EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Whale breath' reveals bacteria threatening endangered killer whalesDroplets and exhaled breath caught from the blowholes of killer whales along the Pacific coast are providing scientists with insights into whale health and revealing bacteria and fungi that may be a threat to the mammals.
6min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Caddisworm silk, DNA sleuths, urban streams and more from the University of Utah at ACSUniversity of Utah chemists gather with their peers in San Francisco next week at the American Chemical Society's National Meeting April 2-6. The theme of the meeting is 'Advanced Materials, Technologies, Systems & Processes.' Below are summaries of select presentations at the meeting, along with the time and date of the presentation and primary contact information. All times are in Pacific Daylig
6min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new treatment for antibiotic resistant bacteria and infectious diseaseA study, published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, describes a new treatment pathway for antibiotic resistant bacteria and infectious diseases with benefits for patients and health care providers.
6min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Protests with many participants and unified message most likely to influence politiciansProtests that bring many people to the streets who agree among themselves and have a single message are most likely to influence elected officials, suggests a new study.
6min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Protests with many participants and unified message most likely to influence politiciansProtests that bring many people to the streets who agree among themselves and have a single message are most likely to influence elected officials, suggests a new study.
16min
Dagens Medicin

Da Peter Geisling talte over sigTV-doktoren brugte fem minutter i en podcast i Stetoskopet/Dagens Medicin på at nedgøre 7.000 lægestuderende. Men kom du ud af dit DR-studie, og find ud af, at vi ikke er uambitiøse navlepillende egoister
22min
Dagens Medicin

(Untitled)
22min
Dagens Medicin

Mindre regneark – mere værdi Staten er nødt til at ændre syn på styringen af regionerne. Og her er, hvordan vi vil forandre styringen
22min
Dagens Medicin

Købmænd i hvide eller snavsede kitler?En institution som sundhedsvæsnet skal løbende træffe beslutninger, enten til gavn for institutionen eller til gavn for den værdige opgave. Oftest bliver beslutningen taget til gavn for institutionen.
22min
Dagens Medicin

Mørk fremtid for akutmodtagelsenJeg frygter alvorligt, at akutafdelingerne smuldrer. Jeg ser en masse erfarne ‘akutmedicinere’, der som jeg har beskæftiget sig med området de sidste 10 år, miste pusten og forlade området. Det ville ikke være nogen katastrofe, hvis der var nye til at tage over. Men det er der ikke
22min
Dagens Medicin

Bombastisk udlægning skader patienterneDer er ikke påvist nogen overdødelighed ved højintens intervaltræning sammenlignet med moderat kontinuerlig træning i de bedste studier
22min
Dagens Medicin

Tilstrækkelig evidens til at undlade tjekTorsten Lauritzen mener, at der er tilstrækkelig evidens for at afprøve regelmæssige helbredstjek ligesom i Storbritannien. Det er der ikke
22min
Dagens Medicin

Tablettens historie er i en kælder i Hillerød Hver tirsdag kan folk nu komme ind fra gaden og besøge Dansk Farmacihistorisk Samling, som er et viden- og aktivitetscenter for farmaciens historie.
22min
Dagens Medicin

(Untitled) Reumatologerne stod i 2015 alene med bekymringen for, om det kunne skade patienterne at blive skiftet over til behandling med nye biosimilære udgaver af leddegigtmidlerne infliximab og etanercept. Stillet over for en enig front af regioner, Rådet for Anvendelse af Dyr Sygehusmedicin og Lægemiddelstyrelsen måtte de erkende deres nederlag.
22min
New on MIT Technology Review

These Tiny Microphones Will Make It Okay to Spill Beer on Your Amazon EchoMEMS microphones from the startup Vesper will make voice-enabled gadgets far more durable.
27min
Ingeniøren

Dårligt indeklima forringer hver femte skoleelevs indlæringEn endnu ikke offentliggjort undersøgelse fra DTU viser, at danske elever præsterer mindst 5 pct. ringere, når de arbejder i dårligt ventilerede klasselokaler.
1h
Popular Science

SpaceX has proven it can reuse its rockets—now what? Space The long road to reusability The dream of reusing rockets on a regular basis isn't quite here yet. Read on.
2h
Popular Science

SpaceX landed an entirely new piece of the Falcon 9 rocket tonight Space The $6 million nose cone came back for a soft landing Using thrusters and parachutes, the bus-sized, $6 million nose cone came back for a safe landing after launch.
2h
NYT > Science

SpaceX Makes a First With Second-Hand RocketSpaceX launched a “pre-flown” rocket into space on Thursday. If the company can repeat it, this method could slash the price of space travel in the future.
2h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Why a tiny, fanged fish produces a pain-free biteScientists say their discovery shows there are medical secrets still hidden in our oceans.
3h
Science | The Guardian

Lost in space: debris shield bag floats away from astronauts during ISS spacewalk US astronauts were halfway through their mission to prepare a docking port for upcoming commercial space taxis when they lost a bag of equipment A 1.5m (5ft) debris shield being installed on the International Space Station has floated away during a spacewalk by two veteran US astronauts. Peggy Whitson, who became the world’s most experienced female spacewalker during the outing, told ground contr
3h
Science | The Guardian

'Peggy I don't have a shield': ISS astronauts lose key piece of equipment – video Cameras on the International Space Station have tracked a bag containing a debris shield as it sailed away and into the distance after it somehow became untethered from the station during a spacewalk. Nasa engineers determined it posed no safety threat to the astronauts or to the facility, a $100bn research laboratory that flies about 250m (402 km) above Earth. Continue reading...
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Children with autism find understanding facial expressions difficultYoung people with autism spectrum conditions (ASC) have difficulties recognizing and distinguishing between different facial expressions, according to research from one of the largest studies to look at emotion recognition in children and adolescents with ASC. The University of Bristol findings are published March 31, 2017, in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders.
3h
New Scientist - News

UK plans to bring 20 species back from brink of extinctionA major funding boost of by £4.6 million is expected to protect little-known but highly endangered plants and animals across the country
3h
The Atlantic

‘General Flynn Certainly Has a Story to Tell' Why does someone request immunity from prosecution before speaking with federal investigators? That question will likely consume Washington in the weeks ahead after Thursday night’s bombshell Wall Street Journal report about former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn. According to the Journal , Flynn is seeking an immunity deal from the FBI and the congressional intelligence committees in exc
4h
Gizmodo

Save Nearly $30 On the GORUCK GR1, Our Readers' Newly Minted Favorite Backpack [Exclusive] GORUCK’s military-inspired GR1 dominated this week’s Co-Op for the best everyday backpack, and they’re celebrating by offering our readers a rare 10% discount with promo code KINJAGORUCK10 . Now, even with the code, this is still a $267 backpack . I’m not blind to the fact that that’s a lot of money. But every GR1 is hand-built over the course of four hours in the USA, is covered by a lifetime wa
4h
Ingeniøren

SpaceX skriver (atter) rumfartshistorie – denne gang med genbrugsraketElon Musk kalder det en milepæl for rumfarten, fordi det åbner for, at prisen for at udforske og udnytte rummet falder markant.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Not a pipe dream anymore. Space-farming: A long legacy leading us to MarsResearch into space farming has resulted in numerous Earth-based advances (e.g., LED lighting for greenhouse and vertical farm applications; new seed potato propagation techniques, etc.) There are still many technical challenges, but plants and associated biological systems can and will be a major component of the systems that keep humans alive when we establish ourselves on the Moon, Mars and bey
4h
Science | The Guardian

SpaceX becomes first to re-fly used rocket Partially recycled Falcon 9 rocket successfully launched and landed, a step toward vastly less expensive spaceflight SpaceX launched its first “pre-flown” rocket on Thursday, marking the first time anyone has relaunched a booster into space in what CEO Elon Musk called “a milestone in the history of space”. “This is going to be ultimately a huge revolution in spaceflight,” Musk said on a SpaceX b
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Methane emissions from treesA new study is one of the first in the world to show that tree trunks in upland forests actually emit methane rather than store it, representing a new, previously unaccounted source of this powerful greenhouse gas.
5h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Intelligence and Empathy What We’re Following Loyalty to Trump: A new report says House Intelligence Committee chair Devin Nunes received his anonymous tip about alleged surveillance of Trump’s transition team from inside the White House —contradicting Nunes’s earlier statements, and adding to critics’ concerns that he’s putting loyalty to the president ahead of his objectivity as an investigator. For his part, Trump is
5h
NYT > Science

SpaceX Launches a Satellite With a Partly Used RocketThe use of a rocket booster that had flown once before may open an era of cheaper space travel, particularly for business ventures like satellite companies.
5h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Success for SpaceX 're-usable rocket'SpaceX flies and lands a Falcon 9 rocket that had already been used on a previous mission.
5h
Live Science

Why Breathing Deeply Helps You Calm DownThe brain center that links breathing and calmness has been found.
5h
WIRED

Yes, Spider-Man Can Jump 6 Meters Onto a Moving Ferry. Physics Says So Let's do some video analysis (homework included). The post Yes, Spider-Man Can Jump 6 Meters Onto a Moving Ferry. Physics Says So appeared first on WIRED .
5h
Latest Headlines | Science News

SpaceX launches and lands its first reused rocketAerospace company SpaceX has successfully reused a Falcon 9 rocket’s booster section for the first time.
5h
The Atlantic

SpaceX Makes History SpaceX just checked off another item on its bucket list on Thursday night. At just after 6:20 p.m. EDT, the private spaceflight company successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket with a first stage that had previously flown before, a first for any rocket in the history of spaceflight. As an added bonus, SpaceX returned it to Earth, landing it upright on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean, a maneuver
5h
Science : NPR

Back From The Dead? Reported Sightings Fuel Hope For Return Of Tasmanian Tigers The last known Tasmanian tiger died more than eight decades ago. It has become the stuff of textbook sketches and yellowing photographs. But now, researchers are launching a new search. (Image credit: Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spain will get giant telescope if Hawaii doesn't, group saysAn agreement has been reached for a giant telescope to be built in Spain's Canary Islands if it cannot be put atop a Hawaii mountain.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Feds pull financial aid tool after potential data breachFamilies applying for federal student aid are facing extra hurdles this year after a potential data breach led federal officials to remove an online tool that smoothed the process.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trudeau looks to make Canada 'world leader' in AI researchPrime Minister Justin Trudeau announced his hopes Thursday of making Canada a "world leader" in artificial intelligence and so-called "deep learning" research and development.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

With new iPhone, Trump still a target for hackersPresident Donald Trump has a new phone. An iPhone.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Glacier photos illustrate climate changeClimate is changing—there should be zero doubt about this circa 2017. The outstanding issue for the geoscience community has been how we best portray to this to the public. In their GSA Today article posted online on 30 March 2017, a team of experts in the field—Patrick Burkhart, Richard Alley, Lonnie. Thompson, James Balog, Paul E. Baldauf, and Gregory S. Baker—present an exceptional example.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers discover tree trunks act as methane source in upland forestsA new study from the University of Delaware is one of the first in the world to show that tree trunks in upland forests actually emit methane rather than store it, representing a new, previously unaccounted source of this powerful greenhouse gas.
6h
Big Think

Our Cognitive Abilities May Make Human Sexuality Unique Jess Bering sees our ability to summon arousing recollections as the reason human sexuality is unique among animals. Read More
6h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: All the Nunes That’s Fit to Print Today in 5 Lines The New York Times reported that two White House officials provided House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes with intelligence information about Trump campaign officials. In a tweet, President Trump warned the House Freedom Caucus that they will “hurt the entire Republican agenda if they don’t get on the team,” and vowed to “fight them” in the 2018 midterm elections. Nor
6h


Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Ride With The Chief in Mega Race Virtual Reality! (360 Video) Big Chief invites you to ride along as he takes on Gas Monkey Garage in a Mega Race drag showdown. See all the results: http://www.discovery.com/MegaRace Catch up with full episodes streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/fast-n-loud/ https://www.discoverygo.com/street-outlaws/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.c
2min
Ars Technica

Gizmodo found what looks to be FBI Director James Comey’s Twitter account Enlarge / FBI Director James Comey. (credit: Drew Angerer / Getty Images News) An enterprising Gizmodo reporter seems to have found the private Twitter account of the head of the FBI , James Comey. In a Thursday afternoon e-mail to Ars, the FBI National Press Office wrote: "We don’t have any comment." The reporter, Ashley Feinberg, wrote up a detailed narrative as to how she was able to locate hi
11min
Gizmodo

How Cars Could 'Talk' To Each Other In The Future—And Why That Has To Happen The phrase V2V, meaning vehicle-to-vehicle communication, gets tossed around a lot when autonomous cars and the future of car safety come up. But it’s not some far-off thing: it’s becoming a reality on current cars, with Cadillac in particular launching it as standard on all 2017 CTS sedans. So what is V2V, how does it work and why do we need it? Up to 80 percent of crashes not attributed to driv
11min
Gizmodo

Our Greatest Geological Discovery Is This Chocolate Boulder With Edible Candy Geodes Inside GIF: Instagram If you thought Cadbury Creme Eggs were humanity’s greatest confectionery creation, Alex O’Brien Yeatts , a baking and pastry student at the Culinary Institute of America, has come up with a dessert that looks straight out of a geology textbook—not a cookbook. Working with cake decorator Abby Lee Wilcox , Yeatts created what looks like a massive boulder. When cracked open, it’s fill
23min
WIRED

For Google, the AI Talent Race Leads Straight to Canada America's biggest tech companies are remaking the internet through artificial intelligence—and they're looking north to Canada to advance AI itself. The post For Google, the AI Talent Race Leads Straight to Canada appeared first on WIRED .
23min
Ars Technica

SpaceX may try a daring rocket fairing recovery tonight, too SpaceX SpaceX has long said it would like to make its entire Falcon 9 rocket reusable. Tonight at 6:27pm ET the company may take a key step toward that goal by reusing a first stage of the rocket that launched nearly a year ago. But SpaceX may also go for another "first" tonight—by recovering the payload fairing of its rocket. In a Facebook post today Steve Jurveston, a venture capitalist and Spa
29min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Methane emissions from treesA new study from the University of Delaware is one of the first in the world to show that tree trunks in upland forests actually emit methane rather than store it, representing a new, previously unaccounted source of this powerful greenhouse gas.
36min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Donor-recipient weight and sex mismatch may contribute to kidney transplant failureA new study indicates that the success of a kidney transplant may rely in part on a kidney donor's weight and sex, factors that are not typically considered when choosing a recipient for a deceased donor kidney. The findings, which appear in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, suggest that changes may be needed to current immunology-based protocols that
36min
The Atlantic

S-Town Is a Well-Crafted Monument to Empathy In the days after the 2016 election, an article by David Wong on Cracked called “How Half of America Lost Its F**king Mind” went viral. It listed five reasons why the Donald Trump phenomenon was explicable not by red vs. blue but rural vs. urban, and it relied heavily on pop culture to make its case. “Every TV show is about L.A. or New York, maybe with some Chicago or Baltimore thrown in,” he wro
40min
BBC News - Science & Environment

Lost in space: 'Peggy, I don't have a shield'Astronauts Peggy Whitson and Shane Kimbrough were meant to be installing debris shields on the ISS.
47min
Ars Technica

Your save data is not safe on the Nintendo Switch Enlarge (credit: Aurich Lawson) In the post-launch update to our initial Nintendo Switch review , we noted that there was no way to externally back up the game save data stored on the system itself. A recent horror story from a fellow writer, who lost dozens of hours of game progress thanks to a broken system, highlights just how troublesome this missing feature can be. Over at GamesRadar, Anthon
50min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Satellite galaxies at edge of Milky Way coexist with dark matterNew research rules out a challenge to the accepted standard model of the universe and theory of how galaxies form by shedding new light on a problematic structure.
53min
New on MIT Technology Review

Tech Giants Grapple with the Ethical Concerns Raised by the AI BoomAs machines take over more decisions from humans, new questions about fairness, ethics, and morality arise.
56min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Glacier photos illustrate climate changeBoulder, Colorado, USA: Climate is changing -- there should be zero doubt about this circa 2017. The outstanding issue for the geoscience community has been how we best portray to this to the public. In their GSA Today article posted online on 30 March 2017, a team of experts in the field -- Patrick Burkhart, Richard Alley, Lonnie. Thompson, James Balog, Paul E. Baldauf, and Gregory S. Baker -- pr
57min
Gizmodo

360-Degree Video Puts 4,200 Falling Dominoes All Around You GIF: YouTube In the world of competitive dominoes, stacking 4,200 tiny plastic bricks is, surprisingly, not even close to setting any kind of record. But YouTube’s FlippyCat might have created one of the most satisfying domino falls to watch, since the entire structure was stacked around a 360-degree camera , putting you in the center of all the destruction. Until someone invents a camera small e
59min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

It's true: The sound of nature helps us relaxPlaying 'natural sounds' affects the bodily systems that control the flight-or-fright and rest-digest autonomic nervous systems, with associated effects in the resting activity of the brain, new research shows.
1h
Ars Technica

Government funding’s impact three times larger than we thought Sarah Laszlo puts an EEG headset on a research participant's head. (credit: Jonathan Cohen/Binghamton University ) In recent years, funding for research provided by the National Institutes of Health has struggled to keep up with inflation. A recent paper published in Science suggests this could mean bad things for the overall economy. Ana analysis of 27 years of NIH grants shows that 10 percent o
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Manatees are no longer endangered: US officialsManatees are no longer an endangered species, US officials said Thursday, declaring success after decades of efforts to rebuild the population of the chubby sea cows in Florida and the Caribbean region.
1h
Gizmodo

A Minor PC Gaming Miracle Building and maintaining your own gaming PC is the best . It’s also occasionally the worst . This week I upgraded my PC, fully expecting it to be a pain in the ass. Instead, something magical happened. Windows 10 actually came through. I spent the past six months or so in a constant state of doubt about my PC. I had a really good graphics card (a GTX 1080) and a slightly aged but still totally se
1h
Science : NPR

Why The Newly Proposed Sepsis Treatment Needs More Study The bodywide inflammation known as sepsis kills about 300,000 people in U.S. hospitals each year. Promising treatments have come and gone, warn skeptical doctors, who call for rigorous research. (Image credit: Sukiyashi/Getty Images/iStockphoto)
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mosquitoes wing it: New research shows howThe unique mechanisms involved in mosquito flight have been shared for the first time in a new collaboration, which could inform future aerodynamic innovations, including tiny scale flying tech.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Finding faces in a crowd: Context is key when looking for small things in imagesSpotting a face in a crowd, or recognizing any small or distant object within a large image, is a major challenge for computer vision systems. The trick to finding tiny objects, say researchers, is to look for larger things associated with them. An improved method for coding that crucial context from an image has enabled researchers to demonstrate a significant advance in detecting tiny faces.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Satellite galaxies at edge of Milky Way coexist with dark matter, says RIT studyResearch conducted by scientists at Rochester Institute of Technology rules out a challenge to the accepted standard model of the universe and theory of how galaxies form by shedding new light on a problematic structure.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Getting a leg up: Hand task training transfers motor knowledge to feetThe human brain's cerebellum controls the body's ability to tightly and accurately coordinate and time movements as fine as picking up a pin and as muscular as running a foot race. Now, researchers have added to evidence that this structure also helps transfer so-called motor learning from one part of the body to another.
1h
Gizmodo

Elon Musk’s Cryptic Art Suggests Unicorn Fart-Powered Teslas Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images Enigmatic entrepreneur Elon Musk has no shortage of hobbies: sometimes, he makes cars . Other times, he likes to do a space thing or play Martian overlord . But now, the 45-year-old billionaire is turning his attention to the arts, as evidenced by a series of cryptic drawings he created using Tesla’s new sketchpad feature, which is accessible once users downloa
1h
Ars Technica

Oculus cofounder Palmer Luckey leaves Facebook Palmer Luckey, the person most directly associated with the rise of Oculus as a major force in the growing world of virtual reality hardware, has left parent company Facebook , according to a statement provided to Ars Technica by a Facebook representative: Palmer will be dearly missed. Palmer’s legacy extends far beyond Oculus. His inventive spirit helped kickstart the modern VR revolution and he
1h
Science : NPR

Australian Researchers Plan Investigation Into Tasmanian Tiger Sightings NPR's Ari Shapiro interviews James Cook University researcher Sandra Abell, who is leading a search for the Tasmanian Tiger, believed to be extinct until recent sightings surfaced.
1h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Getting dengue first may make Zika infection much worseExperiments in cells and mice suggest that a previous exposure to dengue or West Nile can make a Zika virus infection worse.
1h
WIRED

Marco Rubio Says Hack Attempts From Russia Targeted Him, Too Attempted intrusions against any senator aren't surprising. But they're a reminder election hacking shouldn't be a partisan issue. The post Marco Rubio Says Hack Attempts From Russia Targeted Him, Too appeared first on WIRED .
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

NIH funding helps generate private-sector patentsResearch grants issued by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) contribute to a significant number of private-sector patents in biomedicine, according to a new study. The study examines 27 years of data and finds that 31 percent of NIH grants, which are publicly funded, produce articles that are later cited by patents in the biomedical sector.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Previous exposure to flaviviruses increases effects of ZikaPrior infection with dengue or West Nile virus can enhance the effects of Zika infection, a new study using human samples tested in mice finds.
1h
Gizmodo

Freaky Experiment Allows Tadpoles to See Out of Eyes Implanted on Their Tails Image: Allen Discovery Center at Tufts University. By leveraging the regenerative powers of migraine medication, researchers at Tufts University have restored the vision of blind tadpoles after grafting eyes to their tails. Sounds bizarre, but a similar technique could one day be used on humans. A new study published in npj Regenerative Medicine shows that eyes, and probably other sensory organs,
1h
Gizmodo

Oculus Founder Palmer Luckey Out at Facebook Where in the world is Palmer Luckey? Well, he’s not at Facebook. In 2014, Palmer Luckey, the 24-year-old whiz kid who was one of VR’s most prominent evangelists sold his company, Oculus, to Facebook for a cool $2 billion. He has ( almost ) totally disappeared after The Daily Beast revealed last year he was collaborating with Milo Yiannopoulos to fund a pro-Trump “shitposting” operation. Here’s a
1h
Gizmodo

Cut the Cord With Amazon's Top-Selling HDTV Antenna, Now Just $23 1byone Amplified HDTV Antenna , $23 with code SS38X7QO If you’ve tried an unamplified HDTV antenna (like the standard Mohu Leaf ), but can’t quite pull in every channel you want , this 1byone leaf-style model includes a USB-powered amp that should add a few miles of range. Amazingly, this is actually Amazon’s top-selling TV antenna , and boasts a 3.9 star review average on over 12,000 reviews. 3.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Prudence, impatience and laziness: Are these contagious personality traits?People tend to unconsciously imitate others' prudent, impatient or lazy attitudes, according to a new study. 'Prudence,' 'impatience' or 'laziness' are typically thought of as entrenched personality traits that guide how people weigh the cost of risk, delay and effort (respectively). However, new research shows that people's attitudes towards effort, delay or risk drift towards those of others.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Search for stellar survivor of a supernova explosionAstronomers have used the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope to observe the remnant of a supernova explosion in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Beyond just delivering a beautiful image, Hubble may well have traced the surviving remains of the exploded star's companion.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Explaining the accelerating expansion of the universe without dark energyEnigmatic dark energy, thought to make up 68% of the universe, may not exist at all, according to a Hungarian-American team. The researchers believe that standard models of the universe fail to take account of its changing structure, but that once this is done the need for dark energy disappears.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers create tough material for next generation of powerful enginesTo stand up to the heat and pressure of next-generation rocket engines, the composite fibers used to make them should be fuzzy.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How do plants make oxygen? Ask cyanobacteriaThe ability to generate oxygen through photosynthesis—that helpful service performed by plants and algae, making life possible for humans and animals on Earth—evolved just once, roughly 2.3 billion years ago, in certain types of cyanobacteria. This planet-changing biological invention has never been duplicated, as far as anyone can tell. Instead, according to endosymbiotic theory, all the "green"
1h
Scientific American Content: Global

Meditation's Calming Effects Pinpointed in BrainA new mouse study reveals a set of neurons that may point to physiological roots for the calming effects of breathing control -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
The Atlantic

An EU Official Lets Loose on Trump By the ordinarily staid standards of EU officials, Jean-Claude Juncker can be outspoken. The European Commission (EC) president might couch his criticisms in humor—such as when he addressed Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban as a “ dictator ,” shook his hand, and slapped his cheek (Orban wasn’t amused)—but there’s often little doubt what he means. So when on Thursday in Malta Juncker spoke to
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Aging: Cell coordination breakdownScientists have resolved a key question in aging research by showing how mouse immune cells of different ages respond to stimulation. Study demonstrates weaker response of older cells is due to their coordination breaking down, making their response to immune stimulation more variable. Single-cell sequencing technology allows scientists to profile individual cells independently to view cellular ac
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Triple-threat cancer-fighting polymer capsules for guided drug deliveryChemists have designed triple-threat cancer-fighting polymer capsules that bring the promise of guided drug delivery closer to preclinical testing. These multilayer capsules show three traits that have been difficult to achieve in a single entity. They have good imaging contrast that allows detection with low-power ultrasound, they can stably and efficiently encapsulate the cancer drug doxorubicin
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The carbon footprint of crime has fallen, study findsA study has found that the carbon footprint of crime over the last 20 years has fallen.
2h
Gizmodo

FCC Takes a Hatchet to Program Providing Broadband Internet for the Poor Image: Getty Yesterday, the Federal Communications Commission took on the real threat facing America: poor people who need to get online. FCC chairman Ajit Pai announced that he would direct the agency to eliminate the federal approval process for broadband providers who want to provide service through the LifeLine program, which administers subsidies for phone and internet service. That means an
2h
Gizmodo

Ghost in the Shell Delivers a Beautiful but Ultimately Empty Adaptation of an Anime Classic Major Mira Killian doesn’t remember who she was before. Now the character played by Scarlett Johansson is living inside a different kind of body about to start a different kind of life. She effortlessly leaps and shoots across a deliriously oversaturated cityscape with power and purpose. There’s something wrong at the heart of it all, with her sense of her (own) self. It’s a problem that Ghost in
2h
Ars Technica

Libraries have become a broadband lifeline to the cloud for students Enlarge / Three students—Jarquiese McCaskey, Jaquan Hawkins and Zaylan Randolph—hold computers as they enter the school library where they will attempt to do work on laptops with very limited Internet access. As testing time for students is ongoing this time of year, students at Monroe Intermediate School in Lower Peach Tree, Alabama are at a disadvantage as Internet capabilities at the school ar
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The US burden of neurological disease is nearly $800 billion/yearThe most common neurological diseases cost the United States $789 billion in 2014, and this figure is projected to grow as the elderly population doubles between 2011 and 2050, according to a new study published in the April issue of the Annals of Neurology.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How do plants make oxygen? Ask cyanobacteriaA new study adds 41 new types of cyanobacteria, and helps pin down when in history they 'invented' oxygen-producing photosynthesis.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Not a pipe dream anymore -- space-farming: A long legacy leading us to MarsResearch into space farming has resulted in numerous Earth-based advances (e.g., LED lighting for greenhouse and vertical farm applications; new seed potato propagation techniques, etc.) There are still many technical challenges, but plants and associated biological systems can and will be a major component of the systems that keep humans alive when we establish ourselves on the moon, Mars and bey
2h
The Atlantic

How Many Robots Does It Take to Replace a Human Job? Last week, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said he wasn’t worried at all about advancing artificial intelligence taking over jobs anytime soon. In fact, he said, he wouldn’t be worried about it for for another 50 to 100 years. As I wrote recently, many experts would disagree with the notion that displacement—or at the very least, shifts—in the labor market due to automation are that far afield.
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The Atlantic

The Geography of U.S. Productivity From 2007 to 2016, productivity in the U.S. grew at about 1 percent — a historically low rate . In other recent periods, it’s been much higher: 2.6 percent from 2000 to 2007 and 2.2 percent in the 1990s. The divergence has left economist looking for answers about slumping productivity and how to fix it. A host of reasons have been suggested for why productivity has been declining: slowing innovat
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New on MIT Technology Review

A Field Guide to Digital TransformationHybrid IT, edge computing and other advanced technologies can help companies accelerate time to value.
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Futurity.org

4 ways to promote reusable coffee cups A new study identifies strategies that could reduce the use of disposable coffee cups. Researchers at Cardiff University tested a range of measures to encourage the use of reusable coffee cups on behalf of the foodservice coffee company Bewley’s. They found that financial incentives, re-usable alternatives, and clear messages reminding customers of the environmental impact of single-use coffee cu
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Little Tropical Fish With a Big, Venomous BiteWith their large lower canines, fang blennies deliver opioid-laced venom that seems to cause a sudden drop in their predators’ blood pressure.
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NYT > Science

SpaceX Launch Feels Familiar for Part of the Falcon 9 RocketOn Thursday, SpaceX will try to launch a cheaper, partiallyused rocket to take a communications satellite into orbit.
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The Scientist RSS

Anti-Flavivirus Antibodies Enhance Zika Infection in MiceResearchers report evidence of antibody-dependent enhancement in a Zika-infected, immunocompromised mouse model.
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Gizmodo

This Is Almost Certainly James Comey’s Twitter Account Digital security and its discontents—from Hillary Clinton’s emails to ransomware to Tor hacks—is in many ways one of the chief concerns of the contemporary FBI. So it makes sense that the bureau’s director, James Comey, would dip his toe into the digital torrent with a Twitter account. It also makes sense, given Comey’s high profile, that he would want that Twitter account to be a secret from the
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Live Science

Laziness Is Contagious, Scientists FindPrudence, impatience and laziness are personality traits that were thought to be pretty set once you reached adulthood. But a new study suggests otherwise.
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Inside Science

Mystery Microorganism May Have Been the First to Produce Oxygen Mystery Microorganism May Have Been the First to Produce Oxygen New findings suggest current oxygen-producing bacteria borrowed the ability from a possibly extinct lifeform. Prismatic-Spring.jpg Cyanobacteria, such as those that live in the Grand Prismatic Spring in Yellowstone National Park, evolved the ability to perform photosynthesis more than two billion years ago. Image credits: Brewbooks v
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Gizmodo

Watch SpaceX Launch a Re-Used Rocket into Space for the First Time Ever Image: SpaceX via Flickr Later this evening, SpaceX will attempt a historic feat when it launches a reused Falcon 9 rocket into orbital space. It’s an achievement Elon Musk and his team have been working toward since the company was founded in 2002, and tonight, it will hopefully— finally —come full circle. Literally. The plan is pretty straightforward: Sometime after 6:27pm EDT, SpaceX will atte
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Gizmodo

Every Amusement Park Should Have 100 MPH Bumper Cars As far as amusement park rides go, bumper cars rank somewhere between Ferris Wheels and benches when it comes to thrills. They don’t drive anywhere near fast enough to do any real damage. Unless you swap out their electric motor for a gas-powered engine from a motorcycle, that is . Colin Furze , internet famous for trying everything you probably shouldn’t try at home, upgraded a ‘60s-era bumper c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Fuzzy' fibers can take rockets' heatRice University scientists collaborate with NASA to improve its composite materials for next-generation rocket engines by adding a 'fuzzy' silicon carbide fiber.
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Live Science

Bus-Sized Asteroid Buzzes Earth Closer Than Moon | VideoA roughly 26-foot (8 meter) asteroid named 2017 FJ101 came within 202,000 miles (~325,087 km) of Earth on Mar. 30, 2017. It was first observed on March 25, 2017.
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New Scientist - News

NASA orbiter shows Mars lost 90 per cent of its CO2 to spaceThe MAVEN spacecraft has completed the key part of its mission: to track down how much argon Mars’s atmosphere is giving up as a proxy for carbon dioxide loss
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New Scientist - News

Flying foxes are facing extinction on islands across the worldDespite their key role as pollinators, these fruit bats are hunted for food and to protect fruit crops, which could wipe them out on their island homes
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New Scientist - News

Destroying a type of brain cell makes mice really chilled outTaking deep breaths during meditation or yoga can make you feel relaxed, but we don’t know why. Now some extremely chilled-out mice have given us a clue
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Proteins that can take the heatAncient proteins may offer clues on how to engineer proteins that can withstand the high temperatures required in industrial applications, according to new research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Researchers used experiments to examine critical differences between 15 proteins from the thioredoxin family, including seven extinct protein sequences that date back mo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tigers, ready to be countedA new methodology developed by the Indian Statistical Institute, and WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) may revolutionize how to count tigers and other big cats over large landscapes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cyprus businessman suing Buzzfeed for unproven Trump dossierA businessman based in Cyprus is suing the Buzzfeed online media outlet for defamation over its publication of an unproven dossier on President Donald Trump's purported activities involving Russia and allegations of Russian interference during last year's U.S. election.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

This timid little fish escapes predators by injecting them with opioid-laced venomFang blennies are small fish with big teeth. Specifically, they have two large canine teeth that jut out of their lower jaw. Since blenny fish are only about two inches long, these 'fangs' would be less than intimidating if not for the venom within. Blenny fish venom most likely causes a sudden drop in blood pressure in would-be predators, such as grouper fish, that have been bitten by blennies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mysterious cosmic explosion surprises astronomers studying the distant x-ray universeA mysterious flash of X-rays has been discovered by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory in the deepest X-ray image ever obtained. This source likely comes from some sort of destructive event, but it may be of a variety that scientists have never seen before.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Why Social Media Became the Perfect Incubator for Hoaxes and MisinformationComputational social scientists are studying how conspiracy theories spread online—and what, if anything, can be done to stop them -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Argentina suspends Canada's Barrick mining over spillArgentina suspended Canadian mining company Barrick Gold on Thursday after the firm admitted to a new spill at a mine in the Andes mountains, its third in two years.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

SpaceX set to launch its first recycled rocketSpaceX is about to launch its first recycled rocket.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Solar wind stripped Martian atmosphere awaySolar wind and radiation are responsible for stripping the Martian atmosphere, transforming Mars from a planet that could have supported life billions of years ago into a frigid desert world, according to new results.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A decorated raven bone discovered in Crimea may provide insight into Neanderthal cognitionThe cognitive abilities of Neanderthals are debated, but a raven bone fragment found at the Zaskalnaya VI (ZSK) site in Crimea features two notches that may have been made by Neanderthals intentionally to display a visually consistent pattern, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sculpting optical microstructures with slight changes in chemistryIn 2013, materials scientists grew a 'garden' of self-assembled crystal microstructures. Now, applied mathematicians have developed a framework to better understand and control the fabrication of these microstructures. Together, the researchers used that framework to grow sophisticated optical microcomponents.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Extreme gas loss dried out Mars, MAVEN data suggestOver the planet’s history, the Martian atmosphere has lost 66 percent of its argon and a majority of its carbon dioxide, according to data from NASA’s MAVEN spacecraft.
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Ars Technica

For the first time, we know what Tyrannosaur faces really looked like Dino Pulerà New scientific discoveries about Tyrannosaurs have upended our understanding of the giant predators whose massive populations extended from Asia to the Americas. They had feathers. They ran like birds. And now, a new species that lived approximately 100 to 66 million years ago in Montana has given us our first real look at these dinosaurs' faces. Carthage College paleontologist Thomas
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Gizmodo

The Robots of the Future May Be Controlled By Magnetic Fields Image: Schmuach et al Life is soft. If we want our robots to become more lifelike, or if we want to start using them for more biological applications, they too have to be soft and flexible. That includes robots designed to move around in fluids, robots designed to augment organs in the human body , prosthetics, and, uh, this. Scientists studying soft robotics are trying to overcome some of the in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Proteins that can take the heatAncient proteins may offer clues on how to engineer proteins that can withstand the high temperatures required in industrial applications, according to new research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tigers, ready to be countedA new methodology developed by the Indian Statistical Institute, and WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) may revolutionize how to count tigers and other big cats over large landscapes.
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Ars Technica

A kitten becomes Exhibit 41 in defamation suit against Buzzfeed over Trump dossier Enlarge / Exhibit 41 in latest court filing in the defamation suit against Buzzfeed for publishing the Trump dossier. (credit: Federal court documets ) When looking through the latest legal filing in the defamation lawsuit against Buzzfeed and editor Ben Smith that stems from publishing the Trump dossier in full, one might suspect the suit brought by Russian tech mogul Aleksej Gubarev is all fun
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The Atlantic

150 Years Ago Today, the U.S. Bought Alaska From Russia for $7.2 Million On March 30, 1867, the United States gave the government of Russia a check for $7.2 million and took possession of 586,412 square miles (1,518,800 sq km) of new land which became the Alaska Territory, and later, in 1959, would become America’s 49 th state. In the past 150 years, Alaska has seen several gold rushes, an oil boom, a groundbreaking distribution of lands to Native groups, a disastrous
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The Atlantic

The Call Was Coming From Inside the White House Updated on March 30 at 2:44 p.m. For more than a week, House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes has provided the hottest topic for speculation in Washington : Where did he receive mysterious reports that suggested intelligence surveillance of Trump transition team officials? Now, there appears to be an answer, courtesy of The New York Times : a pair of officials in the Trump White House.
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Live Science

'Ghost in the Shell': Hollywood’s Mischievous Vision of AIWith the new sci-fi flick "Ghost in the Shell" hitting theaters this week, Scientific American asks artificial intelligence experts which movies, if any, have gotten AI right.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

NIH research grants yield economic windfall More than 30% of biomedical studies funded by the US government are later cited in commercial patents. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21752
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Ars Technica

It’s official: Destiny 2 is coming to the PC PC-exclusive gamers will have one fewer console-exclusive first-person shooter to be jealous of this year. Destiny 2 , the recently announced sequel to Activision and Bungie's nearly three-year-old console MMO shooter, will be coming to the PC as well as the Xbox One and PS4 on September 8 following a beta test this summer. The move, which has been rumored since September , comes after Activision
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team creates triple-threat cancer-fighting polymer capsules for guided drug deliveryChemists at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have designed triple-threat cancer-fighting polymer capsules that bring the promise of guided drug delivery closer to preclinical testing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers reveal atomic-level activity of green catalyst used in PVC productionAn international group of scientists has unlocked the secret of a gold-based catalyst that is responsible for a new, environmentally friendly method of producing the vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) that is used to manufacture polyvinyl chloride (PVC), the world's third-most widely used plastic.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA examines the rainfall left behind from ex-Tropical Cyclone DebbieTropical Cyclone Debbie generated a lot of rainfall before and after it made landfall in Queensland, Australia, and NASA analyzed how much rain fell from a vantage point of space. NASA's Terra satellite provided a look at the remnants early on March 30 is it lingered near Australia's Gold Coast.
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Gizmodo

Science March Appoints Three Public Faces Amidst Mounting Controversy Image: Bill Hrybyk/NIH/Hurley Medical Center Bill Nye the Science Guy will be joining the March for Science as an honorary chair, according to a new blog post on The Planetary Society’s website. Two other scientists, Mona Hanna-Attisha, public health advocate at Hurley Medical Center, and Lydia Villa-Komaroff, a well-known biologist, will also be chairing, according to a report in Buzzfeed News.
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Live Science

No Lips! T. Rex Didn't Pucker Up, New Tyrannosaur ShowsThe fearsome Tyrannosaurus rex didn't have lips if it looked anything like a newly discovered tyrannosaur species that scientists are calling the "frightful lizard."
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Live Science

Photos: Newfound Tyrannosaur Had Nearly 3-Inch-Long TeethAfter nearly 30 years since its discovery in Montana, a newfound species of tyrannosaur is finally making its debut.
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Live Science

Why Russia Gave up Alaska, America's Gateway to the ArcticThe tale of how and why Russia ceded its control over Alaska to the U.S. 150 years ago is actually two tales and two intertwining histories.
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Popular Science

This fish basically gives its enemies heroin Animals Could new drugs be found in its unique venom? At first glance, a fang blenny looks completely unthreatening. But in reality, it's anything but. Read on:…
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Science : NPR

A Tiny Spot In Mouse Brains May Explain How Breathing Calms The Mind A cluster of neurons connects breathing and emotion centers in mouse brains, researchers say. If this turns out to be true in humans, it could explain how controlled breathing calms the mind. (Image credit: laflor/Getty Images/iStockphoto)
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The Atlantic

Trump Is Driving Some American Jews to Reclaim Citizenship in Europe For years, Elliott Masie pondered the possibility of reclaiming citizenship in Germany, the country his father fled in 1936. But he never felt compelled to act. Then Donald Trump became president of the United States. Spurred by what he described as the disturbing rhetoric of Trump’s campaign and the uncertainty sowed by the election, Masie decided to become a German citizen. Germany, Spain, and
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The Atlantic

Mike Pence Brings Congress One Step Closer to Defunding Planned Parenthood Updated 2:17 p.m. EST In the late days of December, the Obama administration made a last-ditch attempt to protect Planned Parenthood from the incoming Republican Congress. On Thursday, the Senate voted to overturn the Obama administration’s regulation, lifting restrictions on how states treat abortion providers and clearing the way for Congress to take further action. The House had already passed
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA examines the rainfall left behind from ex-Tropical Cyclone DebbieTropical Cyclone Debbie generated a lot of rainfall before and after it made landfall in Queensland, Australia, and NASA analyzed how much rain fell from a vantage point of space. NASA's Terra satellite provided a look at the remnants early on March 30 is it lingered near Australia's Gold Coast.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lupus Research Alliance Novel Research Grants push discoveriesThe Lupus Research Alliance announced today the Novel Research Grant Class of 2017. The Lupus Research Alliance Novel Research Grants, the proven platform for innovation, make discovery and scientific progress possible. This year's grantees push science out in front and ahead of the curve to deliver 10 innovative approaches seeking results that can transform the lives of people with lupus.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UAB creates triple-threat cancer-fighting polymer capsules for guided drug deliveryChemists have designed triple-threat cancer-fighting polymer capsules that bring the promise of guided drug delivery closer to preclinical testing. These multilayer capsules show three traits that have been difficult to achieve in a single entity. They have good imaging contrast that allows detection with low-power ultrasound, they can stably and efficiently encapsulate the cancer drug doxorubicin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers reveal atomic-level activity of green catalyst used in PVC productionUK-U.S. group reports in Science that individual ions of gold dispersed on a carbon support are the ideal catalytic species for converting acetylene, a gas derived from coal, into the molecule used to manufacture PVC. The discovery comes amid international efforts to phase out acetylene conversion, which relies on a mercury-containing catalyst.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rotating molecules create a brighter futureScientists have discovered a group of materials which could pave the way for a new generation of high-efficiency lighting, solving a quandary which has inhibited the performance of display technology for decades. The development of energy saving concepts in display and lighting applications is a major focus of research, since a fifth of the world's electricity is used for generating light.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sculpting optical microstructures with slight changes in chemistryIn 2013, materials scientists at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Wyss Institute of Biologically Inspired Engineering, grew a garden of self-assembled crystal microstructures. Now, applied mathematicians at SEAS and Wyss have developed a framework to better understand and control the fabrication of these microstructures. Together, the researcher
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Public funding essential for advances in biomedical researchArticle shows that publicly-funded research creates knowledge that links to private companies' efforts to develop drugs, medical devices, and other patented biomedical products.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New MAVEN findings reveal how Mars' atmosphere was lost to spaceSolar wind and radiation are responsible for stripping the Martian atmosphere, transforming Mars from a planet that could have supported life billions of years ago into a frigid desert world, according to new results from NASA's MAVEN (Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission) spacecraft led by the University of Colorado Boulder.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vaginal bacteria can trigger recurrent UTIs, study showsA kind of bacteria found in the vagina may trigger recurrent UTIs, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings help explain why sexual activity is associated with UTIs. When it gets into the bladder, the vaginal bacteria Gardnerella vaginalis causes dormant E. coli from a previous infection to start multiplying again, causing another UTI. Gardner
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Previous exposure to flaviviruses increases effects of ZikaPrior infection with dengue or West Nile virus can enhance the effects of Zika infection, a new study using human samples tested in mice finds.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The late evolutionary event that gave rise to modern lifeThe emergence of oxygen-producing bacteria more than two billion years ago gave rise to life as we know it today, and now a new study reveals that this happening might have occurred multiple times.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The Red Planet is severely gassed outNew measurements of Mars' thin atmosphere show that most of it has been lost to space due to bombardment from solar wind; this was the likely driver of the transition in Martian climate from an early, warm, wet environment to today's cold, dry, thin atmosphere.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Publicly funded research lays critical foundations for private sectorNearly 10 percent of US National Institutes of Health research grants directly generate a patent, a new study reveals, and more than 30 percent generate articles that are then cited by patents.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Aging: Cell coordination breakdownScientists have resolved a key question in aging research by showing how mouse immune cells of different ages respond to stimulation.Study demonstrates weaker response of older cells is due to their coordination breaking down, making their response to immune stimulation more variable.Single-cell sequencing technology allows scientists to profile individual cells independently to view cellular acti
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

MIT study: NIH funding helps generate private-sector patentsResearch grants issued by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) contribute to a significant number of private-sector patents in biomedicine, according to a new study co-authored by an MIT professor. The study, published in the journal Science, examines 27 years of data and finds that 31 percent of NIH grants, which are publicly funded, produce articles that are later cited by patents in the biom
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Single-cell RNA sequencing reveals detailed composition of two major types of brain tumorDetailed analysis of two brain tumor subtypes by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard has revealed that they may originate from the same type of neural progenitor cells and be distinguished by gene mutation patterns and by the composition of their microenvironments.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vaginal bacterium triggers recurrent E. coli infection in the mouse bladderIn mice, exposure of the bladder to a common vaginal bacterium awakened dormant Escherichia coli and triggered recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs). Published in PLOS Pathogens, these findings could help improve understanding of recurrent UTIs in women.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain's role in Tourette tics simulated in new computational modelA new computer-based brain simulation shows that motor tics in Tourette syndrome may arise from interactions between multiple areas of the brain, rather than a single malfunctioning area, according to a study published in PLOS Computational Biology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Prudence, impatience and laziness: Are these contagious personality traits?People tend to unconsciously imitate others' prudent, impatient or lazy attitudes, according to a study published in PLOS Computational Biology. 'Prudence,' 'impatience' or 'laziness' are typically thought of as entrenched personality traits that guide how people weigh the cost of risk, delay and effort (respectively). However, new research shows that people's attitudes towards effort, delay or ri
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers profile symbiotic relationship between bacteria and filarial nematodesFilarial nematodes -- microscopic, thread-like roundworms -- currently infect up to 54 million people worldwide and are the leading cause of disability in the developing world. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have described the relationship between one species of the worm, Brugia malayi, and a bacteria, Wolbachia, that lives in the worm's body. The symbiotic relation
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Immune suppressant ineffective in treating leprosy inflammationThroughout the course of a leprosy infection, patients often have episodes of painful inflammation affecting their skin and nerves. Researchers have continuously struggled with finding effective drugs to treat these so-called 'type 1 reactions,' and now one more study has come up empty-handed. The immune-suppressant azathioprine did not improve the standard of care treatment with steroids, researc
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Gizmodo

You Won't Believe What Jared Kushner Does to His MacBook Photo: Getty You’re probably not surprised to learn that Jared Kushner enjoys Apple design. The Cupertino company does make some fine-looking hardware! But would you guess that the Trump suck-up actually buys expensive MacBooks just so he can install Windows on them? It’s true. At least, it was a few years ago when Gawker’s founding editor, Elizabeth Spiers, inherited Kushner’s laptop at The New
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WIRED

A Silicon Valley Lawmaker’s $1 Trillion Plan to Save Trump Country Silicon Valley's newest member of Congress wants lawmakers to embrace one of tech's favorite ideas: a basic income to counter the impact of automation. The post A Silicon Valley Lawmaker's $1 Trillion Plan to Save Trump Country appeared first on WIRED .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ford hires 400 for Canadian connected car researchFord Motor Co. will hire approximately 400 employees from software company BlackBerry Ltd. as part of sizable new investments in Canada that include a connected-vehicle research center in Ottawa, company officials said Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sockeye salmon removed from flood-threatened Idaho hatcheryAbout 4,000 endangered Snake River sockeye salmon have been evacuated from a flood-threatened hatchery in southwestern Idaho.
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Viden

Astronomer: Stjerner kan opstå i vinden fra sorte hullerAstronomer har opdaget en helt ny måde, at stjerner kan dannes på - omkring sorte huller i midten af galakser som Mælkevejen.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Massive, computer-analyzed geological database reveals chemistry of ancient oceanA study that used a new digital library and machine reading system to suck the factual marrow from millions of geologic publications dating back decades has unraveled a longstanding mystery of ancient life: Why did easy-to-see and once-common structures called stromatolites essentially cease forming over the long arc of earth history?
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Waves on Sun give NASA new insight into space weather forecastingOur sun is a chaotic place, simmering with magnetic energy and constantly spewing out particles. Sometimes the sun releases solar flares and coronal mass ejections—huge eruptions of charged particles—which contribute to space weather and can interfere with satellites and telecommunications on Earth. While it has long been hard to predict such events, new research has uncovered a mechanism that may
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New Scientist - News

Is taking sugar out of food as difficult as industry says it is?Reducing sugar by a fifth in cakes and cereals sounds easy. So why is "big food" claiming it will be tough to do, wonders chef Anthony Warner
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

It's not just you: science papers are getting harder to read Papers from 2015 are a tougher read than some from the nineteenth century — and the problem isn't just about words, says Philip Ball. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.21751
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spacewalkers lose piece of shielding, use patch insteadSpacewalking astronauts carried out an impromptu patch job outside the International Space Station on Thursday, after losing a vital piece of cloth shielding when it floated away.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New MAVEN findings reveal how Mars' atmosphere was lost to spaceSolar wind and radiation are responsible for stripping the Martian atmosphere, transforming Mars from a planet that could have supported life billions of years ago into a frigid desert world, according to new results from NASA's MAVEN (Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission) spacecraft led by the University of Colorado Boulder.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NIH funding helps generate private-sector patents: studyResearch grants issued by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) contribute to a significant number of private-sector patents in biomedicine, according to a new study co-authored by an MIT professor.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rotating molecules create a brighter futureScientists have discovered a group of materials which could pave the way for a new generation of high-efficiency lighting, solving a quandary which has inhibited the performance of display technology for decades. The development of energy saving concepts in display and lighting applications is a major focus of research, since a fifth of the world's electricity is used for generating light.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sculpting optical microstructures with slight changes in chemistryIn 2013, materials scientists at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Wyss Institute of Biologically Inspired Engineering, grew a garden of self-assembled crystal microstructures. Now, applied mathematicians at SEAS and Wyss have developed a framework to better understand and control the fabrication of these microstructures.
3h
The Atlantic

Ghost in the Shell Is an Incoherent Misfire of a Remake When Mamoru Oshii’s anime film Ghost in the Shell debuted in 1995, it was a genuinely revolutionary vision that took stock of an over-industrialized, hyper-connected, and slowly deteriorating world with strange matter-of-factness. Ostensibly an action film, it lingered in the culture more because of the philosophical ground it broke in talking about the ways human identity intersects with compute
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Popular Science

We finally know what happened to (most of) Mars' missing atmosphere Space The answer was blowing in the solar wind Was Mars' atmosphere lost in space, or did the Martian crust reabsorb it? New data is settling the debate.
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Popular Science

What slime mold and online shoppers have in common Animals Trying to make good choices in a cold, hard world New research from the robust scientific discipline of slime suggests many living things may be making basic decisions roughly the same way. Read on:…
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Ars Technica

Dealmaster: Get one year of TorGuard VPN service for just $29.99 Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our partners at TechBargains , we're back with new deals to share with you. Today, you can get one year's worth of TorGuard VPN service for just $29.99. That's 50 percent off its typical price of $60, so grab it now if you're in need of a VPN service. We also have great deals on Dell's Inspiron 15 7000 gaming laptop, complete with a Core i5 processor and GTX 960m g
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Gizmodo

When It's Cold Outside, Is it Better To Stand, Walk, or Run to Keep Warm? While waiting for the bus in the dead of winter, you’ve probably wondered if taking a run around the block would help you battle the freezing cold. After all, your body generates heat and warms up when you exercise, right? It turns out that strategy has some merit, but only at certain speeds. Minute Physics crunched the numbers, and while there are countless variables that factor in to someone fe
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Watch the First Heat of Mega Race: Will It Be Midwest Or Gas Monkey? Mega Race In arguably the best hit at Mega Race, Chief looks to gain an advantage on Alex and the Gas Monkey build heading into round two. Full episodes streaming FREE on Discovery GO: https://www.discoverygo.com/mega-race/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/StreetOutlaws Follow on Twitter: http
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Massive, computer-analyzed geological database reveals chemistry of ancient oceanA study that used a new digital library and machine reading system to suck the factual marrow from millions of geologic publications dating back decades has unraveled a longstanding mystery of ancient life: Why did easy-to-see and once-common structures called stromatolites essentially cease forming over the long arc of earth history?
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Waves on sun give NASA new insight into space weather forecastingNew research has uncovered a mechanism, similar to one that occurs on Earth, which may allow new insights into forecasting space weather and activity on the sun.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wispy remains of supernova explosion hide possible 'survivor'This image, taken with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, shows the supernova remnant SNR 0509-68.7, also known as N103B. It is located 160,000 light-years from Earth in a neighboring galaxy called the Large Magellanic Cloud. N103B resulted from a Type Ia supernova, whose cause remains a mystery.
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Gizmodo

Twitter Just Ruined Twitter Twitter was already really bad, but the brain trust over on Market Street just figured out how to make it worse. In the olden days (yesterday), when you included someone’s username in your tweet, it deducted from your 140 character limit. Now, for some inexplicable reason, it doesn’t. Which means you can tag a seemingly infinite number of people in a thread. Let’s observe this thread created by l
4h
WIRED

Valerian’s Biggest PR Problem: It Did Everything First To sell Luc Besson's latest sci-fi epic, his studio has to make it look familiar—but also new. The post Valerian's Biggest PR Problem: It Did Everything First appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

Big Cable’s Case for Selling Your Data Doesn’t Hold Up ISPs claim they want a level playing field, but it's already tilted in their favor. The post Big Cable's Case for Selling Your Data Doesn't Hold Up appeared first on WIRED .
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Ars Technica

STEM Workforce is aging, leaving few positions for new scientists Enlarge (credit: BRICK 101 ) The population of people doing science is increasingly older, and fewer young people are establishing careers in the field. A recent paper published in PNAS finds there are two main factors contributing to the aging STEM workforce (science, tech, engineering, and math). The first is that a large majority of current scientists come from the baby boomer generation—now a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Different databases, differing statistics on racial disparities in immediate breast reconstruction after mastectomyThree major national databases include varying estimates of racial gaps in the use of immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) after mastectomy for breast cancer, reports a study in the March issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).
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Gizmodo

The Game Is On in This Incredible Game of Thrones Season Seven Promo The first promo for the new season of Game of Thrones is here, and kings and queens and guillotines are ready to take some lives. Only stop, it’s Winter Time. Game of Thrones comes back this summer with its penultimate season, and our three major players are set to make their next move. Queen Cersei has taken over the Seven Kingdoms, but Jon Snow is poised to reclaim the North, and Daenerys has c
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Ingeniøren

Myggen er et aerodynamisk vidunder, og fysikerne har fået en ny kampladsUgens videnskabelige overblik byder også på en opdagelse af en asteroide i en usædvanlig bane og et spilteoretisk eksperiment, der peger på en metode til at mindske problemet med hadske kommentarer på nettet.
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New Scientist - News

Why you should worry that your browsing history is now for saleA repeal of rules preventing ISP’s touting US users’ data isn’t just another chip in our non-existent internet privacy: it’s more fundamental than that
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New Scientist - News

Tiny fish’s venom makes predators zone out and release themWhen predators attack, blennies on Pacific coral reefs bite back with a venom that makes the attackers so dizzy that they open their mouths to let the prey out
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Ars Technica

iFixit: New $329 iPad is a throwback to the original iPad Air iFixit Apple's $329 iPad, officially dubbed the iPad (5th generation) , is a lot like the iPhone SE insofar as Apple is revisiting a design from 2013, putting more modern components in it, and selling it for a relatively low price. We already knew from the size, weight, and other specs that the iPad 5 was going to be a lot like the original iPad Air, and a teardown from iFixit reveals just how si
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Science | The Guardian

'Super potato' grown in Mars-like conditions may benefit Earth's arid areas Scientists in Peru conducted experiments reminiscent of the 2015 Matt Damon film the Martian, creating similar conditions on Earth Could potatoes one day support human life on Mars? Scientists in Peru have used a simulator that mimics the harsh conditions on the red planet to successfully grow a small potato plant. Continue reading...
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The Economist: The world this week

Business this week
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The Economist: The world this week

KAL's cartoon
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The Economist: The world this week

Politics this week
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stem cells help explain varied genetics behind rare neurologic diseaseResearchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have successfully grown stem cells from children with a devastating neurological disease to help explain how different genetic backgrounds can cause common symptoms. They identified individual and shared defects in the cells that could inform treatment efforts.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Even short-duration heat waves could lead to failure of coffee crops'Hot coffee' is not a good thing for java enthusiasts when it refers to plants beset by the high-temperature stress that this century is likely to bring.
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The Atlantic

The Psychological Approach to Educating Kids On a recent Monday morning, 25 freshmen filed into Rudolph “Keeth” Matheny’s wood-paneled portable classroom on the campus of Austin High School in Austin, Texas. But not before the shake. Matheny greeted each student by name, then extended his hand. “I won the handshake competition, and there’s an art to it,” one student said. “You have to do webbing to webbing, that’s the trick.” Shake firmly,
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Scientific American Content: Global

Why Were There Fewer Microcephaly Cases from Zika Last Year?A new study of 2016 has some surprising findings -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New on MIT Technology Review

This Robotic Tentacle Can Easily Grasp Smooth ObjectsIts dexterity could make it invaluable in factories and homes.
5h
New Scientist - News

It just got harder to deny climate change drives extreme weatherThe link between human activity and unusual jet stream patterns associated with extreme weather events is getting stronger, says Olive Heffernan
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Ars Technica

Solar cell produces hydrogen to light the night Enlarge / Thin gallium photovoltaic cells have been made before, but these are the first to efficiently split water. (credit: John Rodgers ) The clean energy revolution, despite recent policy developments , is upon us. The Netherlands' main train company now runs entirely on wind energy. Electric cars are making inroads, especially in high density urban areas. But, to be frank, batteries are not
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Twitter eases 140-character limit in repliesTwitter has found more creative ways to ease its 140-character limit without officially raising it.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Newly characterized protein has potential to save US farmers millions annuallyInstead of turning carbon into food, many plants accidentally make a plant-toxic compound during photosynthesis that is recycled through a process called photorespiration. University of Illinois and USDA/ARS researchers report in Plant Cell the discovery of a key protein in this process, which they hope to manipulate to increase plant productivity.
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Gizmodo

Oh Great, Now Bluetooth Speakers Are Exploding Image: JBL / Pexels / Gizmodo This week’s edition of Batteries Are Dangerous brings us to the great state of New Jersey, where a Bluetooth speaker recently started burning on a girl’s bed and then exploded. Thankfully, nobody was hurt, and the house didn’t burn down. The incident still serves as a cautionary tale for us all. By now, this sort of story sounds frightfully familiar. NBC New York rep
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Viden

Heroin-lignende fiskegift giver håb for udvikling af ny, smertestillende medicinMed giftfyldte hugtænder sender denne lille koralfisk sit bytte i morfinrus.
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Viden

Heroin-lignende fiskegift giver håb for udvikling af ny medicinMed giftfyldte hugtænder sender denne lille koralfisk sit bytte i morfinrus.
5h
WIRED

The World’s Biggest Porn Site Goes All-In on Encryption Now that Pornhub's going HTTPS, your private browsing will be a lot more private. The post The World's Biggest Porn Site Goes All-In on Encryption appeared first on WIRED .
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WIRED

The Fanged Fish That Drugs Its Enemies With Opioids Researchers reveal what makes the fang blenny's venom so unique: It's packed with opioid peptides. The post The Fanged Fish That Drugs Its Enemies With Opioids appeared first on WIRED .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Putin says climate change not caused by emissionsRussian President Vladimir Putin on Thursday said climate change was unstoppable and not caused by human activity and urged countries to adapt to global warming.
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