The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Climate Changes What We’re Following Power Plans: President Trump signed a highly anticipated executive order on climate today. The two biggest effects: The EPA will rewrite (and roll back) Obama-era regulations like the Clean Power Plan, and government agencies will no longer need to account for climate change while reporting on a project’s environmental impact. Here’s a guide to the details . Environmental adv
8min
Ars Technica

Despite Clean Power Plan rollback, utilities say coal isn’t ascendant Enlarge (credit: Kym Farnik ) Despite the executive order signed by President Trump this afternoon to roll back the Clean Power Plan, it’s unclear that much will change in the US for the declining coal industry. An annual survey conducted by UtilityDrive and research firm PA Consulting asked 600 utility executives from around the country to answer a series of questions about how their utility is
12min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Seasonal warming leads to smaller animal body sizesChanges in the body size of animals measured under controlled laboratory conditions have been shown to closely match changes in body size with seasonal warming in nature, according to research from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).
17min
Futurity.org

Brain changes can leave seniors vulnerable to scams Older adults who have fallen for scams by friends, relatives, or strangers behave just as their peers who have avoided rip-offs do. They are able to balance their checkbooks. They can remember and evaluate information. Their personalities are normal, and their arithmetic is fine. But their brains are different. For the first time, researchers have found a biological basis for financial exploitati
26min
Science | The Guardian

Neuro-prosthesis reconnects brain to muscles to restore arm movements to man with complete paralysis – video A paralysed man has been able to drink and feed himself thanks to an experimental neuro-prosthesis, which reconnects his brain with his muscles. The system uses decoded brain signals and sends them to sensors in his arm to regain movement in his hand and arm. The technology had only been tested on one participant in the USA but the team behind the research say the findings could lead to greater i
38min
Science | The Guardian

New technology allows tetraplegic man to move hand with thought Neuroprosthetic procedure first in world to restore brain-controlled reaching and grasping in person with complete paralysis A man who was paralysed from below the neck after crashing his bike into a truck can once again drink a cup of coffee and eat mashed potato with a fork, after a world-first procedure to allow him to control his hand with the power of thought. Bill Kochevar, 53, has had elec
38min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The Lancet: Neuro-prosthesis reconnects brain to muscles to restore functional arm movements to man with complete paralysisA system that decodes brain signals and transmits them to sensors in the arm has allowed a man paralyzed from the shoulders down to regain movement in his hand and arm, according to the first study to report results for this new technology, published in The Lancet.
38min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Man with quadriplegia employs injury bridging technologies to move again -- just by thinkingA subject who was paralyzed below his shoulders in a bicycling accident, is believed to be the first person with quadriplegia in the world to have arm and hand movements restored with the help of two temporarily implanted technologies.A brain-computer interface with recording electrodes under his skull, and a functional electrical stimulation (FES) system activating his arm and hand, reconnect his
38min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Knee replacement surgery may have minimal effect on quality of life & unattractiveKnee replacement surgery for patients with osteoarthritis, as currently used, provides minimal improvements in quality of life and is economically unattractive.
38min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Very premature babies benefit most from corticosteroids before birthGiving corticosteroid drugs to mothers at risk of preterm delivery -- from as early as 23 weeks of pregnancy -- is associated with a lower rate of death and serious illness for their babies, finds a study published by The BMJ today.
38min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Knee surgery may have minimal quality of life effects in those with less severe symptomsCurrent use of knee replacement surgery for patients with osteoarthritis may have minimal effects on quality of life and is economically unattractive, concludes a study from the United States in The BMJ today.
38min
Latest Headlines | Science News

Sarcasm looks the same in the brain whether it's words or emojiSarcasm via winking emoji affects the brain like verbal irony does.
40min
Live Science

Trump Ditches Clean Power Plan: What It Means for Science & HealthPresident Donald Trump signed an executive order today (March 28) that dismantles the Clean Power Plan, an Obama-era regulation that would have set limits on emissions of carbon dioxide and other pollutants from power plants.
46min
New on MIT Technology Review

This Paralyzed Man Is Using a Neuroprosthetic to Move His Arm for the First Time in YearsTo reverse paralysis, scientists wired a man’s brain to his muscles using electronics.
48min
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

Andre Fenton (NYU) 3: Preemptive cognitive training https://www.ibiology.org/ibioseminars/preemptive-cognitive-training-can-prevent-future-cognitive-control-impairment.html Part 1: Reconstructing memory: Dr. André Fenton explains the neurobiological factors that maintain memory in our brains. Part 2: Protein Kinase M zeta is essential for storing long-term memory: Fenton describes the importance of Protein Kinase M zeta for the persistence of Long
50min
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

Andre Fenton (NYU) 2: Protein Kinase M zeta promotes memory and Long-Term potentiation (LTP) https://www.ibiology.org/ibioseminars/protein-kinase-m-zeta-essential-storing-long-term-memory.html Part 1: Reconstructing memory: Dr. André Fenton explains the neurobiological factors that maintain memory in our brains. Part 2: Protein Kinase M zeta is essential for storing long-term memory: Fenton describes the importance of Protein Kinase M zeta for the persistence of Long-Term potentiation an
50min
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

Andre Fenton (NYU) 1: Reconstructing memory https://www.ibiology.org/ibioseminars/reconstructing-memory.html Part 1: Reconstructing memory: Dr. André Fenton explains the neurobiological factors that maintain memory in our brains. Part 2: Protein Kinase M zeta is essential for storing long-term memory: Fenton describes the importance of Protein Kinase M zeta for the persistence of Long-Term potentiation and memory across days. Part 3: Preem
50min
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Rare sighting reveals deep-sea octopus's unusual breakfast Video confirms the cephalopod feeds on gelatinous creatures. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21725
52min
New on MIT Technology Review

Nvidia’s Deep-Learning Chips May Give Medicine a Shot in the ArmThe company sees medicine as the next big market for its machine-learning hardware.
1h
Gizmodo

Congress Just Gave Internet Providers the Green Light to Sell Your Browsing History Without Consent Sen. Jeff Flake (R-AZ), who introduced the bill in the Senate last week. Image: Getty. The House of Representatives voted today repeal rules preventing internet service providers from selling their customers’ web browsing and app usage data without explicit consent. The Senate passed the same bill last week , which means the only obstacle that remains is a signature from President Trump—and the W
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Watch Big Chief Lay into Richard Rawlings Before Mega Race #StreetOutlaws | Mondays at 9/8c on Discovery The debate over the original rules continues as Richard refuses to risk his life and Chief's by getting behind the wheel with no license and no seat time. Full episodes streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/street-outlaws/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ Disc
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Gizmodo

These Flip Flops Are 'Smart' for the Dumbest Possible Reason Image: Hari Mari Shoe brand Hari Mari has a new line of flip flops done in partnership with baseball glove maker Nokona. These aren’t just any flip flops, though. They have a special chip inside of them that makes them smart. Allegedly. We say “allegedly” because, sadly, “smart” really just seems to mean “adds buyers to Hari Mari’s email list.” As reported by Fast Company , the new Hari Mari x No
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Ars Technica

For sale: Your private browsing history Enlarge (credit: Getty Images ) The House of Representatives voted today to eliminate ISP privacy rules, following the Senate vote to take the same action last week . The legislation to kill the rules now heads to President Donald Trump for his signature or veto. The White House issued a statement today supporting the House's action, and saying that Trump's advisors will recommend that he sign th
1h
WIRED

Amazon’s Time-Saving Trick for Groceries: You Drive to Us The company that changed retail forever by bringing everything to your door wants to convince you it's innovative to drive to them. The post Amazon's Time-Saving Trick for Groceries: You Drive to Us appeared first on WIRED .
1h
New on MIT Technology Review

AutoX Has Built a Self-Driving Car That Navigates with a Bunch of $50 WebcamsThe startup wants to make autonomous vehicles cheap enough for everyone to use.
1h
BBC News - Science & Environment

New population of rare tigers found in eastern ThailandCamera traps caught images of the critically endangered Indochinese tigers in eastern Thailand.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Menstrual cycle recreated 'in a dish'Scientists have made a mini working replica of the female reproductive tract to experiment on.
1h
Gizmodo

One Engineer Is Trying to Get IBM to Reckon With Trump Photo: William Turton/Gizmodo Daniel Hanley, a cybersecurity engineer at IBM, doesn’t want to be the center of attention. When I asked to take his picture outside one of IBM’s New York City offices, he told me that he wasn’t really into the whole “organizer profile thing.” Dressed in jeans and a light jacket, and sporting a backpack with Black Lives Matter and Democratic Socialists of America pin
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The Atlantic

A Bot That Can Tell When It's Really Donald Trump Who's Tweeting For at least two years, an open secret lurked in the the metadata behind President Donald Trump’s personal Twitter account. Folks quickly noticed that his boring tweets—event announcements, press releases on polls—were usually sent from an iPhone, probably a staffer’s. The 3 a.m. rants , on the other hand, were generally sent from an Android . Guess which kind of phone Trump uses personally? This
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The Atlantic

The Hate U Give Enters the Ranks of Great YA Novels “They finally put a sheet over Khalil. He can’t breathe under it. I can’t breathe.” The last words of Eric Garner, adopted and amplified by the Black Lives Matter movement, echo again in the early pages of Angie Thomas’s young-adult novel The Hate U Give. By the time she’s 16, Starr Carter, the protagonist of the book, has lost two of her childhood friends to gun violence: one by a gang drive-by,
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Marathon running may cause short-term kidney injuryThe physical stress of running a marathon can cause short-term kidney injury, according to new research. Although kidneys of the examined runners fully recovered within two days post-marathon, the study raises questions concerning potential long-term impacts of this strenuous activity at a time when marathons are increasing in popularity.
1h
Popular Science

Apple's iOS 10.3 update is freeing up gigabytes of storage space on iPhones Technology How is that even possible? If you upgrade your iPhone to iOS 10.3 today, you'll likely find that you have an extra GB or more of storage space.
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The Scientist RSS

Enzo: Immunohistochemistry SolutionsEnsure that your message is clear with the right immunohistochemistry tools.
1h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: A Miner Victory for Trump Today in 5 Lines President Trump signed an executive order that would dramatically change major Obama-era rules aimed at preparing for climate change and curbing greenhouse-gas emissions. The Washington Post reported that the Trump administration attempted to block former acting Attorney General Sally Yates from testifying before the House Intelligence Committee on alleged ties between the Trump
1h
Live Science

Beating Human Heart Tissue Grown from Spinach LeavesVegetables are good for your health, but now there's a whole new way that one veggie could help your heart: Spinach leaves can be used as a scaffold for beating human heart cells, a new study finds.
1h
The Scientist RSS

Texas Considers GM MosquitoesIn an effort to prevent the spread of Zika virus, Harris County officials are in discussions with Oxitec to release insects engineered to produce short-lived offspring.
1h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Cruel fusion: What a young man’s death means for childhood cancer Epigenetic discoveries are fuelling renewed interest in the fusion proteins that have bedevilled cancer biologists. Nature 543 608 doi: 10.1038/543608a
1h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Mini reproductive system on a chip mimics human menstrual cycle Researchers create models of organs such as a uterus and cervix in the laboratory. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21712
1h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

How Trump plans to wipe out Obama-era climate rules The US president has ordered the Environmental Protection Agency to reverse limits on carbon emissions from power plants. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21726
1h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Japanese man is first to receive 'reprogrammed' stem cells from another person World-first transplant to treat macular degeneration could augur rise of iPS cell banks Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21730
1h
The Scientist RSS

Texas Considers GM MosquitoesIn an effort to prevent the spread of Zika virus, Harris County officials are in discussions with Oxitec to release insects engineered to produce short-lived offspring.
1h
Inside Science

Tapping Traditional Wisdom to Cope with Climate Change Earth From the mountains of Tajikistan to Standing Rock in the Dakotas, scientists are collaborating with indigenous people to study climate change and predict the future. 03/28/2017 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer https://www.insidescience.org/news/tapping-traditional-wisdom-cope-climate-change#overlay-context=news/how-much-sunshine-can-you-get
2h
Inside Science

Tapping Traditional Wisdom to Cope with Climate Change Tapping Traditional Wisdom to Cope with Climate Change From the mountains of Tajikistan to Standing Rock in the Dakotas, scientists are collaborating with indigenous people to study climate change and predict the future. ecocal_final2 (1).jpg Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Rights information: Copyright American Institute of Physics ( reprinting information ) Earth Tuesday, March
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Gizmodo

Tropical Cyclone Debbie Looked Massive and Furious From the Space Station Although tropical cyclone Debbie, yesterday a Category 4 beast, has now been downgraded to a tropical storm carrying a severe weather warning , this footage of the cyclone at near peak intensity captured from the International Space Station will make you glad you don’t live on the eastern coast of Australia. The eight-minute clip reveals just how furious a storm like this can grow. Despite Debbie
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Forests fight global warming in ways more important than previously understoodTrees impact climate by regulating the exchange of water and energy between Earth's surface and the atmosphere, an important influence that should be considered as policymakers contemplate efforts to conserve forested land, said the authors of an international study.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Herpes STDs: From chimps to humans to cold sore cousin mixing before worldwide spreadIt's an axiom of the infectious disease research community that wherever humans go, germs are likely to follow. Such is the case with the herpes virus family.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers discover dust plays prominent role in nutrients of mountain forest ecoystemsThis study shows that dust may be crucial in mountainous forest ecosystems, dominating nutrient budgets despite continuous replacement of depleted soils with fresh bedrock via erosion.
2h
Gizmodo

New Pirates of the Caribbean Featurette Confirms a Fan Favorite Theory Image: Disney We know that Orlando Bloom is returning to the Pirates of the Caribbean franchise, but we haven’t gotten an actual glimpse of Will Turner in the footage we’ve seen so far. Now, we are at least sure we’ve seen his genes. This was something everyone has suspected for a while, but Brenton Thwaites’ character has been called “Henry,” no last name, for a long time. But a new behind-the-s
2h
Gizmodo

What To Do When An Old Friend Wants You To Join A Pyramid Scheme Image credit: Angelica Alzona Have you ever gotten a weird phone call from your home area code? Or maybe someone you used to know randomly invites you over to dinner, mentioning something about a business opportunity. These are sure signs that someone is trying get you involved in a pyramid scheme, and that’s bad, because pyramid schemes are bad. In my three decades on Earth, I’ve had three close
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Abuse accelerates puberty in childrenWhile it has long been known that maltreatment can affect a child's psychological development, new research indicates that the stress of abuse can impact the physical growth and maturation of adolescents as well.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Parents who play Pokémon GO with kids: 'It wasn't really about the Pokémon'In the first study to survey and interview parents who play 'Pokémon GO' with their children, families report a number of side benefits, including increased exercise, more time spent outdoors and opportunities for family bonding. However, some guilt about screen time persisted.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ion pairs perform enhanced 'spooky action,' physicists showAdding to strong recent demonstrations that particles of light perform what Einstein called 'spooky action at a distance,' in which two separated objects can have a connection that exceeds everyday experience, physicists have confirmed that particles of matter can act really spooky too.
2h
Ars Technica

Uber’s lament: “No Black or Hispanic employee holds leadership positions in tech” (credit: Uber ) For the first time, Uber released diversity figures for its employees—which does not include its thousands of drivers, whom the company considers to be contract workers. Like many other Silicon Valley companies , Uber's labor force—in particular its tech staff—is overwhelmingly male and largely white. According to a series of figures posted Tuesday, the company even called out the
2h
Live Science

Friendly Felines: Cats Like People (Really!), Study SaysCats like us! They really like us!
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Jefferson Lab accomplishes critical milestones toward completion of 12 GeV upgradeThe Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has achieved two major commissioning milestones and is now entering the final stretch of work to conclude its first major upgrade.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Key research priorities for agricultural microbiomes identifiedA coordinated effort to understand plant microbiomes could boost plant health and agricultural productivity, according to a new Perspective publishing March 28 in the open access journal PLOS Biology by Posy Busby of Oregon State University in Corvallis and colleagues at eight other research institutions.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Physics can predict wealth inequalityThe 2016 election year highlighted the growing problem of wealth inequality and finding ways to help the people who are falling behind. This human urge of compassion isn’t new, but the big question that remains to be addressed is why inequality is so difficult to erase.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Key research priorities for agricultural microbiomes identifiedA coordinated effort to understand plant microbiomes could boost plant health and agricultural productivity, according to a new Perspective publishing March 28 in the open access journal PLOS Biology by Posy Busby of Oregon State University in Corvallis and colleagues at eight other research institutions.
2h
Science : NPR

Mayor Of Wyoming Coal Town Reacts To Trump's Climate Order NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Louise Carter-King, mayor of Gillette, Wyo., about the impact that President Trump's executive order loosening regulations on coal will have on the the town.
2h
Science : NPR

Trump Signs Executive Order Rolling Back Regulation On Carbon Emissions President Trump signed a sweeping set of executive orders on Tuesday that aim to dismantle the Obama administration's efforts to combat climate change.
2h
Gizmodo

Rising Sea Levels Could Decimate Southern California Beaches by 2100 Exposed bedrock on the beach near the University of California, Santa Barbara, in February 2017. (Image: Daniel Hoover, USGS) Using a new computer model, scientists predict that upwards of 67 percent of Southern California beaches could be severely damaged by rising sea levels in the next 80 years. A new study published in the Journal of Geophysical Research warns that 31 to 67 percent of Souther
2h
Live Science

Women's Entire Menstrual Cycle Replicated in a LabThe entire female menstrual cycle has been replicated in a bento-box-like device that can fit into the palm of your hand.
2h
Gizmodo

Uber Puts Tokens in PR Machine, Finally Releases Long-Delayed Diversity Report Uber If Uber was hoping the release of its first ever diversity report would deflect from its recent string of PR calamities, it thought wrong. Released Tuesday, the report and accompanying EEO filing are unimpressive at best, even by Silicon Valley’s notoriously low standards for diversity. Women make up less than a third of the company, there are no black/Latinx workers in tech leadership and u
2h
Scientific American Content: Global

How Trump Plans to Wipe Out Obama-era Climate RulesThe president has ordered the Environmental Protection Agency to reverse limits on carbon emissions from power plants -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
Big Think

Here’s a Bold New Strategy for Dealing with North Korea Say it should fall. It’ll cost over $1 trillion to rehabilitate the nation. Who’s going to pay for that? Read More
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Early use of marijuana can increase its negative health impactsThe need for age guidelines for marijuana use is the focus of a new study. The findings show that young users report the most impact to their physical and mental health.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

System better allots network bandwidth, for faster page loadsAt the Usenix Symposium on Networked Systems Design and Implementation this week, researchers from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) are presenting a new system for allocating bandwidth in data center networks. In tests, the system maintained the same overall data transmission rate -- or network 'throughput' -- as those currently in use, but it allocated bandwid
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ACP decries devastating impact of climate change orderPresident Trump's executive order on climate change will have a devastating impact on public health, said the American College of Physicians (ACP) today.
3h
Ars Technica

Alternative facts alert: Proposed legislation bans “fake news” US Constitution. (credit: Kim Davies ) Here at Ars, we're always on the lookout for wacky, tech-focused legislation. And we've found one bill that is certain to make our Top 10 list. Edwin "Ed" Chau. The new proposal bars the online publication of a "false or deceptive statement designed to influence the vote." Bye-bye online news. On the flip side, this legislation would probably outlaw lawmaker
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Can intergenerational cooperation defeat climate change?Older adults are powerful allies in addressing climate change, say researchers. Research shows that older adults are at risk for the effects of extreme weather events and climate change; but they are also a potential resource for climate action.
3h
The Atlantic

Trump’s Taking Credit Where No Credit Is Due On Tuesday, Ford Motor Company announced a $1.2 billion investment in three Michigan plants—a move that was preceded by a 3:30 a.m. tweet from President Trump touting the job gains that the company’s announcement would bring. But as much as Trump tries to link himself to increases in auto-industry investment, the narrative is a dubious one. Massive car companies take a long time to make large inv
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trump tosses Obama's 'clean' energy plan, embraces coalDeclaring "the start of a new era" in energy production, President Donald Trump signed an executive order Tuesday that he said would revive the coal industry and create jobs.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Electronics ban on flights not a longterm solution: IATA bossBritish and US bans on laptops and tablet computers in the cabin of flights are not sustainable in the long term, the head of the association representing airlines said Tuesday.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stop eating! You are fullResearchers have identified a molecule sent by fat cells to the fly brain that senses when they have had enough food and inhibits feeding, according to a study publishing March 28 in the open access journal PLOS Biology by Walton Jones of the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology in Daejeon, and colleagues.
3h
Live Science

Lifelike Model of Women's Menstrual Cycle Made in a Lab | VideoA new bento-box-like device that can fit into the palm of your hand represents a huge leap beyond the standard plastic petri dish as a medium for studying human biology.
3h
Gizmodo

How to Use 1Blocker to Hide Everything That Annoys You On Mobile Sites You’re browsing the web on your iPhone when you come across a pop-up box asking you to subscribe to a newsletter. You: A) frantically search for the little “X” to make it go away, B) Roll your eyes and press the back button to leave, or C) Wish you could get rid of those annoying pop-ups while still reading your favorite sites. 1Blocker , our favorite ad blocker on iOS , just rolled out a feature
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

As sea level rises, much of Honolulu and Waikiki vulnerable to groundwater inundationNew research from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa (UHM) reveals a large part of the heavily urbanized area of Honolulu and Waikiki, Hawai'i is at risk of groundwater inundation—flooding that occurs as groundwater is lifted above the ground surface due to sea level rise. Shellie Habel, lead author of the study and doctoral student in the UHM Department of Geology and Geophysics, School of Ocean
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New method to 'fingerprint' HIV developedA method to analyze the glycan shield on HIV's protective outer glycoprotein has been developed as a potential HIV vaccine candidate, report scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Malaria parasites 'walk through walls' to infect humansResearchers have identified proteins that enable deadly malaria parasites to 'walk through cell walls' -- a superpower that was revealed using the Institute's first insectary to grow human malaria parasites. The research has identified two parasite proteins that are the key to this superpower. The proteins could be targeted to develop much-needed antimalarial drugs or vaccines.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Therapies that target dementia in early stages critical to successTargeting dementia in the earlier stages of the condition could be critical for the success of future therapies, say researchers who have found that the very earliest symptoms of dementia might be due to abnormal stability in brain cell connections rather than the death of brain tissue, which comes after.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A seismic mapping milestoneUsing advanced modeling and simulation, seismic data generated by earthquakes, and one of the world's fastest supercomputers, a team of scientists is creating a detailed 3-D picture of Earth's interior. Currently, the team is focused on imaging the entire globe from the surface to the core-mantle boundary, a depth of 1,800 miles.
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Gizmodo

You Won't Be Able to See Or Hear This 36-Hour Nano-Scale Endurance Race One month from today, a record-setting race will be held in Toulouse, France. Teams from around the world will race nano-scale vehicles built from less than 100 individual atoms , at blistering speeds of up to five nanometers per hour. To put that in perspective, it would take these microscopic cars almost 37 million years to drive a single mile. Organized by the National Center for Scientific Re
3h
The Atlantic

Education Doesn't Solve the Gender Pay Gap In recent decades, women have been making significant headway in becoming dentists, doctors, and lawyers—professions which require a significant amount of education and postgraduate training. According to some theories, this growing number of women with advanced degrees should help bridge the gender pay gap. And yet, for all three professions, not only does the gender pay gap persist, the differe
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fighting world hunger: Robotics aid in the study of corn and drought toleranceDeveloping drought tolerant corn that makes efficient use of available water will be vital to sustain the estimated 9 billion global population by 2050. In March 2014, the National Science Foundation (NSF) awarded the University of Missouri a $20 million grant as part of a multi-institutional consortium to study how corn maintains root growth during drought conditions. Using funding from the NSF,
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Less invasive hysterectomy for early-stage endometrial cancer finds clinical supportResearchers found similar rates of disease-free survival and no difference in overall survival among women who received a laparoscopic or abdominal total hysterectomy for stage I endometrial cancer, according to a study.
3h
Big Think

New Study Reveals Which People Fear Death the Least Does the thought of death make you anxious? A new study suggests that the fear of mortality isn't really about the afterlife at all. Read More
3h
WIRED

Tinder’s New Desktop App Pushes You to Actually Talk to People Tinder Online encourages users to temper their snap judgements with some genuine connections. The post Tinder's New Desktop App Pushes You to Actually Talk to People appeared first on WIRED .
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Gizmodo

Save $6 On Anker's Future-Proof Car Charger, Complete With USB-C and QC 3.0. Anker PowerDrive+ 4 , $24 with code MULTI777 This Anker PowerDrive isn’t the cheapest or smallest USB car charger out there, but with Quick Charge 3.0 and USB-C, it might just be the most future-proof. Get it for $6 off with promo code MULTI777.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Elevating women's status lowers dependence on solid fuelsA new research paper finds that in countries where gender inequalities are most pronounced, women are much more likely to be exposed to solid fuel -- including burning from wood, crop wastes, charcoal, and dung -- and its negative consequences.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Discovery of a new regulatory protein provides new tool for stem cell engineeringBioengineers have discovered a protein that regulates the switch of embryonic stem cells from the least developed 'naïve' state to the more developed 'primed' state. This discovery sheds light on stem cell development at a molecular level.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Using a method from Wall Street to track slow slipping of Earth's crustAn indicator for stock prices can be used with GPS data to automatically detect slow-slip earthquakes from a single station's observations, offering a new way to monitor seismic activity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Elevated blood pressure not a high mortality risk for elderly with weak gripA study of nearly 7,500 Americans age 65 or older suggests that elevated blood pressure is not related to high mortality risk among people in that age group with weak grip strength.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fairy circles of Namibia: New research helps scientists gain insightNew insights have been gained into one of nature's great mysteries: the fairy circles of Namibia. Numbering in the millions, the so-called fairy circles are in the eastern, interior margin of the coastal Namib Desert, stretching from southern Angola to northern South Africa. They range in size from about 12 feet to about 114 feet, consisting of bare patches of soil surrounded by rings of grass. Th
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Alcohol use in veterans with schizophrenia less common than thought; no level safeUS veterans who are being treated for schizophrenia are much less likely to drink any alcohol than the general population. But when they do misuse alcohol, it leads to worsening of their symptoms.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Evolving 'lovesick' organisms found survival in sexBeing 'lovesick' takes on a whole new meaning in a new theory which answers the unsolved fundamental question: why do we have sex?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Potential drugs and targets for brain repairResearchers have discovered drugs that activate signaling pathways leading to specific adult brain cell types from stem cells in the mouse brain, according to a new study. The results may open new avenues for drug development aimed at treatment of degenerative brain disorders.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Unraveling the functional diversity of longevity gene SIRT1While the search for elixir of life has captivated human imagination for millennia, researchers around the world have put in efforts to extend healthy lifespan and reduce the burden of morbid diseases in an increasingly aging population. Researchers have now identified a control mechanism within a longevity gene, which is key to unraveling its functional diversity and is likely to boost efforts at
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How bacteria hunt other bacteriaA bacterial species that hunts other bacteria has attracted interest as a potential antibiotic, but exactly how this predator tracks down its prey has not been clear. A new study reveals that the bacterial predator Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus homes in on its target by taking advantage of fluid forces generated by its own swimming movements and those of its prey. These bring the bacteria in close pr
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Vitamin D, calcium supplementation among older women does not significantly reduce risk of cancerAmong healthy postmenopausal women, supplementation with vitamin D3 and calcium compared with placebo did not result in a significantly lower risk of cancer after four years, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Celiac disease: Not enough evidence for screeningThe current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for celiac disease in asymptomatic persons, the US Preventive Services Task Force has concluded.
3h
Big Think

What Happens When Environmentalists Ignore Data? Rachel Carson effectively stopped the usage of DDT. This has led to disastrous consequences, writes Paul Offit in his new book, Pandora's Lab. Read More
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The Atlantic

Marathons Injure Kidneys Six years ago, a study from Michigan’s William Beaumont Hospital found that about 40 percent of runners suffer acute kidney injury after marathons. That sounds bad. Is it? Should I never run another marathon? Never run more than a few miles? Never leave this chair? The nephrologist Chirag Parikh, a professor of medicine at Yale, was unsure what to tell his patients. He knew that running marathons
3h
Ars Technica

Trump kills Clean Power Plan, orders agencies to ignore climate change Enlarge (credit: Tammy Anthony Baker ) After weeks of rumors and delays, President Trump signed an executive order on climate policies Tuesday at the headquarters of the Environmental Protection Agency—an agency the Trump administration tried to hit with a $247 million cut for the current fiscal year, according to Politico , and is seeking a 31 percent budget cut for next year. The order includes
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sun: Igniting a solar flare in the corona with lower-atmosphere kindlingRecent images have revealed the emergence of small-scale magnetic fields in the lower reaches of the corona researchers say may be linked to the onset of a main flare.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How a young-looking lunar volcano hides its true ageA young-looking volcanic caldera on the Moon has been interpreted by some as evidence of relatively recent lunar volcanic activity, but new research suggests it's not so young after all.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lead exposure in childhood linked to lower IQ, lower status jobs, as adultsA long-term study of 565 children who grew up in the era of leaded gasoline has shown that their exposure to the powerful neurotoxin may have led to a loss of intelligence and occupational standing by the time they reached age 38. Ninety-four percent of the children exceeded today's reference value of 5 micrograms of lead per deciliter of blood. For each 5-microgram increase in blood lead, a perso
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Gizmodo

DNA Is Being Collected to Protect Sex Workers, But It Could Also Be Used Against Them Image: Getty Nearly a decade ago, Dallas police proposed a new program designed to get sex workers off the streets. Rather than just send them to jail, police would set up shop at truck stops, accompanied by counselors, social workers and nurses, and give the sex workers a choice of either prison or talking to a counselor. But the program also had a grimmer, more ethically fraught component—colle
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Gizmodo

Here’s What You Have To Do To Get Behind The Wheel Of A Robot Car Back in December Uber refused to pay for a $150 permit to put semi-autonomous vehicles on the road in California. But that regulatory standoff ended this month when the company reversed course and said it would secure a permit after all . So, Jalopnik snagged a copy of the application. One notable part: it includes the program Uber gives to all drivers trained to operate the self-driving cars. It
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

As sea level rises, much of Honolulu and Waikiki vulnerable to groundwater inundationNew research from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa reveals a large part of the heavily urbanized area of Honolulu and Waikiki, Hawai'i is at risk of groundwater inundation--flooding that occurs as groundwater is lifted above the ground surface due to sea level rise. A newly-developed computer model simulates future flood scenarios in the urban core as sea level rises three feet, as is projected
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stop eating! You are fullA novel role as appetite suppressant for BH4, a well-known enzyme cofactor.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Supermassive black hole gets kicked to the galactic curbGravitational waves may have given a supermassive black hole a big kick, with enough energy to send it flying toward the edges of its host galaxy.
4h
Live Science

Elon Musk Wants to Computerize Your BrainNeuralink will aim to link the human brain to digital devices.
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Live Science

Boom! Russian Volcano Awakens After Centuries of SleepA Russian volcano erupted after 250 years of sleep.
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The Atlantic

Dave Chappelle Reckons With Himself Almost exactly halfway through Deep in the Heart of Texas , the second of his two comedy specials released on Netflix last week, Dave Chappelle does something unusual: He sits down. The live-wire comic perches on a stool in the center of the stage, plops his feet onto a speaker, and asks the crowd if anyone has a cigarette. He delivers the rest of the show like that, occasionally springing to his
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New Scientist - News

Trump signs executive order to reverse Obama’s climate policiesThe order targets the 2015 Clean Power Plan, which was meant to limit emissions from coal-fired power plants, and aims to relax fracking regulations
4h
Ars Technica

Potent LastPass exploit underscores the dark side of password managers (credit: Wikimedia ) Developers of the widely used LastPass password manager are scrambling to fix a serious vulnerability that makes it possible for malicious websites to steal user passcodes and in some cases execute malicious code on computers running the program. The flaw, which affects the latest version of the LastPass browser extension, was briefly described on Saturday by Tavis Ormandy, a
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tiny bacterium provides window into whole ecosystemsResearch on Prochlorococcus, the most abundant life form in the oceans, shows the bacteria's metabolism evolved in a way that may have helped trigger the rise of other organisms, to form a more complex marine ecosystem with overall greater biomass.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Vitamin D decreases risk of cancer, new study suggestsLow vitamin D status may increase the risk of cancer, suggests new research. The study is a randomized clinical trial of the effects of vitamin D supplementation on all types of cancer combined.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Understanding predictability, randomness by digging in the dirtWhen tilling soil, the blade of the tool cuts through dirt, loosening it in preparation for seeding. The dirt granules are pushed aside in a way that looks random -- but might not be. Now, researchers have found a way to distinguish whether such a process is truly random, or is actually deterministic -- which can lead to deeper understanding and the ability to control the process.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers shoot for success with simulations of laser pulse-material interactionsWith the advent of laser technology in the 1960s, materials scientists gained a new tool to both study and modify materials. Today, lasers allow researchers to manipulate materials on atomic and subatomic levels, leading to new materials and a host of other applications.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers shoot for success with simulations of laser pulse-material interactionsUniversity of Virginia professor Leonid Zhigilei led a team that used the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility's Titan supercomputer to gain deeper insights into laser interactions with metal surfaces.
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Science | The Guardian

Alien intelligence: the extraordinary minds of octopuses and other cephalopods After a startling encounter with a cuttlefish, Australian philosopher Peter Godfrey-Smith set out to explore the mysterious lives of cephalopods. He was left asking: why do such smart, optimistic creatures live such a short time? Inches above the seafloor of Sydney’s Cabbage Tree Bay, with the proximity made possible by several millimetres of neoprene and an oxygen tank, I’m just about eyeball to
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Insurance coverage for IVF increases chance of having babyWomen who pursue in vitro fertilization (IVF) to become pregnant are more likely to give birth if they have health insurance that covers the procedure, according to new research. The key reason is financial rather than medical: For many people, the high cost for one IVF procedure prohibits women from seeking a second treatment if the first attempt fails.
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NYT > Science

Trump Signs Executive Order Unwinding Obama Climate PoliciesFlanked by coal miners at the Environmental Protection Agency, President Trump signed an order directing the agency to start the process of rewriting the Clean Power Plan.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uber diversity report says 36 percent of employees are womenUber's first report on employee diversity shows low numbers for women, especially in technical positions. In that regard, the company is similar to other Silicon Valley giants such as Google, Facebook and Apple.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chinese tech company Tencent acquires 5 percent Tesla stakeChinese tech giant Tencent Holdings has acquired a 5 percent stake in electric car maker Tesla Inc.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Igniting a solar flare in the corona with lower-atmosphere kindlingScientists from NJIT's Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research are providing some of the first detailed views of the mechanisms that may trigger solar flares, colossal releases of magnetic energy in the Sun's corona that dispatch energized particles capable of penetrating Earth's atmosphere within an hour and disrupting orbiting satellites and electronic communications on the ground.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How a young-looking lunar volcano hides its true ageWhile orbiting the Moon in 1971, the crew of Apollo 15 photographed a strange geological feature—a bumpy, D-shaped depression about two miles long and a mile wide—that has fascinated planetary scientists ever since. Some have suggested that the feature, known as Ina, is evidence of a volcanic eruption Moon within the past 100 million years—a billion years or so after most volcanic activity on the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researcher weighs in on fairy circles of NamibiaA study conducted by researchers at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis adds new insights into one of nature's great mysteries: the fairy circles of Namibia.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fighting world hunger: Robotics aid in the study of corn and drought toleranceDeveloping drought tolerant corn that makes efficient use of available water will be vital to sustain the estimated 9 billion global population by 2050. In March 2014, the National Science Foundation (NSF) awarded the University of Missouri a $20 million grant as part of a multi-institutional consortium to study how corn maintains root growth during drought conditions. Using funding from the NSF,
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New on MIT Technology Review

Actually, Steve Mnuchin, Robots Have Already Affected the U.S. Labor MarketThe suggestion that job loss due to automation is 50 years off is laughable—and there’s finally some data to prove it.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Highway to health: Findings point way to more nutritious cropsAlmost every calorie that we eat at one time went through the veins of a plant. If a plant's circulatory system could be rejiggered to make more nutrients available - through bigger seeds or sweeter tomatoes - the world's farmers could feed more people.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study finds that elevating women's status lowers dependence on solid fuelsGlobally, more people die each year of indoor air pollution than HIV, TB and malaria combined. So why is household air pollution such a neglected health issue and what needs to change in order to stop this "silent killer of women"?
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A seismic mapping milestoneBecause of Earth's layered composition, scientists have often compared the basic arrangement of its interior to that of an onion. There's the familiar thin crust of continents and ocean floors; the thick mantle of hot, semisolid rock; the molten metal outer core; and the solid iron inner core.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Heated pavement technology tested at Des moines International AirportEngineers are testing heated pavement technologies at the Des Moines International Airport. They've installed two test slabs of electrically conductive concrete. And the pavement has effectively cleared ice and snow.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Can intergenerational cooperation defeat climate change?Older adults are powerful allies in addressing climate change, according to "Gray and Green Together: Climate Change in an Aging World," the latest edition of Public Policy & Aging Report (PP&AR) from The Gerontological Society of America (GSA).
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New method heats up ultrasonic approach to treating tumorsHigh-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a breakthrough therapeutic technique used to treat tumors. The principle of this noninvasive, targeted treatment is much like that of focusing sunlight through a lens, using an ultrasonic transducer like a convex lens to concentrate ultrasound into a small focal region. In an article appearing this week in the Journal of Applied Physics, a multi-institut
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Night lights, big data: Tool shows relationship between night-time lights and socio-economic factorsWhen the Earth is dark, human activity sparkles across the globe. As seen from space, night-time lights tell a story about how we live, correlating to everything from electricity consumption and CO2 emissions, to gross domestic product, population and poverty.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fighting world hunger: Robotics aid in the study of corn and drought toleranceDeveloping drought tolerant corn that makes efficient use of available water will be vital to sustain the estimated 9 billion global population by 2050. In March 2014, the National Science Foundation (NSF) awarded the University of Missouri a $20 million grant as part of a multi-institutional consortium to study how corn maintains root growth during drought conditions. Using funding from the NSF,
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rarely studied gene USF3 plays role in predisposition to thyroid cancerCharis Eng, M.D., Ph.D., of Cleveland Clinic and her team have discovered that a faulty, rarely studied gene called USF3 may predispose individuals to thyroid cancer. They recently published this discovery in Human Molecular Genetics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

TSRI researchers develop new method to 'fingerprint' HIVScientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have developed a method to analyze the glycan shield on HIV's protective outer glycoprotein, developed as a potential HIV vaccine candidate.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Alcohol use in veterans with schizophrenia less common than thought; no level safeUS veterans who are being treated for schizophrenia are much less likely to drink any alcohol than the general population. But when they do misuse alcohol, it leads to worsening of their symptoms.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How a young-looking lunar volcano hides its true ageA young-looking volcanic caldera on the moon has been interpreted by some as evidence of relatively recent lunar volcanic activity, but new research suggests it's not so young after all.
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Viden

Danmarks planer for autonome skibe er i seriøs nordisk konkurrenceNorsk firma forventer at have det første fjernstyrede skib i fuld størrelse klar allerede i 2018.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Highway to health: New findings point way to more nutritious cropsResearchers have had the closest look yet at the inner workings of a plant's circulatory system. Their findings show how nutrients get from the leaves, where they are produced through photosynthesis, to 'sinks' that can include the fruits and seeds we eat and the branches we process for biofuels.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Desktop scanners can be hijacked to perpetrate cyberattacksThe researchers conducted several demonstrations to transmit a message into computers connected to a flatbed scanner. Using direct laser light sources up to a half-mile (900 meters) away, as well as on a drone outside their office building, the researchers successfully sent a message to trigger malware through the scanner.
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Science : NPR

Device Mimicking Female Reproductive Cycle Could Aid Research Scientists have assembled a lab system from living tissue that can replicate a woman's 28-day hormonal cycle. The goal is to use the system to find new ways to treat a host of women's health problems. (Image credit: Courtesy of Northwestern University)
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Futurity.org

Migrating birds need these shrinking ‘rest stops’ Drought and reduced seasonal flooding of wetlands and farm fields threaten a globally important stopover site for tens of thousands of migratory shorebirds in California’s Sacramento Valley, a new study shows. Analysis of historical biweekly NASA Landsat satellite images of the valley reveals that flooded habitat near the peak time of spring migration has shrunk by more than twice the size of Was
4h
Scientific American Content: Global

NASA Technology Fights Flight DelaysA new air traffic control system could ensure that you spend less time flying the crowded skies -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Igniting a solar flare in the corona with lower-atmosphere kindlingRecent images captured by NJIT's 1.6-meter New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) have revealed the emergence of small-scale magnetic fields in the lower reaches of the corona the researchers say may be linked to the onset of a main flare.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

IUPUI researcher weighs in on fairy circles of NamibiaA study conducted by researchers at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis adds new insights into one of nature's great mysteries: the fairy circles of Namibia.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Elevated blood pressure not a high mortality risk for elderly with weak gripA study of nearly 7,500 Americans age 65 or older suggests that elevated blood pressure is not related to high mortality risk among people in that age group with weak grip strength.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New strategy identifies potential drugs and targets for brain repairResearchers have discovered drugs that activate signaling pathways leading to specific adult brain cell types from stem cells in the mouse brain, according to a study publishing on March 28 in the open access journal PLOS Biology by Kasum Azim of the University of Zurich and colleagues from INSERM/university of Lyon and University of Portsmouth. The results may open new avenues for drug developmen
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Effects of at-home cognitive stimulation therapy on dementia patients and caregiversIndividual cognitive stimulation therapy, an intervention carried out at home by family caregivers, has little impact on the cognition of patients with dementia, a new study has found, but boosts the quality of the relationship between the patient and caregiver. The new study, a randomized, controlled trial by Martin Orrell of the University of Nottingham, UK, and colleagues, is published in PLOS
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Gizmodo

Why SpaceX's Next Rocket Launch Is a Really Big Deal Image: SpaceX via Flickr Since its inception , SpaceX has been working toward developing reusable rockets. From a fiscal standpoint, the move makes a tremendous amount of sense: Not having to pay tens of million dollars to build a new first stage booster every time you launch is cost-effective, and would make launches a hell of a lot easier as a result. On Thursday , SpaceX will finally take the
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Futurity.org

Recovering lost Caribbean bats would take 8M years More than half of mammal species went extinct after human colonization in the Caribbean alone. Can nature restore the numbers of species on islands to levels that existed before human arrival—and, if so—how long would it take for nature to regain this lost mammal diversity? To answer these questions, researchers compiled data on New World leaf-nosed bats and their close relatives. These bats form
5h
Ars Technica

Sponges innocent of producing a toxic industrial chemical Enlarge / This branching tube sponge wouldn't seem to benefit much from a flame retardant. (credit: NOAA ) Scientific advancements have led to the introduction of many new chemicals into daily life. Unfortunately, along with their benefits, some of those chemicals have brought problems with toxicity. One group of chemicals that has faced this challenge is called polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PB
5h
Live Science

Cookbooks' Missing Ingredient? Food SafetyCookbooks may be leaving out a crucial step in recipes: food safety. The vast majority of recipes found in popular cookbooks offer little useful advice to keep you from getting sick, a new study finds.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New method heats up ultrasonic approach to treating tumorsHigh-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a breakthrough therapeutic technique used to treat tumors. The principle of this noninvasive, targeted treatment is much like that of focusing sunlight through a lens, using an ultrasonic transducer like a convex lens to concentrate ultrasound into a small focal region. Researchers have now designed a transducer for potential application in HIFU that can
5h
Gizmodo

Robots Are Already Replacing Human Workers at an Alarming Rate Kuka robots work on Tesla Model S cars in the Tesla factory in Fremont, California. (Image: AP) We all know, or at least suspect, that robots are taking people’s jobs, but new research shows the dramatic degree to which industrial robots are replacing human workers and forcing down wages. Each additional robot in the US economy reduces employment by 5.6 workers, and every robot that is added to t
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Ars Technica

New trailer for Spider-Man: Homecoming made me a believer It's trailer #2 for Spider-Man: Homecoming , and it's looking mighty fine. There's a new trailer out for Spider-Man: Homecoming , and I now officially love this movie. Or at least I like what I've seen of it in the trailers. This trailer gives us a much better sense of Peter Parker's arc in the movie, and it also gives us a chance to see him hanging out with his hilarious best friend, Ned Leeds (
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

It Sounds Crazy... But This Is A Treasure Map From Space | Cooper's Treasure Get ready for the greatest treasure hunt on Earth. Cooper's Treasure premieres Tuesday April 18th at 10/9c on Discovery. Full Episodes of Your Favorites Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery From: Discovery
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds that elevating women's status lowers dependence on solid fuelsA new research paper finds that in countries where gender inequalities are most pronounced, women are much more likely to be exposed to solid fuel -- including burning from wood, crop wastes, charcoal, and dung -- and its negative consequences.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Night lights, big dataResearchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) have developed an online tool that incorporates 21 years of night-time lights data to understand and compare changes in human activities in countries around the world.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tiny bacterium provides window into whole ecosystemsMIT research on Prochlorococcus, the most abundant life form in the oceans, shows the bacteria's metabolism evolved in a way that may have helped trigger the rise of other organisms, to form a more complex marine ecosystem with overall greater biomass.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Highway to health: WSU findings point way to more nutritious cropsWashington State University researchers have had the closest look yet at the inner workings of a plant's circulatory system. Their findings show how nutrients get from the leaves, where they are produced through photosynthesis, to 'sinks' that can include the fruits and seeds we eat and the branches we process for biofuels.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Broad support exists for larger warnings on cigarette packsA UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center study found broad support, even among smokers, for increasing the size of health warnings on cigarette packs.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dust contributes valuable nutrients to Sierra Nevada forest ecosystemsDust from as close as California's Central Valley and as far away as Asia's Gobi Desert provides nutrients, especially phosphorus, to vegetation in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, a team of scientists has found.
5h
WIRED

Ridley Scott Reveals the Origin of His Androids in the Alien Saga It all goes back to HAL 9000. The post Ridley Scott Reveals the Origin of His Androids in the Alien Saga appeared first on WIRED .
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Futurity.org

Clinic blood tests can miss ‘masked’ hypertension Monitoring blood pressure around the clock during daily activity revealed masked, or undetected, high blood pressure in a significant number of otherwise healthy people, research shows. “These findings debunk the widely held belief that ambulatory blood pressure is usually lower than clinic blood pressure,” says lead author Joseph E. Schwartz, professor of psychiatry and sociology at Stony Brook
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Futurity.org

Swirls are a step toward self-propelled fluid Imagine a liquid that could move on its own without human effort or the pull of gravity. You could put it in a container flat on a table, not touch it in any way, and it would still flow. As reported in Science , researchers have taken the first step in creating a self-propelling liquid. The finding offers the promise of developing an entirely new class of fluids that can flow without human or me
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rescuing 11 Asian Elephants from a mud holeThe rescue of 11 Asian Elephants (Elephas maximus) from a mud hole inside the Keo Seima Wildlife Sanctuary, Mondulkiri Province, Cambodia, on 24th March 2017 avoided a tragedy for wildlife conservation in Cambodia.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brain stimulation improves schizophrenia-like cognitive problemsA new study finds that stimulating the cerebellum in rats with schizophrenia-like thinking problems normalizes brain activity in the frontal cortex and corrects the rats' ability to estimate the passage of time -- a cognitive deficit that is characteristic in people with schizophrenia.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Watching the passage of knotted DNA slip through nanoporesHow can long DNA filaments, which have convoluted and highly knotted structure, manage to pass through the tiny pores of biological systems? Scientists used computer simulations to investigate the options available to the genetic material in such situations.
5h
Live Science

Love Bugs: Couple Donates 'World-Class' $10M Insect CollectionMore than a million insect specimens will be added to the Arizona State University entomology collection.
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Gizmodo

Johnny Depp Will Play John McAfee in a New Movie, But Will There Be Bath Salts? Image: Getty Movie fans rejoice! The obvious cinematic tale of John McAfee allegedly doing drugs, having sex, and going out of his mind in Belize will become a movie. Johnny Depp will play John McAfee, an obvious choice. But how will the A-lister manage to look as decrepit as the anti-virus software mogul? Bath salts, probably . Deadline casually reported the news of Johnny Depp starring in a fil
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Gizmodo

Charge Your Phone, Cut Your Seatbelt, and Break a Window With This $21 Flashlight Suaoki 4-in-1 Cree LED Flashlight , $21 with code MNL6I62Q A USB-rechargeable Cree LED flashlight for $21 would be a pretty good deal under any circumstances, but this one includes a seatbelt cutter, window hammer, and even a 10,400mAh USB battery charger. Plus, it includes IPX6 waterproofing, so you’ll still be able to use it if you drive your car into a lake (though in that situation, I’d focus
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Prostate screening often occurs without discussion of benefits, risksLess than a third of men in a large national survey reported talking with their doctor about both the pros and cons of the PSA blood test for prostate cancer, and the likelihood has decreased further since a national panel recommended against the test.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Toward glow-in-the-dark tumors: New fluorescent probe could light up cancerA fluorescent probe lights up the enzyme beta-galactosidase in a cell culture. The glowing probe-enzyme combination could make tumors fluoresce, allowing surgeons to cut away cancer while leaving healthy tissue intact.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Interaction among proteins that cause cancer cells to metastasizeResearchers have identified an interaction among proteins that allows cancer cells to grow and metastasize. They say the discovery may play a role in developing a better understanding of how tumors grow in a variety of malignancies, including breast, prostate, pancreatic, colon, lung and skin cancers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

EPA's controlled human exposure studies of air pollution are warrantedA new report finds these studies are warranted and recommends that they continue under two conditions: when they provide additional knowledge that informs policy decisions and regulation of pollutants that cannot be obtained by other means, and when it is reasonably predictable that the risks for study participants will not exceed biomarker or physiologic responses that are of short duration and r
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NYT > Science

Severe Eczema Drug Is Approved by F.D.A.; Price Tag Is $37,000 a YearThe drug makers Regeneron Pharmaceuticals and Sanofi made a rare move, negotiating with insurers in advance over the price for Dupixent.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New method heats up ultrasonic approach to treating tumorsHigh-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a breakthrough therapeutic technique used to treat tumors. The principle of this noninvasive, targeted treatment is much like that of focusing sunlight through a lens, using an ultrasonic transducer like a convex lens to concentrate ultrasound into a small focal region. Researchers have now designed a transducer for potential application in HIFU that can
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A seismic mapping milestoneUsing advanced modeling and simulation, seismic data generated by earthquakes, and one of the world's fastest supercomputers, a team led by Jeroen Tromp of Princeton University is creating a detailed 3-D picture of Earth's interior. Currently, the team is focused on imaging the entire globe from the surface to the core-mantle boundary, a depth of 1,800 miles.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can intergenerational cooperation defeat climate change?Older adults are powerful allies in addressing climate change, according to 'Gray and Green Together: Climate Change in an Aging World,' the latest edition of Public Policy & Aging Report (PP&AR) from The Gerontological Society of America (GSA).
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Ars Technica

Finally, some details about how NASA actually plans to get to Mars NASA NASA has spent the last six years building the massive Space Launch System rocket , but beyond making general statements about a “Journey to Mars,” the agency has not provided much detail about how the SLS booster would be used to that end. This situation began to change on Tuesday, when the agency’s chief of human spaceflight, Bill Gerstenmaier, briefed the agency’s advisory council on tent
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Viden

Autonome skibe skal gøre livet lettere og sikrere for søfolkNår der er fare på færde kan skib og besætning arbejde sammen for højere sikkerhed.
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Ars Technica

Tesla worker claims company did little to halt racial, sexual harassment Tesla Factory in Fremont, California. (credit: Maurizio Pesce ) A worker at Tesla’s factory in Fremont, California, has sued the company over what he claims are months of racial, sexual, and physical harassment by his co-workers. Tesla did little to stop it, the suit alleges. The lawsuit was filed Monday in Alameda County Superior Court on behalf of Dewitt Lambert, an African-American man who mov
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Big Think

This Awesome LEGO-Compatible Tape Has Raised More than $1.4M on Indiegogo You know what would make LEGO even better? A base tape that lets you build against gravity. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Toward glow-in-the-dark tumors: New fluorescent probe could light up cancerA fluorescent probe developed by Michigan Tech chemist Haiying Liu lights up the enzyme beta-galactosidase in a cell culture. The glowing probe-enzyme combination could make tumors fluoresce, allowing surgeons to cut away cancer while leaving healthy tissue intact.
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Ars Technica

Will the Supreme Court end the East Texas patent scam? Enlarge / People wait in line to enter the US Supreme Court building in January 2016. (credit: Mark Wilson/Getty Images) It didn't take long during oral arguments yesterday for the Supreme Court to hear about the "single judge in the United States that has one-quarter of all patent cases" from a lawyer representing patent defendant TC Heartland. Now, the question is what the court will do about i
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Gizmodo

The First Footage From Jumanji Is Surprisingly Very Fun Image: via The Rock. No, Seriously . Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (the actual new title) won’t open until Christmas, but exhibitors got a first look at footage from the film at CinemaCon 2017. It revealed the not-so-secret premise, a connection to Robin Williams and, frankly, a lot of fun, family-friendly action. It starts with four high school kids going to detention. Their punishment is to cl
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The Atlantic

Germany Is Taking Away Kindergarteners' Toys to Curb Future Addiction At a Berlin day-care center, the children packed away all the toys: the cars, the tiny plastic animals, the blocks and Legos, even the board games and most of the art materials. They then stood in the empty classroom and looked at their two instructors. “What should I do now?” my son, then 5, asked. He did not get an answer to this question for a long time. His day-care center, or kita , was star
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Samsung's fire-prone Note 7 phone may return after recallsSamsung's fire-prone Galaxy Note 7 phone might come back as refurbished or rental phones.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Desktop scanners can be hijacked to perpetrate cyberattacksA typical office scanner can be infiltrated and a company's network compromised using different light sources, according to a new paper by researchers from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev and the Weizmann Institute of Science.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

It's not too late to conserve water resources in rapidly urbanizing areasAs climate change and population pressure both intensify in suburban areas northwest of Boston in the coming decades, a new study by watershed scientist Timothy Randhir of the University of Massachusetts Amherst suggests that threats to the area's watershed such as water shortages and poor quality can be met if managers begin to act now.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Prostate screening often occurs without discussion of benefits, risksLess than a third of men in a large national survey reported talking with their doctor about both the pros and cons of the PSA blood test for prostate cancer, and the likelihood has decreased further since a national panel recommended against the test.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

It's not too late to conserve water resources in rapidly urbanizing areasAs climate change and population pressure intensify in suburbia, a new study by watershed scientist Timothy Randhir at UMass Amherst suggests that threats such as water shortages and poor quality can be met if managers begin to act now. 'A lot of studies in hydrology climate science focus on climate, but very few combine the two, land use and its synergy with climate change.' He modeled how this w
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Desktop scanners can be hijacked to perpetrate cyberattacksThe researchers conducted several demonstrations to transmit a message into computers connected to a flatbed scanner. Using direct laser light sources up to a half-mile (900 meters) away, as well as on a drone outside their office building, the researchers successfully sent a message to trigger malware through the scanner.
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Ars Technica

Would you consider a disc-free console option? Enlarge / Take THAT, legacy media! When dredging up the Xbox One's brief used game policy debacle of 2013 yesterday, I was reminded of an interesting bit of trivia that came out in the aftermath of that story. Apparently, as late as mid-2013, Microsoft was considering making the Xbox One completely disc-free . Microsoft eventually rejected that plan because, as Microsoft Studios head Phil Spencer
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Spray-on mosquito repellents are more effective than other devicesTo avoid mosquito bites, stick with spray-on repellents and skip the bracelets and citronella candles, a new study says.
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Popular Science

To save their land, they unveiled the world’s biggest dinosaur footprint Science Australia has always had the market cornered on enormous animals trying to kill you The Goolarabooloo people have been singing about dinosaur footprints for thousands of years—they just don’t call them ‘dinosaurs.’ Read on.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Machine-Learning Algorithm Watches Dance Dance Revolution, Then Creates Dances of Its OwnA machine learns to choreograph by studying a famous 1990s music video game.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fluorescent probe could light up cancerA fluorescent probe developed by Michigan Tech chemist Haiying Liu illuminates the enzyme beta-galactosidase in a cell culture, which could help cancer surgeons.
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Gizmodo

Dear President Trump: Throwing Out The First Pitch At The Nats Game Will Heal This Nation Photo credit: Charles Krupa/AP Dear Mr. President, I just read a report from The Politico that says you are considering throwing out the ceremonial first pitch at the Washington Nationals’ home opener on Monday. As a baseball fan and as a patriot, I urge you to meet this challenge. Perhaps you are worried about the fact that you received only four percent of the vote in the District of Columbia i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

European scientists, officials warn against US climate planScientists, officials and environmental campaigners in Europe said Tuesday that the United States would be damaging its own interests if it rolls back the previous administration's efforts to curb climate change.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A molecular on/off switch for CRISPRPicture bacteria and viruses locked in an arms race. For many bacteria, one line of defense against viral infection is a sophisticated RNA-guided "immune system" called CRISPR-Cas. At the center of this system is a surveillance complex that recognizes viral DNA and triggers its destruction. However, viruses can strike back and disable this surveillance complex using "anti-CRISPR" proteins, though
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cornering endangered speciesAs certain species decline in number, the geographic areas they inhabit also shrink. Still, even with less space to occupy, these decreasing populations manage to remain locally abundant.
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

AMPK blocks starvation-inducible transgenerational defects in Caenorhabditis elegans [Developmental Biology]Life history events, such as traumatic stress, illness, or starvation, can influence us through molecular changes that are recorded in a pattern of characteristic chromatin modifications. These modifications are often associated with adaptive adjustments in gene expression that can persist throughout the lifetime of the organism, or even span multiple...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Injury-stimulated and self-restrained BMP signaling dynamically regulates stem cell pool size during Drosophila midgut regeneration [Developmental Biology]Many adult organs rely on resident stem cells to maintain homeostasis. Upon injury, stem cells increase proliferation, followed by lineage differentiation to replenish damaged cells. Whether stem cells also change division mode to transiently increase their population size as part of a regenerative program and, if so, what the underlying...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Hormone and receptor interplay in the regulation of mosquito lipid metabolism [Developmental Biology]Mosquitoes transmit devastating human diseases because they need vertebrate blood for egg development. Metabolism in female mosquitoes is tightly coupled with blood meal-mediated reproduction, which requires an extremely high level of energy consumption. Functional analysis has shown that major genes encoding for enzymes involved in lipid metabolism (LM) in the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Multitrait successional forest dynamics enable diverse competitive coexistence [Ecology]To explain diversity in forests, niche theory must show how multiple plant species coexist while competing for the same resources. Although successional processes are widespread in forests, theoretical work has suggested that differentiation in successional strategy allows only a few species stably to coexist, including only a single shade tolerant....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Osmolality/salinity-responsive enhancers (OSREs) control induction of osmoprotective genes in euryhaline fish [Evolution]Fish respond to salinity stress by transcriptional induction of many genes, but the mechanism of their osmotic regulation is unknown. We developed a reporter assay using cells derived from the brain of the tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus (OmB cells) to identify osmolality/salinity-responsive enhancers (OSREs) in the genes of O. mossambicus. Genomic...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Loss of LMOD1 impairs smooth muscle cytocontractility and causes megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome in humans and mice [Genetics]Megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) is a congenital visceral myopathy characterized by severe dilation of the urinary bladder and defective intestinal motility. The genetic basis of MMIHS has been ascribed to spontaneous and autosomal dominant mutations in actin gamma 2 (ACTG2), a smooth muscle contractile gene. However, evidence suggesting...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Cathepsin S is the maȷor activator of the psoriasis-associated proinflammatory cytokine IL-36{gamma} [Immunology and Inflammation]The proinflammatory cytokine IL-36γ is highly expressed in epithelial cells and is a pivotal mediator of epithelial inflammation. In particular, IL-36γ is strongly associated with the inflammatory skin disease psoriasis. As with other IL-1 cytokines, IL-36γ is expressed as an inactive precursor and must be processed by specific proteases to...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Receptor Mincle promotes skin allergies and is capable of recognizing cholesterol sulfate [Immunology and Inflammation]Sterile (noninfected) inflammation underlies the pathogenesis of many widespread diseases, such as allergies and autoimmune diseases. The evolutionarily conserved innate immune system is considered to play a key role in tissue injury recognition and the subsequent development of sterile inflammation; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not yet completely understood....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Inhibition of atherogenesis by the COP9 signalosome subunit 5 in vivo [Immunology and Inflammation]Constitutive photomorphogenesis 9 (COP9) signalosome 5 (CSN5), an isopeptidase that removes neural precursor cell-expressed, developmentally down-regulated 8 (NEDD8) moieties from cullins (thus termed “deNEDDylase”) and a subunit of the cullin-RING E3 ligase-regulating COP9 signalosome complex, attenuates proinflammatory NF-κB signaling. We previously showed that CSN5 is up-regulated in human athe
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Exhaustion-associated regulatory regions in CD8+ tumor-infiltrating T cells [Immunology and Inflammation]T-cell exhaustion is a progressive loss of effector function and memory potential due to persistent antigen exposure, which occurs in chronic viral infections and cancer. Here we investigate the relation between gene expression and chromatin accessibility in CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) that recognize a model tumor antigen and have features...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Mouse cytomegalovirus M36 and M45 death suppressors cooperate to prevent inflammation resulting from antiviral programmed cell death pathways [Microbiology]The complex interplay between caspase-8 and receptor-interacting protein (RIP) kinase RIP 3 (RIPK3) driving extrinsic apoptosis and necroptosis is not fully understood. Murine cytomegalovirus triggers both apoptosis and necroptosis in infected cells; however, encoded inhibitors of caspase-8 activity (M36) and RIP3 signaling (M45) suppress these antiviral responses. Here, we report...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Nielsen et al., Opinion: Gender diversity leads to better science [Correction]OPINION Correction for “Opinion: Gender diversity leads to better science,” by Mathias Wullum Nielsen, Sharla Alegria, Love Börjeson, Henry Etzkowitz, Holly J. Falk-Krzesinski, Aparna Joshi, Erin Leahey, Laurel Smith-Doerr, Anita Williams Woolley, and Londa Schiebinger, which appeared in issue 8, February 21, 2017, of Proc Natl Acad Sci USA (114:1740–1742;...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Koop, Crystals creeping out of cracks [Correction]COMMENTARY Correction for “Crystals creeping out of cracks,” by Thomas Koop, which appeared in issue 5, January 31, 2017, of Proc Natl Acad Sci USA (114:797–799; first published January 19, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1620084114). The author notes that panel E in Fig. 1 appeared incorrectly. The corrected figure and its legend appear...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Sethna et al., Insights into immune system development and function from mouse T-cell repertoires [Correction]BIOPHYSICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY Correction for “Insights into immune system development and function from mouse T-cell repertoires,” by Zachary Sethna, Yuval Elhanati, Chrissy S. Dudgeon, Curtis G. Callan Jr., Arnold J. Levine, Thierry Mora, and Aleksandra M. Walczak, which appeared in issue 9, February 28, 2017, of Proc Natl Acad...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Hou et al., Homeostatic regulation of AMPA receptor expression at single hippocampal synapses [Correction]NEUROSCIENCE Correction for “Homeostatic regulation of AMPA receptor expression at single hippocampal synapses,” by Qingming Hou, Dawei Zhang, Larissa Jarzylo, Richard L. Huganir, and Heng-Ye Man, which appeared in issue 2, January 15, 2008, of Proc Natl Acad Sci USA (105:775–780; first published January 3, 2008; 10.1073/pnas.0706447105). The authors note...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Relevance of the alternate conductance states of anthrax toxin channel [Biological Sciences]In their recent article in PNAS, Das and Krantz (1) attempt to relate the previously described (2, 3) alternate conductance substate of the anthrax toxin protective antigen (PA63) channel to the allosteric helix compression model (4). Although we do not intend to discuss the differences between this model and the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Yamini and Nestorovich: Alternate clamped states of the anthrax toxin protective antigen channel [Biological Sciences]Yamini and Nestorovich (1) recently commented on our article in PNAS (2). In their letter, they weigh in on two issues with the previously reported (3, 4) alternate conductance substate of the protective antigen (PA) translocase channel. The first point they raised was whether the conductance substate was a clamped...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Effect of material flexibility on the thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrophobically induced evaporation of water [Applied Physical Sciences]The evaporation of water induced by confinement between hydrophobic surfaces has received much attention due to its suggested functional role in numerous biophysical phenomena and its importance as a general mechanism of hydrophobic self-assembly. Although much progress has been made in understanding the basic physics of hydrophobically induced evaporation, a...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Electron transfer between anatase TiO2 and an O2 molecule directly observed by atomic force microscopy [Chemistry]Activation of molecular oxygen is a key step in converting fuels into energy, but there is precious little experimental insight into how the process proceeds at the atomic scale. Here, we show that a combined atomic force microscopy/scanning tunneling microscopy (AFM/STM) experiment can both distinguish neutral O2 molecules in the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structural basis for specific ligation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {delta} [Chemistry]The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) family comprises three subtypes: PPARα, PPARγ, and PPARδ. PPARδ transcriptionally modulates lipid metabolism and the control of energy homeostasis; therefore, PPARδ agonists are promising agents for treating a variety of metabolic disorders. In the present study, we develop a panel of rationally designed PPARδ agonists....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Biological regulation of atmospheric chemistry en route to planetary oxygenation [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Emerging evidence suggests that atmospheric oxygen may have varied before rising irreversibly ∼2.4 billion years ago, during the Great Oxidation Event (GOE). Significantly, however, pre-GOE atmospheric aberrations toward more reducing conditions—featuring a methane-derived organic-haze—have recently been suggested, yet their occurrence, causes, and significance remain underexplored. To examine the
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Optimal run-and-tumble-based transportation of a Janus particle with active steering [Physics]Although making artificial micrometric swimmers has been made possible by using various propulsion mechanisms, guiding their motion in the presence of thermal fluctuations still remains a great challenge. Such a task is essential in biological systems, which present a number of intriguing solutions that are robust against noisy environmental conditions...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Cross-cousin marriage among the Yanomamo shows evidence of parent-offspring conflict and mate competition between brothers [Anthropology]Marriage in many traditional societies often concerns the institutionalized exchange of reproductive partners among groups of kin. Such exchanges most often involve cross-cousins—marriage with the child of a parent’s opposite-sex sibling—but it is unclear who benefits from these exchanges. Here we analyze the fitness consequences of marrying relatives among the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Morphological features of IFN-{gamma}-stimulated mesenchymal stromal cells predict overall immunosuppressive capacity [Applied Biological Sciences]Human mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) lines can vary significantly in their functional characteristics, and the effectiveness of MSC-based therapeutics may be realized by finding predictive features associated with MSC function. To identify features associated with immunosuppressive capacity in MSCs, we developed a robust in vitro assay that uses principal-component analysis...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Photocyclic behavior of rhodopsin induced by an atypical isomerization mechanism [Biochemistry]Vertebrate rhodopsin (Rh) contains 11-cis-retinal as a chromophore to convert light energy into visual signals. On absorption of light, 11-cis-retinal is isomerized to all-trans-retinal, constituting a one-way reaction that activates transducin (Gt) followed by chromophore release. Here we report that bovine Rh, regenerated instead with a six-carbon-ring retinal chromophore featuring...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Phytosphingosine degradation pathway includes fatty acid {alpha}-oxidation reactions in the endoplasmic reticulum [Biochemistry]Although normal fatty acids (FAs) are degraded via β-oxidation, unusual FAs such as 2-hydroxy (2-OH) FAs and 3-methyl-branched FAs are degraded via α-oxidation. Phytosphingosine (PHS) is one of the long-chain bases (the sphingolipid components) and exists in specific tissues, including the epidermis and small intestine in mammals. In the degradation...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structure-guided SCHEMA recombination generates diverse chimeric channelrhodopsins [Biochemistry]Integral membrane proteins (MPs) are key engineering targets due to their critical roles in regulating cell function. In engineering MPs, it can be extremely challenging to retain membrane localization capability while changing other desired properties. We have used structure-guided SCHEMA recombination to create a large set of functionally diverse chimeras...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Multisite aggregation of p53 and implications for drug rescue [Biochemistry]Protein aggregation is involved in many diseases. Often, a unique aggregation-prone sequence polymerizes to form regular fibrils. Many oncogenic mutants of the tumor suppressor p53 rapidly aggregate but form amorphous fibrils. A peptide surrounding Ile254 is proposed to be the aggregation-driving sequence in cells. We identified several different aggregating sites...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Phosphorylation-induced conformational dynamics in an intrinsically disordered protein and potential role in phenotypic heterogeneity [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) that lack a unique 3D structure and comprise a large fraction of the human proteome play important roles in numerous cellular functions. Prostate-Associated Gene 4 (PAGE4) is an IDP that acts as a potentiator of the Activator Protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factor. Homeodomain-Interacting Protein Kinase 1 (HIPK1)...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Bacterial proteostasis balances energy and chaperone utilization efficiently [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Chaperones are protein complexes that help to fold and disaggregate a cell’s proteins. It is not understood how four major chaperone systems of Escherichia coli work together in proteostasis: the recognition, sorting, folding, and disaggregating of the cell’s many different proteins. Here, we model this machine. We combine extensive data...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Large-scale identification of coevolution signals across homo-oligomeric protein interfaces by direct coupling analysis [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Proteins have evolved to perform diverse cellular functions, from serving as reaction catalysts to coordinating cellular propagation and development. Frequently, proteins do not exert their full potential as monomers but rather undergo concerted interactions as either homo-oligomers or with other proteins as hetero-oligomers. The experimental study of such protein complexes...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Fission yeast myosin I facilitates PI(4,5)P2-mediated anchoring of cytoplasmic dynein to the cortex [Cell Biology]Several key processes in the cell, such as vesicle transport and spindle positioning, are mediated by the motor protein cytoplasmic dynein, which produces force on the microtubule. For the functions that require movement of the centrosome and the associated nuclear material, dynein needs to have a stable attachment at the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Toll pathway is required for wound-induced expression of barrier repair genes in the Drosophila epidermis [Developmental Biology]The epidermis serves as a protective barrier in animals. After epidermal injury, barrier repair requires activation of many wound response genes in epidermal cells surrounding wound sites. Two such genes in Drosophila encode the enzymes dopa decarboxylase (Ddc) and tyrosine hydroxylase (ple). In this paper we explore the involvement of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Overcoming catastrophic forgetting in neural networks [Applied Mathematics]The ability to learn tasks in a sequential fashion is crucial to the development of artificial intelligence. Until now neural networks have not been capable of this and it has been widely thought that catastrophic forgetting is an inevitable feature of connectionist models. We show that it is possible to...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Volatile secondary metabolites as aposematic olfactory signals and defensive weapons in aquatic environments [Chemistry]Olfaction is considered a distance sense; hence, aquatic olfaction is thought to be mediated only by molecules dissolved in water. Here, we challenge this view by showing that shrimp and fish can recognize the presence of hydrophobic olfactory cues by a “tactile” form of chemoreception. We found that odiferous furanosesquiterpenes...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Storage and release of hydrogen cyanide in a chelicerate (Oribatula tibialis) [Chemistry]Cyanogenesis denotes a chemical defensive strategy where hydrogen cyanide (HCN, hydrocyanic or prussic acid) is produced, stored, and released toward an attacking enemy. The high toxicity and volatility of HCN requires both chemical stabilization for storage and prevention of accidental self-poisoning. The few known cyanogenic animals are exclusively mandibulate arthropods...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Fossil and genomic evidence constrains the timing of bison arrival in North America [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]The arrival of bison in North America marks one of the most successful large-mammal dispersals from Asia within the last million years, yet the timing and nature of this event remain poorly determined. Here, we used a combined paleontological and paleogenomic approach to provide a robust timeline for the entry...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Flowering phenology shifts in response to biodiversity loss [Ecology]Observational studies and experimental evidence agree that rising global temperatures have altered plant phenology—the timing of life events, such as flowering, germination, and leaf-out. Other large-scale global environmental changes, such as nitrogen deposition and altered precipitation regimes, have also been linked to changes in flowering times. Despite our increased understanding...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Transcriptional landscape of the human cell cycle [Genetics]Steady-state gene expression across the cell cycle has been studied extensively. However, transcriptional gene regulation and the dynamics of histone modification at different cell-cycle stages are largely unknown. By applying a combination of global nuclear run-on sequencing (GRO-seq), RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), and histone-modification Chip sequencing (ChIP-seq), we depicted a comprehensive...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Gentamicin B1 is a minor gentamicin component with major nonsense mutation suppression activity [Genetics]Nonsense mutations underlie about 10% of rare genetic disease cases. They introduce a premature termination codon (PTC) and prevent the formation of full-length protein. Pharmaceutical gentamicin, a mixture of several related aminoglycosides, is a frequently used antibiotic in humans that can induce PTC readthrough and suppress nonsense mutations at high...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Modulating IgG effector function by Fc glycan engineering [Immunology and Inflammation]IgG antibodies contain a conserved N-glycosylation site on the Fc domain to which a complex, biantennary glycan is attached. The fine structures of this glycan modulate antibody effector functions by affecting the binding affinity of the Fc to diverse Fc receptor family members. For example, core fucosylation significantly decreases antibody-dependent...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Genetic variation in chromosome Y regulates susceptibility to influenza A virus infection [Immunology and Inflammation]Males of many species, ranging from humans to insects, are more susceptible than females to parasitic, fungal, bacterial, and viral infections. One mechanism that has been proposed to account for this difference is the immunocompetence handicap model, which posits that the greater infectious disease burden in males is due to...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Small molecule selectively suppresses MYC transcription in cancer cells [Medical Sciences]Stauprimide is a staurosporine analog that promotes embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation by inhibiting nuclear localization of the MYC transcription factor NME2, which in turn results in down-regulation of MYC transcription. Given the critical role the oncogene MYC plays in tumor initiation and maintenance, we explored the potential of stauprimide...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

B vitamins attenuate the epigenetic effects of ambient fine particles in a pilot human intervention trial [Medical Sciences]Acute exposure to fine particle (PM2.5) induces DNA methylation changes implicated in inflammation and oxidative stress. We conducted a crossover trial to determine whether B-vitamin supplementation averts such changes. Ten healthy adults blindly received a 2-h, controlled-exposure experiment to sham under placebo, PM2.5 (250 μg/m3) under placebo, and PM2.5 (250...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Selective dietary supplementation in early postpartum is associated with high resilience against depressed mood [Medical Sciences]Medical research is moving toward prevention strategies during prodromal states. Postpartum blues (PPB) is often a prodromal state for postpartum depression (PPD), with severe PPB strongly associated with an elevated risk for PPD. The most common complication of childbearing, PPD has a prevalence of 13%, but there are no widespread...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Host immunity to Plasmodium falciparum and the assessment of emerging artemisinin resistance in a multinational cohort [Microbiology]Artemisinin-resistant falciparum malaria, defined by a slow-clearance phenotype and the presence of kelch13 mutants, has emerged in the Greater Mekong Subregion. Naturally acquired immunity to malaria clears parasites independent of antimalarial drugs. We hypothesized that between- and within-population variations in host immunity influence parasite clearance after artemisinin treatment and the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Patterns of coordinated cortical remodeling during adolescence and their associations with functional specialization and evolutionary expansion [Neuroscience]During adolescence, the human cortex undergoes substantial remodeling to support a rapid expansion of behavioral repertoire. Accurately quantifying these changes is a prerequisite for understanding normal brain development, as well as the neuropsychiatric disorders that emerge in this vulnerable period. Past accounts have demonstrated substantial regional heterogeneity in patterns of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE2 negatively regulates cellulose synthesis in Arabidopsis by phosphorylating cellulose synthase 1 [Plant Biology]The deposition of cellulose is a defining aspect of plant growth and development, but regulation of this process is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the protein kinase BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE2 (BIN2), a key negative regulator of brassinosteroid (BR) signaling, can phosphorylate Arabidopsis cellulose synthase A1 (CESA1), a subunit of the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Noncanonical role of Arabidopsis COP1/SPA complex in repressing BIN2-mediated PIF3 phosphorylation and degradation in darkness [Plant Biology]The E3 ligase CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1 (COP1) has been known to mediate key signaling factors for degradation via the ubiquitin/26S proteasome pathway in both plants and animals. Here, we report a noncanonical function of Arabidopsis COP1, the central repressor of photomorphogenesis, in the form of a COP1/ SUPPRESSOR of phyA-105...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Bison invasion of North America Modern American bison. Image courtesy of the Government of Yukon. The arrival of bison in North America from Asia was an ecologically significant event, causing a major upheaval within the established large mammal community. The timing of the first bison arrival in North America remains...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

QnAs with Marcia McNutt [QnAs]When geophysicist Marcia McNutt learned that she had been nominated to stand for election as president of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), she modestly pointed out to the selection committee that, although she felt honored, she was surprised to be chosen from a pool of what were surely far...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

George Klein: 1925-2016 [Retrospectives]George Klein, famous cancer biologist and acclaimed writer on matters of science, human responsibility, and the human condition, decorated by innumerable awards, honorary doctorates and other honors, elected member of this Academy and many other learned societies, including the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences and the American Philosophical Society, and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Manipulating molecules with quantum light [Chemistry]It was first realized by Purcell (1) that the spontaneous emission rate of a quantum system can be enhanced or suppressed by placing it in a resonant radiofrequency cavity. Spontaneous emission as it was first theoretically described by Einstein (2) is not a pure property of matter. It is described...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Can self-awareness be taught? Monkeys pass the mirror test—again [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]“Mirrors,” she said, “are never to be trusted.” Neil Gaiman, Coraline The ability to recognize oneself in the mirror is often held as evidence of self-awareness. However, children under the age of 2 y and most animals do not behave as if their mirrored reflection represents their own face or...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Rationally designed PPAR{delta}-specific agonists and their therapeutic potential for metabolic syndrome [Chemistry]The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) family of nuclear receptors regulates a wide variety of lipid-related genes, including those responsible for adipose differentiation, cholesterol metabolism, and lipid metabolism and transport. There are three different PPAR nuclear receptors, with different localizations and specializations. PPARα is primarily expressed in the liver, heart, ki
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Collaboration, conflict, and disconnect between psychologists and economists [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]In PNAS, Bruine de Bruin and Fischhoff (1) describe two collaborations of psychologists and economists in which they made the central contributions by psychologists. In both cases, the objective was to design survey questions that measure in probabilistic terms the expectations that individuals hold for future events. They judged both...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Glass transition imminent, resistance is futile [Applied Physical Sciences]The immense variety of glassy materials around us makes it is easy to get caught up in excessive detail when thinking about the structural glass transition. For decades, there have been only a few attempts to describe covalently bonded, molecular, and metallic glasses on the same footing, so different do...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Eliciting probabilistic expectations: Collaborations between psychologists and economists [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]We describe two collaborations in which psychologists and economists provided essential support on foundational projects in major research programs. One project involved eliciting adolescents’ expectations regarding significant future life events affecting their psychological and economic development. The second project involved eliciting consumers’ expectations regarding inflation, a potentially
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

New Middle Pleistocene hominin cranium from Gruta da Aroeira (Portugal) [Anthropology]The Middle Pleistocene is a crucial time period for studying human evolution in Europe, because it marks the appearance of both fossil hominins ancestral to the later Neandertals and the Acheulean technology. Nevertheless, European sites containing well-dated human remains associated with an Acheulean toolkit remain scarce. The earliest European hominin...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Topological knots and links in proteins [Applied Mathematics]Twenty years after their discovery, knots in proteins are now quite well understood. They are believed to be functionally advantageous and provide extra stability to protein chains. In this work, we go one step further and search for links—entangled structures, more complex than knots, which consist of several components. We...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Eradicating catastrophic collapse in interdependent networks via reinforced nodes [Applied Physical Sciences]In interdependent networks, it is usually assumed, based on percolation theory, that nodes become nonfunctional if they lose connection to the network giant component. However, in reality, some nodes, equipped with alternative resources, together with their connected neighbors can still be functioning after disconnected from the giant component. Here, we...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Computational investigation of surface freezing in a molecular model of water [Applied Physical Sciences]Water freezes in a wide variety of low-temperature environments, from meteors and atmospheric clouds to soil and biological cells. In nature, ice usually nucleates at or near interfaces, because homogenous nucleation in the bulk can only be observed at deep supercoolings. Although the effect of proximal surfaces on freezing has...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Dynamic cross-correlations between entangled biofilaments as they diffuse [Applied Physical Sciences]Entanglement in polymer and biological physics involves a state in which linear interthreaded macromolecules in isotropic liquids diffuse in a spatially anisotropic manner beyond a characteristic mesoscopic time and length scale (tube diameter). The physical reason is that linear macromolecules become transiently localized in directions transverse to their backbone but...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Real space renormalization group theory of disordered models of glasses [Applied Physical Sciences]We develop a real space renormalization group analysis of disordered models of glasses, in particular of the spin models at the origin of the random first-order transition theory. We find three fixed points, respectively, associated with the liquid state, with the critical behavior, and with the glass state. The latter...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Core Concept: Unraveling the enigma of fast radio bursts [Astronomy]The mystery began in 2007, when astrophysicist Duncan Lorimer and his undergraduate physics student were combing through archival data from the Parkes Observatory in Australia. After a month of analysis, the two noticed something unusual: an extreme burst from 2001 that briefly became one of the brightest radio objects in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Distinct recognition of complement iC3b by integrins {alpha}X{beta}2 and {alpha}M{beta}2 [Biochemistry]Recognition by the leukocyte integrins αXβ2 and αMβ2 of complement iC3b-opsonized targets is essential for effector functions including phagocytosis. The integrin-binding sites on iC3b remain incompletely characterized. Here, we describe negative-stain electron microscopy and biochemical studies of αXβ2 and αMβ2 in complex with iC3b. Despite high homology, the two integrins...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Persistence of the mitochondrial permeability transition in the absence of subunit c of human ATP synthase [Biochemistry]The permeability transition in human mitochondria refers to the opening of a nonspecific channel, known as the permeability transition pore (PTP), in the inner membrane. Opening can be triggered by calcium ions, leading to swelling of the organelle, disruption of the inner membrane, and ATP synthesis, followed by cell death....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Ligand-induced allostery in the interaction of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa heme binding protein with heme oxygenase [Biophysics and Computational Biology]A heme-dependent conformational rearrangement of the C-terminal domain of heme binding protein (PhuS) is required for interaction with the iron-regulated heme oxygenase (HemO). Herein, we further investigate the underlying mechanism of this conformational rearrangement and its implications for heme transfer via site-directed mutagenesis, resonance Raman (RR), hydrogen–deuterium exchange MS (HDX-MS
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Steady-state EB cap size fluctuations are determined by stochastic microtubule growth and maturation [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Growing microtubules are protected from depolymerization by the presence of a GTP or GDP/Pi cap. End-binding proteins of the EB1 family bind to the stabilizing cap, allowing monitoring of its size in real time. The cap size has been shown to correlate with instantaneous microtubule stability. Here we have quantitatively...
6h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Conserved role for Gga proteins in phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase localization to the trans-Golgi network [Cell Biology]Phosphoinositides serve as key membrane determinants for assembly of clathrin coat proteins that drive formation of clathrin-coated vesicles. At the trans-Golgi network (TGN), phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns4P) plays important roles in recruitment of two major clathrin adaptors, Gga (Golgi-localized, gamma-adaptin ear homology, Arf-binding) proteins and the AP-1 (assembly protein-1) compl
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Parasitophorous vacuole poration precedes its rupture and rapid host erythrocyte cytoskeleton collapse in Plasmodium falciparum egress [Cell Biology]In the asexual blood stages of malarial infection, merozoites invade erythrocytes and replicate within a parasitophorous vacuole to form daughter cells that eventually exit (egress) by sequential rupture of the vacuole and erythrocyte membranes. The current model is that PKG, a malarial cGMP-dependent protein kinase, triggers egress, activating malarial proteases...
6h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Diagnosis of prostate cancer by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometric imaging of small metabolites and lipids [Chemistry]Accurate identification of prostate cancer in frozen sections at the time of surgery can be challenging, limiting the surgeon’s ability to best determine resection margins during prostatectomy. We performed desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI-MSI) on 54 banked human cancerous and normal prostate tissue specimens to investigate the spatial...
6h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Experimental comparison of two quantum computing architectures [Computer Sciences]We run a selection of algorithms on two state-of-the-art 5-qubit quantum computers that are based on different technology platforms. One is a publicly accessible superconducting transmon device (www.research.ibm.com/ibm-q) with limited connectivity, and the other is a fully connected trapped-ion system. Even though the two systems have different native quantum interactions,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Specific deletion of LKB1/Stk11 in the Mullerian duct mesenchyme drives hyperplasia of the periurethral stroma and tumorigenesis in male mice [Developmental Biology]Nearly all older men will experience lower urinary tract symptoms associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), the etiology of which is not well understood. We have generated Stk11CKO mice by conditional deletion of the liver kinase B1 (LKB1) tumor suppressor gene, Stk11 (serine threonine kinase 11), in the fetal Müllerian...
6h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Pacific North American circulation pattern links external forcing and North American hydroclimatic change over the past millennium [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Land and sea surface temperatures, precipitation, and storm tracks in North America and the North Pacific are controlled to a large degree by atmospheric variability associated with the Pacific North American (PNA) pattern. The modern instrumental record indicates a trend toward a positive PNA phase in recent decades, which has...
6h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Sediment supply controls equilibrium channel geometry in gravel rivers [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]In many gravel-bedded rivers, floods that fill the channel banks create just enough shear stress to move the median-sized gravel particles on the bed surface (D50). Because this observation is common and is supported by theory, the coincidence of bankfull flow and the incipient motion of D50 has become a...
6h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Deep-sea coral evidence for lower Southern Ocean surface nitrate concentrations during the last ice age [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]The Southern Ocean regulates the ocean’s biological sequestration of CO2 and is widely suspected to underpin much of the ice age decline in atmospheric CO2 concentration, but the specific changes in the region are debated. Although more complete drawdown of surface nutrients by phytoplankton during the ice ages is supported...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Inner Workings: SMART collars help track and conserve wildlife [Engineering]Caleb Bryce drops into a ravine and tucks into the shadows. The dry foliage bursts into confetti as a puma careens up the opposite bank, hounds wailing close behind. Bryce and other scientists leap in pursuit. The big cat skirts a meadow and vaults into a fir tree. Wide-eyed, she...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Wettability effect on nanoconfined water flow [Engineering]Understanding and controlling the flow of water confined in nanopores has tremendous implications in theoretical studies and industrial applications. Here, we propose a simple model for the confined water flow based on the concept of effective slip, which is a linear sum of true slip, depending on a contact angle,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Tunable moire bands and strong correlations in small-twist-angle bilayer graphene [Physics]According to electronic structure theory, bilayer graphene is expected to have anomalous electronic properties when it has long-period moiré patterns produced by small misalignments between its individual layer honeycomb lattices. We have realized bilayer graphene moiré crystals with accurately controlled twist angles smaller than 1° and studied their properties using...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Coarse graining from variationally enhanced sampling applied to the Ginzburg-Landau model [Physics]A powerful way to deal with a complex system is to build a coarse-grained model capable of catching its main physical features, while being computationally affordable. Inevitably, such coarse-grained models introduce a set of phenomenological parameters, which are often not easily deducible from the underlying atomistic system. We present a...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Deep melting reveals liquid structural memory and anomalous ferromagnetism in bismuth [Physics]As an archetypal semimetal with complex and anisotropic Fermi surface and unusual electric properties (e.g., high electrical resistance, large magnetoresistance, and giant Hall effect), bismuth (Bi) has played a critical role in metal physics. In general, Bi displays diamagnetism with a high volumetric susceptibility (∼10−4). Here, we report unusual ferromagnetism...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Electron-hole asymmetry of the topological surface states in strained HgTe [Physics]Topological insulators are a new class of materials with an insulating bulk and topologically protected metallic surface states. Although it is widely assumed that these surface states display a Dirac-type dispersion that is symmetric above and below the Dirac point, this exact equivalence across the Fermi level has yet to...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Monostable superrepellent materials [Physics]Superrepellency is an extreme situation where liquids stay at the tops of rough surfaces, in the so-called Cassie state. Owing to the dramatic reduction of solid/liquid contact, such states lead to many applications, such as antifouling, droplet manipulation, hydrodynamic slip, and self-cleaning. However, superrepellency is often destroyed by impalement transitions...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

In vivo diagnostics of early abiotic plant stress response via Raman spectroscopy [Physics]Development of a phenotyping platform capable of noninvasive biochemical sensing could offer researchers, breeders, and producers a tool for precise response detection. In particular, the ability to measure plant stress in vivo responses is becoming increasingly important. In this work, a Raman spectroscopic technique is developed for high-throughput stress phenotyping...
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cornering endangered speciesGeographic areas occupied by certain species shrink as they decline in abundance, leaving them more vulnerable to extinction by harvest.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New quantum gadget could make contactless payment more secureA prototype gadget that sends secret keys to encrypt information passed from a mobile device to a payment terminal, could help to answer public concerns around the security of contactless and wireless transactions.In partnership with Nokia and Bay Photonics, Oxford University researchers from the Department of Physics, have devised a system for transmitting quantum keys that ensures data security.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A molecular on/off switch for CRISPRTSRI scientists reveal how viruses disable bacterial immune systems.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

It is easier for a DNA knot...How can long DNA filaments, which have convoluted and highly knotted structure, manage to pass through the tiny pores of biological systems? This is the fascinating question addressed by Antonio Suma and Cristian Micheletti, researchers at the International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) in Trieste who used computer simulations to investigate the options available to the genetic material in s
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WIRED

The 11 Best Comic Book Movies You Can Stream Right Now, From Superman to Deadpool It's a bird… it's a plane… it's a great way to spend your couch time! The post The 11 Best Comic Book Movies You Can Stream Right Now, From Superman to Deadpool appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Facebook Camera Means Snapping Is Officially the Future 24-hour ephemeral videos, silly filters, funny masks. These are the tools for the way we talk next. The post Facebook Camera Means Snapping Is Officially the Future appeared first on WIRED .
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Popular Science

Organizing the natural world by color makes for some seriously satisfying photos Entertainment Excerpt: Encyclopedia of Rainbows A new book that shows the natural world—world arranged by color. And it's incredibly satisfying. Take a look:…
6h
Big Think

Harvard Scientists Launch $20M 'Stratospheric Injection' Climate Change Experiment US scientists fearing for Earth's climate future begin testing solar bioengineering. The consequences may be terrifying — which is exactly why we need these small-scale experiments. Read More
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The Atlantic

Winners of the 2017 Sony World Photography Awards The Sony World Photography Awards , an annual competition hosted by the World Photography Organisation, has announced the winners of its Open categories and National categories for 2017. This year's contest attracted 227,596 entries from 183 countries. The organizers have again been kind enough to share some of the winners and runners-up with us, gathered below. All captions below come from the p
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The Atlantic

No, We Can’t Say Whether Cancer Is Mostly Bad Luck Two years ago, Time wrongly reported that “ Most cancer is beyond your control .” The Guardian incorrectly wrote: “ Two-thirds of adult cancers largely ‘down to bad luck’ rather than genes .” And the BBC misleadingly said: “ Most cancer types ‘just bad luck .’” All of these deceptive headlines arose from a widely misinterpreted study that looked at the role of random chance in initiating cancers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How randomness helps cancer cells thriveIn a research effort that merged genetics, physics and information theory, a team of researchers has added significantly to evidence that large regions of the human genome have built-in variability in reversible epigenetic modifications made to their DNA.
6h
Gizmodo

Scientists Have Created Self-Flowing Liquids That Don't Need Pumps to Move Around To bring a constant supply of fresh water into its massive cities, the Romans built countless miles of gravity-powered aqueducts, all at a tremendous expense. But even the massive pumping stations we rely on now might one day be obsolete as scientists work on perfecting liquids that can move all by themselves. In a new research article titled Transition from turbulent to coherent flows in confine
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Enzyme structures illuminate mechanism behind bacteria's bioremediation prowessScientists have solved the structure of an enzyme caught in the act of attacking toluene -- a chemical derived from wood and oil.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hair spacing keeps honeybees clean during pollinationA honeybee can carry up to 30 percent of its body weight in pollen because of the strategic spacing of its nearly three million hairs. The gap between each eye hair is approximately the same size as a grain of dandelion pollen, which is typically collected by bees. This keeps the pollen suspended above the eye and allows the forelegs to comb through and collect the particles.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain stimulation improves schizophrenia-like cognitive problemsA new study from the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine finds that stimulating the cerebellum in rats with schizophrenia-like thinking problems normalizes brain activity in the frontal cortex and corrects the rats' ability to estimate the passage of time -- a cognitive deficit that is characteristic in people with schizophrenia.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Discovery of a new regulatory protein provides new tool for stem cell engineeringBioengineers at the University of California San Diego have discovered a protein that regulates the switch of embryonic stem cells from the least developed 'naïve' state to the more developed 'primed' state. This discovery sheds light on stem cell development at a molecular level.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Therapies that target dementia in early stages critical to successTargeting dementia in the earlier stages of the condition could be critical for the success of future therapies, say researchers from the University of Bristol, who have found that the very earliest symptoms of dementia might be due to abnormal stability in brain cell connections rather than the death of brain tissue, which comes after.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Malaria parasites 'walk through walls' to infect humansResearchers have identified proteins that enable deadly malaria parasites to 'walk through cell walls' -- a superpower that was revealed using the Institute's first insectary to grow human malaria parasites.The research has identified two parasite proteins that are the key to this superpower. The proteins could be targeted to develop much-needed antimalarial drugs or vaccines.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How bacteria hunt other bacteriaA bacterial species that hunts other bacteria has attracted interest as a potential antibiotic, but exactly how this predator tracks down its prey has not been clear. A Biophysical Journal study reveals that the bacterial predator Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus homes in on its target by taking advantage of fluid forces generated by its own swimming movements and those of its prey. These bring the bact
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Marathon running may cause short-term kidney injuryAccording to a new Yale-led study, the physical stress of running a marathon can cause short-term kidney injury. Although kidneys of the examined runners fully recovered within two days post-marathon, the study raises questions concerning potential long-term impacts of this strenuous activity at a time when marathons are increasing in popularity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Unraveling the functional diversity of longevity gene SIRT1While the search for elixir of life has captivated human imagination for millennia, researchers around the world have put in efforts to extend healthy lifespan and reduce the burden of morbid diseases in an increasingly aging population. Researchers from the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research have now identified a control mechanism within a longevity gene, which is key to unraveling its functi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hair spacing keeps honeybees clean during pollination: Researchers quantify the cleaning processWith honeybee colony health wavering and researchers trying to find technological ways of pollinating plants in the future, a new Georgia Tech study has looked at how the insects do their job and manage to stay clean.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Discovery of a new regulatory protein provides new tool for stem cell engineeringBioengineers at the University of California San Diego have discovered a protein that regulates the switch of embryonic stem cells from the least developed "naïve" state to the more developed "primed" state. This discovery sheds light on stem cell development at a molecular level.
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Popular Science

What to buy for a better shave Gadgets Trim, shape, moisturize. Face, legs, whatever. Better shaving gear for anyone. Read on.
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cognitive science

A new paper in PSPB explores the relationship between enjoyment of a task and persistence at long-term goals. submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Forests fight global warming in ways more important than previously understoodForests play a complex role in keeping the planet cool, one that goes far beyond the absorption of carbon dioxide, new research has found.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Parents who play Pokemon GO with kids: 'It wasn't really about the Pokemon'Parents who regularly play "Pokémon GO" with their children report a number of side benefits from playing the mobile device-based game, including increased exercise, more time spent outdoors and opportunities for family bonding, according to new University of Washington research.
7h
New on MIT Technology Review

This Gadget Has a Real Working Menstrual Cycle on ItThe latest organ-on-a-chip can release an egg in 28 days.
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Gizmodo

Every Easter Egg and Plot Detail Stuffed Into the New Spider-Man: Homecoming Trailer We got another good look at Spider-Man: Homecoming and there were a lot of new scenes to behold. Between it and the trailer we got last time , we think we’ve got a pretty good handle on what’s going on with Spider-Man, Iron Man, and the Vulture. This is, of course, all conjecture but still: The trailer starts with the teaser we got yesterday , of the spider emblem detaching and flying off as a dr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Malaria parasites 'walk through walls' to infect humansResearchers have identified proteins that enable deadly malaria parasites to 'walk through cell walls' - a superpower that was revealed using the Institute's first insectary to grow human malaria parasites.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How bacteria hunt other bacteriaA bacterial species that hunts other bacteria has attracted great interest as a potential living antibiotic, but exactly how this predator tracks down its prey has not been clear. A study published March 28 in Biophysical Journal sheds light on this question, revealing that the bacterial predator Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus (BV) homes in on its target by taking advantage of fluid forces generated b
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Gizmodo

The World's First 'Period' in a Dish Could Revolutionize Reproductive Medicine Image: Shutterstock/vchal, Gizmodo The female menstrual cycle is a rite of passage into womanhood that for centuries has been shrouded in mystery and taboo. Pliny The Elder, for one, believed that menstrual blood could turn crop fields barren. Just last century, one scientist floated a theory that menstrual blood contained a poison that caused women to turn wine into vinegar. Let’s not even start
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Parents who play Pokémon GO with kids: 'It wasn't really about the Pokémon'In the first study to survey and interview parents who play 'Pokémon GO' with their children, families report a number of side benefits, including increased exercise, more time spent outdoors and opportunities for family bonding. However, some guilt about screen time persisted.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Forests fight global warming in ways more important than previously understoodTrees impact climate by regulating the exchange of water and energy between the Earth's surface and the atmosphere, an important influence that should be considered as policymakers contemplate efforts to conserve forested land, said the authors of an international study that appears in the journal Nature Climate Change.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Abuse accelerates puberty in childrenWhile it has long been known that maltreatment can affect a child's psychological development, new Penn State research indicates that the stress of abuse can impact the physical growth and maturation of adolescents as well.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What makes a cyberattack? Experts lobby to restrict the termWhen U.S. senator John McCain told Ukrainian television that the allegedly Russian-backed breach of the Democratic National Committee's server was "an act of war," Michael Schmitt cringed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amazon tests grocery pickup service in SeattleAmazon is testing a grocery pickup service in Seattle.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Impacts of school choice on segregationDiversity in schools is important for students' experiences and outcomes in schools and beyond, reducing prejudices and ensuring the likelihood of living and working in integrated environments as adults. Penn State researchers are exploring how school choice is affecting racial composition and segregation in Pennsylvania schools.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New report finds EPA's controlled human exposure studies of air pollution are warrantedThe U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) carries out experiments in which volunteer participants agree to be intentionally exposed by inhalation to specific pollutants at restricted concentrations over short periods to obtain important information about the effects of outdoor air pollution on human health. A new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine finds th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physicists show ion pairs perform enhanced 'spooky action'Adding to strong recent demonstrations that particles of light perform what Einstein called "spooky action at a distance," in which two separated objects can have a connection that exceeds everyday experience, physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have confirmed that particles of matter can act really spooky too.
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Point of Pointless BehaviorsHow the “intrinsic motivation” we see in children can help us develop better robots -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Big Think

What We See When We Look at Something Outside Our Senses A blacker-than-black coating reveals how our senses totally fail without input they understand. Read More
7h
The Atlantic

The Voice’s Empty Promise of the American Dream The Voice ’s auditions are some of the best reality TV you can watch. Early in each new season of the NBC show, celebrity coaches will listen to contestants sing with their backs turned. If coaches like what they hear and want to recruit someone for their “team,” they press a button, and their giant red chair spins around for a grand reveal. (If more than one turns, the contestant gets to pick hi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

James Webb space telescope completes acoustic and vibration testsAt NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland the James Webb Space Telescope team completed the acoustic and vibration portions of environmental testing on the telescope. These tests are merely two of the many that spacecraft and instruments endure to ensure they are fit for spaceflight.
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Gizmodo

Trump's Drastic Move to Dismantle the Clean Power Plan Won't Bring Coal Back Image: AP On Tuesday, President Trump is expected to begin the process of dismantling Obama’s environmental legacy, including his signature climate action policy, the Clean Power Plan . According to Reuters , Trump will sign an executive order compelling the Environmental Protection Agency to review and rewrite the plan, which calls on states to reduce carbon emissions from power plants, with an
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Gizmodo

Today's Best Deals: Up To $50 Off a Kindle, ECCO Shoes, Anker Desk Lamp, and More Huge Kindle discounts for Prime members , ECCO shoes , and one of your favorite desk lamps lead off Tuesday’s best deals. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals SanDisk 256GB MicroSD Card , $130 SanDisk’s 256GB microSD card is currently the highest capacity card that you can buy, and at $130 , it’s never been cheaper. That’ll hold a lot of Nintendo Swit
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New on MIT Technology Review

The AI Mind Merge Vision That Silicon Valley Won’t Give UpElon Musk and Sam Altman are adamant that our brains must become one with artificial intelligence if we don’t want it to subjugate us.
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Popular Science

How to book the cheapest flights possible DIY Tech and tools to save you airfare dollars With the right tricks and apps at your disposal, you can make sure you're getting the best deal on your flights, no matter when you're going or where you're heading.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NIST physicists show ion pairs perform enhanced 'spooky action'Adding to strong recent demonstrations that particles of light perform what Einstein called 'spooky action at a distance,' in which two separated objects can have a connection that exceeds everyday experience, physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have confirmed that particles of matter can act really spooky too.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New report finds EPA's controlled human exposure studies of air pollution are warrantedA new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine finds these studies are warranted and recommends that they continue under two conditions: when they provide additional knowledge that informs policy decisions and regulation of pollutants that cannot be obtained by other means, and when it is reasonably predictable that the risks for study participants will not exceed bi
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Impacts of school choice on segregationDiversity in schools is important for students' experiences and outcomes in schools and beyond, reducing prejudices and ensuring the likelihood of living and working in integrated environments as adults. Penn State researchers are exploring how school choice is affecting racial composition and segregation in Pennsylvania schools.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

ExoMars: Rover scientists to study Mawrth Vallis optionEurope is going to investigate a second site on Mars - called Mawrth Vallis - as a possible destination to send its 2021 rover.
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Gizmodo

Houston Is the Next Battleground in the GMO Mosquito War Image: Getty Images Over the past few years, people have been freaking out about a plan to release genetically modified mosquitoes in the Florida Keys, concerned that in addition to combatting the spread of Zika virus and other mosquito-borne illnesses the mosquitoes would usher in some sort of sci-fi catastrophe. Now, the British biotech company behind those mosquitoes is in negotiations with Ho
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The Atlantic

The Giant Trump Climate Order Is Here In the final days of the Obama administration, scholars and journalists took stock of all that he had done to combat the dangerous rise of climate change. Barack Obama, they pronounced, had built up a surprisingly vast array of climate-concerned rules and guidelines across the government. He had turned the many policy-making tools of the many federal agencies toward preparing for this one imminen
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Ingeniøren

Lego-spils sparekneb presser diskpladsen på ny Nintendo-konsol Det er dyrt at producere store spil til Nintendo Switch. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/dyre-spilkassetter-presser-diskpladsen-paa-ny-nintendo-konsol-1074974 Version2
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Live Science

Gobi Desert Dust Helps Sustain California's Sierra NevadaClimate change is expected to increase the amount of dust migrating in the atmosphere, which could have a significant nutritional impact on mountain ecosystems like the Sierra Nevada.
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Ars Technica

Android cofounder gets serious about OEM startup, teases new device Enlarge / Andy Rubin's new smartphone looks pretty good. (credit: Andy Rubin ) Android Inc. cofounder and former CEO Andy Rubin has taken to Twitter to tease a new slim-bezeled smartphone. This is the first device we've seen from Rubin's new startup, called "Essential." The details on Essential came out in a January report from Bloomberg . The report said Rubin is currently building consumer hard
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

About time! Predicting midge seasonality key to reducing livestock diseasesEcologists at the UK-based Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH) have led a study which informs optimal strategies for control of devastating midge-borne diseases like bluetongue and Schmallenberg virus that affect cattle and sheep in the UK and beyond.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Understanding how small organic ions stabilize gold nanoparticles may allow for better controlExpanding the potential of gold nanoparticles for a range of uses requires methods to stabilize the clusters and control their size. Researchers at KAUST reveal how simple organic citrate ions, derived from readily available citric acid, can interact with the gold atoms to yield the stable nanoparticles needed for further research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Debbie make landfall in QueenslandTropical Cyclone Debbie made landfall in Queensland bringing heavy rainfall, hurricane-force winds, rough seas, and flooding. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible look at the storm from space while NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed cloud temperatures to determine the location of the strongest storms within.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Honesty may not be the best policy for hospital safety grades, study suggestsA new study finds that a well-known hospital grading system may put too much weight on the wrong things. The grades are based in part on hospitals' self-reported use of safety-related protocols. But the study show this had little in common with how a hospital did on independent measurements of hospital-acquired infections -- or with whether the government had penalized it for high infection or rea
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New report lays plan to eliminate 90,000 hepatitis B and C deaths by 2030Hepatitis B and C kill more than 20,000 people every year in the United States. A new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine presents a strategy to eliminate these diseases as serious public health problems and prevent nearly 90,000 deaths by 2030.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mayo Clinic researchers identify interaction among proteins that cause cancer cells to metastasizeResearchers at Mayo Clinic have identified an interaction among proteins that allows cancer cells to grow and metastasize. They say the discovery may play a role in developing a better understanding of how tumors grow in a variety of malignancies, including breast, prostate, pancreatic, colon, lung and skin cancers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Debbie make landfall in QueenslandTropical Cyclone Debbie made landfall in Queensland bringing heavy rainfall, hurricane-force winds, rough seas, and flooding. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible look at the storm from space while NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed cloud temperatures to determine the location of the strongest storms within.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Protein identified as potential druggable target for pancreatic cancerA protein known as arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) may be a potential therapeutic target for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common type of pancreatic cancer, and one of the most deadliest with a less than 10 percent, five-year survival rate. PRMT1 is involved in a number of genetic processes including gene transcription, DNA repair and signaling.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA's James Webb space telescope completes acoustic and vibration testsAt NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland the James Webb Space Telescope team completed the acoustic and vibration portions of environmental testing on the telescope. These tests are merely two of the many that spacecraft and instruments endure to ensure they are fit for spaceflight.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dunedin children's exposure to lead linked to lower IQLead exposure in 11-year-old children in Dunedin, New Zealand in the 1970s and '80s has affected their IQ and occupational standing as adults, according to the latest research from the long-running Dunedin Study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Physics can predict wealth inequalityThe 2016 election year highlighted the growing problem of wealth inequality and finding ways to help the people who are falling behind. This human urge of compassion isn't new, but the big question that remains to be addressed is why inequality is so difficult to erase. This inspired Adrian Bejan at Duke University, who in 1996 discovered the Constructal Law, to provide an answer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Female menstrual cycle in a dishWhat if women could have a miniature, personalized reproductive system made with their own tissues that could predict how they would respond to certain medications? Northwestern has developed the first phase of this technology, made with human tissue, which could eventually change the future of research and treatment of diseases in women's reproductive organs. It will allow physicians to test drug
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The physics of wealth inequalityA Duke engineering professor has proposed an explanation for why the income disparity in America between the rich and poor continues to grow. According to the constructal law of physics, income inequality naturally grows along with the economy.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Insurance coverage for IVF increases chance of having babyWomen who pursue in vitro fertilization (IVF) to become pregnant are more likely to give birth if they have health insurance that covers the procedure, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The key reason is financial rather than medical: For many people, the high cost for one IVF procedure prohibits women from seeking a second treatment if the first a
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Women with insurance coverage for IVF more likely to have live birthWomen with insurance coverage for in vitro fertilization (IVF) were more likely to attempt IVF again and had a higher probability of live birth than women who self-paid for IVF, according to a study published by JAMA.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Findings support use of less invasive hysterectomy for early-stage endometrial cancerResearchers found similar rates of disease-free survival and no difference in overall survival among women who received a laparoscopic or abdominal total hysterectomy for stage I endometrial cancer, according to a study published by JAMA.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Evidence insufficient to screen for celiac diseaseThe US Preventive Services Task Force has concluded that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for celiac disease in asymptomatic persons. The report appears in the March 28 issue of JAMA.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vitamin D, calcium supplementation among older women does not significantly reduce risk of cancerAmong healthy postmenopausal women, supplementation with vitamin D3 and calcium compared with placebo did not result in a significantly lower risk of cancer after four years, according to a study published by JAMA.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Childhood lead exposure associated with lower IQ, socioeconomic status nearly 3 decades laterChildren who had higher blood lead levels at age 11 were more likely to have lower cognitive function, IQ and socioeconomic status when they were adults at age 38, according to a study published by JAMA.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lead exposure in childhood linked to lower IQ, lower statusA long-term study of 565 children who grew up in the era of leaded gasoline has shown that their exposure to the powerful neurotoxin may have led to a loss of intelligence and occupational standing by the time they reached age 38. Ninety-four percent of the children exceeded today's reference value of 5 micrograms of lead per deciliter of blood. For each 5-microgram increase in blood lead, a perso
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Understanding predictability and randomness by digging in the dirtWhen tilling soil, the blade of the tool cuts through dirt, loosening it in preparation for seeding. The dirt granules are pushed aside in a way that looks random -- but might not be. Now, researchers have found a way to distinguish whether such a process is truly random, or is actually deterministic -- which can lead to deeper understanding and the ability to control the process. They describe th
7h
WIRED

Scientists Build a Menstrual Biochip That Does Everything But Bleed An organ-on-chip model of the female reproductive tract includes a miniature ovary, uterus, fallopian tube, cervix, and liver. The post Scientists Build a Menstrual Biochip That Does Everything But Bleed appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Those Terrifying Skull Crawlers in Kong Were Inspired by … Pokémon’s Cubone No, seriously. The post Those Terrifying Skull Crawlers in Kong Were Inspired by … Pokémon’s Cubone appeared first on WIRED .
7h
Scientific American Content: Global

Was the Clean Power Plan Really Bad for the Economy?Canceling the first-ever standards to reduce emissions from power plants is unlikely to revive the coal industry -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Gizmodo

Mind-Blowing New Theory Connects Black Holes, Dark Matter, and Gravitational Waves Image: Ryan F. Mandelbaum The past few years have been incredible for physics discoveries. Scientists spotted the Higgs boson, a particle they’d been hunting for almost 50 years, in 2012, and gravitational waves , which were theorized 100 years ago, in 2016. This year, they’re slated to take a picture of a black hole. So, thought some theorists, why not combine all of the craziest physics ideas i
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

About time! Predicting midge seasonality key to reducing livestock diseasesEcologists have completed a study which informs optimal strategies for control of devastating midge-borne diseases like bluetongue and Schmallenberg virus that affect cattle and sheep in the UK and beyond.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Neurological diseases cost the US Nearly $800 billion per yearA new article reports the most common neurological diseases pose a serious annual financial burden for the nation.
8h
Popular Science

The entire female menstrual cycle can now be replicated in a Petri dish Health Providing researchers with a platform to study drugs and diseases influenced by these hormones Researchers have figured out a way to integrate each organ type involved in the menstrual cycle into one fully-functioning unit, all on a Petri dish. Read on:…
8h
New Scientist - News

Mini reproductive organs in a dish mimic 28-day menstrual cycleConnecting clumps of tissue from ovaries, the womb, and other organs in the lab has led to ovulation happening in a dish, but the system cannot menstruate yet
8h
New on MIT Technology Review

AI, Quantum Computing Will Accelerate Materials DiscoveryIBM’s Watson is already at work developing novel polymers.
8h
The Atlantic

Climate Change Is a Boon to Tourism in Iceland On April 14, 2010, Iceland’s Eyjafjallajökull volcano erupted. As a cloud of ash headed toward Ólafur Eggertsson’s picturesque farm nestled in the foothills, he gave his cattle a four-day supply of food, plugged cracks in the barn, then evacuated with his family. Over the next few months, the family filmed their efforts to restore their home and eventually created a 20-minute documentary. A year
8h
The Atlantic

Staring Into Brexit's Abyss At 12:30 p.m. on Wednesday afternoon, Sir Tim Barrow, the U.K.’s permanent representative to the EU, will hand-deliver a letter from British Prime Minister Theresa May to the office of European Council President Donald Tusk in Brussels, officially notifying the European Union of the U.K.’s intention to leave the 60-year-old bloc. The delivery of that letter will trigger Article 50, the statute of
8h
The Atlantic

Tax Reform Will Be a Nightmare “Health care is a very, very complicated issue,” Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin said last week in an interview with Mike Allen at Axios. “[Tax reform’s] a lot simpler.” Really? America’s health-care industry is roughly one-sixth of the economy, or about $3 trillion. U.S. federal tax revenue is roughly one-sixth of the economy, or about $3 trillion. Health care is a complex national cross-subsid
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The Atlantic

Make the Anti-War Movement Great Again President Trump is being pushed to expand an undeclared war of choice in a faraway land, according to an article published late Sunday in the Washington Post . The newspaper reported that the secretary of defense, former general Jim Mattis, wants the White House to lift restrictions on “military support for Persian Gulf states engaged in a protracted civil war against Iranian-backed Houthi rebels
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Video games influence sexist attitudesThe images and roles of female characters in video games send a powerful message that can influence the underlying attitudes of gamers. Researchers found a link between video game exposure and sexism in a new study of more than 13,000 adolescents.
8h
Viden

Enorme dino-fodspor fundet i australsk "Jurassic Park"Tusindvis af dinosaurfodspor er registreret. Nogle af dem er næsten to meter lange.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global

What's Driving the Self-Driving Cars RushScientific American technology editor Larry Greenemeier talks with Ken Washington, vice president of Research and Advanced Engineering at Ford, about self-driving cars. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Ars Technica

Liveblog: The Samsung Galaxy S8 launches tomorrow at 11am ET Enlarge / The Galaxy Unpacked 2017 invite. (credit: Samsung) Samsung is back! After a rough stretch thanks to the recall of the Galaxy Note 7 and the arrest of Samsung chief Lee Jae-yong, Samsung is dusting itself off and jumping back into the smartphone game. "Galaxy Unpacked 2017" starts on March 29th at 11am ET (8am PT, 4pm BST, convert to your time zone here ). We expect Samsung to finally ta
8h
TEDTalks (video)

What we don't know about mother's milk | Katie HindeBreast milk grows babies' bodies, fuels neurodevelopment, provides essential immunofactors and safeguards against famine and disease -- why, then, does science know more about tomatoes than mother's milk? Katie Hinde shares insights into this complex, life-giving substance and discusses the major gaps scientific research still needs to fill so we can better understand it.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Understanding predictability and randomness by digging in the dirtWhen tilling soil, the blade of the tillage tool cuts through the dirt, loosening it up in preparation for seeding. The dirt granules are pushed aside in a way that certainly looks random—but might not be.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physics can predict wealth inequalityThe 2016 election year highlighted the growing problem of wealth inequality and finding ways to help the people who are falling behind. This human urge of compassion isn't new, but the big question that remains to be addressed is why inequality is so difficult to erase.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Female menstrual cycle in a dishNorthwestern Medicine has developed a miniature female reproductive tract that fits in the palm of your hand and could eventually change the future of research and treatment of diseases in women's reproductive organs.
8h
Ingeniøren

Spørg Scientariet: Kan man bruge grønne kartofler som læggekartofler?Vores læser vil gerne vide, om grønne kartofler kan bruges som læggekartofler, når de nu ikke så godt kan spises. Det svarer professor fra Aalborg Universitet på.
8h
Quanta Magazine

A Long-Sought Proof, Found and Almost Lost As he was brushing his teeth on the morning of July 17, 2014, Thomas Royen, a little-known retired German statistician, suddenly lit upon the proof of a famous conjecture at the intersection of geometry, probability theory and statistics that had eluded top experts for decades. Known as the Gaussian correlation inequality (GCI), the conjecture originated in the 1950s, was posed in its most elegan
8h
The Atlantic

How Long Can Devin Nunes Hang On? Embattled House Intelligence Committee chairman Devin Nunes is now facing Democratic calls for his recusal from an investigation into the Trump administration’s ties to Russia, as the inquiry grinds to what is at least a temporary halt. The California Republican has been on the hot seat since announcing last week that he had vague but significant information about “incidental collection” of infor
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tomographic imaging advances considered good yet can lead to overdiagnosis in PE patientsAlthough advances in tomographic imaging have improved the sensitivity of ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) scans for pulmonary embolism (PE), they may lead to overdiagnosis by revealing small and clinically insignificant PEs, according to a state-of-the-art review published in the March 2017 issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR).
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Neurological diseases cost the US nearly $800 billion per yearA new paper published in the Annals of Neurology reports the most common neurological diseases pose a serious annual financial burden for the nation.
8h
Live Science

Siberian Crater Mystery: Are Exploding Gas Pockets Really to Blame?Reports of methane explosions in Siberia may be premature.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global

"Menstrual Cycle on a Chip" Offers a New Window into Female PhysiologyResearchers have completed the first laboratory model of the human female reproductive cycle -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Ars Technica

Tesla sells 5 percent stake to Chinese firm Tencent Enlarge (credit: Scott Olson | Getty Images) The same Chinese company that bought League of Legends a couple of years ago just became one of Tesla's largest shareholders . According to a Securities and Exchange Commission filing dated March 24th, Tencent Holdings Ltd. has purchased a five percent stake in the company—8,167,544 shares to be exact. According to TechCrunch , the deal was arranged a
8h
Gizmodo

Elon Musk Is Wrong to Think He Can Save the World By Boosting Our Brains Image: AP Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk has announced a new venture called Neuralink, a startup which aims to develop neural interface technologies that connect our brains to computers. Musk says it’s the best way to prevent an AI apocalypse, but it’s on this point that he’s gravely mistaken. As reported in The Wall Street Journal , the startup is still very much in its embryonic stages. The com
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Evaluation between maternal mental health and discharge readinessMothers with a history of mental health disorders feel less ready for discharge from the NICU than with mothers without a mental health history, new research indicates.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mustard seeds without mustard flavorResearchers have successfully developed a new oilseed crop that is much more resistant to heat, drought and diseases than oilseed rape.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rogue breast tumor proteins point to potential drug therapiesFor patients with difficult-to-treat cancers, doctors increasingly rely on genomic testing of tumors to identify errors in the DNA that indicate a tumor can be targeted by existing therapies. But this approach overlooks rogue proteins that may be driving cancer cells and also could be targeted with existing treatments, according to research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers turn urine into research toolsResearchers have developed a breakthrough technique to harvest cells directly from urine, and grow them into durable, clinically relevant stem cells to study Down syndrome.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Interferon-beta producing stem cell-derived immune cell therapy on liver cancerInduced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived myeloid cells (iPS-ML) that produce the anti-tumor protein interferon-beta (IFN-beta) have been produced and analyzed. Using human iPS-ML in a mouse model, they found that the cells migrate to and deliver IFN-beta to liver tumors thereby reducing cancer proliferation and increasing survival time.
8h
Gizmodo

io9 The New Spider-Man: Homecoming Trailer Features So Much Iron Man | Jalopnik This Disaster Will M io9 The New Spider-Man: Homecoming Trailer Features So Much Iron Man | Jalopnik This Disaster Will Make You Never Use An Automated Car Wash Ever Again | Kotaku ‘The Doomvault’ Is A D&D Map For Sadists | Lifehacker Never Reveal Your Previous Salary When Negotiating for a Job |
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

World Video Game Hall of Fame names 2017 finalistsThe World Video Game Hall of Fame's 2017 finalists span decades and electronic platforms, from the 1981 arcade classic "Donkey Kong" that launched Mario's plumbing career to the 2006 living room hit "Wii Sports," that made gamers out of grandparents.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why don't Americans have a name for the color 'light blue?' Study finds unique color terms used in Japan, USIf a Japanese woman were to compliment a friend on her flattering pale-blue blouse, she'd probably employ a word with no English equivalent.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

About time! Predicting midge seasonality key to reducing livestock diseasesEcologists at the UK-based Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH) have led a study which informs optimal strategies for control of devastating midge-borne diseases like bluetongue and Schmallenberg virus that affect cattle and sheep in the UK and beyond.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Early use of marijuana can increase its negative health impactsThe need for age guidelines for marijuana use is the focus of a new study recently published in the journal Health. Findings show that young users report the most impact to their physical and mental health.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gold standards for nanoparticlesKAUST researchers reveal how small organic 'citrate' ions can stabilize gold nanoparticles, assisting research on the structures' potential.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ASCO and Cancer Care Ontario update guideline on radiation therapy for prostate cancerThe American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and Cancer Care Ontario today issued a joint clinical practice guideline update on brachytherapy (internal radiation) for patients with prostate cancer. The update provides evidence-based recommendations for different patient risk groups, and specifies the most effective forms of brachytherapy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New research disproves common assumption on cranial joints of alligators, birds, dinosaursPaleontologists have long assumed that the shape of joints in the skulls of dinosaurs, and their closest modern relatives alligators and birds, reveals how much movement are allowed in their skulls. Researchers from the University of Missouri School Of Medicine recently discovered that although alligators, birds and dinosaurs have a similar skull-joint shape, it no longer can be assumed that this
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Video: How do we measure temperature?We have a lot of confidence that we measure temperature accurately. But how do thermometers in the kitchen or doctor's office work? Thanks to the laws of thermodynamics, thermometers respond to heat moving from hot to cold as a means of measuring temperature.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tiny sensor lays groundwork for precision X-rays detection via endoscopyUsing a tiny device known as an optical antenna, researchers have created an X-ray sensor that is integrated onto the end of an optical fiber just a few tens of microns in diameter. By detecting X-rays at an extremely small spatial scale, the sensor could be combined with X-ray delivering technologies to enable high-precision medical imaging and therapeutic applications.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientist pioneers new technology, maps giant virusIn an American laboratory, scientists took a DIY approach to build a retrofitted cryo-electron microscope that allowed them to map a giant Samba virus -- one of the world's largest viruses.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How does oxygen get into a fuel cell?In order for a fuel cell to work, it needs an oxidizing agent. Scientists have now found a way to explain why oxygen does not always enter fuel cells effectively, rendering them unusable.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New insight into superfluids reveals a storm at the surfaceSuperfluid helium has a boundary layer, turning a century of understanding on its head, mathematicians have shown for the first time.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study finds social media course impacts online behavior in first-year medical studentsA majority of first-year medical students changed their online behavior after participating in a social media and professionalism course, researchers have found. Their report highlights effective methods for teaching medical students about the importance of responsible social media use as it relates to their careers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Satellites reveal bird habitat loss in CaliforniaReduced seasonal flooding of wetlands and farm fields in California's Sacramento Valley threatens a key stopover site for migratory shorebirds, a new study shows. Landsat satellite images reveal that flooded habitat is most limited during peak spring migration when the birds urgently need resting and feeding sites. Near the peak of migration, an area of seasonally flooded land twice the size of Wa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

To be or not to be ... An entrepreneurToday, more and more self-employed business owners may call themselves entrepreneurs, a label that connotes creativity, innovation, and success.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Flying syringes' could detect emerging infectious diseasesBlood-sucking flies can act as 'flying syringes' to detect emerging infectious diseases in wild animals before they spread to humans, according to research published in the journal eLife.
8h
Ingeniøren

Nasa vil træne astronauter med virtual realityVR-teknologi skal hjælpe træningen af ISS’ astronauter. Sideløbende arbejdes der på en mere simpel variant, der bliver frigivet til offentligheden, som måske vil inspirere unge astronautspirer.
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Ingeniøren

Kæmpe sikkerhedsopdatering af intelligente elmålere: »Nu får hackerne det langt sværere« Emil Gurevitch hackede sig som DTU-studerende igennem sin elmåler, nu er han fastansat hos offeret og bekæmper ransomware og terrortrusler https://www.version2.dk/artikel/elmaalerhackeren-four-eyes-principle-maa-ind-smartmaalersystemer-1075003 Version2
8h
Gizmodo

We Have Seen the First Footage From The Dark Tower Idris Elba is The Gunslinger in The Dark Tower. Image: Sony The Dark Tower will hit theaters in July but a trailer has yet to be released. Well, that changed at CinemaCon 2017 where Sony showed about four minutes from the film—a featurette leading into a trailer and an extended scene. Here’s what happened in the footage. The whole thing starts with an isolated doorway mysteriously placed in a fla
8h
Popular Science

Asian dust might be the secret to keeping California's sequoias alive Science Small but mighty, distant dust packs a powerful punch A new study sheds light on the role of dust—from far-away lands—on mountain ecosystems. Read on.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Psychological interventions to cut traumatic memories: Tetris or Candy Crush?The popular building-block computer game Tetris might be more than an idle pastime that keeps you glued to a screen. Playing it shortly after experiencing a traumatic event seems to block some of the recurrent intrusive memories that people are often left with. The proof-of-concept suggests Tetris could play an important role in psychological interventions after trauma.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dementia: The right to rehabilitationRehabilitation is important for people with dementia as it is for people with physical disabilities, according to a leading dementia expert.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Secret of nanomaterial that makes harvesting sunlight easierUsing sunlight to drive chemical reactions, such as artificial photosynthesis, could soon become much more efficient thanks to nanomaterials.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New type of sensor material developedScientists have succeeded in developing a nickel complex that changes color and magnetism when exposed to methanol vapor. The new material can potentially be used not only as a chemical sensor, but also with future rewritable memory devices.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Clarifying how lithium ions ferry around in rechargeable batteriesScientists observe the real-time ultrafast bonding of lithium ions with the solvents, in the same process that happens during charging and discharging of lithium batteries, and conclude that a new theory is needed
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study examines death penalty support in MexicoIn sharp contrast to previous studies of public support for the death penalty conducted in the U.S., Catholics in Mexico were found to be more likely to support capital punishment, while older Mexicans and those living in states that bordered the U.S. were less likely to support the death penalty, according to researchers at Sam Houston State University.
8h
WIRED

In Science, You Can’t Always Get What You Want Science experiments don't always provide the data needed to definitively answer a question. Such is the nature of science. The post In Science, You Can't Always Get What You Want appeared first on WIRED .
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Biologists find 'skin-and-bones' mechanism underlying zebrafish fin regenerationUniversity of Oregon biologists have figured out how zebrafish perfectly regenerate amputated fins with a precisely organized skeleton.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sharing expert experimental knowledge to expedite designA reference tool specific to metabolic engineering that optimizes processes to make cells produce useful substances gives researchers a common language and will facilitate novel designs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How does oxygen get into a fuel cell?In order for a fuel cell to work, it needs an oxidizing agent. TU Wien has now found a way to explain why oxygen does not always enter fuel cells effectively, rendering them unusable.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why does the same exercise exert effects on individuals differently?Selenoprotein P, a kind of hepatokine hormone secreted from the liver, has been found, through experiments with cultured muscle cells and mice and through clinical studies, to cause pathology named 'exercise resistance,' which prevents health promotion by physical exercise. The present results elucidate one of the reasons why individual responsiveness to exercise differs markedly as well as shed l
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Living 'flying syringes' could detect emerging infectious diseasesBlood-sucking flies can act as 'flying syringes' to detect emerging infectious diseases in wild animals before they spread to humans, according to new research.
8h
Live Science

After Dino-Killing Asteroid Impact, Life Re-Emerged QuicklyLife re-emerged at the site of the dino-killing asteroid's impact at roughly the same time it began to thrive around the globe, despite suffering from worse conditions.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research disproves common assumption on cranial joints of alligators, birds, dinosaursResearchers from the University of Missouri School Of Medicine recently discovered that although alligators, birds and dinosaurs have a similar skull-joint shape, this does not guarantee that their movements are the same.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers find video games influence sexist attitudesThe images and roles of female characters in video games send a powerful message that can influence the underlying attitudes of gamers. Iowa State and French researchers found a link between video game exposure and sexism in a new study of more than 13,000 adolescents.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Which self-help websites actually improve health? New research yields a listFrom depression to weight loss, insomnia to cutting back on alcohol or cigarettes, the Internet teems with sites that promise to help people improve their health. Which of these really help -- with evidence from gold-standard studies to back up these claims? A new paper compiles only the best of the best: a list of over 40 sites backed by evidence from randomized controlled trials.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How do we measure temperature? (video)How do the thermometers in the kitchen or the doctor's office work? Thanks to the laws of thermodynamics, thermometers respond to heat moving from hot to cold as a means of measuring temperature. Clever physical chemists and engineers and even Einstein have made thermometers from a variety of materials. Watch the latest Reactions video here: https://youtu.be/ibmubP26R9M.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why don't Americans have a name for the color 'light blue?''Mizu' translates to 'water' and has emerged in recent decades as a unique shade in the Japenese lexicon, new research has found.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tiny sensor lays groundwork for precision X-rays detection via endoscopyUsing a tiny device known as an optical antenna, researchers have created an X-ray sensor that is integrated onto the end of an optical fiber just a few tens of microns in diameter. By detecting X-rays at an extremely small spatial scale, the sensor could be combined with X-ray delivering technologies to enable high-precision medical imaging and therapeutic applications.
9h
Gizmodo

This ECCO Gold Box Was Made For The Indecisive Shoe-Wearer Up to 40% Off ECCO Shoes and Bags ECCO has been around since the ‘60s but the timeless, comfortable styles of their men’s and women’s shoes are what’s on display today. Amazon’s Gold Box has ECCO men’s dress shoes, loafers, and sneakers, and women’s heels, sneakers and flats, for as low as $55. Trust me, these things will last, but this 24-hour sale will not. Here are a couple styles to check out
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Futurity.org

Can democracy survive without a middle class? Preserving the middle-class in America is necessary for the United States to continue as a democracy, warns Ganesh Sitaraman. “The shrinking middle class is a constitutional problem because our Constitution wasn’t designed for a country with significant economic inequality,” says Sitaraman, a law professor at Vanderbilt University and author of a new book, The Crisis of the Middle-Class Constitut
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mustard seeds without mustard flavor: New robust oilseed crop can resist global warmingUniversity of Copenhagen and the global player Bayer CropScience have successfully developed a new oilseed crop that is much more resistant to heat, drought and diseases than oilseed rape. The breakthrough is so big that it will feature as cover story of the April issue of Nature Biotechnology, the most prestigious journal for biotechnology research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Biomechanical analysis of head injury in pediatric patientsThe biomechanics of head injury in youths (5 to 18 years of age) have been poorly understood. A new study set out to determine what biomechanical characteristics predispose youths with concussions to experience transient or persistent postconcussion symptoms.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Zika hot spots in the US predictedResearchers predicted the places in the continental US where Zika is most likely to be transmitted are along the Mississippi delta and southern states extending northward along the Atlantic coast and in southern California.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

p300 protein may suppress leukemia in MDS patientsScientists have shown that p300, a protein that increases gene expression by attaching acetyl molecules to DNA, may stop myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) from developing into acute myeloid leukemia (AML).
9h
The Atlantic

Fake News Is Television's Favorite New Storyline This article contains spoilers through the most recent episodes of Homeland and Quantico , as well as recent episodes of The Good Fight . On the most recent episode of Homeland , Max (Maury Sterling) made a discovery that pulled all the manifold villains of the sixth season together when he witnessed the CIA’s Dar Adal (F. Murray Abraham) meet with Brett O’Keefe (Jake Weber), a garrulous online b
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The Atlantic

Trump's Travel Ban Wins a Round in Court President Trump suffered a series of major setbacks last week, beginning with FBI Director James Comey’s blockbuster announcement that his agency is investigating the Trump campaign’s ties to Russia and ending with the collapse of the Republican effort to repeal the Affordable Care Act. But he also closed out the week with a little-noticed victory in the courts—one that could herald a path forwar
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New Scientist - News

US energy systems at the mercy of cyberattack, warns reportHackers could sabotage electricity grid or oil pipelines unless weaknesses that have built up over decades are addressed, writes former NSA inspector general
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New Scientist - News

Geoengineering the sky is scary but we need to test it nowThe world's biggest trial of cooling the planet by altering the atmosphere is being launched. It is crucial that it goes ahead, says Jamais Cascio
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The ATLAS Experiment's quest for the lost arcNature has surprised physicists many times in history and certainly will do so again. Therefore, physicists have to keep an open mind when searching for phenomena beyond the Standard Model.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Just like Wolverine, humans need metal to maintain strong bonesAn international team of researchers, led by The University of Manchester, has used the UK's Diamond Light Source facility (pictured above) to image the precise location and chemistry behind the growth in bone for the first time. Their research has provided fresh insight into how bones grow and develop, and how the traces of metal found in bones play a vital part in this process.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uber pulls out of Denmark citing tougher cab standardsThe Danish branch of the ride-sharing service Uber said Tuesday it is shutting down its services in Denmark due to a proposed law that toughens standards for cabs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Information storage with a nanoscale twistSwirling objects known as magnetic vortices and skyrmions can be miniaturized without sacrificing mobility, a KAUST-led international research team has found. These findings are relevant for future "race-track" memory technologies that feature massive densities of moveable magnetic bits.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Clarifying how lithium ions ferry around in rechargeable batteriesAlthough most of our electronic devices, like mobile phones, laptops and electric vehicles use lithium rechargeable batteries, what is going on inside them is not fully understood. Researchers from the Center for Molecular Spectroscopy and Dynamics, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) succeeded in observing in realtime the ultrafast dynamics of lithium ions with femtosecond time resolutio
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Got camera? Facebook adds more Snapchat-like featuresFacebook is adding more Snapchat-like features to its app. The company says it wants to let your camera "do the talking" as more people are posting photos and videos instead of blocks of text.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China's Tencent takes 5% stake in Tesla: SEC filingChina's giant Tencent Holdings has taken a five percent stake in the Tesla electric car company as it moves to ramp up production, according to an official filing Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wild Thai tiger cub footage sparks hope for endangered speciesConservationists on Tuesday hailed the discovery of a new breeding population of tigers in Thailand as a "miraculous" victory for a sub-species nearly wiped out by poaching.
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Ingeniøren

Europa vil give omstridt patent på gensaks til ‘konkurrenten’Mens to amerikanske forskergrupper kæmper om patentrettighederne til genredigeringsværktøjet Crispr, har Europas patentkontor besluttet, hvem der får retten til at opkræve licens for brugen af metoden i Europa.
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Futurity.org

Drugs for Zika could target this protein Researchers have mapped a key protein that causes Zika virus to reproduce and spread. The work could speed the path to new treatments for the infectious disease. “Mapping this protein provides us the ability to reproduce a key part of the Zika virus in a lab,” says Cheng Kao, a professor of molecular and cellular biology at Indiana University. “This means we can quickly analyze existing drugs and
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Gizmodo

The Best Apps for Sending Money, From Least to Most Annoying Image: PayPal If you’ve got a debt to pay, a bill to split or a reward to give, you no longer need to dig out your wallet or bother with notes and coins—your smartphone is perfectly capable of sending money to friends and relatives with just a few taps. But the apps that let you send the money can be rife with hidden fees, they often hold your cash for longer than you might like, and sometimes th
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Biological underpinnings of chronic fatigue syndrome begin to emerge Gut bacteria and altered metabolic pathways are suspects in mysterious disease. Nature 543 602 doi: 10.1038/543602a
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Scientific American Content: Global

Suicide Risk Assessment Doesn't WorkNew research suggests it doesn’t help—and it may hurt—to rely on a formula to predict the risk of a suicide -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Honesty may not be the best policy for hospital safety grades, study suggestsA new study finds that a well-known hospital grading system may put too much weight on the wrong things. The grades are based in part on hospitals' self-reported use of safety-related protocols. But the study show this had little in common with how a hospital did on independent measurements of hospital-acquired infections -- or with whether the government had penalized it for high infection or rea
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Trump Action on Clean Power Plan threatens air quality, health, and economic benefits'If we overturn the Clean Power Plan we will forfeit important health benefits and undermine the longstanding American tradition of energy innovation and clean air progress, at a time when we need it most.'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Van Andel Research Institute installs cryo-EM to explore molecular basis of diseaseVan Andel Research Institute (VARI) is now home to one of the world's most powerful microscopes -- one that images life's building blocks in startling clarity and equips VAI's growing team of scientists to push the limits of discovery in search of new treatments for diseases such as cancer and Parkinson's.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Elon Musk hints at new brain-computer projectTech entrepreneur Elon Musk hinted Tuesday that he is working on a new startup focusing on brain-computer interface, part of his vision to help humans keep up with machines.
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New Scientist - News

Baby has surgery to remove parasitic fetus growing inside himA 10-month-old boy in Indonesia was found to have a 400 gram fetus living inside him, one of only a few hundred cases of “fetus in fetu” ever described
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Gizmodo

The New Spider-Man: Homecoming Trailer Features So Much Iron Man Marvel is certainly glad to have Spider-Man back in its stable of characters, isn’t it? The new trailer for Spider-Man: Homecoming gives us a lot of time with Michael Keaton’s Vulture and a lot of references to the wider Marvel cinematic universe. We’ll have a closer look at every Easter egg jammed in here in a little bit, but for now, note that this trailer, even more than the first one, leans h
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The Atlantic

The Problem With Modern Philanthropy In 2011, Michael Bloomberg gave the Sierra Club $50 million, the biggest donation in the club’s history, to expand the organization’s Beyond Coal initiative, which sought to shut down coal-fired power plants across the country. He gave $30 million more in 2015. The Beyond Coal campaign now says it has helped shut down 251 coal-burning plants , thanks in large part to Bloomberg’s donations. The ca
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The Atlantic

When Left-Wing Feminists and Conservative Catholics Unite Conservative Catholics and left-wing feminists often find each other on opposite sides of political debates, especially when it comes to what women should do with their bodies. Yet in Europe, there is a reproductive rights issue on which the Catholic Church, well-known for its staunch pro-life position, is finding common ground with pro-choice feminists: surrogacy. The practice whereby a woman ca
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chemists create microscopic environment to study cancer cell growthAccording to the American Cancer Society, there will be an estimated 1,688,780 new cancer cases diagnosed and 600,920 cancer deaths in the U.S. in 2017. Now a new study may offer new understanding about what turns good cells bad.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chlamydia—how bacteria take controlTo survive in human cells, chlamydiae have a lot of tricks in store. Researchers of the University of Würzburg have now discovered that the bacterial pathogens also manipulate the cells' energy suppliers in the process.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microalgae have great potential as fish feed ingredientCommercially produced microalgae could become a sustainable fish feed ingredient, a project from the National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, has shown. In the project concepts have been developed to grow, harvest, dry and store two types of algae that are rich in protein, antioxidants and omega 3 fatty acids.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers uncover secret of nanomaterial that makes harvesting sunlight easierUsing sunlight to drive chemical reactions, such as artificial photosynthesis, could soon become much more efficient thanks to nanomaterials.
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Popular Science

Here's how China is battling drones From Our Blogs: Eastern Arsenal There's no shortage of targets. Chinese police have drone-jamming guns, while the Chinese military has frigging laser guns.
9h
WIRED

The Island Where Chinese Tourists Flee to Escape the Smog Fresh air so good they bottle it. The post The Island Where Chinese Tourists Flee to Escape the Smog appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

The Creators of Serial Are Back With a Binge-Ready New Podcast The mystery involves alleged murder, buried gold, and a hedge maze. Got seven hours to mainline the new show? The post The Creators of Serial Are Back With a Binge-Ready New Podcast appeared first on WIRED .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Design could save truck fuel with turbulence-cutting electric wind generatorsFor road vehicles, wind resistance increases fuel consumption. But one way to fight wind is with wind. Researchers in Sweden are experimenting with reducing drag on trucks with electric wind devices that mimic the way vortex generators increase lift on airplane wings.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bacterial strain diversity in the gutWhat drives bacterial strain diversity in the gut? Although there are a number of possible explanations, a recent opinion piece published in TRENDs in Microbiology by Dr Pauline Scanlan, a Royal Society – Science Foundation Ireland Research Fellow at the APC Microbiome Institute, University College Cork, addresses one potentially important and overlooked aspect of this unresolved question.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

When writing interferes with hearingA cochlear implant is an electronic device capable of restoring hearing in a profoundly deaf person by stimulating the nerve endings in the inner ear. However, results can be extremely variable. Using brain imaging techniques, a neuroscientist and a surgeon have managed to predict the success of a cochlear implant among people who became profoundly deaf in their adult life.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Novel approach can reveal personalized breast cancer treatmentsResearchers have developed a new way to approach breast cancer treatment. First, they search for the proteins that drive tumor growth, and then test in the lab drugs that potentially neutralize these specific biological drivers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientist pioneers technology new to MSU, maps giant virusIn a laboratory at Michigan State University, scientists took a DIY approach to build a retrofitted cryo-electron microscope that allowed them to map a giant Samba virus -- one of the world's largest viruses.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sharing expert experimental knowledge to expedite designA new repository of metabolic information provides a quick tool for designing useful synthetic biological systems.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

5,000 and counting: Penn Medicine celebrates reconstruction milestoneDoctors in Penn Medicine's Division of Plastic Surgery recently performed their 5,000th free flap reconstructive surgery. Their milestone will be the focus of a presentation at the 96th Annual American Association of Plastic Surgeons Meeting in Austin, Texas, in which they will educate leaders from other institutions on the process of building a free flap program.
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Live Science

Ingestible Snake Robot Could Slither Through Your IntestinesA bizarrely undulating wave robot could one day slither its way through your intestines, visualizing the interior space.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chlamydia: How bacteria take over controlTo survive in human cells, chlamydiae have a lot of tricks in store. Researchers have now discovered that the bacterial pathogens also manipulate the cells' energy suppliers in the process.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Asian dust providing key nutrients for California's giant sequoiasDust from as far away as the Gobi Desert in Asia is providing more nutrients than previously thought for plants, including giant sequoias, in California's Sierra Nevada mountains, a team of scientists have found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Protein that regulates brain cell connections could be new target for treating Alzheimer's diseaseIn experiments with a protein called Ephexin5 that appears to be elevated in the brain cells of Alzheimer's disease patients and mouse models of the disease, researchers say removing it prevents animals from developing Alzheimer's characteristic memory losses. In a report on the studies, the researchers say the findings could eventually advance development of drugs that target Ephexin5 to prevent
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Class pervades the way migrants are viewed in BritainIn a poll of 25 countries by Ipsos MORI published in March 2017, 33% of those interviewed in Britain said immigration was their biggest worry. Although more British people overall were worried about healthcare, only Germans were more worried about immigration.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Fishes from Toxic Springs Reveal Evolution at the LimitsStudies of fishes that inhabit toxic sulfide springs reveal mechanisms of natural selection -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren

Forskere finder over 100 gener der er vigtige for hukommelsenStift bekendtskab med et nyt og hastigt voksende forskningsfelt: 'Imaging genetics’, der forbinder kognitiv neurovidenskab med genetik.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

More compulsory math lessons do not encourage women to pursue STEM careersThe demand for employees in STEM careers (science, technology, engineering and math) is particularly high, as corporations compete to attract skilled professionals in the international market. What is known as "curriculum intensification" is often used around the world to attract more university entrants – and particularly more women – to these subjects; that is to say, students have on average mo
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Dagens Medicin

Ansatte i psykiatrien stiller op til regions­rådet i Midt­jylland To overlæger, en præst og en sygeplejerske har allerede takket ja til at repræsentere psykiatrien i Region Midt til det kommende valg til regionsrådet. Psykiatrien skal på dagsordenen, siger overlæge Peter Møller Andersen.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mathematicians predict delaying school start times won't help sleep deprived teenagersInsufficient sleep during the week, and attempts to catch up at the weekend lead to ‘social jet lag’, finds a new study. Delaying school start times in the UK is unlikely to reduce sleep deprivation in teenagers, the research has found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Novel drug delivery beats swine flu at gene levelScientists have elaborated a new approach to deliver anti-viral RNAi to target cells against H1N1 influenza virus infection. Drug encapsulating via a combination of layer-by-layer technique and sol-gel chemistry allows beating swine flu at the gene level. The first test showed an 80% drop in virus protein synthesis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cortisol excess hits natural DNA process and mental health hardHigh concentrations of the stress hormone cortisol in the body affect important DNA processes and increase the risk of long-term psychological consequences. These relationships are evident in a study on patients with Cushing’s Syndrome, but the findings also open the door for new treatment strategies for other stress-related conditions such as anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New 5G transmitter 20 times more efficient than the previous onesThe new 5G radio transmitter is designed for the small fifth generation base stations. In the future, the coverage of a single base station has to be reduced because of the rapidly increasing number of mobile devices. This reduces the size of base stations, but increases their number, which makes the price, size and power consumption requirements of base stations and mobile phones converge.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cookbooks give readers (mostly) bad advice on food safetyA recent study finds bestselling cookbooks offer readers little useful advice about reducing food-safety risks, and much of the advice they do provide is inaccurate and not based on sound science.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Self-assembly technique could lead to long-awaited, simple method for making smaller microchip patternsA new interface control technique for block co-polymer self-assembly could provide long-sought method for making even tinier patterns on microchips with lines just 9 nanometers wide.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Health problems may increase as young people infected with HIV at birth get olderA new study has found that US youth infected with HIV around the time of their birth are at higher risk throughout their adolescence and young adulthood for experiencing serious health problems, poor control of the HIV virus or death.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Graphene-based neural probes probe brain activity in high resolutionGraphene-based transistors enable a flexible neural probe with excellent signal-to-noise ratio. Such probes are useful for examining neural activity for understanding diseases, as well as in neuroprosthetics for control of artificial limbs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cortisol excess hits natural DNA process and mental health hardHigh concentrations of the stress hormone, Cortisol, in the body affect important DNA processes and increase the risk of long-term psychological consequences. These relationships are evident in a study from the Sahlgrenska Academy on patients with Cushing's Syndrome, but the findings also open the door for new treatment strategies for other stress-related conditions such as anxiety, depression and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Information storage with a nanoscale twistDiscovery of a novel rotational force inside magnetic vortices makes it easier to design ultrahigh capacity disk drives.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mustard seeds without mustard flavor: New robust oilseed crop can resist global warmingUniversity of Copenhagen and the global player Bayer CropScience have successfully developed a new oilseed crop that is much more resistant to heat, drought and diseases than oilseed rape. The breakthrough is so big that it will feature as cover story of the April issue of Nature Biotechnology, the most prestigious journal for biotechnology research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Evaluation between maternal mental health and discharge readinessNew research indicates that mothers with a history of mental health disorders feel less ready for discharge from the NICU than with mothers without a mental health history.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers uncover secret of nanomaterial that makes harvesting sunlight easierUsing sunlight to drive chemical reactions, such as artificial photosynthesis, could soon become much more efficient thanks to nanomaterials.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Entrepreneurs love their companies like parents love their childrenA recent study shows that love is a major motivator both for parents and entrepreneurs. A multidisciplinary study asks whether entrepreneurs love their companies like parents love their children. The study used functional MRIs to study the brain activity of fathers and high-growth entrepreneurs. Fathers were shown pictures of their own children as well as other children they knew. Entrepreneurs we
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dementia: The right to rehabilitationRehabilitation is important for people with dementia as it is for people with physical disabilities, according to a leading dementia expert.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Meet your new electronic trauma interventionThe popular building-block computer game Tetris might be more than an idle pastime that keeps you glued to a screen. Playing it shortly after experiencing a traumatic event seems to block some of the recurrent intrusive memories that people are often left with. The proof-of-concept of the role, which Tetris could play within psychological interventions after trauma, is described in Springer Nature
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Astaxanthin compound found to switch on the FOX03 'longevity gene' in miceAn Astaxanthin compound has been found to switch on the FOX03 'longevity gene' in a study using mice at the University of Hawaii. Researchers measured a nearly 90 percent increase in the activation of the gene in the animals' heart tissue. Life sciences company Cardax Inc. looks forward to further confirmation in human clinical trials of Astanxanthin's potential role as an anti-aging therapy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How does oxygen get into a fuel cell?In order for a fuel cell to work, it needs an oxidizing agent. TU Wien has now found a way to explain why oxygen does not always enter fuel cells effectively, rendering them unusable.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

SHSU study examines death penalty support in MexicoIn sharp contrast to previous studies of public support for the death penalty conducted in the US, Catholics in Mexico were found to be more likely to support capital punishment, while older Mexicans and those living in states that bordered the US were less likely to support the death penalty, according to researchers at Sam Houston State University.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Case Western Reserve University researchers turn urine into research toolsResearchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have developed a breakthrough technique to harvest cells directly from urine, and grow them into durable, clinically relevant stem cells to study Down syndrome.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientist maps giant virusIn a laboratory at Michigan State University, scientists took a DIY approach to build a retrofitted cryo-electron microscope that allowed them to map a giant Samba virus – one of the world's largest viruses.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Virtual museum brings extinct species back to lifeDozens of fascinating digital 3-D models are shedding new light on specimens held at the University of Dundee's D'Arcy Thompson Museum while enhancing the learning of anatomy students around the world.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Countering fake news with contagionsSocial media is a wonderful tool for sharing information quickly; But not surprisingly, some of that information is false and has played a role in the dissemination of conspiracy theories and fake news.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New research shows immigration has only a minor effect on wagesEconomic arguments against immigration often take two forms – immigrants either suppress the wages of workers, or immigration creates higher unemployment. But our research shows that the impact of immigration on the labour market in Australia over the last 15 years is negligible.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How Facebook – the Wal-Mart of the internet – dismantled online subculturesBefore the internet, people interested in body modification – not just tattoo and piercing enthusiasts, but those drawn to more unusual practices like ear pointing, tongue splitting, suspension, scarification and the voluntary amputation of limbs and organs – had a difficult time meeting others who shared their interests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How Australia's animals and plants are changing to keep up with the climateClimate change is one of the greatest threats facing Australia's wildlife, plants and ecosystems, a point driven home by two consecutive years of mass coral bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sidelining planners makes for poorer urban policy, and future generations will pay the priceModern urban planning first came about to improve industrial cities that had become unsafe, unhealthy and essentially unliveable. However, new policies in Australia and New Zealand view planning as a cause of urban problems, not a solution. Both treat urban planning as a hindrance, which supposedly slows down economic growth and is the main reason for unaffordable housing.
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Science | The Guardian

Zander Wedderburn obituary My mentor, the psychologist Zander Wedderburn, who has died aged 81, was an international authority on shiftwork who helped to overturn the conventional wisdom that workers should rotate shifts on a weekly basis. Instead he found that rapidly rotating shifts – say, two early, two late, two nights and three days off – were more acceptable because of the social flexibility they offer. Zander was bo
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Science | The Guardian

ESA to narrow down possible Mars landing sites in search for life The European Space Agency is meeting with Mars scientists and engineers to take the next step in deciding where to land its life-searching ExoMars rover In about four years, the ExoMars rover will open its eyes on the surface of Mars. After a brief look around, its wheels will slowly crunch onto the frozen ground, beginning its journey on another planet. Later today we should be one step closer t
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Gizmodo

How I Let Disney Track My Every Move On a recent trip to Disney World, I had an unusual experience. I rode a ride. It broke. We were evacuated, and a few minutes later, I got a picture on my phone. It was an empty raft sliding down Splash Mountain, taken at precisely the moment I was walking down the emergency stairwell. It was weird. Technology has changed the Disney experience—and not necessarily in a bad way. These days, you can
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nanocages dramatically facilitate structure formation of biomoleculesNano-size space help faster folding of molecules and stabilize the structure, which regulates enzyme reactions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Major genetic study identifies 12 new genetic variants for ovarian cancerA genetic trawl through the DNA of almost 100,000 people, including 17,000 patients with the most common type of ovarian cancer, has identified 12 new genetic variants that increase risk of developing the disease and confirmed the association of 18 of the previously published variants.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Trump to Sign Order Sweeping Away Obama-Era Climate PoliciesGreen groups promise a fight; legal challenges could go on for years -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Scientist - News

“They said I was peri-menopausal. It’s a miracle I got pregnant”After several miscarriages and six unsuccessful IVF attempts, a woman in Germany is six months pregnant following an experimental ovarian rejuvenation treatment
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Popular Science

A desert researcher shares his essential survival gear Science How to stay alive so you can do science in scorching heat Kumud Acharya seeks out the world’s hottest conditions. Here’s what he brings to stay hydrated—and alive—while doing science in the most scorching environments.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Medicinal food' diet counters onset of type 1 diabetesResearchers have found -- for the first time -- that a diet yielding high amounts of the short-chain fatty acids acetate and butyrate provided a beneficial effect on the immune system and protected against type 1 or juvenile diabetes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New tool allows analysis of single-cell RNA data in pre-malignant tumoursScientists have developed a new analysis tool that showed, for the first time, which genes were expressed by individual cells in different genetic versions of a benign blood cancer. The new computer tool -- Single Cell Consensus Clustering -- was shown to be more accurate and robust than existing methods of analyzing single-cell RNA sequence data, and is freely available for researchers to use.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The first crowdfunded study in Japan: Micro X-ray observation of a fleshy brittle starNot only have scientists from Japan performed the first non-destructive morphological observations on the fleshy brittle star, Asteronyx loveni, using micro X-ray tomography, but they also published their research as the first study supported by crowdfunding in the Asian country. The team leader managed to raise part of the funds via Japan's pioneering crowd-funding platform academist.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Of Star Trek, Mark Twain and helmets: 15 new species of wasps with curious namesFifteen new species of parasitic wasps have been described from the Neotropics. Apart from being quite distinct with their large and elongated bodies, the new insects also draw attention with their curious formal names. Among them, there are species named after characters from Star Trek and Mark Twain's The Prince and the Pauper, and five wasps bearing names translating to 'helmet' in three differ
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Inflammation awakens sleepersThe inflammatory response that is supposed to ward off pathogens that cause intestinal disease makes this even worse. This is because special viruses integrate their genome into Salmonella, which further strengthens the pathogen.
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Ars Technica

Here’s why the imminent test of Jeff Bezos’ BE-4 rocket engine is a huge deal Enlarge / Blue Origin founder Jeff Bezos has an important engine test coming up soon. (credit: Win McNamee/Getty Images) Key Blue Origin officials have begun to drop hints about the imminent hot-fire test of the company's new rocket engine, the BE-4. Jeff Bezos recently said to expect a full-scale engine test "in the coming weeks." And last Wednesday the company's director of business development
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New on MIT Technology Review

The Download, Mar 28, 2017: AI Speed Boost, Musk’s Mind Meld, and Cellular ComputersThe most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cosmic collisions at the LHCb experimentLast week at the 52nd Rencontres de Moriond EW in La Thuile, Italy, the LHCb experiment presented the results of an unprecedented and unusual study. Instead of the usual proton-proton collisions, this time the LHCb detector registered collisions between protons and helium nuclei, which were injected near the interaction point of the experiment. This type of collision can usually only be seen far a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New type of sensor material developedHokkaido University scientists have succeeded in developing a nickel complex that changes color and magnetism when exposed to methanol vapor. The new material can potentially be used not only as a chemical sensor, but also with future rewritable memory devices.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New outbursts detected in a peculiar, active dwarf nova MN Draconis(Phys.org)—A team of astronomers led by Karolina Bąkowska of the Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center in Warsaw, Poland, has discovered several new outbursts in a peculiar, active dwarf nova known as MN Draconis. The results of new observations, which could provide better understanding of dwarf novae in general, were published Mar. 20 in a paper on arXiv.org.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Air could be the world's next batteryWind and sun, two unpredictable resources, are becoming ever more important as sources of energy in Europe. This means that we face a growing need for energy storage facilities, because if energy cannot be used immediately when it is generated, it needs to be stored until it is needed.
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Ingeniøren

Papiret væk fra produktionen: Maskinfabrik gik 100 procent digitalMaskinfabrik i Tønder brugte 1,5 millioner kroner på at digitalisere produktionen. Det giver 10 gigabyte data hver dag. Men også indsigt i, at pengene tjenes andre steder, end man ellers har troet.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Biologists find 'skin-and-bones' mechanism underlying zebrafish fin regenerationUniversity of Oregon biologists have figured out how zebrafish perfectly regenerate amputated fins with a precisely organized skeleton.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A basis for the application of drought indices in ChinaThe definition of a drought index is the foundation of drought research. It is of great importance to evaluate the applicability of drought indices in drought monitoring, forecasting systems and research. Performances of seven meteorological drought indices have been identified in China, using terrestrial water storage obtained from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment, the observed soil mo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chlamydia: How bacteria take over controlTo survive in human cells, chlamydiae have a lot of tricks in store. Researchers of the University of Würzburg have now discovered that the bacterial pathogens also manipulate the cells' energy suppliers in the process.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Interferon-beta producing stem cell-derived immune cell therapy on liver cancerInduced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived myeloid cells (iPS-ML) that produce the anti-tumor protein interferon-beta (IFN-beta) have been produced and analyzed by researchers from Kumamoto University, Japan. Using human iPS-ML in a mouse model, they found that the cells migrate to and deliver IFN-beta to liver tumors thereby reducing cancer proliferation and increasing survival time.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Clarifying how lithium ions ferry around in rechargeable batteriesIBS scientists observe the real-time ultrafast bonding of lithium ions with the solvents, in the same process that happens during charging and discharging of lithium batteries, and conclude that a new theory is needed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Evolving 'lovesick' organisms found survival in sexBeing 'lovesick' takes on a whole new meaning in a new theory which answers the unsolved fundamental question: why do we have sex?
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Gizmodo

There Might Be Life in the Live-Action Akira Remake Just Yet Image: Concept art via Ruairí Robinson Zack Snyder discusses the importance of Superman in Justice League . Jessica Chastain throws her hat in the ring for Gotham City Sirens . Michael Keaton compares his Spider-Man: Homecoming villain to Tony Stark. Plus, new details about the Tomb Raider reboot, and a ton of new pictures from American Gods . To me, my spoilers! Akira After years in development
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Scientific American Content: Global

Of Mice and Men: Study Pushes Rodents' Home Invasion to 15,000 Years AgoScientists provide a new estimate for when the common house mouse took up residence with humans -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rocks that tell our industrial historyResearchers have published a study in which they analyze beachrocks, cemented sand formations that have industrial waste, produced as a result of metallurgical activities, trapped inside them. These strange rocks bear witness to the impact of industrial development and its influence on the coastal environment.
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Science | The Guardian

Are we entering a golden age of the conspiracy theory? ‘Post-truth’ society provides the perfect conditions for dubious theories to flourish. But are some people more susceptible to conspiracy theories? “I want you all to know that we are fighting the fake news. It’s fake, phoney, fake. A few days ago, I called the fake news the enemy of the people. And they are. They are the enemy of the people …” Donald Trump’s assault on “terrible, dishonest” jour
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Gizmodo

A Wild New Hypothesis for How Saturn's Moon Enceladus Got Its Geysers Image: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute Saturn’s moon Enceladus is a beautiful mystery. Though it looks like a lonely ice ball, this moon is concealing what’s probably an underground ocean , engulfing a rocky core. In fact, Enceladus’s south pole contains active jets that shoot out water vapor and icy particles from this ocean, which were first observed by NASA’s Cassini orbiter in 2005. These or
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Futurity.org

How ‘hearts and minds’ strategy endangers Afghan civilians Winning the “hearts and minds” of Afghan civilians is a key component of the United States’ strategy in Afghanistan, where war continues to rage more than 16 years after NATO-backed forces knocked the Taliban from power. But these kinds of aid programs may have an unintended consequence: Taliban insurgents target villages where aid projects have gained traction, says Jason Lyall, associate profes
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Scientific American Content: Global

Planet-Sized "Waves" Spotted in the Sun's AtmosphereLong-sought features may help researchers improve models of solar activity and predict space weather -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Popular Science

What the frack is in fracking fluid? Environment Most of the ingredients are unknown Over 100 billion gallons of fracking fluid is injected into the U.S. each year. But what's inside that water? Read on:…
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Ars Technica

The life-saving treatment that’s being thrown in the trash Enlarge / A little needlework and blood has never looked better. (credit: © MaricorMaricar @ Handsome Frank) Transplanted umbilical cord blood can be used to treat or cure more than 80 conditions, from leukemia to sickle-cell disease. For Mosaic, Bryn Nelson follows the story of one man, Chris. After being diagnosed with leukemia in his early 40s, his best chance of survival comes in the form of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A step toward making crops drought tolerantQUT researchers are part of an international consortium of researchers whose work hopes to future-proof crops against the impacts of global climate change.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The role of tiny RNA in genetic diversityAll species, from zebrafish to humans, possess a genetically diverse collection of traits that allow them to adapt to changing environments. Yet scientists do not fully understand how organisms reach a state of optimal diversity—just enough variability to respond to environmental risks but not too much to function properly.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Neonicotinoid insecticides losing efficiency in potato psyllid controlThe potato industry may be losing a mainstay in the battle against psyllids, according to a recent Texas A&M AgriLife Research study.
10h
WIRED

AI Wields the Power to Make Flying Safer—and Maybe Even Pleasant From cutting delays to cutting edge autopilot, the computers are coming to help. The post AI Wields the Power to Make Flying Safer—and Maybe Even Pleasant appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Even Switzerland Is Obsessed With Smartwatches Now Watches last forever. Gadgets don't. Where does that leave luxury smartwatches? The post Even Switzerland Is Obsessed With Smartwatches Now appeared first on WIRED .
10h
Gizmodo

Tackle Your Home Improvement Projects With Amazon's One-Day Drill Discount Black & Decker 20V Drill + 30 Accessories , $42 Everyone should own a decent drill, and this Black & Decker starter kit offers a ton of value for just $42 . That gets you a 20V drill, a battery, and all the bits you need to get started. There are definitely more powerful drills out there, but I’ve owned this one for years, and it’s been perfectly adequate for basic tasks around the house, and I’m
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New type of sensor material developedHokkaido University scientists have succeeded in developing a nickel complex that changes color and magnetism when exposed to methanol vapor. The new material can potentially be used not only as a chemical sensor, but also with future rewritable memory devices.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rogue breast tumor proteins point to potential drug therapiesFor patients with difficult-to-treat cancers, doctors increasingly rely on genomic testing of tumors to identify errors in the DNA that indicate a tumor can be targeted by existing therapies. But this approach overlooks rogue proteins that may be driving cancer cells and also could be targeted with existing treatments, according to research led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Lo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

To be or not to be ... an entrepreneurProfessor Ross Levine found evidence that a company's legal status -- incorporated or unincorporated -- can be used as a reliable measure to distinguish entrepreneurs from other business owners.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Group investigates how phototherapy combats neuropathic painLow-level laser therapy has been shown by recent studies to be a non-invasive and effective alternative for treating neuropathic pain. Recent studies helped elucidate the mechanisms behind the effect of low-level laser therapy.
10h
Viden

Hajskind-sko skal hjælpe robotter på ujævne vejeSkindet fra sildehajer er dækket af små kroge, som får robotten til at stå fast.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ancient palace complex discovered in Mexican Valley of Oaxaca(Phys.org)—A pair of archaeologists with the American Museum of Natural History has unearthed a palatial compound in El Palenque's plaza in the Oaxaca Valley in Mexico. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Elsa Redmond and Charles Spencer describe their work, what they have uncovered and how their findings fit with the emergence of organized states in Mesoam
10h
The Atlantic

The Atheists Struggling to Find Therapists in the Bible Belt In the lead-up to the 2016 presidential election, life in the town of Easley, South Carolina, was tense for Leigh Drexler. Pick-up trucks with airborne Confederate flags seemed more prevalent than ever before, and her grandparents—who had never voted in their lives—registered to cast their ballots for the Donald himself. Drexler felt isolated. “My family has always directed their point of view at
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The Atlantic

The Subtle Radicalism of Julio Cortázar's Berkeley Lectures “What good is a writer if he can’t destroy literature?” The question comes from Julio Cortázar’s landmark 1963 novel Hopscotch , the dense, elusive, streetwise masterpiece that doubles as a High Modernist choose-your-own-adventure game. Famously, it includes an introductory “table of instructions”: “This book consists of many books,” Cortázar writes in it, “but two books above all.” The first ver
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Senior ScientistsThe aging science and engineering workforce in the U.S. can be traced back to the Baby Boomer cohort of researchers and the elimination of mandatory retirement in universities.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

3-D structure of enzyme opens path to new drug design in brain diseaseResearchers at the University of York and Simon Fraser University, Canada, revealed the 3-D structure of an enzyme that could provide a crucial step forward in treating neurodegenerative diseases.
10h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Stamcellemodeller giver nye muligheder for behandling af demensForskere fra Københavns Universitet har udviklet stamcellemodeller, som kan afsløre mekanismerne...
10h
Futurity.org

Graphene tested as tiny ‘coolers’ for computer chips Graphene could offer a new way to cool tiny chips in phones, computers, and other gadgets. “You can fit graphene, a very thin, two-dimensional material that can be miniaturized, to cool a hot spot that creates heating problems in your chip,” says Eva Y. Andrei, a physics professor at Rutgers University. “This solution doesn’t have moving parts and it’s quite efficient for cooling.” “We’ve achieve
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Videnskabens Verden

I tidernes morgen, var der ikke meget liv her på Jorden. I lang tid, var det mest alger. Men pludselig opstod der en eksplosion af liv. Nogenlunde samtidig blev Jorden ramt af en voldsom meteorstorm. Og man mente, at det var meteorstormen, der satte gang i denne udvikling. Men nej, det var det ikke, viser nye resultater fra danske og svenske forskere. Tilrettelæggelse: Charlotte Koldbye, Maja Hald
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Houses aren't more unaffordable for first home buyers, but they are riskierClimbing house prices seem to scare people but houses are relatively more affordable today than they were in 1990, it's actually interest-rate risk that's the bigger problem for first home buyers.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Flying syringes' could detect emerging infectious diseasesBlood-sucking flies can act as 'flying syringes' to detect emerging infectious diseases in wild animals before they spread to humans, according to research published in the journal eLife.
11h
The Atlantic

The Quest to Kill the Superbug That Can Survive in Outer Space Highbay 1 at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is one of the most sterile cleanrooms on Earth. Not long from now, NASA’s next big Mars mission, the life-hunting Mars 2020 rover will have its parts attached here and so will the first probe sent to Europa. As long as un-crewed missions keep going to space, their Frankenstein bodies will be attached piece-by-piece in this room. To sterilize the
11h
cognitive science

Words matter when math teachers describe student learning: Do you recall being assigned to a "high," "middle" or "low" group? If so, you'll relate to a new study on the importance of how teachers talk about students' mathematical work. submitted by /u/parrishthethought [link] [comments]
11h
Ingeniøren

Robot skyder lakselus med laserEn norsk robot kan genkende laksedræbende havlus og skyder parasitten med laser, men reflekterer strålen mod fiskens skæl.
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Futurity.org

Did fruit, not friends, give us big brains? Diet, not social life, may be the driver of brain size evolution, a new study suggests. The findings call into question “the social brain hypothesis,” which argues that humans and other primates are big-brained because of their sociality. The findings, which appear in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution , reinforce the notion that both human and non-human primate brain evolution may be drive
11h
Dagens Medicin

Ny ledende overlæge i SlagelseSusette Krohn Therkelsen er pr. 1. februar 2017 ansat som ny ledende overlæge i Kardiologisk/Endokrinologisk afdeling på Slagelse Akutsygehus.
11h
Gizmodo

Trump Official's Lego Batman Joke Will Be Investigated Because Democrats Clearly Want to Lose in 2020 Screenshot from the movie Lego Batman (left) Steven Mnuchin (right, photo by Getty Images) In an interview on Friday, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin made a joke about everyone sending their kids to go see Lego Batman , a movie that he helped produce. So now Senator Ron Wyden, a Democrat from Oregon, is calling for the Office of Government Ethics to investigate Mnuchin for violating ethics rule
11h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Trump to sweep away Obama climate change policiesEnvironmentalists warn Mr Trump's order will have serious consequences at home and abroad.
11h
WIRED

The Race to Rule the High-Flying Business of Satellite Imagery Satellite companies have mountains of data. Some of them analyze in-house, while others sell their data. Who will dominate the new space information economy? The post The Race to Rule the High-Flying Business of Satellite Imagery appeared first on WIRED .
11h
WIRED

VPNs Won’t Save You from Congress’ Internet Privacy Giveaway Get ready to say good-bye to your online privacy. Not that you ever really had it anyway. The post VPNs Won't Save You from Congress' Internet Privacy Giveaway appeared first on WIRED .
11h
Ars Technica

The Collapsing Empire is a hilarious tale of humanity’s impending doom Mild spoilers ahead. (credit: Illustration by Sparth, via Tor Books) In his new novel The Collapsing Empire , bestselling writer John Scalzi builds a fascinating new interstellar civilization in order to destroy it. The Interdependency is a thousand-year-old interplanetary trade partnership in humanity's distant future. Its member planets were once connected to Earth by the Flow, a natural featur
11h
Science | The Guardian

World's largest dinosaur footprints discovered in Western Australia Newly-discovered prints left by gigantic herbivores are part of a rich collection of tracks belonging to an estimated 21 different types of dinosaur The largest known dinosaur footprints have been discovered in Western Australia, including 1.7 metre prints left by gigantic herbivores. Until now, the biggest known dinosaur footprint was a 106cm track discovered in the Mongolian desert and reported
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New Zooniverse project—muon hunterA new citizen science project, led by Associate Professor Lucy Fortson, is asking for help from the public to identify and categorize hundreds of thousands of ring patterns within images produced by VERITAS gamma-ray observatory cameras.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Changing habitat releasing long-stored carbon into the atmosphereCoastal environments supporting seagrasses, salt marshes and mangroves are storehouses for vast reserves of organic carbon known as blue carbon. These reservoirs have trapped organic carbon beneath the surface for hundreds to thousands of years in a low oxygen environment.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Mysterious Jovian dark spotThis enhanced-color image of a mysterious dark spot on Jupiter seems to reveal a Jovian "galaxy" of swirling storms.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Can computers one day understand emotions? New patent paves the wayA new patent awarded to a Penn State team led by James Wang, professor in the College of Information Sciences and Technology; Reginald Adams, associate professor of psychology in the College of the Liberal Arts; Jia Li, professor of statistics in the Eberly College of Science; and Michelle Newman, professor of psychology, takes the next step in computer learning techniques in the hopes that comput
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Words matter when math teachers describe student learningThink back to math class in elementary school. Do you remember being assigned to a "high," "middle" or "low" group? If so, you'll relate to a new study from North Carolina State University on the importance of how teachers talk about students' mathematical work.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Opinion: Why we signed the open letter from scientists supporting a total ban on nuclear weaponsThese are dangerous times. The Doomsday Clock sits at just two and a half minutes before midnight, which represents global catastrophe.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ubiquitous marine organism co-evolved with other microbes, promoting more complex ecosystemsWilliam Blake may have seen a world in a grain of sand, but for scientists at MIT the smallest of all photosynthetic bacteria holds clues to the evolution of entire ecosystems, and perhaps even the whole biosphere.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate change puts invasive plants on the moveClimate change may force one of New England's invasive plant species to retreat north, while another will likely stay put and take over an even greater area, according to a new study by UConn faculty and former doctoral candidates.
11h
Live Science

Playing 'Tetris' After Trauma May Reduce Bad FlashbacksPlaying Tetris shortly after a traumatic event, such as a car crash, may reduce the risk of developing intrusive "flashbacks" of the event, a new study suggests.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Can robots write meaningful news?Robots and computers are replacing people everywhere; doctors, pilots, even journalists. Is this leading to a dystopian society, or could it be something positive?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Prefabricated phrases in young learners' oral languageA new doctoral dissertation by Parvin Gheitasi at Umeå University explores the different functions of prefabricated phrases in young learners' oral language production. These phrases provided learners with an instrument to overcome their lack of knowledge, to improve their fluency, and to enjoy some language play.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cooling materials super-quicklyCooling materials super-quickly, called rapid solidification, prevents the normal crystalline structures of materials from forming, often creating unique properties in the process. If single crystal growth techniques sit at one end of the materials synthesis spectrum, promoting the growth of that material's equilibrium crystalline structure, rapid solidification techniques promote the opposite eff
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The role of single crystals in creating new materialsWhen it comes to creating new materials, single crystals play an important role in presenting a clearer picture of a material's intrinsic properties. A typical material will be comprised of lots of smaller crystals and the grain boundaries between these crystals can act as impediments, affecting properties such as electrical or thermal resistance.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NuSTAR probes puzzling galaxy mergerA supermassive black hole inside a tiny galaxy is challenging scientists' ideas about what happens when two galaxies become one.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New, highly accurate positions and motions available for millions of starsThe United States Naval Observatory (USNO) has released a new catalog of over 107 million stars, the 5th USNO CCD Astrograph Catalog (UCAC5). This catalog of about 5.5 gigabytes of binary data is currently available from the German Astrophysical Virtual Observatory (GAVO) Data Center. It will soon be available from the Astronomical Data Center (CDS) in Strasbourg, France and its mirror sites. In a
12h
The Atlantic

Today's News: March 28, 2017 —Members of Scottish Parliament voted 69-59 to give First Minister Nicola Sturgeon the authority to negotiate with the U.K. government on holding a second referendum on independence. More here —President Trump signed an executive order on energy independence that aims to roll back Obama-era environmental protections. But many of the coal jobs the president has promised to restore are unlikely to
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Humans are 'learning to think as a species'Humanity is in the early stages of the most significant evolution in its history: learning to think as a species.
12h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Don’t put greasy Q-tips up your kid’s nose, and other nosebleed adviceNosebleeds in children are common and usually nothing to fret about.
12h
Ars Technica

With “Age of Triumph,” Bungie wants to give Destiny players a “victory lap” Enlarge / Shoot the thing! (credit: Bungie ) For nearly three years, Destiny has been the source of strife, joy, frustration, and often fierce loyalty to millions of players. With a full sequel to the game just announced on Twitter , developer Bungie has elected to close things out with a celebration of sorts. “The dream of Destiny has always been that it is an adventure that continues,” Bungie C
12h
Scientific American Content: Global

The Genius of Pinheads: When Little Brains Rule​Bigger brains are not always better -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
Dagens Medicin

Fælles standard øger overlevelse hos børn med aggressiv kræftformNy standardbehandling giver bedre overlevelse og reducerer bivirkningerne blandt patienter med højrisiko neuroblastom.
12h
Live Science

Ancient Assyrian Tomb with 10 Skeletons Discovered in IraqConstruction workers accidentally discovered a vaulted tomb, and 10 skeletons, dating back to the time of the Assyrian Empire in Erbil, the capital of Iraqi Kurdistan.
12h
BBC News - Science & Environment

'Fake science used to justify badger culls'A senior researcher claims ministers are using a flawed method for assessing badger numbers in the TB cull.
12h
WIRED

Joking While Muslim in Trump’s America In the middle of the debate over what—and who—makes America great, an Iranian American comic mixes patriotism with punch lines. The post Joking While Muslim in Trump's America appeared first on WIRED .
12h
WIRED

Chonda Pierce on Being a Conservative Comedian If you want to mock snowflake liberals, you have to be able to take it when a stranger tells you to (praise Jesus) f-off. The post Chonda Pierce on Being a Conservative Comedian appeared first on WIRED .
12h
WIRED

Confessions of Presidential Joke Writer Jon Lovett "We can make fun and we can fight and we can do it through jokes and through comedy, but it has to be about more than why people are reprehensible." The post Confessions of Presidential Joke Writer Jon Lovett appeared first on WIRED .
12h
WIRED

Samantha Bee’s Full-Frontal Assault on the Trump Regime Playing nice with a president so contemptuous of the media is going to be challenging for journalists. Bee has resolved to play not-nice. The post Samantha Bee's Full-Frontal Assault on the Trump Regime appeared first on WIRED .
12h
WIRED

Inside the Anger-Fueled World of Comedy in the Trump Age Comedy is now politics. Politics is comedy. And with our new president, not all of it is exactly funny. The post Inside the Anger-Fueled World of Comedy in the Trump Age appeared first on WIRED .
12h
WIRED

How Your (Liberal Elite) Comedy Gets Made Exploring the president's pathological self-consciousness through the timeless magic of dick jokes. The post How Your (Liberal Elite) Comedy Gets Made appeared first on WIRED .
12h
WIRED

When Kanye Met Donald: A Late-Night Story As politics merges with pop culture, it changes how comedians approach their work. The post When Kanye Met Donald: A Late-Night Story appeared first on WIRED .
12h
Science | The Guardian

Cross-border surrogacy: exploiting low income women as biological resources? Our globalised economy responds voraciously to biotech advances, but lax regulation risks turning the poor into biological resources to be used for profit “Look at us, here! We are creating the world of tomorrow!” exclaims Mike. His words bounce off the walls of the high-tech fertility clinic we are in. Outside, the sun is slowly sinking into the smog of New Delhi’s skyline as the streets fill wi
12h
New on MIT Technology Review

High-Temperature Superconductivity Claimed for Sunscreen MoleculeAn organic molecule, usually used in sunscreen, superconducts at the remarkable temperature of -150 degrees Centigrade, say Chinese researchers. But how does the evidence stack up?
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Dagens Medicin

Listen med vacciner i restordre vokser hos seruminstituttetStatens Serum Instituts liste med vacciner i restordre er længere end normalt, fordi instituttets vaccinationsproduktion er solgt fra.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New intermediate discovered for the photodissociation of triiodide anion, a classic textbook reactionThe photodissociation of triiodide anion (I3-) is a classic textbook reaction that has been extensively studied both in solution and in gas phase. However, probing the ultrafast dynamics of this reaction in the solid state is challenging due to partial reversibility of the reaction and its sensitivity to experimental conditions. Now, a team of scientists have discovered a new reaction intermediate
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Evolving 'lovesick' organisms found survival in sexBeing 'lovesick' takes on a whole new meaning in a new theory which answers the unsolved fundamental question: why do we have sex?
13h
Ars Technica

Planet Earth II is “need a new TV” propaganda—if you get the right version Enlarge / This flamingo colony runs in a nearly perfect formation as a "parade" of sorts. It's even more stunning in motion—and that much more stunning if you get to see the birds' perfect pink tones on an HDR-10 display. (credit: BBC Home Entertainment) BBC series Planet Earth stood out in 2006 for many reasons: massive budget, beautiful cinematography, isolated ends of the planet, David Attenbo
13h
Science | The Guardian

I am an Arctic researcher. Donald Trump is deleting my citations | Victoria Herrmann These politically motivated data deletions come at a time when the Arctic is warming twice as fast as the global average Analysis: Trump signals end of US dominance in climate change battle As an Arctic researcher, I’m used to gaps in data. Just over 1% of US Arctic waters have been surveyed to modern standards. In truth, some of the maps we use today haven’t been updated since the second world w
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nanoscale sensor to spot diseaseA new nanoscale sensor has been developed that can help detect cytokines—molecules that play a critical role in cellular response to infection, inflammation, trauma and disease.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A novel hybrid UAV that may change the way people operate dronesTwo PhD students in National University of Singapore, Unmanned System Research Group spent four years developing novel hybrid unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). The U-Lion is a hybrid UAV that can take off and land vertically like helicopter UAVs, and transit to cruise flight like airplanes.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists discovered tip induced unconventional superconductivity on Weyl semimetalsRecently, Prof. Jian Wang and collaborators discovered tip-induced unconventional superconductivity by hard point contact on Weyl semi-metal TaAs crystals, which might be topologically non-trivial. Topological superconductors have attracted great attention for their ability to host Majorana zero modes, which could be used in topological quantum computation. Therefore, this discovery not only opens
13h
Ingeniøren

55.117 kameraer tjekker din hastighedHvis nye stærekasser skal erstatte fotovogne til hastighedsovervågning, kommer Danmark med i klubben af lande med automatisk hastighedskontrol.
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Science | The Guardian

I have vulvodynia – but countless gynaecologists dismissed my agony | AnonymousStatistics say that one in six women will contract this painful condition. So why did it take years and endless misdiagnoses before I was properly treated? It was after a spate of kidney infections that I started experiencing intimate pain, including a burning and stinging sensation on the skin around my vulva whenever I attempted to sleep with my partner or insert a tampon. I was a student at the
13h
Ingeniøren

Intels lynhurtige 3D-storage er på vej til din bærbare Det er gået hurtigere end forventet med at få den nye lagerserie så langt ned i pris, at den er velegnet til forbrugermarkedet. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/intels-lynhurtige-3d-storage-paa-vej-din-baerbare-1074972 Version2
13h
Ingeniøren

Forældre: Youtubes algoritmer fjerner ikke upassende indhold til børn Ikke alt er, hvad det udgiver sig for at være på internettet. Heller ikke på Youtube. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/foraeldre-youtubes-algoritmer-formaar-ikke-at-fjerne-upassende-indhold-boern-1074970 Version2
13h
Ingeniøren

Samsung vil gensælge brandfarlige telefonerSamsung har indsamlet 97 procent af Galaxy Note 7-telefonerne, og nu skal de genbruges eller gensælges.
13h
Ingeniøren

Ny analyse: Danmark halter efter udlandet i biotek-kapløbetStaten, universiteter og de store aktører inden for life science skal samarbejde bedre, hvis Danmark skal bevare sin plads blandt de bedste inden for lægemidler, fastslår rapport.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When writing interferes with hearingA cochlear implant is an electronic device capable of restoring hearing in a profoundly deaf person by stimulating the nerve endings in the inner ear. However, results can be extremely variable. Using brain imaging techniques, a neuroscientist from University of Geneva and a Parisian ENT surgeon have managed to predict the success of a cochlear implant among people who became profoundly deaf in th
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Novel approach can reveal personalized breast cancer treatmentsResearchers from various institutions, including Baylor College of Medicine, have developed a new way to approach breast cancer treatment. First, they search for the proteins that drive tumor growth, and then test in the lab drugs that potentially neutralize these specific biological drivers.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Dust helps regulate Sierra Nevada ecosystemsA new study released March 28 in the journal Nature Communications indicates it's important to understand how dust helps vegetation thrive, especially in light of the changing climate and land-use intensification.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Asian dust providing key nutrients for California's giant sequoiasDust from as far away as the Gobi Desert in Asia is providing more nutrients than previously thought for plants, including giant sequoias, in California's Sierra Nevada mountains, a team of scientists, including several from the University of California, Riverside, have found.
14h
The Atlantic

Reforming Government First Requires Understanding It This week President Trump put his son-in-law Jared Kushner in charge of a new White House office, the Office of American Innovation. It will reportedly be staffed by former business executives who will operate like a SWAT team to bring new ideas to government. This is an admirable undertaking. Like any large organization the government can always use fresh ideas. But the reality is that governmen
14h
Viden

3D-printede fødevarer skal lokke børn og ældre til fadetEn 3D-printet gulerod formet som en stjerne skal lokke kræsne børn til at spise grøntsager.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dust helps regulate Sierra Nevada ecosystems, study finds"Collecting dust" isn't usually considered a good thing.
14h
Science : NPR

The Truth Is, Lying Might Not Be So Bad With repeated lies, the brain becomes less and less sensitive to dishonesty, supporting ever larger acts of dishonesty. But why do we lie and is it such a terrible thing if we do?
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Science : NPR

Expected Executive Actions On Climate Change Policies Aim To Ensure Focus On Energy Independence President Trump will sign executive actions Tuesday that aim to roll back a sweeping set of climate policies put in place by the Obama administration. A moratorium on new coal leases on public lands, a rule designed to address methane emissions from oil and gas operations and the Clean Power Plan, will all get a review.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Souq.com says Amazon has bought it after $800M counterofferAmazon purchased the Middle East's biggest online retailer Souq.com on Tuesday for an undisclosed amount, a day after a state-backed firm disclosed an $800 million counteroffer.
14h
The Atlantic

Obamacare Won't Explode Unless Trump Wants It To After the American Health Care Act, the GOP’s Obamacare replacement bill, was pulled on Friday, people who feared the bill would cut their own or their loved ones’ health-care access breathed a sigh of relief. From a friend. One of many reasons why I'm so relieved pic.twitter.com/DbAN9ziz1t — Mark Joseph Stern (@mjs_DC) March 24, 2017 Indeed, the elderly, poor, and those on Medicaid would have su
14h
The Atlantic

It Doesn't Get Any Easier for Republicans Now “In a way I’m glad I got it out of the way,” President Trump told the Washington Post last week in the moments after he and Republican leaders in Congress pulled the plug on their first major legislative priority, repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act. Health care was hard. Really hard. “Nobody knew that health care could be so complicated,” the president had said in a now-infamous quot
15h
The Atlantic

‘Protest Is Necessary, but Insufficient’ Republicans spent the past eight years opposing President Obama, and now Democrats are calling for “resistance” against President Trump. But opposition alone isn’t enough to win converts to a cause or enact a political agenda, argues Eric Liu, the founder of the non-profit Citizen University and author of the new book You’re More Powerful Than You Think: A Citizen’s Guide to Making Change Happen.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Self-driving car crash comes amid debate about regulationsA crash that caused an Uber self-driving SUV to flip onto its side in a Phoenix suburb serves as a stark reminder of the challenges surrounding autonomous vehicles in Arizona, a state that has gone all-in to entice the company by promising minimal government regulation.
15h
Ingeniøren

Infrarødt internet på vej med svimlende hastighederMed hastigheder på over 40 Gbps lover en ny type lysbaseret wifi en helt ny type trådløs forbindelse.
15h
Science-Based Medicine

Stem Cells for Macular Degeneration: Meticulous Science vs. Unethical CarelessnessRigorous scientists stabilized a patient’s macular degeneration with a cutting-edge stem cell treatment; less rigorous scientists misapplied stem cell science and left three women blind.
16h
Ingeniøren

De vellønnede ingeniører bor i Nordsjælland - og derefter kommer... Privatansatte ingeniører i Nordsjælland topper lønstatistikken, mens fynboerne ligger i bunden. Og så er det ikke i Vestjylland, man skal blive gammel, hvis man vil være rig. Generelt ser det nu godt ud for alle, mener IDA https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/store-loenforskelle-mellem-regionerne-7187 Jobfinder
16h
Ingeniøren

Netværk skal grundlægges tidligt: Tag til jobmesse allerede på 1. semester Rasmus Goosmann, der er formand for DSE Messe Lyngby, anbefaler studerende på både første og sidste år at bruge messen til at skabe gode netværk til et senere arbejdsliv. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/netvaerk-skal-grundlaegges-tidligt-tag-jobmesse-allerede-pa-1-semester-7212 Jobfinder
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Waze gets into the order-ahead business with Dunkin' DonutsWaze's traffic navigation app already shows ads prodding drivers to swing by fast-food joints like Dunkin' Donuts and Taco Bell. Now it's adding a new item to its menu—the ability to place orders at some shops.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Monster' cyclone Debbie batters northeast AustraliaA "monster" cyclone smashed into northeast Australia Tuesday, cutting power, damaging buildings and uprooting trees, with coastal towns in lockdown as residents battled lashing rain and howling winds.
16h
The Guardian's Science Weekly

Built on bones: the history of humans in the city - Science Weekly podcastIan Sample and bioarchaeologist Brenna Hassett explore the history of our relationship with an urban lifestyle – the good, the bad, and the ugly
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study predicts significant Southern California beach erosionMore than half of Southern California's beaches could completely erode back to coastal infrastructure or sea cliffs by the year 2100 as the sea level rises, according to a study released Monday.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Using a method from Wall Street to track slow slipping of Earth's crustStock traders have long used specialized trackers to decide when to buy or sell a stock, or when the market is beginning to make a sudden swing. A new University of Washington study finds that the same technique can be used to detect gradual movement of tectonic plates, what are called "slow slip" earthquakes. These movements do not unleash damaging amounts of seismic energy, but scientists are ju
16h
Science | The Guardian

Built on bones: the history of humans in the city - Science Weekly podcast Ian Sample and bioarchaeologist Brenna Hassett explore the history of our relationship with an urban lifestyle – the good, the bad, and the ugly Subscribe & Review on iTunes , Soundcloud , Audioboom , Mixcloud & Acast , and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter In 2014, the United Nations estimated that 54% of the world’s population lives in urban areas, a figure expected to increase to 66%
16h
Live Science

Obese or Not? It's Time to Rethink BMI, Researchers ArgueShould obesity be redefined?
16h
cognitive science

Online Experiments with psytoolkit - example experiment as my enthusiastic support for this free tool! submitted by /u/Dan_Cook [link] [comments]
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cognitive science

A Life out of Sync: Sensory Desynchronization submitted by /u/Geordie_Murray [link] [comments]
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Science | The Guardian

Did you solve it? Take the Ada Lovelace challenge (Solution part II) The second part of the solution to the tricky teaser set by the world’s first computer programmer The first part is here Okay, so here we’re solving the following grid. Each square has a number from 1 to 7. No digit appears more than once in each row or column. The digits must obey the inequalities and if there is a circled number, the two digits either side must differ by that number. Continue r
17h
Science | The Guardian

Did you solve it? Take the Ada Lovelace challenge (Solution part I) The first part of the solution to the tricky teaser set by the world’s first computer programmer For the explanation of the second grid click here Yesterday I set you the following puzzle by Pavel Curtis , channelling Ada Lovelace. ( Here’s a printable pdf. ) My dear Mr Bellos, Continue reading...
17h
Ingeniøren

It-udvikler tapper nemt ca. 4.000 mailadresser fra LinkedIn En dansk frontend-udvikler har begået et lille Javascript for at demonstrere, hvor let det er at høste mail-adresser fra kommentarer på LinkedIn. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/frontend-udvikler-hoester-ca-4000-mailadresser-linkedin-med-34-linjers-javascript-1074752 Version2
17h
Science | The Guardian

Tuesday’s best TV: Stargazing Live; Rio Ferdinand – Being Mum and Dad Brian Cox goes down under and stares up at southern skies; Rio Ferdinand explores grief and emotional struggles. Plus: Jim Al-Khalili investigates gravity For this new series, Brian Cox and Dara O Briain trade Jodrell Bank for its equivalent on the other side of the world: the Siding Spring Observatory, situated on a mountaintop in New South Wales. As the dawn approaches, Brian and Dara are joine
18h
Gizmodo

Two Of The Oldest Video Game Torrents In The World Are Ubisoft Classics The Pirate Bay is about to turn 13, and in honour of the site becoming a teenager, folks like Torrentfreak are checking out the oldest content that has been continuously available since its launch back in 2003. While the oldest torrent in the world is a bizarre copy of The Matrix , among the ten oldest on The Pirate Bay are two Ubisoft games: an Xbox torrent called Prince of Persia , which was ma
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Using a method from Wall Street to track slow slipping of Earth's crustAn indicator for stock prices can be used with GPS data to automatically detect slow-slip earthquakes from a single station's observations, offering a new way to monitor seismic activity.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why does the same exercise exert effects on individuals differently?Selenoprotein P, a kind of hepatokine hormone secreted from the liver, has been found, through experiments with cultured muscle cells and mice and through clinical studies, to cause pathology named 'exercise resistance,' which prevents health promotion by physical exercise. The present results elucidate one of the reasons why individual responsiveness to exercise differs markedly as well as shed l
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Biomechanical analysis of head injury in pediatric patientsThe biomechanics of head injury in youths (5 to 18 years of age) have been poorly understood. A new study reported in the Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics set out to determine what biomechanical characteristics predispose youths with concussions to experience transient or persistent postconcussion symptoms.
18h
Dagens Medicin

Stamceller skal blive til læge­middel mod hjerte­svigt Overlæge Jens Kastrup er igang med at færdiggøre kliniske studier og skaffe den nødvendige dokumentation for at få stamcellebehandling godkendt som lægemiddel.
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Dagens Medicin

Eksperter kritiske overfor at udvide Repathas indikationSelv om Fourier-studiet viser, at Repatha kan reducere det lede kolesterol ned under gulvbrædderne, er den gavnlige effekt meget lille i forhold til prisen. Det vurderer flere eksperter.
18h
New on MIT Technology Review

Is This the Anti-Aging Pill We’ve All Been Waiting For?A drug derived from an Easter Island bacterium extends the life of lab animals. People could be next.
19h
Gizmodo

'Immortalized' Stem Cells Could Be the Key to Mass-Produced Artificial Blood Photo: Getty The need for more blood donations is a seemingly never-ending problem. Between interruptions to the donation process, fear of needles , rare blood types , and a general lack of awareness, life-saving blood supplies are difficult to keep stocked. But a team of researchers has found a way to manufacture artificial blood that could make a major impact on millions. Scientists working at
19h
Ingeniøren

Niels Bohr Bygningen bliver mindst 160 mio. kr. dyrere end planlagtBygningsstyrelsen har fyret entreprenøren, der skulle lave vvs og ventilation i den 1,6 mia. kr. dyre Niels Bohr-bygning. Styrelsen forventer nu, at byggeriet bliver mindst 160 mio. kr. dyrere end planlagt. Københavns Universitet kommer til at betale regningen.
19h
NYT > Science

News Analysis: Planned Rollback of Climate Rules Unlikely to Achieve All Trump’s GoalsEnergy economists say the executive order is likely to fall far short on the president’s goals of increasing the nation’s “energy independence” and restoring lost coal mining jobs.
19h
NYT > Science

What to Know About Trump’s Order to Dismantle the Clean Power PlanPresident Trump is set to undo key aspects of Obama’s climate legacy, targeting regulations for coal-fired power plants.
19h
Science | The Guardian

'Sightings' of extinct Tasmanian tiger prompt search in Queensland Eyewitness accounts of large, dog-like animals in state’s far north spur scientific hunt for thylacines, thought to have died out in 1936 “Plausible” possible sightings of a Tasmanian tiger in northern Queensland have prompted scientists to undertake a search for the species thought to have died out more than 80 years ago. The last thylacine is thought to have died in Hobart zoo in 1936, and it i
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Zika virus protein mapped to speed search for cureA team of scientists has mapped a key protein that causes the Zika virus to reproduce and spread. Results of this study advance efforts to find drugs in fight against the disease, say scientists.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Psychologists enlist machine learning to help diagnose depressionCognitive neuroscientists are using the Stampede supercomputer to provide accurate predictions of risk for those with depression and anxiety. They have been able to classify individuals with major depressive disorder with roughly 75 percent accuracy using a machine learning approach. Stampede 2 -- which will come online later in 2017 -- will provide the increased computer processing required to in
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Obese people have lower pain threshold, new research showsAn extra layer of fat won’t provide a cushion against pain – in fact, obese people are more sensitive to pressure pain than those who are not overweight, and they are equally susceptible to extremes of hot and cold.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Vitamins could help treat cystic fibrosis, research findsResearchers have discovered why antibiotics for treating people with cystic fibrosis are becoming less effective and how fat soluble vitamins might offer a viable solution.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Biomarker found that could help predict the onset of Type 1 diabetesA significant finding has been made that has the potential to contribute to the identification of biological markers that predict the development of Type 1 diabetes, a chronic autoimmune disease.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers warn of hazards of smoking and need for wider use of varenicline to quitMore than 35 million Americans are trying to quit smoking. Researchers reassure clinicians and their patients that varenicline, whose brand name is Chantix, is a safe and effective way to achieve smoking cessation and that failure to use this drug has caused preventable heart attacks and deaths from cardiovascular disease. Just a few months ago, the FDA removed the black box warning from varenicli
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Basic microbiology research study unexpectedly uncovers practical findings for growersResearchers initially set out to describe the microbiology of rye cover crop roots and how they changed over time in a field setting. Among the many microorganisms detected, they found several poorly understood oomycetes, microorganisms often responsible for plant diseases. Because these organisms were also able to cause corn seedling disease, what they unexpectedly discovered was the potential fo
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A little nudge may provide a big boost to flu vaccination ratesCurrently, only 44 percent of adults in the United States receive an annual flu vaccination. But, a new study suggests that a simple behavioral economics technique may be able to help. In the study, researchers programmed electronic health records (EHR) to alert care providers when a patient was eligible, and prompt them to choose to 'accept' or 'decline' a flu vaccination order. Results showed a
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Minority colorectal cancer patients report higher burden of poor quality-of-life than whitesA study of racial disparities in health-related quality of life of colorectal cancer patients revealed among several findings, that Hispanics and blacks had a higher burden of poor health-related quality-of-life (HR-QoL) than white patients and that poor HR-QoL resulted in shorter median survival. Yet Hispanics had an average survival time of 85.4 months as compared to blacks at 47.8 months and wh
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New genetic disorder named for Children's Hospital of Philadelphia teamThree scientists at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia who identified and studied a genetic disease have been recognized by having their names attached to the disorder. An authoritative reference site for genetic diseases, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) now designates this condition as Mulchandani-Bhoj-Conlin syndrome (MBCS), characterized by failure to thrive, severe short stature an
21h
NYT > Science

In Health Bill’s Defeat, Medicaid Comes of AgeMedicaid now covers more Americans than Medicare, and it played a major role in stopping the Republican drive to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.
21h
WIRED

Innovation Can Fix Government, Sure. Either That or Break It Trump is embracing the cult of innovation in government. But as he learned last week, moving fast and breaking things doesn't always work in Washington. The post Innovation Can Fix Government, Sure. Either That or Break It appeared first on WIRED .
21h
Gizmodo

A Side-by-Side Comparison of Movies and the Historical Clips That Inspired Them GIF Source: Vimeo Period films are the bane of movie producers’ existence. They cost a ton of money, limit locations, require elaborate costuming and are always fighting against the very existence of the modern world. But when it all comes together, the films function as one of the closest things we have to a time machine. Filmmaker Vugar Efendi likes pairing famous films with their historical in
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Astronomers probe swirling particles in halo of starburst galaxyAstronomers have used a radio telescope in outback Western Australia to see the halo of a nearby starburst galaxy in unprecedented detail.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New genetic risk factors identify two distinct glioma subtypesAn international consortium of researchers has conducted the largest study to date of malignant brain tumors looking for genetic markers of glioma, a highly aggressive form of brain cancer.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New finding could lead to earlier liver cancer diagnosisResearchers have now developed a way to determine, by sequencing DNA of liver cells, whether cells have been exposed to aflatoxin. This profile of mutations could be used to predict whether someone has a high risk of developing liver cancer, potentially many years before tumors actually appear.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The power of one: Single crystals provide clarityWhen it comes to creating new materials, single crystals play an important role in presenting a clearer picture of a material’s intrinsic properties. A typical material will be comprised of lots of smaller crystals and the grain boundaries between these crystals can act as impediments, affecting properties such as electrical or thermal resistance.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

For the birds: New prediction method sheds brighter light on flightResearchers have found a new way to precisely measure the vortices -- circular patterns of rotating air -- created by birds' wings during flight. The results shed greater light on how these creatures produce enough lift to fly.
22h
Ars Technica

Ransomware scammers exploited Safari bug to extort porn-viewing iOS users (credit: Lookout ) Ransomware scammers have been exploiting a flaw in Apple's Mobile Safari browser in a campaign to extort fees from uninformed users. The scammers particularly target those who viewed porn or other controversial content. Apple patched the vulnerability on Monday with the release of iOS version 10.3 . The flaw involved the way that Safari displayed JavaScript pop-up windows. In a
22h
Gizmodo

New It Images Are Here to Add Some Clown Terror to Your Monday Evening Image: Brooke Palmer © 2016 WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT INC. AND RATPAC-DUNE ENTERTAINMENT LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED As the numbered balloons on director Andy Muschietti’s Instagram have warned us, we’re just two days away from the first trailer for It . We’re looking forward to seeing this version of villain Pennywise the Clown in action, and creepy new photos released today reminded us of the nig
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Our aging scientific workforce raises concernsThe science and engineering workforce in the United States is aging rapidly, according to a new study. And it is only going to get older in coming years. Economists have found that the average age of employed scientists increased from 45.1 to 48.6 between 1993 and 2010, faster than the workforce as a whole.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Addressing the threat of Zika virus to US blood supplyCertain screening methods that detect the genetic material of Zika virus can be used to ensure that donated blood supplies remain free of the virus, investigators have shown.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Artificial materials created atom-by-atomResearchers have manufactured artificial materials with engineered electronic properties. By moving individual atoms under their microscope, the scientists were able to create atomic lattices with a predetermined electrical response. The possibility to precisely arrange the atoms on a sample bring 'designer quantum materials' one step closer to reality. By arranging atoms in a lattice, it becomes
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How do some opioids cause severe itching?Opioids have long been an important tool in the world of pain management, but the side effects of these drugs -- from addiction and respiratory failure to severe itching and dizziness, can be overwhelming. Scientists have been trying to understand how these side effects happen so they can create better, less problematic pain relievers.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Largest ever brain cancer study reveals new secrets to inherited riskScientists have uncovered a treasure trove of information about the genetic causes of brain cancer in the largest ever study of the disease.
22h
Ars Technica

Elon Musk is setting up a company that will link brains and computers Get ready to plug in. (credit: Village Roadshow Pictures ) Billionaire futurist space explorer Elon Musk has a new project: a "medical research company" called Neuralink that will make brain-computer interfaces. Musk's projects are frequently inspired by science fiction, and this one is a direct reference to a device called a "neural lace," invented by the late British novelist Iain M. Banks for
22h
BBC News - Science & Environment

How the mouse came to live alongside humansThe origins of house mice go back about 15,000 years to the Middle East, fossil evidence suggests.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A probiotic stress fixAn engineer is working to create a probiotic that would help protect the host from the negative health effects of adrenaline surges. The new probiotic could easily be mixed into yogurt or taken in pill form.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Patients face rising costs for epipen allergy drugCommercially insured patients who use the life-saving epinephrine autoinjector known as 'EpiPen' have experienced skyrocketing out-of-pocket costs since 2007, according to research.
23h
Gizmodo

These Prime-Only Kindle Discounts Are Better Than Black Friday Kindle , $50 | Kindle Paperwhite , $90 | Kindle Voyage , $150 If you’ve got Prime and enjoy reading, Amazon’s offering some of the best Kindle discounts we’ve ever seen right now, with $30 off the entry level models, and $50 off the rarely discounted Voyage. The $50 price point on the entry-level model brings it into impulse purchase range, but just remember that it doesn’t include a backlight. T
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The economic case for wind, solar energy in AfricaTo meet skyrocketing demand for electricity, African countries may have to triple their energy output by 2030. While hydropower and fossil fuel power plants are favored approaches in some quarters, a new assessment has found that wind and solar can be economically and environmentally competitive options and can contribute significantly to the rising demand.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mouse in the house tells tale of human settlementLong before the advent of agriculture, hunter-gatherers began putting down roots in the Middle East, building more permanent homes and altering the ecological balance in ways that allowed the common house mouse to flourish, new research indicates. Findings suggest the roots of animal domestication go back to human sedentism thousands of years prior to what has long been considered the dawn of agri
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mathematicians predict delaying school start times won't help sleep deprived teenagersDelaying school start times in the UK is unlikely to reduce sleep deprivation in teenagers, research from the University of Surrey and Harvard Medical School has found. The research, conducted in collaboration between mathematicians and sleep scientists, predicts that turning down the lights in the evening would be much more effective at tackling sleep deprivation.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New insight into superfluids reveals a storm at the surfaceThe discovery of a 'storm' layer created when superfluid helium flows across a rough surface has turned a century of understanding about one of the most important discoveries in quantum physics on its head.
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Live Science

Trump to Scrap Clean Power Plan: What That Means for EarthPresident Donald Trump is expected to sign an executive order on Tuesday (March 28) that will dismantle the Clean Power Plan, according to news sources.
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Live Science

Pregnant Giraffe Keeps Anxious Viewers WaitingMillions of internet viewers are tensely following the video feed featuring April the pregnant giraffe — who is still pregnant.
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Voters vs. Politics What We’re Following Investigation Intrigue: House Intelligence Committee chair Devin Nunes is under fire again after it was revealed that he visited the White House the day before making his sudden announcement about possible government surveillance of Trump’s transition team. Nunes says his visit was innocent, but his story raises questions, and feeds speculation that he’s too close to Trump to
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Ars Technica

Despite what Mylan said, its price hikes hit patients’ wallets hard Enlarge (credit: Getty | Joe Raedle ) While facing intense outrage for repeatedly jacking up the price of their life-saving epinephrine auto-injectors, Mylan continually argued that patients were shielded from the soaring list price—thanks to insurance coverage, discounts, and rebates. But a new study looking into insurance claims casts doubt on that defense. Between 2007 and 2014, the average ou
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New international banking rules would not prevent another financial crisisThe Basel III regulatory framework, as planned, will not reduce systemic risk in the financial sector, according to new research. Instead, regulations should aim to increase the resilience of financial networks.
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Big Think

Man-Made Glaciers May Be Himalayan Farmers' Last Resort The European Geosciences Union predicts that over 70% of glacier volume in the Everest region could be lost by 2100. One man has engineered a solution so that life in these regions can go on. Read More
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Gizmodo

Carrying a Flying Camera Drone Results in Some Beautifully Stabilized Shots A proper Steadicam rig that can capture smooth tracking and chase shots usually requires thousands of dollars (not including the camera) and a highly-skilled operator. As a cheaper workaround, these filmmakers used a gyro-stabilized camera drone that they held in front of them like a traditional film camera. The approach by Brazilian production house Space Criative is unorthodox, to say the least
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Gizmodo

Kotaku You Can Do A Lot Of Role-Playing In The PS4's Latest Baseball Game | io9 Here’s the First Kotaku You Can Do A Lot Of Role-Playing In The PS4's Latest Baseball Game | io9 Here’s the First Look at Hollywood’s New Version of Tomb Raider Heroine Lara Croft | Foxtrot Alpha ‘Magic Carpet’ Will Make Landing On An Aircraft Carrier So Much Easier | Lifehacker This Evil Alarm Clock App Is the Only Reason I’m Awake Right Now |
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Devin Nunes and the Mystery on the White House Grounds Today in 5 Lines House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes confirmed that he was on White House grounds to meet with a source, who’d allegedly given the congressman intelligence information about Trump transition officials. White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer didn’t rule out the possibility that Nunes met with a source from the White House, but he added that the idea “doesn’t really p
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Ars Technica

Microsoft sued for millions over Windows 10 upgrades Enlarge / The upgrade arc of Windows 10. It now has more than 400 million users, regardless of problems. (credit: Microsoft) Unhappy Windows 10 users in Illinois are taking Microsoft to court , claiming that problems caused by the Windows 10 upgrade show that it was negligently designed, that Microsoft fraudulently failed to disclose its defects, and that the upgrade is unfit for purpose. In a br
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Gizmodo

Cash Cab Is Coming Back to Taunt Cab-Taking New Yorkers With the Hope of Late-Night Cash Cash Cab host Ben Bailey in 2006. Photo via AP Images . Cash Cab , the trivia show that tantalized with the magnificent possibility you might get into a New York City cab late at night and discover an exciting televised surprise rather than a stranger’s vom, is returning to television. That’s according to The Hollywood Reporter. Specifically it’s coming to Discovery, and “the new episodes will fe
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Ars Technica

Activists want to know why feds are searching more devices at the border Enlarge (credit: William Hook ) A free speech advocacy organization sued the Department of Homeland Security and Immigration and Customs Enforcement on Monday, seeking "statistical, policy, and assessment records regarding the government’s searches" of digital devices at the United States border. The group, the Knight First Amendment Institute based at Columbia University, said on Twitter that th
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

A Young Man Made A Horrifying Discovery In The Louisiana Woods | Killing Fields #KillingFields | Tuesdays at 10/9c on Discovery During the height of the serial killer scare in Louisiana, 12-year-old Ethan Reames found a terrifying discovery in the woods. Full Episodes Streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/killing-fields/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow along as the investigation progresses: http://www.discovery.com/tv-sho
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: They Mixed Science, Art and Costume Parties to Reveal Mysteries of the SeaThe expeditions of William Beebe and his coed Department of Tropical Research are remembered at an upcoming show at The Drawing Center in New York.
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NYT > Science

A Dream of Clean Energy at a Very High PriceIf a fusion experiment in France succeeds, it could shape the power plants of the future and contribute greatly to reducing planet-warming emissions.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Math-anxious brains tackle simple problems differentlyAn fMRI study found more variable brain activity in people who get nervous about math problems.
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WIRED

Uber Redeploys Its Self-Driving Cars After a Wreck in Arizona The embattled ridesharing giant gets back on the road in Tempe, Pittsburgh, and San Francisco. The post Uber Redeploys Its Self-Driving Cars After a Wreck in Arizona appeared first on WIRED .
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Gizmodo

Report: Sad Brexit Loser David Cameron Encouraged London Mayor to Drop Uber Regulations Image: Getty Remember David Cameron, the failed Prime Minister of Great Britain who slunk away from public life last year amid the chaos of Brexit? The man who will be remembered for being, among other things, the utter git who reportedly decided to hold the Brexit vote in a Chicago airport pizza restaurant? Well, he’s in the news again: The Financial Times reports that he encouraged the mayor of
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New on MIT Technology Review

Otto Cofounder Says AI Will Be Widely Available in Trucks Within 10 YearsCofounder of the Uber-owned firm says totally self-driving trucks will come in “baby steps.”
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WIRED

So Hey, What’s Devin Nunes Been Up to Lately? The House Intelligence Committee chair has had himself quite a week. The post So Hey, What’s Devin Nunes Been Up to Lately? appeared first on WIRED .
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Big Think

A Map of Europe's Fastest-Eroding Coast Ravenser Odd is just one of 29 towns swallowed by the North Sea Read More
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The Scientist RSS

NIH: Grant Applicants Can Cite PreprintsIn an agency first, the National Institutes of Health provides guidance on citing certain non-peer-reviewed publications in agency proposals and reports.
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Gizmodo

This Evil Alarm Clock App Is the Only Reason I’m Awake Right Now First I have to play a game of “Memory.” Then I have to put all those little numbers in order. Then I have to type that string of gibberish. And I’m only half done. I believe my dreams. Say I’m dreaming about getting to the airport, or finding the room with the final exam I haven’t studied for. When an alarm goes off, I snooze it: I am on a very important mission and cannot be interrupted. That i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

With health insurance at risk, community health centers face cut-backsRepeal of key provisions of the Affordable Care Act, combined with a failure to renew critical funding streams, would result in catastrophic funding losses for community health centers-forcing these safety net providers to cut back on services, lay off staff or shut down clinical sites, according to a report published today. The report represents the first analysis of the potential effects on medi
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WIRED

Want Congress to Protect Your Privacy? A Clever App Makes the Call for You Congressional phone lines are often busy. Voicemail is often full. Stance will keep calling until your message gets through. The post Want Congress to Protect Your Privacy? A Clever App Makes the Call for You appeared first on WIRED .
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Science : NPR

What Gave Some Primates Bigger Brains? A Fruit-Filled Diet A new study suggests that diet had a big influence in driving the evolution of brain size in primates. Monkeys who thrive on fruit have bigger brains than their plant eating neighbors. (Image credit: Anup Shah/Getty Images)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronomers probe swirling particles in halo of starburst galaxyAstronomers have used a radio telescope in outback Western Australia to see the halo of a nearby starburst galaxy in unprecedented detail.
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Live Science

Kim Kardashian Wants a 3rd Baby: How Dangerous Is Placenta Accreta?Kim Kardashian wants to have a third baby. Here's how risky that could be for her.
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Big Think

Every Joke Falls in One of 11 Categories, Says Founding Editor of The Onion The Onion founding editor Scott Dikkers says every joke can be categorized in one of 11 "funny filters." Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Astronomers probe swirling particles in halo of starburst galaxyAstronomers have used a radio telescope in outback Western Australia to see the halo of a nearby starburst galaxy in unprecedented detail.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Expect more deadly heat from climate change, study saysDeaths related to extreme heat are expected to keep rising, even if most nations can contain global warming at agreed-upon levels, a new study reports.
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Science : NPR

Proposed Budget Cuts Slash Funding For Great Lakes Clean-Up Proposed White House budget cuts to the Environmental Protection Agency and other agencies will end federal spending on Great Lakes clean-up. That includes axing work on invasive species like Asian carp and a public health program that protects drinking water from toxic algae for 11 million residents around Lake Erie.
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Science : NPR

Trump's Plan To Ditch Clean Power Plan Threatens Paris Agreement President Trump is expected to ditch the Clean Power Plan this week. The CPP regulations would reduce emissions of greenhouse gases that warm the planet. Without it, the U.S. won't live up to its pledge, made in Paris in 2015, to make deep cuts in emissions. That could jeopardize the Paris deal, in which nearly 200 nations made similar pledges.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bird flu found in chicken flock at northwest Georgia farmAbout 18,000 chickens were destroyed at a northwest Georgia poultry farm after tests confirmed avian influenza in the flock, the first time the disease has been detected in commercial birds in the state, authorities said Monday.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists discover new class of anti-diabetes compounds that reduce liver glucose productionA team of scientists has identified a new class of compounds that reduce production of glucose in the liver, which is linked to type 2 diabetes, the form of diabetes considered responsible for close to 95 percent of cases in the United States.
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Live Science

Mount Etna: Photos of the Largest Active Volcano in EuropeCheck out these spectacular images of one of the most famous volcanoes in the world.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

AP Exclusive: Colombia 'panic buttons' expose activistsIt is supposed to help protect human-rights activists, labor organizers and journalists working in risky environments, but a GPS-enabled "panic button" that Colombia's government has issued to about 400 people could be exposing them to more peril.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lawsuit: Hackers stole customer data at 1,000 Arby's storesA Connecticut couple says Georgia-based Arby's restaurants failed to prevent hackers from stealing customer information at hundreds of its stores.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uber resumes self-driving car program after brief suspensionUber says it is resuming its self-driving car program in Arizona and Pittsburgh after it was suspended following a crash over the weekend.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trump poised to roll back climate protectionsUS President Donald Trump will on Tuesday roll back a slew of environmental protections enacted by Barack Obama, in a bid to untether the fossil fuel industry.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Samsung to sell refurbished safety-recalled Note 7 phonesSamsung announced Monday it would sell some Note 7 smartphones that were recalled for safety reasons as refurbished devices, in an effort to manage its stockpile in an "environmentally friendly" manner.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Zika virus protein mapped to speed search for cureA study published today shows how Indiana University scientists are speeding the path to new treatments for the Zika virus, an infectious disease linked to birth defects in infants in South and Central America and the United States.
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Gizmodo

Americans Have Somehow Helped the Environment Without Even Trying Image: AP Climate change is bad, beef is bad, everything is bad, yadda yadda. But Americans ate less beef between 2005 and 2014, which kept a lot of greenhouse gases out of the atmosphere, according to a new study. Maybe cutting back on those hamburgers is actually doing something good for the environment. The Natural Resource Defense Council, or NRDC, released a report this month detailing how c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Longer telomeres may shield mice from age-related human diseasesResearchers in Deepak Srivastava's laboratory at the Gladstone Institute of Cardiovascular Disease hypothesized that mice may be protected from age-associated human diseases due to the relatively longer length of their telomeres, the regions at the end of chromosomes that help guard against deterioration. In work published this week in the JCI, the researchers used mice with shortened telomeres to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Longer telomeres protect against diseases of aging: A tale of mice and menScientists at the Gladstone Institutes discovered a key mechanism that protects mice from developing a human disease of aging, and begins to explain the wide spectrum of disease severity often seen in humans. Both aspects center on the critical role of telomeres, protective caps on the ends of chromosomes that erode with age.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Protein that regulates brain cell connections could be new target for treating Alzheimer's diseaseIn experiments with a protein called Ephexin5 that appears to be elevated in the brain cells of Alzheimer's disease patients and mouse models of the disease, Johns Hopkins researchers say removing it prevents animals from developing Alzheimer's characteristic memory losses. In a report on the studies, published online March 27 in The Journal of Clinical Investigation, the researchers say the findi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Satellites reveal bird habitat loss in CaliforniaDrought and reduced seasonal flooding of wetlands and farm fields threaten a globally important stopover site for tens of thousands of migratory shorebirds in California's Sacramento Valley, a new Duke University-led study shows.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers create artificial materials atom-by-atomResearchers at Aalto University have manufactured artificial materials with engineered electronic properties. By moving individual atoms under their microscope, the scientists were able to create atomic lattices with a predetermined electrical response. The possibility to precisely arrange the atoms on a sample bring 'designer quantum materials' one step closer to reality. By arranging atoms in a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers link orphan receptor to opioid-induced itchingOpioids have long been an important tool in the world of pain management, but the side effects of these drugs - from addiction and respiratory failure to severe itching and dizziness, can be overwhelming. Scientists have been trying to understand how these side effects happen so they can create better, less problematic pain relievers.
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Gizmodo

No One Tell This Adorable Little Girl the Truth About Her New Robot Friend Image: YouTube After you watch this video of an adorable little girl named Rayna greeting and hugging a new robot friend , you’ll come to the realization it will never hug or love her back—because it’s actually a discarded water heater. (Sad!) Shortly after that, you’ll also come to the realization that kids clearly aren’t being raised with a proper fear and respect of robots. There’s little doub
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Scientific American Content: Global

Food for Thought: Do We Owe Our Large Primate Brains to a Passion for Fruit?A new study suggests our outsize brains may have arisen from scouring for and eating kumquats and kiwis -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Zika virus protein mapped to speed search for cureA study published today reports that a team led by Indiana University scientists has mapped a key protein that causes the Zika virus to reproduce and spread.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New finding could lead to earlier liver cancer diagnosisMIT researchers have now developed a way to determine, by sequencing DNA of liver cells, whether cells have been exposed to aflatoxin. This profile of mutations could be used to predict whether someone has a high risk of developing liver cancer, potentially many years before tumors actually appear.
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