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Citizen search for new planet in solar systemANU is launching a search for a new planet in our solar system, inviting anyone around the world with access to the Internet to help make the historic discovery.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Extreme weather events linked to climate change impact on the jet streamUnprecedented summer warmth and flooding, forest fires, drought and torrential rain -- extreme weather events are occurring more and more often, but now an international team of climate scientists has found a connection between many extreme weather events and the impact climate change is having on the jet stream.
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Futurity.org

Sugar rush could be deadly with this heart condition One out of every 2,000 people suffers from long QT syndrome, which can lead to heart failure. For these people, too much sugar may be dangerous, research shows. “If you suffer from long QT intervals, you should be careful not to consume a lot of sugar at once. In fact, a medium-size soft drink is enough to cause the blood sugar to drop to dangerously low levels further increasing the QT interval,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers discover 'switch' that allows microbes to recognize kinHow one-celled microbes recognize their kin is described in a paper by University of Wyoming scientists and published online this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
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Science | The Guardian

Bad language: why being bilingual makes swearing easier Bilingual reduced emotional resonance is fairly well-established, but why does it happen? And does that have a knock-on effect for different communities? My dad had a liberal philosophy of childrearing, but he would always tell us off for swearing. As a result, I grew up feeling very uncomfortable using swearwords. Or, at least, so I thought – when I first moved to Scotland, I noticed that it was
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Ingeniøren

Ugens job: Dong, Novo, Rambøll og andre af de store jagter flere ingeniører - tjek de nyeste opslag https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/ugens-job-dong-novo-ramboell-andre-de-store-jagter-flere-ingenioerer-tjek-de-nyeste-opslag Det boomer med job på ugens liste over de nyeste opslag på Jobfinder. Du kan eksempelvis udvikle laser til hurtigere heling eller avanceret lydudstyr til special styrker. Find ud af, om der er job for dig. Jobfinder
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Ingeniøren

Sådan får du bedst tid til både drift og ledelse https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/saadan-faar-du-bedst-tid-baade-drift-ledelse-7193 Som leder står du tit i den klassiske konflikt at nå dine egne driftsopgaver og samtidig få tid til ledelse. Trine Kolding, der er specialist i personlig effektivitet og planlægning, giver gode råd til at frigøre tid. Jobfinder
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Ingeniøren

En tidlig E-sportsklassiker vender tilbage: Internettet gløder over ny Starcraft-remake Bedre grafik og ny onlineplatform på klassikeren Starcraft fra Blizzard. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/tidlig-e-sportsklassiker-vender-tilbage-internettet-gloeder-ny-starcraft-remake-1074912 Version2
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Ingeniøren

Norske elkabler taber fire procent af effekten under turen til DanmarkRegnskabet for de fire Skagerrak-kabler mellem Danmark og Norge viser, at gevinsten for nordmændene ikke står mål med energitabet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Emaar Malls offers $800M for Souq.com amid Amazon rumorsA subsidiary of the state-backed developer Emaar says it made an $800-million offer to purchase the online retailer Souq.com amid rumors of a possible acquisition of the website by Amazon.
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Dagens Medicin

It-løsning forbedrer sam­arbejde om rehab­ilitering af patienter med hjerte­svigt En ny online-platform gør det lettere af følge en borgers rehabilitering og tilpasse forløbet til den enkelte behov.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

EU calls for privacy-security balance on message encryptionThe European Union's presidency says people's privacy must be protected following British calls for police access to encrypted messages in case of attacks.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers crack structure of key protein in Zika virusZika virus (ZIKV), which causes Zika virus disease, is spread to people primarily through the bite of an infected Aedes aegypti or Aedes albopictus mosquito. An infected pregnant woman can pass ZIKV to her fetus during pregnancy or around the time of birth. Sex is yet another way for infected persons to transmit ZIKV to others.
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Viden

Biobrændsel: Er Danmarks største vedvarende energikilde grøn eller sort?Bioenergi kan aldrig blive CO2-neutralt. Men det kan være godt for klimaet alligevel, forklarer dansk energiforsker.
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Ingeniøren

Fotovogne skal skiftes ud med stærekasserRegeringen foreslår, at 20 af landets fotovogne skal erstattes af stærekasser på særligt farlige vejstrækninger. Det skulle øge trafiksikkerheden og reducere antallet af trafikdræbte. Trafikforsker kalder det et tilbageskridt.
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Ingeniøren

Britisk minister efter angreb: »Whatsapp er et hemmeligt skjul for terrorister« https://www.version2.dk/artikel/britisk-pres-paa-kryptotjeneester-boer-ikke-vaere-noget-sted-terrorister-kan-skjule-sig Efter angrebet i London, hvor fem mennesker mistede livet, langer den britiske indenrigsminister nu ud efter tjenester som WhatsApp. Version2
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers crack structure of key protein in Zika virusThe genomic replication of the Zika virus (ZIKV) is made possible by its 'NS5' protein. UC Riverside scientists report that they have determined the crystal structure of the entire ZIKV NS5 protein and demonstrated that NS5 is functional when purified in vitro. Knowing the structure of ZIKV NS5 helps the researchers understand how ZIKV replicates itself. Further, the researchers identified the inh
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Weather extremes: Humans likely influence giant airstreamsThe increase of devastating weather extremes in summer is likely linked to human-made climate change, mounting evidence shows. Giant airstreams are circling the Earth, waving up and down between the Arctic and the tropics. These planetary waves transport heat and moisture. When these planetary waves stall, droughts or floods can occur. Warming caused by greenhouse-gases from fossil fuels creates f
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Kimberley fossil tracks are Australia's 'Jurassic Park'Scientists describe a remarkable collection of dinosaur tracks on beaches in Western Australia.
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Science | The Guardian

Climate change: ‘human fingerprint’ found on global extreme weather Global warming makes temperature patterns that cause heatwaves, droughts and floods across Europe, north America and Asia more likely, scientists find The fingerprint of human-caused climate change has been found on heatwaves, droughts and floods across the world, according to scientists. The discovery indicates that the impacts of global warming are already being felt by society and adds further
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The Atlantic

What it Means to Defund Planned Parenthood On March 6, House Republicans proposed legislation to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. It contained language that would defund Planned Parenthood—that is, end the provider’s reimbursements through Medicaid—for one year. The House abandoned that legislation on Friday. But this July, it’s possible that a small-scale version of that defunding will happen in Iowa, where Republicans are pus
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The Atlantic

The Legislators Working to Thwart the Will of Voters Updated on March 27 at 9:57 a.m. When Kris Steele joined the Oklahoma house of representatives in 2001, he noticed that whenever a matter of criminal justice came up, legislators felt it was necessary to appear “tough on crime.” As a result, the state kept enacting harsher sentences and making more crimes punishable by jail. In 2016, after leaving government, he spearheaded two ballot measures to
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Science : NPR

Breast-Fed Kids May Be Less Hyper, But Not Necessarily Smarter, Study Finds Prior research points to an association between breast-feeding and higher intelligence, but a new study finds no causal link. The study does find that breast-fed kids are less hyperactive at age 3. (Image credit: Guerilla/Getty Images)
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Science : NPR

EPA Chief: Trump Plans To Kill Obama-era Clean Power Plan The Trump administration is expected this week to unveil its executive order undoing President Obama's Clean Power Plan, which aimed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from power plants.
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Ingeniøren

Uber suspenderer forsøg med selvkørende bilerEt uheld i Arizona, USA, får nu kørselstjenesten Uber til foreløbigt at parkere alle forsøg med selvkørende biler. Uheldet skete, fordi en anden bil ikke overholdt sin vigepligt i et sving.
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Ingeniøren

Danmarks største jernbane­projekt bygger på lappeløsningerDanmarks udrulning af det ufærdige togsignalsystem ERTMS bygger allerede nu på fejlslagne gæt om EU-standarder og nye jernbaner, der midlertidigt udstyres med gamle signaler.
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Dagens Medicin

Nu bliver 5-årsfristen forlængetRegeringen sender i dag forslag i høring, der blandt andet vil give nye læger længere tid til at påbegynde en speciallægeuddannelse.
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NYT > Science

Editorial: The Trump Administration’s War on ScienceMr. Trump’s inaugural budget blueprint is a narrow-minded document that sacrifices American innovation to small-bore politics.
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The Atlantic

Trump Is Scaring Indian Americans Into Finding Their Political Voice Manik Suri is the archetypical overachiever from an Indian American family. The 34-year-old runs a start-up in Silicon Valley. He speaks four languages. He’s got two Ivy League degrees. And yet, when the windows at an Indian restaurant near his house were shot out in late February, along with those of an Eritrean place nearby, he felt shaken. “We catered my wife’s sister’s wedding in that restaur
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Live Science

Can People Allergic to Nuts Still Eat Some Types?Some nuts may be OK for those with allergies, a new study says.
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Dagens Medicin

IRF går til kamp mod danskernes høje forbrug af opioider Sundhedsstyrelsens institut for rationel farmakoterapi iværksætter nu en række tiltag, som skal få danskerne og deres læger til at reducere brugen af opioider mod nonmaligne smerter.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

'Fake research' comes under scrutinyThe scale of "fake research" in the UK appears to have been underestimated, a BBC investigation suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Thousands evacuated as cyclone bears down on AustraliaThousands of people including tourists were evacuated Monday as northeast Australia braced for a powerful cyclone packing destructive winds, with warnings of major structural damage and surging tides.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Unparalleled' number of dinosaur tracks found in AustraliaAn "unprecedented" 21 different types of dinosaur tracks have been found on a stretch of Australia's remote coastline, scientists said Monday, dubbing it the nation's Jurassic Park.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trump to roll back Obama clean power planPresident Donald Trump will sign an executive order Tuesday to undo his predecessor Barack Obama's plan to limit greenhouse gas emissions from coal-fueled power plants, according to the new environmental chief.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

People who watch entertainment TV are more likely to vote for populist politiciansPeople exposed to entertainment television are more likely to vote for populist politicians according to a new study co-authored by an economist at Queen Mary University of London.
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Science-Based Medicine

Did cannabis oil cure Deryn Blackwell, the “boy in seven billion,” of his two cancers?In a forthcoming book, The Boy in 7 Billion , Callie Blackwell claims that she cured her son Deryn of two different cancers using cannabis oil, which rescued his failing bone marrow transplant. When examined more closely, however, her story appears to be another alternative cancer cure testimonial that confuses correlation with causation.
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Big Think

A British Teenager Finds an Error in NASA's Space Station Data A 17-year-old British schoolboy spots an error in the data from International Space Station's radiation sensors. Read More
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cognitive science

National Corruption Breeds Personal Dishonesty. A shady government influences the moral behavior of its citizens. submitted by /u/EustacheDaugerLives [link] [comments]
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Science | The Guardian

Can you solve it? Take the Ada Lovelace challenge We’ve channelled the spirit of the mathematician, writer and daughter of Byron in order to set a riddle for Guardian readers Hello guzzlers, I have a special treat for you today: a letter from the nineteenth century mathematician, Countess Ada Lovelace. The letter comes through the medium of Pavel Curtis , who every month for the last few years has been releasing similar puzzles from Ada that he
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Ingeniøren

Dårligt sikrede overvågningskameraer streamer stadig direkte på nettet https://www.version2.dk/artikel/daarligt-sikrede-overvaagningskameraer-streamer-stadig-direkte-paa-nettet-1074282 156 streams fra overvågningskameraer i Danmark er stadig frit tilgængelige på internettet. Flere af dem kommer fra private hjem Version2
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Science | The Guardian

The 100 best nonfiction books: No 60 – On the Origin of Species by Charles Darwin (1859)Darwin’s revolutionary, humane and highly readable introduction to his theory of evolution is arguably the most important book of the Victorian era When Charles Darwin first saw On the Origin of Species by means of Natural Selection, or The Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life in book form, he is said to have remarked that he found it tough going. Actually, the book, composed in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Playing to beat the blues: Video games viable treatment for depressionVideo games and 'brain training' applications are increasingly touted as an effective treatment for depression. A new UC Davis study carries it a step further, though, finding that when the video game users were messaged reminders, they played the game more often and in some cases increased the time spent playing.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Children, youth born in Canada at higher risk of unintentional gun injury than immigrantsChildren and youth born in Canada are at higher risk of unintentional injury from guns compared with immigrant children and youth, although certain subgroups of immigrants and refugees are at higher risk of assault-related injury, found a study published in CMAJ.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Are tree nut allergies diagnosed too often?A new study in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology shows about 50 percent of those who thought they were allergic to all tree nuts were able to pass an oral food challenge without a reaction.
15h
New on MIT Technology Review

MIT’s Nuclear Lab has an Unusual Plan to Jump-Start Advanced-Reactor ResearchScientists want to test plans for a transportable molten-salt reactor by piggybacking on their existing nuclear facility.
15h
Ingeniøren

Vaccine-salg splitter it-system op hos SSI: »Som at dele lunkent vand op i koldt og varmt« https://www.version2.dk/artikel/vaccine-salg-splitter-erp-system-efter-22-aar-at-dele-lunkent-vand-koldt-varmt-1074682 Salget af Danmarks vaccineproduktion har udløst et kompliceret arbejde med at skille it-systemer fra hinanden. Version2
16h
Ingeniøren

Byggeforsker: Nyt byggedirektiv vil stoppe vindmøller og solcellerEn 'helvedes masse' afbrænding af træpiller og brænde og en underminering af danske planer om flere solceller og vindmøller vil blive resultatet af et nyt direktivforslag fra EU, advarer byggeforsker.
16h
Science-Based Medicine

Corrigendum. The Week in Review. 03/26/2017Death from naturopathy. Cows and soldiers have a similar problem. Pseudo-medicines never die. Chiropractic complications. And more.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

In a quantum race, everyone is both a winner and a loserOur understanding of the world is mostly built on basic perceptions, such as that events follow each other in a well-defined order. Such definite orders are required in the macroscopic world, for which the laws of classical physics apply. However, in the quantum world orders can be ‘scrambled’. It is possible for different orders of quantum operations to coexist in a superposition. New work by a t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Discovery showcases membranes that can fix themselvesScientists have developed a self-healing membrane for hydrogen fuel cells; typical membranes, a crucial component of the cells, are prone to cracks and pinholes. This discovery showcases membranes that can fix themselves.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Passive smoking: Acrolein inhibits immune response, hence accelerating tumor growthThe World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that every year 600,000 deaths are caused by passive smoking worldwide. Now researchers have, for the first time, identified the organic compound acrolein (acrylic aldehyde) as one of the main causes of failure of the immune defense to tumors due to passive smoking.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Survivors of childhood brain tumors have increased body fatNew research findings suggest that one of the most important risk factors for heart disease and type 2 diabetes, which is excess total and central fat in the body, is present relatively early in survivors of childhood brain tumors. This may program their future risk of these diseases and impact their outcomes.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New era in precision medicine for pancreatic cancerThe development of new treatments for pancreatic cancer is set to be transformed by a network of clinical trials, aiming to find the right trial for the right patient, after a £10 million investment from Cancer Research UK.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fingerprint technique spots frog populations at risk from pollutionResearchers have found a new way to detect subtle early warning signs that reveal a frog population is at risk from pollution.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Steep rise of the Bernese AlpsThe striking North Face of the Bernese Alps is the result of a steep rise of rocks from the depths following a collision of two tectonic plates. This steep rise gives new insight into the final stage of mountain building and provides important knowledge with regard to active natural hazards and geothermal energy.
18h
The Scientist RSS

Rethinking a Cancer Drug TargetThe results of a CRISPR-Cas9 study suggest that MELK—a protein thought to play a critical role in cancer—is not necessary for cancer cell survival.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

People who watch entertainment TV are more likely to vote for populist politiciansPeople exposed to entertainment television are more likely to vote for populist politicians according to a new study co-authored by an economist at Queen Mary University of London. The researchers investigated the political impact of entertainment television in Italy over the last 30 years during the phased introduction of Silvio Berlusconi's commercial TV network Mediaset.
19h
Science : NPR

In Conflict With Trump Agenda, California Sets Stricter Auto Emissions Standards California put itself on a collision course with the Trump Administration as the state's clean air agency moved forward with stricter emissions requirements for trucks and cars.
21h

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