EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Newly characterized protein has potential to save US farmers millions annuallyInstead of turning carbon into food, many plants accidentally make a plant-toxic compound during photosynthesis that is recycled through a process called photorespiration. University of Illinois and USDA/ ARS researchers report in Plant Cell the discovery of a key protein in this process, which they hope to manipulate to increase plant productivity.
2min
The Atlantic

How Pence's Dudely Dinners Hurt Women In a recent in-depth Washington Post profile of Karen Pence, Vice President Mike Pence’s wife, a small detail is drawing most of the attention: “In 2002, Mike Pence told The Hill that he never eats alone with a woman other than his wife and that he won’t attend events featuring alcohol without her by his side, either.” In context, this choice is not especially surprising. The Pences are evangelic
2min
Science | The Guardian

Colds feel worse to lonely people, study suggests Loneliness has no impact on symptom severity or likelihood of getting sick, but does appears to be linked to feeling more under the weather, say researchers Having a cold can be a miserable experience, but it turns out that the symptoms may seem worse if you feel lonely. A study by a team of US researchers has found while loneliness does not appear to have any impact on an individual’s chance of
5min
NYT > Science

Meet Evatar: The Lab Model That Mimics the Female Reproductive SystemResearchers hope the model, fashioned from human and mouse tissue, will help with research into endometriosis, fibroids, cancer and infertility.
6min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

This timid little fish escapes predators by injecting them with opioid-laced venomFang blennies are small fish with big teeth. Specifically, they have two large canine teeth that jut out of their lower jaw. Since blenny fish are only about two inches long, these "fangs" would be less than intimidating if not for the venom within. Blenny fish venom most likely causes a sudden drop in blood pressure in would-be predators, such as grouper fish, that have been bitten by blennies, r
6min
New on MIT Technology Review

Microsoft: AI Isn’t Yet Adaptable Enough to Help BusinessesMicrosoft’s top research executive says it’s too difficult to customize powerful machine learning systems to an individual company’s needs.
7min
Live Science

Fanged Fish Drugs Attackers with Heroin-Like VenomFang blennies — colorful Pacific region fish — in the Meiacanthus genus may be small, but they pack a very serious bite.
11min
BBC News - Science & Environment

James Webb telescope: Hubble successor set for yet more testsThe spectacular James Webb Space Telescope is bound next for the giant Apollo testing chamber.
12min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The carbon footprint of crime has fallen, study findsA study led by an Engineering Doctorate student at the University of Surrey has found that the carbon footprint of crime over the last 20 years has fallen.
12min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Built from the bottom up, nanoribbons pave the way to 'on-off' states for grapheneA new way to grow narrow ribbons of graphene, a lightweight and strong structure of single-atom-thick carbon atoms linked into hexagons, may address a shortcoming that has prevented the material from achieving its full potential in electronic applications. Graphene nanoribbons, mere billionths of a meter wide, exhibit different electronic properties than two-dimensional sheets of the material.
12min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mysterious cosmic explosion surprises astronomers studying the distant X-ray universeA mysterious flash of X-rays has been discovered by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory in the deepest X-ray image ever obtained. This source likely comes from some sort of destructive event, but it may be of a variety that scientists have never seen before.
12min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Search for stellar survivor of a supernova explosionAstronomers have used the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope to observe the remnant of a supernova explosion in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Beyond just delivering a beautiful image, Hubble may well have traced the surviving remains of the exploded star's companion.
12min
New on MIT Technology Review

The Rush for Lithium Is On in NevadaPrices for the metal have soared along with global demand for batteries, and a bonanza could be waiting beneath a valley in the desert.
21min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The carbon footprint of crime has fallen, study findsA study led by an Engineering Doctorate student at the University of Surrey has found that the carbon footprint of crime over the last 20 years has fallen.
23min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Search for stellar survivor of a supernova explosionAstronomers have used the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope to observe the remnant of a supernova explosion in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Beyond just delivering a beautiful image, Hubble may well have traced the surviving remains of the exploded star's companion.
23min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

It's true -- the sound of nature helps us relaxResearchers at Brighton and Sussex Medical School have discovered that playing 'natural sounds' affects the bodily systems that control the flight-or-fright and rest-digest autonomic nervous systems, with associated effects in the resting activity of the brain.
23min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Industry and occupation affect flu vaccination coverageNot surprisingly, healthcare workers are almost twice as likely to get flu vaccines as those in other occupations. However, fewer than 30 percent of workers in other occupations in frequent contact with the public -- such as food preparation and serving, sales, personal care, and service occupations -- are likely to be vaccinated, according to a study published in the April issue of the American J
23min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Built from the bottom up, nanoribbons pave the way to 'on-off' states for grapheneA new way to grow narrow ribbons of graphene, a lightweight and strong structure of single-atom-thick carbon atoms linked into hexagons, may address a shortcoming that has prevented the material from achieving its full potential in electronic applications. Graphene nanoribbons, mere billionths of a meter wide, exhibit different electronic properties than two-dimensional sheets of the material. 'Co
23min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Getting a leg up: Hand task training transfers motor knowledge to feetThe human brain's cerebellum controls the body's ability to tightly and accurately coordinate and time movements as fine as picking up a pin and as muscular as running a foot race. Now, Johns Hopkins researchers have added to evidence that this structure also helps transfer so-called motor learning from one part of the body to another.
23min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mysterious cosmic explosion surprises astronomers studying the distant x-ray universeA mysterious flash of X-rays has been discovered by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory in the deepest X-ray image ever obtained. This source likely comes from some sort of destructive event, but it may be of a variety that scientists have never seen before.
23min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research finds novel method for generating airway cells from stem cellsResearchers have developed a new approach for growing and studying cells they hope one day will lead to curing lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis through 'personalized medicine.'
23min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

High doses of vitamin C to improve cancer treatment passes human safety trialClinical trials found that it is safe to regularly infuse brain and lung cancer patients with 800 -- 1000 times the daily recommended amount of vitamin C as a potential strategy to improve outcomes of standard cancer treatments. The researchers also show pathways by which altered iron metabolism in cancer cells, and not normal cells, lead to increased sensitivity to cancer cell killing caused by h
23min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

This timid little fish escapes predators by injecting them with opioid-laced venomFang blennies are small fish with big teeth. Specifically, they have two large canine teeth that jut out of their lower jaw. Since blenny fish are only about two inches long, these 'fangs' would be less than intimidating if not for the venom within. Blenny fish venom most likely causes a sudden drop in blood pressure in would-be predators, such as grouper fish, that have been bitten by blennies, r
23min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fanged fish's heroin-like venom could lead to pain treatmentsA fearless fanged coral reef fish that disables its opponents with heroin-like venom could offer hope for the development of new painkillers. University of Queensland researcher Associate Professor Bryan Fry said the venomous fang blenny was found in the Pacific region, including on the Great Barrier Reef.
23min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The Latest: Spacewalking astronauts lose piece of shieldingThe Latest on a spacewalk at the International Space Station (all times local):
24min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First on the Martian menu: spudsCould potatoes one day support human life on Mars?
24min
The Atlantic

Brownback Vetoes Medicaid Expansion in Kansas The expansion of Medicaid in one of the nation’s most Republican states will have to wait at least a little longer. Governor Sam Brownback of Kansas on Thursday vetoed legislation expanding Medicaid passed with Republican majorities in the state’s House and Senate. Supporters of the bill are likely a few votes shy of the two-thirds majority needed to override Brownback’s veto. The move was expect
24min
The Atlantic

A Tiny Fish With Terrifying Fangs And Opioid Venom Think about a venomous fang, and you’ll probably conjure up an image of a snake or spider. But perhaps you should also spare a thought for group of unassuming reef fish that are appropriately called fangblennies. They are finger-sized, colorful, and rather cute—that is, until they open their mouths. Their lower jaws bear two upsettingly large canine teeth, capable of delivering a deep bite. And t
24min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Melting sea ice may lead to more life in the seaEvery year an increasing amount of sea ice is melting in the Arctic. This can start a chain reaction, which leads to increased production of algae and hence more food for creatures in the sea.
26min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Larger doses of vitamin C may lead to a greater reduction in common cold durationThe relationship between vitamin C dosage and its effects on the duration of the common cold symptoms may extend to 6-8 grams per day.
26min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brain's 'GPS' does a lot more than just navigateThe part of the brain that creates mental maps of one's environment plays a much broader role in memory and learning than was previously thought, according to new research.
26min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Illinois considers strengthening internet privacy rightsIllinois lawmakers are considering several measures that advocates say would enhance internet privacy rights at a time when federal protections are being rolled back.
29min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US environmental groups file suit to block new coal mining on public landsUS environmental groups and a Native American tribe have filed a lawsuit to block the Trump administration's plans to resume leasing of federal lands for coal mining.
29min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Welfare reform that really worksA new study published in the Review of Economic Studies indicates that introducing additional welfare components to tax systems can make people worse off by changing their behavior. But certain policy interventions carry sizable work incentives and make people better off by helping them commit to long-run goals.
29min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Speeding star gives new clues to breakup of multi-star systemA remarkable new discovery using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope reveals three stars that now hold the record as the youngest-known examples of a super-fast-flying breed. "Until these observations, only a few—but older—examples of such rapidly-moving stars had been found with origins traceable back to the volatile systems that likely ejected them," said lead researcher Kevin Luhman of Penn State Uni
29min
Gizmodo

This Backwards-Orbiting Asteroid Has Been Flirting With Death For a Million Years The retrograde asteroid is shown in green. (Credit: Paul Weigert/Western University) Most asteroids orbit the Sun in a counterclockwise fashion, but a newly-discovered object nicknamed Bee-Zed goes against the grain, spinning around the Solar System the opposite way. Not only that, it frequently ventures within Jupiter’s orbital space—putting it on a potential collision course with the gas giant
29min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fluctuation in the concentration of calcium ions contributes to brain shapeThe first step in shaping the brain is that the neural plate, a sheet-like cell layer, curves to form the neural tube. Scientists have now shown that during the process of neural tube formation a transient increase in the concentration of calcium ions in cells causes these morphological changes and is essential for neural tube formation.
33min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Modern alchemy creates luminescent iron moleculesScientists have made the first iron-based molecule capable of emitting light. This could contribute to the development of affordable and environmentally friendly materials for e.g. solar cells, light sources and displays.
33min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Engineer patents waterlike polymer to create high-temperature ceramicsCeramic textiles, improved jet engine blades, 3-D printed ceramics and better batteries may soon become a reality, thanks to a recently patented polymer from a Kansas State University engineer.
35min
Futurity.org

A cold may feel more miserable if you’re lonely People who feel lonely are likely to think their cold symptoms are more severe than those who have strong friendships and social networks. “Loneliness puts people at risk for premature mortality and all kinds of other physical illnesses,” says Angie LeRoy, a graduate student at Rice University who works with psychologist Chris Fagundes. “But nothing had been done to look at an acute but temporary
36min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Follow-up study suggests group meditation reduced murder rates in large US citiesA follow-up study in the Journal of Health and Environmental Research examines a novel proposed approach to help reduce murder rates in large US urban areas. In a prospective social experiment from 2007 to 2010, practice of the Transcendental Meditation® and TM-Sidhi® program by a large group at Maharishi University of Management in Iowa was associated with a 28.4 percent reduction in murder rates
38min
The Atlantic

Donald Trump vs. The House Freedom Caucus Donald Trump is escalating his attacks on hardline conservatives in Congress in for a fight that could deepen the rifts within the Republican Party that already threaten to hobble the president’s agenda. On Thursday, Trump tweeted : “The Freedom Caucus will hurt the entire Republican agenda if they don’t get on the team, & fast.” He added: “We must fight them, & Dems, in 2018!” It is highly unusu
39min
The Atlantic

Mike Pence and the 'Billy Graham Rule' What an age to be alive! The internet has broken out into a feverish and wildly entertaining debate over, of all things, the fallen nature of man. What prompted all of this was a profile of the vice president’s wife, Karen Pence, in The Washington Post , that included this detail about the vice president: In 2002, Mike Pence told the Hill that he never eats alone with a woman other than his wife
39min
Gizmodo

These Fish Inject Predators With Opioid Venom and That's Not Even the Coolest Part Micro CT scan of a fangblenny (Casewell et al) Fangblennies are tiny reef-dwelling fish only two inches long that look like they came from some adorable deep-sea vampire movie. Only, if you’re a predator and you piss them off, they will wreck the shit out of you with their opioid-laced venom. An international team of scientists wanted to know how venom evolved in these little fish—there hasn’t be
42min
Ars Technica

AT&T gets $6.5 billion to build US-wide public safety network Enlarge / Fire martial texting a message on his cell phone. (credit: Getty Images | yougottalove) AT&T has won a lucrative contract to build and manage a nationwide public safety network for America's police, firefighters, and emergency medical services. The First Responder Network Authority, or FirstNet , was authorized by the federal government in 2012 and operates as an independent authority w
43min
Gizmodo

5 Uses for Gmail Beyond Sending Boring Old Regular Emails Image: Alex Knight / Unsplash /Google Even if you don’t personally use Gmail , someone you know does. The service is perfect for people who need an email address independent of their work one , and a far better alternative than security nightmares like YahooMail . Yet Gmail, despite the name, isn’t just a great platform for email. Gmail makes use of the cloud, just like Dropbox or Google Drive, t
48min
Science : NPR

A Forgotten Shipwreck Imperils Washington's Oysters The sunken Hero, an Antarctic research vessel from the 1960s, is leaking oil into Willapa Bay, where more than half of the state's oysters are grown. And no one knows how to remove it. (Image credit: Molly Solomon/Oregon Public Broadcasting)
48min
Gizmodo

Today's Best Deals: Amazon Jeans Sale, Razer Blowout, Ecobee3, and More A one-day sale on jeans , a Razer Gold Box deal , and your favorite affordable vacuum lead off Thursday’s best deals from around the web. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals RAVPower 6-Port 60W USB Charger , $17 Look around the room you’re in now, and you can probably find half a dozen things you own that charge over USB. Now, you can juice them all
53min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Internet crystal ball can predict risk of heart disease, diabetes, study findsAn online metabolic calculator predicts people's risk of developing heart disease and diabetes more accurately than traditional methods, a large new study has found. The tool's creator hopes it will prompt people to make lifestyle changes that would spare them the suffering and expense of avoidable illnesses.
59min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Speeding star gives new clues to breakup of multi-star systemThree stars have been discovered that now hold the record as the youngest-known examples of a super-fast star category. The discovery, led by a Penn State University astronomer, is published in this month's edition of Astrophysical Journal Letters. Four colorful images plus an animated GIF are available.
59min
TEDTalks (video)

How early life experience is written into DNA | Moshe SzyfMoshe Szyf is a pioneer in the field of epigenetics, the study of how living things reprogram their genome in response to social factors like stress and lack of food. His research suggests that biochemical signals passed from mothers to offspring tell the child what kind of world they're going to live in, changing the expression of genes. "DNA isn't just a sequence of letters; it's not just a scri
1h
Futurity.org

New way to test empathy uses painful images Psychologists have developed new tests and mathematical models to help capture and quantify the snap moral and empathetic judgments we make all the time, such as when seeing footage from a war-ravaged country. Certain situations could trigger instant moral and empathetic assessments, even when they were directed to counteract those feelings, according to a series of studies looking at people’s in
1h
Gizmodo

Creator Joel Hodgson on the Return of Mystery Science Theater 3000 and the Hidden Beauty of Bad Movies Patton Oswalt and Joel Hodgson. All images: Netflix. In just about two weeks, Mystery Science Theater 3000 returns to TV, courtesy of Netflix. Usually bringing back something so beloved by fans after so long is an attempt to meet impossible expectations, but creator Joel Hodgson and the show’s new cast and crew have pulled it off. The original show began in 1988 and ran for a total of 10 seasons
1h
Live Science

Wind Tunnel for Birds Could Result in Agile DronesA specially designed wind tunnel for birds could help scientists learn the secrets of avian aerial abilities and translate them into drones that are masters of flying through rough-and-tumble conditions.
1h
Live Science

'Space Poop' Challenge Winners Come Clean on VictoryFrom power-supply issues to skin-protection concerns, the winners of NASA's Space Poop Challenge discussed all the details of their innovative spacesuit waste-disposal systems designed to help solve NASA's astronaut potty problem.
1h
Popular Science

Bill Nye is going to march on Washington Science The Science Guy joins the March for Science When scientists gather to march in support of research and truth on April 22, Bill Nye the Science Guy will be right there with them. Read on:…
1h
Ars Technica

Reminder: Download some DSiWare games while you still can The Oregon Trail After this week, this quality portable port of The Oregon Trail will only be available to those who have previously bought and downloaded it. Back in September, we warned you that Nintendo was about to stop selling "DSiWare points," the digital currency used in its first downloadable game store for the Nintendo DSi. After this week, those points will be officially useless. That's
1h
Gizmodo

Astronaut Peggy Whitson Just Shattered a Spacewalking Record Image: Peggy Whitson/NASA Johnson via Flickr Astronaut Peggy Whitson is no stranger to breaking barriers: In addition to becoming the first woman commander of the International Space Station (ISS), the Iowa native has logged 377 days in space between two missions —the most of any American spacewoman to date. Now, on her third mission aboard the ISS, Whitson is racking up even more impressive feat
1h
NYT > Science

Foreign Correspondents as They Live and BreatheWhile we might check the weather every morning, these reporters check the Air Quality Index.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Join forces to reduce US violence, says UK expertViolence in the US can be reduced if police and health agencies join forces, says a leading UK expert.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds ethnic differences in effect of age-related macular degeneration on visual functionIn study that included Chinese, Malay, and Indian participants, researchers found that among those with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) there were ethnic differences in visual function, such as the ability to read a newspaper or labels on medication bottles, according to a study published online by JAMA Ophthalmology.
1h
The Atlantic

The Founding Fathers Encrypted Secret Messages, Too Thomas Jefferson is known for a lot of things—writing the Declaration of Independence, founding the University of Virginia, owning hundreds of slaves despite believing in the equality of men—but his place as the “Father of American Cryptography” is not one of them. As a youth in the Virginia colony, Jefferson encrypted letters to a confidante about the woman he loved. While serving as the third p
1h
Ars Technica

Pruitt chooses not to ban pesticide after scientists find neurotoxicity Enlarge (credit: Getty | Jack Clark ) Scott Pruitt, head of the Environmental Protection Agency, announced late Wednesday that a widely used pesticide will remain available to farmers, despite agency scientists recommending last year that it be banned due to neurotoxicity risks to farm workers and children. The pesticide, chlorpyrifos, made by Dow Chemical, is used on tens of thousands of farms i
1h
Gizmodo

Dancers Instantly Swap Freaky Face Masks Using a Face-Tracking Projector Costume-changes during a live performance are fast and frenetic, limiting how elaborate makeup and outfits can be. But for this performance by Japanese dance duo AyaBambi, a high-speed face-tracking projector was used to change their appearances while they performed, even creating the illusion of wearing masks that instantaneously appear over their faces. Japanese studio WOW, led by Technical and
1h
Quanta Magazine

Quantum Questions Inspire New Math Mathematics might be more of an environmental science than we realize. Even though it is a search for eternal truths, many mathematical concepts trace their origins to everyday experience. Astrology and architecture inspired Egyptians and Babylonians to develop geometry. The study of mechanics during the scientific revolution of the 17th century brought us calculus. Remarkably, ideas from quantum
1h
Ars Technica

To fight Tor hack prosecutions, activist groups offer up legal help Enlarge (credit: The Washington Post / Getty Images News) Three legal advocacy organizations have published a new guide for criminal defense attorneys who are defending more than 200 people who are accused of accessing Playpen, a now-shuttered notorious child porn site that was only available as a Tor-hidden service. The Playpen prosecutions, which are unfolding nationwide, have raised significan
1h
Science | The Guardian

How to safeguard science in an era of fake news A new report by the House of Commons science and technology committee calls for a rethink of the relationship between scientists, media and the public Science and journalism don’t always see eye to eye. Scientific accuracy is often sacrificed in the quest for an enticing headline, but at a time when fake news is on the rise, high quality scientific reporting has never been more essential. As the
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Annals publishes annual updates in Internal MedicineAnnals of Internal Medicine, the flagship journal of the American College of Physicians (ACP), has published summaries of the most important medical studies published in 2016 in the fields of general internal medicine, cardiology, hematology, endocrinology, gastroenterology and hepatology, rheumatology, and perioperative, pulmonary, and geriatric medicine.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Welfare reform that really worksA new study published in the Review of Economic Studies indicates that introducing additional welfare components to tax systems can make people worse off by changing their behavior. But certain policy interventions carry sizable work incentives and make people better off by helping them commit to long-run goals.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Link between common prostate cancer treatment, dementia detailed in new Penn studyA new analysis of patients who have undergone treatment for prostate cancer shows a connection between androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) -- a testosterone-lowering therapy and a common treatment for the disease -- and dementia, according to researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.
1h
Live Science

Gruesome Wasp Named After Shape-Shifting 'Star Trek' CharacterA group of wasps with a gruesome lifestyle has just gained 15 new members. Like their kin, the newbies make a habit of laying their eggs in developing insects.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New dinosaur species sheds light on evolution, provides facial makeover for tyrannosaursScientists have discovered a new relative of T. rex that is the geologically youngest species of the lineage called Daspletosaurus, the 'frightful lizards'. The new species of dinosaur, Daspletosaurus horneri, evolved directly from its geologically older relative, D. torosus. The excellently preserved fossils reveal that the face of tyrannosaurs was covered by a mask of large flat scales, with sma
1h
WIRED

An App That Tracks Your Movement to Help You Relax, Even in the Back of a Cab Sway is the latest in a recent spate of meditation apps designed to encourage mindfulness. The post An App That Tracks Your Movement to Help You Relax, Even in the Back of a Cab appeared first on WIRED .
1h
WIRED

Review: Earin M-1 Wireless Earbuds Apple's AirPods aren't the only wireless earbud game in town. The post Review: Earin M-1 Wireless Earbuds appeared first on WIRED .
1h
Gizmodo

Kotaku Rockstar Releases Busted GTA Online Car That Costs Nearly A Million In-Game Dollars | io9 Mor Kotaku Rockstar Releases Busted GTA Online Car That Costs Nearly A Million In-Game Dollars | io9 More Details on a Mysterious Landmark in Star Wars: The Last Jedi | Jalopnik The Dodge Challenger SRT Demon Has An Insane Cooling System No Other Car Has | Two Cents It’s Not Very Common, But Yes, Student Loans Can Be Forgiven |
1h
Scientific American Content: Global

The World Wants the U.S. to Stay in the Paris Climate DealThe coming weeks are expected to settle whether Trump will stay or leave the agreement -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain's 'GPS' does a lot more than just navigateThe part of the brain that creates mental maps of one's environment plays a much broader role in memory and learning than was previously thought, according to new research published this week in the journal Nature by researchers at Princeton University.
1h
Ingeniøren

Intel: Moores lov er på ingen måde død Men selskabet efterlyder en fælles målestok for transistortæthed. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/intel-moores-lov-paa-ingen-maade-doed-1075073 Version2
1h
Ingeniøren

Intel: Moores lov er på ingen måde død Men selskabet efterlyder en fælles målestok for transistortæthed. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/intel-moores-lov-paa-ingen-maade-doed-1075073 Version2
1h
Ingeniøren

Hver tredje landmølle har ingen nære naboerEn ny opgørelse viser, at hver tredje vindmølle på land ikke har beboelse i nærheden. Inden for en radius af 8 gange møllens højde har hovedparten af møllerne otte eller færre naboer.
1h
Gizmodo

Club Penguin Island Launches And The Profanity Bans Continue Yesterday Disney closed Club Penguin , the kid-friendly online game that had been delighting children and quickly banning potty-mouths since 2005. Today Disney launches Club Penguin Island , a subscription-based mobile game, bringing kid-friendly fun and high-speed banning to a new generation. Club Penguin Island , available today in the U.S. for iOS and Android devices, aims to give players of a
2h
Popular Science

Why tonight's SpaceX launch is actually a big deal Space Watch the critical test live right here On Thursday evening, SpaceX plans to test out a key part of its reusable rocket plan: the re-using part. Check it out:…
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers watch blood vessels develop in whole Zebrafish embryosFor the first time, researchers have followed the development of blood vessels in zebrafish embryos without using any labels or contrast agents, which may disturb the biological processes under study.
2h
WIRED

Space Opera Fiction Isn’t Just Back. It’s Better Than Ever No longer just the home of cyborgs and ships, space operas are exploring a lot of new frontiers. The post Space Opera Fiction Isn't Just Back. It's Better Than Ever appeared first on WIRED .
2h
WIRED

The Uncertain Science Behind Your Phone’s Blue Light Dimmer Does blue light make you more alert? Yep. But does removing it from your phone's screen help you fall asleep? That hasn't actually been proven yet. The post The Uncertain Science Behind Your Phone's Blue Light Dimmer appeared first on WIRED .
2h
WIRED

How Reggaetón Exploded All Over Cuba Without the Internet Three million people download music from hard drives delivered by hand. The post How Reggaetón Exploded All Over Cuba Without the Internet appeared first on WIRED .
2h
Ars Technica

Samsung will throw in a free Gear VR if you preorder the Galaxy S8 Enlarge / The Samsung Galaxy S8. Check out those bezels. Preorders for Samsung's new Galaxy S8 and S8+ smartphones are available now, and the company is throwing in a gift if you pledge your money before the handsets launch on April 21. When you go to Samsung's website and preorder either smartphone, you can get a free Gear VR headset and the new motion controller Samsung developed with Oculus. W
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers watch blood vessels develop in whole Zebrafish embryosFor the first time, researchers have followed the development of blood vessels in zebrafish embryos without using any labels or contrast agents, which may disturb the biological processes under study.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Medication history for patients on blood thinners is critical to EMSOne change to field triage guidelines for emergency medical services (EMS) responding to older adults with head trauma could make a 'clinically important improvement over usual care,' according to a study and accompanying editorial published earlier this month in Annals of Emergency Medicine ('Out-of-Hospital Triage of Older Adults With Head Injury: A Retrospective Study of the Effect of Adding 'A
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What happens in the living cell?The plasma membrane serves as a major hub for signal cascades to control crucial cellular processes. But it is a fluidmedium, which makes the signaling processes difficult to monitor. Now, German scientists have designed a molecular'paintbrush' technique to trigger, control, and also monitor signaling processes. As they write in the journalAngewandte Chemie, their modular system made of light-acti
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rearranging nest boxes keeps more blue orchard bees aroundOrchard growers looking for alternatives to honey bees for managed pollination services have new reason to be optimistic about the potential of one honey bee cousin, the blue orchard bee. A recent research experiment has shown blue orchard bees can be a sustainable option in tart cherry orchards, and a simple change to the distribution of the bees' nesting boxes makes the bees more likely to remai
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rearranging nest boxes keeps more blue orchard bees aroundOrchard growers looking for alternatives to honey bees for managed pollination services have new reason to be optimistic about the potential of one honey bee cousin, the blue orchard bee.
2h
Gizmodo

Put Some New Pants on With Amazon's One-Day Denim Sale Up to 50% Jeans Off & More You need jeans. Everyone needs jeans. Right now, get some from brands like Lucky Brand, Lee, NYDJ, Calvin Klein and more for a lot less during Amazon’s one-day sale . There are jeans for as low as $20, plus shorts, skirts, dresses, and plus size thrown in for women and a couple Big & Tall pairs of jeans for the guys . Here are a few really good options to grab, but ther
2h
Popular Science

How to secure your Facebook account DIY Simple steps to social media lockdown Follow these straightforward steps to make sure your Facebook account is as well-protected and as private as it can be.
2h
Live Science

Cannabis Over Cows? Richard Branson Tells Farmers to Grow WeedInstead of raising cows, the billionaire said farmers in New Zealand should grow cannabis.
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Futurity.org

How to save a country’s coffee from beetles The coffee berry borer, a beetle capable of decimating 80 percent of a coffee crop, is notorious in places like Hawaii and Brazil, where it has devastated coffee production. The beetle is notorious in places like Hawaii and Brazil. In February, careful inspection by the Coffee Industry Corporation in Papua New Guinea led to its discovery in a container of beans. Papua New Guinea was one of only t
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Futurity.org

Hunt for life on exoplanets gets new tools There’s a new strategy for scanning exoplanets for biosignatures—signs of life such as oxygen molecules and methane. These chemicals—which don’t naturally stick around for long because they bind with other chemicals—are abundant on Earth largely thanks to the living creatures that expel them. Finding both of these chemicals around another planet would be a strong indicator of the presence of life
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Scientific American Content: Global

Transplanted Eyes Let Tadpoles See from Their TailsThe discovery sheds light on how to connect implants and grafts to the body's own wiring -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

Is North Carolina Finally Going to Repeal Its Bathroom Bill? DURHAM, N.C.—About a year ago, Republicans in the North Carolina General Assembly hurriedly passed H.B. 2 , a law that barred transgender people from using the bathroom of the gender with which they identify, along with several other provisions. And almost ever since, the state has been trying and failing to find way to reverse it. Late Wednesday, politicians in Raleigh announced they had struck
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The Atlantic

How Mike Pence's Marriage Became Fodder for the Culture Wars The Washington Post ran a profile of Karen Pence, the wife of Vice President Mike Pence, on Wednesday. The piece talks about the closeness of the Pences’ relationship, and cites something Pence told The Hill in 2002: Unless his wife is there, he never eats alone with another woman or attends an event where alcohol is being served. (It’s unclear whether, 15 years later, this remains Pence’s practi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Weather forecasting technology used to predict where proteins anchor within human cellsMet Office technology used to study climate change is being used by scientists to predict the behaviour of vitalsorting and location of proteins cells in cells of the the human body.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Discovery of new predatory dinosaur species gives new insight on their evolutionScientists discovered a new tyrannosaur with an unusual mode of evolution. Findings include that Daspletosaurus horneri, or 'Horner's Frightful Lizard,' evolved directly from its geologically older relative, D. torosus, a rare form of evolution called anagenesis where one species gradually morphs into a new one. The research also changes the face of tyrannosaurs, which was covered by a lipless mas
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bad cold? If you're lonely, it may feel worseA new study showed people who feel lonely are likely to report more severe symptoms from the common cold.
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New Scientist - News

Weird T. rex forerunner had small horns and crocodile-like snoutThis new species was a ferocious predator with a sensitive side that reigned across North America until T. rex came along
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Gizmodo

Military Officials Say We Need to Prepare for Space War Image: Wikimedia commons What’s old is unfortunately new again: Recently, two military officials said that we should be getting ready for a war in space, a sentence I am ashamed to write in the year 2017. Their advice was seemingly bolstered by a Hill article penned by two national security experts this week, which reminded Americans that North Korea could in theory use a satellite weapon to send
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Finding faces in a crowd: Context is key when looking for small things in imagesSpotting a face in a crowd, or recognizing any small or distant object within a large image, is a major challenge for computer vision systems. The trick to finding tiny objects, say researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, is to look for larger things associated with them.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gender-affirming restrooms recommended for schoolsEducational policies and practices should explicitly ensure the wellbeing and healthy development of all students by supporting the right of students to use a bathroom in an institutional context that affirms their gender identity and expression. There are many ways that this can occur including providing gender-neutral restrooms in schools, says Laura Wernick of Fordham University in the US, lead
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Balance test improves insight into illness in schizophreniaA common symptom of schizophrenia -- not knowing that you're ill -- can be temporarily alleviated using a balance test that stimulates part of the brain with cold water, an exploratory study at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) has shown.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study demonstrates how Zika virus rewires and repurposes invaded cellsNew research reveals a high-resolution view of the Zika viral life cycle within infected cells and shows dramatic changes in the cell's architecture throughout the infection process. This novel perspective may lead to the development of new vaccines and treatments.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Finding faces in a crowd: Context is key when looking for small things in imagesSpotting a face in a crowd, or recognizing any small or distant object within a large image, is a major challenge for computer vision systems. The trick to finding tiny objects, say researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, is to look for larger things associated with them. An improved method for coding that crucial context from an image has enabled CMU researchers to demonstrate a significant ad
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Molecular therapy set to protect at-risk patients against heart attack and strokeEven a single dose of a specific ribonucleic acid molecule, known as a small interfering RNA (siRNA), offers patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease long-lasting protection against high LDL cholesterol -- one of the main risk factors for heart attack and stroke. This is the result of a clinical study that researchers from Charité and Imperial College London have published as leading author
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Is it a boy or is it a girl? New method to ID baby sea turtles' sexIs it a boy or is it a girl? For baby sea turtles it's not that cut and dry. Because they don't have an X or Y chromosome, baby sea turtles' sex is defined during development by the incubation environment. The nest's thermal environment determines whether an embryo will develop as a male or female. Warmer sand temperatures produce more females and cooler sand temperatures produce more males. To ma
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Red and violet light reset the circadian clock in algae via novel pathwayAs anyone who has spent wakeful nights suffering from jetlag will attest, the human body has a strong sense of time. The body clock runs on a 24-hour cycle, or circadian (from the Latin meaning "about a day") rhythm. When our internal cycle gets out of sync with our surroundings, such as when crossing time zones, jetlag can result. The circadian rhythm therefore needs to be reset, which is achieve
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The Atlantic

Five Nonprofits Receive National Award for Driving Positive Change in Underserved Communities from The Atlantic and Allstate Washington, D.C. (March 30, 2017)—At a social innovation summit in the nation’s capital today, The Atlantic and Allstate will honor five nonprofits with Renewal Awards for their innovative, grassroots approach to solving our nation’s most pressing challenges. The five Renewal Award recipients have a shared mission, which is to meet the needs of underserved communities, including LGBT homeless you
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Explore LA's Beautiful Japanese Garden in Virtual Reality! (360 Video) Beyond The Backyard: Ground Level Patrick is a gardener who took his passion for backyard botany and turned it into a job as a landscape architect at the nationally renowned Japanese Garden in Los Angeles. See what he sees in the soil like never before. For more immersive experiences, head to http://DiscoveryVR.com or download the app for your iPhone or Android device. iPhone: http://apple.co/1Kl
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team develops accurate contactless 3-D fingerprint identification systemThe research team of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) has developed a system for three-dimensional (3D) fingerprint identification by adopting ground breaking 3D fingerprint minutiae recovery and matching technology, pushing contactless biometric technology into a new realm of speed and accuracy for use in identification, crime investigation, immigration control, security of access and
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Blind tadpoles learn visually with eyes grafted onto tail, neurotransmitter drug treatmentBlind tadpoles were able to process visual information from eyes grafted onto their tails after being treated with a small molecule neurotransmitter drug that augmented innervation, integration, and function of the transplanted organs. The work, which used a pharmacological reagent already approved for use in humans, provides a potential road map for promoting innervation -- the supply of nerves t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Weather forecasting technology used to predict where proteins anchor within human cellsMet Office technology used to study climate change is being used by scientists to predict the behavior of vitalsorting and location of proteins cells in cells of the the human body.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study sheds light on how mosquitoes wing itThe unique mechanisms involved in mosquito flight have been shared for the first time in a new Oxford University collaboration, which could inform future aerodynamic innovations, including tiny scale flying tech.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

£3m awarded to Oxford-led consortium for national machine learning computing facilityA consortium of eight UK universities, led by the University of Oxford, has been awarded £3 million by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) to establish a national high-performance computing facility to support machine learning. The new facility, known as the Joint Academic Data Science Endeavour (JADE), forms part of a combined investment of £20m by EPSRC in the UK's reg
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Beyond graphene: Advances make reduced graphene oxide electronics feasibleResearchers have developed a technique for converting positively charged (p-type) reduced graphene oxide (rGO) into negatively charged (n-type) rGO, creating a layered material that can be used to develop rGO-based transistors for use in electronic devices.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Larger doses of vitamin C may lead to a greater reduction in common cold durationThe relationship between vitamin C dosage and its effects on the duration of the common cold symptoms may extend to 6-8 grams per day according to a statistical analysis published in Nutrients.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Melting sea ice may lead to more life in the seaEvery year an increasing amount of sea ice is melting in the Arctic. This can start a chain reaction, which leads to increased production of algae and hence more food for creatures in the sea.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Kidney transplants: White blood cells control virus replicationCertain white blood cells play an important role in bringing a harmful virus under control after kidney transplantations. The results of a research group at the Department of Biomedicine at the University of Basel and University Hospital Basel could contribute to improving control of immunosuppression, avoiding transplant rejection and developing relevant vaccines.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ludwig scientists reveal new advances in cancer research at 2017 AACR annual meetingLudwig Cancer Research released today the full scope of advances to be presented by Ludwig researchers at this year's American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting in Washington D.C., April 1-5, 2017.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Discovery of new predatory dinosaur species gives new insight on their evolutionJayc Sedlmayr, PhD, Assistant Professor of Cell Biology & Anatomy at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans School of Medicine, was part of an international team of scientists who discovered a new tyrannosaur with an unusual mode of evolution. Their findings include that Daspletosaurus horneri, or "Horner's Frightful Lizard," evolved directly from its geologically older relative, D. torosus, a rar
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Test of Mars-bound instruments in the Black ForestThe "InSight" Mars mission planned for 2018 by NASA and European partners is aimed at studying geophysical properties of the "red planet." In addition, fundamental questions relating to the planetary and solar system shall be answered to better understand the history of creation of planets of the inner solar system, one of which is the Earth. A highly sensitive seismograph (SEIS) will be one of th
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Science | The Guardian

I can tell a narcissist from a drama queen. I learned it in a quiz | Emma BrockesNarcissism is the latest condition being bandied around as the root of all evil. And thanks to online quizzes and columns, you don’t need any qualifications It was 15C spring weather in New York this week and my timeline was full of pictures of daffodils and checklists on how to spot and deal with a narcissist. I feel as if we go through this every few years: a condition, vaguely defined, emerges
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Viden

Mikrochip-organer: Første skridt mod at dyrke børn uden for livmoderenForskere har genskabt kvindens menstruationcyklus i laboratoriet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lighter, more efficient, safer lithium-ion batteriesResearchers from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid and the Council for Scientific Research (initialed CSIC in Spanish) have patented a method for making new ceramic electrodes for lithium-ion batteries that are more efficient, cheaper, more resistant and safer than conventional batteries.
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Gizmodo

Classical Music Pairs Surprisingly Well With Footage of Candy Melting and Unmelting Just as everything is cooler in slow motion , humans are fascinated with watching things happen in reverse. That’s probably because time only moves in one direction for us, but whatever the reason, watching gummies melt and unmelt alongside classical music just made Thursday a little easier to bear. Erwin Trummer is the genius behind this video, and he didn’t need any expensive gear to pull it of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The beginning of the end of order: Experiments prove Mermin-Wagner fluctuationsClassical physics states that a crystal consists of perfectly ordered particles from a continuous symmetrical atomic structure. The Mermin-Wagner theorem from 1966 broke with this view: it states that in one-dimensional and two-dimensional atomic structures (for example in an atomic chain or membrane) there cannot be perfect ordering of particles over long ranges.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fragmentation of tropical forests increases global emissions of greenhouse gasesWhen talk is of important ecosystems, tropical forests are top of the list. After all, half of the carbon stored in all of the Earth's vegetation is contained in these ecosystems. Deforestation has a correspondingly fatal effect. Scientists estimate that this releases 1000 million tonnes of carbon every year, which, in the form of greenhouse gasses, drives up global temperatures. That is not all,
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Popular Science

Here’s how air pollution kills 3,450,000 people a year Health Coal is costly As the president rolls back regulations that keep our air clean, how will air pollution hurt the global population? Read on:…
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Live Science

Hind Sight: Blind Tadpoles See Via Eyes in TailsTadpoles that "see" through eyes grafted onto their tails represent an exciting step forward for regenerative medicine, researchers said.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Modern alchemy creates luminescent iron moleculesA group of researchers at Lund University in Sweden have made the first iron-based molecule capable of emitting light. This could contribute to the development of affordable and environmentally friendly materials for e.g. solar cells, light sources and displays.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What climate change means for leaf litterThe carbon dioxide coming from some of Earth's tiniest residents may not be increasing as quickly as some believed in the face of global climate change.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tunneling under Stonehenge—the effects of urban sprawlEarlier this month, officials in England proposed a plan that could alleviate traffic on one of the most congested highways from London to southwest England. The idea involves digging a tunnel just south of Stonehenge, the prehistoric and heavily protected monument.
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The Scientist RSS

Experimental MERS Treatments Target Host Cell ReceptorResearchers are searching for ways to prevent the coronavirus from attaching to DPP-4 receptors, blocking it from invading and replicating within host cells.
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Gizmodo

The Hunt for Undiscovered Drugs at the Bottom of the Sea In 2009, Kerry McPhail descended Jacques Cousteau-style towards the Axial Volcano, inside the cramped, 30-year-old little submarine DSV Alvin , with a pilot and another scientist. Three hundred miles off the coast of Oregon, they were collecting tubeworms, bacterial mats and bivalves living near a deep sea volcanic vent. These samples could potentially yield new pharmaceutical compounds—and in tu
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Ars Technica

Live today: SpaceX attempts to launch a “flight proven” rocket Enlarge / The "flight proven" Falcon 9 rocket sits on the launch pad at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. (credit: SES) This evening, nearly a full year after it first launched a payload into orbit, a Falcon 9 booster will attempt a second launch. Some might call this a "used" or "reused" rocket, but in a wonderful marketing euphemism, SpaceX has characterized the booster as "flight proven." One d
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Live Science

Wine-Loving Physicist Solves Bottle Drip ProblemA scientist has created a wine bottle lip that doesn't drip.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The consumption of legumes is associated with a lower risk of diabetesRecent results from the PREDIMED (Prevención con Dieta Mediterranea) study show a protective association between total legumes consumption, especially lentils, and the risk of developing subsequent type 2 diabetes after more than 4 years of follow-up of 3349 participants at high cardiovascular risk. Moreover, the present study shows that replacing a half a serving/day of eggs, bread, rice or baked
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Method identified to boost detection of highly cancerous stem cellsTokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU)-led researchers discovered a subpopulation of highly cancerous stem cells in a brain cancer cell line. The cells are not identified by standard tumor cell fluorescence detection methods. By investigating the pathways involved in breaking down the fluorescent labeling material, the research team discovered that by reducing the availability of iron they cou
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Explaining the accelerating expansion of the universe without dark energyEnigmatic dark energy, thought to make up 68% of the universe, may not exist at all, according to a Hungarian-American team. The researchers believe that standard models of the universe fail to take account of its changing structure, but that once this is done the need for dark energy disappears. The team publish their results in a paper in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gender-affirming restrooms recommended for schoolsEducational policies and practices should explicitly ensure the well-being and healthy development of all students by supporting the right of students to use a bathroom in an institutional context that affirms their gender identity and expression. There are many ways that this can occur including providing gender-neutral restrooms in schools, says Laura Wernick of Fordham University in the US, lea
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Emissions from the edge of the forestHalf of the carbon stored in all of the Earth's vegetation is contained in tropical forests. Deforestation has a correspondingly fatal effect. Scientists estimate that this releases 1,000 million tonnes of carbon every year, which, in the form of greenhouse gasses, drives up global temperatures. A team of scientists from the UFZ and the University of Maryland has discovered that fragmentation of f
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fluctuation in the concentration of calcium ions contributes to brain shapeThe first step in shaping the brain is that the neural plate, a sheet-like cell layer, curves to form the neural tube. Assistant Professor Makoto Suzuki of the National Institute for Basic Biology and their colleagues have shown that during the process of neural tube formation a transient increase in the concentration of calcium ions in cells causes these morphological changes and is essential for
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sleep-inducing herb: The key component identifiedCan't sleep? Your sleep problems may be improved if you try an Indian herb, Ashwagandha. Researchers in the sleep institute in Japan found that an active component of Ashwagandha leaves significantly induces sleep.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Red and violet light reset the circadian clock in algae via novel pathwayA Nagoya University-led team uncovered a pathway in the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that resets its circadian clock on exposure to red or violet light. This color-specific response implies multiple pathways, allowing the alga to differentially modulate its circadian rhythm in response to different light colors. The team identified a gene, CSL, involved in the red- or violet-light response. CSL
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Is it a boy or is it a girl? New method to ID baby sea turtles' sexIs it a boy or is it a girl? For baby sea turtles it's not that cut and dry. Because they don't have an X or Y chromosome, baby sea turtles' sex is defined during development by the incubation environment. Warmer sand temperatures produce more females and cooler sand temperatures produce more males. A crucial step in the conservation of these animals is estimating hatchling sex ratios, which remai
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Biodiversity not a risk factor for emerging diseases and other ecology newsIs biodiversity bad for your health? Understanding the underground dynamics of grassland mosaics. Eurasian tree sparrows feed their nestlings hoverflies, reducing biocontrol of aphids in cereals. Defusing conflict around invasive species management. Livestock grazing impact on sage-grouse depends on when and how much boxes not always the best way to understand or boost bird populations
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nanomagnets for future data storageAn international team of researchers led by chemists from ETH Zurich have developed a method for depositing single magnetizable atoms onto a surface. This is especially interesting for the development of new miniature data storage devices.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bad cold? If you're lonely, it may feel worseA Rice University-led study showed people who feel lonely are likely to report more severe symptoms from the common cold.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cold symptoms feel worse when people feel lonelyHaving a cold is bad enough, but having a cold if you're lonely can actually feel worse, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Discovery of new predatory dinosaur species gives new insight on their evolutionScientists discovered a new tyrannosaur with an unusual mode of evolution. Findings include that Daspletosaurus horneri, or 'Horner's Frightful Lizard,' evolved directly from its geologically older relative, D. torosus, a rare form of evolution called anagenesis where one species gradually morphs into a new one. The research also changes the face of tyrannosaurs, which was covered by a lipless mas
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Resilient red blood cells need fuel to adapt their shape to the environmentAn international research team led by Osaka University built a novel 'Catch-Load-Launch' microfluidic device to monitor the resilience of red blood cells after being held in a narrow channel for various periods of time. They found that the time for the red blood cell to spring back into shape was shorter for when starved of adenosine triphosphate or exposed to endotoxins. These findings may help i
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Scientific American Content: Global

Battle between Quantum and Thermodynamic Laws Heats UpPhysicists try to rebuild the laws of heat and energy for processes at a quantum scale -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Popular Science

The government won't protect your internet privacy, so here's how to do it yourself Technology Harm mitigation in a suddenly less secure internet Congress is gutting online privacy. Read on for tips to protect yourself in a much less secure internet. Read on.
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Science | The Guardian

Tyrannosaurus rex was a sensitive lover, new dinosaur discovery suggests Tyrannosaurs had sensitive snouts that they may have enjoyed rubbing together while mating, scientists say It made its name by terrorising Earth at the end of the Late Cretaceous, but Tyrannosaurus rex had a sensitive side too, researchers have found. The fearsome carnivore, which stood 20 feet tall and ripped its prey to shreds with dagger-like teeth, had a snout as sensitive to touch as human f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researcher finds ways to reduce stress in shelter dogs"Who's a good dog? You are, aren't you? Yes, you're the best dog that ever was."
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why states are pushing ahead with clean energy despite Trump's embrace of coalOn Tuesday, March 28, President Trump traveled to the Environmental Protection Agency to sign an executive order rolling back a number of climate-related regulations that have taken effect over the past eight years. The president's team claims this effort will help bring our nation closer to energy independence, and that it will begin the process of resuscitating a coal industry that has experienc
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Live Science

Coughing, Sneezing … Loneliness: Isolation Can Make Colds WorseThe lonelier a person feels, the more miserable they feel when they have a cold.
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Ingeniøren

Kronik: Skjulte regninger i udvidelse af lufthavnen - se dem her Fly
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The importance of crop genetic diversityIn North Carolina, the seventh most-productive blueberry state in the U.S., blueberries ripen between June and August. But North Carolina shoppers can buy blueberries throughout the year. That's because most people only eat a few kinds of food, so farmers around the world are growing the same crops to meet the demand of consumers thousands of miles away. As Rob Dunn points out in his new book, tha
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Molecular activity painting' to control and monitor switch-like, light-controlled perturbations inside cellsThe plasma membrane serves as a major hub for signal cascades to control crucial cellular processes. But it is a fluid medium, which makes the signaling processes difficult to monitor. Now, German scientists have designed a molecular "paintbrush" technique to trigger, control, and also monitor signaling processes. As they write in the journal Angewandte Chemie, their modular system made of light-a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Curbing coffee cup usageThe use of disposable coffee cups could be reduced by 50 – 300 million annually according to research announced today by leading coffee roaster Bewley's.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Confused by data visualisation? Here's how to cope in a world of many featuresThe late data visionary Hans Rosling mesmerised the world with his work, contributing to a more informed society. Rosling used global health data to paint a stunning picture of how our world is a better place now than it was in the past, bringing hope through data.
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Ars Technica

Beyond Zelda: The first month of Switch games acts as a promising crystal ball Enlarge / So many Switch games to play that Zelda: Breath of the Wild has been relegated to the bottom of my bin. (Insane, I know.) We've had a lot — a lot , lot , lot —to say about the new Nintendo Switch game system this past month. But if you are keeping score, you may notice that we haven't reviewed many games for the home-portable hybrid console. That's no small gap in coverage, because as w
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Gizmodo

More Details on a Mysterious Landmark in Star Wars: The Last Jedi Another name is being floated for the Akira remake. David Leitch talks about what might have been with one potential Cable for Deadpool 2 . Annabelle 2 gets a name change. Plus, new pictures from Wonder Woman , good news for The Santa Clarita Diet , and a new look at The Flash ’s return next month. Spoilers now! Star Wars: The Last Jedi Perennial rumor hounds Making Star Wars have an intriguing n
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Ars Technica

If you publish Georgia’s state laws, you’ll get sued for copyright and lose Carl Malamud of Public.Resource.Org. (credit: Kirk Walter ) If you want to read the official laws of the state of Georgia, it will cost you more than $1,000. Open-records activist Carl Malamud bought a hard copy , and it cost him $1,207.02 after shipping and taxes. A copy on CD was $1,259.41. The "good" news for Georgia residents is that they'll only have to pay $385.94 to buy a printed set from
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Dagens Medicin

Læge fyret for at have overset kræftBornholms Hospital tilbyder 198 patienter yderligere undersøgelse for at udelukke risiko for oversete forandringer i tarmen. Det sker efter manglende kvalitet fra en af hospitalets læger, der blev afskediget i september.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

New tyrannosaur had a sensitive sideTyrannosaurs may have had sensitive snouts that detected temperature and touch.
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Futurity.org

Shrinking habitat may turn animals into easy targets As some animals decline in number, the geographic areas they inhabit can also shrink, causing remaining animals to be easy, affordable targets for hunting and fishing—and at even greater risk for extinction. “We often think of species like elephants and bluefin tunas as being over-harvested because of their high market value,” says lead author Matt Burgess, a postdoctoral researcher in the Sustai
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Helping refugee children to read—with computer gamesSome 2.5 million Syrian children receive no education in Arabic because of conflict in their homeland. They reside mainly in neighbouring countries, such as Turkey and Jordan, where they often receive little or no schooling at all.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Advances make reduced graphene oxide electronics feasibleResearchers at North Carolina State University have developed a technique for converting positively charged (p-type) reduced graphene oxide (rGO) into negatively charged (n-type) rGO, creating a layered material that can be used to develop rGO-based transistors for use in electronic devices.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Who feels the pain of science research budget cuts?Science funding is intended to support the production of new knowledge and ideas that develop new technologies, improve medical treatments and strengthen the economy. The idea goes back to influential engineer Vannevar Bush, who headed the U.S. Office of Scientific Research and Development during World War II. And the evidence is that science funding does have these effects.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In China and Pakistan's coal romance, where's the love for the climate?If you were travelling via motorway from Islamabad to Lahore during November or December 2016, you might have felt like your head was in the clouds. That's thanks to the smog that engulfed large parts of Pakistan's Punjab and Sindh provinces in that period.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The dangers of the dark webThe dark web—which utilizes a technology created by military researchers in the 1990s to allow intelligence operatives to exchange information completely anonymously—is unknown to many. It's been said to be a breeding ground for organized crime, sex traffickers, and hackers. But it's also used by good actors, including whistle-blowers and activists.
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Gizmodo

This Tyrannosaur Used a 'Sixth Sense' to Hunt Its Prey A newly-discovered tyrannosaur that lived 75 million years ago in what is now Montana is offering insights into the facial features and uncanny senses of these fearsome prehistoric beasts. Like modern crocodiles, tyrannosaurs had faces covered with highly sensitive scales that allowed them to sense the slightest changes to their environment—like their next meal trying to avoid detection. As if ty
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The beginning of the end of orderClassical physics states that a crystal consists of perfectly ordered particles from a continuous symmetrical atomic structure. The Mermin-Wagner theorem from 1966 broke with this view: it states that in one-dimensional and two-dimensional atomic structures (for example in an atomic chain or membrane) there cannot be perfect ordering of particles over long ranges.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

PolyU develops accurate contactless 3-D fingerprint identification systemThe research team of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) has developed a system for three-dimensional (3-D) fingerprint identification by adopting ground breaking 3-D fingerprint minutiae recovery and matching technology, pushing contactless biometric technology into a new realm of speed and accuracy for use in identification, crime investigation, immigration control, security of access a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Modern alchemy creates luminescent iron moleculesA group of researchers at Lund University in Sweden have made the first iron-based molecule capable of emitting light. This could contribute to the development of affordable and environmentally friendly materials for e.g. solar cells, light sources and displays.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cancer cells disguise themselves by switching off genes, new research revealsScientists have uncovered how tumor cells in aggressive uterine cancer can switch disguises and spread so quickly to other parts of the body. In a study published in Neoplasia, researchers at the Washington University School of Medicine created a map showing which genes were switched on and off in different parts of the tumor, providing a 'signature' of these switches throughout the genome.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genetic errors associated with heart health may guide drug developmentA new study of such 'beneficial' genetic mutations, led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, may provide guidance on the design of new therapies intended to reduce the risk of heart attacks.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Penn State study shows aphasia may not solely be a language disorderAphasia, a language disorder commonly diagnosed in stroke patients, may not be solely a language issue as traditionally believed, according to a Penn State study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tests can help quantify automatic empathy and moral intuitionsWhen people scan the latest political headlines or watch a video from a war-ravaged land, they tend to feel snap ethical or moral responses first and reason through them later. Now a team of psychologists have developed news tests and mathematical models that help to capture and quantify those snap moral and empathetic judgments.
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Warmth of Friendship, the Chill of BetrayalThanks to some evolutionary hardwiring in the brain and body, our physical and psychological temperatures are linked -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New on MIT Technology Review

The Download, Mar 30, 2017: AI’s Future, Nevada’s Lithium Rush, and a Robotic TentacleThe most fascinating and important news in technology and innovation delivered straight to your inbox, every day.
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Ars Technica

How many NSA spy hubs are scooping up your Internet data? I counted 7 Enlarge A couple of years ago, when I was investigating the UK's safest ISP , a high-ranking employee at Virgin Media told me there was no NSA or GCHQ Internet traffic interception equipment hiding within Virgin's network. He also said that, in his opinion, not much traffic interception actually occurs in the UK. I asked him why. "Because they don't need to. They'll get your data when lands in th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sensor warns when oil in CHP plants is no longer up to the jobThanks to a new sensor system developed collaboratively by Professor Andreas Schütze and his research team at Saarland University and a group of industrial project partners, unnecessary oil changes could well be a thing of the past. The new system can provide operators of combined heat and power plants with reliable continuous feedback on the current state of the oil. And the system can also warn
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Biomaterials for the regeneration of bone and cartilage tissues from apple wasteResearchers from UPM and CSIC have employed waste from the agri-food industry to develop biomaterials that act as matrices to regenerate bone and cartilage tissues, which is of great interest for the treatment of diseases related to aging.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wood burning releases high amounts of secondary organic aerosols - current emission estimates too lowAerosol emissions from logwood combustion increase significantly when the emission ages in ambient air. A significant increase occurs already within three hours of aging, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. The emission increase was caused by the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in which gaseous organic compounds, released during the combustion, oxidise an
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Yes, academics tend to be left wing – but let's not exaggerate itThe accusation that that academia is disproportionately left-wing and liberal is not a new one. Nor is the main thrust of the claim, in a report by the Adam Smith Institute, contentious. Many accept that academics tend towards the left, even if we cannot be sure of precise levels of inclination or whether the tendency is on the rise. The more important issue is whether or not this actually matters
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Explaining the accelerating expansion of the universe without dark energyEnigmatic 'dark energy', thought to make up 68% of the universe, may not exist at all, according to a Hungarian-American team. The researchers believe that standard models of the universe fail to take account of its changing structure, but that once this is done the need for dark energy disappears. The team publish their results in a paper in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

To really help U.S. workers, we should invest in robotsAmerica's manufacturing heyday is gone, and so are millions of jobs, lost to modernization. Despite what Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin might think, the National Bureau of Economic Research and Silicon Valley executives, among many others, know it's already happening. And a new report from PwC estimates that 38 percent of American jobs are at "high risk" of being replaced by technology within t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Take a peek inside Blue Origin's new Shepard crew capsuleBlue Origin founder Jeff Bezos provided a sneak peek today into the interior of the New Shepard crew capsule, the suborbital vehicle for space tourism. He released a few images which illustrate what the flight experience might be like on board.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

An epigenetic lesion could be responsible for acute T-cell leukemiaResearchers from the Epigenetics and Cancer Biology Program (PEBC) led by Dr. Manel Esteller at IDIBELL have discovered how an epigenetic lesion can lead to T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The article, published in the journal Leukemia, correlates the lesion with the activation of a powerful oncogen capable of malignizing this type of cells of the immune system.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NUS scientists discover novel vulnerabilities in dengue virusA team of researchers from the National University of Singapore has uncovered hidden vulnerabilities on the surface of the dengue virus.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Watch rotating horns of Venus at dawnHave you seen it yet? An old friend greeted us on an early morning run yesterday as we could easily spy brilliant Venus in the dawn, just three days after inferior conjunction this past Saturday on March 25th.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Silicon sandwiches feed LHC's upgraded collision appetiteIn a special, dust-free, clean laboratory, straddling the Swiss-French border, a group of physicists spend their time probing hand-sized hexagons of silicon. These hexagons are a fraction of a millimetre thick and are made up of over a hundred smaller hexagons, individual sensors each roughly one centimeter across. Together with layers of metal, the sensors will form a new subdetector to replace p
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Science | The Guardian

Ken Harrap obituaryCancer researcher whose work on drug development had a major impact on life expectancy Ken Harrap, who has died aged 85, was a pioneer in the development of anti-cancer drugs. The research he directed over several decades in the UK resulted in the discovery of three registered cancer drugs, carboplatin, raltitrexed and abiraterone, an outstanding achievement. When Ken was born there were no effect
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Ingeniøren

Regeringen afsætter 27,5 millioner til udvikling af droneteknologiFire projekter finansieret af Uddannelses- og Forskningsministeriet skal udvikle droneteknologi til dansk erhvervsliv.
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The Atlantic

Hip-Hop Adds a Chapter to the Flute’s Epic History When Future’s “Mask Off” was released earlier this year, the internet remixed its bittersweet tale of drug use with video syncs of kids, cartoons, and Ron Burgundy playing the flute—mimicking the woodwind sample from Tommy Butler’s “Prison Song” looped in the beat. The meme highlighted the flute’s often-cheeky portrayal in pop culture, but also its relatively unusual place in hip-hop until recent
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The Scientist RSS

TS Picks: March 30, 2017Obama administration’s science advisers stick together; “allies confident” NIH Director Francis Collins can dissuade Congress from approving drastic budget cuts; how Brexit may affect scientists
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Optically excited structural transition fastest electronic switch ever observed(Phys.org)—A team of researchers from several institutions in Germany has used laser pulses to change an atomic wire from an insulator to a metal and back again in what the group describes as the fastest electronic switch ever observed. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the team describes their experiments testing the boundaries of phase transition speeds, which have proven that it c
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mobile phones are not always a cure for poverty in remote regionsA mobile phone is typically the first and only modern information communication technology for inhabitants of the most remote rural areas around world.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

CO2 clathrate hydrate propertiesClathrate hydrates (Fig. 1) are cage-like structures of water molecules that house guest gas species. They form when the gas interacts with ice under high-pressure and low-temperature conditions, and are thought to influence the surface geology and composition of icy bodies in the Solar System. Although the importance of clathrates has long been recognised, previous studies of their formation and
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US astronaut breaks record for most spacewalks by a womanAmerican astronaut Peggy Whitson made history when she floated outside the International Space Station on Thursday, breaking the record for the most spacewalks by a woman.
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Dana Foundation

Upcoming Brain Events in New York City This year’s Brain Awareness Week (BAW) was another success with over 850 registered events worldwide (including 42 countries and 44 states)! We spoke with BAW partners from Korea , Israel , and the US , and went to the Rubin Museum of Art in NYC to learn more about perception with their Brainwave series. For those of you living in the NYC area, if you weren’t able to attend any local events, it’s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Deadly pathogen to cure itself?A Massey professor of microbiology has led new research that could yield a vaccine against an emerging deadly pathogen that has proven resistant to various treatments.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Harmful bacteria discovered in both amphibians and mammalsBrucella bacteria have a not-so-illustrious reputation for causing illness and death in mammals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fungal viruses cross the barriers between distantly related fungal speciesAccording to research conducted at the Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), some fungal viruses (mycoviruses) that infect fungi associated with forest trees are able to cross the barriers between distantly related fungal species. This overturns the former theory that mycoviruses are host specific, and will create new perspectives on their possible roles in regulating forest biodiversity.
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Gizmodo

All Of Your Favorite Razer Gaming Gear Is On Sale In Amazon's Gold Box, Today Only Razer makes some of your favorite gaming mice and keyboards , and a huge chunk of its lineup is on sale in today’s Amazon Gold Box . Highlights include the iconic DeathAdder Chroma for $35 , the BlackWidow Tournament Edition Chroma for $98 , and even the Blade Stealth Ultrabook for $800 , but head over to Amazon to find a lot more peripherals , plus several bundles that include mouse pads . Just
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The Scientist RSS

Paralyzed Man Moves Arm with NeuroprostheticTwo chips implanted in a quadriplegic patient’s motor cortex and 36 electrodes in his right arm allow the man to control the movement of his right arm and hand.
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The Scientist RSS

Study: Diet Contributes to Brain SizeThe results of a historical primate behavior analysis suggest that species with fruit-filled diets evolved larger brains.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Even short-duration heat waves could lead to failure of coffee crops"Hot coffee" is not a good thing for java enthusiasts when it refers to plants beset by the high-temperature stress that this century is likely to bring, research at Oregon State University suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fewer malfunctions and lower costs thanks to smarter maintenance modelResearchers at the University of Twente have developed a mathematical model for improving the maintenance schedule for trains, rails, aircraft, self-driving cars, robots and nuclear power plants.
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Futurity.org

When should climate prompt us to abandon land? An ever-changing climate can put certain regions in the crosshairs of coastal flooding, heavy rain, erosion, and other risks. Now scientists have charted landscapes to clarify when and how to implement “managed retreat,” the relocation or abandonment of development in the face of extreme weather risks. “Many people have an apocalyptic vision of what managed retreat means—ripping people out of the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Student writing project exposes NYC's illegal ivory tradeIn spring 2016, student Wendy Hapgood walked around midtown Manhattan, visiting antique stores advertising mammoth ivory for sale that she found on Google maps. "Mammoth tusk is so interesting," she explained, "A piece of ancient past, a long extinct mammal, dug up in the tundra in Russia, sent to China for carving, then finding its way here."
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Neon NeuronsNeuroscientists combined a variety of techniques—drawing, optical engineering, and gold-etching—to create this artistic depiction of the human brain.
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Dagens Medicin

Hovedstaden skal redegøre for problemer med FMK og SundhedsplatformFormanden for FMKs styregruppe har rettet henvendelse til Region Hovedstaden omkring problemer med Sundhedsplatformen og Fælles Medicinkort.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Roosters are nicer to their relatives than to other malesMale domestic fowl are less aggressive towards related males than to unrelated males when competing for copulations, according to a new study from Linköping University in Sweden. This finding, which has been published in the scientific journal Behavioral Ecology, suggests that domestic fowl can recognise their kin among individuals in a group, and that their behaviour is different towards kin and
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Designing cities to withstand natural disastersWhat happens after Cyclone Debbie is a familiar process. It has been repeated many times in cities around the world. The reason is that our cities are not designed for these types of events.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nanomagnets for future data storageAn international team of researchers led by chemists from ETH Zurich have developed a method for depositing single magnetisable atoms onto a surface. This is especially interesting for the development of new miniature data storage devices.
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Gizmodo

Here Are The Jobs NASA Can't Fill Because of Trump's Stupid Hiring Freeze President Trump makes gestures in the Oval Office on March 21, 2017 to show that if humans really wanted to get to the moon all they needed to do was move their arms like this (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images) One of President Trump’s first actions after taking office was to institute a federal hiring freeze, leaving thousands of jobs vacant across the US government. Many of these jobs are in age
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New Scientist - News

Tadpoles learn to see with new eyes transplanted on their tailsA migraine drug seems to help nerve cells connect to new eyes implanted into blind tadpoles. The drug may prove useful for wiring up new organs in people
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study shows the importance of coastal water quality to recreational beach usersCoasts around the world are threatened by land-based pollutants, including sewage, which affect water quality, coastal habitats and human experiences. To capture the value people place on the coastal environment, UH ecological economist Kirsten L.L. Oleson and former MS student Marcus Peng recently published a study in the journal Ecological Economics. Titled "Beach Recreationalists' Willingness t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Increase in gas prices associated with increase in child maltreatmentIncreases in gasoline prices are associated with increases in child maltreatment referral rates, finds a new study from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Finding a 'lost' planet, about the size of NeptuneYale astronomers have discovered a "lost" planet that is nearly the size of Neptune and tucked away in a solar system 3,000 light years from Earth.
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Live Science

150 Years Ago Today, the US Bought AlaskaThe U.S. bought Alaska for $7.2 million, though the region's worth wasn't realized until three decades later when Alaskans struck gold.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cuts to sole parent benefits are human rights violationsSole parents in Australia are economically vulnerable and are experiencing ongoing cuts to their social security. Legislation limiting welfare benefits that was rushed through the Senate last week will make many of them poorer – but how is this a human rights issue?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Who gains most from high-skilled foreign workers?Foreign computer scientists granted H-1B visas to work in the United States during the IT boom of the 1990s had a significant impact on workers, consumers and tech companies.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers work on carbon dioxide capture systemsA Missouri University of Science and Technology researcher and her team are developing technology that could help keep astronauts safe from carbon dioxide buildup during flight and aboard the International Space Station.
4h
WIRED

Watch SpaceX Launch Its First Truly Reusable Rocket This is the first time SpaceX—or any commercial space company—has attempted to reuse a rocket to send something into orbit. The post Watch SpaceX Launch Its First Truly Reusable Rocket appeared first on WIRED .
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Scientific American Content: Global

Growth Spurts May Determine a Lamprey's SexThe parasitic fish could be the first case of growth-dependent sex determination -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Popular Science

Climate change contributes to mental illness Health It makes us a little nuts A new report highlights the ways in which climate change can hurt our mental health. Read on:…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

An enzyme keeps the parasites of the genome in check and turns them into an evolutionary advantageJumping genes are double-edged sword: By copying and integrating themselves into other parts of the genome these so-called transposons can lead to a variety of genetic disorders such as haemophilia or breast cancer. On the other hand the mobile DNA bits can create new genes and new gene expression programs. This is crucial for maintaining high genetic variability and adaptability to environmental
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers look for genetic clues to help grapes survive coldMonths before northern vineyards burst into their lush summer peak, the delicate grape buds holding the nascent fruit in its tiny core must first withstand the freezing onslaught of winter.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Red Planet versus Dead Planet: Scientists Debate Next Destination for Astronauts in SpaceNearly a half-century after humans voyaged to the moon, NASA and private U.S. companies are once again setting their sights beyond low Earth orbit -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team predicts increasing decline of hemlock as winters warmLand managers in New England and eastern New York state have a new tool to help identify eastern hemlock stands at greatest risk for rapid growth decline by evaluating stresses on the trees, including response to the hemlock woolly adelgid and changes resulting from a warming climate.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: The splitting of the dunesThe mound in the center of this Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) image appears to have blocked the path of the dunes as they marched south (north is to the left in this image) across the scene. Many of these transverse dunes have slipfaces that face south, although in some cases, it's hard to tell for certain. Smaller dunes run perpendicular to some of the larger-scale dunes, probably indicating
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WIRED

If You Want a VPN to Protect Your Privacy, Start Here A VPN's not a perfect solution to your privacy problems, but it's a start. The post If You Want a VPN to Protect Your Privacy, Start Here appeared first on WIRED .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In new research on social networks, 'a mathematical argument for stable families or for stable friendships'Large social networks foster connections by erasing national, geographic, and even linguistic barriers. But when it comes to fostering cooperation, global connectivity leaves something to be desired, new research says.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Unique genome architectures after fertilisation in single-cell embryosUsing a newly developed method, researchers at the Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (IMBA) have been able to shed light on the complexity of genome reorganization occurring during the first hours after fertilization in the single-cell mammalian embryo. Their findings have recently been published in the journal Nature. The team of researchers (from three cont
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Improved variety of guayule plant as a natural source of tire rubberRubber is a substance usually made from petroleum or from the Asian rubber tree plant. But rubber can also be produced from a domestic plant called "guayule." Guayule is a woody desert shrub cultivated in the southwestern United States as a source of natural rubber (latex), organic resins, and high-energy biofuel feedstock.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Reasons behind mosquitoes' unusual flight behaviour identified in new studyThe reason behind mosquitoes' unusual flight behaviour has long puzzled scientists. The angular sweep of their wings is around 40 degrees, which is less than half that of the honey bee, prompting speculation over how they fly at all.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Inventing tools for detecting life elsewhereRecently, astronomers announced the discovery that a star called TRAPPIST-1 is orbited by seven Earth-size planets. Three of the planets reside in the "habitable zone," the region around a star where liquid water is most likely to exist on the surface of a rocky planet. Other potentially habitable worlds have also been discovered in recent years, leaving many people wondering: How do we find out i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Prolific Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter completes 50,000 orbitsThe most data-productive spacecraft yet at Mars swept past its 50,000th orbit this week, continuing to compile the most sharp-eyed global coverage ever accomplished by a camera at the Red Planet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Expanding super bubble of gas detected around massive black holes in the early universeIn a study led by Sandy Morais, a PhD student at Instituto de Astrofísica e Ciências do Espaço and Faculty of Sciences of the University of Porto (FCUP), researchers found massive super bubbles of gas and dust around two distant radio galaxies about 11.5 billion light years away.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The last caimans living in SpainSixteen million years ago, the reptile Diplocynodon ratelii lived in wooded ecosystems among the lakes and pools of what we know today as Catalonia (Spain). Fossils found at the Els Casots site in the Vallès-Penedès Basin confirm not only that these are the most recent remains of the genus in the Iberian Peninsula, but also that temperatures at the time were higher than today's.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New smart system to reduce queues at roundaboutsLong queues at certain approaches to some roundabouts could be reduced using magnetic detection devices under the road surface that would activate a traffic metering signal at another, less congested approach. Researchers at the Universitat Politecnica de Valencia (Spain) have released a guide for technicians to implement this intelligent traffic system, already used on roundabouts in Australia an
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Future of Asian luxury cars, electric vehicles at auto showSouth Korea's largest auto show provides a look at the future of Asian premium cars and electric vehicles, as well as efforts by Asian auto and tech companies to catch up in the field of autonomous driving.
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Ars Technica

Sands of Titan may dance to their own static electricity Enlarge / The lakes of Titan may have highly charged dunes on their shores. (credit: NASA ) Granular flows are, not to put too fine a point on it, horrible. In some situations, they flow like a normal fluid, but a minuscule change will cause the flow to jam. In the right situation, the particles will experience enough friction to pick up charge. Then, if the particles are fine enough, the static
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Latest Headlines | Science News

For kids, daily juice probably won’t pack on the poundsAn analysis of existing studies suggests that regular juice drinking isn’t linked to much weight gain in kids.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Ghost in the Sell: Hollywood's Mischievous Vision of AIWith the new sci-fi flick Ghost in the Shell hitting theaters this week, Scientific American asks artificial intelligence experts which movies, if any, have gotten AI right -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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WIRED

Inside Cheddar, the Would-Be CNBC of the Internet The company's big plan is to be everywhere video is---everywhere but your cable box. The post Inside Cheddar, the Would-Be CNBC of the Internet appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Questlove and the Art of the Subversive Musical Dig The Roots---the house band of The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon ---are known for sneaking flyby jabs into 10-second snippets of walk­-on music. The post Questlove and the Art of the Subversive Musical Dig appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Our Favorite Trump-Era Headlines From The Onion At a time when Republicans and Democrats alike are fond of flinging around the term "fake news," The Onion is reveling in the absurdity of it all. The post Our Favorite Trump-Era Headlines From The Onion appeared first on WIRED .
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The Atlantic

Today's News: March 30, 2017 —Lawmakers in North Carolina and the state’s governor have reached an agreement to repeal HB2, its controversial “bathroom” bill. —The number of refugees from the Syrian civil war has exceeded 5 million for the first time, the UN says. —We’re tracking the news stories of the day below. All updates are in Eastern Daylight Time (GMT -4). Read On »
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cognitive science

The Psychological Benefits of Being Alone. Under the right circumstances, choosing to spend time alone can be a huge psychological boon. submitted by /u/symonsymone [link] [comments]
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Ingeniøren

Ledelse og venskab er en giftig cocktail 60 procent af de IDA-medlemmer, der er ledere, bliver rekrutteret internt i den virksomhed, de er ansat i – og derfor risikerer de at være venner med deres medarbejdere. Men det er farligt for autoriteten som leder, fastslår karriererådgiver i IDA Kim Knudsen https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/ledelse-venskab-giftig-cocktail-7258 Jobfinder
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Ingeniøren

USA vil lade internetudbydere sælge brugernes historik: Aktivist varsler nu offensivt modangreb De seneste uger har amerikanske politikere nærmet sig en tilladelse til ISP’er, så de kan sælge deres kunders internet-data. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/amerikanske-politikere-vil-tillade-internetudbydere-at-saelge-historik-aktivist-lover-at Version2
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Ingeniøren

SpaceX er klar til at skrive rumfartshistorie i nat – kig selv medElon Musks rumfartsselskab vil forsøge at sende en genbrugt Falcon 9-raket i kredsløb om Jorden. Hvis det lykkes, er det første gang, at en central del af en løfteraket genbruges på den måde.
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Dagens Medicin

Ny immunterapi i tabletform på vej til flere allergiområder Immunterapi har været en stor forandring for patienter med allergi. Det ser ud til at tabletbehandlingen vil blive udvidet til patienter, der ikke kan tåle birkepollen eller dyr. Samtidig bliver der eksperimenteret med intralymfatisk immunterapi.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blind tadpoles learn visually with eyes grafted onto tail, neurotransmitter drug treatmentBlind tadpoles were able to process visual information from eyes grafted onto their tails after being treated with a small molecule neurotransmitter drug that augmented innervation, integration, and function of the transplanted organs. The work, which used a pharmacological reagent already approved for use in humans, provides a potential road map for promoting innervation -- the supply of nerves t
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The Atlantic

Building Social Change From the Bottom Up LaVonte Stewart was a Little League coach between jobs. Sister Tesa Fitzgerald was a nun with a long career in Catholic education. Chelina Odbert and her five friends were students at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. Tara Libert and Kelli Taylor were TV journalists. Kate Barnhart was running a shelter for LGBT youth. Each was doing something else when they felt a calling to start a civic or
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Ingeniøren

Nu kommer der bedre mobildækning på togturen over broerneNye mobilmaster langs jernbanerne på Storebælt og Øresund skal give bedre mobilforbindelser i tog på broer og i tunneller.
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Ingeniøren

EU: Politiet skal have adgang til data fra apps - ellers vil vi lovgive om bagdøre EU-Kommissionen vil i juni annoncere op til fire bud på, hvordan apps som WhatsApp kan give politi og efterretningstjenester adgang til krypteret brugerindhold. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/eu-apps-skal-give-politiet-adgang-ellers-vil-vi-kraeve-bagdoere-med-lov-1075069 Version2
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Science : NPR

A Surprising Explanation For Why Some Immigrants Excel In Science It has to do with language learning, according to a new study from Duke University. (Image credit: Chris Ayers/Society for Science & the Public)
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Gizmodo

Australia Hit by Real Life Sharknado A dead shark found in Ayr, Queensland, Australia after Cyclone Debbie made landfall this week (Queensland Fire and Emergency Services Twitter) The Australian state of Queensland was hit hard this week by a vicious tropical cyclone. And while there has been property damage, thankfully no one was seriously injured by Cyclone Debbie. Well, no one, unless you count this 5-foot long shark that was fou
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Science : NPR

EPA Says It Will Allow Continued Sale Of Controversial Pesticide The EPA is not going ahead with a proposed ban on a pesticide called chlorpyrifos, saying there's still scientific uncertainty over its safety. Environmental groups say it can harm young children.
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NYT > Science

Trump Leaves Science Jobs Vacant, Troubling CriticsScores of scientists and technology experts have left the White House, and conservatives — and the president — have questioned whether they need to be replaced.
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Science : NPR

Fewer Zika-Linked Birth Defects Than Expected Scientists expected a surge of severe birth defects in Brazil because of the Zika outbreak. But that didn't happen last year. Researchers are re-examining the link between Zika and birth defects.
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Ingeniøren

Nyt koncept vil producere fremtidens fjernvarme uden ildUdviklingselskabet European Energy mener, at fremtidens fjernvarme skal leveres af overskudsstrøm fra sol og vind via kæmpestore varmelagre. Et projekt er undervejs i Esbjerg, og selskabet har også regnet på et projekt for forsyning af hele København med konceptet.
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Opdagelse af enzym kan give ny behandling af æggestokkræftEn forskergruppe fra Københavns Universitet har fundet et enzym, som har stor betydning for udviklingen...
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Anti-cancer drug gets a boost when combined with antirheumaticScientists at EPFL and NTU have discovered that combining an anticancer drug with an antirheumatic produces improved effects against tumors. The discovery opens a new path for drug-drug synergy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study says best-looking politicians lean right, best-looking scholars lean leftAccording to research by Berggren, Jordahl and Poutvaara, in elections run in Australia, the European Union, Finland and the United States, right-leaning politicians are generally more attractive than left-leaning politicians. The current study by Professor Jan-Erik Lönnqvist shows that this applies specifically to politicians and does not mean that right-leaning people on the whole are more attra
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A novel method that helps reducing noise problems produced by road trafficScientists from the universities of Granada (UGR) and Southampton (United Kingdom) have designed a new method to reduce noise problems caused by road traffic, one of the main environmental impacts of roads, and which has important effects on people's health and their physical and psychological well-being.
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The Atlantic

What Do Right-Leaning Populists Actually Want? Do populist Republicans want a federal government where politicians stand on principle and refuse to compromise? Or do they want a pragmatist to make fabulous deals? The intra-Republican conflict highlighted by last week’s failure to repeal or replace Obamacare is usefully understood as a consequence of confusion on those questions. Elected officials associated with the Tea Party, or the House Fr
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The Atlantic

The Virtues of Isolation In the ’80s, the Italian journalist and author Tiziano Terzani, after many years of reporting across Asia, holed himself up in a cabin in Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan. “For a month I had no one to talk to except my dog Baoli,” he wrote in his travelogue A Fortune Teller Told Me . Terzani passed the time with books, observing nature, “listening to the winds in the trees, watching butterflies, enjoyin
7h
Ingeniøren

Enhedslisten vil have sporingschip i alle cyklerDigitale stelnumre på danske cykler ligger nu på de folkevalgtes bord, og folketingets partier skal i løbet af foråret beslutte, om alle danske cykler skal kunne spores. Det åbner for overvågning, mener kritikere.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Samsung eyes rebound with Galaxy S8 phones, virtual assistantSamsung on Wednesday unveiled its new Galaxy S8 smartphones, incorporating the virtual assistant Bixby, as the market leader seeks to rebound from a chaotic handset recall and a corruption scandal.
8h
The Atlantic

The Many Ironies of Mick Mulvaney Is it just me, or does Mick Mulvaney look a bit tense lately? You could hardly blame the guy. The Great Republican Health Care Meltdown has been rough on the White House budget director, who was a central player in President Trump’s push to save the GOP’s floundering plan. But as the House vote approached, Mulvaney found himself increasingly at odds with a chunk of the conservative Freedom Caucus
8h
The Atlantic

Democrats Go to War Over Neil Gorsuch There’s an easy way and a hard way for the Senate to confirm Judge Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court, and it appears Democrats are going to make Republicans do it the hard way. That Gorsuch would ultimately take the late Justice Antonin Scalia’s seat on the high court has scarcely been in doubt in the weeks since President Trump nominated him 11 days after he took office. A well-regarded judge on
8h
Dagens Medicin

HIV-forsker modtager Hagedorn Prisen Hagedorn Prisen 2017 går til professor og overlæge Jens D. Lundgren fra klinik for infektionsmedicin på Rigshospitalet.
8h
Ingeniøren

Knaphed på sensorer forsinker fremtidens bilerUdviklingen af autonome køretøjer sker så hastigt, at den bagvedliggende industri halser efter. Bilproducenter må vente et halvt år på lidarer - de sensorer der lader deres selvkørende modeller se verden.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Underwater wasteland' worries after cyclone hits Barrier ReefA powerful cyclone that smashed into northeastern Australia could have caused further damage to the under-pressure Great Barrier Reef, turning parts into an "underwater wasteland", scientists warned Thursday.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Federal agency refuses to ban pesticide used on cropsPresident Donald Trump's administration denied a petition by environmental groups that sought to ban a common pesticide used on citrus fruits, apples, cherries and other crops, reversing a push by the Obama administration to revoke all uses of the pesticide on food after a government review concluded it could harm children's brains.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US climate science hearing descends into bullying 'food-fight'Lawmakers and scientists called names, lamented Soviet-era tactics and accused each other of wrongdoing at a nearly three-hour hearing on climate science in the US capital on Wednesday.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study: Early Americas girl 'Naia' may have been young motherMore details have emerged about one of the oldest sets of human remains found in the Americas, a young woman nicknamed "Naia" whose nearly complete skeleton was discovered in 2007 in a water-filled cave in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Westinghouse's woes spotlight US nuclear sector's declineWestinghouse's bankruptcy announcement cast a pall over the future of nuclear energy in the United States and comes as the Trump administration seeks to revive the coal industry.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

SpaceX poised to launch first recycled rocketSpaceX is poised to launch its first recycled rocket on Thursday, using a booster that sent food and supplies to the astronauts living at the International Space Station in April.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A faster single-pixel camera: New technique greatly reduces the number of exposures necessary for 'lensless imaging'Compressed sensing is an exciting new computational technique for extracting large amounts of information from a signal. In one high-profile demonstration, for instance, researchers at Rice University built a camera that could produce 2-D images using only a single light sensor rather than the millions of light sensors found in a commodity camera.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study finds that napping flies have higher resistance to deadly human pathogenA new University of Maryland study has found that fruit flies genetically coded to take frequent naps had the strongest resistance to both a fungal infection and to a bacteria that the World Health Organization says is one of the world's most dangerous superbugs for humans.
9h
Dagens Medicin

Forskere får million­bevilling til at forske i pludselig død og hjertestopEn gruppe forskere har fået en EU-bevilling på 10 mio. kr. til at finde svar på, hvorfor så mange pludselig dør eller falder om med hjertestop.
10h
Ingeniøren

Sådan udtrykker du dig, så selv journalister kan forstå det Fagfolk skal droppe deres skepsis over for journalister. Det vil gavne deres forskning, mener forfatteren bag bog om journalistiske værktøjer, som er målrettet forskere. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/sadan-udtrykker-du-dig-sa-selv-journalister-kan-forsta-7209 Jobfinder
10h
Ingeniøren

Nyt værktøj fra Nets: Nu skal danske banker tilbyde konti til Bitcoin-brugere Et dansk analyseværktøj skal gennem Nets lade banker håndtere Bitcoins uden frygt for reguleringshammer. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/nets-indgaar-fintech-samarbejde-vil-lade-banker-tilbyde-konti-bitcoin-brugere-1075051 Version2
10h
Gizmodo

No, The Daily Show Didn't Get Hacked Earlier tonight, the broadcast of The Daily Show was briefly interrupted by a blip of stock war footage, a spinning ballerina, and a web address with a Russian domain name. The internet quickly assumed that the late night comedy show had been hacked. It wasn’t. Simply put this was a dumb publicity stunt designed to play on the fears surrounding the ongoing investigation into Russia’s interference
11h
Ingeniøren

Aktindsigt: Derfor fik KMD ordren på Skats betalingssystem - trods stævning KMD skal drifte og videreudvikle systemet Skattekontoen for Skat, fordi man tilbød den laveste pris. Og til trods for, at KMD ikke fik højeste point på kvalitet. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/skat-valgte-kmd-it-system-trods-kaempe-staevning-laes-forklaringen-her-1074626 Version2
12h
Ingeniøren

Islamisk Stat klistrer vinger og granater på hobbydronerIslamisk Stat er begyndt at bevæbne droner med hjemmelavede bomber og granater. De bruger dronerne som våben - enten som bombefly, der kaster eksplosiver ned fra himlen, eller i direkte angreb, hvor de flyver droner ind i deres mål, så de eksploderer.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Napping flies have higher resistance to deadly human pathogenA new University of Maryland study finds that fruit flies that take frequent naps have the strongest resistance to both a fungal infection and to Drosophila 'superbug' bacteria. The unexpected finding of dual resistance to the two different pathogens suggests genes regulating factors involved in general immune system resistance to disease played a bigger role than did the genes conferring disease-
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When it comes to biological populations, expect the unexpectedMore than three decades of data on the physical, chemical and biological variables in 11 Midwestern lakes show that while lake temperatures and nutrient concentrations rise within relatively expected ranges, biological organisms achieve high population extremes.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

When it comes to biological populations, expect the unexpectedHuman beings are familiar with the idea of extreme events. Meteorologists keep us up to date on hurricanes, floods and high temperatures. Economists watch the stock market for signs of crashes or rallies. We spend a lot of time trying to better predict these events, yet are often surprised when they occur.
12h
Live Science

Facts About Humpback WhalesHumpback whales are known for their haunting songs and amazing aerial acrobatic displays.
12h
Live Science

Wrong-Way, Daredevil Asteroid Plays 'Chicken' with JupiterAstronomers have found a bizarre asteroid orbiting the sun in the wrong direction while playing a risky game of "chicken" with the largest planet in the solar system.
12h
New on MIT Technology Review

Baidu’s Plan for Artificial Intelligence without Andrew NgThe Chinese search giant lost the star leader of its AI lab last week, but the technology remains an essential long-term focus.
12h
Gizmodo

Uber Is Trying to Keep Its Court Battle With Google Out of the Public Eye Photo: AP Last month Google filed a lawsuit against Uber alleging that the ridesharing company colluded with a former Google engineer to steal trade secrets and proprietary designs from the Waymo self-driving car unit. Today, Uber’s lawyers filed a motion to move the case into the dark hole of arbitration. The motion revealed for the first time that Google had previously filed two arbitration dem
13h
Gizmodo

Let's Dive Into the Villain's Big Move on Legion's Season Finale Legion just aired its first season finale, and all I can say is “Hell. Yes.” It started off relatively slow, but that was just to get us warmed up for the plethora of twists and turns the Shadow King would hurl our way—ending in something I, in no way, predicted. I’m pretty sure I owe somebody on this site $5. So, the major event in “Chapter 8" is the moment the Shadow King leaves David’s body, r
13h
Ingeniøren

Islamisk Stat bevæbner kommercielle droner og angriber fra luften for første gangIslamisk Stat udfører et terror-pioner-arbejde med at udstyre kommercielle droner med blandt andet granater. Det øger utrygheden for koalitionens soldater, men vil næppe få indflydelse på udfaldet af krigen i Syrien og Irak, vurderer militærforskere.
13h
NYT > Science

E.P.A. Chief, Rejecting Agency’s Science, Chooses Not to Ban InsecticideE.P.A. scientists had concluded that exposure to the chemical, chlorpyrifos, which has been in use since 1965, was potentially causing significant health consequences.
13h
Gizmodo

New Footage from Justice League, Wonder Woman, and Aquaman Hits All the Right Notes A still from Justice Leauge. All Images: Warner Bros. “Tone” has been the magic word for the DC Universe since the release of Batman v Superman . Would future films get the right tone, giving audiences a sufficiently fun, superhero feeling to go along with the universe’s decidedly dark vision? Well, at CinemaCon 2017, that answer, maybe for the first time, was “Yes.” At the Las Vegas convention,
14h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Food trade drains global water sources at 'alarming' ratesThe global food trade is depleting water sources quicker than they can naturally be refilled in many places.
14h
BBC News - Science & Environment

SpaceX set to launch 'used rocket'California's SpaceX company expects to make a piece of history later when it re-flies a Falcon rocket.
14h
Gizmodo

Tesla's Latest Update For The Model S Finally Makes It Good Again Photo: Getty Tesla’s approaching the launch date for production of the Model 3 , and in the meantime continues to roll out the latest software update for owners with the latest hardware, including notable safety features and tasteful conveniences. Particularly of note, there’s several Autopilot 2.0 features. Under the 8.1 software update for Hardware 2.0 (HW2) Teslas, the max speed for Autosteer
15h
Gizmodo

Big Trouble in Little China: The Game Looks Fan-Freaking-Tastic All images: courtesy of Boris Polonsky We first heard about Big Trouble in Little China: The Game last summer, and today we’re getting a first glimpse of what the box art, game art, and—most excitingly—the miniatures will look like in the final product. Three words: Mini Egg Shen. The still-in-development game is designed by Chris Batarlis and Boris Polonsky, who are both obviously huge fans of J
15h
Blog » Languages » English

March Scythe Marathon: Results That’s a wrap! We have completed this cell in 11 hours 48 minutes. Congrats and kudos, plus a big round of applause for the Scythes, who did a stellar job overseeing their first marathon! After Happy Hour next week, we’ll also have a little cell naming ceremony based on your nominations and votes. Share This:
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Climate change's toll on mental healthWhen people think about climate change, they probably think first about its effects on the environment, and possibly on their physical health. But climate change also takes a significant toll on mental health, according to a new report.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Natural chemical helps brain adapt to stressA natural signaling molecule that activates cannabinoid receptors in the brain plays a critical role in stress-resilience -- the ability to adapt to repeated and acute exposures to traumatic stress.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Weather whiplash' triggered by changing climate will degrade Midwest's drinking waterNew research shows weather whiplash in the American Midwest's agricultural regions will drive the deterioration of water quality, forcing municipalities to seek costly remedies to provide safe drinking water to residents.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Beating deadly pneumonia with hormonesResearchers have identified a hormone that helps fight off a severe form of bacterial pneumonia, and that discovery may offer a simple way to help vulnerable patients.
16h
Ars Technica

Someone is putting lots of work into hacking Github developers Enlarge (credit: MGM ) Open source developers who use Github are in the cross-hairs of advanced malware that can steal passwords, download sensitive files, take screenshots, and self-destruct when necessary. Dimnie, as the reconnaissance and espionage trojan is known, has largely flown under the radar for the past three years. It mostly targeted Russians until early this year, when a new campaign
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cannabis use may predict opioid use in women undergoing addictions treatment, study saysResearchers have found that women in methadone treatment who use cannabis are 82 per cent more likely to continue using opioids. This means that women who use cannabis are at high risk of failing methadone treatment. Tailoring treatment to the patient's sex can help to deliver more accurate, personalized treatment.
16h
New Scientist - News

ALS linked to occupational exposure to electromagnetic fieldsPeople who work as welders, sewing-machine operators, and aircraft pilots may be more likely to develop amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a motor neurone disease
16h
Gizmodo

Jeff Bezos Had a Good Ass Day Photo: Getty Amazon founder Jeff Bezos just had one of those days that we all have from time to time. He officially became the second richest human on the planet, and he shut down a business that was founded by one of his bitter rivals. Bloomberg reports that Bezos’ personal fortune increased by a cool $1.5 billion today following a big jump in Amazon’s stock price. The $18.32 rise in the online
16h
Gizmodo

Congress Won't Protect Your Browsing History, So Do It Yourself With NordVPN For Under $4 Per Month 1 Year NordVPN , $48 with code VIP70 | 2 Year Plan , $72 with code 2YSpecial2017 One day, we might get representatives in Washington that value their constituents’ privacy over corporate profits , but until then, it’s as good a time as any to sign up for a VPN service . Luckily, it costs less per month than a typical trip to Starbucks. NordVPN has long been one of the most popular and reliable VP
16h
WIRED

Wanna Protect Your Online Privacy? Open a Tab and Make Some Noise After Tuesday's vote by the House of Representatives to strip online privacy protections, a new site aims to mask your browsing history with search noise. The post Wanna Protect Your Online Privacy? Open a Tab and Make Some Noise appeared first on WIRED .
17h
WIRED

Supercomputers Are Stocking Next Generation Drug Pipelines A new model incorporates protein, drug, and clinical data to better predict which genes are most likely make proteins that drugs can bind to. The post Supercomputers Are Stocking Next Generation Drug Pipelines appeared first on WIRED .
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research into light particles challenges understanding of quantum theoryScientists have discovered a new mechanism involved in the creation of paired light particles, which could have significant impact on the study of quantum physics.Researchers at the University of East Anglia (UEA) have shown that when photons -- the fundamental particles of light -- are created in pairs, they can emerge from different, rather than the same, location.
17h
Big Think

Here's Why Evolution Can Be "Survival of the Friendliest" The state of nature isn't a "war of all against all." Even no-brainer bacteria "know" that sometimes the game is "Survival of the Friendliest" Read More
17h
Ars Technica

Secretly recorded Planned Parenthood tapes barred from publication (credit: Pablo Ares Gastesi ) A federal appeals court on Wednesday upheld (PDF) a lower court's injunction barring anti-abortion activists from distributing video they secretly recorded of Planned Parenthood conferences and of other meetings with women's healthcare providers. A San Francisco federal judge initially handed down an injunction on the side of the National Abortion Federation in 2015,
17h
Science-Based Medicine

CVS selling homeopathic remedies: It gets personalI almost purchased a worthless homeopathic eye remedy at CVS for a cancer patient. I'm taking action to try to stop this from happening to others.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New research into light particles challenges understanding of quantum theoryScientists have discovered a new mechanism involved in the creation of paired light particles, which could have significant impact on the study of quantum physics.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Very low frequency electromagnetic field exposure linked to motor neurone diseaseWorkplace exposure to very low frequency electromagnetic fields may be linked to a doubling in risk of developing the most common form of motor neurone disease -- amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS for short -- suggests research published online in Occupational & Environmental Medicine.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Every £1 spent on public health in UK saves average of £14Every £1 spent on public health returns an extra £14 on the original investment, on average -- and in some cases, significantly more than that -- concludes a systematic review of the available evidence, published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.
17h
Big Think

Goodbye, Privacy. Your Online Browsing History May Soon Be For Sale Congress has voted to repeal online privacy rules that would have given consumers greater notice and control over their data. Internet Service Providers such as AT&T and Verizon will now be able to sell your browsing history, app usage, and geo-location. Read More
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tackling resilience: Finding order in chaos to help buffer against climate changeA new article aims to provide clarity among scientists, resource managers and planners on what ecological resilience means and how it can be achieved.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Infant vitamin B1 deficiency leads to poor motor function and balanceA new study found that infantile vitamin B1 (thiamine) deficiency severely affected the motor function of preschoolers who were fed faulty formula in the first year of their lives. The conclusions were based on a retrospective study of children who received Remedia, an Israeli formula brand completely lacking in vitamin B1, in 2004.
18h
Gizmodo

Watch: Women at Work: This First Lady Redefines the Role Editor’s note: For Women’s History Month, The Root is celebrating women from a wide range of professional industries in our video series Women at Work. “People expect women to be a certain way. They expect black women to be a certain way,” says Chirlane McCray , the wife of New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio. “You could be sitting at the table with the decision-makers, and they’ll look at the whi
18h
Live Science

X-37B Space Plane Breaks Orbital Record | VideoOn March 25, the X-37B robotic space plane broke an orbital record when it hit 675 days in orbit around Earth.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Controlling soft robots using magnetic fieldsEngineering researchers have made a fundamental advance in controlling so-called soft robots, using magnetic fields to remotely manipulate microparticle chains embedded in soft robotic devices. The researchers have already created several devices that make use of the new technique.
18h
Gizmodo

Vitals Starving Yourself Two Days a Week Is Actually Not a Bad Diet | io9 10 Banned, Censored, and C Vitals Starving Yourself Two Days a Week Is Actually Not a Bad Diet | io9 10 Banned, Censored, and Controversial Movies That Are Now Cult Classics | Kotaku Persona 5 : The Kotaku Review | Jalopnik ‘Battle Cars’ Is The Newest And Best Trend In The Auto World |
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why do we choose to get vaccinations?Since vaccines protect not only those who take them, but also the people who otherwise could have been infected, there are many plausible motives for choosing to get vaccinated. Apart from the most obvious -- wanting to protect oneself or one's children from becoming ill -- research shows that many also are affected by care for others.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Organic-inorganic heterostructures with programmable electronic propertiesResearchers have devised a novel supramolecular strategy to introduce tunable 1D periodic potentials upon self-assembly of ad hoc organic building blocks on graphene, opening the way to the realization of hybrid organic-inorganic multilayer materials with unique electronic and optical properties.
18h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Brexit Day What We’re Following Triggering Brexit: British Prime Minister Theresa May sent European Council President Donald Tusk a hand-delivered letter notifying the European Union of the U.K.’s intention to leave the 60-year-old bloc. The move comes nine months after Britons stunned the European political establishment by voting 52 percent in favor of leaving the EU, and though it’s expected to be a two-
18h
Ars Technica

Intel is keeping Moore’s Law alive by making bigger improvements less often Gordon Moore's original graph, showing projected transistor counts, long before the term "Moore's law" was coined. Moore's original observation was that transistor density doubled every year; in 1975, this was revised to doubling every two years. (credit: Intel) Intel took half a day this week to talk about processor manufacturing technology. The company still believes in Moore's Law and says the
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists predict reading ability from DNA analysis aloneResearchers have used a genetic scoring technique to predict reading performance throughout school years from DNA alone.
18h
Popular Science

The truth about climate change continues to be inconvenient in Al Gore's new trailer Environment 'An Inconvenient Truth's' sequel takes climate deniers to task Al Gore's follow-up to An Inconvenient Truth…
18h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Ride Along With Aaron! It's Mega Race in Virtual Reality (360 Video) Get inside the Gas Monkey Mega Race BMW as Aaron Kaufman takes on Farmtruck and AZN's build. See all the results: http://www.discovery.com/MegaRace Catch up with full episodes streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/fast-n-loud/ https://www.discoverygo.com/street-outlaws/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Dis
18h
Gizmodo

Is Tony Stark the World's Worst Re-Gifter? The latest trailer for Spider-Man: Homecoming has its share of hints and Easter eggs. Some big, others small. All of them pale in comparison to one shocking reveal, involving Tony Stark, Peter Parker, and a T-shirt. In the trailer, we see Tony and Peter walking through the halls of Avengers Tower as Tony explains why Peter should let others (i.e. The Avengers) handle the whole Vulture situation.
18h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Every Day Is Now Bring Your Daughter to Work Day Today in 5 Lines Ivanka Trump will become an official federal employee, serving as an unpaid adviser to the president. In a news conference, the leaders of the Senate Intelligence Committee said they have asked 20 people to be questioned as part of their investigation into alleged Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. Committee Chairman Richard Burr said the probe is “one of the
19h
The Atlantic

The Senate's No-Drama Russia Investigation As Tolstoy would have written if he were a national-security reporter, all dysfunctional committees are dysfunctional in their own way, while all functional committees are frustratingly tight-lipped. Or something like that. In any case, a Wednesday press conference by Senators Richard Burr and Mark Warner, the chairman and ranking Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee, presented a glaring
19h
Live Science

Photos: Dinosaur Tracks Reveal Australia's 'Jurassic Park'In an effort to save their culture's history, the Goolarabooloo people of Australia called in a group of paleontologists to examine thousands of dinosaur footprints.
19h
Scientific American Content: Global

Your Cat Thinks You're CoolA study of house cats and shelter cats found that the felines actually tended to choose human company over treats or toys. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
19h
Science : NPR

Where Levees Fail In California, Nature Can Step In To Nurture Rivers After devastating floods, California is looking to spend billions on dams and levees. Some are calling for a new approach to flood control, one that mimics nature instead of trying to contain it. (Image credit: Lauren Sommer/KQED)
19h
WIRED

How an Anarchist Bitcoin Coder Found Himself Fighting ISIS in Syria The strange story of Amir Taaki---Bitcoin coder, anti-ISIS revolutionary, and British terrorism defendant. The post How an Anarchist Bitcoin Coder Found Himself Fighting ISIS in Syria appeared first on WIRED .
19h
The Atlantic

Six Ways to Tell If Trump Is Sabotaging Obamacare With the president pulling the vote to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, both the media and health experts have correctly zeroed in what may be the crucial test for Trump and health care going forward: governing responsibly when it comes to the ACA or sabotage. If the president is seen as purposely seeking to destroy the ACA to try to make his claims come true, he will destroy the trust
19h
Live Science

Here's Why 'Homemade Slime' Can Be Bad for KidsIt sounds like a fun science project, but making "slime" at home can hurt kids.
19h
Live Science

Woman's Painful Sores Are Not Bug Bites, But Burrowing BugsStrange sores on a woman's swollen skin weren't caused by an insect bite, but by insects burrowing into her skin, according to a recent report of the woman's case.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A faster single-pixel cameraReporting their results in the journal IEEE Transactions on Computational Imaging, researchers from the MIT Media Lab now describe a new technique that makes image acquisition using compressed sensing 50 times as efficient. In the case of the single-pixel camera, it could get the number of exposures down from thousands to dozens.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers track perfluorinated chemicals in the bodyNew research in the journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters shows scientists have developed a method to track perfluorinated alkyl substances (PFAS) in the body. PFAS are potentially toxic chemicals found in stain-resistant products, nonstick cookware, fire-fighting foams and -- most recently -- fast food wrappers.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Officials dedicate OSC's newest, most powerful supercomputerJ.C. "Jesse" Owens possessed both elite speed and raw power, which he honed and blended on his way to winning four Olympic gold medals in 1936.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researcher lays groundwork for new ways to prevent youth violence in CaribbeanA study by an Indiana University School of Social Work associate professor at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis has laid the groundwork for new strategies dealing with youth violence in five Caribbean countries.
19h
Science : NPR

Launch, Land, Launch — SpaceX Tries Reusing Its Rocket On Thursday, the private company SpaceX plans to launch a satellite using a rocket that it has launched once before. Reusing equipment could make it cheaper to do business in deep space. (Image credit: SpaceX)
19h

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BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

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