Gizmodo
Far-Right Twitter Personality Laura Loomer Banned From Uber, Lyft for Racist Tweets [Updated] Image: Screengrab via Twitter Laura Loomer, the former Rebel Media contributor best known for stage-crashing a Donald Trump-themed production of Julius Caesar and blaming her car’s blown tires on probably fictional leftist saboteurs, has joined the exclusive but growing club of far-right Twitter personalities banned from Uber for racism. Loomer was in Lower Manhattan on Wednesday at the scene of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dog star: Scientist recalls training Laika for space"I asked her to forgive us and I even cried as I stroked her for the last time," says 90-year-old Russian biologist Adilya Kotovskaya, recalling the day she bid farewell to her charge Laika.
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Ingeniøren
Revisorer: Derfor kørte Niels Bohr Bygningen helt af sporetHverken rådgivere eller entreprenøren Inabensa får ros af revisionsfirma, der har nærstuderet skandalebyggeriet Niels Bohr Bygningen. Men kritikken af Bygningsstyrelsen er særlig sønderlemmende
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Most US adults say today's children have worse health prospectsLess than one-third of adults believe that kids are physically healthier today compared to kids in their own childhoods and fewer than 25 percent think children's mental health status is better now.
11min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nanoscale 'abacus' uses pulses of light instead of wooden beads to perform calculationsThe quest to develop ever-faster and more powerful computers has led to one of the most rudimentary methods of counting being given a 21st century make-over.
1min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Key to better asparagus identified in evolution of sex chromosomesWorking with an international team of breeders and genome scientists, plant biologists at the University of Georgia have sequenced the genome of garden asparagus as a model for sex chromosome evolution.
1min
Science | The Guardian
Have psychologists found a better way to persuade people to save the planet? Recent studies linking people’s views on social inequality to how they think and act on environmental issues could prove crucial to changing their behaviour In the 1990s, psychologists at the University of California, Los Angeles, developed a scientific theory to account for all the prejudice and violence in the world. Social dominance theory , which attributes sexism and racism (among other isms
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Ingeniøren
Sonys nye robothund har flere brikker at rykke med end hypet Sophia-robotEn talende robot udformet som en kvinde vakte opsigt, da den i weekenden fik tildelt statsborgerskab i Saudi Arabien. Men en ny lille robothund fra Sony er med garanti mere “intelligent”.
17min
Latest Headlines | Science News
Dino-dooming asteroid impact created a chilling sulfur cloudThe Chicxulub impact spewed more sulfur than previously believed.
18min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Key to better asparagus identified in evolution of sex chromosomesWorking with an international team of breeders and genome scientists, plant biologists at the University of Georgia have sequenced the genome of garden asparagus as a model for sex chromosome evolution. The work sheds light on longstanding questions about the origin and early evolution of sex chromosomes, and at the same time serves as a foundation for asparagus breeding efforts.
19min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanoscale 'abacus' uses pulses of light instead of wooden beads to perform calculationsThe quest to develop ever-faster and more powerful computers has led to one of the most rudimentary methods of counting being given a 21st century make-over.
19min
The Atlantic
The Shadow Government Working to Save Obamacare From Collapse On the first day of open enrollment for insurance coverage under the Affordable Care Act for 2018, senior administration officials did what you’d expect: The president directed Americans to a government website and encouraged them to sign up, the health secretary conducted media interviews to promote the law, and others coordinated outreach with volunteers and non-profits across the country helpi
20min
Dagens Medicin
Steno Diabetes Center står bag internationalt netværkNyt globalt diabetesnetværk skal nedbryde grænserne mellem forskning og udvikling ved at involvere borgerne.
28min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A method to recover obscured serial numbers from polymer productsPolymers are widely used in industry and increasingly deployed as replacements for metals in the manufacture of automobile parts, firearms and other products. Such parts are marked with serial numbers for security and traceability purposes. The numbers may, however, be partially or completely erased, and although there are techniques for recovering them from metal parts, this is not the case for p
37min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research finds multiple nutrients are required for phytoplankton to thrivePhytoplankton, unicellular photosynthetic microbes, play a fundamental role in the global carbon cycle and fuel marine food webs. Globally, phytoplankton productivity is regulated by the availability of essential nutrients such as nitrogen and iron. Researchers at the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research, Kiel, have now been able to show that the growth of phytoplankton over large extents of
37min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gold nanoantennas used to create more powerful nanoelectronicsScientists from Tomsk Polytechnic University and their colleagues from Germany have conducted an experiment demonstrating the behavior of areas of two-dimensional materials. The study has applications in the creation of flexible displays for smartphones and other gadgets, flexible optical and computing schemes, flexible solar cells and so on. The scientists are working on a technology to observe h
43min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Television adverts are about to get personalTelevision viewers could be offered adverts that are a lot more relevant and personal with the help of new technology under development.
49min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Heat-dissipating shoes with graphene solesThe ability of graphene to add functionality to common objects has been exploited in footwear with better thermal properties. Developed by Graphene Flagship partners Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Italy, in collaboration with FADEL, a leading Italian shoe company based in Tuscany, the new GET technology gives the footwear better thermoregulation and freshness.
49min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wave properties of particles can manifest in collisionsDmitry Karlovets, senior researcher at the TSU Faculty of Physics, and Valery Serbo from the Institute of Mathematics of the SB RAS have shown that it is possible to observe the wave properties of massive particles at room temperature in practically any modern physics laboratory—it is only necessary to precisely focus the beam of particles. The results of the theoretical research were published in
49min
The Neurocritic
Can a Computer Algorithm Identify Suicidal People from Brain Scans? The Answer Won't Surprise You Just et al. 2017 Death by suicide is a preventable tragedy if the suicidal individual is identified and receives appropriate treatment. Unfortunately, some suicidal individuals do not signal their intent, and others do not receive essential assistance. Youths with severe suicidal ideation are not taken seriously in many cases, and thus are not admitted to emergency rooms. A common scenario is tha
53min
Dagens Medicin
Sklerosepatienter har gavn af hård styrketræning Styrketræning to gange om ugen gør underværker for patienter med multipel sklerose, viser et nyt studie, der udgår fra Sydjysk Skleroseklinik. Foruden at øge muskelmassen forårsager træning også vækst i bestemte hjernecentre, hvilket peger på, at fysisk aktivitet i stigende grad bør ses som tillægsbehandling til medicin, vurderer forskerne.
58min
Ingeniøren
Vingespidser som en høg skal øge vindmøllers produktion med 8%Med inspiration trukket ud af naturen, skal et forskerhold på DTU Wind Energy udvikle montérbare vingespidser, som i sidste ende kan øge elproduktionen med 8%.
1h
The Atlantic
The Tragedy of President Trump's Tribalism Although in dramatically different ways, Tuesday’s terrorist attack in New York and the Republican tax plan scheduled for release Thursday raise the same jagged question: In the Donald Trump era, is it possible for a deeply divided America to sustain any shared interest or common purpose? The country obviously faced difficult divisions long before this president was elected. But he’s operated in
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The Atlantic
Can Germany Fix Facebook? Members of The Masthead got an advance copy of this article. Want to get exclusive insights and support a sustainable future for journalism? Join now. In early October, a musical titled Facebook—Terms and Conditions toured in Germany. It’s an intentionally outlandish love story about an aspiring novelist who pens a fictional work about an imaginary social network. The novel just happens to be tit
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The future for defense drones may be under the oceansThe next frontier for unmanned military drones may not be solely in the skies. It could be undersea.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Maker of $1,000 'smart' teapot gives upThree years and $12 million were simply not enough time and money to teach the world about the benefits of owning a $1,000 teapot.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Beer o'clock in the Amazon: the tribe that loves to partyDeep in the Amazon rainforest, it's that time again—beer o'clock.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Malawi turns to British troops in poaching warUnder a scorching sun, a team of British soldiers and Malawian rangers sheltered under a tree ready to pounce on their prey: poachers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Telescope permit decision appealed to Hawaii Supreme CourtOpponents of a giant telescope planned for a Hawaii mountain are appealing the state land board's approval of the project's construction permit.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Philippine Everest conqueror sets sail for ChinaAfter conquering Mount Everest, Philippine adventurer Carina Dayondon is set to sail to China aboard a wooden replica of an ancient boat in the hopes of boosting national pride in a forgotten maritime prowess.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The Noah's Ark of animals sent in to spaceThree and a half years before Russian cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first man in space, a dog called Laika was in 1957 the first living creature to orbit the Earth.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mice, fish and flies: the animals still being sent into spaceSixty years after Laika the dog became the first living creature to go into orbit, animals are still being sent into space—though these days much smaller creatures are going up.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US moves to end ban on new uranium mining near Grand CanyonU.S. officials said Wednesday they have proposed ending the Obama administration's ban on new uranium mining leases on public land outside Grand Canyon National Park.
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Ars Technica
HTC U11 Life hands on—A cheap ($349!) imitation of the U11 Ron Amadeo After the launch of the flagship HTC U11 earlier this year, it's time for a cheaper entry in HTC's lineup. HTC's approach this year is to take the U11, cut the price and premium-ness by about 50 percent, and create the "HTC U11 Life." It's a cheap imitation of the U11, for just $349. From a distance, you can barely tell the difference between the flagship U11 and the U11 Life. You get
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Ingeniøren
Forbrugerrådet om Apple Pay: Kun dig der skal bestemme, hvordan du betaler Mangel på kontrol over mobilbetaling har fået serie-iværksætter til at slette Apple Pay. https://www.version2.dk/1082302 Version2 Forside relaterede artikler VIDEO: Apple Pay undertrykker MobilePay helt automatisk
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Science | The Guardian
Big tech firms' AI hiring frenzy leads to brain drain at UK universities High demand at companies such as Google could leave fewer talented scientists to teach next generation, academics fear British universities are being stripped of artificial intelligence (AI) experts in a brain drain to the private sector that is hampering research and disrupting teaching at some of the country’s leading institutions. Scores of talented scientists have left or passed up university
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Gizmodo
Georgia Attorney General Won't Defend Election Officials in Lawsuit Over Wiped Electoral Server Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp. Photo: AP Worried about whether U.S. elections are vulnerable to outside interference? On Wednesday, tech giants Facebook, Twitter and Google testified that their platforms were used to spread Russian misinformation and propaganda to millions of potential voters in 2016. But here’s a case that illustrates how the struggling technical systems that run electio
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Ingeniøren
Efterretningstjeneste: International mediedækning øgede risiko for flere angreb mod Støjbergs ministerium Den er sandsynligt, men ikke sikkert, tyrkisk hackergruppe stod bag DDoS-angrebet mod udlændinge- og integrationsministeriet, vurderede Center for Cybersikkerhed blandt andet umiddelbart efter angrebet. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/cfcs-efter-ddos-mod-integrationsministeriet-international-mediedaekning-vil-oege-risiko Version2
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Ingeniøren
Headhuntere har fået et nyt yndlingsbytte Selv med få års erfaring bliver flertallet af projektledere forsøgt forført af rekrutteringsagenter fra andre firmaer. Det viser en ny undersøgelse blandt medlemmerne af IDA’s projektlederpanel. Læs også, hvordan du nærmer dig rollen som projektleder. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/undersoegelse-headhuntere-jagter-projektledere-aldrig-foer-10888 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UTSA researcher collaborates with Canadian geneticist to explore 30-year old medical caseAimin Liu, Lutcher Brown Distinguished Chair in Biochemistry at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), has published research demystifying a decades-old medical case. The article, which appeared in Molecular Genetics and Metabolism, explores the first confirmed human case of 2,3-dioxygenase deficiency.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists of SibFU have found a way to determine the toxicity of nanomaterialsOfficial website of the Russian Science Foundation reports that a group of scientists from Siberian Federal University and Krasnoyarsk Scientific Center of the SB RAS has developed a bioluminescent enzymatic test system for assessing the toxicity of carbon nanomaterials.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Learning a mother tongue: A universal process?Specialists in language development in children have studied a traditional population in the Bolivian Amazon, the Tsimane. They show that, on average, less than one minute per hour is spent talking to children under the age of four. This is up to ten times less than for children of the same age in industrialized countries. This observation should prompt us to conduct more studies of this kind in v
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Gizmodo
Luke Is Back on the Falcon in New The Last Jedi Clip Still: Star Wars via Twitter “Darkness rises, and the Light to meet it.” A new clip for The Last Jedi brings Luke Skywalker back to the ship that started it all, but that’s not the only place we see the Millennium Falcon. The new clip gives us plenty of new glimpses at the upcoming film, including a few surprises. We get a better look at Snoke’s throne room, as well as Finn joining in the Battle
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New on MIT Technology Review
Doubling Down on Gene Therapy for Heart FailureAfter a disappointing clinical trial in 2015, scientists are trying anew to mend failing hearts with a gene.
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The Atlantic
‘Scorn for Tribalism Is an American Tradition’ Let’s take another whack at whether the right word to describe the tribal divisions now on display in Congress is in fact tribalism , or whether some other term would do better. The first entry in this series was here , with follow-ups here and here . This next set of entries makes the fourth in the series: Tribalism is ok . From a reader with advanced degrees in linguistics, who grew up in the U
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Gizmodo
Tim Cook: Tech Is Dividing People, But Also Could We Slash Apple's Taxes Already? Photo: AP Apple CEO Tim Cook, whose company mostly sells consumer products, has largely avoided being sucked into the rapidly expanding scandal over the alleged Russian effort to promote internal division in the US before the 2016 elections—unlike other tech giants like Google, Twitter and Facebook, all of which now admit some degree of involvement . With his hands washed of this particular matte
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Miracle cure costs less than a budget airline flightThe revolution in generic drugs means that a 12-week course of drugs to cure hepatitis C can be manufactured for just US$50. Furthermore, new data shows that these generic copies are just as effective as the branded medicines. Yet restrictions and patent issues around the world mean that hardly any patients can access the drugs at these low costs, say experts speaking at the World Hepatitis Summit
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Science | The Guardian
Pregnant sharks and rays likely to abort their young if captured New research has found a quarter of pregnant sharks and rays lose their pups when caught, threatening some species Australian researchers have found a quarter of pregnant sharks and rays abort their pups when captured, revealing a little-known risk to the survival of the slow-growing animals. An analysis of recorded instances of sharks and rays either aborting their pups or undergoing a premature
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Gizmodo
Elon Musk Just Yelled 'SHAME' At A Bunch Of Journalists Photo credit AP Tesla’s had something of a rough go lately. Long the disruptive darling of both the automotive and tech worlds, the automaker has struggled to ramp up production of its new Model 3 sedan to meet its self-stated targets, and in addition to facing numerous worker lawsuits over alleged discrimination , it is now facing questions and criticism over the allegedly performance-related fi
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Gizmodo
In This New Star Wars: Rebels Clip, the Force May Be Binding Them All Together Image: Disney XD In this exclusive clip from the seventh episode of Star Wars: Rebels season four, titled “Kindred,” Kanan and Hera have a very loaded conversation—one that seems to be setting up what’s to come for our band of freedom fighters. As the Jedi put it in last week’s episode (“Flight of the Defender”): “All paths are coming together now.” Check it out: Kanan’s right; for good, for bad,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Babies born late preterm may be at risk of cardiovascular diseasesBabies born late preterm at 35 weeks are at a higher risk of cardiovascular disease in adult life than those born at full term, according to research published in Experimental Physiology.
9h
NYT > Science
Panel Recommends Opioid Solutions But Puts No Price Tag on ThemThe commission’s 56 suggestions include expanding medication-assisted treatment and creating more drug courts but do not suggest a new approach to the crisis.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Are some natural environments more psychologically beneficial than others?Spending time in rural and coastal locations is more psychologically beneficial to individuals than time spent in urban green spaces, a new study in the journal Environment & Behavior reports.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quality of life deterioration delayed if progression of advanced breast cancer delayedPatients with advanced breast cancer have a better quality of life for longer if the progression of their disease can be delayed, according to new results presented at the Advanced Breast Cancer Fourth International Consensus Conference.
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Popular Science
Space dust is stirring this star's plasma soup Space What is the solar wind, anyways? Observations of a distant star show that aluminum dust might be speeding up its solar winds. Here’s why understanding solar winds is important.
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New on MIT Technology Review
A Renewable Energy Champion is Suing His Scientific Critics
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Feed: All Latest
Elon Musk Admits Tesla Model 3 Production Is Months Behind ScheduleBut he swears things are getting better.
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Gizmodo
The Four Best Cutting Boards, According To You We asked for your opinions on your favorite cutting boards and we’ve trimmed off the fat and sliced it down to four finalists. Now it’s time to pick one board that is a cut above the rest. Read about the finalists and submit your vote at the end of this post. Restaurant Thick Cutting Board Restaurant Thick Plastic Cutting Board Cheap, can be dishwashered, you can even saw it in half if you want t
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Ars Technica
Sales up, revenue up, but still losing money: A Tesla story Enlarge (credit: David Butow | Getty Images) Tesla CEO Elon Musk has called the company "a drama magnet" compared to SpaceX, The Boring Company, or any of Musk's other endeavors. Since the launch of the Model 3 , the $35,000 vehicle in Tesla's battery-electric lineup, that's held true. Now in Q3, the company's financial statement reflects more of that drama, good and bad. Wednesday night, Tesla p
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NYT > Science
F.D.A. Warns Companies Against Claims That Marijuana Cures DiseasesThe agency singled out businesses claiming their products could cure cancer or diabetes, and vanquish other illnesses.
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Ars Technica
Video dooms cop who arrested nurse for not letting him take patient’s blood A Utah nurse who was roughed up and arrested on July 26 by a Salt Lake City cop because she told the officer that he needed a warrant to draw blood from an unconscious patient has settled for a $500,000 payout. Body cam footage from the scene shows University Hospital nurse Alex Wubbels calmly telling the officer, who was trained for the task of blood withdrawal, that he cannot take a blood sampl
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Citizen science may boost engagement and understanding in undergraduate biology classesCitizen science projects, such as ClimateWatch, can boost engagement in undergraduate courses, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New mathematical models could help solve few-body problems in physicsIn physics, the conundrum known as the 'few-body problem,' how three or more interacting particles behave, has bedeviled scientists for centuries. Equations that describe the physics of few-body systems are usually unsolvable and the methods used to find solutions are unstable. There aren't many equations that can probe the wide spectrum of possible few-particle dynamics. A new family of mathemati
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Gizmodo
Facebook Ran Some Russia-Funded Ads on Gizmodo Media Content. Here's What We Know About It Image: AP This week, Facebook was grilled before three Congressional committees over Russian propaganda that it allowed to reach approximately 126 million users. The social network has now revealed to our parent company Fusion Media Group (FMG) that some Russian-bought ads appeared alongside content by two of our sister sites— Splinter and The Root. According to Facebook, affected content from Sp
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Scientific American Content: Global
A Moth with a Potent Cocktail of PoisonThe wood tiger moth is the first species known in which fluids from various parts of the moth’s body each target a different type of predator. Jason Goldman reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org
How a tub of liquid helium could help detect dark matter Researchers have developed a new strategy for directly detecting dark matter, the elusive material thought to account for the majority of matter in the universe. The strategy, which is designed to detect interactions between dark matter particles and a tub of superfluid helium, would be sensitive to particles in a much lower mass range than is possible with any of the large-scale experiments run
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Futurity.org
For $10, turn 2D ultrasound machines into 3D scanners With a $10 microchip, it’s possible to turn a $50,000 ultrasound machine into something closer to a 3D imaging device that normally costs around $250,000, researchers report. “Instead of looking through a keyhole to understand what’s in the room, we can open a door and see everything in front of us.” The key to the technology is a fingernail-sized microchip that mounts onto a traditional ultrasou
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Do animals think rationally?Previous studies have shown that animals can remember specific events, use tools and solve problems. But exactly what that means remains a matter of scientific dispute. Now one researcher suggests the evidence shows a wide range of animal species exhibit so-called 'executive control' when it comes to making decisions, consciously considering their goals and ways to satisfy those goals before actin
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genetic pathways to individualized treatment for advanced prostate cancerResearchers have uncovered genetic clues to why tumors resist a specific therapy used for treating advanced prostate cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bottlenecks in early seagrass growth identifiedA new study reveals bottlenecks in the growth of seagrass from seed to seedling, knowledge useful for improving seed-based restoration efforts.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
One factor that may help schools close racial achievement gapA study of one Texas school district reveals one of the best evidence-based ways ever found to close the educational achievement gap between black and white students. The research found that teachers' sense of collective efficacy in any one school -- the belief that they had the capability and support necessary to educate their students -- was closely connected to the achievement gap.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A nutrient mix makes phytoplankton thriveUnicellular photosynthetic microbes -- phytoplankton -- play a fundamental role in the global carbon cycle and fuel marine food webs. Globally, phytoplankton productivity is regulated by the availability of essential nutrients, such as nitrogen and iron. Researchers have now been able to show that the growth of phytoplankton over large extents of the ocean are not limited by a single nutrient, but
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Newly described giraffid species may help trace evolution of giraffe ancestorsA new giraffid species from Spain may extend the range and timespan of the ancestors of giraffes, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
An early Christmas present: Scientists have unwrapped the reindeer genomeA new article describes the sequencing and analysis of the reindeer genome. The article provides a resource for gaining greater understanding of the processes of evolution, domestication, animal husbandry, and adaptation to extreme environments.
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: 'Freedom From Want, Freedom From Fear' What We’re Following The Attack in NYC: Eight people were killed when a man who claimed to be inspired by the Islamic State ran down pedestrians, cyclists, and other motorists with a pickup truck. The alleged attacker has been identified as Sayfullo Saipov, a 29-year-old born in Uzbekistan . In response, President Trump called for an end to the Diversity Immigrant Visa Program , which he alleged
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How life arose from primordial muck: Experimental evidence overturns accepted theoryLife on Earth originated in an intimate partnership between the nucleic acids (genetic instructions for all organisms) and small proteins called peptides, according to two new articles from biochemists and biologists. Their 'peptide-RNA' hypothesis contradicts the widely-held 'RNA-world' hypothesis, which states that life originated from nucleic acids and only later evolved to include proteins.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Winners and losers of forest fragmentationBreaking up the rainforest into small, isolated patches is forcing more species to live at the forest edge and putting those that are dependent on the forest core at risk. Eighty-five percent of species are now being impacted by this forest fragmentation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mapping the microbiome of ... everythingIn the Earth Microbiome Project, an extensive global team has collected more than 27,000 samples from numerous, diverse environments around the globe. They analyzed the unique collections of microbes -- the microbiomes -- living in each sample to generate the first reference database of bacteria colonizing the planet.
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Luck plays a role in how language evolves, team findsRead a few lines of Chaucer or Shakespeare and you'll get a sense of how the English language has changed during the past millennium. Examining collections of annotated texts dating from the 12th to the 21st centuries, researchers found that certain linguistic changes were guided by pressures analogous to natural selection -- social, cognitive and other factors -- while others seem to have occurre
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Two classes of GGAA-microsatellites in a Ewing sarcoma contextResearchers describe two types of GGAA-microsatellites and their roles in EWS/FLI binding and gene regulation in Ewing sarcoma. Ewing sarcoma is the second most common pediatric bone malignancy. It is initiated by chromosomal translocation t(11;22)(q24;q12), which creates the fusion protein and oncogenic driver EWS/FLI.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A third of the Internet is under attackSpanning two years, from March 2015 to February 2017, researchers found that about one-third of the IPv4 address space was subject to some kind of DoS attacks, where a perpetrator maliciously disrupts services of a host connected to the Internet.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Topical gel made from oral blood pressure drugs shown effective in healing chronic woundsScientists have shown that a topical gel made from a class of common blood pressure pills that block inflammation pathways speeds the healing of chronic skin wounds in mice and pigs.
11h
Feed: All Latest
CIA Reveals What's Inside Osama Bin Laden’s Files: GIFs, Memes, and Iran TiesA newly released trove of 470,000 files seized from Osama bin Laden's compound include some internet classics—and links to Iran.
12h
Gizmodo
Deadspin Did Crybaby Loser Papa John Also Lose Our Chain Pizza Rankings? Deadspin Did Crybaby Loser Papa John Also Lose Our Chain Pizza Rankings? | The Root Disgusting University of Hartford Freshman Expelled After Being Accused of Rubbing Used Tampons on Black Roommate’s Bag, Contaminating Her Living Space | Jezebel Harvey Weinstein’s Abuse Took Many Forms, As I Learned Firsthand | Splinter The Historic Black Town Gradually Being Washed Away | Earther Trump’s NASA Pi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Overlooked Treasure: The First Evidence of ExoplanetsMount Wilson is the site where some of the key discoveries about our galaxy and universe were made in the early 20th century. But there is a far lesser known, 100-year-old discovery from Mount Wilson -- one that was unidentified and unappreciated until recently: the first evidence of exoplanets.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A new advanced forensics tool: Recovering erased serial numbers in polymersPolymers are highly prized by industry and increasingly used as replacements for metals in the manufacture of e.g. automobile parts and firearms. Such parts are marked with serial numbers, for security and traceability purposes. The numbers may however be partially or completely erased, and although there are techniques for recovering them from metal parts, this is not the case for polymers.
12h
The Atlantic
In Defense of the 'Cut Cut Cut Act' Negotiating a plan to cut taxes is hard. Negotiating a name for that tax cut shouldn’t be. Nonetheless, according to ABC News’s Tara Palmeri , the matter of what to christen the forthcoming GOP proposal is one of the snags holding up the public announcement of this plan. Ryan initially kicked the naming over to Trump because of his knack for branding, according to a senior Hill aide. Trump has be
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The Atlantic
Why 'A Father-Son Talking-To' Is So Troubling “Toby is in HR, which technically means he works for corporate, so he’s really not a part of our family,” Michael Scott told the documentary cameras, of his arch-enemy, in the second season of The Office . Unable, in classic Scottian style, to help himself, the Dunder Mifflin branch manager added: “Also, he’s divorced, so he’s really not a part of his family.” The Office captured many awkward tru
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
These Frontierswomen Are Saddling Up For An All-Girls Cattle Drive #AlaskaTLF | Sundays at 9p Charlotte and Jane take the helm for this year's cattle drive, leaving the boys behind. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/alaska-the-last-frontier/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Check out The Last Frontier live cams: http://bit.ly/alaskalivecams Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlaskaTLF https://www.
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Ars Technica
Pirate TV services are taking a bite out of cable company revenue Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Priscila Zambotto) TV piracy services are being used by about 6.5 percent of North American households with broadband access, potentially costing legitimate TV providers billions of dollars a year, a new analysis found. Pirate services that offer live TV channels are apparently responsible for more downstream traffic each night than torrent downloads. Based on thes
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Gizmodo
The 10 Best Deals of November 1, 2017 There were a ton of great deals today to kick off the one of the biggest shopping months of the year, but these were our ten favorites. Head over to our main post for more deals, and follow us on Twitter and Facebook to never miss a chance to save. You can also join our Kinja Deals Community Facebook group to connect with your fellow deal hunters. #1: Dyson Ball Refurb Dyson Ball , $150 Dyson vac
12h
The Atlantic
Social Media in 1857 Many Novembers ago, when The Atlantic was brand-new, a writer for The New York Times made a cautiously optimistic assessment of the fledgling magazine. The talent of The Atlantic ’s writers was “indisputable,” the newspaper said, though “there is a lack of freshness in the topics discussed.” No matter, the reviewer concluded. “A periodical, like a horse or steamer, must have sufficient time allow
12h
Popular Science
Meet the mountain bikes built to survive a backflip off a cliff Technology Surprisingly, most parts come right off the shelf of the bike shop. Professional freeride mountain bikers huck themselves off cliffs and over canyons. This is the bike tech that helps them survive.
12h
Big Think
PTSD Doesn’t Only Reside in the Brain These results may offer a pathway toward novel treatment options in the near future. Read More
13h
Gizmodo
November Is Here, Which Means You Can Add These New Scifi and Fantasy Books to Your Shelves Detail from cover for Artemis by Andy Weir. Image: Crown Andy Weir’s follow-up to The Martian , the moon-heist thriller Artemis , is finally here, but that’s just one of dozens of new scifi and fantasy books out this month. The days are shorter, it’s cold and rainy outside, and there’s no better time to pick out a new book or five to stay home and read. We’ve got you covered. All Those Explosions
13h
Popular Science
United Airlines is auctioning off Boeing 747 memorabilia next week Aviation Nostalgic passengers can now own seats and other parts from the iconic aircraft. United is auctioning off Boeing 747 parts ahead of the aircraft's farewell flight for the airline.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tesla swings to $671m loss on Model 3 delaysElectric car maker Tesla Inc. swung to a $671 million loss in the third quarter as it struggled to ramp up production of its new Model 3 small car.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amid soaring profits, Facebook vows to curb abuseFacebook on Wednesday reported profits leapt on booming revenue from online ads in the third quarter, topping investor forecasts and buoying shares already at record highs.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New drug enables infants with genetic disorder to live longer, gain motor functionInfants with the most severe form of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) were more likely to show gains in motor function and were 47 percent more likely to survive without permanent assisted ventilation support when treated with a new medication, according to a study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Phase 1 study shows encouraging data for gene replacement therapy for SMA type IA one-time intravenous infusion of the high dose of gene therapy extended the survival of patients with spinal muscular atrophy type 1 (SMA1) in a Phase 1 clinical trial, according to a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study unveils changes in the brain during extended missions in spaceMUSC neuroradiologist Donna Roberts conducted a study titled 'Effects of Spaceflight on Astronaut Brain Structure as Indicated on MRI,' the results of which will be featured in the Nov. 2 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.
13h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: ‘Mr. President, Where Is Your Leadership?’ Today in 5 Lines New York police said Sayfullo Saipov, the Uzbek immigrant who allegedly drove a pickup truck through a crowd in Manhattan on Tuesday, “did this in the name of ISIS” and planned the attacks for weeks. President Trump called Saipov an “animal” and told reporters he would consider sending him to Guantanamo Bay prison. Trump also pledged to end the diversity visa program, which is ho
13h
Ars Technica
Georgia insists server deletion was “not undertaken to delete evidence” Enlarge / A man casts his ballot during a special election in Georgia's 6th Congressional District special election at North Fulton Government Service Center on June 20, 2017 in Sandy Springs, Georgia. (credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images) Georgia state officials said Monday that the recent reports of server deletion "were not undertaken to delete evidence." The conclusion came as part of a two-page
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wind farms along mountain ridges may negatively affect batsBy attaching miniaturized Global Positioning System tags to cave bats near a mountain ridge in Thailand, researchers have shown that bats repeatedly use mountain slopes to ascend to altitudes of more than 550 m above the ground.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New Greenland maps show more glaciers at riskNew maps of Greenland's coastal seafloor and bedrock beneath its massive ice sheet show that two to four times as many coastal glaciers are at risk of accelerated melting as had previously been thought.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
One factor that may help schools close racial achievement gapA study of one Texas school district reveals one of the best evidence-based ways ever found to close the educational achievement gap between black and white students.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Vitamin E discovery in maize could lead to more nutritious cropNew research has identified genes that control vitamin E content in maize grain, a finding that could lead to improving the nutritional profile of this staple crop.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study identifies bottlenecks in early seagrass growthSeagrass meadows, key nursery and feeding grounds for many kinds of marine life, are being lost worldwide to nutrient pollution, warming waters, and other ills. A new study by an international research team reveals bottlenecks in the growth of seagrass from seed to seedling, knowledge useful for improving seed-based restoration efforts.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
High molybdenum in Wisconsin wells not from coal ashWhen high levels of the trace element molybdenum (mah-LIB-den-um) were discovered in drinking-water wells in southeastern Wisconsin, the region's numerous coal ash disposal sites seemed to be a likely source of the contamination.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nicotine's hold: What the gut and gender have to do with itMany people who smoke or chew tobacco can't seem to escape nicotine's addictive properties. Studies show that women in particular seem to have a harder time quitting, even with assistance, when compared to men. Now, scientists report in a mouse study published in ACS' journal Chemical Research in Toxicology that the difference in gender smoking patterns and smoking's effects could be due to how ni
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Jellyfish-inspired electronic skin glows when it gets hurtElectronic-skin technologies for prosthetics and robots can detect the slightest touch or breeze. But oddly, the sensors that make this possible do not respond effectively to a harmful blow. Now researchers report in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces the development of a jellyfish-inspired electronic skin that glows when the pressure against it is high enough to potentially cause an injury.
13h
Live Science
Here's How Space Travel Changes the BrainAstronauts who spend prolonged time in space experience noticeable changes to their brain's structure, a new study finds.
13h
Gizmodo
The Razer Phone Is Here, But Is It For Real? All images: Gizmodo As the folks at Razer would tell it, the plan was always to make a phone. No one at Razer was quite sure what that phone would look like, or precisely how it would be a “gamer” phone—Razer’s peripherals and laptops are built primarily for gamers—but the phone was a distant dream. Now it’s a distinct reality, and at $699, the new gaming-focused Razer Phone could even be a solid
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Saliva proteins could explain why some people overuse saltMany Americans consume too much salt. Now in a study appearing in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists report that people who can easily taste salt have differing amounts of certain proteins in their saliva than those who are less sensitive. The finding could help explain why some of us have a hard time shaking the salt habit and could potentially lead to the development of m
13h
Feed: All Latest
Razer Phone: Specs, Price, Release DateIts looks may disguise its intentions, but the Razer Phone exists for gaming.
13h
Ars Technica
Razer made a smartphone, and it’s an all-black version of the Nextbit Robin Enlarge (credit: Valentina Palladino) Nearly a year after Razer bought Nextbit , we now know what the startup smartphone company has been working on while under the gaming company's leadership. Razer debuted its first smartphone today, the Razer Phone, and it's clearly born from the ashes of the Nextbit Robin. Mobile gaming continues to be important to all types of smartphone users, and gaming co
13h
The Scientist RSS
Study Raises Questions About Brain Stimulation Boosting MemoryIn people with epilepsy, transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) does not affect memory-related brainwaves as widely claimed, researchers report.
13h
Ars Technica
Here are the Kremlin-backed Facebook ads designed to foment discord in US Today is Day 2 of top officials from Facebook, Google, and Twitter being grilled by congressional committees about how their platforms played host to a disinformation campaign perpetrated by Russian state actors. Facebook, which has conceded that Kremlin-backed ads might have been seen by as many as 126 million people, has been taking the biggest beatings in these hearings. Today, the House Intel
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New theory addresses how life on Earth arose from the primordial muckLife on Earth originated in an intimate partnership between the nucleic acids (genetic instructions for all organisms) and small proteins called peptides, according to two new papers from biochemists and biologists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the University of Auckland. Their "peptide-RNA" hypothesis contradicts the widely-held "RNA-world" hypothesis, which states that l
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Brexit fallout: An uncertain future for academic scientistsOn June 23, 2016, the U.K. voted to leave the European Union—and science has not been immune to its effects. The referendum has led to uncertainties in future policies and funding that could hurt the research enterprise and science-related higher education in the U.K., according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change could decrease Sun's ability to disinfect lakesIncreasing organic runoff as a result of climate change may be reducing the penetration of pathogen-killing ultraviolet (UV) sunlight in inland lakes, rivers, and coastal waters, according to a new study in the journal Scientific Reports. The findings, from a team including researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, points to the potential for an increase in waterborne pathogens.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA investigates invisible magnetic bubbles in outer solar systemSpace may seem empty, but it's actually a dynamic place populated with near-invisible matter, and dominated by forces, in particular those created by magnetic fields. Magnetospheres—the magnetic fields around most planets—exist throughout our solar system. They deflect high-energy, charged particles called cosmic rays that are spewed out by the Sun or come from interstellar space. Along with atmos
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Poll finds one-third of Latinos say they have experienced discrimination in their jobs and when seeking housingThis report is part of a series titled "Discrimination in America." The series is based on a survey conducted for National Public Radio, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. While many surveys have explored Americans' beliefs about discrimination, this survey asks people about their own personal experiences with discrimination.
13h
Ars Technica
EPA bans research grant recipients from advising agency on science Enlarge / Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency Scott Pruitt. (credit: Getty Images) US Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt took another step to reshape the independent boards that advise the agency on science Tuesday. The newly announced directive bars scientists who receive EPA research grants from serving as science advisers to the agency. The move follows
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Wind farms along mountain ridges may negatively affect batsBy attaching miniaturized Global Positioning System tags to cave bats near a mountain ridge in Thailand, researchers have shown that bats repeatedly use mountain slopes to ascend to altitudes of more than 550 m above the ground.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
World's largest meeting of eye physicians and surgeons kicks off in New OrleansNext week, thousands of eye physicians and surgeons will attend AAO 2017, the American Academy of Ophthalmology's 121st annual meeting.
13h
Feed: All Latest
Google Limits Access to Airfare Data, Risking Antitrust ConcernsGoogle plans to discontinue its QPX Express service featuring airline data from ITA Software.
13h
Big Think
‘Know Thyself’ Is Not Just Silly Advice: It’s Actively Dangerous Knowing who you are can stop you from becoming who you want to be. Read More
14h
Live Science
Rare Find at King Solomon's Mines: Ancient Pregnant Woman's RemainsThe skeleton of a pregnant woman, dating back around 3,200 years, has been found near a temple dedicated to the Egyptian goddess Hathor at King Solomon's Mines in Israel.
14h
Live Science
In Photos: Ancient Skeleton of Pregnant Woman Found Buried Near Temple of GoddessArchaeologists have discovered the 3,200-year-old skeleton of a pregnant woman who died in her 20s and was buried near a temple in Israel.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Vitamin E discovery in maize could lead to more nutritious cropNew research has identified genes that control vitamin E content in maize grain, a finding that could lead to improving the nutritional profile of this staple crop.Cornell University scientists and colleagues from other institutions combined different types of genetic association analyses to identify 14 genes across the genome that were involved in the synthesis of vitamin E. Six genes were newly
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Poll: One-third of Latinos say they have experienced discrimination in jobs and housingThis report is part of a series titled "Discrimination in America." The series is based on a survey conducted for National Public Radio, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. While many surveys have explored Americans' beliefs about discrimination, this survey asks people about their own personal experiences with discrimination.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Molybdenum in Wisconsin wells not from coal ashNatural causes, not leaching coal ash, are to blame for high levels of molybdenum in drinking water wells in southeastern Wisconsin, a study by Duke and Ohio State researchers finds. The scientists used isotopic fingerprinting and age-dating techniques to rule out the possibility that surface coal-ash contamination could be causing the problem and traced it to natural processes occurring deep unde
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Co-parenting after the end of a violent marriage: What does the first year look like?Intimate partner violence is not uncommon among divorcing couples. Whether a woman experienced intimate partner violence during marriage -- and the kind of violence she experienced -- has an impact on how well she and her former partner are able to co-parent after separation. Researchers at the University of Illinois wanted to find out how co-parenting varies during the first year after separation
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Close friends linked to a sharper memoryMaintaining positive, warm and trusting friendships might be the key to a slower decline in memory and cognitive functioning, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study. SuperAgers -- who are 80 years of age and older who have cognitive ability at least as good as people in their 50s or 60s -- reported having more satisfying, high-quality relationships compared to their cognitively average, sa
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brexit fallout: An uncertain future for academic scientistsOn June 23, 2016, the UK voted to leave the European Union -- and science has not been immune to its effects. The referendum has led to uncertainties in future policies and funding that could hurt the research enterprise and science-related higher education in the UK, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new advanced forensics toolPolymers are highly prized by industry and increasingly used as replacements for metals in the manufacture of e.g. automobile parts and firearms. Such parts are marked with serial numbers, for security and traceability purposes. The numbers may however be partially or completely erased, and although there are techniques for recovering them from metal parts, this is not the case for polymers.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Saliva proteins could explain why some people overuse saltMany Americans consume too much salt. Now in a study appearing in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists report that people who can easily taste salt have differing amounts of certain proteins in their saliva than those who are less sensitive. The finding could help explain why some of us have a hard time shaking the salt habit and could potentially lead to the development of m
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New theory addresses how life on earth arose from the primordial muckLife on Earth originated in an intimate partnership between the nucleic acids (genetic instructions for all organisms) and small proteins called peptides, according to two new papers from biochemists and biologists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the University of Auckland. Their 'peptide-RNA' hypothesis contradicts the widely-held 'RNA-world' hypothesis, which states that l
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Inflammation in middle age may be tied to brain shrinkage decades laterPeople who have biomarkers tied to inflammation in their blood in their 40s and 50s may have more brain shrinkage decades later than people without the biomarkers, according to a study published in the Nov. 1, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The brain cell loss was found especially in areas of the brain that are affected by Alzheimer's di
14h
The Atlantic
Guantanamo and the Myth of Swift Justice President Trump on Wednesday labeled the U.S. federal justice system as a “joke” and a “laughing stock” as he called for “quick” and “strong justice” for terrorism suspects like Sayfullo Saipov, the Uzbek national who authorities say carried out Tuesday’s fatal terrorist attack in New York City. The president also said he would “certainly consider” sending Saipov to the U.S. military prison on Gu
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers demonstrate how to control liquid crystal patternsResearchers have demonstrated that not only could patterns on liquid crystals be controlled at nanoscales, but the changes could be visible without microscopes. The work could potentially pave the way to new biosensors and energy-efficient harvesting devices.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
White matter damage linked to chronic musculoskeletal pain in Gulf War veteransA new study has linked structural damage in the white matter of the brain to chronic musculoskeletal pain in Gulf War veterans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Marijuana use associated with cognitive dysfunction in people with HIV who have substance abuse disorder, study findsMarijuana use is associated with cognitive dysfunction in people with HIV infection who have an alcohol or other drug use disorder, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bacterial fats, not dietary ones, may deserve the blame for heart diseaseHeart disease and fatty clogs in the arteries go hand in hand. But new evidence suggests the fatty molecules might come not only from what you eat, but from the bacteria in your mouth, scientists report. The research may explain why gum disease is associated with heart trouble.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
NASA investigates invisible magnetic bubbles in outer solar systemForty years ago, the twin Voyagers spacecraft were launched to explore the frontiers of our solar system, and have since made countless discoveries, including finding magnetic bubbles around two of the outer planets.
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Popular Science
You should not be worried about Sephora giving you herpes Health Mostly because you probably already have it. You can’t put “herpes” in a headline without people losing their damn minds, so we’re here to unpack this for you.
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Ars Technica
CIA releases 321 gigabytes of Bin Laden’s digital library, Web cache crap Enlarge / Osama Bin Laden gets ready to play some Final Fantasy VII , apparently. (credit: US Department of Defense via Getty Images) Today, the Central Intelligence Agency posted a cache of files obtained from Osama Bin Laden's personal computer and other devices recovered from his compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan by Navy SEALs during the raid in which he was killed on May 2, 2011. The 470,000 f
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Gizmodo
Report Finds US Oversight of Dangerous Pathogens Is Seriously Lacking Image: Getty Images In the course of researching diseases like the Ebola virus, more than 200 labs in the United States work with hazardous pathogens. But oversight of those labs is seriously lagging, with safety lapses occurring at some of them, according to a new report from the US Government Accountability Office. The Federal Select Agent Program, which is run by the Centers for Disease Contro
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nicotine's hold: What the gut and gender have to do with itMany people who smoke or chew tobacco can't seem to escape nicotine's addictive properties. Studies show that women in particular seem to have a harder time quitting, even with assistance, when compared to men. Now, scientists report in a mouse study published in ACS' journal Chemical Research in Toxicology that the difference in gender smoking patterns and smoking's effects could be due to how ni
14h
The Atlantic
Are Facebook, Twitter, and Google American Companies? On Tuesday’s technology-executive hearings before the Senate Intelligence Committee, a key tension at the heart of the internet emerged: Do American tech companies, such as Twitter, Facebook, and Google, operate as American companies ? Or are they in some other global realm, maybe in some place called cyberspace? In response to a tough line of questions from Senator Tom Cotton of Arkansas, Twitte
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Versatile marine bacteria could be an influence on global warming, scientists discoverScientists have discovered that a 'rare' type of marine bacteria is much more widespread than previously thought -- and possesses a remarkable metabolism that could contribute to greenhouse gas production.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Innovative heart device is safe and effective, study findsA new study has found that a pioneering device to repair heart valves is safe and effective, and can reduce the invasiveness and side effects of conventional mitral valve surgery. The Harpoon Mitral Valve Repair System is deployed through a small opening between the ribs, and repairs the heart while it continues to beat.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New Greenland maps show more glaciers at riskNew maps of Greenland's coastal seafloor and bedrock beneath its massive ice sheet show that two to four times as many coastal glaciers are at risk of accelerated melting as had previously been thought.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New analysis shows Brazil slows deforestation with land registration programBrazil's environmental land registration program has been successful in slowing down the rate of deforestation on private land, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Low genetic diversity in domestic ferretsResearchers reported that the domestic ferrets in North America and Australia had extremely low genetic diversity, whereas ferrets in Europe had higher genetic diversity, as periodic hybridization with wild polecats appears to occur. However, all the countries sampled had ferrets with lower genetic diversity than their wild ancestors.
14h
Gizmodo
Here Are 14 Russian Ads That Ran on Facebook During The 2016 Election Screenshot: Gizmodo As part of its ongoing probe into Russian election meddling, Democrats on the House Intelligence Committee have released a “representative sampling” of Facebook and Instagram ads allegedly purchased by Russian trolls during presidential campaign season. The ads were obtained by Gizmodo as attorneys for Facebook, Twitter, and Google testified before the committee on Wednesday.
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Gizmodo
Upgrade Your Monitor To 4K For $230, Today Only Refurb Samsung 28" 4K Monitor , $230 If you’re ready to make the leap to 4K ( and if your computer can handle it ), Amazon’s blowing out refurbished 28" Samsung monitors for just $230 , today only. It’s not an IPS panel, unfortunately, but that’s still one of the best prices we’ve ever seen on a 60Hz 4K display. More Deals
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Gizmodo
Grab Some Sunglasses From Privé Revaux's New ICON Collection For Just $22 [Exclusive] Privé Revaux ICON Collection Glasses , $22 with code GIZMODO25 Privé Revaux already made some terrific sunglasses for affordable prices, but their new ICON collection raises the bar without raising the price, and they’re offering our readers and exclusive chance to save 25% with promo code GIZMODO25 . Compared to the original styles, Privé’s ICON collection make greater use of acetate plastic (wh
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The Scientist RSS
Corals pH Sensor IdentifiedSoluble adenylyl cyclase measures and responds to pH changes in coral cells, but whether it can help the animals withstand ocean acidification is not yet known.
14h
Gizmodo
Demand For Electric Cars May Be Just What We Need To Get Back Into Space GIF Yesterday, we reported on an alarming development for the future of electric cars : we may not have enough of the crucial minerals needed for their batteries to meet the expected demand. Supplies of nickel and cobalt are going to be needed in far larger quantities than ever before, and it’s looking like we may not have the necessary resources. Though, it’s worth mentioning that this is only a
14h
New on MIT Technology Review
Quantum Breakthrough Heralds New Generation of Perfectly Secure MessagingPhysicists can only tell whether a quantum message has been overheard after the fact. Now they’ve found a way around this problem.
14h
Inside Science
Physicist Tests Guitar String Theory Physicist Tests Guitar String Theory Redesigned guitar strings use physics to avoid whammy bar dissonance. whammy.jpg Image credits: Jonathan A. Kemp/University of St. Andrews Rights information: Authorized news organizations may publish this photograph with this Inside Science story. Physics Wednesday, November 1, 2017 - 15:30 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- The leverlike guitar acces
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Feed: All Latest
Eight Revelations From Day Two of Russia Hearings with Facebook, Twitter, and GoogleTwo hearings Wednesday revealed new details of how Russia used propaganda to divide and anger Americans.
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Ars Technica
This stupid patent was going to be used to sue hundreds of small businesses Enlarge The Electronic Frontier Foundation's most recent "Stupid Patent of the Month" highlights the importance of IPRs—patent reviews that can knock out bad patents quickly and relatively cheaply. US Patent No. 6,738,155 was originally filed in 1999 and assigned to the Banta Corporation, a provider of printing and supply chain management services. Banta was acquired by R.R. Donnelly in 2006, and
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Jellyfish-inspired electronic skin glows when it gets hurtElectronic-skin technologies for prosthetics and robots can detect the slightest touch or breeze. But oddly, the sensors that make this possible do not respond effectively to a harmful blow. Now researchers report in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces the development of a jellyfish-inspired electronic skin that glows when the pressure against it is high enough to potentially cause an injury.
14h
Feed: All Latest
Four Deals to Help You Spy On Your Pets (or Intruders)From an Amazon security camera, an LG 4K TV and Dell laptops, we've got deals for you.
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Gizmodo
Innovative Headphone Maker Doppler Labs Was Too Good For This World Image: Doppler Labs Doppler Labs emerged four years ago as a rare breed in the startup world. It had an original idea—putting a computer in everyone’s ear and allowing them to control the sound of their world—and it was ambitious without forcing snake oil down people’s throats. On Tuesday, the company announced that it was going out of business. Doppler released its first product, Dubs , back in
14h
New on MIT Technology Review
Humans Are Still Better Than AI at StarCraft—for NowA StarCraft gamer won 4-0 in the world’s first contest between AI systems and professional human players.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
For 1 in 10 cancer patients, surgery means opioid dependenceMore than 10 percent of people who had never taken opioids prior to curative-intent surgery for cancer continued to take the drugs three to six months later. The risk is even greater for those who are treated with chemotherapy after surgery.
15h
Viden
Nyopdaget planet er næsten en kopi af JordenNASA har fundet 20 nye jordlignende planeter fjernt fra Jorden - én med særligt potentiale for liv.
15h
Live Science
'Kleptopredator' Found: Sea Slug Attacks After Prey Has EatenA colorful sea slug feasts on microscopic marine creatures called zooplankton, but it captures more of them in a gulp by using a middleman.
15h
NYT > Science
Leading Western Publisher Bows to Chinese CensorshipSpringer Nature, one of the world’s largest academic publishers, was the latest company to acknowledge acquiescing to Chinese demands to limit free speech.
15h
The Atlantic
On Turning 160 A 160th birthday is an odd occasion to commemorate, I’ll confess. There are no longer any traditional gifts for the 160th. Unlike a sesquicentennial— the 150th —this milestone bears no well-worn Latin name. But they say after a certain age, every birthday is a triumph. So it is with The Atlantic , which officially turns 160 years old today. Careful readers might notice that we’ve been celebrating
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New Greenland maps show more glaciers at riskNew maps of Greenland's coastal seafloor and bedrock beneath its massive ice sheet show that two to four times as many coastal glaciers are at risk of accelerated melting as had previously been thought.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Investigating the collateral effects of antibioticsAntibiotics can influence the swimming and swarming ability of multidrug-resistant bacteria, according to a new study. The study, conducted using multidrug-resistant Salmonella, explored how antibiotics may modulate Salmonella virulence mechanisms.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Infertility linked to higher risk of death among womenWomen with a history of infertility have a 10 percent increased risk of death compared to those without reported infertility struggles, according to results of a new study. The study, which examined the association between infertility and mortality as well as specific causes of death, also showed that women with a history of infertility have a 20 percent increased risk of cancer-related mortality.
15h
Big Think
New Study Detects Suicidal Thought Patterns with 91% Accuracy By observing the brain's reaction to key emotional words relating to life and death, scientists taught A.I. to recognize the neural patterns of suicidal ideation. Read More
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The Atlantic
1857: Photos of the World From the Year The Atlantic Launched 160 years ago, the world was in a state of transition. The Industrial Revolution had laid the groundwork for an upcoming rapid modernization; steamships and telegraph lines were making the world a smaller place; the United States was struggling with the issue of slavery and trying to avoid a civil war; and a relatively new invention was becoming an indispensable tool for artists, documentarians,
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
One factor that may help schools close racial achievement gapA study of one Texas school district reveals one of the best evidence-based ways ever found to close the educational achievement gap between black and white students. The research found that teachers' sense of collective efficacy in any one school -- the belief that they had the capability and support necessary to educate their students -- was closely connected to the achievement gap.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study identifies bottlenecks in early seagrass growthA new study by an international research team reveals bottlenecks in the growth of seagrass from seed to seedling, knowledge useful for improving seed-based restoration efforts.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate change could decrease Sun's ability to disinfect lakesIncreasing organic runoff as a result of climate change may be reducing the penetration of pathogen-killing ultraviolet (UV) sunlight in inland lakes, rivers, and coastal waters, according to a new study in the journal Scientific Reports.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA investigates invisible magnetic bubbles in outer solar systemForty years ago, the twin Voyagers spacecraft were launched to explore the frontiers of our solar system, and have since made countless discoveries, including finding magnetic bubbles around two of the outer planets.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers find genetic pathways to individualized treatment for advanced prostate cancerResearchers at Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine have uncovered genetic clues to why tumors resist a specific therapy used for treating advanced prostate cancer.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study: Innovative heart device is safe and effectiveA new study has found that a pioneering device to repair heart valves is safe and effective, and can reduce the invasiveness and side effects of conventional mitral valve surgery. The Harpoon Mitral Valve Repair System, an image-guided device based on technology developed at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, is deployed through a small opening between the ribs, and repairs the heart w
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Can corals adapt to climate change?Cool-water corals can adapt to a slightly warmer ocean, but only if global greenhouse gas emissions are reduced, a study has found. Some corals in the normally cool waters of the Cook Islands carry genetic variants that predispose them to heat tolerance. This could help the population adapt more quickly to rising temperatures. But they may not adapt quickly enough to outpace climate change.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Time to rewrite the dinosaur textbooks? Not quite yet!The classification of the dinosaurs might seem to be too obscure to excite anyone but the specialists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Subset of stem cells identified as source for all cells in blood, immune systemsA specific subset of adult blood stem cells that is exclusively responsible for repopulating the entire blood and immune system after a transplant has now been identified by researchers. The discovery has the potential to revolutionize blood stem cell transplantation as well as the delivery and targeting of cell and gene therapies that use healthy versions of the self-renewing stem cells to replac
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Gizmodo
Dinosaur-Killing Asteroid Basically Brought a Nuclear Winter, Says New Model Image: Kathleen /Flickr If and when the nuclear holocaust begins to bring down society as we know it, it’s not the initial blasts you should be worrying about. Carl Sagan and other scientists once hypothesized that dust blocking out the Sun could bring a nuclear winter. It probably happened before—to the dinosaurs. A team of scientists have dug deep into the specifics of the Chicxulub impact, the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Martian ridge brings out rover's color talentsColor-discerning capabilities that NASA's Curiosity rover has been using on Mars since 2012 are proving particularly helpful on a mountainside ridge the rover is now climbing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Do animals think rationally? Researcher suggests rational decision-making doesn't require languagePrevious research has shown that animals can remember specific events, use tools and solve problems. But exactly what that means - whether they are making rational decisions or simply reacting to their environment through mindless reflex - remains a matter of scientific dispute.
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Springer Nature Blocks Access to Sensitive Articles Within ChinaThe world's largest publisher yields to censorship policies of the world's largest country.
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Popular Science
The secrets of gecko tails could help heal human spine injuries Animals They can sprout new tails in the span of a month. Geckos are able to regrow their tails by activating a specific group of stem cells when the tail is lost. Scientists think this could help us find better ways to heal…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers demonstrate how to control liquid crystal patternsWhen Lisa Tran set out to investigate patterns in liquid crystals, she didn't know what to expect. When she first looked through the microscope, she saw dancing iridescent spheres with fingerprint-like patterns etched into them that spiraled and flattened as the solution they were floated in changed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Do animals think rationally?Previous research has shown that animals can remember specific events, use tools and solve problems. But exactly what that means remains a matter of scientific dispute. Cameron Buckner, assistant professor of philosophy at the University of Houston, suggests the evidence shows a wide range of animal species exhibit so-called 'executive control' when it comes to making decisions, consciously consid
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research documents link between nightmares and self-harmResearch by doctoral student Chelsea Ennis found a link between nightmares and self-injurious behavior.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pregnant women should be tested more than once for the presence of ZikaBrazilian study that monitored women with confirmed Zika diagnosis detected the virus even after previous tests that pointed non-existent viral load -- the pathogen's intermittent presence in urine lasted for up to seven months. Scientist recommends that pregnant women who tested negative for zika to repeat the test at least twice, at intervals of a week.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bacterial Fats, not dietary ones, may deserve the blame for heart diseaseHeart disease and fatty clogs in the arteries go hand in hand. But new evidence suggests the fatty molecules might come not only from what you eat, but from the bacteria in your mouth, report UConn scientists in the 16 August issue of the Journal of Lipid Research. The research may explain why gum disease is associated with heart trouble.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
BU finds marijuana use associated with cognitive dysfunction in people with HIVMarijuana use is associated with cognitive dysfunction in people with HIV infection who have an alcohol or other drug use disorder, according to a new study from researchers at Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH), Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), and Boston Medical Center (BMC).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
White matter damage linked to chronic musculoskeletal pain in Gulf War veteransA Veterans Affairs study has linked structural damage in the white matter of the brain to chronic musculoskeletal pain in Gulf War veterans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Penn researchers demonstrate how to control liquid crystal patternsResearchers at the University of Pennsylvania demonstrated that not only could patterns on liquid crystals be controlled at nanoscales, but the changes could be visible without microscopes. The work could potentially pave the way to new biosensors and energy-efficient harvesting devices.
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Ars Technica
Disney makes a bigger ask of theaters than ever before with The Last Jedi If two-month-early ticket sales causing delays at sites like Fandango weren't indication enough, there's plenty of audience appetite for Star Wars Episode VIII: The Last Jedi this fall. Disney evidently knows this, too, and according to The Wall Street Journal , the company is happily using its leverage in unprecedented distribution deals with theaters over the next Star Wars installment. WSJ rep
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The Atlantic
How Trust Shapes Nations' Safety Rules When I moved to China nearly two years ago, one of the first things I bought was a bicycle. I live on a university campus, where everyone rides, and the bike was cheap: $17 for an ancient Five Rams cruiser, with a lively color scheme of teal and rust. I used to cycle to work when I lived in New York, dodging tourists and threading in between delivery trucks. But the moment I pulled out onto a str
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New on MIT Technology Review
A New Generation of Perfectly Secure Messaging Is on the WayExploiting entanglement simplifies quantum cryptography.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Pay for US postdocs varies wildly by institution Analysis of universities' salary data suggests major disparities in pay for early-career researchers. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22932
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Scientific American Content: Global
How to Build More Muscle with Less ProteinResearch suggests that higher protein meals can help you lose weight, slow aging, and speed recovery. But what if you don't want to—or can't—eat that much protein? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Wind may be driving the melting of East Antarctica’s largest glacierWinds may be helping warm ocean waters speed up the melting of East Antarctica’s largest glacier.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers find low genetic diversity in domestic ferretsUniversity of Wyoming researchers studied inbred domestic ferrets and determined the mammals have low genetic diversity on a global scale, according to a paper recently published in Evolutionary Applications.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New analysis shows Brazil slows deforestation with land registration programBrazil's environmental land registration program has been successful in slowing down the rate of deforestation on private land, according to a new study.
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Gizmodo
Avengers: Infinity War Is a Heist Movie About Stealing Infinity Stones Image: Marvel Studios The time has come for Thanos, the biggest bad in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, to fully enter the scene. In Avengers: Infinity War, Josh Brolin’s villain will be after the Infinity Stones, and if he wants them, he’s going to have to steal them. That information comes directly from the Russo Brothers, who are directing the film, courtesy of an interview on CNet . When asked
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Live Science
Dino Family Tree Overturned? Not Quite, But Changes May Lie AheadA new dinosaur family tree floated earlier this year isn't quite right, and the old tree, which researchers have accepted as canon for 130 years, isn't much better, a new study finds.
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Science : NPR
When More Vegan Meals Are The Goal, What Is The Strategy? Activist Tobias Leenaert counsels vegans and vegetarians to focus on vegan meals rather than vegan identities — and to talk encouragingly with meat reducers, says anthropologist Barbara J. King. (Image credit: yulkapopkova/Getty Images)
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800.000 tons skodder kan blive en gave for miljøetRester fra de seks billioner cigaretter, som årligt bliver røget på verdensplan, kan forvandles fra problem til alletiders løsning til lagring af ren energi.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers find low genetic diversity in domestic ferretsResearchers reported that the domestic ferrets in North America and Australia had extremely low genetic diversity, whereas ferrets in Europe had higher genetic diversity, as periodic hybridization with wild polecats appears to occur. However, all the countries sampled had ferrets with lower genetic diversity than their wild ancestors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New analysis shows Brazil slows deforestation with land registration programBrazil's environmental land registration program has been successful in slowing down the rate of deforestation on private land, according to a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
People with psychotic-like experiences spend less time in healthy brain statesA new study looks at the brain dynamics of healthy people with psychotic symptoms
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New tissue-engineered blood vessel replacements one step closer to human trialsResearchers at the University of Minnesota have created a new lab-grown blood vessel replacement that is composed completely of biological materials, but surprisingly doesn't contain any living cells at implantation. The vessel, that could be used as an "off the shelf" graft for kidney dialysis patients, performed well in a recent study with nonhuman primates.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A nutrient mix makes phytoplankton thriveUnicellular photosynthetic microbes -- phytoplankton -- play a fundamental role in the global carbon cycle and fuel marine food webs. Globally, phytoplankton productivity is regulated by the availability of essential nutrients, such as nitrogen and iron. Researchers at the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel have now been able to show that the growth of phytoplankton over large extents
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Time to rewrite the dinosaur textbooks? Not quite yet!An international consortium of specialists, led by Max Langer from the Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil, and including experts from Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Great Britain, and Spain has re-evaluated the data provided by Baron et al. in support of their claim. Their results, presented in this week's edition of the journal Nature, show that it might still be too early to re-write the textbooks f
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Intensifying winds could increase east Antarctica's contribution to sea level riseTotten Glacier, the largest glacier in East Antarctica, is being melted from below by warm water that reaches the ice when winds over the ocean are strong, according to research led by The University of Texas at Austin. The new findings are a cause for concern because the glacier holds more than 11 feet of sea level rise and acts as a plug that helps lock in the ice of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Two classes of GGAA-microsatellites in a Ewing sarcoma contextIn a study published in PLOS ONE, researchers describe two types of GGAA-microsatellites and their roles in EWS/FLI binding and gene regulation in Ewing sarcoma. Ewing sarcoma is the second most common pediatric bone malignancy. It is initiated by chromosomal translocation t(11;22)(q24;q12), which creates the fusion protein and oncogenic driver EWS/FLI.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Subset of stem cells identified as source for all cells in blood and immune systemsResearchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have identified a specific subset of adult blood stem cells that is exclusively responsible for repopulating the entire blood and immune system after a transplant. The discovery, to be published Nov. 1 in Science Translational Medicine, has the potential to revolutionize blood stem cell transplantation as well as the delivery and targeting of c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Luck plays a role in how language evolves, Penn team findsRead a few lines of Chaucer or Shakespeare and you'll get a sense of how the English language has changed during the past millennium. Examining collections of annotated texts dating from the 12th to the 21st centuries, researchers found that certain linguistic changes were guided by pressures analogous to natural selection -- social, cognitive and other factors -- while others seem to have occurre
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Human activities are reshaping forest animal communities around the worldForest-dwelling animals don't have to live right by a road, pasture or human settlement to be affected by what scientists call forest edges. Indeed, animals up to a kilometer (0.6 miles) from an edge show a measurable impact from their proximity to areas where trees have been removed to make way for other land uses.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists trace the stem cells that repopulate bone marrow after transplantationScientists have finally tracked down the precise subset of blood-forming (also known as hematopoietic) stem cells, or HSCs, that are capable of fully repopulating the bone marrow after transplantation in nonhuman primates.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mapping the microbiome of...everythingIn the Earth Microbiome Project, an extensive global team co-led by researchers at University of California San Diego, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory collected more than 27,000 samples from numerous, diverse environments around the globe. They analyzed the unique collections of microbes -- the microbiomes -- living in each sample to gen
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Time to rewrite the dinosaur textbooks? Not quite yet!The classification of the dinosaurs might seem to be too obscure to excite anyone but the specialists.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Life on the edgeResearch led by Newcastle University, UK, and Imperial College London, shows that 85 percent of species are now being impacted by this forest fragmentation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Alcohol makes rats more vulnerable to compulsive cocaine useRats given alcohol for 10 days prior to cocaine exhibited enhanced cocaine-addiction behavior, including continuing to seek cocaine despite receiving a brief electric shock when they did so, a new study reports.
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Can corals adapt to climate change?Cool-water corals can adapt to a slightly warmer ocean, but only if global greenhouse gas emissions are reduced, a study in Science Advances found. Some corals in the normally cool waters of the Cook Islands carry genetic variants that predispose them to heat tolerance. This could help the population adapt more quickly to rising temperatures. But they may not adapt quickly enough to outpace climat
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Citizen science may boost engagement and understanding in undergraduate biology classesCitizen science projects, such as ClimateWatch, can boost engagement in undergraduate courses, according to a study published Nov. 1, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Nicola Mitchell from The University of Western Australia, and colleagues.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Newly described giraffid species may help trace evolution of giraffe ancestorsA new giraffid species from Spain may extend the range and timespan of the ancestors of giraffes, according to a study published Nov. 1, 2017 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by María Ríos from the National Museum of Natural History, Spain, and colleagues.
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New Scientist - News
A third of animals are vanishing as roads spread through forestsThe world’s forests are being criss-crossed by roads and clearings, and as a result many backboned animals are becoming less abundant
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The Atlantic
America's Victim-in-Chief “No politician in history — and I say this with great surety — has been treated worse or more unfairly.” ~ Donald J. Trump Imagine growing up heir to a fortune in New York City, attending an Ivy League university, marrying a series of models, getting paid millions of dollars to host a reality-TV show, getting elected president … and then constantly casting yourself as a victim. That apparent comp
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The Atlantic
Donald Trump Jr.'s Hilariously Bad Tweet Just before 7 p.m. on Halloween, Donald Trump Jr. posted a tweet of his daughter tilting her orange bucket of candy toward the camera, and staring up forlornly at the photographer. Appended to the darling photo was a lesson, or an attempt at a lesson, by the father: I’m going to take half of Chloe’s candy tonight & give it to some kid who sat at home. It’s never to early to teach her about social
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The Atlantic
Mexico's Populist Savior May Be Too Good to Be True Until last year, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) had enjoyed a relatively untroubled existence. For its nearly 24 years, the agreement, which links the economies of the United States, Canada, and Mexico by removing trade tariffs between them, sat largely beyond the public consciousness. But those quiet days are no more. On October 17, the fourth round of talks to renegotiate NAFTA
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Science : NPR
Plastics Are Forever Plastic is in everything, including our tap water. (Image credit: Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Physicists describe new dark matter detection strategyPhysicists propose a dark matter detector that would use superfluid helium to explore mass ranges for dark matter particles thousands of times smaller than current large-scale experiments.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Breast cancer patients forego post-surgery treatment due to mistrust, study suggestsNearly one-third of women with breast cancer went against their doctor's advice and chose not to begin or complete the recommended adjuvant anti-cancer therapy to kill residual tumor cells following surgery, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
PARP inhibitor may be effective against some TNBC lacking BRCA mutationsThe investigational PARP inhibitor talazoparib caused regression of patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) of triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) that had BRCA mutations and also those that did not have BRCA mutations but had other alterations in DNA damage-repair pathways.
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Gizmodo
The 42 Weirdest Movies on Osama bin Laden's Computer [Update: OMG He Watched a 9-11 Truther Video] Photo: Getty Today, the CIA released a trove of files obtained from Osama bin Laden’s compound when he was killed by US forces in 2011. We knew that bin Laden had some unexpected things on his computer, but we now have a better look at some of the files. “Today’s release of recovered al-Qa‘ida letters, videos, audio files and other materials provides the opportunity for the American people to gai
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Gizmodo
How to Get the Android 8.0 Oreo Beta on Your Galaxy S8 Galaxy S8/ Gizmodo If you bought the Pixel 2 or you’re using an older Google-branded smartphone , you’ve already got Android 8. 0 up and running. But for everyone else, that update is still out of reach. Thankfully, it looks like Samsung is getting ready to test the latest version of Android on the Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8 Plus. Here’s what you need to know to get your hands on Samsung’s Android 8
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Science | The Guardian
Resistance to changes in grammar is futile, say researchers Linguists say that random chance plays a bigger role than previously thought in the evolution of language – but also that ‘English is weird’ When it comes to changes in language, there’s no point crying over spilt milk: researchers charting fluctuations in English grammar say the rise of certain words, such as spilled, is probably down to chance, and that resistance is futile. Comparisons have lo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hilton will pay $700,000 to settle case over data breachHotel operator Hilton will pay $700,000 to settle an investigation into two separate data breaches that exposed more than 350,000 credit card numbers.
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
James Spudich (Stanford) 4: Myosin mutations and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy James Spudich begins his talk with an early history of muscle biology, and through parts 2-4 of his talk, he moves forward to our current understanding of the molecular basis of muscle contraction and disease. https://www.ibiology.org/ibioseminars/myosin-mutations-hypertrophic-cardiomyopathy.html Talk Overview: In his last talk, Spudich focuses on work currently going on in his lab to understand
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
James Spudich (Stanford) 3: Ca2+ regulation of muscle contraction James Spudich begins his talk with an early history of muscle biology, and through parts 2-4 of his talk, he moves forward to our current understanding of the molecular basis of muscle contraction and disease. https://www.ibiology.org/ibioseminars/ca2-regulation-muscle-contraction.html Talk Overview: In his third talk, Spudich recounts his first foray into muscle research as a postdoctoral fellow
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
James Spudich (Stanford) 2: A brief history of muscle biology 1969-2017 James Spudich begins his talk with an early history of muscle biology, and through parts 2-4 of his talk, he moves forward to our current understanding of the molecular basis of muscle contraction and disease. https://www.ibiology.org/ibioseminars/brief-history-muscle-biology-1969-2017.html Talk Overview: In his second talk, Spudich describes the technological and experimental advances of the las
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
James Spudich (Stanford) 1: A brief history of muscle biology 1864-1969 James Spudich begins his talk with an early history of muscle biology, and through parts 2-4 of his talk, he moves forward to our current understanding of the molecular basis of muscle contraction and disease. https://www.ibiology.org/ibioseminars/a-brief-history-of-muscle-biology-1864-1969.html Talk Overview: Dr. Spudich begins his talks with a clear overview of muscle biology. Muscles are made
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Latest Headlines | Science News
The way hungry young stars suck in food keeps most X-rays in, tooThe columns of plasma that feed growing stars develop an extra layer that keeps X-rays in.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Canada Gets Its First AI-Run Exchange-Traded Fund
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Intensifying winds could increase east Antarctica's contribution to sea level riseTotten Glacier, the largest glacier in East Antarctica, is being melted from below by warm water that reaches the ice when winds over the ocean are strong—a cause for concern because the glacier holds more than 11 feet of sea level rise and acts as a plug that helps lock in the ice of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Earth Microbiome Project: Mapping the microbiome of... everythingIn the Earth Microbiome Project, an extensive global team co-led by researchers at University of California San Diego, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory collected more than 27,000 samples from numerous, diverse environments around the globe. They analyzed the unique collections of microbes—the microbiomes—living in each sample to generate
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Time to rewrite the dinosaur textbooks? Not quite yetThe classification of the dinosaurs might seem to be too obscure to excite anyone but the specialists.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Citizen science may boost engagement and understanding in undergraduate biology classesCitizen science projects, such as ClimateWatch, can boost engagement in undergraduate courses, according to a study published November 1, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Nicola Mitchell from The University of Western Australia, and colleagues.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Newly described giraffid species may help trace evolution of giraffe ancestorsA new giraffid species from Spain may extend the range and timespan of the ancestors of giraffes, according to a study published November 1, 2017 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by María Ríos from the National Museum of Natural History, Spain, and colleagues.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Life on the edge: New research identifies the winners and losers of forest fragmentationBreaking up the rainforest into small, isolated patches is forcing more species to live at the forest edge and putting those that are dependent on the forest core at risk.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Luck plays a role in how language evolves, study findsRead a few lines of Chaucer or Shakespeare and you'll get a sense of how the English language has changed during the past millennium. Linguists catalogue these changes and work to discern why they happened. Meanwhile, evolutionary biologists have been doing something similar with living things, exploring how and why certain genes have changed over generations.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Can corals adapt to climate change?Cool-water corals can adapt to a slightly warmer ocean, but only if global greenhouse gas emissions are reduced. That's according to a study published November 1 in the journal Science Advances of genetic adaptation and the likely effects of future warming on tabletop corals in the Cook Islands.
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Gizmodo
This Huge, Four-Horned Mammal Is Rewriting Giraffe Prehistory Decennatherium rex . (Image: Ríos et al (2017)) Giraffes are hard to miss. Scraping the sky at roughly 18 feet up, they are the tallest animals on Earth. Humans have taken notice, becoming infatuated with giraffes from the first moments of the animals’ lives, and revering their iconic, alien gangliness across the globe. But despite all this attention, our species doesn’t have a particularly good
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: Ancient Fossil Offers a New European Ancestor to GiraffesFound near Madrid, the fossil provides evidence that members of the giraffe family roamed Europe much earlier.
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Feed: All Latest
Wind Is Driving Rapid Melting in Antarctica's Biggest GlacierResearch from East Antarctica's Totten Glacier pins glacial melting on an unexpected aspect of climate change: wind.
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Feed: All Latest
Earth Microbiome Project's Ambitious Effort to Catalogue the World's MicrobesIt's the most macro study of the microscopic world ever published.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A quarter of problematic cannabis users have anxiety disorders, many since childhoodAbout a quarter of adults whose marijuana use is problematic in early adulthood have anxiety disorders in childhood and late adolescence, reports a study published in the November 2017 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Infertility linked to higher risk of death among womenWomen with a history of infertility have a 10 percent increased risk of death compared to those without reported infertility struggles, according to results of a new study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The study, which examined the association between infertility and mortality as well as specific causes of death, also showed that women with
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why do some obese people have 'healthier' fat tissue than others?One little understood paradox in the study of obesity is that overweight people who break down fat at a high rate are less healthy than peers who store their fat more effectively.
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The Atlantic
Forest Animals Are Living on the Edge At the very beginning of his book The Song of the Dodo , the author David Quammen invites us to imagine a fine Persian carpet, which we then slice into 36 equal pieces. “What does it amount to?” he writes. “Have we got 36 nice Persian throw rugs? No. All we’re left with is three dozen ragged fragments, each one worthless and commencing to come apart.” He wrote that almost two decades ago, and it’
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The Atlantic
The Randomness of Language Evolution Joshua Plotkin’s dive into the evolution of language began with clarity—and also a lack of it. Today, if you wanted to talk about something that’s clear, you’d say that it has clarity . But if you were around in 1890, you would almost certainly have talked about its clearness . Plotkin first noticed this linguistic change while playing with Google’s Ngram Viewer, a search engine that charts the f
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The Atlantic
How Trump's Corporate-Tax Plan Could Send American Jobs Overseas President Trump and his Council of Economic Advisors argue that cutting the corporate tax rate would be a major boon to American workers, in that it would substantially boost their household income. This is, as many economists and journalists have pointed out , wrong. But there is another issue with the Trump- and GOP-proposed corporate-tax plan that has not drawn as much attention. A major provi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
People with psychotic-like experiences spend less time in healthy brain statesHealthy people experiencing subtle symptoms observed in psychotic disorders, such as hallucinations and delusions, have altered brain dynamics, according to a new study. The alterations were found in patterns of brain activity that reoccur, or "states" that the brain moves in and out of over time. The participants who reported the psychotic-like experiences (PLEs) -- considered to be at the low en
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lose fat, preserve muscle: Weight training beats cardio for older adultsWeight training or cardio? For older adults trying to slim down, pumping iron might be the way to go. A new study suggests combining weight training with a low-calorie diet preserves much needed lean muscle mass that can be lost through aerobic workouts.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
One-step 3-D printing of catalystsScientists have developed a 3-D printing process that creates a chemically active catalytic object in a single step, opening the door to more efficient ways to produce catalysts for complex chemical reactions in a wide scope of industries.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
One step closer to defining dark matter, GPS satellite atomic clocks on the huntOne professor who studies the earth and one who studies space came together in the pursuit to detect and define dark matter. They are one step closer. Using 16 years of archival data from GPS satellites that that orbit the earth, the team looked for dark matter clumps in the shape of walls or bubbles and which would extend far out beyond the GPS orbits, the solar system and beyond.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Huge Microwave Observatory to Search for Cosmic InflationMulti-telescope project has ambitious goals and a big price tag -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
Open Up All of Your Gadgets With This $22 Tool Kit Ohuhu 77-in-1 Screwdriver Kit , $22 with code 7QFWVXGD If you’re the kind of person who scoffs in the face of warranties and wants to repair their own phone, this $22 tool kit has everything you need to open pretty much any gadget , including a suction cup, spudgers, and of course, tons of tiny screwdrivers. It would also make a great stocking stuffer for the tinkerer in your life.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists describe new dark matter detection strategyPhysicists from Brown University have devised a new strategy for directly detecting dark matter, the elusive material thought to account for the majority of matter in the universe.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Survey findings: 4 in 10 healthcare professionals work while sickA new study suggests that healthcare professionals (HCPs) should heed to their own advice: stay home when sick.
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The Atlantic
The Diversity Visa Program Was Created to Help Irish Immigrants On Wednesday, President Trump attacked the diversity visa program, which offers 50,000 visas a year, alleging that it was how the suspect in the Manhattan attack came to the United States. “The terrorist came into our country through what is called the ‘Diversity Visa Lottery Program,’ a Chuck Schumer beauty. I want merit based,” Trump said on Twitter , pushing instead for a system that would giv
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The Atlantic
Why Does Uzbekistan Export So Many Terrorists? The most striking thing about Sayfullo Saipov, the 29-year-old Uzbek man who allegedly drove a pickup truck into a crowd in Lower Manhattan, killing eight people, was his big, black, bushy beard: He wouldn’t have been able to grow one in his native Uzbekistan. A beard would be considered a sign of religious extremism in Uzbekistan, which has a long and notorious record of restricting the religiou
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Treatment for dogs alleviates fear of noisy fireworksWith Bonfire Night approaching, many dogs suffer anxiety and fear from the loud bangs and explosions of firework displays. A study published by Veterinary Record shows how a medicinal treatment can help alleviate common fear behaviours, such as trembling and whining.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Zebra 'poo science' improves conservation effortsHow can Zebra poo tell us what an animal's response to climate change and habitat destruction will be?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hacking evolution, screening technique may improve most widespread enzymePlants evolved over millions of years into an environment that has dramatically changed in the last 150 years since the Industrial Revolution began: carbon dioxide levels have increased 50 percent, and the average global temperature has increased by nearly 2 degrees Fahrenheit. While natural adaptation has been unable to keep up, scientists have developed tools to simulate millions of years of evo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers provide fisheries a solution to overharvestingThere are fewer fish in the sea - literally.
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Quanta Magazine
How to Build a Robot That Wants to Change the World Isaac Asimov’s famous Three Laws of Robotics — constraints on the behavior of androids and automatons meant to ensure the safety of humans — were also famously incomplete. The laws, which first appeared in his 1942 short story “Runaround” and again in classic works like I, Robot , sound airtight at first: 1. A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Children uniquely vulnerable to sleep disruption from electronic screensA new article spells out why children and teens are particularly sensitive to the sleep-disrupting impact of electronics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Folding circuits just atoms thick using the principles of origamiWhile the creation of a paper swan using origami may be intriguing, the idea of creating 3-D circuits based on similar design principles is simply mindboggling. Researchers have focused on large scale synthesis and device fabrication using ultra-thin materials, which has led to improvements in 2-D models and the introduction of 3-D vertically integrated devices.
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Viden
Kunstig intelligens skaber falske berømthederGenkender du personerne på billedet? Det burde du ikke, da alle billederne er skabt fra bunden i en computer.
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Live Science
Person Dies from Bat Bite: How Rabies KillsA person in Florida has died from rabies after being bitten by a bat.
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The Atlantic
Washington Is Never Quite Sure Where It Is at War The United States is a nation at war. But for much of the past two decades, a great deal of the Pentagon’s overseas activities would not technically classify as combat, with all its attendant logistical trappings and legal tango. In fact, much of this activity receives rather benign categories: “building partner capacity”; “Light footprint” ; or “Assisting or accompanying,” like a maiden aunt cha
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Investigating the collateral effects of antibioticsAntibiotics can influence the swimming and swarming ability of multidrug-resistant bacteria, according to a new study in mSphere, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. The study, conducted using multidrug-resistant Salmonella, explored how antibiotics may modulate Salmonella virulence mechanisms.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
National study by CU & Duke identifies best method for achieving a healthy IVF birthNew research by the University of Colorado suggests transferring fresh donor eggs during IVF provide a higher chance of implantation and using a single embryo result in healthier birth outcomes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Azithromycin overprescribed for childhood pneumoniaA combination of two antibiotics is often prescribed to treat community-acquired pneumonia in children but a study is now showing that using just one of the two has the same benefit to patients in most cases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fisheries given a solution to overharvestingMany commercial fisheries are threatened by overharvesting. However, they can't address the problem because of inadequate scientific information, from overall population numbers to data on how fast fish grow and reproduce. Researchers have developed a model using information about landed fish catches and prices for any species. This model allows fisheries to net enough to meet rising demand while
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists create magnetic system that transforms heat into motionScientists have discovered a pioneering new technique to transform ambient heat into motion in nanoscale devices - which could revolutionize future generations of data storage and sensors.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple aims to work its magic with iPhone XWith its new iPhone X, Apple is setting the ambitious goal for itself of reinventing the smartphone, again.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
An early Christmas present: Scientists have unwrapped the reindeer genomeWith Halloween over, today is traditionally the day that the Christmas decorations come out, so it is appropriate that an iconic animal associated with the festivity is getting a jump on the holiday spirit by joining the list of species to have its genome sequenced. Published today in the open-access journal GigaScience, is an article describing the sequencing and analysis of the reindeer genome.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Metal-silicone microstructures could enable new flexible optical and electrical devicesFor the first time, researchers have used a single-step, laser-based method to produce small, precise hybrid microstructures of silver and flexible silicone. This innovative laser processing technology could one day enable smart factories that use one production line to mass-produce customized devices combining soft materials such as engineered tissue with hard materials that add functions such as
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Ars Technica
Sony’s Aibo robot dog is back, gives us OLED puppy dog eyes Sony Weird Sony is back, and it recently announced a new version of the Sony Aibo, everyone's favorite robotic toy dog! Sony has been out of the plastic pooch business for about 11 years , and the 2017 version is well-equipped for the smartphone era with LTE and an app. Sadly, like seemingly every Aibo ever, the pup is only for sale in Sony's hometown of Japan, but we can still love it from afar.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Physicists describe new dark matter detection strategyBrown University physicists propose a dark matter detector that would use superfluid helium to explore mass ranges for dark matter particles thousands of times smaller than current large-scale experiments.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In the lab and in the clinic, alisertib with TAK-228 excels against solid tumorsUniversity of Colorado Cancer Center studies presented this weekend at AACR Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics Meeting show that using the drug alisertib along with the drug TAK-228 is more effective against triple-negative breast cancer and solid tumors than either drug alone.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Metal-silicone microstructures could enable new flexible optical and electrical devicesFor the first time, researchers have used a single-step, laser-based method to produce small, precise hybrid microstructures of silver and flexible silicone. This innovative laser processing technology could one day enable smart factories that use one production line to mass-produce customized devices.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New research shows where in the brain the earliest signs of Alzheimer's occurFor the first time, researchers have convincingly shown where in the brain the earliest signs of Alzheimer's occur. The discovery could potentially become significant to future Alzheimer's research while contributing to improved diagnostics.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
The new thermodynamics: how quantum physics is bending the rules Experiments are starting to probe the limits of the classical laws of thermodynamics. Nature 551 20 doi: 10.1038/551020a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research looks at how 'cosmic web' of filaments alters star formation in galaxiesAstronomer Gregory Rudnick sees the universe crisscrossed by something like an interstellar superhighway system. Filaments—the strands of aggregated matter that stretch millions of light years across the universe to connect galaxy clusters—are the freeways.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New mathematical models could help solve few-body problems in physicsIn physics, the conundrum known as the "few-body problem," how three or more interacting particles behave, has bedeviled scientists for centuries. Equations that describe the physics of few-body systems are usually unsolvable and the methods used to find solutions are unstable. There aren't many equations that can probe the wide spectrum of possible few-particle dynamics. A new family of mathemati
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
One step closer to defining dark matter, GPS satellite atomic clocks on the huntOne professor who studies the earth and one who studies space came together in the pursuit to detect and define dark matter. They are one step closer. Using 16 years of archival data from GPS satellites that that orbit the earth, the University of Nevada, Reno team, Andrei Derevianko and Geoff Blewitt in the College of Science, looked for dark matter clumps in the shape of walls or bubbles and whi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Are elevated levels of mercury in the American dipper due to run-of-river dams?A study published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry used American dippers to determine if run-of-river (RoR) dams altered food webs and mercury levels at 13 stream sites in British Columbia.
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Blog » Languages » English
Monthly Stats for Eyewire: October 2017 Three cheers for Grim’s favorite month! From October 1st through Halloween, we completed 69 cells, reached the Dig’s halfway mark, finished the monthly marathon in a very respectable 9 hours 33 minutes, explored Grim’s Haunted Mansion, and premiered our third Happy Hour event (HH3)! It was an action packed time, and we’re certainly looking forward to what November might bring. New Scouts: arachna
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New on MIT Technology Review
Eugenics 2.0: We’re at the Dawn of Choosing Embryos by Health, Height, and MoreWill you be among the first to pick your kids’ IQ? As machine learning unlocks predictions from DNA databases, scientists say parents could have choices never before possible.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Why Hedge Funds Are Already Experimenting with Quantum Computers
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Science | The Guardian
Anomalous bottoms at Cern and the case for a new collider Particles known as “bottom mesons” are not decaying in the way the Standard Model of particle physics says they should, and it’s causing some excitement Measurements made by the LHCb experiment at CERN are showing some anomalies which, if confirmed by more data, would signal the breaking point of our most fundamental description of particle physics to date - the Standard Model. Using proton colli
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Gizmodo
Trump's NASA Pick Says Human-Caused Climate Change Depends 'On a Whole Lot of Factors' Photo: AP The White House’s effort to head every science-adjacent agency with science skeptics continued apace today, when the Senate held a confirmation hearing for Jim Bridenstine (R-OK), Trump’s pick to lead NASA. You’ll be shocked to learn that his views on climate change do not exactly comport with the overwhelming scientific consensus on the issue. NASA may be better known for its missions
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Ars Technica
The underground story of Cobra, the 1980s’ illicit handmade computer Enlarge / Mihai Moldovanu tinkers with his beloved Cobra. (credit: Adi Dabu) BUCHAREST, Romania—Mihai Moldovanu grabs the cardboard box with the enthusiasm of a man from the future who’s opening a time capsule. “Maybe it could still work,” he tells me. He dusts it off with his hands. Inside the box rests the computer he built for himself in high school. He hasn’t switched it on in 10, maybe 20 ye
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
One step closer to defining dark matter, GPS satellite atomic clocks on the huntOne professor who studies the earth and one who studies space came together in the pursuit to detect and define dark matter. They are one step closer. Using 16 years of archival data from GPS satellites that that orbit the earth, the University of Nevada, Reno team looked for dark matter clumps in the shape of walls or bubbles and which would extend far out beyond the GPS orbits, the solar system
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Improving public safety in face of extreme weather and disastersOur ability to observe and predict severe weather events and other disasters has improved markedly over recent decades, yet this progress does not always translate into similar advances in the systems used in such circumstances to protect lives. A more cohesive alert and warning system that integrates public and private communications mechanisms and adopts new technologies quickly is needed to del
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hot flashes, night sweats connected to obstructive sleep apnea risk in middle-aged womenIn a new study published today in Menopause, researchers have found that the hot flashes and night sweats faced by upward of 80 percent of middle-aged women may be linked to an increased risk of obstructive sleep apnea.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
One-step 3-D printing of catalysts developed at Ames LaboratoryThe US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has developed a 3-D printing process that creates a chemically active catalytic object in a single step, opening the door to more efficient ways to produce catalysts for complex chemical reactions in a wide scope of industries.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lose fat, preserve muscle: Weight training beats cardio for older adultsWeight training or cardio? For older adults trying to slim down, pumping iron might be the way to go. A new study by researchers at Wake Forest University suggests combining weight training with a low-calorie diet preserves much needed lean muscle mass that can be lost through aerobic workouts.
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Big Think
Saudi Arabia Is Building a $500-Billion New Territory Based on Tech and Liberal Values This independent zone, with its own regulations and social norms, will be built from scratch on 10,231 square miles of untouched land at a cost of $500 billion. Read More
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The Atlantic
Inside East Germany's Most Notorious Women's Prison From 1950 to 1990, Communist East Germany imprisoned thousands of women for committing political crimes against the state. (Among the punishable offenses: demonstrating the desire to travel, criticism of state politics, and participating in public demonstrations.) Hoheneck, a 700-year-old castle, was the most notorious women’s prison in the GDR. Many inmates did not survive their sentences, durin
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Gizmodo
Everything We Learned About Russian Election Interference From Facebook, Twitter, and Google From left, Facbook’s General Counsel Colin Stretch, Twitter’s Acting General Counsel Sean Edgett, and Google’s Senior Vice President and General Counsel Kent Walker, are sworn in for a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Russian election activity and technology, Wednesday, Nov. 1, 2017, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (Photo: AP) Representatives for Twitter, Facebook, and Google testified bef
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Gizmodo
Stan Against Evil Returns With More Demons, More Wisecracks, and a Much Better Sense of Itself Image: IFC Stan Against Evil ’s first season was enjoyable, but it suffered due to its undeniable similarities to Ash vs. Evil Dead . With Ash ’s next season still AWOL, Stan stands alone in the cranky-old-dude-fighting-demons zone—and happily, IFC’s horror comedy has finally found its footing in season two. I watched all of season two and I won’t spoil anything here, but all of the show’s market
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New on MIT Technology Review
Google Is Backing an Eclectic Group of Startups That Use AI in Health Care
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Ars Technica
Members of Congress want you to hack the US election voting system Enlarge (credit: NurPhoto/Getty Images) This summer, DefCon's "Voting Machine Hacking Village" turned up a host of US election vulnerabilities (PDF). Now, imagine a more mainstream national hacking event backed by the Department of Homeland Security that has the same goal: to discover weaknesses in voting machines used by states for local and national elections. That might just become a reality i
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: When This Sea Slug Eats, It Prefers the Turducken of the SeaA species of nudibranch was found to engage in what researchers call kleptopredation — “steal your meal and eat you, too.”
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Gizmodo
Serial Killer in Japan Stalked, Murdered Suicidal Women He Found Through Twitter Photo: Getty In a grisly tale, The New York Times reports Takahiro Shiraishi, 27, was arrested in Zama prefecture, Japan, 30 miles outside of Tokyo, after police found nine severed heads in coolers in his apartment. Shiraishi reportedly used Twitter to find women who’d expressed suicidal thoughts over the service, murdering and decapitating them. Shiraishi has also admitted to sexually assaulting
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New on MIT Technology Review
Google Is Backing an Eclectic Group of Startups That Use AI to Tackle Health-Care Problems
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Viden
Det har sin pris at være ’Hård Udenpå’: 99 procent oplever bivirkninger ved steroiderDer er sket et skred i motiverne for at bruge anabole steroider inden for de seneste ti år, vurderer forsker.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Great praise for categories, and seeing beyond themActing Editor in Chief Elizabeth Quill discusses classification and some of the challenges of putting species in categorical boxes.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Readers intrigued by ancient animals’ bonesReaders had questions about gut bacteria, woolly rhino ribs and ancient horses hooves.
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Live Science
Tech Shows 2,000-Year-Old Mummy of a Little Girl in Amazing DetailNew 3D scanning tech will reveal details about the mummified body of a 5-year-old girl who died 2,000 years ago in Egypt.
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Ars Technica
Newly discovered planet is nearly 25 percent the size of its star Enlarge (credit: University of Warwick/Mark Garlick ) What does it take to build a gas giant? Building models of planet formation and studying exosolar systems have both provided us with some hints. But there's a small but growing list of cases where the two of these approaches disagree about what's possible. A new paper adds to that list by describing a gas giant planet that orbits a dwarf star,
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Popular Science
Hurricanes might be worsening, coffee could save your life, and hedging is definitely a huge part of science Science This might be the best article you've ever read on the subject. In other words, it’s better for researchers to under-promise and over-deliver than the opposite.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
U of G researchers provide fisheries a solution to overharvestingMany commercial fisheries are threatened by overharvesting. However, they can't address the problem because of inadequate scientific information, from overall population numbers to data on how fast fish grow and reproduce. U of G researchers have developed a model using information about landed fish catches and prices for any species. This model allows fisheries to net enough to meet rising demand
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Vanderbilt study shows azithromycin overprescribed for childhood pneumoniaA combination of two antibiotics is often prescribed to treat community-acquired pneumonia in children but a JAMA Pediatrics study is now showing that using just one of the two has the same benefit to patients in most cases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
An early Christmas present: Scientists have unwrapped the reindeer genomeA new paper published today in GigaScience describes the sequencing and analysis of the reindeer genome. The paper provides a resource for gaining greater understanding of the processes of evolution,domestication, animal husbandry, and adaptation to extreme environments.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gut microbiome may make chemo drug toxic to patientsThe composition of people's gut bacteria may explain why some of them suffer life-threatening reactions after taking a key drug for treating metastatic colorectal cancer, new research has discovered. The findings could help predict which patients will suffer side effects and prevent complications in susceptible patients.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Breast cancer researchers track changes in normal mammary duct cells leading to diseaseBreast cancer researchers have mapped early genetic alterations in normal-looking cells at various distances from primary tumors to show how changes along the lining of mammary ducts can lead to disease.
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The Atlantic
‘The Parable of the Tribes’ From the 1990s, and still relevant Yesterday I argued that certain Republican congressional leaders were behaving in a “tribal” (as opposed to constitutional) manner, in declining to apply normal standards of scrutiny to Donald Trump. Then a reader who had worked with Navajo and Pueblo tribes wrote in to complain about the pejorative use of the term. I mentioned in that dispatch Harold Isaacs’s c
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Scientific American Content: Global
Octopuses Invade Welsh Beach–Here Are the Scientific Theories WhyStrandings of octopuses and other cephalopods are pretty rare and the exact truth of why this happened may never be known -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New on MIT Technology Review
Hedge Funds Are Already Experimenting With Quantum Computers
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Viden
Forskning kobler influenzavaccine til abort - men passer det?Nej, siger dansk professor. Undersøgelsen, der har cirkuleret i amerikanske og britiske medier, burde ikke have været udgivet.
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Ars Technica
HoloLens availability expanded as Microsoft continues pushing it to industry HoloLens Development Edition. (credit: Microsoft) Much of the interest around augmented and virtual reality (AR and VR) has focused on consumers, and gaming in particular. But if those technologies are to become a significant and sustained part of the computing landscape, they probably need to find markets beyond entertainment. Microsoft has been pushing its HoloLens AR headset as an enterprise p
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Gizmodo
Wednesday's Best Deals: Dyson Vacuum, 4K Monitor, Qi Charging Pad, and More Start off your Wednesday with deals on a refurbished Dyson vacuum and 4K monitor , a Qi charging pad , and more. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. TOP TECH DEALS Refurb Samsung 28" 4K Monitor , $230 If you’re ready to make the leap to 4K ( and if your computer can handle it ), Amazon’s blowing out refurbished 28" Samsung monitors for just $230 , today o
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New Scientist - News
Is modern life making today’s teenagers more depressed?The media is full of stories about a teenage mental health crisis, but the reality is more complex. The real problem is we don't do enough to help those who need it
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New Scientist - News
Malaria parasite makes mosquitoes more likely to suck your bloodThe malaria parasite appears to alter mosquitoes’ feeding behaviour to steer the vector towards a human host
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New Scientist - News
Rivers and forests need the same legal rights we grant to peopleEnvironmental campaigners want the Colorado river to get the right to sue in US courts. It's not as crazy as it sounds, says Richard Schiffman
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New Scientist - News
Freeloading mites are squatting on spider webs and stealing foodA newly-discovered species of mite sets up home on a spider’s web and nibbles away at any insects the spider catches – and the spider doesn’t seem to mind
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The Scientist RSS
Check Out This 3-D Interactive Fire Ant ModelExplore the many facets of this invasive species.
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Scientific American Content: Global
How Baby Bats Develop Their DialectsThe young animals crowdsource the pitch of their calls from colony members -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New mathematical models could help solve few-body problems in physicsIn physics, the conundrum known as the 'few-body problem,' how three or more interacting particles behave, has bedeviled scientists for centuries. Equations that describe the physics of few-body systems are usually unsolvable and the methods used to find solutions are unstable. There aren't many equations that can probe the wide spectrum of possible few-particle dynamics. A new family of mathemati
18h
The Atlantic
Trump's Tweets Take Down His Military Ban on Trans People “By the pricking of my thumbs,” says the Second Witch in Shakespeare’s Macbeth, “something wicked this way comes.” Donald Trump’s thumbs have been wicked busy on Twitter. On Monday his tweets, like Banquo’s ghost, returned to haunt him again, when Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia cited them as among the reasons she was temporarily blocking Trump
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Ars Technica
AT&T admits defeat in lawsuit it filed to stall Google Fiber (credit: Mike Mozart ) AT&T is reportedly abandoning its attempt to stop a Louisville ordinance that helped draw Google Fiber into the city. In February 2016, AT&T sued the local government in Louisville and Jefferson County, Kentucky to stop an ordinance that gives Google Fiber and other ISPs faster access to utility poles. A US District Court judge dismissed AT&T's lawsuit in August of this yea
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Ars Technica
Trump administration reportedly kills vehicle-to-vehicle safety mandate [Updated] (credit: US Department of Transportation) Update: Ars reached out to NHTSA this morning, which told us that it has yet to make a final decision. "The vehicle-to-vehicle notice of proposed rulemaking was released in December 2016 for public feedback, and received over 460 comments. NHTSA is still reviewing and considering all comments submitted and other relevant new information to inform its next
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Gizmodo
Google Wants to Beat AirPods with Software Image: Google With the Pixel 2 , Google joined Apple in the race to kill the headphone jack. But you can’t kill the jack if you don’t have a solid wireless solution to fall back on. Which is why, on Tuesday, Google announced that its doing a riff on one of the Apple’s coolest features, the seamless pairing of phones to Bluetooth headphones like the Apple Airpods . Now you should be able to pair y
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Ingeniøren
Forbedret cementproduktion sparer 2.600 danskeres drivhusgasudledningAalborg Portland har ombygget to kalcinatorer, så de er blevet smallere og længere. Det gør det muligt at anvende mere affald, øge produktionen og mindske drivhusgasudledningen
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Ingeniøren
Droner og 'pletsprøjtning' skal minimere brugen af sprøjtegiftVed at få droner til at registrere mængden af ukrudt på en mark, skal det i fremtiden blive langt nemmere for landmændene at bruge den rette mængde sprøjtegift på markerne. Det kan betyde store fordele for miljøet og landmændenes pengepung.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
Sci-fi stories that imagine a future Africa | Nnedi Okorafor"My science fiction has different ancestors -- African ones," says writer Nnedi Okorafor. In between excerpts from her "Binti" series and her novel "Lagoon," Okorafor discusses the inspiration and roots of her work -- and how she opens strange doors through her Afrofuturist writing.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Almost half of those who resolve a drinking or drug problem do so without assistanceA study has estimated, for the first time, the number of Americans who have overcome serious problems with the use of alcohol or other drugs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Largest ever collection of patient data of inherited epilepsy conditionsResearchers have joined up with five other centers from around the world to compile the biggest recorded collection of families with forms of epilepsy where genetics may play a part in the recurring feature of the condition.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Interstellar visitor, Arctic shipwrecks and a retraction recommendation The week in science: 27 October–2 November 2017. Nature 551 10 doi: 10.1038/551010a
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Infusions of young blood tested in patients with dementia The first controlled human trial of whether blood from young donors rejuvenates old tissue has reported. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22930
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Ars Technica
ITC suggests Trump impose up to a 35% tariff on imported solar modules Enlarge / A solar farm under construction in Punta Gorda, Florida, in 2016. (credit: KERRY SHERIDAN/AFP/Getty Images ) The International Trade Commission (ITC) issued its recommendations for solar panel component tariffs on Tuesday, a month after it decided that US manufacturers of cells and modules had been harmed by cheap equipment imports. The commissioners offered three different recommendati
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The Atlantic
The South Only Embraced States' Rights as It Lost Control of the Federal Government One hundred and fifty-eight years ago, on the morning of October 18, 1859, the radical abolitionist John Brown found himself surrounded in Harpers Ferry, Virginia, by an armed force much larger than his. Two days before, Brown had led a daring raid on a federal armory, hoping that its capture would catalyze the rapid abolition of slavery in the United States. But a local militia quickly cornered
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New research shows where in the brain the earliest signs of Alzheimer's occurResearchers at Lund University in Sweden have for the first time convincingly shown where in the brain the earliest signs of Alzheimer's occur. The discovery could potentially become significant to future Alzheimer's research while contributing to improved diagnostics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hacking evolution, screening technique may improve most widespread enzymePlants evolved over millions of years into an environment that has dramatically changed in the last 150 years since the Industrial Revolution began: carbon dioxide levels have increased 50 percent, and the average global temperature has increased by nearly 2 degrees Fahrenheit. While natural adaptation has been unable to keep up, scientists have developed tools to simulate millions of years of evo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Are elevated levels of mercury in the American dipper due to run-of-river dams?A study published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry used American dippers to determine if run-of-river (RoR) dams altered food webs and mercury levels at 13 stream sites in British Columbia.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Breast cancer patients forego post-surgery treatment due to mistrust, study suggestsNearly one-third of women with breast cancer went against their doctor's advice and chose not to begin or complete the recommended adjuvant anti-cancer therapy to kill residual tumor cells following surgery, according to a study led by a Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researcher.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Metal-silicone microstructures could enable new flexible optical and electrical devicesFor the first time, researchers have used a single-step, laser-based method to produce small, precise hybrid microstructures of silver and flexible silicone. This innovative laser processing technology could one day enable smart factories that use one production line to mass-produce customized devices.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
To make surgery safer & less expensive for all, take Michigan's model national, team saysHalf the dollars spent on health care in America have something to do with a surgical procedure -- including post-surgery care to fix problems that could have been prevented. A Michigan-based model for making surgery safer, and avoiding complications, could have a major impact on the nation's health and bottom line, but needs federal support to go national.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dissecting effects of 1960s anti-poverty programs on present USResearchers trace the history and effects of New Careers, a 1960s federal anti-poverty program. While it helped expand the nonprofit sector, it also perpetuated inequality in urban areas.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Feral animals pose major threat to Outback, climate change study findsA study of changing rainfall and wildfire patterns over 22 years in Australia's Simpson Desert has found - in addition to a likely climate-induced decrease in cover of the dominant plant spinifex - introduced cats and foxes pose a major threat to seed-eating rodents.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Zebra scat science improves conservation effortsHow can zebra excrement tell us what an animal's response to climate change and habitat destruction will be? That is what scientists have been investigating in South Africa. Together the team have been using zebra stools to understand how challenges or 'stressors', such as the destruction and breakup of habitats, impact on populations of South Africa's Cape mountain zebra.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Diagnostic revolution targets tuberculosis, other deadly diseasesResearchers describe the development of several new methods for TB diagnosis that improve the speed, accuracy, and cost of TB detection.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Marine scientists discover kleptopredation, a new way of catching preyWhen it comes to feeding time sea slugs are the pirates of the underwater world -- attacking prey that have just eaten in order to plunder their target's meal, new research has found. Scientists have now observed this cunning and brutal feeding strategy in the natural world and have named the behavior kleptopredation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Are some natural environments more psychologically beneficial than others?Spending time in rural and coastal locations is more psychologically beneficial to individuals than time spent in urban green spaces, a new study reports.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
System could let thousands of researchers contribute to data analysis projectsResearchers have developed a new collaboration tool, dubbed FeatureHub, intended to make feature identification more efficient and effective. With FeatureHub, data scientists and experts on particular topics could log on to a central site and spend an hour or two reviewing a problem and proposing features. Software then tests myriad combinations of features against target data, to determine which
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Feed: All Latest
The Downfall of Doppler Labs: Inside the Last Days of a Hardware StartupDoppler Labs tried to start an ear-puter revolution with its Here One earbuds. Then everything went downhill.
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Feed: All Latest
The Life Cycle of Planes, as Told in Stunning Aerial PhotosA 747 has about 35,000 flights in it.
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Gizmodo
Richard Branson Creates New Space Venture to Launch Government and Military Spacecrafts Photo: Getty Richard Branson could play a part in our upcoming star wars. The billionaire’s satellite-launch company Virgin Orbit has started a new venture, Vox Space, aimed at wooing government clients. The Vox Space website states that the Manhattan Beach, California-based company “provides the national security community of the USA and allied nations with responsive, dedicated, and affordable
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The Atlantic
Why Movie-Ticket Surge Pricing Is a Bad Idea As movie-ticket sales continue to decline , theater chains are trying to find new ways to sell the cinema experience. AMC Theatres has been adding reserved seating at locations nationwide, with some screens offering a “prime” option with fancy leather recliners. The Alamo Drafthouse is expanding across the country with a model based on food and drink service, one that other smaller indie theaters
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The Atlantic
There's No Toilet Like Home There’s a full-body sigh that happens when you cross the threshold of your home for the first time after a long trip. And I do mean full- body: No sooner have your limp arms discarded your luggage on the floor and your lungs filled themselves with that sweet familiar home air than your gut feels the sudden, emphatic need to poop. For me, it happens within minutes, if not seconds. And I’m not alon
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Ingeniøren
Sikkerhedshul lod hackere spionere gennem støvsugerrobot Sårbarhed i LGs IoT-produkter gjorde det muligt at styre udstyr i hjemmet og på kontoret. Det var bl.a. muligt at se ud af robotstøvsugerens kamera. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/sikkerhedshul-laver-robotstoevsuger-spion-hackere-1082301 Version2
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Largest ever collection of patient data of inherited epilepsy conditionsResearchers from Swansea University Medical School have joined up with five other centres from around the world to compile the biggest recorded collection of families with forms of epilepsy where genetics may play a part in the recurring feature of the condition.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Almost half of those who resolve a problem with drugs or alcohol do so without assistanceA study from the Recovery Research Institute at Massachusetts General Hospital has estimated, for the first time, the number of Americans who have overcome serious problems with the use of alcohol or other drugs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists create magnetic system that transforms heat into motionScientists have discovered a pioneering new technique to transform ambient heat into motion in nanoscale devices - which could revolutionise future generations of data storage and sensors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Riding the bike to work is just as effective as leisure time exerciseA new study shows that inactive, overweight people can lose fat mass just as effectively by riding the bike to work than by exercising in their leisure time. It is a time-effective solution if you want to be physically active, but lead a busy everyday life, the researchers say.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain tumor's 'addiction' to common amino acid could be its weaknessStarving a childhood brain tumor of the amino acid glutamine could improve the effect of chemotherapy, according to an early study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chimpanzees shown spontaneously 'taking turns' to solve number puzzleA new study has shown chimpanzees spontaneously taking turns to complete a number sequencing task.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Many prescription drug users not aware of driving-related risksA large portion of patients taking prescription drugs that could affect driving may not be aware they could potentially be driving impaired, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Engineers develop filters that use nanoparticles to prevent slime build-upResearchers have a new way of making membranes that allows them to add in a host of new abilities via functional nanoparticles that adhere to the surface of the mesh. They tested this method by adding antifouling particle that could prevent biofilm build-up.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists develop groundnut resistant to aflatoxinThe discovery has the potential to drastically improve food safety and reduce losses caused by the contamination from the poisonous carcinogen, aflatoxin.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New SOFT e-textiles could offer advanced protection for soldiers and emergency personnelNew technology harnesses electronic signals in a smart fabric to detect, capture, concentrate and filter toxic chemicals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain tumor's 'addiction' to common amino acid could be its weaknessStarving a childhood brain tumor of the amino acid glutamine could improve the effect of chemotherapy, according to a new and early study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Marijuana farming hurts environment, new study findsPlanting cannabis for commercial production in remote locations is creating forest fragmentation, stream modification, soil erosion and landslides. Without land-use policies to limit its environmental footprint, the impacts of cannabis farming could get worse, according to a new study.
19h
Ars Technica
Ubisoft says DRM isn’t the reason Assassin’s Creed: Origins pushes CPUs Enlarge / Ubisoft says detailed imagery like this, and not DRM, is pushing CPUs to their limits. Ubisoft is pushing back against reports that the DRM used in Assassin's Creed: Origins is eating up significant CPU cycles and causing performance problems for many people playing the PC version of the game. The explosive accusation comes from noted game cracker Voksi, who tells TorrentFreak that an a
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Dagens Medicin
Psykiatrien i hovedstaden har mere end halveret antallet af bæltefikseringer Ved hjælp af hospitalets egen handlingsplan og en god portion stædighed er det lykkes Danmarks største psykiatriske hospital at nedbringe antallet af bæltefikseringsepisoder med 53 pct. siden den nationale indsats for at nedbringe brugen af tvang i psykiatrien begyndte.
19h
Dagens Medicin
Voksne med cerebral parese er sjældent i arbejdeNy rapport viser, at voksne med cerebral parese ofte står uden for arbejdsmarkedet og sjældent har en kompetencegivende uddannelse.
19h
Science | The Guardian
How does socioeconomic position affect our health? - Science Weekly podcast This week, Ian Sample and Nicola Davis explore the complex relationship between poverty, stress, and life expectancy Subscribe & Review on Apple Podcasts , Soundcloud , Audioboom , Mixcloud & Acast , and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter In 2016, the New Policy Institute estimated that 13.5 million people in the UK – that’s a fifth of the population – were living in poverty. For this sh
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The Guardian's Science Weekly
How does socioeconomic position affect our health? - Science Weekly podcastThis week, Ian Sample and Nicola Davis explore the complex relationship between poverty, stress, and life expectancy
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Gizmodo
Scientists Identify a Whole New Way of Catching Prey: Kleptopredation Image: Gabriella Luongo Food webs might seem clear to you—grass grows in the sun, cows eat the grass, you eat the cow, you play on the computer. But it doesn’t always work that way in the animal kingdom. Today’s word of the day is kleptopredation, a new way of eating that was recently discovered in a species of sea slug by researchers in Europe. Kleptopredation’s existence shows that there’s more
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chimpanzees shown spontaneously 'taking turns' to solve number puzzleA new study from Kyoto and Oxford universities and Indianapolis Zoo has shown chimpanzees spontaneously taking turns to complete a number sequencing task.
19h
The Atlantic
Five Books to Make You Less Stupid About the Civil War On Monday, the retired four-star general and White House Chief of Staff John Kelly asserted that “the lack of an ability to compromise lead to the Civil War.” This was an incredibly stupid thing to say. Worse, it built on a long tradition of endorsing stupidity in hopes of making Americans stupid about their own history. Stupid enjoys an unfortunate place in the highest ranks of American governme
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