Science : NPR

Fishermen Catch 50 Pound Carp In The Middle Of Los Angeles MacArthur Park in the middle of Los Angles is not the most picturesque location, but it is where members of the California Ghetto Carping Club love to fish. And this week, it's where Eddie Salmeron caught the club's record fish, a 50 pound carp.
5min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

IUPUI researcher lays groundwork for new ways to prevent youth violence in CaribbeanA study by an Indiana University School of Social Work associate professor at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis has laid the groundwork for new strategies dealing with youth violence in five Caribbean countries
7min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

JNeurosci: Highlights from the March 29 IssueCheck out these newsworthy studies from the March 29, 2017, issue of JNeurosci. Media interested in obtaining the full text of the studies should contact media@sfn.org.
7min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The search for obesity drugs targets hunger's complex chemistryDiscoveries of hormones related to weight and appetite in the '90s helped spur a search for obesity treatments targeting those hormones -- with disappointing results. Now scientists are taking a new tack that could finally yield promising treatments, according to a story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN) that was produced in collaboration with the American Chemical Society's open-access journa
7min
The Atlantic

Why the Trump Administration Won't Ask About LGBT Americans on the 2020 Census The Census Bureau had to give Congress a list of proposed topics for its 2020 survey of America this week. Tucked in at the end of its 77-page report was an item that’s never been included in the census before: sexual orientation and gender identity, marked as “proposed.” Shortly after the bureau released its report, a new version came out. This time, the line about sexual orientation and gender
9min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Manufacturing, global trade impair health of people with no stake in eitherThe latest products may bring joy to people around the globe, but academic researchers this week are highlighting the heightened health risks experienced by people in regions far downwind of the factories that produce these goods and on the other side of the world from where they're consumed. Scientists quantify and map the shift of environmental and health burdens brought on by globalization and
12min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Products can be pals when you're lonely, but it may cost you, study findsAccording to a new study, it appears humanlike products do keep people from seeking out normal human interaction, which is typically how people try to recover from loneliness. However, there are limits to this phenomenon, and the long-term consequences are unclear, the researchers said.
12min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Microscopic muscles: How non-muscle cells find the strength to moveResearchers have described, for the first time, the ordered arrangement of myosin-II filaments in actin cables of non-muscle cells.
12min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Inflammation awakens sleepersThe inflammatory response that is supposed to ward off pathogens that cause intestinal disease makes this even worse. This is because special viruses integrate their genome into Salmonella, which further strengthens the pathogen.
12min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Teacher encouragement has greatest influence on less advantaged children'Big data' study finds that children from families with limited education have strongest long-term response to teacher encouragement, and are more likely to progress to university as a result.
12min
Gizmodo

Deadpool 2's Potential Cables, Ranked Image: Marvel Comics Over the last year, we’ve been drowning in rumor after rumor about just who will play time-traveling mutant Cable in Deadpool 2 . We’ve had so many at this point, with no end in sight, we decided to do the only thing we could: scientifically rank all of the rumored candidates, in order of likeliness, desire, and Cable-iness. 12) Mel Gibson Gibson is one of several names Deadp
13min
Ars Technica

Samsung Galaxy S8 hands-on: Samsung produces a stunning redesign (video link) NEW YORK CITY—After tons of leaks and speculation, the Galaxy S8 is finally here. Samsung took the wraps off its newest flagship at the swanky Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, and we spent a few minutes testing the device out. I'm a bit spoiled by having seen recent slim bezel devices like the Xiaomi Mi Mix and the LG G6 , but the Galaxy S8 is still a stunner in person. Samsun
15min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tracking hazardous chemicals from fast-food wrappers in the bodyJust one month after major research findings showed dangerous PFAS present in more than one-third of fast food packaging tested, researchers have created a new technique to track PFASs in the body.
19min
Live Science

Crikey! Refrigerator-Size Dinosaur Footprints Discovered in AustraliaRefrigerator-size dinosaur footprints are just some of the trackways that make the western coast of Australia the most diverse place on Earth for dinosaur footprints, a new study finds.
19min
New on MIT Technology Review

Is Artificial Intelligence Stuck in A Rut?The former director of Uber’s AI lab says the field is in danger of losing sight of its long-term goals.
19min
Ars Technica

Nuclear giant Westinghouse files for bankruptcy after costs skyrocketed Illustration of the AP1000 reactor from Westinghouse bankruptcy filing. (credit: Westinghouse) On Wednesday, Westinghouse Electric Company, a subsidiary of Japanese company Toshiba, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. The company claimed in a court filing that it was losing money on construction projects in South Carolina and Georgia, although it maintained that nuclear fuel and plant ser
22min
Gizmodo

$1000 Reward if You Know Who Stole Death Valley's Missing Fossils Have you seen these men? Image: National Park Service National Parks exist for all Americans to share and enjoy. And when something like a fossil or footprint goes missing, it stinks for everyone, including us Americans and scientists who need to know the footprint’s location to help understand the animal that made it. A footprint fossil went missing from a lakebed at Death Valley National Park o
25min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Making cows more environmentally friendlyAn important discovery surrounding plants used to feed livestock has been released by scientists. They report that plants growing in warmer conditions are tougher and have lower nutritional value to grazing livestock, potentially inhibiting milk and meat yields and raising the amount of methane released by the animals.
26min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Analysis yields clues to chemical composition, natural aging of 100-year-old beerStashed away and long-forgotten, a trio of century-old bottled beers recently discovered in the Czech Republic could help scientists better understand early 20th-century brewing practices, as well as the chemical changes that occur in beer over long periods of time.
26min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nurse volunteer activities improve the health of their communities, workforce study saysA new study describes nurses' perceptions of how they promote health in their communities through a whole lot of both formal and informal volunteer work.
28min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Gum disease, tooth loss may increase postmenopausal women's risk of deathFindings suggest that older women may be at higher risk for death because of their periodontal condition, and may benefit from more intensive oral screening measures.
28min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hepatitis B and C may be linked to increased risk of Parkinson's diseaseThe viruses hepatitis B and C may both be associated with an increased risk of Parkinson's disease, according to a study published in the March 29, 2017, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The hepatitis virus affects the liver.
28min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gum disease, tooth loss may increase postmenopausal women's risk of deathGum disease and tooth loss in postmenopausal women may be linked to a higher risk of death. The dental issues did not appear to increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. The findings suggest older women may benefit from more intensive oral screening measures.
28min
Popular Science

Does brushing your teeth affect your appetite? Health It's complicated There’s no evidence that brushing your teeth has any effect on the hormones that regulate a person’s appetite. Read on:…
28min
New Scientist - News

Neanderthal artist revealed in a finely carved raven boneRegularly spaced notches on a raven's wing bone appear to have been carved for aesthetic reasons, with implications for Neanderthal intelligence
31min
WIRED

With the First Trailer for It, Stephen King Reclaims the ’80s When it came to big-screen horror adaptations, the Reagan decade wasn't always kind to the author. But Hollywood has only gotten Pennywiser with age. The post With the First Trailer for It , Stephen King Reclaims the '80s appeared first on WIRED .
31min
WIRED

Tesla Finally Makes Its New Autopilot as Good as the Old One The reboot of the automaker's self-driving system gets going. The post Tesla Finally Makes Its New Autopilot as Good as the Old One appeared first on WIRED .
31min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

No decision yet on staying in Paris climate accord: USThe United States has made no decision yet on whether it will continue to participate in the Paris accord on reducing emissions of greenhouse gases, the Trump administration said Wednesday.
31min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Two possible landing sites for ExoMars missionThe ExoMars mobile rover, tasked with recovering evidence of life on the Red Planet, will touch down in 2021 at one of two sites, scientists announced Wednesday.
31min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Adults with migraines have triple the prevalence of generalized anxiety disorderGeneralized anxiety disorder is much more common among adults who have migraines than those without migraine, according to a new study. Many people with migraines have pain that prevent some daily activities and have problems managing their household responsibilities
33min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Giving brown fat a green lightSince the discovery in 2009 that brown fat can be active in adult humans, researchers around the world have worked to unveil ways to switch on this fat. Scientists have now identified a new route to throw the switch.
33min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team highlights work on tuning block polymers for nanostructured systemsHigh-performance materials are enabling major advances in a wide range of applications from energy generation and digital information storage to disease screening and medical devices.
37min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Reusable carbon nanotubes could be the water filter of the futureA new class of carbon nanotubes could be the next-generation clean-up crew for toxic sludge and contaminated water, say researchers at Rochester Institute of Technology.
37min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

11 percent of disappearing groundwater used to grow internationally traded foodEleven percent of the global non-renewable groundwater drawn up for irrigation goes to produce crops that are then traded on the international market, new research concludes.
40min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tackling resilience: Finding order in chaos to help buffer against climate change"Resilience" is a buzzword often used in scientific literature to describe how animals, plants and landscapes can persist under climate change. It's typically considered a good quality, suggesting that those with resilience can withstand or adapt as the climate continues to change.
43min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers can track hazardous chemicals from fast-food wrappers in the bodyResearch teams from the University of Alabama at Birmingham's School of Medicine and the University of Notre Dame have developed a new method that enables researchers to radiolabel three forms of perfluorinated and polyfluorinated alkyl substances and track the fate of these chemicals when they enter the body.
43min
Gizmodo

Villagers Find Missing Man's Corpse in Belly of Enormous Snake Image: YouTube / Tribun Timur Snakes are scary. Even little ones—the way they move, the prospect of venom, those little forked tongues—can send chills down your neck. But did you know that some snakes can eat human beings? A tragic incident in Indonesia recently reminded the world of this fact . A 25-year-old man named Akbar disappeared on Sunday when he was harvesting palm oil on the Indonesian
43min
Scientific American Content: Global

Calculating Imponderable Complexity with Quantum SupercomputersLarge quantum computers are difficult to build, but they can answer questions too complicated for conventional computation, unlocking new research possibilities in fields like protein modeling and... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
46min
Science : NPR

Will The EPA Reject A Pesticide, Or Its Own Scientific Evidence? The agency must decide this week whether to ban chlorpyrifos, a pesticide widely used on produce. The EPA thinks it could pose risks to consumers. But its new head made his name fighting such rules. (Image credit: Jim West/Science Source)
47min
Gizmodo

The European Space Agency Will Send Its First Mars Rover to One of These Two Mysterious Sites Image: ESA/ATG medialab Mars rovers are great for many reasons, most importantly, because they allow us to live vicariously through a hunk of metal exploring the Red Planet. NASA’s currently working on a yet-to-be-named rover mission slated for 2020, and is in the process of narrowing down a landing location. Similarly, the European Space Agency (ESA) has just announced that it’s debating two loc
49min
Gizmodo

Lean Into the Alexa-Powered Future With $20 Off Three Amazon Echo Dots Three Amazon Echo Dots , $130 with code DOT3PACK Amazon’s Alexa is basically the operating system of the home , but to fully appreciate it, you need to scatter Echoes and Echo Dots around your house until they can basically hear your from anywhere. If you’re ready to fully commit, Amazon’s offering a solid discount on the already-affordable Echo Dot when you buy three , this week only. To get the
49min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Making bones strongerNew treatments for osteoporosis are desperately needed. Two University of Delaware scientists report estimates of potentially the most effective dosage of a particular peptide, with results that could raise density levels in badly degraded bones back to healthy levels.
49min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain scans show dopamine levels fall during migraine attacksUsing PET scans of the brain, University of Michigan researchers showed that dopamine falls and fluctuates at different times during a migraine headache.
49min
The Atlantic

Why Do So Many Republicans Believe Trump’s Wiretap Claims? An overwhelming majority of Republicans—at 74 percent—believe it’s likely that Donald Trump was wiretapped or otherwise subject to government surveillance while he was running for president, according to a CBS News poll released on Wednesday. The results suggest that Republican voters have largely accepted the president’s claim—which he first made earlier this month in a tweet —that President Oba
54min
The Atlantic

Brexit: So What Now? What did the U.K. government do on March 29? The U.K.’s envoy to the European Union hand-delivered a letter from Prime Minister Theresa May to the office of the European Council president in Brussels, invoking Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty and formally beginning the process of talks over the U.K.’s separation from the European Union—the process that’s come to be known as Brexit. How did we get
54min
New on MIT Technology Review

Apple’s AI Director: Here’s How to Supercharge Deep LearningRuslan Salakhutdinov, who leads Apple’s AI efforts, says emerging techniques could make the most popular approach in the field far more powerful.
55min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Team highlights work on tuning block polymers for nanostructured systemsHigh-performance materials are enabling major advances in a wide range of applications from energy generation and digital information storage to disease screening and medical devices. Block polymers, which are two or more polymer chains with different properties linked together, show great promise for many of these applications, and a research group at the University of Delaware has made significa
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Case comprehensive cancer center analyzes brain tumor data, doubles known risk factors for gliomaA massive new study involving blood samples from over 30,000 individuals has identified 13 new genetic risk factors for glioma, the most common type of malignant brain tumor in adults.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Reusable carbon nanotubes could be the water filter of the future, says RIT studyEnhanced single-walled carbon nanotubes offer a more effective and sustainable approach to water treatment and remediation than the standard industry materials--silicon gels and activated carbon--according to a paper by RIT researchers John-David Rocha and Reginald Rogers.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fred Hutch scientists to cover advances in immunotherapy, proteomics at AACRScientists from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle are scheduled to present and discuss the latest developments in immunotherapy and proteomics at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting, Research Propelling Cancer Prevention and Cures, on April 1-5. What follows is a selection of the more than 30 Hutch presentations at the AACR gathering.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA laser communications to provide Orion faster connectionsNASA is working to forever change the way astronauts communicate to and from space using an advanced laser communications system called LEMNOS, which will enable exponentially faster connections than ever before.
1h
NYT > Science

Three Storm Chasers Die in Crash in TexasOne of the hazards of storm chasing is the number of people on the road pursuing tornadoes as the activity has grown in popularity, an expert said.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Male or female? Scientist challenges evidence of sex differences among dinosaursA paleontologist is countering decades of studies that assert that some dinosaurs can be identified as male or female based on the shapes and sizes of their bones.
1h
New on MIT Technology Review

AI-Powered Drone Will Follow You Around and Take PicturesStartup Skydio is prepping a consumer drone that uses machine vision to keep track of you while avoiding obstacles.
1h
Gizmodo

Today's Congressional Hearing on Climate Change Was a Colossal Train Wreck Lamar Smith, a Republican Congressman from Texas and Chairman of the House Science Committee. Image: AP In the midst of today’s highly-anticipated House Science Committee hearing on climate science and the scientific method, right around the time that Congressman Dana Rohrabacher thundered that certain witnesses (the one mainstream climate scientist in the room, specifically) should be ashamed of
1h
Ars Technica

Lamar Smith claims climate scientists not following scientific method Enlarge / Rep. Lamar Smith, R-Texas. (credit: Bill Clark / Getty Images Contributor) Illinois Representative Bill Foster summed up today's hearing of the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology as "a very strange mixture of science and not." Entitled "Climate Science: Assumptions, Policy Implications, and the Scientific Method," the hearing provided a platform for Committee Chairman Lam
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA laser communications to provide Orion faster connectionsNASA is working to forever change the way astronauts communicate to and from space using an advanced laser communications system called LEMNOS, which will enable exponentially faster connections than ever before.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Climate change's toll on mental healthWhen people think about climate change, they probably think first about its effects on the environment, and possibly on their physical health. But climate change also takes a significant toll on mental health, according to a new report released by the American Psychological Association and ecoAmerica entitled 'Mental Health and Our Changing Climate: Impacts, Implications, and Guidance.'
1h
Popular Science

Peek inside Blue Origin's capsule for space tourists Space My, what big windows you have Blue Origin, the private company hoping to carry tourists into space in 2018, has unveiled the interior design for its spacecraft's cabin. Check it out:…
1h
Popular Science

The devastating effects of childhood lead exposure could last a lifetime Health Even moderate exposure might lower IQ Even modest exposure to lead as a kid causes a decline in IQ points—and career opportunities—with effects lasting well into middle age. Read on:…
1h
Inside Science

Playing Nuclear Chess with North Korea Playing Nuclear Chess with North Korea Advances in GPS and remote detection of hidden military sites shift the strategic landscape. nucleargame_final.gif Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Rights information: Copyright American Institute of Physics ( reprinting information ) Technology Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 14:45 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- Earlier this month, N
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Gizmodo

A Squishy Robotic Octopus Tentacle Might Not Actually Be Nightmare Fuel GIF: YouTube Hollywood movies have used giant squids and octopi to inspire underwater nightmares for decades. But Festo, a German company that makes industrial machinery, has realized that an octopus’ amazing muscle-packed body and tentacles could actually be the ideal way to design and build a robot destined to work alongside humans. Robotic arms have already joined humans on assembly lines and
1h
WIRED

NASA’s Shapeshifting Origami Robot Squeezes Where Others Can’t Puffer, from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, can explore places too risky for bigger, more expensive rovers. The post NASA’s Shapeshifting Origami Robot Squeezes Where Others Can’t appeared first on WIRED .
1h
The Atlantic

Wells Fargo’s $110 Million Settlement The latest development in the Wells Fargo saga has good news for some of its customers: The bank will pay $110 million to settle a class-action lawsuit for around 2 million accounts opened without customer permission. The settlement, which is awaiting court approval in California, comes amid six months of continual fallout for Wells Fargo, the second-largest commercial bank in the United States .
1h
Viden

Højesteret stadfæster dom: Vigtig sejr for sjældne danske fugleLandmænd må ikke så nyt græs på fredede enge, slår Højesteret fast. Og det er godt for sjældne engfugle som stor kobbersneppen.
1h
Gizmodo

10 Banned, Censored, and Controversial Movies That Are Now Cult Classics Last House on the Left (1972) Image: imdb Recently, we shared a clip from Ken Russell’s The Devils , a racy 1971 horror film that’s finally available for streaming on Shudder after years of obscurity. That got us thinking about other cult movies once deemed so scandalous they were either censored, banned, or taken out of circulation for years. Some of these films have remained off-the-radar curio
1h
Gizmodo

Lyft Is Not A 'Better Boyfriend' Lyft CEO John Zimmer. Photo: AP Uber has had a relentless year of scandals, spurring the logical conclusion that its arch-rival Lyft is now in a position to capitalize . John Zimmer, Lyft’s president, spoke at length on Tuesday with Time about how his company’s attempting to do just that—and it’s ridiculous. At a moment when Uber’s reeling from allegations of rampant sexism , a perception of arro
1h
Live Science

Putting Names to Faces May Boost CooperationPeople are more likely to cooperate when they know someone's name, new research finds.
1h
Futurity.org

‘Lawless’ English spelling is surprisingly organized Even though the English language hasn’t been subject to regulation or governing over the centuries, it has organized itself, say researchers. A study on the history and spelling of English suffixes demonstrates that the spelling of English words is more orderly than previously thought. Unlike France and Italy, and other countries where national academies oversee the written language, no English-s
1h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Mosquito flight is unlike that of any other insectHigh-speed video and modeling reveal a more complex understanding of mosquito flight.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Journal: Researchers can track hazardous chemicals from fast-food wrappers in the bodyJust one month after major research findings showed dangerous PFAS present in more than one-third of fast food packaging tested, UAB and Notre Dame created a new technique to track PFASs in the body.
1h
The Atlantic

Encryption Won’t Stop Your Internet Provider From Spying on You Earlier this month, a lobby group for major internet providers like Comcast and Verizon attacked a set of online-privacy regulations that they believe are too strict. In a filing to the Federal Communication Commission, the group argued that providers should be able to sell customers’ internet history without the customers’ permission, because that information shouldn’t be considered sensitive. B
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Viden

SpaceX affyrer sin første genbrugsraketTorsdag skriver en Falcon 9-raket historie, når den sendes afsted på sin anden tur i rummet.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Seeing the whole galaxy with a 'second eye on the sky'Earlier this month, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) reached an important milestone by opening its "second eye on the sky" – a new instrument called the "APOGEE South spectrograph."
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study reveals listeria bacteria can hide inside tissue of romaine lettuceA Purdue University study shows that the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes can live inside the tissue of romaine lettuce, suggesting that conventional post-harvest sanitization practices might not be sufficient to kill the potentially lethal pathogen.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tackling resilience: Finding order in chaos to help buffer against climate changeA new paper by the University of Washington and NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center aims to provide clarity among scientists, resource managers and planners on what ecological resilience means and how it can be achieved.
2h
Dana Foundation

A Day in the Life of Successful Aging & Your Brain! For Brain Awareness Week, the Dana Foundation presented a Successful Aging & Your Brain (SA&YB) program, alongside AARP Orlando and Telemundo, at Engelwood Neighborhood Center in Orlando, FL. Ambrosio J. Romero, M.D., F.A.A.F.P, discussed how memory is affected as one ages, what types of diseases exist and how to avoid them, and what you can do to age healthily. Check out the video to see a day i
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Gizmodo

Stick Two Of These Ridiculously Popular Motion Lights In Your Closets For $15 2-Pack OxyLED T-02 Motion Light , $15 with code 2POXYT02 OxyLED’s OxySense motion-sensing closet light is one of the best-selling products in Kinja Deals history , and it’s easy to see why. You can stick it anywhere, it turns itself on and off, and it’s super cheap. Today, add two individual lights your cart (not the 2-pack available on the page), and get both for $15 with promo code 2POXYT02.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fossils stolen from Death Valley National ParkAncient fossil footprints have been stolen from Death Valley National Park.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study reveals listeria bacteria can hide inside tissue of romaine lettuceA Purdue University study shows that the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes can live inside the tissue of romaine lettuce, suggesting that conventional post-harvest sanitization practices might not be sufficient to kill the potentially lethal pathogen.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How to measure potentially damaging free radicals in cigarette smokeSmoking cigarettes can lead to illness and death. Free radicals, which are atoms or groups of atoms with unpaired electrons, in inhaled smoke are thought to be partly responsible for making smokers sick. Now researchers report in ACS' journal Chemical Research in Toxicology a method for measuring free radicals in cigarette smoke that could help improve our understanding of the relationship between
2h
Big Think

Astronomy: The Gateway Drug of Science The study of science, without planned application, can lead to fascinating things in its own right. Read More
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Big Think

Two Cities Launch Plans for a Flying Taxi Service by the 2030s Three autonomous aerial vehicles (AAVs) are being considered for this epic feat. Read More
2h
New on MIT Technology Review

This Gadget Has a Real Working Menstrual CycleThe latest organ-on-a-chip can release an egg in 28 days.
2h
Live Science

1,000-Year-Old Toy Viking Boat Unearthed in NorwayArchaeologists recently found a 1,000-year-old toy Viking ship during an excavation of a site in central Norway.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The search for obesity drugs targets hunger's complex chemistryDiscoveries of hormones related to weight and appetite in the '90s helped spur a search for obesity treatments targeting those hormones— with disappointing results. Now scientists are taking a new tack that could finally yield promising treatments, according to a story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN) that was produced in collaboration with the American Chemical Society's open-access journal
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Painting fingernails with silver and goldSince ancient times, people have used lustrous silver, platinum and gold to make jewelry and other adornments. Researchers have now developed a new way to add the metals to nail polish with minimal additives, resulting in durable, tinted—and potentially antibacterial—nail coloring. They report their method in ACS' journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Virtual reality therapy helps decrease pain in hospitalized patientsVirtual reality therapy is effective in significantly reducing pain for hospitalized patients, according to a new Cedars-Sinai study. In the study, published online today by JMIR Mental Health, a sister publication of the Journal of Medical Internet Research, investigators examined 100 hospitalized patients who reported pain scores of greater than 3 on the Numeric Pain Rating Scale from zero to 10
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NHGRI oral history collection features influential genomics researchersA collection of oral histories released today by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) features candid conversations with pioneering scientists involved in the Human Genome Project and a rare discussion with all three institute directors since the organization was established in 1989. In each oral history, influential scientists offer extensive insight into science and medicine, as
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Software-based system improves the ability to determine the cause of ischemic strokeMassachusetts General Hospital investigators have developed a software package that provides evidence-based, automated support for diagnosing the cause of stroke.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers identify genes that give cannabis its flavorUBC scientists have scanned the genome of cannabis plants to find the genes responsible for giving various strains their lemony, skunky or earthy flavors, an important step for the budding legal cannabis industry.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Building trust, not hateWhen anonymity between people is lifted, they more likely cooperate with each other. Playing nice can thereby become a winning strategy, an international team of scientists shows in a study to be published in Science Advances.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Eating peanuts may lead to supple arteries and healthy heartsEating peanuts with a meal may help protect against cardiovascular diseases which can lead to heart attacks and stroke, according to an international team of researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Solving the mystery of the Arctic's green iceIn 2011, researchers observed something that should be impossible -- a massive bloom of phytoplankton growing under Arctic sea ice in conditions that should have been far too dark for anything requiring photosynthesis to survive. So, how was this bloom possible? Using mathematical modeling, researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences found that thinning
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Social bees have kept their gut microbes for 80 million yearsBacteria living in the guts of social bees have been passed down from generation to generation for 80 million years, according to a new study. The finding adds to the case that social creatures, like bees and humans, not only transfer bacteria between one another in their own lifetime -- they have a distinctive relationship with bacteria over time, in some cases even evolving on parallel tracks as
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Building trust, not hateWhen anonymity between people is lifted, they more likely cooperate with each other. Playing nice can thereby become a winning strategy, an international team of scientists shows in a study to be published in Science Advances. The findings are based on experiments with a limited number of participants but might have far-reaching implications, if confirmed. Reducing anonymity could help social netw
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

From Beethoven to Bieber, why playing music to chimps is falling on deaf earsPlaying music to captive chimpanzees has no positive effect on their welfare, researchers have concluded.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Financialization's negative effect on the American solar industryThe increasing role of the United States' financial sector in the 1980s and 1990s, when it shifted from focusing on technology investment to speculating on future markets, impaired the country's emerging solar industry, a new study reports.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new marker for the most common form of ALSA molecule found in blood and cerebrospinal fluid could serve as an indicator for the most common form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), offering a much needed tool to measure disease outcomes in clinical trials, a new study reports.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Testing effects of 'noise' on the decision-making abilities of slime moldForaging abilities of the amoeboid slime mold Physarum polycephalum may be improved by 'noise' in the form of intermittent light exposure, according to a study published March 29, 2017, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Bernd Meyer from Monash University, Australia, and colleagues.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A bird's blind spot plays an important role in its visionThe width of a bird's visual binocular field is partially determined by the size of the blind area in front of its head, according to a study published March 29, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Luke Tyrrell and Esteban Fernández-Juricic from Purdue University, USA.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A decorated raven bone discovered in Crimea may provide insight into Neanderthal cognitionThe cognitive abilities of Neanderthals are debated, but a raven bone fragment found at the Zaskalnaya VI (ZSK) site in Crimea features two notches that may have been made by Neanderthals intentionally to display a visually consistent pattern, according to a study by Ana Majkic at the Universite de Bordeaux and colleagues, published in the open access journal, PLOS ONE on March 29, 2017.
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Ars Technica

FCC to halt expansion of broadband subsidies for poor people (credit: Free Press ) The Federal Communications Commission is dropping its legal defense of a new system for expanding broadband subsidies for poor people, and it will not approve applications from companies that want to offer the low-income broadband service. The decision announced today by FCC Chairman Ajit Pai would halt implementation of last year's expansion of the Lifeline program. This 32
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Gizmodo

Trump's Plan to Slash the NIH Budget Won’t Just Hurt Scientists—It Will Hurt Everyone Image: Getty While the Trump Administration’s plan for massive cuts to the Environmental Protection Agency has caused a veritable national panic, much less discussed has been the proposal to slash the budget of the National Institutes of Health . On top of a 20%, $5.8 billion cut to the agency’s total budget revealed earlier this month as part of the administration’s 2018 budget proposal, on Mond
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Viden

Trump dropper med et pennestrøg officielt Obamas klimapolitikUSA's præsident har underskrevet et dekret, der skal tilbagerulle dele af Obamas klimaaftale.
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New Scientist - News

Giant octopus wears jellyfish cape after it devours its ownerA rarely-seen deep-sea octopus eats zooplankton and a gelatinous, low-calorie food – jellyfish – and may use them as tools to catch food and feed through
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New Scientist - News

MRI brain scans train machines to see the world more like usTeaching machine learning algorithms to recognise objects in a more human-like way could make it easier for us to trust them in systems like driverless cars
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New Scientist - News

Western demand for goods from China is killing 100,000 a yearNearly a quarter of premature deaths from air pollution worldwide happen in countries that manufacture goods for export
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New Scientist - News

Fight against patent for hepatitis C drug that can cost €55,000Sofosbuvir can cost up to €55,000 for a course of treatment. Charities hope revoking the patent would allow far cheaper generics to cure hepatitis C in Europe
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New Scientist - News

The coldest place in the universe marks a double stellar graveNew observations finally reveal why an odd planetary nebula is so chilly: two stars met their end in close quarters
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New Scientist - News

Bias test to prevent algorithms discriminating unfairlyAlgorithms that make judicial and financial decisions about people perpetuate racial or gender bias in the data they learn from. There's a way to clean it up
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New Scientist - News

Lyme disease is set to explode, and you can’t protect yourselfA new prediction says 2017 and 2018 will see major Lyme disease outbreaks in new areas. This could lead to lifelong health consequences, so where's the vaccine?
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New Scientist - News

Backwards asteroid shares an orbit with Jupiter without crashingA rare retrograde asteroid has been spotted in Jupiter's orbital zone - and nudges from the giant planet may have kept it stable there for a million years
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Painting fingernails with silver and goldSince ancient times, people have used lustrous silver, platinum and gold to make jewelry and other adornments. Researchers have now developed a new way to add the metals to nail polish with minimal additives, resulting in durable, tinted -- and potentially antibacterial -- nail coloring. They report their method in ACS' journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How to measure potentially damaging free radicals in cigarette smokeSmoking cigarettes can lead to illness and death. Free radicals, which are atoms or groups of atoms with unpaired electrons, in inhaled smoke are thought to be partly responsible for making smokers sick. Now researchers report in ACS' journal Chemical Research in Toxicology a method for measuring free radicals in cigarette smoke that could help improve our understanding of the relationship between
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Manufacturing, global trade impair health of people with no stake in eitherThe latest products may bring joy to people around the globe, but academic researchers this week are highlighting the heightened health risks experienced by people in regions far downwind of the factories that produce these goods and on the other side of the world from where they're consumed. In a study to be published Thursday, March 30, in the journal Nature, scientists quantify and map the shif
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Harnessing brain's internal reserves might help treat epilepsyEpilepsy is one of the most common chronic neurological disorders affecting humans that causes recurrent convulsive seizures. Along with their colleagues from MIPT, researchers from the Laboratory of Systemic Organization of Neurons at ITEB discovered an efficient way of protecting the temporal lobe from pathological changes that arise as epilepsy progresses. In a study biophysicists have shown th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blood test unlocks new frontier in treating depressionDoctors for the first time can determine which medication is more likely to help a patient overcome depression, according to research that pushes the medical field beyond what has essentially been a guessing game of prescribing antidepressants.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

When people know each other, cooperation is more likely than conflictWhen anonymity between people is lifted, they more likely cooperate with each other. Playing nice can thereby become a winning strategy, an international team of scientists shows in a study to be published in Science Advances. The findings are based on experiments with a limited number of participants but might have far-reaching implications, if confirmed. Reducing anonymity could help social netw
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Social bees have kept their gut microbes for 80 million yearsAbout 80 million years ago, a group of bees began exhibiting social behavior, which includes raising young together, sharing food resources and defending their colony. Today, their descendants—honey bees, stingless bees and bumble bees—carry stowaways from their ancient ancestors: five species of gut bacteria that have evolved along with the host bees.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

From Beethoven to Bieber, why playing music to chimps is falling on deaf earsPlaying music to captive chimpanzees has no positive effect on their welfare, researchers have concluded.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Testing effects of 'noise' on the decision-making abilities of slime moldForaging abilities of the amoeboid slime mold Physarum polycephalum may be improved by "noise" in the form of intermittent light exposure, according to a study published March 29, 2017, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Bernd Meyer from Monash University, Australia, and colleagues.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Solving the mystery of the Arctic's green iceIn 2011, researchers observed something that should be impossible—a massive bloom of phytoplankton growing under Arctic sea ice in conditions that should have been far too dark for anything requiring photosynthesis to survive. So, how was this bloom possible?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers identify genes that give cannabis its flavorUBC scientists have scanned the genome of cannabis plants to find the genes responsible for giving various strains their lemony, skunky or earthy flavors, an important step for the budding legal cannabis industry.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A decorated raven bone discovered in Crimea may provide insight into Neanderthal cognitionThe cognitive abilities of Neanderthals are debated, but a raven bone fragment found at the Zaskalnaya VI (ZSK) site in Crimea features two notches that may have been made by Neanderthals intentionally to display a visually consistent pattern, according to a study by Ana Majkic at the Universite de Bordeaux and colleagues, published in the open access journal, PLOS ONE on March 29, 2017.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A bird's blind spot plays an important role in its visionThe width of a bird's visual binocular field is partially determined by the size of the blind area in front of its head, according to a study published March 29, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Luke Tyrrell and Esteban Fernández-Juricic from Purdue University, USA.
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The Scientist RSS

In Certain Social Bees, Gut Microbiomes Follow PhylogenyCorbiculate bees and their gut-dwelling microbes have been coevolving since the social species evolved from their solitary ancestors around 80 million years ago, scientists suggest.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Thinning ice creates undersea Arctic greenhousesArctic sea ice thinned by climate change increasingly produces conditions favorable for phytoplankton blooms in the waters below, new research suggests.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Neandertals had an eye for patternsNeandertals carved notches in a raven bone, possibly to produce a pleasing or symbolic pattern, scientists say.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Watch AZN Drop The Hammer While Aaron Drifts Down The Drag Strip Mega Race Aaron Kaufman struggles to get traction in the drag race while AZN takes off in the Farmbird. Full episodes streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/mega-race/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/StreetOutlaws Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery https://t
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Gizmodo

The First Footage of Alex Garland's Annihilation Looks Absolutely Mesmerizing An image of Natalie Portman in Thor: The Dark World. No official photos of Annihilation have been released yet. Image: Disney A movie we’ve been looking forward to for some time is Alex Garland’s Annihilation , based on the crazy, critically acclaimed Jeff VanderMeer book of the same name. Well, there’s good news and bad news. The bad news is it won’t be out until 2018. The good news is the first
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Names Rosie Gray White House Correspondent Washington, D.C. (March 29, 2017)— Rosie Gray has been assigned as White House correspondent, a role she takes on just three months after joining T he Atlantic as a staff writer covering politics. Gray’s new role adds to the increased weight The Atlantic has given to coverage of politics and policy over the last 15 months, under the leadership of editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg , TheAtlantic.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Satellite galaxies at edge of Milky Way coexist with dark matterResearch conducted by scientists at Rochester Institute of Technology rules out a challenge to the accepted standard model of the universe and theory of how galaxies form by shedding new light on a problematic structure.
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Gizmodo

Save $50 on the Smart Thermostat That's Smarter Than a Nest Ecobee3 Smart Thermostat , $199 While it doesn’t have the brand recognition of Nest’s learning Thermostat, the Ecobee3 Smart Thermostat one-ups its most popular competitor by including a wireless remote sensor that you can place elsewhere in your house, giving the thermostat a more accurate picture of your home’s overall temperature. Plus, it’ll work with Siri via HomeKit, and your Amazon Echo to
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Science | The Guardian

Teach evolution – but not in a moral vacuum | Letters Jules Howard writes that teaching evolution from an early age would help combat racism and promote humanist values ( Utopian thinking: Forget British Values – teach children they are apes , theguardian.com, 27 March), but this is not borne out by experience. Most early evolutionists were racist, Darwin included. Some of the most brilliant evolutionary theorists, such as Francis Galton and Ronald
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Next stop: A trip inside the Sun's atmosphereEvery so often the sun emits an explosive burst of charged particles that makes its way to Earth and often wreaks havoc on power grids, aircraft and satellite systems. When clouds of high-speed charged particles come racing off the sun, they can bathe spacecraft, astronauts and planetary surfaces in damaging radiation. Understanding why the sun occasionally emits these high-energy particles can he
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Viden

Forskere: Private penge betyder positive medicinforsøgMedicinalindustrien afviser, at forskere bliver påvirket af dem, der betaler for forsøgene.
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Futurity.org

Giant virus requires team to retrofit microscope In order to map one of the world’s largest viruses, scientists took a DIY approach to build a retrofitted cryo-electron microscope. “If the common cold virus is scaled to the size of a ladder, then the giant Samba virus is bigger than the Washington Monument,” says Kristin Parent, assistant professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at Michigan State University and coauthor of the paper in t
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cognitive science

How to Change Bad Habits and Create New ones (Animated Video) submitted by /u/Smart_by_Design [link] [comments]
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Gizmodo

A '90s Version of Snapchat Would Have Been a Whole Lot Less Confusing Looking back at older versions of software makes you wonder how we even managed to use them years ago. Dusty iterations of programs like Word, Excel, and even Photoshop were crude as hell by today’s standards. But what if Snapchat—Mark Zuckerberg’s favorite ephemeral app—had existed on desktop computers in the ‘90s ? It probably would have been simpler to use, actually. The self-destructing socia
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Turkish court blocks Booking.com travel websiteA Turkish commercial court has ordered the blocking of travel website Booking.com over alleged unfair competition its hotel and flight reservations platform may pose to local firms, the Association of Turkish Travel Agencies, Tursab, said Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study finds 11 percent of disappearing groundwater used to grow internationally traded foodWheat, rice, sugar, cotton and maize are among the essential internationally traded crops in the global economy. To produce these crops many countries rely on irrigated agriculture that accounts for about 70 percent of global freshwater withdrawals, according to the United Nations Water program. One freshwater source is underground aquifers, some of which replenish so slowly that they are essentia
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

11 percent of disappearing groundwater used to grow internationally traded food11 percent of the global non-renewable groundwater drawn up for irrigation goes to produce crops that are then traded on the international market.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wrong-way asteroid plays 'chicken' with JupiterFor at least a million years, an asteroid orbiting the 'wrong' way around the sun has been playing a cosmic game of chicken with giant Jupiter and with about 6,000 other asteroids sharing the giant planet's space, says a report published in the latest issue of Nature.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study reveals amount of premature deaths linked to international tradeA new study involving the University of East Anglia (UEA) has revealed for the first time the global scale of premature deaths related to air pollution from international trade.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

For microbes fighting viruses, a fast response means a better defenseResearchers have found that the bacterial immune system known as CRISPR targets an invading virus as soon as it enters the cell. The discovery answers a long-standing question about how microbes defend themselves.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Trauma and stress in teen years increases risk of depression during menopause, Penn study showsA new study shows that women who experience multiple traumatic events during childhood or adolescence have a significantly increased risk of depression in the years leading into menopause (known as perimenopause). In particular, women who experienced their first traumatic event in their teens are especially susceptible to depression during perimenopause, even if they had previously never had depre
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Manufacturing, global trade impair health of people with no stake in eitherIn a study to be published Thursday, March 30, in the journal Nature, scientists quantify and map the shift of environmental and health burdens brought on by globalization and international trade.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wrong-way asteroid plays 'chicken' with JupiterFor at least a million years, an asteroid orbiting the "wrong" way around the sun has been playing a cosmic game of chicken with giant Jupiter and with about 6,000 other asteroids sharing the giant planet's space, says a report published in the latest issue of Nature.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Legends of the lost reservoirsTucked away in a laboratory in University of Cincinnati's Braunstein Hall are tubes of rock and dirt that quietly tell a story—a story that looks back on ancient society's early water conservation. UC researchers hope the story will aid in the future preservation of our planet's most precious resource.
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The Atlantic

Does Germany Hold the Key to Defeating Populism? Amid fears of a rising populist tide in Europe, Germany seems to be resisting its rightward tug with unique success. The day after Donald Trump’s election, The New York Times hailed German Chancellor Angela Merkel as the “Liberal West’s Last Defender.” And it was to Merkel, the new “ leader of the free world ,” that Barack Obama directed his final phone call as president. Meanwhile, others around
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How plants are grown beyond Earth?Following a new NASA bill, passed in March by the US Congress and which authorizes $19.5 billion spending for space exploration in 2017, manned missions to Mars are closer to reality than ever before.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

No ill effects from grazing cattle on crop residues: Nebraska studyIt makes sense that a 1,200 pound Angus cow would place quite a lot of pressure on the ground on which it walks. But a new study shows that even these heavy beasts can't do much to compact common soils—if they're grazed responsibly.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Kids' wildlife preferences differ from island to mainlandGrowing up on an island or mainland location can shape the way children think about wildlife, including which species they prefer, according to North Carolina State University research. Comparison surveys of children living in the Bahamas and in North Carolina reveal significant differences and potential challenges for wildlife-conservation efforts on islands.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Male or female? Scientists challenge evidence of sex differences among dinosaursA paleontologist at the Canadian Museum of Nature is countering decades of studies that assert that some dinosaurs can be identified as male or female based on the shapes and sizes of their bones.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Analysis yields clues to chemical composition, natural aging of 100-year-old beerStashed away and long-forgotten, a trio of century-old bottled beers recently discovered in the Czech Republic could help scientists better understand early 20th-century brewing practices, as well as the chemical changes that occur in beer over long periods of time. A report on the well-preserved lagers appears in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.
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Gizmodo

Does the New Samsung Galaxy Explode? Image: Samsung / Wikicommons / Gizmodo Esteemed tech analysts are already wondering if the new Samsung phone will explode. So… will it? We don’t know yet. Thank you for reading.
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Popular Science

We may finally know how mosquitoes fly Animals But we're still not sure why Mosquitoes are blood-sucking, disease-carrying, embodiments of annoyance dressed up as insects. They also have a fascinating method of flight. Read on:…
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Popular Science

This building hanging from an asteroid is absurd—but let’s take it seriously for a second Technology Welcome to the Analemma tower and its half hour elevator rides Have you ever wanted to wake up and see the curvature of the Earth? Or wanted to live exclusively indoors? Well good news, weirdos. Read on:…
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Ars Technica

Encounters with Jupiter send asteroid on a bizarre backward spin Enlarge (credit: NASA ) Jupiter is widely credited with providing Earth with a bit of protection. The immense gravity of the gas giant typically either sucks in asteroids and comets or flings them out into orbits where they pose our planet little danger. But astronomers have now identified an asteroid that's in a stable orbital interaction with Jupiter. That interaction sends the asteroid around
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Asteroid in Jupiter's orbit goes its own wayAsteroid shares Jupiter’s orbit around the sun but travels in the opposite direction as the planet.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Trump’s Rollback Paves the Way for a New Climate LeaderThe world’s next global leader on climate is probably not the country you’d expect.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How plants are grown beyond Earth?Following a new NASA bill, passed in March by the US Congress and which authorizes $19.5 billion spending for space exploration in 2017, manned missions to Mars are closer to reality than ever before.
3h
Popular Science

Samsung's new digital assistant, Bixby, tries to push past voice recognition toward true AI Technology The Galaxy S8 smartphone can see, listen, and learn. Samsung announced its Galaxy S8 and S8 Plus Wednesday. Here's what we know about its new personal assistant, Bixby.
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Science | The Guardian

Thousands of pollution deaths worldwide linked to western consumers – study Study shows extent to which US and western European demand for clothes, toys and mobile phones contributes to air pollution in developing countries Western consumers who buy cheap imported toys, clothes and mobile phones are indirectly contributing to tens of thousands of pollution-related deaths in the countries where the goods are produced, according to a landmark study. Nearly 3.5 million peop
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Gizmodo

The First It Teaser Is Here, and Pennywise Looks Scary as Hell The first teaser trailer for Andy Muscietti’s It opens with the ultimate loss of innocence, when raincoat-clad Georgie (Jackson Robert Scott) chases a paper boat right into the clutches of a certain sewer-dwelling clown. It only gets darker from there. We get missing posters, balloons drifting through classrooms, a spewing bathroom sink, kids prowling the tunnels under Derry, and a slide projecto
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Scientific American Content: Global

Rare Sighting Reveals Deep-Sea Octopus's Unusual BreakfastVideo confirms the cephalopod feeds on gelatinous creatures -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

New Supply Could Prevent Deep-Space Plutonium ShortagePublic-private partnerships may boost available nuclear fuel for space exploration -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

For microbes fighting viruses, a fast response means a better defenseIn battles between germs, the opening shot is often an injection. A virus, intent on infecting a microbe, punctures the cell's protective wall and inserts its own genetic code. New research from The Rockefeller University reveals how microbes act quickly to fend off the incoming threat using CRISPR, a bacterial immune system that also serves as a powerful tool for editing genomes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study reveals amount of premature deaths linked to international tradeA new study involving the University of East Anglia (UEA) has revealed for the first time the global scale of premature deaths related to air pollution from international trade.
3h
The Atlantic

The Game-Changing Technique That Cracked the Zika-Mosquito Genome Ten years ago, a team of scientists published the first genome of Aedes aegypti­ —the infamous mosquito that spreads Zika, dengue fever, and yellow fever. It was a valiant effort, but also a complete mess . Rather than tidily bundled in the insect’s three pairs of chromosomes, its DNA was scattered among 36,000 small fragments, many of which were riddled with gaps and errors. But last week, a tea
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Growth spurts may determine a lamprey's sex The parasitic fish could be the first case of growth-dependent sex determination. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21724
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Ars Technica

$3.5 million crowdfunded drone campaign flops, lawsuit alleges Enlarge (credit: Shenzen Sunshine ) The marketplace for the consumer drone is skyrocketing. Now there are more than 770,000 drones registered with the US Federal Aviation Administration. That's up from 670,000 in January alone. The number might be even higher if an Indiegogo crowdfunded campaign delivered its Onagofly F115 drone as promised, according to a would-be class-action federal lawsuit. T
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Futurity.org

Can robot duo track crops better than drones? A tower and robot vehicle duo can accurately create 3D models of plants and collect data on both regions of crops and individual plants. The mobile sensor tower and an autonomous robot vehicle equipped with three levels of sensors and an additional robotic arm help complete a complex process called plant phenotyping. This involves assessing growth, development, yield, as well as tolerance and res
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WIRED

Intel’s Got a Plan to Dominate VR. First Stop? March Madness The Final Four plays out in Arizona this weekend, but you can watch it in VR. The post Intel's Got a Plan to Dominate VR. First Stop? March Madness appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Trump’s Speeches Are Helping People Learn English. Really In Facebook groups sharing posts focusing on language learning, early English students are turning to Trump-speak to learn basic vocabulary and concepts. The post Trump's Speeches Are Helping People Learn English. Really appeared first on WIRED .
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Ars Technica

“Samsung Dex” is a Galaxy S8 dock that makes your phone into a desktop Samsung Samsung brought a few different accessories to the launch party for the Galaxy S8 this morning. One, Samsung Dex, is the latest in a long line of products that promise to let you replace your desktop computer with your phone. Samsung hasn't announced pricing or a release date, and most of what we know comes from Samsung's presentation. The dock is small and circular, includes two USB port
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research explains why even targeted therapies eventually fail in lung cancerNew research shows the accumulation of genetic diversity in cancer cells with damaged DNA repair mechanisms contributes to the occurrence of resistance after the exposure of the cells to drugs used to treat tumors. A corollary to this discovery is that killing cancer cells that are more genetically unstable in the earlier stages of tumorigenesis could result in improved outcomes in currently used
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The Atlantic

The Zookeeper’s Wife Is a Staid Tale of Holocaust Heroism The true story of The Zookeeper’s Wife is an arresting, if somewhat familiar, narrative of heroism in the Second World War. Antonina and Jan Żabiński, the owners and operators of the Warsaw Zoo in Poland, lived in relative security during the carnage of the Nazi occupation, though their facility was robbed of its animals by the invaders. Nonetheless, the couple put themselves at great risk by hid
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The Atlantic

Can Trump Fix Government by Running It Like a Business? Donald Trump is taking steps to make the government more like the private sector. Past administrations have tried similar exercises in reform with mixed results, however, and it might be harder for a White House with relatively little governing experience to make improvements to the sprawling federal bureaucracy. On the campaign trail, Trump pointed to his business record in promising to fix gove
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Ars Technica

“Samsung Connect” wrangles all the insecure Things in your Internet of Things Enlarge / Every blue dot represents a thing that can be hacked into and broken by malicious actors or used to spy on you by unscrupulous OEMs. But hey, at least you'll be able to control them all from one app. As part of today's Samsung event , the Korean megacorp announced its intention to launch the new "Samsung Connect" service. Centered around a small Google Wi-Fi-like home router (called the
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Futurity.org

Oops! Our bodies can make Salmonella more toxic When someone gets Salmonella , their body’s own inflammatory response can make things worse by waking up viruses called bacteriophages. These viruses, also known as phages, can infect Salmonella and transfer genes that give it new properties and make it more toxic, according to a new study published in Science . As soon as the bacteria cell is attacked by inflammatory factors such as reactive oxy
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Gizmodo

How to Hide Your Browsing History From Your Snooping ISP All images: Getty Congress has moved to dismantle some Obama-era rules that would have protected the online privacy of everyday Americans. This sucks. The deregulation means it will be easier for huge telecom companies to track and sell their customers’ browsing history. This sucks! But not all is lost. Regardless of what the Capitol Hill-based wrecking ball does to the FCC’s online privacy rules
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Male or female? Scientist challenges evidence of sex differences among dinosaursA paleontologist at the Canadian Museum of Nature is countering decades of studies that assert that some dinosaurs can be identified as male or female based on the shapes and sizes of their bones. The study by Dr. Jordan Mallon appears in the online edition of Paleobiology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Adults with disabilities screened less often for colorectal cancerColorectal cancer is the fourth most common type of cancer in the United States, with nearly 135,000 cases reported in 2016. The likelihood of surviving colorectal cancer is strongly related to the stage in which it is diagnosed. Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine found that individuals with certain disabilities are less likely to receive recommended preventive screenin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Legends of the lost reservoirsUniversity of Cincinnati interdisciplinary researchers and global collaborators dig into the past to inspire modern water management strategies that can save time and money and may avoid negative effects on our climate.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

TBI in emergency departments a substantial economic burdenA new study that looked at nearly 134,000 emergency department visits for traumatic brain injury, including concussion, during a one year period in Ontario estimated that those visits had a total cost of $945 million over the lifetimes of those patients.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Analysis yields clues to chemical composition, natural aging of 100-year-old beerStashed away and long-forgotten, a trio of century-old bottled beers recently discovered in the Czech Republic could help scientists better understand early 20th-century brewing practices, as well as the chemical changes that occur in beer over long periods of time. A report on the well-preserved lagers appears in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Steering towards grazing fieldsIt makes sense that a 1,200 pound Angus cow would place quite a lot of pressure on the ground on which it walks. But a new study shows that even these heavy beasts can't do much to compact common soils -- if they're grazed responsibly.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Kids' wildlife preferences differ from island to mainlandWhen asked to name their favorite wildlife, Bahamian children chose feral cats, dogs and pigs - invasive species that can be more damaging in an island environment. However, they chose a wider variety of favorite species -- including birds, lizards, fish and insects -- than mainland children from North Carolina, who favored mammals such as deer, bears, rabbits, wolves and squirrels.
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Live Science

11 Asian Elephants Rescued from Mud-Filled Bomb CraterA muddy rescue saves 11 elephants in Cambodia.
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Live Science

World’s Most Diverse Dinosaur Footprints Preserved in Australia | VideoMore than 20 different types of dinosaur tracks are preserved along the coast of western Australia, earning it the name “Australia’s Jurassic Park” … even though the footprints date to the Cretaceous.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Data Privacy: Is Trump's FCC Redefining Public Interest as Business Interest?Recent U.S. Senate and FCC activity favors large Internet companies at the expense of their customers -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Viden

Tre myter om MFR-vaccinen - og hvorfor de ikke holderGiver MFR-vaccinen autisme og andre alvorlige bivirkninger? Nej, svarer dansk vaccinationsekspert.
4h
Ars Technica

Stealth update to enemy power causes an uproar in World of Warcraft This patch announcement video fails to mention a massive change to late game enemy power hidden in the latest World of Warcraft update Keeping a massively multiplayer online game fresh and challenging for longtime players while simultaneously staying accessible and fun for lower-powered relative newcomers is always a challenge. In World of Warcraft , a hidden change to the way end-game enemies po
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New Scientist - News

Sawfish’s fearsome snout evolved to be undetectable to preyThe snout of the elusive sawfish doesn’t make vibrations that prey fish can detect as it swims – just like a wind turbine blade through air
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Popular Science

The best Spotify add-ons and tricks DIY Become a streaming music pro in no time If you've signed up for an account on the world's biggest and best-known music streaming service, these are the expert tips you need to get the most out of Spotify.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Samsung's Galaxy S8 phone aims to dispel the Note 7 debacleSamsung seems to be playing it safe with its first major smartphone since the embarrassing recall of its fire-prone Note 7.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Making cows more environmentally friendlyScientists at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Scotland's Rural College (SRUC) and the Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre, Frankfurt have published a paper today revealing an important discovery surrounding plants used to feed livestock; that plants growing in warmer conditions are tougher and have lower nutritional value to grazing livestock, potentially inhibiting milk and meat
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Gizmodo

This Elusive Giant Octopus Snacks on Giant Jellies A female Haliphron holding an egg-yolk jellyfish in her arms. (Image: MBARI) The giant deep-sea octopus Haliphron is so rare that marine biologists have seen it just three times in 27 years. Using a robotic sub, scientists have finally caught video footage of this animal at mealtime—revealing its distinct preference for gelatinous sea creatures. A new study published in Scientific Reports is prov
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Weather whiplash' triggered by changing climate will degrade Midwest's drinking waterOne consequence of global climate change is the likelihood of more extreme seesawing between drought and flood, a phenomenon dubbed "weather whiplash."
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How should the UK approach Brexit?A study published in the Oxford Review of Economic Policy summarizes strategies for the United Kingdom to adopt when negotiating new trade arrangements with the European Union. Theresa May triggered Article 50 today and began the Brexit process. This article discusses the future of UK trade policy following the referendum vote.
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Ars Technica

Persona 5 brings depth and complexity to its Robin Hood tale Enlarge / The Phantom Thieves love leather. Note: Light spoilers for Persona 5 follow. You should know exactly how you feel about Persona 5 's style and tone within the first 10 minutes. I certainly did—although it has taken me well over 100 hours to see all the incredible and consistent ways developer Atlus' high-school heist RPG bends, breaks, and leans into its look, feel, and message. Persona
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Gizmodo

Drone Video Shows The Horrifying Scale Of The Volkswagen Buyback No one really knows the environmental ramifications of scrapping hundreds of thousands of cheating diesel Volkswagens . That’s scary in and of itself. But the sheer scale of what’s going on is hard to imagine, and while you’ve probably seen still shots of the various places where those hordes of VWs are parked, this drone video drives the point home better than any photo can. The video comes to u
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Scientific American Content: Global

House Science Committee Calls on Alt-Science to Drive PolicyToday's hearing will try to reframe climate change as an unsettled debate, allowing skeptics and industry to influence regulations and research funding -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

Paul Manafort's Mysterious Millions Washington attracts a certain type of person who loves attention—the thrill of the crowd, the glow of the camera. But it also attracts the kind of person who loves to operate in the shadows: the master of arcane rules, the backroom operator. When the second category of person ends up with the attention, things can get uncomfortable. Related Story What Exactly Did Paul Manafort Do Wrong? Take Paul
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA sees ex-Tropical Cyclone Debbie over QueenslandNASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Ex-Tropical Cyclone Debbie after it made landfall in eastern Queensland and weakened.
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Gizmodo

Today's Best Deals: Anker Switch Accessories, Echo Dots, Merrell Shoes, and More Nintendo Switch accessories from Anker , Echo Dot 3-packs , and Merrell shoes lead off Tuesday’s best deals. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Three Amazon Echo Dots , $130 with code DOT3PACK Amazon’s Alexa is basically the operating system of the home , but to fully appreciate it, you need to scatter Echoes and Echo Dots around your house until th
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Making cows more environmentally friendlyScientists at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Scotland's Rural College (SRUC) and the Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre, Frankfurt have published a paper revealing an important discovery surrounding plants used to feed livestock.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'On-off switch' brings researchers a step closer to potential HIV vaccineUniversity of Nebraska-Lincoln scientists are pursuing an HIV vaccine using a weakened form of HIV. In a recent study, they demonstrated an 'on-off switch' that would shut off replication of the weakened form of HIV after it reached immunity-triggering levels.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cost of neurological disease in US Approaching $800 billion a yearA new University of South Florida study published in the Annals of Neurology looked at the nine most prevalent and costly diagnosed neurological diseases and found the annual cost to be staggering -- totaling nearly $800 billion.
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Live Science

Elephants Rescued After Getting Stuck in Mud Pit | VideoA video shows the heroic rescue of 11 Asian elephants that got stuck in a mud-filled bomb crater in Cambodia.
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The Atlantic

What a World Led by China Might Look Like Next week, Chinese President Xi Jinping will travel to the United States to meet Donald Trump for the first time. But according to Gideon Rachman, the chief foreign affairs commentator for the Financial Times , power is flowing in the opposite direction. Rachman is far from the first analyst to argue that China and other Asian nations are rising while the Western world declines, nor is he the fir
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Gene editing of human embryos yields early resultsGene editing in embryos has started in labs, but isn’t ready for the clinic.
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Scientific American Content: Global

First Drug for Aggressive MS Nets FDA ApprovalResearchers say the medication is a significant improvement over other treatments -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo

Uranus Smells Like Farts Image: Ryan F Mandelbaum/NASA/Walter Baxter Scientists have lots of questions about Uranus. Why does Uranus look the way it does, why did Uranus form the way it did, why does Uranus differ so much from other gas giants, like Jupiter and Saturn? But I had a more important question. What does Uranus smell like? The question is actually harder to answer than it seems—it’s unlikely we’d ever be able
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WIRED

Gear VR Just Took a Huge Leap Forward (Thanks to Oculus) Gear VR games should get a lot easier to navigate, thanks to a new controller and an overhauled Oculus app. The post Gear VR Just Took a Huge Leap Forward (Thanks to Oculus) appeared first on WIRED .
5h
WIRED

Samsung’s Sweet Galaxy S8 Will Make You Forget All About the Note 7 The Galaxy S8 and S8 Plus put everything that was great about the Note 7 in a slicker, non-explosive package. The post Samsung's Sweet Galaxy S8 Will Make You Forget All About the Note 7 appeared first on WIRED .
5h
WIRED

Flight Lab: Watch as I Flunk NASA’s Brutal Test Pilot Training Course Before takeoff, NASA test pilots brave a battery of training and testing on the ground. The post Flight Lab: Watch as I Flunk NASA's Brutal Test Pilot Training Course appeared first on WIRED .
5h
The Atlantic

Black Americans Are Working More—With Little to Show for It The discrepancies in earnings, wealth and other markers of financial success between black and white Americans are stark. Black Americans, for instance hold much less wealth and have higher rates of unemployment. But perhaps more unsettling than the gaps themselves is the fact that even as many black Americans make progress that should help bridge the divide, such as by working more hours, they h
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The Atlantic

Escaping Is Not a Form of Understanding The little transgressions are the forgivable ones. Local knowledge in any place is earned with time. So it’s understandable why someone who is only visiting Hawaii might think to describe poke as “sashimi salad,” for example, though that’s not quite right . But then there are the big transgressions, the characterizations of a place that are so unmoored from a sense of history that it’s almost sho
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How should the UK approach Brexit?A study published in the Oxford Review of Economic Policy summarizes strategies for the United Kingdom to adopt when negotiating new trade arrangements with the European Union. Theresa May triggered Article 50 today and began the Brexit process. This article discusses the future of UK trade policy following the referendum vote.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bullies and their victims obsessed with weight-lossSchool bullies and their victims are more obsessed with weight-loss than anyone else, according to new research by the University of Warwick.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Discovery may help patients beat deadly pneumoniaResearchers have identified a hormone that helps fight off a severe form of bacterial pneumonia, and that discovery may offer a simple way to help vulnerable patients.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Weather whiplash' triggered by changing climate will degrade Midwest's drinking waterUniversity of Kansas have published findings in the journal Biogeochemistry showing weather whiplash in the American Midwest's agricultural regions will drive the deterioration of water quality, forcing municipalities to seek costly remedies to provide safe drinking water to residents.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Surgery to remove unaffected breast in early breast cancer increasesThe proportion of women in the United States undergoing surgery for early-stage breast cancer who have preventive mastectomy to remove the unaffected breast increased significantly in recent years, particularly among younger women, and varied substantially across states.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Prevalence of heroin use rises in decade, greatest increase among whitesThe proportion of the population using heroin and having heroin use disorder increased over the decade from 2001 through 2013, with the greatest increases among whites, and nonmedical use of prescription opioids before heroin use increased among white users only, according to a new article published online by JAMA Psychiatry.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Heroin use rises significantly among young whitesHeroin use and heroin use disorder have increased significantly among American adults since 2001, according to new research at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. The portion of Americans using heroin has climbed five-fold in the last decade, and clinically defined heroin dependence has more than tripled. Increases were greatest among males, whites, those with low income and lit
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Electronic health records improve weekend surgery outcomesElectronic health record systems significantly improve outcomes for patients who undergo surgeries on weekends, according to a Loyola Medicine study published in JAMA Surgery. Past research has shown that weekend surgery patients tend to experience longer hospital stays and higher mortality rates and readmissions, a phenomenon known as the 'weekend effect.'
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Popular Science

From space sprouts to landmine legumes, here are the world’s weirdest farms Environment Across the globe, above the globe, under the globe... From a frozen tundra to an apartment complex rotating 249 miles above Earth, these extreme farms are keeping humans healthy, no matter where their adventures take them.
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Futurity.org

Most doctors don’t share pros and cons of prostate screening A blood test that helps screen for prostate cancer is still common, but conversations between patients and doctors about the pros and cons of the screening are not. Only 30 percent of men in a large national survey reported having a balanced discussion about the advantages and disadvantages with their health care provider. Further, the conversations are even less likely since the US Preventive Se
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Gizmodo

The US Is Ceding the Energy Industry of the Future to China AP On Tuesday, President Trump pledged to end the “war on coal” by rolling back the Clean Power Plan , an Obama-era federal policy that compels states to reduce carbon emissions from power plants. China responded Wednesday , reaffirming its commitment to investing in clean energy and honoring the Paris Agreement, an international accord to tackle climate change with progressively more stringent c
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Science | The Guardian

US heroin use has increased almost fivefold in a decade, study shows Researchers say increase is seen across all social groups, ages and sexes and highlight link between misuse of prescription opioids and heroin abuse Heroin use among American adults has increased almost fivefold in the last decade, according to a study based on a survey of almost 80,000 people. Researchers found that just after the turn of the millennium, 0.33% of the adult population reported ha
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Ars Technica

Samsung announces its newest flagships, the Galaxy S8 and S8+ NEW YORK CITY—After months of speculation and leaks, Samsung has finally made the Galaxy S8 official. It's everything we were expecting based on weeks of leaks : a major redesign of Samsung's flagship smartphone and a departure from the design language of the Galaxy S6 and S7. Samsung hasn't mentioned a price, but in the US the Galaxy S8 and S8+ will go up for pre-order on March 30 and will start
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Ars Technica

ISPs and FCC Chair Ajit Pai celebrate death of online privacy rules Enlarge / FCC Chairman Ajit Pai testifying before a Senate subcommittee on May 11, 2016. (credit: Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images) Internet privacy advocates are mourning the death of online privacy rules, but yesterday's House vote to eliminate the consumer protections was celebrated by ISPs, advertisers, and Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai. The rules would have required home
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Gizmodo

9 Things to Know About the Samsung Galaxy S8 and Bixby Images: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo Samsung’s Galaxy S8 is very important because as you probably know, Samsung is in a bit of trouble. The Note 7 explosions from last summer continue to haunt the company, and Samsung’s leadership is currently embroiled in a scandal that is, to put it gently, totally bananas. The company needs a big win lest it be consigned to the punchline of late night talkshow hosts. S
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New Scientist - News

Robot has eyes designed to follow you around like the Mona LisaThe Transgazer robot appears to be looking at several people at once because of its concave eye design, which could help it better communicate with groups
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Futurity.org

Plankton morph to survive ocean ‘washing machines’ Microscopic marine plankton don’t just drift helplessly in the ocean. They perceive cues that indicate turbulence and rapidly respond. New research shows how. By day, these tiny organisms, one-tenth the diameter of a human hair, actively migrate towards the sunlit ocean surface to carry out photosynthesis. At night, they make their way to depths of tens of meters, where the supply of nutrients is
5h
Live Science

Heroin Use Rises Among White AdultsHeroin use is on the rise, particularly among white adults, a new study finds.
5h
TEDTalks (video)

Addiction is a disease. We should treat it like one | Michael BotticelliOnly one in nine people in the United States gets the care and treatment they need for addiction and substance abuse. A former Director of National Drug Control Policy, Michael Botticelli is working to end this epidemic and treat people with addictions with kindness, compassion and fairness. In a personal, thoughtful talk, he encourages the millions of Americans in recovery today to make their voi
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Ingeniøren

Er det godt for miljøet at skrotte 500.000 VW-dieselbiler?Som en del af forliget med de amerikanske myndigheder om Dieselgate skal VW skrotte en halv million dieselbiler. Men ingen har gennemført en livscyklusanalyse, som kan godtgøre, om det er bedre for miljøet end at lade dem køre videre.
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Gizmodo

The Wreck-It Ralph Sequel Just Got a Very Long, Backwards Title The first image of the Wreck it Ralph sequel. Image: Disney Last year, Disney announced that a sequel to Wreck-It Ralph would be coming in 2018. They also announced that sequel would be about Ralph not breaking video games this time, but breaking the internet. Well, at CinemaCon on Tuesday, Disney announced the film’s full title and it’s a doozy. The title is Ralph Breaks The Internet: Wreck-It R
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Giving brown fat a green lightSince the discovery in 2009 that brown fat can be active in adult humans, researchers around the world have worked to unveil ways to switch on this fat. Scientists at Joslin Diabetes Center now have identified a new route to throw the switch.
5h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic's Third Annual Education Summit to Take Place on Tuesday, April 11 in Washington, D.C. Washington, D.C. (March 29, 2017)— With a new administration at the helm and Republicans dominating state legislatures from coast to coast, there is renewed debate over many fundamentals of the education system: viability of voucher programs; federal versus state and local jurisdiction; race and gender issues in schools; education quality and access for rural students. All of this leads to one ce
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Gizmodo

io9 Black Panther Confirms an Important Cast Member | Jalopnik ‘Deep Subprime’ Loans Skyrocket As Am io9 Black Panther Confirms an Important Cast Member | Jalopnik ‘Deep Subprime’ Loans Skyrocket As Americans Keep Buying Cars They Can’t Pay For | Kotaku Funcom Relaunches The Secret World As A Free-To-Play Action RPG | Two Cents Do You Still Need to Cut Up Your Canceled Credit Cards? |
5h
Ars Technica

Android Wear 2.0 begins rolling out, but only to three watches for now Enlarge / New Balance's $299 RunIQ Android Wear running watch. (credit: Valentina Palladino) Nearly two months after Android Wear 2.0 launched , some smartwatches are finally getting the update. According to Android Wear Google forums , the Fossil Q Founder, Casio Smart Outdoor, and Tag Heuer Connected smartwatches have started receiving updates to Android Wear 2.0. Those are the only three devic
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Brexit triggered, preprint push and a stem-cell first The week in science: 24–30 March 2017. Nature 543 594 doi: 10.1038/543594a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Immunologic changes point to potential for clinical investigation of combination immunotherapy for deadly kidney cancerImmunologic changes observed in an early study of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (MRCC) raised the possibility for a larger clinical study of combination immunotherapy, according to findings reported by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vanderbilt study finds natural chemical helps brain adapt to stressA natural signaling molecule that activates cannabinoid receptors in the brain plays a critical role in stress-resilience -- the ability to adapt to repeated and acute exposures to traumatic stress, according to researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA sees ex-Tropical Cyclone Debbie over QueenslandNASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Ex-Tropical Cyclone Debbie after it made landfall in eastern Queensland and weakened.
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Viden

Mæslinger: Derfor skal så mange vaccineresWHO anbefaler, at 95 procent vaccineres mod mæslinger. I Danmark har vi endnu ikke nået det mål, og det gør os sårbare overfor et mæslinge-udbrud.
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Ingeniøren

Flytrafik og landbrug trues af gåseinvasionPå 40 år er gåsebestandene i Vesteuropa eksploderet. De er nu blevet så stor en belastning, at myndighederne er gået sammen på tværs af landegrænser for at bekæmpe problemet.
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Gizmodo

I Would Eat This Ham and Cheese Bust of Vin Diesel Fast and Furiously Thanks to YouTube, the easiest way to score your 15 minutes of fame is to buy an expensive machine, master its capabilities, and film yourself using it. Some go with high-speed cameras , while others go with hydraulic presses . William Osman , on the other hand, went the laser cutter route, and used one to make a hauntingly detailed ham and cheese bust of Vin Diesel, because the unyielding terror
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The Atlantic

Hulu’s Harlots Takes a Modern View of 18th-Century Sex Work In 1763 London, Harlots baldly reveals in its opening scene, one in five women made a living by selling sex. It’s a provocative statistic that—coupled with images of petticoats trailing in the filthy streets and corseted bosoms thrust skyward—sets the series up to be a genially bawdy historical drama. But Harlots, a co-production with ITV that debuts on Hulu Wednesday, is something more complex.
6h
WIRED

If You Want to Stop Big Data Breaches, Start With Databases The root of so many high-profile data leaks are the insecure databases that underpin the internet. The post If You Want to Stop Big Data Breaches, Start With Databases appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Everything, a Must-Play Game Like Nothing You’ve Seen Before A truly unconventional game challenges and delights; this does both by allowing you to be literally anything you want. The post Everything , a Must-Play Game Like Nothing You’ve Seen Before appeared first on WIRED .
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

London, Paris, Seoul launch 'name-and-shame' polluting car indexThe mayors of Paris, London and Seoul on Wednesday launched an initiative to rate the most polluting vehicles in a bid to keep them off the roads of their cities.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Etihad to lend US-bound passengers iPads as ban workaroundOne Mideast airline affected by the ban on most electronics in the cabins of U.S.-bound flights will lend iPads to its top-paying travelers.
6h
New on MIT Technology Review

Google Brain Wants Creative AI to Help Humans Make a “New Kind of Art”The search giant’s AI research division has developed a deep-learning tool to produce music and art with humans in the loop.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Carnegie Mellon Power Sector Index tracks 24 percent decline in carbon emissionsYesterday during Carnegie Mellon Energy Week, Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems (MHPS) Americas President & CEO Paul Browning unveiled the initial results of a new Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) index measuring carbon dioxide emissions from the U.S. electrical power generation sector. The Carnegie Mellon Power Sector Carbon Index found that U.S. power producers had cut carbon dioxide emissions in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fellowship aims to protect threatened Australian night parrotsEnsuring one of Australia's most high-profile threatened bird species does not disappear a second time is the mission of a University of Queensland researcher.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Teacher encouragement has greatest influence on less advantaged childrenSchoolchildren who receive words of encouragement from a teacher are significantly more likely to continue their education beyond the age of 16 than those who do not, a new study suggests.
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Science : NPR

HPV Vaccine Could Protect More People With Fewer Doses, Doctors Insist In the U.S., there are about 39,000 cancers associated with the human papillomavirus each year. Doctors say the new HPV vaccine may help reduce the number of cases. (Image credit: Matthew Busch for The Washington Post/Getty Images)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Infant vitamin B1 deficiency leads to poor motor function and balanceA new Tel Aviv University study found that infantile vitamin B1 (thiamine) deficiency severely affected the motor function of preschoolers who were fed faulty formula in the first year of their lives. The conclusions were based on a retrospective study of children who received Remedia, an Israeli formula brand completely lacking in vitamin B1, in 2004.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

An LED-based device for imaging radiation induced skin damageA noninvasive imaging device tested at UC Irvine's Beckman Laser Institute may help predict skin damage effects from radiation treatment in breast cancer patients.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Apixaban superior to warfarin for reducing brain bleeds in patients with AFibPatients with atrial fibrillation showed a substantially reduced risk of dangerous bleeding in the brain, known as intracranial hemorrhage, when taking the newer anticoagulant apixaban compared to those taking warfarin. The study also showed that taking aspirin increased the risk of intracranial hemorrhage, especially in older patients.
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Gizmodo

Britain Releases Futuristic New Pound Coin Just in Time For Brexit Image: Royal Mint / Gizmodo The Royal Mint released 300 million new one pound coins into circulation on Tuesday. The money’s packed with cutting edge anti-counterfeiting measures, including one that British authorities won’t even talk about. Is it a coincidence that this happened the day before British Prime Minister Teresa May triggered the UK’s exit from the European Union ? Probably. The new b
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Gizmodo

How to Get the Windows 10 Creators Update Early Image: Microsoft You don’t have to wait around like a normal person for the Creators Update to drop—it’s available to download right now, if you’re a Windows Insider. The Windows Insider program lets you beta test advance versions of the OS for free, if you don’t mind the occasional bug, and here’s what you need to do to get enrolled. There are no specific requirements to be a Windows Insider and
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Reading between the lines of highly turbulent plasmasPlasma, the ionised state of matter found in stars, is still not fully understood, largely due to its instability. Astrophysicists have long-since sought to develop models that can account for the turbulent motions inside plasma, based on observing line shapes emitted by atoms and ions in the plasma. Turbulences are typically detected through the observation of broadened lines due to the Doppler e
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Gizmodo

Outfit Your Nintendo Switch (Plus Your Other USB-C Gear) With Today's Anker Discounts Nintendo Switch GlassGuard Screen Protector 2-Pack , $8 with code SWITCHGO | Anker PowerLine+ USB 3.0 to USB-C Cable , $10 with code SWITCH88 | Anker PowerLine+ USB-C to USB-C Cable , $10 with code SWITCH11 I’ve heard vague rumors of the existence of a new game console out there, which means it’s time for accessory makers to cash in. Check out the links and promo codes below for Anker PowerLine+
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Ars Technica

Google adds “order ahead” feature to Waze, letting you skip the morning coffee line Enlarge (credit: Dunkin' Donuts) Google wants to make your morning commute as easy as possible with a new feature in its navigation app Waze. The company added an "order ahead" feature to Waze and teamed up with Dunkin' Donuts to let users order coffee and breakfast from within the Waze app. Now you can place an order with Dunkin' Donuts on your way to work and pick it up immediately, skipping th
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The Atlantic

The Body Is Made Up of an Entire World In I Contain Multitudes , Atlantic writer Ed Yong synthesizes hundreds of papers to dispel the fear of microbes. Only a small amount of microbes have the ability to make us sick. The other hundreds of thousands of species live symbiotically within us. “We have been tilting at microbes for too long,” says Yong. “And created a world that is hostile to the ones we need.” Bill Gates sits down with Yo
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The Atlantic

Will Personalized Learning Become the New Normal? Over the last few years, Rhode Island has emerged as a national leader in the drive to put personalized-learning programs into actual classroom practice. Now education leaders in Providence, the state’s capital and most populous city, are looking to scale their early efforts statewide, pushing district leaders to think bigger about pilot programs and technological infrastructure, while also commi
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The Atlantic

Trolls Are Winning the Internet, Technologists Say I’m going to confess an occasional habit of mine, which is petty, and which I would still enthusiastically recommend to anyone who frequently encounters trolls, Twitter eggs, or other unpleasant characters online. Sometimes, instead of just ignoring a mean-spirited comment like I know I should , I type in the most cathartic response I can think of, take a screenshot, and then file that screenshot
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Gizmodo

Trump's Social Media Crony Claims Our Dear Leader Is Tweeting From an iPhone Image: AP Last week, we reported on some strange activity taking place on Donald Trump’s Twitter account. The tweets are as unhinged and angry as ever, but since March 8th, nearly every message has come from an iPhone , and not Trump’s woefully out of date and unsecured Android device . Given his love for his Android device, this was odd, but now, we finally have some clues. For more than a year,
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Ars Technica

Blue Origin teases more images of its New Shepard capsule Blue Origin Even as Blue Origin has talked up its ambitions to build a larger New Glenn rocket this year, the company also continues to finalize work on its suborbital space tourism vehicle, New Shepard. On Wednesday, Blue Origin founder Jeff Bezos released some illustrations of what the experience might look like from inside the capsule. The images show six leather, recumbent seats arranged arou
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Adults with migraines have triple the prevalence of generalized anxiety disorderGeneralized anxiety disorder is much more common among adults who have migraines than those without migraine (6 percent vs. 2 percent), according to a new study from researchers at the University of Toronto.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientific discovery opens new possibilities for cancer and fibrosis treatmentResearchers from the Turku Centre for Biotechnology (BTK) in Finland have discovered that a cellular fuel sensor, known to control energy processes in the cells, is involved in the regulation of the contact of cells with their surrounding environment. This unexpected link could help scientists better understand life-threatening diseases, such as cancer and tissue fibrosis.
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Popular Science

The 10 best science images, videos, and visualizations of the year Science These are the 2017 winners of the Vizzies Challenge. The winners of the science visualizations awards are in! Read on for a look at some incredible photography, illustrations, and infographics.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cold spray technology to repair surfaces of corroded aircraft partsFaster, market competitive and safer airplane repairs. That's the goal of a project by The University of Akron and Airborne Maintenance and Engineering Services in obtaining Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) approval for "cold spray" repair of corroded and worn parts on commercial aircraft.
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The Atlantic

​​​​​​​Benoît Hamon: France's Utopian Candidate? In January, Benoît Hamon, the far-left politician, beat out former Prime Minister Manuel Valls to lead the French Socialist Party’s ticket in next month’s presidential contest, but you wouldn’t know it by some of the party members’ endorsements. In the past few weeks, Socialist leaders like Jean-Yves Le Drian, the defense minister, and Thierry Braillard, the sports minister, have thrown their sup
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Gizmodo

Elephant Herd Rescued After Harrowing Ordeal in Mud Trap Image: WCS Late last week, 11 Asian elephants at Cambodia’s Keo Seima Wildlife Sanctuary ambled into a mud-filled bomb crater that dates back to the Vietnam War. Unable to get out, and with the mud quickly drying, the elephants’ situation become dire—prompting conservation officials to spring into action. As reported yesterday by the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), the hole’s 10-foot walls w
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Norwegian fjords captured by Proba-VSnow-dusted Norwegian fjords imaged by ESA's Earth-observing Proba-V minisatellite.
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Futurity.org

Fluffy foam may hide age of moon’s volcano While orbiting the Moon in 1971, the crew of Apollo 15 photographed a strange geological feature—a bumpy, D-shaped depression about two miles long and a mile wide—that has fascinated planetary scientists ever since. Some have suggested that the phenomenon, known as Ina, is evidence of a volcanic eruption on the moon within the past 100 million years—a billion years or so after most volcanic activ
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Windows update will bring 3-D, game tools and less clutterA major update to Microsoft's Windows 10 system will start reaching consumers and businesses on April 11, offering 3-D drawing tools, game-broadcasting capabilities and better ways to manage your web browsing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sex-shifting fish: Growth rate could determine sea lamprey sexUnlike most animals, sea lampreys, an invasive, parasitic species of fish damaging the Great Lakes, could become male or female depending on how quickly they grow, according to a U.S. Geological Survey study published today.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists predict reading ability from DNA aloneResearchers from King's College London have used a genetic scoring technique to predict reading performance throughout school years from DNA alone.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Global warming and coral bleaching in the Great Barrier ReefResearchers are using 3-D mapping techniques to capture the Great Barrier Reef in incredible detail in order to study the effects of global warming and the extent of coral bleaching.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Reliable molecular toggle switch developedNanotechnology constantly allows for new records in miniaturization. Reduction of the dimension of electronic components, however, has physical limits that will be reached soon. Novel materials and components are required. This is where molecular electronics comes in. Scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now succeeded in developing a molecular toggle switch that does not only
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vaginal estriol gel helps women recover after surgery for pelvic organ prolapsePelvic organ prolapse is estimated to affect up to one-half of all women, causing pain and interfering with sexual function. A new study demonstrates how an ultralow dose of vaginal estriol gel used before and after pelvic organ prolapse surgery can improve recovery time and results. The study outcomes are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NA
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Reading between the lines of highly turbulent plasmasPlasma, the ionised state of matter found in stars, is still not fully understood. Astrophysicists have long-since sought to develop models that can account for the turbulent motions inside plasma. Turbulences are typically detected through observation of broadened lines due to the Doppler Effect. In a study published in EPJ D, Roland Stamm and colleagues develop an iterative simulation model that
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Penn studies find promise for innovations in liquid biopsiesFrom using fluid in the lungs to better understand the potential of immunotherapy treatments in lung cancer, to tracking circulating tumor cells in prostate cancer, to conducting RNA sequencing of cancer cell clusters from the blood of pancreatic cancer patients, to finding new ways to biopsy tissue from patients who may have esophageal cancer, a series of studies from the Perelman School of Medic
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers control soft robots using magnetic fieldsEngineering researchers have made a fundamental advance in controlling so-called soft robots, using magnetic fields to remotely manipulate microparticle chains embedded in soft robotic devices. The researchers have already created several devices that make use of the new technique.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists discover new category of analgesic drugs that may treat neuropathic painNew research published online in The FASEB Journal suggests that a novel therapeutic target called LPCAT2 may prove effective against pain that is not receptive to the current treatments. This study has also revealed the existence of a platelet alleviating factor (PAF) pain loop, suggesting a possible role for PAF-receptor antagonists.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The last 'caimans' living in SpainSixteen million years ago, the reptile Diplocynodon ratelii lived in wooded ecosystems among the lakes and pools of what we know today as Catalonia (Spain). Fossils found at the Els Casots site in the Vallès-Penedès Basin confirm not only that these are the most recent remains of the genus in the Iberian Peninsula, but also that temperatures at the time were higher than today's.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Asthmatic schoolchildren are 'uncomfortable' using their inhalersPoor asthma control and knowledge are common in children with doctor-diagnosed asthma, according to research by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Organic-inorganic heterostructures with programmable electronic propertiesResearchers from the University of Strasbourg & CNRS (France), in collaboration with the University of Mons (Belgium), the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (Germany) and the Technische Universität Dresden (Germany), have devised a novel supramolecular strategy to introduce tunable 1D periodic potentials upon self-assembly of ad hoc organic building blocks on graphene, opening the way to t
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Teacher encouragement has greatest influence on less advantaged children'Big data' study finds that children from families with limited education have strongest long-term response to teacher encouragement, and are more likely to progress to university as a result.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A novel molecular link between cholesterol, inflammation and liver cancerHepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a deadly disease with no effective cure that develops in the context of liver diseases associated with chronic inflammation. New paper describes how important is the protein c-Fos for HCC development, because it affects cholesterol homeostasis in hepatocytes. Using genetically modified mouse models, researchers at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pharmacist care for Canadians with hypertension would save more than $15.7 billionA new study shows that comprehensive long-term pharmacist care for Canadians with hypertension, including patient education and prescribing, improves health outcomes and will save money for Canada's cash-strapped health care system. Projected cost savings would be more than $15.7 billion if full scope pharmacist care were administered to the full eligible population in Canada.
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Gizmodo

Saturn's Weirdest Moon Is Full of Electric Sand Image: NASA/JPL Saturn is the golden retriever of the solar system: It’s nice to look at and generally everyone’s favorite, including mine. While liking Saturn is admittedly a little basic, its 62 moons are anything but—it has a Death Star moon , a dumpling moon , and many other misfits. But its largest moon, Titan, might actually be the weirdest moon in the solar system. In addition to literal s
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Scientific American Content: Global

Should You Take Melatonin for Insomnia?Insomnia is a very common medical condition in today's high-stress world. Aside from prescription drugs, you may have been curious about over-the-counter melatonin supplements. But do they... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Poor outlook for biodiversity in AntarcticaThe popular view that Antarctica and the Southern Ocean are in a much better environmental shape than the rest of the world has been brought into question in a new study.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hair spacing keeps honeybees clean during pollinationA honeybee can carry up to 30 percent of its body weight in pollen because of the strategic spacing of its nearly three million hairs. The gap between each eye hair is approximately the same size as a grain of dandelion pollen, which is typically collected by bees. This keeps the pollen suspended above the eye and allows the forelegs to comb through and collect the particles.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cornering endangered speciesGeographic areas occupied by certain species shrink as they decline in abundance, leaving them more vulnerable to extinction by harvest, concludes new research.
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Ingeniøren

Trumps kulsorte dekret kan ikke stoppe vedvarende energiTirsdag underskrev præsident Trump et dekret, der skal bremse de klimakrav, Obama satte for kulkraftværker. Fra flere sider lyder det, at det næppe vil betyde mindre vedvarende energi i USA.
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cognitive science

Cultures like the Piraha don't have precise words to describe numbers. What would happen if our society lacked words for numbers...? submitted by /u/rohendricks [link] [comments]
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Popular Science

China's Marine Corps is getting bigger and stronger From Our Blogs: Eastern Arsenal A reorganization and expansion brings the program from 20,000 to 100,000 Marines. China's Marines are expanding in numbers, possibly soon to be armed with main battle tanks, heavy artillery and attack helicopters.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

An LED-based device for imaging radiation induced skin damageTo eradicate any cancer cells that may potentially remain after surgery or chemotherapy, many breast cancer patients also undergo radiation therapy. All patients experience unfortunate side effects including skin irritation, and sometimes peeling and blistering. Patients can also develop permanent discoloration of the skin and thickening of the breast tissue months, or even years, after treatment.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Continuous breathing metal-organic framework with guest selectivity(Phys.org)—Researchers from the University of Sheffield report a new continuous-breathing metal-organic framework (MOF), SHF-61, that has two different solvent-specific forms, a narrow-pore structure that is the result of DMF or H2O desolvation and a wide-pore structure that is the result of CHCl3 desolvation. The wide-pore form showed uptake of N2, CO2, and CH4 with selectivity for CO2. They were
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Measuring the impact of visitors, not just residents, on a city's crime rateWhen a city district is said to have a "high crime rate," it's often assumed the criminals are "insiders," people who live in the area. But what if the criminals are actually outsiders, people who live somewhere else?
7h
WIRED

Windows ‘Creator’s Update’ Has Come to Kill Your Apps Sure, there are some cool new features, but the big message is that Windows wants to do more things natively. The post Windows 'Creator's Update' Has Come to Kill Your Apps appeared first on WIRED .
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Female menstrual cycle in a dishA miniature female reproductive tract that fits in the palm of your hand has now been developed by researchers. It could eventually change the future of research and treatment of diseases in women’s reproductive organs.This new 3-D technology — called EVATAR — is made with human tissue and will enable scientists to conduct much-needed testing of new drugs for safety and effectiveness on the female
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A molecular on/off switch for CRISPRScientists now reveal how viruses disable bacterial immune systems. For many bacteria, one line of defense against viral infection is a sophisticated RNA-guided "immune system" called CRISPR-Cas. At the center of this system is a surveillance complex that recognizes viral DNA and triggers its destruction. However, viruses can strike back and disable this surveillance complex using "anti-CRISPR" pr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Reliable molecular toggle switch developedNanotechnology constantly allows for new records in miniaturization. Reduction of the dimension of electronic components, however, has physical limits that will be reached soon. Novel materials and components are required. This is where molecular electronics comes in. Scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now succeeded in developing a molecular toggle switch that does not only
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Quantum communication: How to outwit noiseQuantum information transfer requires reliable information transfer from one quantum system to the other, which is extremely difficult to achieve. Independently, two research teams have now developed a new quantum communication protocol. This protocol enables reliable quantum communication even under the presence of contaminating noise. Both research groups work with the same basic concept: To mak
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

LSTM reports on a new way of screening potential treatments for TBScientists from LSTM's Research Centre for Drugs and Diagnostics (RCDD) have described in a paper published today in Scientific Reports, a new way of screening potential treatments for Tuberculosis (TB) which may assist in the identification and prioritization of new therapies which could potentially reduce the duration of current TB treatment.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists predict reading ability from DNA aloneResearchers from King's College London have used a genetic scoring technique to predict reading performance throughout school years from DNA alone.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Best-looking politicians lean right, best-looking scholars lean leftIn politics, right-leaning politicians are in general physically more attractive, but in academia it is the other way around. A new study conducted at the Swedish School of Social Science at the University of Helsinki argues that right-leaning politicians are more highly rewarded for attractive looks than left-leaning politicians.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Poor outlook for biodiversity in Antarctica: Study findsAn international study led by Monash scientists has debunked the popular view that Antarctica and the Southern Ocean are in a much better environmental shape than the rest of the world.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Choosing a simpler path to drug discoveryResearchers from Kyoto University, MIT, and ETH Zurich have developed a compact drug discovery method using simple models and small data sets. Their findings appeared March 6 in the journal Future Medicinal Chemistry.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New smart system to reduce queues at roundaboutsLong queues at certain approaches to some roundabouts could be reduced using magnetic detection devices under the road surface, which would activate a traffic metering signal at another, less congested approach. Researchers at the Universitat Politecnica de Valencia (Spain) have released a guide for technicians to implement this intelligent traffic system, already used on roundabouts in Australia
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Inflammation awakens sleepersThe inflammatory response that is supposed to ward off pathogens that cause intestinal disease makes this even worse. This is because special viruses integrate their genome into Salmonella, which further strengthens the pathogen.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Japanese researchers make breakthrough in antioxidant enzyme linked to jaundiceA Japanese research team involving Osaka University investigated biliverdin reductase, the enzyme producing bilirubin -- a substance linked with jaundice -- from biliverdin (BV). Two BV molecules were found at the enzyme reaction site, in an unusual stacked arrangement. Mutation experiments confirmed which enzyme amino acid was necessary for bilirubin production. In the proposed mechanism, this am
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Heart failure and skilled nursing facilities: The importance of getting the factsFor many people diagnosed with heart failure -- which almost invariably results in a hospital stay -- the next stop is a skilled nursing facility. While their physician often will reassure them that it's just for a short time until they can get back to their home, in reality, that stay is long (averaging 144 days). And often they find themselves back in the hospital and back to a nursing facility
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sex-shifting fish: Growth rate could determine sea lamprey sexUnlike most animals, sea lampreys, an invasive, parasitic species of fish damaging the Great Lakes, could become male or female depending on how quickly they grow, according to a US Geological Survey study published today.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Night parrot rediscovery in WA raises questions for miningThe Night Parrot is unquestionably one of Australia's most enigmatic, elusive and enthralling species. The final frontier of Australian ornithology, this cryptic parrot eluded dedicated expeditions to find it for nearly half a century.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mechanism for hMTH1's broad substrate specificity revealedHuman MutT homolog 1 (hMTH1) protein acts as the primary enzyme for breaking down (hydrolyzing) damaged (oxidized) deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) the substrates of DNA synthesis. Recently, hMTH1 has drawn attention as a popular target for new anticancer therapies because it is non-essential for normal cells, but cancer cells require it to avoid incorporating oxidized nucleotides into DNA, w
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Viruses in the oceanic basementA team of scientists from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) showed for the first time that many novel viruses are present in the fluids circulating deep in the rocky crust of the seafloor known as the ocean basement. Their recently published study also provides evidence that the viruses are actively infecting the many unusual microorganisms
7h
Futurity.org

Watch: Honey bees clean pollen off their hairy eyes A new study looks at how honey bees manage to stay clean while pollinating plants. According to the study, a honey bee can carry up to 30 percent of its body weight in pollen because of the strategic spacing of its nearly three million hairs. The hairs cover the insect’s eyes and entire body in various densities that allow efficient cleaning and transport. The Georgia Tech researchers found that
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Gizmodo

The Plan to Bring a Little Bit of Venus Back to Earth Photo Illustration by Elena Scotti, photos via Wikimedia Commons Venus, arguably the most Earth-like world we know of, is an enigma. Despite decades of studying Venus from afar, and sending off probes to melt into metallic puddles on its surface, we still don’t understand why our nearest neighbor is a toxic hellscape. But scientists hope to change that, with a bold new mission that would bring a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Seasonal warming leads to smaller animal body sizesChanges in the body size of animals measured under controlled laboratory conditions have been shown to closely match changes in body size with seasonal warming in nature, according to research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Broad support exists for larger warnings on cigarette packsA new study has found broad support, even among smokers, for increasing the size of health warnings on cigarette packs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Legos and origami inspire next-generation materialsInspired by the fun of playing with Legos, an international team of researchers from Tianjin University of Technology and Harvard University have used the idea of assembling building-blocks to make the promise of next-generation materials a practical reality.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Creating waterproof concreteWater is concrete's ultimate enemy. Although concrete withstands constant beatings from cars and trucks, water can break it down, pooling on its surface and infiltrating the tiniest cracks. Add freezing and thawing cycles, and it's no wonder roads need frequent repairs.
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Viden

Faktatjek: Modsatrettede nyheder om CO2 er begge sandePå samme dag kunne man læse, at den globale CO2-udledning ikke længere er stigende, og at CO2-indholdet i atmosfæren stiger med rekordhast. Men faktisk er begge historier sande, fortæller Detektor.
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Gizmodo

Black Panther Confirms an Important Cast Member Get a look at some of the weird and wonderful aliens of Valerian . Once Upon a Time might be saying farewell to two major characters. Another familiar face could appear in Spider-Man: Homecoming . The cast of The Flash discusses the ramifications of last night’s episode. Plus, a new picture from Pacific Rim: Uprising . Spoilers Get! Black Panther At last night’s Disney CinemaCon panel, the full m
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Egypt's famed pyramids get new lab to restore pharaonic boatEgypt's famed pyramids at Giza have a newcomer in their midst: the largest on-site antiquities laboratory meant to restore the location's second pharaonic boat.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Birds hit by cars are, well, bird-brainedWhat's the difference between birds that get killed by cars, and those that don't?
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bacteria and phages: An endless cycles of evolutionWhat drives bacterial strain diversity in the gut? Although there are a number of possible explanations, a recent opinion piece addresses one potentially important and overlooked aspect of this unresolved question.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Skin-and-bones' mechanism underlying zebrafish fin regeneration discovered by researchersBiologists have figured out how zebrafish perfectly regenerate amputated fins with a precisely organized skeleton.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Astaxanthin compound found to switch on the FOX03 'Longevity Gene' in miceAn Astaxanthin compound has been found to switch on the FOX03 'Longevity Gene' in a study using mice. Researchers measured a nearly 90% increase in the activation of the gene in the animals' heart tissue. Life sciences company Cardax, Inc. looks forward to further confirmation in human clinical trials of Astanxanthin's potential role as an anti-aging therapy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google Translate app now unblocked in ChinaGoogle on Wednesday made available in China a new version of its translation app that is accessible without censor-evading software, a move likely to fuel speculation that the internet giant was mending fences with Beijing.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Imperial instrument ready to study the sunImperial's contribution to the Solar Orbiter mission, which will go closer to the sun than anything so far, is ready to fly after extensive testing.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers control soft robots using magnetic fieldsA team of engineering researchers has made a fundamental advance in controlling so-called soft robots, using magnetic fields to remotely manipulate microparticle chains embedded in soft robotic devices. The researchers have already created several devices that make use of the new technique.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cubic photometer makes light in a room visibleLight determines how we see the world. Take a golf ball: we can see the shine on it, make out the structure or even perceive it as a flat disk because in a certain light we cannot see any shadow. Knowledge of light and how we perceive it can help designers to make our life and work easier. Measurements made with a cubic photometer and software have now been used to make a systematic analysis of th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Programming human cells to follow sets of logical instructions(Phys.org)—A team of researchers at Boston University has developed a new way to engineer mammalian cells that allows for programming them to behave in desired ways. In their paper published in the journal Nature Biotechnology, the team describes their technique and where they believe such technology is heading.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How non-muscle cells find the strength to moveResearchers from the Mechanobiology Institute, Singapore (MBI) at the National University of Singapore have described, for the first time, the ordered arrangement of myosin-II filaments in actin cables of non-muscle cells. This work was published in Nature Cell Biology in January 2017.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genome editing in human cellsNew techniques in molecular biology that enable targeted interventions in the genome are opening up promising new possibilities for research and application. The ethical and legal ramifications of these methods, known as "genome editing" and "genome surgery," need to be discussed throughout society, particularly with regard to research on human cells. The German Embryo Protection Act prohibits res
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Organic–inorganic heterostructures with programmable electronic propertiesResearchers from the University of Strasbourg & CNRS (France), in collaboration with the University of Mons (Belgium), the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (Germany) and the Technische Universität Dresden (Germany), have devised a novel supramolecular strategy to introduce tunable 1D periodic potentials upon self-assembly of ad hoc organic building blocks on graphene, opening the way to t
7h
Ars Technica

Review: Windows 10 Creators Update is quite a small major update Enlarge / The announcement of the Creators Update in October 2016. The next big update to Windows 10 is nearly upon us: Windows 10 version 1703, known as the Creators Update, will be published to Windows Update next Patch Tuesday, on April 11th. The final build is—probably—15063. That build is already available to insiders and should soon become available for the Windows 10 Media Creation tool, b
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mechanism for hMTH1's broad substrate specificity revealedResearchers from Japan have revealed the mechanism that gives the hMTH1 protein broad substrate specificity, i.e., the ability to catalyze more than one substrate. The discovery could be used to improve current anticancer therapies.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Microscopic muscles: How non-muscle cells find the strength to moveResearchers from the Mechanobiology Institute, Singapore at the National University of Singapore have described, for the first time, the ordered arrangement of myosin-II filaments in actin cables of non-muscle cells.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Atomic 're-packing' behind metallic glass mysteryA new method uncovers a four-decade mystery about metallic glass that could allow researchers to fine-tune its properties to develop new materials.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Decorating single layer and bilayer graphene with useful chemical groupsIBS scientists develop a new platform to attach chemical groups on graphene lying on a silica/silicon substrate.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds 1 in 8 Calgary homes exceed Health Canada's acceptable radon levelRadon gas is a colorless, odorless radioactive gas that has been linked to lung cancer. University of Calgary, Cumming School of Medicine, researchers have proven it's prevalent throughout southern Alberta homes. Undertaking one of the largest Canadian municipal studies to date, Aaron Goodarzi, Ph.D., and his team tested radon levels in more than 2,300 Calgary and area homes. The results show that
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Viruses in the oceanic basementA team of scientists from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) showed for the first time that many novel viruses are present in the fluids circulating deep in the rocky crust of the seafloor known as the ocean basement. Their recently published study also provides evidence that the viruses are actively infecting the many unusual microorganisms
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wealth and knowledge drive bushmeat consumption during the West African Ebola crisisBushmeat, or wild animal meat, is an essential source of protein for many people in tropical regions. But handling and eating bushmeat carries the risk of contracting diseases, such as Ebola virus disease (EVD). During the latest and largest ever recorded Ebola crisis, household income and specific knowledge about the risks of eating bushmeat were linked to changes in its consumption, researchers
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Legos and origami inspire next-generation materialsInspired by the fun of playing with Legos, an international team of researchers from Tianjin University of Technology and Harvard University have used the idea of assembling building-blocks to make the promise of next-generation materials a practical reality.
7h
Gizmodo

Windows Creators Update Is Full of Neat Tricks You'll Never Use It’s official: Come April 11, the Windows 10 Creators Update will begin slowly rolling out to every Windows 10 machine on the planet—whether you want it on said machine or not. Microsoft is clearly fond of the ample changes it made when launching Windows 10 back in 2015 because two years after its initial release, the operating system is on its third major update, and Microsoft seems to have noth
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Interior positioning system for dynamic environmentsThere is no positioning technology, such as GPS, for the indoor area. This makes location at shipyards, for instance, very difficult. In ship building, the environment changes constantly as a result of the construction process. Moreover, the metallic environment inhibits wireless communication that is required for location. Now, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), in cooperation with Meyer We
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

TimepixCam pulls together diverse technologies to capture ions and photons for biology, chemistry and moreAndrei Nomerotski joined the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory to build a three-gigapixel camera for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), a massive instrument that will be installed in the mountains of Chile to capture the deepest and widest snapshots of the cosmos to date. The LSST is Nomerotski's main focus, yet he manages to find time to run a side project at Bro
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How to outwit noise in quantum communicationHow to reliably transfer quantum information when the connecting channels are impacted by detrimental noise? Scientists at the University of Innsbruck and TU Wien (Vienna) have presented new solutions to this problem.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nanomaterial makes laser light more applicableLight is absorbed differently, depending on the material it shines on. An international research team including material scientists from Kiel University has created a complex hybrid material with the ability to absorb light with a unique broad range of wavelengths. In addition to that it scatters light which makes it really interesting for industrial applications. That could mean an important step
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers make breakthrough in antioxidant enzyme linked to jaundiceA Japanese research team involving Osaka University investigated biliverdin reductase, the enzyme producing bilirubin – a substance linked with jaundice – from biliverdin (BV). Two BV molecules were found at the enzyme reaction site, in an unusual stacked arrangement. Mutation experiments confirmed which enzyme amino acid was necessary for bilirubin production. In the proposed mechanism, this amin
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New approach improves potential HIV vaccineBy engineering an on/off switch into a weakened form of HIV, University of Nebraska-Lincoln researchers have enhanced the safety and effectiveness of a potential vaccine for the virus that has killed approximately 35 million people during the past 35 years.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers examine how supporting pollinators helps agricultureWhen agriculture helps pollinators, pollinators help agriculture, according to a research review published today by an international group of experts, including a University of Idaho researcher.
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New on MIT Technology Review

The Download, Mar 29, 2017: Trump’s Climate Rollback, AI’s Promise and Pain, and Reversing ParalysisThe most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Music therapy reduces pain in spine surgery patientsMusic therapy has been found to decrease pain in patients recovering from spine surgery, compared to a control group of patients who received standard postoperative care alone.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Poor outlook for biodiversity in AntarcticaThe popular view that Antarctica and the Southern Ocean are in a much better environmental shape than the rest of the world has been brought into question in a study publishing on March 28 in the open access journal PLOS Biology, by an international team lead by Steven L. Chown and Monash University scientists.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What motivates moral outrage?When 109 travelers entering the United States were detained by an executive order blocking citizens from seven Muslim majority countries, tens of thousands of Americans gathered all over the country to voice their anger. The policy had little to no direct effect on the protesters themselves.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Testing the performance of semiconductors—with lightSemiconductors are the cornerstone of modern electronics. They're used in solar cells, light emitting diodes (LEDs), microprocessors in laptops and cell phones, and more. Most of them are made of silicon, but silicon has its limitations. So for decades researchers have been exploring new materials with properties that make them good candidates for better, lighter, and cheaper energy-efficient lamp
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Decorating single layer and bilayer graphene with useful chemical groupsResearchers at the Center for Multidimensional Carbon Materials, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) at Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology disclosed a new method to add chemical groups on (that is, to "functionalize") single layer (SLG) and bilayer (BLG) graphene lying on silica/silicon. This study, recently published online in the Journal of the American Chemical Society
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Gizmodo

Amazon Wants You To Get Outdoors With This Merrell Shoe Sale Up to 40% Off Merrell Shoes Stock up on all the footwear you could need to get outside for spring from Amazon’s one-day Merrell shoe sale. Take up to 40% off shoes for many different occasions, like hiking, running, or trekking from one of the most popular outdoor brands. You’ll probably need to think of more excuses to leave work and get the heck outside.
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Gizmodo

North Korean Defector Describes the Shock of Adjusting to a Society With Advanced Technology The “internet room” at Pyongyang’s international airport in 2015, which at the time reportedly didn’t have access to the internet (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara) The Wall Street Journal has a fascinating new video about the struggles that many North Koreans go through when they defect to the South. Many of the hurdles are technological. As just one example, when North Koreans first encounter ATMs they
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The seven deadly sins of statistical misinterpretation, and how to avoid themStatistics is a useful tool for understanding the patterns in the world around us. But our intuition often lets us down when it comes to interpreting those patterns. In this series we look at some of the common mistakes we make and how to avoid them when thinking about statistics, probability and risk.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cats found to like humans more than thought(Phys.org)—A trio of researchers with Oregon State University and Monmouth University has conducted experiments with cats, and has found that they appear to like humans more than expected. In their paper published in the journal Behavioral Processes, Kristyn Vitale Shreve, Lindsay Mehrkam and Monique Udell describe their experiments and their plans for conducting additional experiments to better u
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Thousands of images of frozen bacteriaHow do bacteria sense and adapt to their environment? Ariane Briegel, Professor of Ultrastructural Biology, is intrigued by this question. Using new techniques, she produces three-dimensional images of bacteria that provide us with new clues about their sensory system.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

E-gloves to protect workers from dangerous vibration levelsGloves embedded with tiny sensors are being developed by Nottingham Trent University to help protect construction workers from exposure to vibration.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Secrecy obligation for the digital piggy bank"Do you collect bonus points?" This question is part of daily purchasing routine. More than 80% of German households participate in bonus programs. They run the risk of disclosing sensitive information about themselves, if such a system is misused. For this reason, the Cryptography and Security Group of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) develops a digital bonus and payment system that protec
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Double DoseScientists engineered the Artemisia annua plant to produce twice the normal amount of artemisinin, the main component in many malaria treatments.
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Live Science

What Motivates Moral Outrage?A lot of moral outrage has been expressed lately – over Trump's travel ban and other issues. The expression of such outrage is more than a response to perceived injustice.
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The Scientist RSS

Mini Female Reproductive System on a ChipScientists create an organ-on-a-chip system that can simulate the human menstrual cycle.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists establish the first semen collection from saltwater crocodiles in MalaysiaSaltwater crocodiles are not endangered, but their natural range has been greatly reduced. Formerly dominant in estuaries throughout South-East Asia, they now roam wildly in only a handful of countries. Habitat loss and deadly conflict with humans threaten the crocodiles' future in this fast-developing region.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Focusing on grains, researchers solve a mystery of rivers' flowTaking a simpler approach to a complex problem, Yale researchers have an answer for why large grains move more easily than smaller ones when driven by fluid flow along a riverbed—a question that has confounded scientists for decades.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Motherhood is full of challenges—even for bird supermomsMotherhood is full of challenges. Mums need to look after not only themselves but also their offspring: mothers make sure the young have good food, healthy and develop well, and they need to shelter the young from harsh environment, nasty neighbours and hungry predators. In addition, mums need to keep a watchful eye on their partners: as an eminent neurobiologist puts it, from the mother's point o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Measuring the subjective wellbeing of children in careThere are around 70,000 children and young people in care in England, mainly because of abuse and neglect. The impact of maltreatment can be long lasting and the quality of substitute care the child receives has a significant impact on their developmental recovery. Whilst some young people will have a positive experience during their time in care and will go on to flourish as adults, there are als
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists highlight Antarctic ice upheaval in response to prehistoric climate changeA team of scientists led by the University of Southampton has found that the Antarctic ice cap underwent dramatic cycles of expansion and melt-back millions of years ago when carbon dioxide levels were similar to those experienced today.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

How giant marine reptiles terrorized the ancient seas Ichthyosaurs were some of the largest and most mysterious predators to ever prowl the oceans. Now they are giving up their secrets. Nature 543 603 doi: 10.1038/543603a
8h
Scientific American Content: Global

Life Bounced Back Fast after Dino-Killing ImpactA new study finds organisms only took 30,000 years to repopulate a region devastated by the impact -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
The Atlantic

How the U.S. Protects the Environment, From Nixon to Trump A little less than 50 years ago, President Richard Nixon united with a Democratic Congress to pass laws that altered the everyday experience of almost everyone living in the United States. These laws arose from a flurry of legislating—nearly all emerged in the same two-year period—and they had astonishingly large goals. They sought to restrict toxic air pollution nationwide, clean up hundreds of
8h
The Atlantic

Are Skinny Jeans Going to Kill Me? Recently I was sitting next to my friend Arianna in a coffee shop when I noticed her pulling at the side seams of her jeans, looking worried. I asked her what was going on. “Have you ever worried that your jeans are going to give you blood clots?” she asked. Surprisingly, of the many dubious health concerns I have considered in my lifetime, that wasn’t one of them. “It just seems like maybe we sh
8h
The Atlantic

Is President Trump Above the Law? In the mid-1990s, President Bill Clinton made a bold legal claim: He couldn’t be subjected to civil lawsuits for his actions as a private citizen until after his presidency ended. As you can imagine, that assertion raised eyebrows across the legal community. Among its critics was George Conway, a prominent New York City lawyer, who wrote in a 1994 Los Angeles Times op-ed that the claim “smacks of
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Taking a drive to Venus? Physicist does the mathIn November of 2005, the satellite Venus Express at a speed of about 18,000 miles per hour made the trip to the second planet from the sun in about 155 days.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rescue of 11 Asian elephants in CambodiaThe rescue of 11 Asian Elephants (Elephas maximus) from a mud hole inside the Keo Seima Wildlife Sanctuary, Mondulkiri Province, Cambodia, on 24th March 2017 avoided a tragedy for wildlife conservation in Cambodia.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New report shines light on installed costs and deployment barriers for residential solar PV with energy storageResearchers from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are making available the most detailed component and system-level cost breakdowns to date for residential photovoltaic (PV) solar systems equipped with energy storage-and quantifying previously unknown soft costs for the first time.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New, viable female politicians become role models for women, study findsAfter Hillary Clinton became the presumptive Democratic nominee for president in June 2016—the first woman in American history nominated for president by a major political party—she tweeted a picture of her dancing with a young girl. The caption read, "To every little girl who dreams big: Yes, you can be anything you want—even president. Tonight is for you."
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microalgae could play key role in relieving climate warmingThink better living through marine microalgae, as it may become crucial to mitigate atmospheric greenhouse gases, reduce carbon dioxide emissions from commercial agriculture and steady the global climate, according to Cornell-led research published in the March issue of Earth's Future, a journal of the American Geophysical Union.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New flu test easy as breathing, with faster resultsA method for diagnosing flu virus from breath samples could soon replace invasive nasal swabs and deliver better results faster.
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Ingeniøren

Forskere vil bygge menneske-hjerter af spinatForskere fra Worcester Polytechnic Institute har fundet ud af, at spinatblade egner sig særdeles godt til konstruktion af hjertevæv. De mangler dog endnu at teste, om det er sikkert at implementere i mennesker.
8h
Ars Technica

How teachers see the classroom redefined by the cloud Enlarge / Education Images/UIG via Getty Images. (credit: Getty Images) The Library of Alexandria was one of the most important libraries of the ancient world. Its vast number of scrolls, collections of works, lecture halls, and meeting rooms were a boon to education. In many ways, the cloud has the potential to have just as revolutionary an effect as the Library of Alexandria—it can liberate edu
8h
Scientific American Content: Global

The Pros and Cons of Being Self-AwareWe value the quality in others—but we don't always like how it reflects on us -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Videnskabens Verden

Det ser ud til, at regnormenes liv bliver påvirket af biogødning, der er slam fra rensningsanlæggene. Slammet indeholder nemlig mikroplastik. Lektor i miljøbiologi Annemette Palmqvist fortæller, hvordan hun undersøger slammet og forsker i påvirkningen af miljøet. Vært og tilrettelægger: Dorthe Chakravarty. www.dr.dk/p1/videnskabensverden
8h
The Scientist RSS

SCOPUS Dumps OMICS JournalsA database of scientific journal titles has removed several OMICS titles for “publication concerns.”
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New Zealanders' beliefs in climate change increasingNew research from Victoria University of Wellington and the University of Auckland has found New Zealanders' beliefs in climate change and that humans are causing it are increasing over time.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Where states rank on water rights transfersA new report from Stanford's Water in the West program assesses progress among states in the Colorado River Basin with respect to environmental water rights transfers, a legal tool that enables water rights holders to voluntarily transfer their water to rivers, streams and wetlands to benefit the environment and potentially generate revenue.
8h
Gizmodo

Kid Makes A Cardboard Nintendo Switch Because Mom Won't Buy The Console [Image: Ama-chan ] Gotta love the creativity of kids! Twitter user Ama-chan ’s kid brother made this cardboard Nintendo Switch because their mother wouldn’t buy the real deal. According to Ama-chan, her little brother is in fifth grade and dreams of making video games in the future. If that doesn’t work out, he can always design hardware, cardboard or not! Kotaku East is your slice of Asian inter
9h
Live Science

Rugged Antarctica Shows Its Ice in New 3D MapA new map puts Antarctica into three-dimensional perspective with an aerial view of the continent's ice, created from 250 million satellite measurements.
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Science | The Guardian

It's a riot: the stressful AI simulation built to understand your emotions Inspired by global unrest, Riot uses artificial intelligence, film and gaming technologies to help unpick how people react in stressful situations An immersive film project is attempting to understand how people react in stressful situations by using artificial intelligence (AI), film and gaming technologies to place participants inside a simulated riot and then detecting their emotions in real t
9h
The Atlantic

Gazing Into the Abyss The landscape appeared more Martian than terrestrial—barren for the most part, with a reddish hue, and dotted with salt-splashed mountain ridges. We passed a few wild donkeys among the desert shrubs and a field of cacti along the way . Ahead of the final ascent by bus, we heard dire warnings about the risks associated with altitude sickness, ultraviolet exposure, and dehydration. A paramedic chec
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A hotter climate may catch up to PhoenixPhoenix changed in a matter of decades from a scorching desert outpost into one of the largest cities in the nation. The Arizona city is a horizon of asphalt, air conditioning and historic indifference to the pitfalls of putting 1.5 million people in a place that gets just 8 inches of rain a year and where the temperature routinely exceeds 100 degrees.
9h
WIRED

Some Other Scientific Theories the GOP Should Debate Imagine if the House Science Committee held other branches of science to account like they did climate science. The post Some Other Scientific Theories the GOP Should Debate appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

A Plan to Save Blockchain Democracy From Bitcoin’s Civil War As a civil war over the future of bitcoin simmers, a new kind of blockchain offers a more peaceful way to bring democratic rule to cryptocurrency. The post A Plan to Save Blockchain Democracy From Bitcoin's Civil War appeared first on WIRED .
9h
Live Science

Record-Breaker! Heftiest and Purest 'Failed Star' IdentifiedAn ancient brown dwarf about 750 light-years from Earth is the most massive and purest such "failed star" ever discovered, a new study suggests.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

Transcending the BrainAt least some cases of physical damage are associated with enriched consciousness or cognitive skill -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Dagens Medicin

519 nordjyder fik undersøgt kræft­mistanke for sent Over en periode på tre år er flere end 500 kvinder ikke blevet undersøgt for mistanke om brystkræft inden for fastsatte tidsfrister. »Det er bare ikke godt nok,« lyder det fra Kræftens Bekæmpelse.
9h
Live Science

Reshaping the Universe: VR Landscapes Explore Mind-Bending GeometryIn this wonky, non-Euclidean universe, the floor can fall away from your feet as you walk forward and distances aren't what they seem.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

Japanese Man Is First to Receive "Reprogrammed" Stem Cells from Another PersonWorld-first transplant to treat macular degeneration could augur rise of iPS cell banks -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
The Atlantic

Today's News: March 29, 2017 —The U.K. government has invoked Article 50 of the EU charter, triggering the mechanism by which it can begin formal talks on its separation from the European Union. More here —Iraqi troops, backed by U.S. and allied forces, are trying to wrest Mosul back from ISIS. —The Nobel Academy says Bob Dylan, who skipped the award ceremony in December, will pick up his prize this weekend. More here —We’re
9h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Cyclone Debbie: Experts fear damage to Great Barrier ReefThe Australian state of Queensland is assessing the extent of the damage caused by the major storm.
9h
Ars Technica

Video games may protect mental health and avert trauma, addiction Enlarge (credit: Getty | Radachynskyi) Video games often blamed for rotting minds may actually protect them, according to a series of studies. Researchers report that Tetris —a classic game that takes hold of spatial and visual systems in the brain as players align irregular polygons—seems to jumble the mind’s ability to process and store fresh traumatic memories. Those improperly preserved memor
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers program RNA nanoparticles that could protect against ZikaUsing a new strategy that can rapidly generate customized RNA vaccines, MIT researchers have devised a new vaccine candidate for the Zika virus.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

Ringo Is a Beatle, Hawaii Is a State--Why Isn't Pluto a Planet?After more than a decade of controversy, the debate over the icy world’s demotion to “dwarf planet” status shows no sign of stopping -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Radiocarbon study provides insight into soil carbon dynamics and effects of agricultureANSTO has contributed to research that indicated agriculture affects the organic carbon storage in subsoil up to one metre and challenged the concept that subsoil is a stable repository of organic carbon.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study investigates the passage of knotted DNA through nanoporesAnyone who has been on a sail boat knows that tying a knot is the best way to secure a rope to a hook and prevent slippage. Similarly, knots in sewing threads prevent them slipping through two pieces of fabric. How, then, can long DNA filaments, which have convoluted and highly knotted structure, manage to pass through the tiny pores of various biological systems? This is the fascinating question
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flexible electronic devices with roll-to-roll overmolding technologyVTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has, for the first time, performed all manufacturing stages for a flexible in-moulded LED foil with a roll-to-roll process. The purpose of this demo is to prove the suitability of the technique for the highly cost-effective manufacture of products such as flexible LED displays containing printed electronics.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Poor outlook for Antarctic biodiversityAn international study involving scientists from British Antarctic Survey (BAS) has debunked the popular view that Antarctica and the Southern Ocean are in a much better environmental shape than the rest of the world.
10h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Battle between quantum and thermodynamic laws heats up Physicists try to rebuild the laws of heat and energy for processes at a quantum scale. Nature 543 597 doi: 10.1038/543597a
10h
Ingeniøren

Amerikansk kongres omstøder privacy-regler: Lader internetudbydere sælge browserdata Nye privacy-regler var uretfærdige overfor internetselskaber, forklarer Det Hvide Hus. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/amerikansk-kongres-omstoeder-privacy-regler-lader-isper-saelge-browserdata-uden-samtykke Version2
10h
Ingeniøren

Blyholdig benzin har skadet New Zealands børns fremtid – USA kigger bekymret medEn befolkningsundersøgelse i New Zealand med over 500 deltagere gennem næsten 40 år viser, at blyudledningen fra bilers udstødning har ført til tab af intelligens og dermed dårligere levevilkår.
10h
Ingeniøren

Gå-på-mod gav job lynhurtigt efter eksamen Casper Christoffersen, der blev uddannet bygningsingeniør 10. januar, stod midt i februar med to jobtilbud på hånden. Han kontaktede en i Føtex iklædt tøj fra et entreprenørfirma – og ringede til et firma efter at have set en artikel i Licitationen https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/gaa-paa-mod-gav-job-lynhurtigt-efter-eksamen-7259 Jobfinder
10h
Ingeniøren

God samtalelyd breder sig: Endnu et mobilselskab indfører opkald via 4GMobilselskabet 3 lader nu kunder tale over 4G-netværket, så de ligesom Telenor-kunder kan få bedre lyd og hurtigere opkald.
10h
Ars Technica

IRS loses lawsuit in attempt to get Amazon to pay $1.5B in back taxes (credit: Getty Images) Amazon has successfully emerged from a lawsuit brought by the Internal Revenue Service, saving the company from a huge potential tax bill . A federal tax court judge ruled last week that the agency’s determination that Amazon’s re-assessed tax liability for 2005 and 2006 of $1.5 billion plus interest was "arbitrary, capricious, and unreasonable." Had Amazon lost, it would h
10h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Elephants in dramatic muddy escapeEleven Asian elephants manage to drag themselves clear of a muddy hole in Cambodia.
10h
The Atlantic

The Boss Baby Missed the Memo In his 1927 book Understanding Human Nature , the psychotherapist Alfred Adler argued that children’s birth order—their status in their families as a first child, or middle, or youngest—influences, in ways both varied and predictable, the personalities they go on to develop later in life. It’s a notion that, today, is controversial . The controversy has done very little, however, to prevent birth
10h
Viden

Polarhavets dyreliv blomstrer i takt med, at havisen forsvinderHvert år smelter stadig mere havis på grund af klimaforandringer. Det truer dyrelivet på land, men kan give mere liv i havene, ifølge danske forskere.
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Science | The Guardian

Catnip to cat lovers everywhere: your fluffy friend loves you right back | Fay Schopen Research has shown that cats love human company above all else. That may be news to some – but not to me and my loyal, sociable sidekick In very important news: cats are nice . Yes, that’s right – forget about Legs-it ; purge your mind of Trump’s climate change idiocy (if only) and don’t worry about the axing of your gluten-free bread prescription . Just turn to your nearest source of feline fluf
10h
Ingeniøren

Lidar-sensorer på nippet til endeligt gennembrudSensorer, som bruger laserlys til at måle afstand, kan revolutionere alt fra selvkørende biler til luftbårne laserscanninger. Lidar-teknologien vil inden for de næste par år skrumpe voldsomt i både pris, størrelse og vokse i udbredelse.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Toshiba says Westinghouse files for bankruptcy protectionJapan's embattled Toshiba Corp. said Wednesday that its U.S. nuclear unit Westinghouse Electric Co. has filed for bankruptcy protection, marking a key step in its struggles to stop the flow of massive red ink.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hope for elephants as ivory prices fall: conservation groupThe price of ivory has fallen by nearly two-thirds in the last three years, according to research conducted in China and published on Wednesday by the conservation group Save the Elephants.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cities throw shade at rising heatRudy Lane is a two-lane road that curves through the leafy suburb of Windy Hills east of Louisville, Ky. Broadway is a main drag downtown where the federal and state courthouses bump up against the 1920s-era Brown Hotel.
11h
WIRED

This Delivery Robot Isn’t Just Charming. It’s Stuffed With Pizza Starship Technologies' cooler-sized robot starts slinging the 'za. The post This Delivery Robot Isn’t Just Charming. It’s Stuffed With Pizza appeared first on WIRED .
11h
Dagens Medicin

Udbydere af efter­uddannelser til praksis­læger kan ikke følge med Praktiserende læger skal have tre dages systematisk efteruddannelse om året. Men kursusudbyderne kan langt fra følge med den store efterspørgsel, og tænker derfor nu i alternative baner for at nå målet om efteruddannelse til alle.
11h
Dagens Medicin

Liberal Alliance vil holde ikke-vaccinerede børn væk fra institutioner Liberal Alliance vil undersøge, om forældre kan få frataget retten til at sende deres børn i en offentlig institution, hvis de ikke vaccinerer deres børn.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

With first atlas update in 30 years, clouds getting a whole new lookMore than a cloud formation, what Jane Wiggins saw above the prosaic skyline of her central Iowa town looked like a foreboding, storm-incited sea at war with itself.
11h
The Atlantic

The Day Bill O'Reilly Apologized Tuesday was not a good day for America’s hard-charging white men. Fox News host Bill O’Reilly began his day on the set of Fox & Friends, where he was asked about remarks that Representative Maxine Waters made Monday evening on the floor of Congress about Trump supporters and patriotism. Instead of responding to Waters’s comments, O’Reilly opted to focus on something else. “I didn’t hear a word sh
11h
Viden

DTU-forsker: Sommeren kan blive katastrofal for ArktisHavisen i Arktis er skrumpet med 10 procent i forhold til sidste år. Og det kan betyde, at endnu større mængder smelter henover sommeren.
11h
Science : NPR

Measuring The Impact Of Rolling Back Environmental Regulations President Trump's environmental order proposes rolling back regulations. David Greene speaks with John Larsen of the Rhodium Group about the impact those rollbacks could have on emissions levels.
11h
Science : NPR

Passengers Take Flight To View Southern Lights The Aurora Australis is a display of neon green lights that dance across the southern skies. A plane took off from New Zealand to get a special view.
11h
Science : NPR

Scientists Who Want To Study Climate Engineering Shun Trump The controversial study of climate engineering — aka deliberately messing with Earth's temperature — was finally starting to regain a measure of respectability. And then came President Trump. (Image credit: Pixza/Getty Images)
11h
New on MIT Technology Review

Qualcomm Wants Your Smartphone to Have Energy-Efficient EyesThis power-sipping image sensor uses computer vision to help you unlock your phone.
11h
Dagens Medicin

Styrelse varsler første tilsynsbesøg i praksis i denne uge Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed offentliggjort de konkrete målepunkter for den nye tilsynsordning i almen praksis. De første praktiserende læger vil derfor blive varslet om tilsynsbesøg i ugens løb.
11h
Dagens Medicin

Aalborg får ny professor i almen medicin Jette Kolding Kristensen er tiltrådt som klinisk professor inden for almen medicin ved Klinisk Institut, Aalborg Universitet og Aalborg Universitetshospital.
11h
The Atlantic

A Victory for the Eighth Amendment The major news out of Moore v. Texas , the Supreme Court’s death-penalty decision announced Tuesday, is that all eight of the current justices rejected a crude list of “factors” the Texas courts had evolved to tell when a criminal defendant can be executed despite evidence that he or she is intellectually disabled. (“Intellectual disability,” or “ID,” is the condition courts until recently called
11h
The Atlantic

A Victory for the Eighth Amendment The major news out of Moore v. Texas , the Supreme Court’s death-penalty decision announced Tuesday, is that all eight of the current justices rejected a crude list of “factors” the Texas courts had evolved to tell when a criminal defendant can be executed despite evidence that he or she is intellectually disabled. (“Intellectual disability,” or “ID,” is the condition courts until recently called
11h
The Atlantic

The States Where Obamacare's Footprint Might Get Even Bigger Now that the Affordable Care Act has survived its most serious threat in Congress, the law’s footprint across the country might grow even larger in the months ahead. Several states that initially opted out of Obamacare’s Medicaid expansion are now reconsidering their decision as a result of last year’s elections and as Republicans come under new pressure to accept the billions in federal dollars
11h
Ingeniøren

Forsker: Fascination over iPads i skolen minder om plastikbegejstringen i 70'erne Ph.d.-studerende forholder sig på sitet erhvervsfilosofi kritisk til hypen med iPads til skolelever: Det vil skabe mennesker, som tror de kan noget særligt digitalt, men i stedet kommer med overfladiske standardløsninger. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/forsker-vores-fascination-ipads-folkeskoleelever-mindre-1074962 Version2
12h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Brexit must preserve advisory networks Policymakers in charge of the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union have a duty to maintain benefits of collaboration, says James Wilsdon. Nature 543 591 doi: 10.1038/543591a
12h
Science : NPR

A New Kind Of March Madness Hits Schools It's March Mammal Madness, a bracket with real animals facing off in fictional battles. Hundreds of science classes are playing in schools around the country. (Image credit: Adam Cole/NPR)
12h
Dagens Medicin

Ny rapport: Skizofrene får mindre behandling end tidligereIndlæggelsesdagene bliver færre og færre for patienter med skizofreni, men antallet af ambulante besøg stiger ikke tilsvarende. Det betyder, at skizofrene får mindre behandling end tidligere. Det viser en ny rapport foretaget af KL Momentum.
12h
The Atlantic

The Fundamental Dishonesty of the Gorsuch Hearings Soon after his nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court, Judge Neil Gorsuch confided to a number of senators that President Trump’s attacks on federal judges are “disheartening and demoralizing.” Is there a better description of the Gorsuch nomination itself, and the fundamentally dishonest process by which it is slouching toward confirmation? Last week’s hearings, featuring two days of testimony by
12h
Ingeniøren

Hemmeligholdt Sovjet-rapport blotlægger atomkatastrofe større end TjernobylEn netop offentliggjort rapport fra det tidligere Sovjet viser, at atomprøvesprængninger i det østlige Kazakhstan havde vidtrækkende konsekvenser. Et enkeltstående tilfælde i 1956 var over fire gange så katastrofalt som ulykken i Tjernobyl.
12h
Ars Technica

Man who claims he invented e-mail is now running for US Senate Enlarge (credit: Boston Globe / Getty Images News) Shiva Ayyadurai, the Massachusetts man who for years has made a widely disputed claim that he invented e-mail, has formally declared his intention to run as a candidate for the United States Senate in 2018. The Federal Elections Commission only recently published Ayyadurai's statement of candidacy online. It has a filing date of March 17. The Bos
12h
Dagens Medicin

Hver fjerde kommune har aftale om plejehjems­lægerKommunerne er i fuld gang med at indgå aftaler om at tilknytte praktiserende læger til de enkelte plejehjem. Indtil videre har ca. hver fjerde kommune aftaler i hus.
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Dagens Medicin

Flere konsultationer kræver øget ind­dragelse af andet personale Nye tal fra PLO viser en stigning i konsultationer i almen praksis, selvom antallet af læger falder. Det kræver en større inddragelse af andre personalegrupper, mener PLO-formand.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What the death of broadband privacy rules meansNow that both houses of Congress have voted to block Obama-era broadband privacy rules , what does that mean for you?
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

California prepares for war with Trump over environmentCalifornia, one of the most progressive in the US on climate issues, is heading toward a legal showdown with the Trump administration over its environmental policies.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Products can be pals when you're lonely, but it may cost you, study findsThe Liberty Mutual commercial mentions naming your car Brad and considering him part of your family.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Adding grads and going green can brighten economic outlookAttracting college graduates and boosting natural amenities may give communities a double shot of economic growth potential, according to economists.
13h
WIRED

You’ve Never Seen a Bluetooth Speaker Cuter Than the UE Wonderboom Ultimate Ears has a new smaller Boom speaker that ticks many of the same boxes as its larger cousin, but costs half as much. The post You've Never Seen a Bluetooth Speaker Cuter Than the UE Wonderboom appeared first on WIRED .
13h
Science | The Guardian

Are you sitting comfortably? Then we'll begin the evolutionary 'fairytale' of coral Science storytelling could be the way forward for science communication, so for your edification here’s the story of the Three Little Corals ... Science and storytelling don’t seem like obvious bedfellows but recently there’s been a serious vein of science communication research that suggests a strong narrative can help with dissemination , understanding by nonexperts and number one for most publ
13h
Gizmodo

The Wonderboom Is a Great Little $100 Bluetooth Speaker With a Familiar Face All images: Adam Clark Estes It’s hard to have long-lasting fun for $100 these days. A fancy dinner is over in a couple of hours. A ticket to Disney World expires not long after sunset. But the Wonderboom, a new waterproof speaker from Ultimate Ears , feels like it could last forever. The Wonderboom is the latest in a celebrated line of Bluetooth speakers from UE, the audio brand acquired a few y
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Iranians, engines of US university research, wait in limboHundreds of Iranian students already accepted into U.S. graduate programs may not be able to come next fall because of the uncertainty surrounding President Donald Trump's proposed travel ban, potentially derailing research projects and leaving some science programs scrambling to find new students.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trump moves on climate, no word yet on Paris accordPresident Donald Trump took action on Tuesday to curb rules that underpin American emissions targets, making it clear climate change was not a priority, but said nothing about the 2015 Paris accord.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How Cyclone Debbie got her nameThe huge storm that tore through parts of northeastern Australia this week was almost called Caleb instead of Debbie. The next one will be named Ernie.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US lawmakers roll back privacy rules for internet carriersUS lawmakers voted Tuesday to roll back rules that would block internet service providers from selling user data to third parties, following a heated debate over privacy protections.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

On Siberia native land, oil doesn't take 'no' for an answerThe Sopochin family has seen oil majors gradually encroach on the land in Siberia where they have herded reindeer for generations, but the latest project has made them draw the line.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Japan scientist eyes energy burst from 'typhoon turbine'Most people look for a place to hide when a typhoon is on the horizon, but Atsushi Shimizu hopes that the fury of nature may one day help resource-poor Japan tackle its energy woes.
14h
Science | The Guardian

The first woman in space: 'People shouldn’t waste money on wars' In 1963 Valentina Tereshkova became the first woman to go into space. On her 80th birthday, she looks back at a lifetime of immense political change Parachuting was her first love. The moment she could, Valentina Tereshkova joined the renowned paramilitary flying club in her native Yaroslavl (without telling her mother) and trained almost every weekend. She has more than 90 jumps under her belt.
14h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

How Brexit is changing the lives of eight researchers The months between the Brexit vote and this week's triggering of Article 50 have been a turbulent time for scientists — and things show no sign of calming. Nature 543 600 doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21714
15h
Ingeniøren

Rejsekortstandere skal opdateres: Selvbetjening nede fredag til lørdag Rejsekortsystemet står over for en opdatering fredag, der giver kortvarige udfald på udstyret på stationerne. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/tusindvis-rejsekortstandere-automater-faar-ny-software-selvbetjening-nede-fredag-loerdag Version2
15h
Dagens Medicin

Briter anbefaler forebyggende behandling af brystkræftKvinder, hvis nære familiemedlemmer har haft brystkræft – især i en tidlig alder – kan have gavn af forebyggende behandling med lægemidlet anastrozol for at reducere deres risiko for at udvikle brystkræft.
15h
Dagens Medicin

NICE tilslutter sig samarbejde om udvikling af nye midler mod blodkræftSammen med 50 andre organisationer vil det britiske prioriteringsinstitut NICE nu kæmpe for udvikling af nye lægemidler mod blodkræft. Værktøjet er ‘big data’.
15h
Dagens Medicin

Molekylære analyser skal knække sjælden kræftsygdomDen sjældne galdevejskræft er svær at behandle og langt de fleste dør af sygdommen. Forskere vil ændre dette ved at lave molekylære analyser af tumorer for at forstå sygdommen.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vulnerability to psychosis: How to detect itAn international research team has demonstrated that an exaggerated emotional brain response to non-threatening information predicts emergence of clinically psychotic symptoms.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Adding grads and going green can brighten economic outlookAttracting college graduates and boosting natural amenities may give communities a double shot of economic growth potential, according to economists.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The IT-LIVER European consortium unveils new TGF-beta functions in liver cancerRecent research results from the European consortium IT-Liver provide a better understanding of the role of the TGF-beta cytokine in liver cancer. Their work, published in Cancer Letters, shows how the TGF-beta cytokine is able to modulate not only the migratory capacity of the hepatocellular carcinoma cell but also its capacity as a tumor initiator cell.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Products can be pals when you're lonely, but it may cost you, study findsAccording to a new study, it appears humanlike products do keep people from seeking out normal human interaction, which is typically how people try to recover from loneliness. However, there are limits to this phenomenon, and the long-term consequences are unclear, the researchers said.
16h
Gizmodo

LastPass Exploit Shows That Last Password You Made Probably Wasn't Your Last LastPass is one of the most prominent password managers around. It’s extremely convenient but if it were hacked, it would be quite the pain in the ass for users. In a blog post , the company has warned that a major exploit has been discovered and it outlined what action users should take immediately. Tavis Ormandy, a vulnerability researcher for Google’s Project Zero , tweeted on Saturday that he
16h
Gizmodo

High-Tech Humans Explore a Galactic Void in Scifi Indie The Beyond Image: screen grab A lot of blockbusters are unveiling new trailers this week—but on the other end of the budget and hype spectrum is Hasraf “HaZ” Dulull’s indie scifi film The Beyond, which just dropped its own first trailer. It’s about robotically enhanced astronauts who travel through a wormhole, ominously dubbed “the Void.” Uh, guys... that didn’t work out so well in Event Horizon . Will thes
17h
Ingeniøren

Sluser skal holde havvand ude af byerneVejle og Aarhus har dem. Kerteminde får snart en, og flere byer følger sandsynligvis efter. Sluser bliver en del af beskyttelsen mod havet flere steder i Danmark, forudsiger rådgiver.
17h
Gizmodo

The Tesla Model 3 Will Only Have A Center Screen, Get Over It A follower of Elon Musk on Twitter literally begged for the upcoming Tesla Model 3 to have a traditional speedometer for those who wouldn’t be using Autopilot, but Elon ain’t having it. We already knew the Tesla Model 3 would be delivered with an ultra-minimalist interior, and the announcement presentation of the car suggested all of the user interface information would be located on a center-mou
18h
Gizmodo

Human Poop Found in Coke Cans at Manufacturing Plant Photo: Getty File this story under shit you didn’t want to know. Police in Northern Ireland have opened an investigation to find out exactly how human feces found its way into a shipment of cans at a Coca-Cola bottling plant. The soda behemoth told The Guardian that the poop-containing cans were discovered at the Hellenic Bottling Company factory in Lisburn, Co Antrim. Production was abruptly shu
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Protein identified as potential druggable target for pancreatic cancerA protein known as arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) may be a potential therapeutic target for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common type of pancreatic cancer, and one of the most deadliest with a less than 10 percent, five-year survival rate. PRMT1 is involved in a number of genetic processes including gene transcription, DNA repair and signaling.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Impacts of school choice on segregationDiversity in schools is important for students' experiences and outcomes in schools and beyond, reducing prejudices and ensuring the likelihood of living and working in integrated environments as adults. Now researchers are exploring how school choice is affecting racial composition and segregation in Pennsylvania schools.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New research disproves common assumption on cranial joints of alligators, birds, dinosaursAlthough alligators, birds and dinosaurs have a similar skull-joint shape, this does not guarantee that their movements are the same.
19h
Science | The Guardian

Jane Goodall calls Trump's climate change agenda 'immensely depressing' Renowned primatologist is dismayed by Trump administration’s climate skepticism, but says people have ‘woken up’ to the dangers of doing nothing Trump moves to dismantle Obama’s climate legacy with executive order The leading conservationist Jane Goodall has condemned Donald Trump’s bid to rip up America’s climate change policies as “immensely depressing” and flying in the face of scientific evid
19h
Big Think

This Ingenious Skyscraper Would Hang from an Asteroid and Float Between Cities What if we build from the sky down? NYC architects release designs for a skyscraper that would hang from an asteroid and travel between hemispheres. Read More
19h
Gizmodo

World's Most Useful Robot Prints and Immediately Burns Trump's Tweets Image: @burnedyourtweet The one consistent hallmark of our pissboy president’s two-month-long paranoid sitcom is his habit of retreating to Twitter to inflict his delusions on the rest of us. The diminishing returns of tweeting “ fuck you ” at the man several times are apparent. But, as with most jobs, incendiary responses to our least capable POTUS are being automated. @BurnedYourTweet is a robo
19h
New Scientist - News

Implants let quadriplegic man drink from mug and feed himselfA man who has been paralysed from the shoulders down for eight years has regained the use of his right arm and hand thanks to a “neuroprosthesis”
20h
Gizmodo

Sony Is Weirdly Questioning Spider-Man's MCU Future After the Homecoming Sequel Image: Still via Youtube Earlier today, we got a great big look at Sony and Marvel’s collaboration on Spider-Man: Homecoming . Now, at CinemaCon 2017, Homecoming producer and former Sony Pictures chief Amy Pascal is telling the press that the two studios might not work together again after the already-planned sequel. Whaaa? Speaking to Cosmic Book News at the event, Pascal—who was still head honc
20h
WIRED

Trump Can Scrub the Clean Power Plan, But the West Will Stay Green The region is poised for more renewable energy and less coal. The post Trump Can Scrub the Clean Power Plan, But the West Will Stay Green appeared first on WIRED .
20h
Live Science

Facts About MarmosetsMarmosets are the smallest monkeys. They live high in the treetops in South America.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Seabird bones, fossils reveal broad food-web shift in North PacificFor thousands of years, the Hawaiian petrel has soared over the Pacific Ocean, feeding on fish and squid. Now, using evidence preserved in the birds' bones, scientists at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History and Michigan State University have discovered that the now endangered seabird has experienced a significant shift in food resources most likely during the past 100 years--a dis
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Subaru telescope detects the shadow of a gas cloud in an ancient proto-superclusterBy using the Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope, a team led by researchers at Osaka Sangyo University succeeded in making the widest map of neutral hydrogen gas in the early universe (corresponding to a time about 11.5 billion years ago). They found that the neutral hydrogen gas widely spreads out across 160 million light-years in and around the proto-supercluster.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cattle associated antibiotics disturb soil ecosystems, Virginia Tech researchers sayThe team analyzed soil samples from 11 dairy farms in the United States, and found that the amount of antibiotic resistant genes was 200 times greater in soil near manure piles compared with soil that wasn't.
20h
Gizmodo

University Threatens Destruction of Millions of Specimens if Museum of Natural History Collection Not Relocated [Updated] Photo: Getty According to a Facebook post from the University of Louisiana at Monroe Museum of Natural History, administrators have demanded that 6.5 million plant and fish specimens must find a new home on campus within 48 hours or they will be have to be donated or destroyed. Apparently, space is needed for the track team. This is the full statement: Dear Friends, It is my sad duty to report to
20h
Ingeniøren

Siemens førerposition på Top 10-listen over fleste ledige job er truet Der er over 367 slået op på Jobfinder.dk, og Siemens topper atter listen med flest jobopslag. Men virksomhedens førerposition er stærkt truet. Se hvem, der sniger sig op bagfra https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/siemens-foererposition-paa-top-10-listen-fleste-ledige-job-truet-7288 Jobfinder
20h
Ingeniøren

Weibel fik Andreas på radaren ved DSE-messen Et år efter dimissionen er 26-årige civilingeniør Andreas Kastoft dybt engageret i at udvikle udstyr, der gør Nasas og ESA’s radarudstyr mere præcist. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/weibel-fik-andreas-pa-radaren-ved-dse-messen-7211 Jobfinder
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Subaru telescope detects shadow of gas cloud in ancient proto-superclusterA team led by researchers from Osaka Sangyo University, with members from Tohoku University, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and others, has used the Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope to create the most-extensive map of neutral hydrogen gas in the early universe. This cloud appears widely spread out across 160 million light-years in and around a structure called the proto-supercluster.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Law of physics explains natural drivers of wealth inequalityA engineering professor has proposed an explanation for why the income disparity in America between the rich and poor continues to grow. According to the constructal law of physics, income inequality naturally grows along with the economy.
21h
Science : NPR

Paralyzed Man Uses Thoughts To Control His Own Arm And Hand A spinal injury severed the connection between Bill Kochevar's brain and everything below his shoulders. But technology has given him a new way to control one arm and hand. (Image credit: Cleveland FES Center)
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Man with quadriplegia employs injury bridging technologies to move again -- just by thinkingA subject who was paralyzed below his shoulders in a bicycling accident, is believed to be the first person with quadriplegia in the world to have arm and hand movements restored with the help of two temporarily implanted technologies. A brain-computer interface with recording electrodes under his skull, and a functional electrical stimulation (FES) system activating his arm and hand, reconnect hi
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cattle associated antibiotics disturb soil ecosystemsManure from cattle administered antibiotics drastically changes the bacterial and fungal make-up of surrounding soil, leading to ecosystem dysfunction, according to a Virginia Tech research team.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Seabird bones, fossils reveal broad food-web shift in North PacificFor thousands of years, the Hawaiian petrel has soared over the Pacific Ocean, feeding on fish and squid. Now, using evidence preserved in the birds' bones, scientists at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History and Michigan State University have discovered that the now endangered seabird has experienced a significant shift in food resources most likely during the past 100 years—a disr
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Seasonal warming leads to smaller animal body sizesChanges in the body size of animals measured under controlled laboratory conditions have been shown to closely match changes in body size with seasonal warming in nature, according to research from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cardiac arrest patients do better if taken immediately to a specialist heart centerPeople who suffer cardiac arrest outside of hospital have a better chance of survival if they are taken immediately to a specialist heart center rather than to the nearest general hospital, according to research published in the European Heart Journal. The study found that distance needed to travel to a specialist heart center was not linked to better or worse risk of death.
21h
New on MIT Technology Review

AI That’s Into Celebrity SpottingIt’s still in the early stages, but Clarifai is tackling the tricky task of figuring out which famous people are in images.
21h

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