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The Atlantic
The Diversity Visa Program Makes No Sense Sayfullo Saipov did not arrive in the United States alone. In 2009, he was one of 3,284 lucky residents of Uzbekistan to win the green-card lottery. That same year, the lottery granted green cards to—among others—2,894 Albanians, 590 Australians, 1,154 Bulgarians, 4,307 Kenyans, and 2,331 Turks; for a total of 50,000 admissions. Good and bad qualities are randomly distributed in the human populat
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Ars Technica
SEC warns that celebrity cryptocurrency endorsements may be illegal Enlarge / Boxer Floyd Mayweather has done paid endorsements for little-known cryptocurrencies. (credit: So Max O ) The Securities and Exchange Commission has issued a statement warning celebrities that they may be violating the law if they make paid endorsements of cryptocurrencies without disclosing the payments. Just a few months ago, there would have been no need for such a warning because the
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Gizmodo
Some People at the Emoji Group Have Had Enough of This Goddamn Poop Image Source: Unicode While most of us only take note of the work being done at Unicode when it drops a new set of emojis, the organization is responsible for standardizing the way computers around the world display characters. It’s serious business, and some Unicode researchers have had enough of this stupid emoji shit. On Thursday, Buzzfeed News uncovered publicly available memos that collect f
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Big Think
Here’s How Marijuana Use Affects Sex Drive Researchers found a “dose-dependent relationship” between marijuana use and intercourse. Read More
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Science : NPR
On Thin Ice: Walruses Threatened After U.S. Declines To List As Endangered The Trump administration refused last month to put the Pacific walrus on the endangered species list, spelling a "death sentence" for the species that lives in the seas between Alaska and Russia. (Image credit: S.A. Sonsthagen/AP)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ions in the spotlightNew scientific results have been given a special place in the Nature Photonics journal. They focus on the effective isolation of ions in optical and electrostatic traps.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Newly discovered volcanic rock minerals may offer new insights into earth's evolutionScientists have found evidence showing that komatiites, or three-billion-year old volcanic rock found within the Earth's mantle, had a different composition than modern ones. Their discovery may offer new information about the first one billion years of Earth's development and early origins of life. Results of the team's work has been published in the October 2017 edition of Nature Geoscience.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Resisting alien invasionsInvasive species are can be hugely detrimental to marine ecosystems. Take Caulerpa taxifolia as an example.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers find that two distinct ecological mechanisms may provide resilience against invasive speciesInvasive species are can be hugely detrimental to marine ecosystems. Take Caulerpa taxifolia as an example.
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The Scientist RSS
Sam Clovis Withdraws from Consideration for Top USDA ScientistPresident Donald Trump's pick to serve as the US Department of Agriculture's undersecretary for research, education, and economics blames the 'political climate' for his decision.
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Popular Science
Razer designed its first smartphone to make holding it sideways suck less Gadgets The screen, button layout, and even the speakers make this phone better sideways Gaming company Razer designed its first phone to be "horizontal first."…
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Science : NPR
After Chemical Fires, Texans Worry About Toxic Effects Some residents and first responders are suing the chemical company Arkema, saying it didn't do enough to protect them from fires that started at one of its plants near Houston after Hurricane Harvey. (Image credit: William Chambers for NPR)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Minerals in volcanic rock offer new insights into the first 1.5 billion years of Earth's evolutionThe first 1.5 billion years of Earth's evolution is subject to considerable uncertainty due to the lack of any significant rock record prior to four billion years ago and a very limited record until about three billion years ago. Rocks of this age are usually extensively altered making comparisons to modern rock quite difficult. In new research conducted at LSU, scientists have found evidence show
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NYT > Science
Trump Team to Promote Fossil Fuels and Nuclear Power at Bonn Climate TalksThe American position is likely to provoke strong reactions from attendees of the United Nations meeting that begins on Monday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study identifies additional hurdle to widespread planting of bioenergy cropsA study examining how certain decisions impact what farmers plant and harvest identified one crucial factor that researchers believe needs to be added to the list of decision variables when considering bioenergy crops: the option value.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Explosion of rats, clovers, bedbugs, mosquitoes unintended evolutionary consequence of urbanizationThe recent uproar about seats on a British Airways flight crawling with bedbugs is only one of the unintended consequences that urbanization worldwide has on evolution, say Marc Johnson, an associate professor of biology at the University of Toronto Mississauga, and Jason Munshi-South, who is an associate professor of biological sciences at Fordham University.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Are cities affecting evolution?In the first study to take a comprehensive look at the way urbanization is affecting evolution, Professors Marc Johnson and Jason Munshi-Smith say they've found a 'wake-up call for the public, governments and other scientists.'
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genomic study reveals clues to wild past of grapesAbout 22,000 years ago, as the ice sheets that consumed much of North America and Europe began retreating, humans started to consume a fruit that today brings joy to millions of wine drinkers around the world: grapes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Concrete: A hard material engineers hope to make harderFor thousands of years, people have built civilizations with concrete made from readily available local materials. Just mix and heat, add some sand, stone and water and put it where you want it. Of course, give it time to harden - that is, after you have left your hand print or initials.
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Popular Science
Why do marathon runners get the runs? Ask Us Anything It doesn't just work your leg muscles—racing is rough on your intestines, too. Runners of all levels experience diarrhea and other forms of gastrointestinal distress during and after a run. Here's why.
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Gizmodo
This Laptop Bag Is Like a Portable Private Office Working at a coffee shop or in an economy airplane seat doesn’t usually come with the expectation of privacy, but that’s exactly what the Moose laptop bag gives you, and then some. When it’s closed, the Moose looks like pretty much any compact laptop bag, albeit a very attractive one. Once you open it up though, two panels can fold out and snap to the side of the bag, creating, effectively, a pri
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Live Science
The History Behind That Creepy Bone Chapel You Saw on RedditA chapel of bones has a spiritual history.
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Blog » Languages » English
Common errors in Mystic cells and how to identify them! Hello again Mystics! Your friendly Admins are bringing you a few new helpful tips for attacking nasty errors that pop up in Mystic cells. Let these tips bring us all towards happier, heathier, less mergery Mystic cells! Axons: There can only be one! Where one axon reigns, all others must perish. Or so say the olden neuron texts of yore. And you don’t want to mess around with those texts of yore l
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Additional hurdle to widespread planting of bioenergy crops identifiedA study examining how certain decisions impact what farmers plant and harvest identified one crucial factor that researchers believe needs to be added to the list of decision variables when considering bioenergy crops: the option value.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain activity is inherited, may inform treatment for ADHD, autismA new study concludes that while individually unique, each connectotype demonstrates both familial and heritable relationships.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mexican doctors safely reuse donated pacemakers after sterilizationMexican doctors have safely reused donated pacemakers after sterilization, shows a new study. The findings create the possibility for patients to receive a pacemaker who otherwise could not afford one.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Most US adults say today's children have worse health prospectsLess than one-third of adults believe that kids are physically healthier today compared to kids in their own childhoods and fewer than 25 percent think children's mental health status is better now.
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Viden
Bank-robotterne kommer: Godt eller skidt for dig?Nordeas chatbots er kun begyndelsen. I fremtiden vil utallige opgaver blive overtaget af robotter.
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The Atlantic
Who Is Jerome Powell, Trump’s Pick for Fed Chair? Updated 4:45 p.m. On Thursday, Donald Trump announced that he will nominate Jerome Powell to be the next chair of the Federal Reserve board, an appointment that Trump has been building suspense around for weeks. “We need strong, sound and steady leadership at the United States Federal Reserve,” the president said during a press conference on Thursday. “There are few more important positions than
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The Atlantic
The Inevitability of NPR's Meltdown It went, roughly, like this: On Tuesday, The Washington Post reported that Michael Oreskes, the senior vice president and editorial director at National Public Radio—NPR’s top news executive—had been accused by two women of sexual harassment. “In separate complaints,” The Post ’s Paul Farhi wrote, “the women said Oreskes—at the time, the Washington bureau chief of The New York Times —abruptly kis
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sugar-sweetened drinks raise risk of diabetes, metabolic syndromeRegularly drinking sugar-sweetened beverages such as soda and juice contributes to the development of diabetes, high blood pressure and other endemic health problems, according to a new review.
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Live Science
The Best Microscopes for KidsRelatively inexpensive scientific equipment can spark a child's interest in science. Here are some of the best microscopes for kids that aren't just toys.
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Gizmodo
NASA’s Next Mars Rover Is Going to Be Seriously Badass Artist’s conceptual image of the 2020 rover. (Image: NASA/JPL/Caltech) Should all go according to plan, NASA will launch its next Martian rover in July 2020. The robotic probe is still under construction, but early signs are that the next-gen rover will be equipped with an impressive assortment of high-tech gadgets. The rover is currently under construction at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study identifies additional hurdle to widespread planting of bioenergy cropsA study examining how certain decisions impact what farmers plant and harvest identified one crucial factor that researchers believe needs to be added to the list of decision variables when considering bioenergy crops: the option value.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists identify hotspots of coastal risks in Latin America and the CaribbeanThe catastrophic 2017 hurricane season provided ample demonstrations of the vulnerability of populations and infrastructure in coastal areas to natural disasters. A new study by scientists at UC Santa Cruz and the University of Cantabria, Spain, identifies hotspots of coastal risks throughout Latin America and the Caribbean.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Geometry plays an important role in how cells behaveInspired by how geometry influences physical systems such as soft matter, researchers have revealed surprising insights into how the physics of molecules within a cell affect how the cell behaves.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bacteria in the gut modulates response to immunotherapy in melanomaBacteria that live in the human digestive tract can influence how cancer responds to immunotherapy, opening a new avenue for research to improve treatment, medical researchers report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Is gun violence contagious?Gun violence is mostly not contagious but rather an endemic issue for particular neighborhoods, according to researchers. That means place-based interventions like hotspot policing or greening vacant lots have the best chance to improve this problem.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hormone replacement therapy may be beneficial for women's memoryA new study indicates a potential benefit of the menopausal therapy for a certain type of memory.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Shifting bacterial communities in the stomach may influence cancer riskDifferent changes to the microbial community of the stomach may explain why related conditions are associated with different risk levels and types of gastric tumor, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Onalespib could be an effective treatment for glioblastoma, preclinical studies showThis study showed that the targeted drug onalespib reduced the expression of cell-survival proteins such as AKT and endothelial growth factor receptor in glioma cell lines and glioma stem cells from patient tumors. This, in turn, reduced the survival, proliferation, invasion and migration of the cells. In animal models of glioblastoma the agent crossed the blood-brain barrier and showed effectiven
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New pathogenic mechanism of motor neuron disordersScientists have found a previously unknown pathogenic mechanism of motor neuron disorders. The discovery may lead to a rethinking in drug development.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How caries-causing bacteria can survive in dental plaqueExtracellular polysaccharides play a central role in the survival capabilities of caries-causing bacteria in dental plaque, researchers report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Should patients be asleep or awake during brain surgery?Deep brain stimulation eases the effects of Parkinson's disease and tremor. A new study indicates no demonstrable difference in clinical outcomes between patients who underwent the implantation under general anesthesia versus those who went through it while awake.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Close friends linked to a sharper memoryMaintaining positive, warm and trusting friendships might be the key to a slower decline in memory and cognitive functioning, according to a new study. SuperAgers -- who are 80 years of age and older who have cognitive ability at least as good as people in their 50s or 60s -- reported having more satisfying, high-quality relationships compared to their cognitively average, same-age peers, the stud
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Molybdenum in Wisconsin wells not from coal ashNatural causes, not leaching coal ash, are to blame for high levels of molybdenum in drinking water wells in southeastern Wisconsin, a study finds. The scientists used isotopic fingerprinting and age-dating techniques to rule out the possibility that surface coal-ash contamination could be causing the problem and traced it to natural processes occurring deep underground instead.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Vitamin E discovery in maize could lead to more nutritious cropNew research has identified genes that control vitamin E content in maize grain, a finding that could lead to improving the nutritional profile of this staple crop. Scientists combined different types of genetic association analyses to identify 14 genes across the genome that were involved in the synthesis of vitamin E. Six genes were newly discovered to encode proteins that contribute to a class
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Gizmodo
There's a Damn Good Chance Your Neighbor Thinks Chemtrails Are Real Photo: Aleem Yousaf/Flickr Chemtrails are not real, but that hasn’t stopped an increasing number of Americans from thinking they are. Research by Harvard scientists published in Palgrave Communications on Tuesday shows that a shocking number of people believe the batshit theory that the government is secretly spraying chemicals in the sky to control the weather or our minds or whatever. Advertise
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The Atlantic
A Contested Finding in a Major New Climate-Change Report Climate change is already afflicting human health worldwide, exposing tens of millions of elderly people to excess heat while possibly reducing the ability of hundreds of millions of workers to do their jobs, according to an expansive new synthesis from The Lancet , one of the world’s oldest and most widely cited medical journals. The report examines dozens of statistics from around the planet an
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Ars Technica
Scientists confirm there’s a mysterious “void” in the Great Pyramid ScanPyramids mission Though the Great Pyramid at Giza in Egypt is one of the ancient world's biggest and most elaborate monuments, we still know very little about how it was constructed. We also don't know how many chambers are hidden inside it. Now, an international research team has identified what appears to be a large empty space or void above the pyramid's famed "Grand Gallery." The scientis
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Science | The Guardian
The need to incentivise antibiotic research | LettersThoughtful governmental action can make development of new drugs for small patient populations viable, says Prof David Roblin, while Dr Georgina Crayford responds to an article on efforts to cut the use of antibiotics in farming David Cox reports on the “war on bugs” and development of “superantibiotics” ( 23 October ). A blunderbuss is effective against the enemy, but what of the collateral damag
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Brain activity is inherited, may inform treatment for ADHD, autismA new study conducted at OHSU in Portland, Oregon, concludes that while individually unique, each connectotype demonstrates both familial and heritable relationships. The results published today in Network Neuroscience.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists identify hotspots of coastal risks in Latin America and the CaribbeanThe catastrophic 2017 hurricane season provided ample demonstrations of the vulnerability of populations and infrastructure in coastal areas to natural disasters. A new study by scientists at UC Santa Cruz and the University of Cantabria, Spain, identifies hotspots of coastal risks throughout Latin America and the Caribbean.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fantastic journey: How newborn neurons find their proper place in the adult brainThis week in the Journal of Cell Biology, Professor Linda Van Aelst and colleagues at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) describe for the first time (in mice) how baby neurons -- precursors called neuroblasts, generated from a permanent pocket of stem cells in a brain area called the V-SVZ -- make an incredible journey from their place of birth through a special tunnel called the RMS to their ta
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Gizmodo
What's Really Up With Apple Giving Face Data to Developers? Phil Schiller, Apple’s senior vice president of worldwide marketing, announces features of the new iPhone X, including Face ID. (Photo: AP) App developers can access more robust data about your face and the expressions you make with iPhone X, raising concerns from privacy advocates who worry that this sensitive facial data will end up in the hands of advertisers. According to its developer agreem
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The Atlantic
The 'Harvey Weinstein Effect' Reaches the U.K. It is traditional to express remorse when you’ve lost your job over allegations about your behavior toward women. But Michael Fallon, the newly departed U.K. defense secretary, while apologizing for his behavior, told the BBC: “What might have been acceptable 15, 10 years ago is clearly not acceptable now.” At issue are allegations by the journalist Julia Hartley-Brewer that 15 years ago Fallon r
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Gut microbes can shape responses to cancer immunotherapy Studies find that species diversity and antibiotics influence cutting-edge treaments. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22938
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Idaho looking to cash in on starry skies with more touristsThe stars are aligning for Idaho—mainly because they're visible.
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Science : NPR
Massive Government Report Says Climate Is Warming And Humans Are The Cause The U.S. government's most comprehensive climate report to date is at odds with the statements made by President Trump and his Cabinet. (Image credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How chromosomes 'cheat' for the chance to get into an eggChromosomes can 'cheat,' biasing the chance that they will make it into a sex cell. Biologists show how this bias arises in female cells, detecting molecular signals that create an asymmetry in the machinery that drives meiosis, the cell-division process that gives rise to gametes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Transformation of graphite into hexagonal diamond documentedA team of researchers has for the first time observed and recorded the creation of hexagonal diamond under shock compression, revealing crucial details about how it is formed. The discovery could help planetary scientists use the presence of hexagonal diamond at meteorite craters to estimate the severity of impacts.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Four-in-one flu shot may mean lifelong protection against the fluScientists have found that a vaccine combining centralized ancestral genes from four major influenza strains could be a path toward a universal flu shot.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
This drug could block harmful impact of teen binge drinkingResearchers studying the importance of the brain's immune system in our desire to drink alcohol have made a discovery that may eventually help to switch off binge-drinking behavior in adults who used to binge during their adolescent years.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The secret lives of ancient land plantsResearchers have unraveled the genome of the common liverwort -- Marchantia polymorpha -- gaining new insight into how the modest land plants evolved.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mystery behind red blood cell maturation solvedA team of researchers profiled the human red blood cell proteome and discovered which proteins were changed during the maturation accounting for the transition in shape and deformability of reticulocytes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Co-parenting after the end of a violent marriage: What does the first year look like?Intimate partner violence is not uncommon among divorcing couples. Whether a woman experienced intimate partner violence during marriage -- and the kind of violence she experienced -- has an impact on how well she and her former partner are able to co-parent after separation. Researchers wanted to find out how co-parenting varies during the first year after separation for mothers who have experien
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ryder adds 125 electric vans to its fleetTruck rental company Ryder Systems Inc. is adding 125 fully electric vans to its fleet.
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The Atlantic
What It's Like to Learn You're Going to Die Nessa Coyle calls it “the existential slap”—that moment when a dying person first comprehends, on a gut level, that death is close. For many, the realization comes suddenly: “The usual habit of allowing thoughts of death to remain in the background is now impossible,” Coyle, a nurse and palliative-care pioneer, has written . “Death can no longer be denied.” I don’t know exactly when my mother, wh
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The Atlantic
2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Contest, Part II National Geographic ’s annual photo competition is still open, with the deadline for submissions coming up on November 17. The Grand Prize Winner will receive $7,500, publication in National Geographic Magazine, and a feature on National Geographic’ s Instagram account. Contest runners have allowed me to choose a few more of this year’s contest entries for display here. The captions below were wr
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Live Science
Alcohol Use Makes Rats Crave CocaineResearchers found that rats sought cocaine more avidly after exposure to alcohol.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Religious Festivals Linked to Major Flu OutbreaksFlu vaccination programs should take large religious gatherings into account, researchers say.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Physics Phenomenon Reveals a Pyramid's MysteryScientists used muons, a by-product of cosmic rays, to image the interior of the Great Pyramid—and found a previously unknown space inside. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hubble sees nearby asteroids photobombing distant galaxiesPhotobombing asteroids from our solar system have snuck their way into this deep image of the universe taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. These asteroids reside roughly 160 million miles from Earth, yet they've horned their way into this picture of thousands of galaxies scattered across space and time at inconceivably farther distances.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Innovative statistical methods shed light on extent of modern slavery in US, worldPolicymakers, law enforcement and advocates can now better identify and target modern slavery thanks to the work of human rights experts and researchers whose application of unique statistical methods yields more precise figures on its existence and extent.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Removing digital devices from the bedroom can improve sleep for children, teensRemoving electronic media from the bedroom and encouraging a calming bedtime routine are among recommendations researchers outline in a recent manuscript on digital media and sleep in childhood and adolescence.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Atmospheric beacons guide NASA scientists in search for lifeNew NASA research proposes a novel approach to sniffing out exoplanet atmospheres. It takes advantage of frequent stellar storms from cool, young dwarf stars to highlight signs of possible life.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Aussie snakes and lizards trace back to Asia 30 million years agoDeadly snakes are among Australia's most iconic animals. Now a new study helps explain how they descended from creatures that have come from Asia over the past 30 million years.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Risk of oversharing in conversation increases with age, study saysThe risk of oversharing in conversation -- or providing a listener with too much irrelevant detail -- increases as we age, research suggests. Tests carried out on a group of 100 people show the thinking skills that influence how we respond to people's points of view deteriorate with age. Linguists used a series of computerised listening and visual tests to assess thinking skills in the group, whos
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nanoscale 'abacus' uses pulses of light instead of wooden beads to perform calculationsThe quest to develop ever-faster and more powerful computers has led to one of the most rudimentary methods of counting being given a 21st century make-over.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Youth uniquely vulnerable to sleep disruption from screensDeveloping brains, sleep patterns, and even eyes make children uniquely vulnerable to the body-clock disrupting impact of electronics, a new paper in Pediatrics reports.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A strange new world of lightStructured beams of light, which exhibit strange behavior such as bending in a spiral, corkscrewing and dividing like a fork, not only can tell scientists a lot about the physics of light but also have a wide range of applications from super-resolution imaging to molecular manipulation and communications. Now, Harvard researchers have developed a tool to generate more complex structured light in a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How chromosomes 'cheat' for the chance to get into an eggChromosomes can 'cheat,' biasing the chance that they will make it into a sex cell. A team from the University of Pennsylvania shows how this bias arises in female cells, detecting molecular signals that create an asymmetry in the machinery that drives meiosis, the cell-division process that gives rise to gametes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Left or right? Like humans, bees have a preferenceA discovery that bees have individual flying direction preferences could lead to strategies for steering drone aircraft fleets.Researchers at The University of Queensland's Queensland Brain Institute have found that honeybees have individually distinct biases in "left- and right-handedness" when flying through obstacles. Professor Mandyam (Srini) Srinivasan said the study showed that honeybees dis
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bacteria in the gut modulates response to immunotherapy in melanomaBacteria that live in the human digestive tract can influence how cancer responds to immunotherapy, opening a new avenue for research to improve treatment, a team led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reports in the journal Science.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hormone replacement therapy may be beneficial for women's memoryA new USC study indicates a potential benefit of the menopausal therapy for a certain type of memory.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
An Arctic example: How scientific collaboration can foster international stabilityIn this Policy Forum, Paul Arthur Berkman et al. underscore how international scientific collaboration in the Arctic can help align common interests among countries experiencing geopolitical conflict.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Precise chiral cluster assembly by designScientists have developed a way to precisely assemble micron-sized colloidal clusters of a particular chirality, or orientation in space, by using strands of origami DNA.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Long-term study of Nicaraguan children reveals key window in which...Adding proof to a longstanding but previously unconfirmed theory about severe dengue in humans, a new study in children from Nicaragua pinpoints a narrow but critical range of antibody level that enhances reaction to the disease the second time around.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Unveiling gut microbes' influence on cancer patient response to immunotherapyTwo new studies in cancer patients demonstrate how the composition of gut bacteria can influence response to immunotherapy. Antibiotics, one study showed, render such treatments less effective.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Treating menopausal symptoms can protect against stress' negative effectsMenopausal hormone therapy may shield women from stress' negative effects on some types of memory, according to a small-scale study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sugar-sweetened drinks raise risk of diabetes, metabolic syndromeRegularly drinking sugar-sweetened beverages such as soda and juice contributes to the development of diabetes, high blood pressure and other endemic health problems, according to a review of epidemiological studies published in the Journal of the Endocrine Society.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Shifting bacterial communities in the stomach may influence cancer riskDifferent changes to the microbial community of the stomach may explain why related conditions are associated with different risk levels and types of gastric tumor, according to a new study in PLOS Pathogens.
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Ars Technica
Dealmaster: Get a 24-inch Dell monitor and a $75 gift card for $200 Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our friends at TechBargains , we have another round of deals to share. It's officially November, which means two things: a sudden abundance of mustaches and "Black Friday" deals that start weeks before Black Friday actually happens. The Dealmaster is focusing on the latter today, as some retailers have already started slashing prices on monitors, laptops, headphone
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Scientific American Content: Global
Newly Discovered Orangutan Species Is Also the Most EndangeredThe first new species of great ape described in more than eight decades faces threats to its habitat -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Genomic study reveals clues to wild past of grapesAbout 22,000 years ago, as the ice sheets that consumed much of North America and Europe began retreating, humans started to consume a fruit that today brings joy to millions of wine drinkers around the world: grapes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists show how lifeless particles can become 'life-like' by switching behaviorsPhysicists at Emory University have shown how a system of lifeless particles can become "life-like" by collectively switching back and forth between crystalline and fluid states—even when the environment remains stable.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New, simplified technique makes light metallic nanofoamA simple method for manufacturing extremely low-density palladium nanofoams could help advance hydrogen storage technologies, reports a new study from the University of California, Davis.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ivory Coast inaugurates huge China-funded damPresident Alassane Ouattara on Thursday inaugurated a huge Chinese-funded dam in southern Ivory Coast designed to boost the country's power capacity by nearly 14 percent.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Penny-wise, pound-foolish decisions explained by neurons' firingPeople sometimes spend as much time deciding whether to spend a few cents more on groceries as they do deciding whether to spend a few thousand dollars extra when buying a car. A new study shows that these spending habits may reflect how our brains tally differences in value among objects that vary greatly in worth.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How toxic air clouds mental healthResearchers have found a link between air pollution and psychological distress. The higher the level of particulates in the air, the study showed, the greater the impact on mental health. The study is believed to be the first to use a nationally representative survey pool, cross-referenced with pollution data at the census block level, to evaluate the connection between toxic air and mental health
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Warm air helped make 2017 ozone hole smallest since 1988Measurements from satellites this year showed the hole in Earth's ozone layer that forms over Antarctica each September was the smallest observed since 1988, scientists have announced.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mimicking giant clams to enhance the production of biofuelResearchers are working together to create an artificial system that mimics the process by which giant clams convert sunlight into energy. The research may allow them to enhance the efficiency of biofuel production.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Order in disorder: A key feature of dendritic organization in the brainScientists have found that synaptic inputs in the visual cortex are locally -- but not globally -- organized. This local functional synaptic clustering applies to a diverse set of inputs and appears to be a fundamental principle of dendritic organization. Future work should reveal more about the source of these clustered inputs and how clusters arise during the development of neural circuits.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New broadly protective vaccines for H3N2 influenzaResearchers have developed a vaccine candidate that protects against multiple co-circulating strains of H3N2 influenza isolated over five seasons following testing in mouse and ferret models.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Family favoritism: Younger siblings impacted moreA new study shows if a younger sibling feels like they're the favorite and their parents agree, their relationship is strengthened. With older siblings, whether they feel favored or not, it has no major effect on the relationship.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Help for contaminated groundwater: Dioxane-chomping microbeResearchers have discovered a bacteria-borne gene that triggers the degradation of dioxane, a groundwater contaminant and suspected carcinogen. The discovery could lead to a tool that helps decide how to treat contaminated sites.
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Live Science
Lay Off 'Pot Cures Cancer' Claims, FDA WarnsMedical marijuana may help with several health conditions, but it's certainly not a cure for cancer.
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Ingeniøren
Uventet fusionproces opdaget i partikelfysikkenUgens videnskabelige nyhedsstrøm bød også på en forklaring på neandertalernes uddøen og interessante observationer af, hvordan børn lærer deres modersmål.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Metasurface generates new states of light for fundamental research and applicationsThere's nothing new thing under the sun—except maybe light itself.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How chromosomes 'cheat' for the chance to get into an eggEach of your cells contains two copies of 23 chromosomes, one inherited from your father and one from your mother. Theoretically, when you create a gamete—a sperm or an egg—each copy has a 50-50 shot at being passed on. But the reality isn't so clearcut.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Left or right? Like humans, bees have a preferenceA discovery that bees have individual flying direction preferences could lead to strategies for steering drone aircraft fleets.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
The UK's race to get its own nuclear inspectorsHighly-specialised staff are needed to take over from European nuclear regulators after Brexit.
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Live Science
The Subatomic Discovery That Physicists Considered Keeping SecretThis subatomic reaction is eight times more powerful than the reaction at the core of hydrogen bombs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UC-led genomic study reveals clues to wild past of grapesAbout 22,000 years ago, as the ice sheets that consumed much of North America and Europe began retreating, humans started to consume a fruit that today brings joy to millions of wine drinkers around the world: grapes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is gun violence contagious?Gun violence is mostly not contagious but rather an endemic issue for particular neighborhoods, according to researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Oxford. That means place-based interventions like hotspot policing or greening vacant lots have the best chance to improve this problem.
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Science current issue
Structure of the mitochondrial inner membrane AAA+ protease YME1 gives insight into substrate processing We present an atomic model of a substrate-bound inner mitochondrial membrane AAA+ quality control protease in yeast, YME1. Our ~3.4-angstrom cryo–electron microscopy structure reveals how the adenosine triphosphatases (ATPases) form a closed spiral staircase encircling an unfolded substrate, directing it toward the flat, symmetric protease ring. Three coexisting nucleotide states allosterically i
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Science current issue
Germany and China take the lead
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Science current issue
News at a glance
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Science current issue
New ape found, sparking fears for its survival
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Science current issue
Gut microbes shape response to cancer immunotherapy
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Science current issue
Backlash after shutdown of Swiss astronomy institute
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Science current issue
Sloshing of Earth's core may spike big quakes
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Science current issue
U.S. blocks Iran from fusion megaproject
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Science current issue
Underwater network hunts for mysterious slow quakes
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Science current issue
Signs of life
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Science current issue
A second chance
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Science current issue
Paleolithic networking
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Science current issue
Epitaxy on polycrystalline substrates
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Science current issue
How are DNAs woven into chromosomes?
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Science current issue
Mediating ER-mitochondrial cross-talk
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Science current issue
Finding the first Americans
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Science current issue
Competing chromosomes explain junk DNA
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Science current issue
The Arctic Science Agreement propels science diplomacy
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Science current issue
The making and remaking of Marie Curie
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Science current issue
Evaluating fault lines in Aliso Canyon
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Science current issue
Blogs cannot separate wheat from chaff
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Science current issue
On the origin of preprints
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Science current issue
Alcohol use primes cocaine addiction
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Science current issue
Ultrafast plasmonic modulation
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Topological lasing
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Precise chiral colloidal assembly
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Science current issue
A somatosensory map in the fly brain
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Science current issue
How selfish genes get their way
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Science current issue
How early human groups were organized
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Science current issue
Condensin is a highly processive DNA motor
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Science current issue
Lysosomal calcium in dendritic cell migration
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Science current issue
Molecular mechanisms behind ribosomopathies
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Science current issue
Feeding a protease step by step
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Science current issue
Welcome to the city
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Science current issue
The basic modules of the neocortex
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Science current issue
Laser-shaping nanoparticles
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Science current issue
Making the right contacts
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Exotic states pop up in bilayer graphene
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Science current issue
Cooling molecules in the spin cycle
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Science current issue
Revelations from a Vindija Neandertal genome
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Science current issue
Ancient DNA pushes human emergence back
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Science current issue
Unmasking class II membrane fusion
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A coastal route to the Americas
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Refining the gold standard
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Science current issue
MARKing a change in the cytoskeleton
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Science current issue
An olive branch for sequencing
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Science current issue
Soaking up tumor suppression
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Growing pressure sensors from bacteria
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They can smell your fear
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Watching SAM flip the switch
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Science current issue
Charging through the looking glass
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Science current issue
Elliptical galaxies spinning on end
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Science current issue
Lattice system of functionally distinct cell types in the neocortex The mammalian neocortex contains many cell types, but whether they organize into repeated structures has been unclear. We discovered that major cell types in neocortical layer 5 form a lattice structure in many brain areas. Large-scale three-dimensional imaging revealed that distinct types of excitatory and inhibitory neurons form cell type–specific radial clusters termed microcolumns. Thousands
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Science current issue
Topological and modality-specific representation of somatosensory information in the fly brain Insects and mammals share similarities of neural organization underlying the perception of odors, taste, vision, sound, and gravity. We observed that insect somatosensation also corresponds to that of mammals. In Drosophila , the projections of all the somatosensory neuron types to the insect’s equivalent of the spinal cord segregated into modality-specific layers comparable to those in mammals.
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Science current issue
ER-mitochondria tethering by PDZD8 regulates Ca2+ dynamics in mammalian neurons Interfaces between organelles are emerging as critical platforms for many biological responses in eukaryotic cells. In yeast, the ERMES complex is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)–mitochondria tether composed of four proteins, three of which contain a SMP (synaptotagmin-like mitochondrial-lipid binding protein) domain. No functional ortholog for any ERMES protein has been identified in metazoans. He
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Science current issue
High-speed plasmonic modulator in a single metal layer Plasmonics provides a possible route to overcome both the speed limitations of electronics and the critical dimensions of photonics. We present an all-plasmonic 116–gigabits per second electro-optical modulator in which all the elements—the vertical grating couplers, splitters, polarization rotators, and active section with phase shifters—are included in a single metal layer. The device can be re
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Science current issue
Self-assembled three-dimensional chiral colloidal architecture Although stereochemistry has been a central focus of the molecular sciences since Pasteur, its province has previously been restricted to the nanometric scale. We have programmed the self-assembly of micron-sized colloidal clusters with structural information stemming from a nanometric arrangement. This was done by combining DNA nanotechnology with colloidal science. Using the functional flexibil
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Science current issue
Nonreciprocal lasing in topological cavities of arbitrary geometries Resonant cavities are essential building blocks governing many wave-based phenomena, but their geometry and reciprocity fundamentally limit the integration of optical devices. We report, at telecommunication wavelengths, geometry-independent and integrated nonreciprocal topological cavities that couple stimulated emission from one-way photonic edge states to a selected waveguide output with an is
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Science current issue
Femtosecond laser reshaping yields gold nanorods with ultranarrow surface plasmon resonances The irradiation of gold nanorod colloids with a femtosecond laser can be tuned to induce controlled nanorod reshaping, yielding colloids with exceptionally narrow localized surface plasmon resonance bands. The process relies on a regime characterized by a gentle multishot reduction of the aspect ratio, whereas the rod shape and volume are barely affected. Successful reshaping can only occur withi
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Science current issue
A cryofuge for cold-collision experiments with slow polar molecules Ultracold molecules represent a fascinating research frontier in physics and chemistry, but it has proven challenging to prepare dense samples at low velocities. Here, we present a solution to this goal by means of a nonconventional approach dubbed cryofuge. It uses centrifugal force to bring cryogenically cooled molecules to kinetic energies below 1 K x k B in the laboratory frame, where k B is
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Science current issue
Even-denominator fractional quantum Hall states in bilayer graphene The distinct Landau level spectrum of bilayer graphene (BLG) is predicted to support a non-abelian even-denominator fractional quantum Hall (FQH) state similar to the state first identified in GaAs. However, the nature of this state has remained difficult to characterize. Here, we report transport measurements of a robust sequence of even-denominator FQH in dual-gated BLG devices. Parallel field
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Science current issue
Southern African ancient genomes estimate modern human divergence to 350,000 to 260,000 years ago Southern Africa is consistently placed as a potential region for the evolution of Homo sapiens . We present genome sequences, up to 13x coverage, from seven ancient individuals from KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The remains of three Stone Age hunter-gatherers (about 2000 years old) were genetically similar to current-day southern San groups, and those of four Iron Age farmers (300 to 500 years old
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Science current issue
A high-coverage Neandertal genome from Vindija Cave in Croatia To date, the only Neandertal genome that has been sequenced to high quality is from an individual found in Southern Siberia. We sequenced the genome of a female Neandertal from ~50,000 years ago from Vindija Cave, Croatia, to ~30-fold genomic coverage. She carried 1.6 differences per 10,000 base pairs between the two copies of her genome, fewer than present-day humans, suggesting that Neandertal
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Science current issue
Ancient genomes show social and reproductive behavior of early Upper Paleolithic foragers Present-day hunter-gatherers (HGs) live in multilevel social groups essential to sustain a population structure characterized by limited levels of within-band relatedness and inbreeding. When these wider social networks evolved among HGs is unknown. To investigate whether the contemporary HG strategy was already present in the Upper Paleolithic, we used complete genome sequences from Sunghir, a s
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Science current issue
A glycerophospholipid-specific pocket in the RVFV class II fusion protein drives target membrane insertion The Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is transmitted by infected mosquitoes, causing severe disease in humans and livestock across Africa. We determined the x-ray structure of the RVFV class II fusion protein Gc in its postfusion form and in complex with a glycerophospholipid (GPL) bound in a conserved cavity next to the fusion loop. Site-directed mutagenesis and molecular dynamics simulations furth
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Science current issue
Spindle asymmetry drives non-Mendelian chromosome segregation Genetic elements compete for transmission through meiosis, when haploid gametes are created from a diploid parent. Selfish elements can enhance their transmission through a process known as meiotic drive. In female meiosis, selfish elements drive by preferentially attaching to the egg side of the spindle. This implies some asymmetry between the two sides of the spindle, but the molecular mechanis
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Science current issue
The condensin complex is a mechanochemical motor that translocates along DNA Condensin plays crucial roles in chromosome organization and compaction, but the mechanistic basis for its functions remains obscure. We used single-molecule imaging to demonstrate that Saccharomyces cerevisiae condensin is a molecular motor capable of adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis–dependent translocation along double-stranded DNA. Condensin’s translocation activity is rapid and highly proces
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Science current issue
Technology Feature | The singles seen: Sequencing gets specific
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New Products
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Sponsored Collection | Changing perspectives on daylight: Science, technology, and culture
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Science current issue
I'm not your mother
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Science current issue
Ribosomopathies: Theres strength in numbers Ribosomopathies are a group of human disorders most commonly caused by ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency or defects in ribosome biogenesis. These conditions manifest themselves as physiological defects in specific cell and tissue types. We review current molecular models to explain ribosomopathies and attempt to reconcile the tissue specificity of these disorders with the ubiquitous requiremen
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Science current issue
Erratum for the Perspective "Finding the first Americans" by T. J. Braje, T. D. Dillehay, J. M. Erlandson, R. G. Klein, T. C. Rick
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Science current issue
Evolution of life in urban environments Our planet is an increasingly urbanized landscape, with over half of the human population residing in cities. Despite advances in urban ecology, we do not adequately understand how urbanization affects the evolution of organisms, nor how this evolution may affect ecosystems and human health. Here, we review evidence for the effects of urbanization on the evolution of microbes, plants, and animals
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Gizmodo
Tesla's 'Hell' Threatens Its Future In August, after Tesla got production underway for the Model 3 and made first deliveries of the new mass-market electric sedan to employees, CEO Elon Musk said there should “absolutely” be “zero concern” about the automaker’s ability to increase production to 10,000 cars per week at some point in 2018. This week, that confidence vanished. During a conference call on Wednesday, Musk was asked if T
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: Male Mammoths Died in ‘Silly Ways’ More Often Than Females, Study FindsMost preserved fossils of the beasts are male, scientists found, which offers insights into mammoth behavior.
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The Atlantic
The Student Who Wasn't Afraid of Being Sad This is the latest installment in a podcast called What My Students Taught Me. Each episode features a teacher reflecting on a particularly challenging student, whenever possible in counterpoint with the student’s version of the same events. Listen to previous installments here or subscribe on iTunes . When Jessica Carlson agreed to teach English in an alternative program for at-risk students eig
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Gizmodo
It's Back! Thousands of Marvel Digital Comics Are Incredibly Cheap on Amazon Right Now. Marvel Digital Comic Sale Amazon’s running a Marvel digital comic sale that’s bigger than any Avengers movie today, with literally thousands of titles marked down to just a few bucks , in most cases. You’ll find everything from the Guardians of the Galaxy to Darth Vader to Deadpool to Captain America in there, and every hero in between, so there’s never been a better time to stock your digital sh
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Gizmodo
Trump's Nominee for Top Science Post Confirms He Has Literally Zero Hard Science Experience (UPDATE: Clovis Withdraws) AP Welcome to WHAT NOW , a morning round-up of the news/fresh horrors that await you today. Sam Clovis is many things: a failed politician, a former talk radio host who’s compared being gay to child molestation , and an ex-campaign aide to Donald Trump who now finds himself embroiled in the Russia investigation . But Clovis has now added another notch to his belt: a ready admission that he’s defi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
In autism, too many brain connections may be at root of conditionMutations in a gene linked to autism in people causes neurons to form too many connections in rodents, according to a new study. The findings suggest that malfunctions in communication between brain cells could be at the root of autism.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mindfulness may help mothers cope with stress when their babies have a heart conditionMindfulness may offer an active coping mechanism for mothers faced with the stress of having a newborn diagnosed with congenital heart disease (CHD). Mindfulness, which aims to increase a person's awareness and acceptance of daily experiences, is currently used in a variety of healthcare settings as a potentially effective skill for stress reduction, emotion, affect and attention regulation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tanning beds and risky behavior linked -- in menEven though men use tanning beds at lower rates than women, men who tan tend to do it in riskier ways, according to a new study. The findings should help public health officials rethink how, and to whom, they're targeting anti-tanning messages.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New, simplified technique makes light metallic nanofoam: Potential use in hydrogen storageA simple method for manufacturing extremely low-density palladium nanofoams could help advance hydrogen storage technologies, reports a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Animals' mitochondria defenses discovered in plantsScientists have discovered that the mechanism that mitochondria use to defend mammalian cells against protein-damaging stress also exists in plants.
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Popular Science
Stephen Hawking releases graduate thesis, promptly breaks internet Science It's a big win for something called open access. The Cambridge website crashed last week due to the overwhelming rush to download a paper about the implications of the expanding nature of our universe.
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New on MIT Technology Review
The U.S. Government Might Cut Its $7,500 Subsidy for Electric Cars
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Futurity.org
Even a marketing expert succumbs to store brand bias Store brands have been growing since the 1980s, expanding from a 10 to 15 percent market share to nearly 25 percent today. The phenomenon isn’t limited to supermarkets, but extends to home improvement, office supply, and big-box stores. However, “consumers still think of store brands as a lower quality than the national brands,” says Woochoel Shin, professor of marketing at the University of Flor
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Ars Technica
AT&T struggles to get Trump administration approval for Time Warner merger Enlarge / AT&T will own a bunch of new media properties if it is allowed to buy Time Warner. (credit: Aurich Lawson ) AT&T's purchase of Time Warner Inc. is reportedly hitting a speed bump as the Trump administration's Department of Justice considers filing a lawsuit to block the merger. This wouldn't be a death knell for the merger because the DOJ often files lawsuits against deals that it ultim
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New on MIT Technology Review
Waymo’s Maintenance Deal Hints That Commercially Available Self-Driving Cars May Be Close
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Gizmodo
The Latest Netflix Price Hike Pushed Me Over the Edge GIF Image: Netflix / Gizmodo This morning, after about five clicks over the course of 10 seconds, I cancelled my Netflix membership. The company had started notifying people of its latest price increase —a two buck bump from $12 to $14 in my case—and I just couldn’t do it any more. In fact, you should ask yourself if you need to keep paying for Netflix. It’s not as special as it used to be. Think
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Male mammoths more often fell into 'natural traps' and died, DNA evidence suggestsResearchers who have sexed 98 woolly mammoth specimens collected from various parts of Siberia have discovered that the fossilized remains more often came from males of the species than females. They speculate that this skewed sex ratio exists in the fossil record because inexperienced male mammoths more often traveled alone and got themselves killed by falling into natural traps that made their p
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Newly discovered orangutan species is 'among the most threatened great apes in the world'Scientists have long recognized six living species of great ape aside from humans: Sumatran and Bornean orangutans, eastern and western gorillas, chimpanzees, and bonobos. But researchers have now made it seven, based on a collection of evidence showing that an isolated population of orangutans living in Sumatra is actually its own unique species. They've named the new species the Tapanuli orangut
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In autism, too many brain connections may be at root of conditionMutations in a gene linked to autism in people causes neurons to form too many connections in rodents, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings suggest that malfunctions in communication between brain cells could be at the root of autism.
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Ars Technica
Trump pick for science position withdraws due to Russia connection Enlarge / Sam Clovis, then newly appointed national co-chairman of the Trump campaign, speaks during a news conference with Donald Trump. (credit: Bloomberg / Getty Images ) Yesterday, the Trump administration's pick for a science post at the Department of Agriculture withdrew his name from consideration. Sam Clovis, who was a talk radio host before joining the Trump campaign, had been a controve
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Ars Technica
Company that sought to control Google search results is a no-show in US court Einstein gets ready to do a search on Google Canada. (credit: Photo by Carlos Osorio/Toronto Star via Getty Images) Earlier this year, a small Vancouver software firm called Equustek earned an extraordinary legal win against Google. The Supreme Court of Canada ordered the search giant to de-index all pages from a former Equustek distributor—not just in Canada, but worldwide. Google's response to
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The Atlantic
What To Do When Racists Try To Hijack Your Religion As white supremacists marched through Charlottesville, the high priest of a pagan religion looked on with horror from Reykjavik, Iceland. It wasn’t just their racist message that bothered him. It was that their banners bore the symbols of his religion: Ásatrú, also known as heathenry. “I think it’s obscene,” the high priest, Hilmar Hilmarsson, said of the way white supremacists are coopting Norse
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The Atlantic
Donna Brazile's Curious Account of the 2016 Election For defeated politicians, the period after an election is for score-settling. For defeated political operatives, it’s about positioning for the next race. And if a juicy excerpt from Donna Brazile’s new book Hacks is an indication, the longtime Democratic operative and former interim chair of the Democratic National Party seems to think the future is Bernie Sanders. Brazile’s piece, in Politico M
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Popular Science
Laptop accessories that will upgrade your entire life Gadgets Supplies to help you do everything (that you do on your laptop) better. Personal computer accessories to help protect and leverage your device's capabilities.
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Science | The Guardian
Tabloid derision threatens Australia's research capability, universities head says Group of Eight’s Vicki Thomson defends ‘blue sky’ research in the academic sector after Daily Telegraph labels some ‘nutty’ The derision of academic research by tabloid newspapers risks undermining Australia’s research capabilities, the head of the Group of Eight has warned. This week the education minister, Simon Birmingham, announced the rollout of long-mooted plans to make the $3.5bn in fundin
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New on MIT Technology Review
Trump Might Cut the Government’s $7,500 Electric Car Subsidy
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Quanta Magazine
Life’s First Molecule Was Protein, Not RNA, New Model Suggests Proteins have generally taken a back seat to RNA molecules in scientists’ speculations about how life on Earth started . Yet a new computational model that describes how early biopolymers could have grown long enough to fold into useful shapes may change that. If it holds up, the model, which is now guiding laboratory experiments for confirmation, could re-establish the reputation of proteins as
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New on MIT Technology Review
Trump Is Expected to Cut the Government’s $7,500 Electric Car Subsidy
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Scientific American Content: Global
Should Brain Science Be Making Prisons Better, Not Trying to Prove Innocence?There are many concerns about the appropriate use of neuroscience in a criminal justice setting -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Penny-wise, pound-foolish decisions explained by neurons' firingPeople sometimes spend as much time deciding whether to spend a few cents more on groceries as they do deciding whether to spend a few thousand dollars extra when buying a car. A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows that these spending habits may reflect how our brains tally differences in value among objects that vary greatly in worth.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Physicists show how lifeless particles can become 'life-like' by switching behaviorsPhysicists at Emory University have shown how a system of lifeless particles can become 'life-like' by collectively switching back and forth between crystalline and fluid states -- even when the environment remains stable.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New, simplified technique makes light metallic nanofoamA simple method for manufacturing extremely low-density palladium nanofoams could help advance hydrogen storage technologies, reports a new study from UC Davis.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CSIC tightens the noose around superbugsA team led by researchers from the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) has made an important breakthrough in the battle against superbugs and their resistance to multiple drugs. Scientists have designed molecules which can break the cellular mechanisms which lead these bacteria to becoming unaffected by conventional antibiotics. The results of this discovery are published in the latest issue
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Gizmodo
The FDA Is Cracking Down on Claims That Weed Cures Cancer Image: Getty In the US, so far 29 states and DC have legalized medical marijuana, as modern research has suggested that weed can help treat conditions like chronic pain and the side effects of chemotherapy. Some companies, though, are abusing the growing acceptance of weed for medicinal purposes. On Wednesday, the FDA reported that it has sent warning letters to four companies claiming that marij
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New Scientist - News
There is a third species of orangutan and somehow nobody noticedMeet your newest cousin. We thought there were only two species of orangutan, but the discovery of the Tapanuli orangutan means there are three
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New Scientist - News
People with face blindness are missing a ‘hub’ in their brainsPeople who can’t recognise faces have massive differences in how their brains are connected, which could be identified early in life to help kids circumvent the disorder
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New Scientist - News
Why Hawking’s PhD thesis is now an internet-breaking inspirationMillions rushed to freely access Stephen Hawking's early musings when they went online. More of the same would help ignite young minds everywhere, says Geraint Lewis
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Science : NPR
Ex-Trump Campaign Official Withdraws From Nomination Amid Questions In Russia Probe Sam Clovis, who had been tapped for a USDA post, has been pulled into the imbroglio over last year's interference by Russia in U.S. politics and elections. (Image credit: Charlie Neibergall/AP)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Physics explains protein unpredictabilityScientists theorized that they could manipulate a protein one mutation at a time and predict its evolution. They sought to prove it. And failed. They do think, however, that they've found a fundamental truth underlying unpredictability in a biological system.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Learning a mother tongue: A universal process?Specialists in language development in children have studied a traditional population in the Bolivian Amazon, the Tsimane. They show that, on average, less than one minute per hour is spent talking to children under the age of four. This is up to ten times less than for children of the same age in industrialized countries. This observation should prompt us to conduct more studies of this kind in v
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gut bacteria linked to age-related conditionsNew research shows for the first time that an imbalance in the good and bad bacteria in the gut of old mice causes inflammatory responses in young mice -- responses that are linked to age-related conditions such as stroke, dementia and cardiovascular disease. Therapies that target the bacterial composition of the gut in elderly people, through changes to diet and pre- and probiotic supplements, ma
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Artificial neural networks could power up curation of natural history collectionsFed with new knowledge for centuries, natural history collections contain critical data for many scientific endeavors. While recent efforts in mass digitization have already provided unprecedented insight by generating large datasets from these collections, a new pilot project -- one of the first of its kind -- suggests that the key to efficiently studying these data might lie in the new-age deep
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tanning beds and risky behavior linked -- in menEven though men use tanning beds at lower rates than women, men who tan tend to do it in riskier ways, according to a study by researchers at the University of Connecticut. The findings should help public health officials rethink how, and to whom, they're targeting anti-tanning messages.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Blood-clotting protein prevents repair in the brainKaterina Akassoglou, PhD, and her research team at the Gladstone Institutes uncovered a promising new therapeutic strategy to repair myelin in the brain. Surprisingly, it's associated with a protein in the blood.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mindfulness may help mothers cope with stress when their babies have a heart conditionMindfulness may offer an active coping mechanism for mothers faced with the stress of having a newborn diagnosed with congenital heart disease (CHD). Mindfulness, which aims to increase a person's awareness and acceptance of daily experiences, is currently used in a variety of healthcare settings as a potentially effective skill for stress reduction, emotion, affect and attention regulation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How toxic air clouds mental healthUniversity of Washington researchers have found a link between air pollution and psychological distress. The higher the level of particulates in the air, the UW-led study showed, the greater the impact on mental health.The study is believed to be the first to use a nationally representative survey pool, cross-referenced with pollution data at the census block level, to evaluate the connection betw
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Order in disorder: A key feature of dendritic organization in the brainFitzpatrick and colleagues find that synaptic inputs in the visual cortex are locally -- but not globally -- organized. This local functional synaptic clustering applies to a diverse set of inputs and appears to be a fundamental principle of dendritic organization. Future work should reveal more about the source of these clustered inputs and how clusters arise during the development of neural circ
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How do adult brain circuits regulate new neuron production?UNC school of Medicine researchers identified a brain circuit that controls neuron development in the adult brain. It runs from near the front of the brain back to the hippocampus, a learning- and memory-related structure. The finding ultimately could have implications for understanding and treating many brain disorders arising from aberrant hippocampal neurogenesis, including epilepsy, schizophre
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Animals' mitochondria defenses discovered in plantsScientists at EPFL have discovered that the mechanism that mitochondria use to defend mammalian cells against protein-damaging stress also exists in plants. The work is published in Molecular Cell.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sleeping through the snoring: Researchers id neurons that rouse the brain to breatheA common and potentially serious sleep disorder, obstructive sleep apnea affects at least one quarter of U.S. adults and is linked to increased risk of diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular disease. In a paper published today in the journal Neuron, researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) identified specific neural circuitry responsible for rousing the brain of mice in simulated
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New pathway identified as a target for precision medicine against a common brain tumorSt. Jude Children's Research Hospital findings raise hopes for developing combination targeted therapy to treat medulloblastoma and other tumors linked to over-activation of an important signaling pathway.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
SCAI examines strengths and weaknesses of sham PCI trialThis year, SCAI celebrated the forty-year anniversary of a groundbreaking procedure, now known as percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), that has saved millions of lives and enhanced the lives of millions more. Four decades of clinical study have confirmed the benefit of PCI for patients with myocardial ischemia (insufficient blood flow to an area of heart muscle). A new study presented today a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study of heart stents for stable angina highlights potential of placebo effectResearchers at Imperial College London have explored the placebo effects of a coronary angioplasty procedure with stents for the first time.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Preventing a genetic uprising in early lifeAround half of the human genome is made up of genetic parasites called transposons that can damage our genes, leading to a wide range of genetic illnesses. Normally they are controlled by chemical marks that shut down transposon activity, but there is a time early in life when this isn't possible. Research published in Cell Stem Cell from scientists at the Babraham Institute reveals how molecules
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetic history: Searching for the African roots of Noir Marron communitiesScientists from the Anthropologie Moléculaire et Imagerie de Synthèse (CNRS/Université Toulouse III - Paul Sabatier/Paris Descartes University) and Ecological Anthropology and Ethnobiology (CNRS/MNHN) research units have shown that members of Maroon communities in South America -- formed over four centuries ago by Africans who escaped slavery -- have remarkably preserved their African genetic heri
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exercise can counteract side-effects and improve fitness in advanced breast cancer patientsTaking part in regular exercise can reduce fatigue and pain, and improve cardiovascular health and quality of life in women being treated for advanced breast cancer, according to new research presented at the Advanced Breast Cancer Fourth International Consensus Conference.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel technology pioneered by Stanford ties brain circuits to alertnessStanford University investigators have for the first time tied several brain circuits to alertness. The findings enhance scientists' understanding of the forces driving alertness, a brain state that's essential to survival, by showing that diverse cell types throughout the brain together produce this state.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UZH anthropologists describe third orangutan speciesPreviously only two species of orangutans were recognized -- the Bornean and the Sumatran orangutan. Now, UZH researchers working with an international team have described a new great ape species, the Tapanuli orangutan. It is the great ape species at greatest risk of extinction, with only around 800 remaining individuals occurring in upland forest regions of North Sumatra.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Newly discovered orangutan species is 'among the most threatened great apes in the world'Scientists have long recognized six living species of great ape aside from humans: Sumatran and Bornean orangutans, eastern and western gorillas, chimpanzees, and bonobos. But researchers reporting in Current Biology on Nov. 2 have now made it seven, based on a collection of evidence showing that an isolated population of orangutans living in Sumatra is actually its own unique species. They've nam
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Male mammoths more often fell into 'natural traps' and died, DNA evidence suggestsResearchers who have sexed 98 woolly mammoth specimens collected from various parts of Siberia have discovered that the fossilized remains more often came from males of the species than females. They speculate that this skewed sex ratio exists in the fossil record because inexperienced male mammoths more often traveled alone and got themselves killed by falling into natural traps that made their p
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BBC News - Science & Environment
New great ape species identified in IndonesiaThe apes in question were only reported to exist after an expedition into Sumatra mountains in 1997.
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Gizmodo
Japanese Researchers Trick AI Into Thinking 3D-Printed Turtle Is a Rifle Photo: Kyushu University Japanese researchers have used a startlingly simple exploit to trick object recognition AI into classifying a 3D-printed turtle as a rifle. Incredibly, they did it by changing a single pixel. Typically, object-recognition works by complex pattern matching: the software measures the pixels in an image and matches that to an internal blueprint of a given object’s dimensions
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Latest Headlines | Science News
What male bias in the mammoth fossil record says about the animal’s social groupsMale woolly mammoths were more often caught in natural traps that preserved their remains, DNA evidence suggests.
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Professor Sues PNAS Over Paper CriticismsStanford's Mark Jacobson is asking for $10 million in damages after the journal published a critique of his work on renewable energy.
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The Scientist RSS
The Genetic Strategies of Dealing with High AltitudeAndean highlander genomes possess cardiovascular-related variants, while populations from other regions evolved different solutions to manage the lack of oxygen.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Newly discovered orangutan species is also the most endangered The first new species of great ape described in more than eight decades faces threats to its habitat. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22934
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Science : NPR
Writing On The Terrifying Beauty Of The Human Future Author Kim Stanley Robinson deserves a place as a true visionary: He has done more than just write good science-fiction — he's mapped out new territory in what it means to be human, says Adam Frank. (Image credit: SFX Magazine/Getty Images)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google and AutoNation partner on self-driving car programGoogle is partnering with AutoNation, the country's largest auto dealership chain, in its push to produce self-driving cars for wide use.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Atmospheric beacons guide NASA scientists in search for lifeSome exoplanets shine brighter than others in the search for life beyond the solar system. New NASA research proposes a novel approach to sniffing out exoplanet atmospheres. It takes advantage of frequent stellar storms—which hurl huge clouds of stellar material and radiation into space—from cool, young dwarf stars to highlight signs of habitable exoplanets.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dioxane-chomping microbe has helpful geneRice University researchers have discovered a bacteria-borne gene that helps degrade a form of dioxane, a groundwater contaminant and suspected carcinogen. The discovery could be the basis for a much-needed tool to decide how contaminated sites should be treated.
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Gizmodo
Deadspin George Springer Was The Start Of Something Great | Jezebel Richard Branson Launches Adults- Deadspin George Springer Was The Start Of Something Great | Jezebel Richard Branson Launches Adults-Only Cruise, Which Is Still Not Enough to Make Cruises Good | The Root Kevin Spacey and the Damage Done | Earther Scientists Just Found Another Vulnerability in Antarctica’s Icy Armor | Splinter Trump’s Nominee for Top Science Post Confirms He Has Literally Zero Hard Science Experience |
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Navigating the genome to cure deafnessA new study solves a critical piece of the puzzle of human deafness by identifying the first group of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in the auditory system.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Electrostatic force takes charge in bioinspired polymersResearchers have taken the first steps toward gaining control over the self-assembly of synthetic materials in the same way that biology forms natural polymers. This advance could prove useful in designing new bioinspired, smart materials for applications ranging from drug delivery to sensing to remediation of environmental contaminants.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New system for treating colorectal cancer can lead to complete cureResearchers have developed a new, three-step system that uses nuclear medicine to target and eliminate colorectal cancer. In this study with a mouse model, researchers achieved a 100-percent cure rate -- without any treatment-related toxic effects.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New treatment approach for autoimmune disorderResearchers have been able to improve their understanding of the key mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of a serious autoimmune disease. For the first time, researchers were able to demonstrate a close link between the activation of programmed cell death, complement system activation, and organ damage in patients with systemic inflammation of blood vessels caused by 'ANCA antibodies'.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cancer cells destroyed with dense metal found in asteroidsCancer cells can be targeted and destroyed with the metal from the asteroid that caused the extinction of the dinosaurs, according to new research.
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Science | The Guardian
New species of orangutan discovered in Sumatra – and is already endangered Scientists identify new species of great ape, Pongo tapanuliensis or Tapanuli orangutan, but fear its survival is already in doubt as habitat under threat A new species of great ape has been discovered, according to scientists studying a small population of orangutans in northern Sumatra. Among the great apes – a group that also includes humans, gorillas, chimpanzees and bonobos – orangutans are
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Live Science
Trapped! Woolly Mammoth Bachelors Often Met Disastrous EndsPity the male woolly mammoth: These poor creatures were more likely to meet their end in natural traps — falling through thin ice, tumbling into holes or getting stuck in mudflows — than their female counterparts, a new study finds.
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Gizmodo
There's a New Species of Orangutan and It's Already in Danger Image: Maxime Aliaga All of the orangutans in the world would probably only fit into a college football stadium. Today, scientists are announcing that just one of the sections of that stadium is actually an entirely different species. And it’s already in danger. The international team identified Pongo tapanuliensis based on skull shape and genetic data from an isolated population of 800 orangutan
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The Economist: The world this week
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The Economist: The world this week
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The Economist: The world this week
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Genetic history: Searching for the African roots of Noir Marron communitiesNew genetic data bear witness to transatlantic ties severed by slavery and triangular trade. Scientists from the Anthropologie Moléculaire et Imagerie de Synthèse (CNRS/Université Toulouse III - Paul Sabatier/Paris Descartes University) and Ecological Anthropology and Ethnobiology (CNRS/MNHN) research units have shown that members of Maroon communities in South America - formed over four centuries
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Preventing a genetic uprising in early lifeMolecules called endosiRNAs help us avoid genetic chaos, according to a new study from a team at the Babraham Institute. Much of the human genome contains pieces of DNA called transposons, a form of genetic parasite. When active, transposons can damage genes so it is important to keep them inactive. Early in the human life cycle controlling transposons is particularly difficult. This latest resear
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Animals' mitochondria defenses discovered in plantsMitochondria are cell organelles that play critical roles in maintaining the cell's health, or homeostasis. One way that mitochondria do this is by harvesting energy though oxidative phosphorylation, where various enzymes in the mitochondria release energy to produce the molecule ATP, the cell's "energy currency" that can be used in other processes. This is why mitochondria are often described as
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Anthropologists describe third orangutan speciesScientists have long recognized six living species of great ape aside from humans: Sumatran and Bornean orangutans, eastern and western gorillas, chimpanzees, and bonobos. But researchers reporting in Current Biology on November 2 have now made it seven, based on a collection of evidence showing that an isolated population of orangutans living in Sumatra is actually its own unique species. They've
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Male mammoths more often fell into 'natural traps' and died, DNA evidence suggestsResearchers who have sexed 98 woolly mammoth specimens collected from various parts of Siberia have discovered that the fossilized remains more often came from males of the species than females. They speculate that this skewed sex ratio—seven out of every ten specimens examined belonged to males—exists in the fossil record because inexperienced male mammoths more often travelled alone and got them
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NYT > Science
New Orangutan Species Could Be the Most Endangered Great ApeThe scientists who identified the Tapanuli orangutan said there are only about 800 left, making them the most endangered of all great ape species.
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NYT > Science
‘Unbelievable’: Heart Stents Fail to Ease Chest PainWith a sham treatment, British researchers found that a common and often costly cardiac procedure does not relieve discomfort.
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Popular Science
How much of your life do you spend eating? Grooming? Watching TV? Science A day in the life of an average American. How long do you spend working, watching TV, and grooming yourself each day? This chart breaks down what Americans of different ages do with our waking hours.
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The Atlantic
Scientists Identify a Third Orangutan Species By the time they got to the orangutan, it was already dying. In the Batang Toru forest, on the western flank of Sumatra, orangutans will often venture from the jungle to pick fruit from nearby gardens—a habit that puts them in conflict with villagers. In November 2013, the conservationist Matthew Nowak got word of one such conflict, and his veterinary colleagues went to investigate. They arrived
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New insights into the release of molecules involved in inflammatory diseasesIn a recent study published in Cell Reports, a research team led by Colin Adrain, from the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência (IGC, Portugal), discovered the mechanism that controls the release of important molecules that trigger the inflammatory response during the clearance of infections. When this machinery is deregulated it can contribute to important chronic diseases such as inflammatory bowel d
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dioxane-chomping microbe has helpful geneRice University researchers have discovered a bacteria-borne gene that triggers the degradation of dioxane, a groundwater contaminant and suspected carcinogen. The discovery could lead to a tool that helps decide how to treat contaminated sites.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Family favoritism: Younger siblings impacted moreA new study shows if a younger sibling feels like they're the favorite and their parents agree, their relationship is strengthened. With older siblings, whether they feel favored or not, it has no major effect on the relationship.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
University of Guelph study first to identify the cells driving gecko's ability to re-grow its tailA U of G researcher has discovered the spinal cord of the gecko's tail houses a special type of stem cell known as the radial glia. When the tail detaches, these cells jump into action by proliferating and making different proteins in response to the injury. The result is a brand new spinal cord. This finding has implications for developing a way to treat humans with spinal cord injuries.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Removing digital devices from the bedroom can improve sleep for children, teensRemoving electronic media from the bedroom and encouraging a calming bedtime routine are among recommendations Penn State researchers outline in a recent manuscript on digital media and sleep in childhood and adolescence.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Atmospheric beacons guide NASA scientists in search for lifeNew NASA research proposes a novel approach to sniffing out exoplanet atmospheres. It takes advantage of frequent stellar storms from cool, young dwarf stars to highlight signs of possible life.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chip-based sensors with incredible sensitivityIn London's St. Paul's Cathedral, a whisper can be heard far across the circular whispering gallery as the sound curves around the walls. Now, an optical whispering gallery mode resonator developed by Penn State electrical engineers can spin light around the circumference of a tiny sphere millions of times, creating an ultrasensitive microchip-based sensor for multiple applications.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
No more than 800 orangutans from this newly identified species remainEndangered population of orangutans is the oldest surviving red ape lineage, a new study finds.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Infusions of Young Blood Tested in Patients with DementiaThe controversial approach aims to rejuvenate old tissue -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
Report: Trump Organization Has Been Compromised by Hackers for Years Photo: Getty Security researchers have discovered evidence that hackers were able to register at least 250 shadow domains under the umbrella of the Trump Organization. These subdomains are associated with Russian IP addresses and appear to have ties to possible malware campaigns. The subdomains have been active as recently as last week. Mother Jones reports that it was first contacted by an unnam
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Gizmodo
Thursday's Best Deals: Surround Sound Speakers, Cordless Vacuum, Plasma Lighter, and More We start off today’s deals with surround sound speakers , a battery-powered lighter , a Hoover cordless vacuum , and much more. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. TOP TECH DEALS Refurb Echo Dot , $35 Amazon usually sells certified refurbished Echo Dots for $5 less than new models, but for now at least, that discount has increased to $15. Refurbished Dots still car
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Constructing buildings with re-useable componentsThe Institute for Civil Engineering and Environment (INCEEN) at the University of Luxembourg have signed a "memorandum of understanding" with the Suisse Federal Laboratories of Materials Science and Technology (Empa) of the domain of ETH Zürich to collaborate on research on energy efficiency in the construction sector.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chip-based sensors with incredible sensitivityIn London's St. Paul's Cathedral, a whisper can be heard far across the circular whispering gallery as the sound curves around the walls. Now, an optical whispering gallery mode resonator developed by Penn State electrical engineers can spin light around the circumference of a tiny sphere millions of times, creating an ultrasensitive microchip-based sensor for multiple applications.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Students explore immigration through a big data lensSupercomputers have helped scientists discover merging black holes and design new nanomaterials, but can they help solve society's most challenging policy issues?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Picture this SELFI: NASA advances instrument to study the plumes of EnceladusNASA scientists and engineers have conceived and plan to build an ambitious submillimeter-wave or radio instrument to study the composition of geysers spewing water vapor and icy particles from the south pole of Saturn's small moon, Enceladus.
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Ars Technica
Bitcoin blows past $7,000, double its value in mid-September Enlarge (credit: Bitcoin Charts ) Six weeks ago, it looked like Bitcoin's latest boom might be coming to an end. The virtual currency had been worth almost $5,000 in early September, but then Chinese regulators announced a harsh crackdown on China's Bitcoin economy. On September 15, Bitcoin's price reached a low of $3,000. But then the currency bounced back, and it has been on a tear ever since.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UGA, Sanofi Pasteur develop new broadly protective vaccines for H3N2 influenzaResearchers have developed a vaccine candidate that protects against multiple co-circulating strains of H3N2 influenza isolated over five seasons following testing in mouse and ferret models.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More time on social media is not linked to poor mental healthThere has so far been no evidence supporting the view that the amount of time spent on social media affects mental health in young people, says Chloe Berryman of the University of Central Florida in the US. She is the lead author of a study in Springer's journal Psychiatric Quarterly that found very few links between different aspects of social media use among young adults and possible mental heal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers achieve 4-D printing of programmable shape-changing structuresA new study describes 3-D printing of Shape Memory Polymers to produce active meta-materials that can be programmed to form versatile shapes and are then able to recover their original state when heated to above their activation temperatures.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Penn researchers working to mimic giant clams to enhance the production of biofuelResearchers at the University of Pennsylvania are working together to create an artificial system that mimics the process by which giant clams convert sunlight into energy. The research may allow them to enhance the efficiency of biofuel production.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Warm air helped make 2017 ozone hole smallest since 1988Measurements from satellites this year showed the hole in Earth's ozone layer that forms over Antarctica each September was the smallest observed since 1988, scientists from NASA and NOAA announced today.
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Feed: All Latest
The 11 Best Comic Book Movies You Can Stream Right Now, From 'Batman' to 'Doctor Strange'Here's what to stream in between seeing 'Thor: Ragnarok' and 'Justice League' at the multiplex.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers working to mimic giant clams to enhance the production of biofuelAlison Sweeney of the University of Pennsylvania has been studying giant clams since she was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, Santa Barbara. These large mollusks, which anchor themselves to coral reefs in the tropical waters of the Indian and Pacific oceans, can grow to up to three-feet long and weigh hundreds of pounds. But their size isn't the only thing that makes them uni
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers achieve 4-D printing of programmable shape-changing structuresA new study describes 3D printing of Shape Memory Polymers to produce active meta-materials that can be programmed to form versatile shapes and are then able to recover their original state when heated to above their activation temperatures. This innovative combination of 3D printing, thermoviscoelastic meta-materials, and programmable design to create 4D shape-transforming structures is reported
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Warm air helped make 2017 ozone hole smallest since 1988Measurements from satellites this year showed the hole in Earth's ozone layer that forms over Antarctica each September was the smallest observed since 1988, scientists from NASA and NOAA announced today.
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Scientific American Content: Global
How Wind Might Nudge a Sleeping Giant in AntarcticaScientists are increasingly worried about the Totten Ice Shelf's vulnerability to warm ocean water -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic
The Surprising Revolt at the Most Liberal College in the Country At Reed College, a small liberal-arts school in Portland, Oregon, a 39-year-old Saturday Night Live skit recently caused an uproar over cultural appropriation. In the classic Steve Martin skit, he performs a goofy song, “King Tut,” meant to satirize a Tutankhamun exhibit touring the U.S. and to criticize the commercialization of Egyptian culture. You could say that his critique is weak; that his
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Ars Technica
USS McCain collision ultimately caused by UI confusion Enlarge / Tugboats from Singapore assist the guided-missile destroyer USS John S. McCain (DDG 56) as it steers toward Changi Naval Base, Republic of Singapore, following a collision with the merchant vessel Alnic MC while underway east of the Straits of Malacca and Singapore on August 21. Ten sailors died in the collision. On November 1, the US Navy issued its report on the collisions of the USS
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists decipher mechanisms underlying the biology of agingScientists have helped decipher the dynamics that control how our cells age, and with it implications for extending human longevity. The group employed a combination of technologies to analyze molecular processes that influence aging. Using cutting-edge computational and experimental approaches the scientists discovered that a complete loss of chromatin silencing leads to accelerated cell aging an
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Foraminifer shells much more susceptible to ocean acidification than previously thoughtThe carbonate shells of tiny marine plankton, foraminifers, are important archives of geochemical records of past climates. Now researchers have discovered that, contrary to long-standing textbook knowledge, these shells do not form as calcite, but instead, are originally formed as the metastable carbonate vaterite and only later transform into calcite. The presence of vaterite instead of calcite
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Childhood spankings can lead to adult mental health problemsGetting spanked as a child can lead to a host of mental health problems in adulthood, say researchers.
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Ingeniøren
Byggeforsker: Fyring og flytning giver blot mere uroTransportministeren er gået mere efter at signalere handlekraft end efter faktisk at forbedre Bygningsstyrelsens evne til at styre store og svære byggerier, mener byggeforsker.
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Ingeniøren
Danske organisationer sårbare over for selv små DDoS-angreb Selv mindre DDoS-angreb kan nedlægge en organisation, eksempelvis hvis firewallen kører på standardindstillinger. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/kramshoej-angreb-mod-ministerium-danske-organisationer-saarbare-overfor-selv-smaa-ddos Version2 Forside relaterede artikler Efterretningstjeneste: International mediedækning øgede risiko for flere angreb mod Støjbergs ministerium
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Gizmodo
So What the Hell Is Ragnarok, Anyway? Image: Marvel Comics. Thor #85 art by Andrea DiVito and Laura Villari. This week, Thor: Ragnarok hits theaters—but its titular apocalypse is more than a casual allusion to the Norse mythology that Marvel’s hero originates from. It’s a reference to an event in the comics that has hounded the God of Thunder since his adventures first began. Here’s everything you need to know about it before you go
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Science | The Guardian
'It was a different era': how people understand the concept of time What defines ‘another era’ – and how does the brain perceive and process the passage of time anyway? It’s actually more chaotic than you might think Michael Fallon’s recent and rapid fall from grace has been commented on substantially already. But one thing many are picking up on is his questionable claim that the incidents were more “acceptable” 10 to 15 years ago . Looked at one way, this is an
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Innovative statistical methods shed light on extent of modern slavery in US, worldPolicymakers, law enforcement and advocates can now better identify and target modern slavery thanks to the work of human rights experts and researchers whose application of unique statistical methods yields more precise figures on its existence and extent. The groundbreaking work appears in the October issue of Chance, which features a series of articles written by authority figures on the subjec
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New on MIT Technology Review
Waymo’s Car Maintenance Deal Is Another Hint at Impending Commercial Plans
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A bit of a 'quantum magic trick': Experiment shows how to speed up frequency measurementIs there a faster way to determine a frequency? It turns out there is.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fifty-years of data from a 'living' oxygen minimum lab could help predict the oceans' futureResearchers have released 50 years' worth of data chronicling the deoxygenating cycles of a fjord off Canada's west coast, and detailing the response of the microbial communities inhabiting the fjord. The mass of data, collected in two related articles, could help scientists better predict the impact of human activities and ocean deoxygenation on marine environments.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Loose-fill asbestos insulation and healthA landmark study into the health impacts of living in a house with loose-fill asbestos insulation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA spots Tropical Storm Damrey headed west in South China SeaNASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite flew over the South China Sea and captured a visible image of newly formed Tropical Storm Damrey as it moved on a westerly track toward Vietnam.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Innovative statistical methods shed light on extent of modern slavery in US, worldPolicymakers, law enforcement and advocates can now better identify and target modern slavery thanks to the work of human rights experts and researchers whose application of unique statistical methods yields more precise figures on its existence and extent. The groundbreaking work appears in the October issue of CHANCE, which features a series of articles written by authority figures on the subjec
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Noninvasive procedure is superior to steroid injection for painful knee osteoarthritisFor patients with osteoarthritis of the knee, a minimally invasive procedure called cooled radiofrequency ablation (CRFA) provides better pain reduction and functional improvement compared to steroid injection of the knee, concludes a study in Regional Anesthesia & Pain Medicine, published by Wolters Kluwer.
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Dagens Medicin
Besparelser rammer Nordjylland i 2018 Sundhedsområdet i Region Nordjylland skal spare omkring 150 mio. på næste års budget.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA spots Tropical Storm Damrey headed west in South China SeaNASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite flew over the South China Sea and captured a visible image of newly formed Tropical Storm Damrey as it moved on a westerly track toward Vietnam.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Integrated technologies to recover metal and plastic from electronic wasteVTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has developed a new electronic waste recycling concept that combines a range of technologies and reduces waste. One of the technologies included in the concept is gasification, which is used to recover not only metals and rare-earth elements from the waste but also organic components that can be used to produce energy or products, such as plastic and chemic
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Gizmodo
The Rocky Mountains Painted With the Colors of Fall Are a Treat For Your Eyes GIF Shot on location at the Rocky Mountain National Park, the latest timelapse from More Than Just Parks captures the beauty of the iconic mountain range through all four seasons. But the highlight is undoubtedly when the stunning colors of Fall arrive, turning the park into a living painting. The short film is also a good way to justify that 4K TV you’ve been debating, because watching Rocky Mou
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Futurity.org
Divorce risk rises when wives feel more tension A mismatch in feelings of tension within a marriage could set the stage for divorce, a new study suggests. Increased tension among wives was particularly problematic for marital longevity when their husbands reported low levels of tension over time, the research finds. “People in the same relationships have different ideas about the quality of their tie…” Researchers followed 355 couples over the
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Gizmodo
Thousands of Venomous Portuguese Man O’ Wars Wash Ashore in Australia: ‘It Was the Stuff Of Nightmares’ Late last week, an Australian couple stumbled upon a freaky scene in which thousands of Portuguese man o’ wars, also known as bluebottles, had washed up on the rocks just south of Bateman’s Bay in New South Wales. Disturbingly, it’s a sight we’re going to have to get used to in our warming world. Brett Wallensky and his partner Claudia spotted the scene while walking along Barlings beach on Frida
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Scientific American Content: Global
Stop Doing Companies' Digital Busywork for FreeConsumer technologies—whether user reviews and recommendations, social media or health care portals—involve logistical effort that means more administrative work at home. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Several reasons why whole grains are healthyWhen overweight adults exchange refined grain products -- such as white bread and pasta -- with whole grain varieties, they eat less, they lose weight and the amount of inflammation in their bodies decreases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Absentee Dads affect how women interpret interest from menNew research finds that women who were reminded of a time that their dad was absent from their lives -- or who actually experienced poor quality fathering while growing up -- perceived greater mating intent in the described behaviors of a hypothetical male dating partner and when talking with a man. These women also 'saw' more sexual arousal when viewing images of men's faces.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
50-years of data from a 'living oxygen minimum' lab could help predict the oceans' futureCanadian and US Department of Energy researchers have released 50 years' worth of data chronicling the deoxygenating cycles of a fjord off Canada's west coast, and detailing the response of the microbial communities inhabiting the fjord.
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Popular Science
Autumn isn’t cold enough to kill bugs anymore—find out what pests will persist in your region Environment Pumpkin spice and mosquito bites. A warmer than average summer combined with predictions for a warm fall means that pests might be coming to get you.
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Ingeniøren
Dansk test: Regnvejr giver selvkørende biler problemerEn ny test fra Vejdirektoratet viser, at selvkørende biler har sværere ved at aflæse vejstriber i vådt vejr. Der er dog stor forskel på bilernes formåen.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What mitigates the consequences of recession for companies?Experts of the Higher School of Economics (HSE) demonstrated that companies with foreign ownership have an easier time overcoming the consequences of economic recessions. The results of the study were presented in the paper 'Lean against the wind: The moderation effect of foreign investments during the economic recession in Russia' published by the Journal of Economics and Business: http://www.sci
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New treatment approach for autoimmune disorderResearchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have been able to improve their understanding of the key mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of a serious autoimmune disease. For the first time, researchers were able to demonstrate a close link between the activation of programmed cell death, complement system activation, and organ damage in patients with systemic inflammation of blood ves
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists decipher mechanisms underlying the biology of agingUnderstanding the factors that control aging has been one of humanity's endless pursuits, from the mystical fountain of youth to practical healthful regimens to prolong life expectancy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Electrostatic force takes charge in bioinspired polymersResearchers at the University of Illinois and the University of Massachusetts, Amherst have taken the first steps toward gaining control over the self-assembly of synthetic materials in the same way that biology forms natural polymers. This advance could prove useful in designing new bioinspired, smart materials for applications ranging from drug delivery to sensing to remediation of environmental
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Ants were among the world’s first farmers50 years ago, researchers began unraveling the secrets to Attine ants’ green thumbs.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Squashed in Space: Study Identifies Changes in Astronauts' BrainsThe NASA-funded work compares MRIs before and after trips -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Stem cell laboratory in a bagHuman stem cells are considered a major new hope in the field of medicine. In the future, it is expected that they will make it possible to treat a wide range of ailments such as neurodegenerative diseases. With LabBag, Fraunhofer researchers have developed an all-in-one system in the form of a transparent bag that provides a cheap, fast and sterile way for scientists to grow, differentiate and fr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists discover hidden chamber in Egypt's Great PyramidScientists say they have found a hidden chamber in Egypt's Great Pyramid of Giza, in what would be the first such discovery in the structure since the 19th century and one likely to spark a new surge of interest in the pharaohs.
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Dagens Medicin
Alvorlige bivirkninger i sundhedsvæsenet Standardiserede systemer rulles i stor stil ud på landets hospitaler – senest med den udskældte Sundhedsplatformen – og tager ikke altid højde for den kliniske praksis. Djøfferne skældes ud, men lægerne har ofte selv et ansvar for at hive nye systemer hjem, siger Kirstine Zinck Pedersen, CBS, som er specialist i sundhedsvæsenets organisering.
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Dagens Medicin
Hospital planlægger at lukke akutklinik i GentofteEtablering af akuthus vil føre til omlægninger, meddeler direktionen på Herlev-Gentofte Hospital.
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Futurity.org
Gut inflammation linked to broken cellular ‘recycling’ Gut inflammation may be linked to a common cellular process, researchers report. The new research demonstrates that autophagy—an essential process whereby cells break down and recycle harmful or damaged elements within themselves to keep our bodies healthy—causes tissue inflammation when dysfunctional, which in turn leaves us susceptible to harmful diseases, particularly in the gut. Understanding
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study offers insights into a dog's life in families with childrenMillions of families know how rewarding and enjoyable dog ownership can be – but now a new study has for the first time examined the quality of life for a pet dog owned by a family with children.
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Live Science
TL;DR: Here's the One Thing Scientists Want You to Know About Their FieldsScientists describe a fascinating tidbit about their work in 140 characters or less.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Artificial neural networks could power up curation of natural history collectionsMillions, if not billions, of specimens reside in the world's natural history collections, but most of these have not been carefully studied, or even looked at, in decades. While containing critical data for many scientific endeavors, most objects are quietly sitting in their own little cabinets of curiosity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New system for treating colorectal cancer can lead to complete cureResearchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City and Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Boston have developed a new, three-step system that uses nuclear medicine to target and eliminate colorectal cancer. In this study with a mouse model, researchers achieved a 100-percent cure rate -- without any treatment-related toxic effects. The study is reported in the November fe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Carbonate shells change with timeThe carbonate shells of tiny marine plankton, foraminifers, are important archives of geochemical records of past climates. Now researchers have discovered that, contrary to long-standing textbook knowledge, these shells do not form as calcite, but instead, are originally formed as the metastable carbonate vaterite and only later transform into calcite. The presence of vaterite instead of calcite
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Electrostatic force takes charge in bioinspired polymersResearchers at the University of Illinois and the University of Massachusetts, Amherst have taken the first steps toward gaining control over the self-assembly of synthetic materials in the same way that biology forms natural polymers. This advance could prove useful in designing new bioinspired, smart materials for applications ranging from drug delivery to sensing to remediation of environmental
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Onalespib could be an effective treatment for glioblastoma, preclinical studies showThis study showed that the targeted drug onalespib reduced the expression of cell-survival proteins such as AKT and endothelial growth factor receptor in glioma cell lines and glioma stem cells from patient tumors. This, in turn, reduced the survival, proliferation, invasion and migration of the cells. In animal models of glioblastoma the agent crossed the blood-brain barrier and showed effectiven
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Navigating the genome to cure deafnessA new Tel Aviv University study solves a critical piece of the puzzle of human deafness by identifying the first group of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in the auditory system.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Childhood spankings can lead to adult mental health problemsGetting spanked as a child can lead to a host of mental health problems in adulthood, say University of Michigan researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists decipher mechanisms underlying the biology of agingScientists have helped decipher the dynamics that control how our cells age, and with it implications for extending human longevity. The group employed a combination of technologies to analyze molecular processes that influence aging. Using cutting-edge computational and experimental approaches the scientists discovered that a complete loss of chromatin silencing leads to accelerated cell aging an
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Synergy stent with shorter DAPT is superior to a bare-metal stent in elderly patientsElderly patients undergoing PCI often receive bare-metal stents (BMS) instead of drug-eluting stents (DES) to shorten the duration of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) and reduce bleeding risk. However, results from the SENIOR trial found that compared with BMS, shorter DAPT combined with the Synergy bioabsorbable polymer DES leads to less adverse events without increasing bleeding risk.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Results from the DAPT STEMI trial reported at TCT 2017The first trial to evaluate the safety of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) for less than 12 months in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) found six months of DAPT was non-inferior to 12 months of DAPT among patients treated with second-generation drug-eluting stents (DES).
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The Atlantic
An Astros Win Ends a Wildly Entertaining World Series The weather—a record-setting 103 degrees at first pitch in Game 1 in Dodger Stadium—tried to warn viewers that this would be a World Series of extremes. That first pitch seems forever ago now, because so much baseball, over so many hours, has transpired since. The Houston Astros defeated the Los Angeles Dodgers Wednesday night, 5–1, to secure the first title in their franchise’s 55-year history,
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The Atlantic
Catalonia Is Becoming Europe’s Problem The European Union has gone out of its way to stay out of the crisis in Catalonia, which came to a head last week when the northeastern region’s parliament voted in favor of declaring independence from Spain—a move rejected by Madrid and left unrecognized by just about everyone else. Since the escalation of the territorial dispute last month, EU leaders have insisted Catalonia’s October 1 indepen
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
AR glasses help surgeons when operating on tumorsMalignant tumors often form metastases that spread to other parts of the body via the lymphatic system. High surgical skills are required to identify the precise location of the affected lymph nodes, enabling them to be completely removed. Fraunhofer researchers have developed a navigation aid that simplifies such interventions. 3-D-ARILE is an augmented reality (AR) system that superimposes a vir
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
2016 atmospheric carbon dioxide surges to levels not seen in 800,000 yearsAccording to the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) the level of CO2 recorded in earth's atmosphere in 2016 was up 50 % on that of last ten-year average.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Simple, rapid determination of cable propertiesTrying to fit all the necessary cables into a car is anything but an easy task. Simulations can be helpful, but the properties of each cable need to be precisely defined up front. The automated MeSOMICS measurement system enables carmakers, for the first time, to define these parameters simply and rapidly, without having to call on outside experts: a solution that saves time and money.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physics explains protein unpredictabilityUniversity of Oregon scientists theorized that they could manipulate a protein one mutation at a time and predict its evolution. They sought to prove it. And failed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers document transformation of graphite into hexagonal diamondA new study by Washington State University researchers answers longstanding questions about the formation of a rare type of diamond during major meteorite strikes.
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Ars Technica
Chevy’s Bolt EV outsells Tesla for the first time in October Enlarge / These are becoming a more common sight on our roads. (credit: Chevrolet) Electric vehicle sales continue to increase this year, according to Inside EVs . Although some results have yet to be reported, the site estimates that 50 percent more battery and plug-in hybrid EVs found homes in October 2017 than the year before. And head and shoulders above them all was the Chevrolet Bolt EV. Ch
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
The surprisingly charming science of your gut | Giulia EndersEver wonder how we poop? Learn about the gut -- the system where digestion (and a whole lot more) happens -- as doctor and author Giulia Enders takes us inside the complex, fascinating science behind it, including its connection to mental health. It turns out, looking closer at something we might shy away from can leave us feeling more fearless and appreciative of ourselves.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why do some obese people have 'healthier' fat tissue than others?One little understood paradox in the study of obesity is that overweight people who break down fat at a high rate are less healthy than peers who store their fat more effectively.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Trump's Opioid Panel Wants More Treatment Options and Drug CourtsThe commission put no dollar figure on how much it would cost to support its solutions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
NASA Rocket Scientists Carve the Most Incredible Pumpkins GIF Here’s the thing about NASA’s rocket scientists: They’re smart. And maybe a little weird. When you get literal rocket scientists to channel their energy into something silly like a pumpkin carving contest, the results are bound to be incredible. Seriously: Two groups at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory has been running their pumpkin carving contest since 2011 (which we cover pretty much every
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Australian tourism policies fail to address climate changeAustralia's Federal and State governments are failing to produce effective long-term tourism policy to address climate change, according to the findings of new QUT-led research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A bit of a 'quantum magic trick'—experiment shows how to speed up frequency measurementAn accurate analog clock tick-tick-ticks with a constant precision and well known frequency: one tick per second. The longer you let it tick, the better to test its accuracy —10 times as long corresponds to a ten-fold improvement in any frequency uncertainty. But is there a faster way to determine a frequency?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Health treatment through chemical synthesisIntroducing molecular complexity through the shortest possible route – this is the daily business of Vittorio Pace. In an interview with uni:view, the pharmaceutical chemist explains what this means exactly, what his latest achievements are and how they contribute to solving serious health issues.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Horses can read our body language, even when they don't know usHorses can tell the difference between dominant and submissive body postures in humans, even when the humans are not familiar to them, according to a new University of Sussex-led study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ions in the spotlightThe results of a research group from the Institute of Physics at the University of Freiburg has been given a special place in Nature Photonics. An accompanying "News & Views" article in the print version of the science journal highlights the work of the team led by Alexander Lambrecht, Julian Schmidt, Dr. Leon Karpa and Prof. Dr. Tobias Schätz. In their article "Long lifetimes and effective isolati
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hard to solve a Rubik's cube? Try the adaptive toolbox theory on rationalityContrary to what cognitive scientists long thought, the adaptive toolbox theory - a theory about human rationality - contains an NP-hard problem which asks for demonic computational powers just like the travelling salesman problem and the Rubik's Cube. Maria Otworowska, Iris van Rooij, and colleagues from Radboud University publish these findings in Cognitive Science.
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Futurity.org
Blood pressure drug in a gel heals wounds faster A topical gel made from a common type of blood pressure pill may offer a way to speed up healing of chronic skin wounds. The findings in a study with mice and pigs may lead to use of the gel on treatment-resistant skin wounds among diabetics and others, particularly older adults. “The FDA has not issued any new drug approval for wound healing in the past 10 years,” says Peter Abadir, associate pr
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The Atlantic
Lady Bird Is a Sensational Paean to Teenage Life Christine McPherson (Saoirse Ronan) is someone cursed with that familiar, often painful, gift of youth—absolute certainty. She feels everything strongly, expresses her opinions loudly, and both wounds and charms the people around her without meaning to. On the brink of adulthood, she’s resolute enough about her desire to go to college on the East Coast (far from her home of Sacramento) that she t
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Dagens Medicin
Ny behandling af aggressiv form for lymfekræft godkendt i USAAmerikanske myndigheder godkender Calquence, som er et nyt middel mod Mantle celle lymfom.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, November 2017Story tips from ORNL, November 2017: Fast-learning computing technique supports hurricane damage assessments; neutrons unlock liquid flow mystery; 'puckering' 2D material creates tunable energy gap; window air conditioning prototype allows safe use of propane refrigerant; graphene nanoribbons become semiconductors through precise electrical contacts.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cancer cells destroyed with dinosaur extinction metalCancer cells can be targeted and destroyed with the metal from the asteroid that caused the extinction of the dinosaurs, according to new research by an international collaboration between the University of Warwick and Sun Yat-Sen University in China.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fifty years of data from a 'living' oxygen minimum lab could help predict the oceans' futureCanadian and US Department of Energy researchers have released 50 years' worth of data chronicling the deoxygenating cycles of a fjord off Canada's west coast, and detailing the response of the microbial communities inhabiting the fjord. The mass of data, collected in two new Nature family papers, could help scientists better predict the impact of human activities and ocean deoxygenation on marine
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A bit of a 'quantum magic trick'Is there a faster way to determine a frequency? It turns out there is, in a new discovery published this week in Physical Review Letters by a collaboration between a Washington University in St. Louis professor and graduate student along with a University of Rochester researcher.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mexican doctors safely reuse donated pacemakers after sterilisationMexican doctors have safely reused donated pacemakers after sterilisation, shows a study presented at the 30th Mexican Congress of Cardiology. The findings create the possibility for patients to receive a pacemaker who otherwise could not afford one.
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Gizmodo
10 Tricks to Make Yourself a Google Pixel 2 Master Image: Gizmodo Oh picked up a shiny new Google Pixel 2 or Pixel 2 XL did you? Not had to return it due to screen or audio issues? Wanting to dig a little deeper into the neat features that are available on Google’s own-brand smartphone? Well, you’ve come to the right place—here are 10 tricks to do more with your Pixel 2 or Pixel 2 XL phone. 1) See your Now Playing history Image: Screenshot You’ve
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wanting revenge is only natural – here's whyIn this twilight period of Halloween and the Day of the Dead, and with Bonfire Night imminent, the scary and the weird invade our streets and people gather to watch horror revenge tales at home or the cinema. Revenge in fiction can be shocking, but it often embeds a moral message. There is heroic revenge, a staple of the American movie world, in which the determined hero or anti-hero acts against
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
More than just financial loss, the social impact of gambling cannot be underestimatedThe UK government is mulling a review of the regulations on fixed odds betting terminals commonly found in pubs and betting shops, in order to reduce the risk of problem gambling developing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cancer cells destroyed with metal from the asteroid that killed the dinosaursCancer cells can be targeted and destroyed with the metal from the asteroid that caused the extinction of the dinosaurs, according to new research by an international collaboration between the University of Warwick and Sun Yat-Sen University in China.
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Ars Technica
New Last Jedi trailer has a scene that will tug at fans’ heart strings A new trailer for Star Wars: The Last Jedi was released during Game 7 of the World Series last night. It starts with a nostalgia-inducing shot of a grey-bearded Luke Skywalker walking into the cockpit of the Millennium Falcon. Then there's a voiceover from Kylo Ren, the villain of the third trilogy, saying "let the past die." Of course, the eighth installment of the Star Wars saga has no intentio
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New on MIT Technology Review
Robots Aren’t as Smart as You ThinkAs robots get good at mimicking human behavior, people can be deceived into thinking they have human intelligence. So let’s put them to the test.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Weightlifters and divers offer a lesson for business in risk and rewardWhat do elite weightlifting and diving competitions have in common with top-level money management or pharmaceutical development?
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Gizmodo
Grab Your Women of NASA LEGO Set Before It Falls Out of Orbit LEGO Women of NASA , $25 Update : Sold out LEGO’s brand new Women of NASA set just launched, and we suspect it’ll be hard to find this holiday season. So if you want one for yourself, or to give as a gift, blast off to Amazon and get your order in .
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Feed: All Latest
Workers Displaced by Automation Could Become Caregivers for HumansOpinion: You don’t want a robot taking care of your baby; the aged need to be loved, to be listened to, fed, and sung to.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Saving rare elephants with tourism snapsA Murdoch University student is investigating whether pictures posted to social media of rare pygmy elephants could help with their management and conservation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Brain science should be making prisons better, not trying to prove innocenceEvery week, I wait for the cold steel bars to close behind me, for count to be called, and for men who have years – maybe the rest of their lives – to spend in this prison to come talk with me. I am a clinical psychologist who studies chronic antisocial behavior. My staff and I converted an office in a Connecticut state prison into research space that allows us to measure neural and behavioral res
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds fringe communities on Reddit and 4chan have high influence on flow of alternative news to TwitterResearchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, Cyprus University of Technology, University College London and Telefonica Research have conducted the first large-scale measurement of how mainstream and alternative news flows through multiple social media platforms.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Augmented reality furniture and other signs we're living in the futureLiked Pokémon Go? Wait till you see what's next.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hydrofluorocarbons saved the ozone layer, so why are we banning them?On October 28, Australia ratified the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol. Australia is the tenth country to ratify, joining others as diverse as Mali, the United Kingdom and Rwanda in a global commitment to dramatically reduce hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) in the atmosphere. Once 20 countries have ratified the amendment, it will become binding.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pre-emptive policing is harmful and oppressive, and requires independent scrutinyFor 17 years, police in New South Wales have run a program predicting and disrupting future offenders to reduce crime. But very little was known about the program, the Suspect Targeting Management Plan, before our new study revealed children as young as ten have been targeted for intensive policing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Robolution—it's about human skills, not just technologyThe presence of robots in industry and beyond – factories are far from the only place where machines play a key role – is anything but new. In a July 2017 article written for the World Economic Forum, Jeff Morgan of Trinity College, Dublin, expresses amazement at the concern about new wave of automation. "Robots have been taking our jobs for 50 years, so why are we worried?" he writes.
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Science | The Guardian
Is anybody out there? What Darwin can teach us about how aliens might look | Samuel LevinNatural selection can help us to understand life on other planets – and how much we have in common with alien species Aliens could be everywhere. There are at least 100bn planets in our galaxy alone , and at least 20% of them could be habitable. Even if a tiny fraction of those planets – less than 1% of 1% – evolved life, there would still be tens of thousands of planets with aliens in our vicinit
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Ingeniøren
Tesla taber penge – fordi det er svært at bygge bilerANALYSE: Med et underskud i tredje kvartal på næsten 4 mia. kroner, sætter Tesla ny bundrekord. Forsinket produktion af batterier og Model 3 er en af årsagerne. Imens har konkurrent succes med deres elbil.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The grocerant—how smart grocery stores are becoming hybridsFood trends are difficult to follow these days. Just like hip sectors like tech, the food industry is coming up with its own peculiar lingo when describing market shifts.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How to build artificial nanofactories to power our futuresWhen we buy a new phone or laptop online, we assume it will be delivered to our doorstep in a matter of days.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Big cats in Britain—urban myth or scientific fact?The escape of Lilith the Lynx from a zoo in Wales has focused attention once again on the question of what exotic beasts might be roaming the British countryside.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How to turn a volcano into a power station – with a little help from satellitesEthiopia tends to conjure images of sprawling dusty deserts, bustling streets in Addis Ababa or the precipitous cliffs of the Simien Mountains – possibly with a distance runner bounding along in the background. Yet the country is also one of the most volcanically active on Earth, thanks to Africa's Great Rift Valley, which runs right through its heart.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The inner secrets of planets and starsAfter a five-year, 1.74 billion-mile journey, NASA's Juno spacecraft entered Jupiter's orbit in July 2016, to begin its mission to collect data on the structure, atmosphere, and magnetic and gravitational fields of the mysterious planet.
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The Atlantic
Lindsey Graham's 'Religious War' On Tuesday night, hours after the terrorist attack in New York City, South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham went on Fox News to express his gratitude that, at times like these, Donald Trump is president. “The one thing I like about President Trump, he understands that we’re in a religious war,” Graham declared. “Here’s what I like about President Trump,” he added later, “the gloves are off.” Trump
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The Atlantic
15 Things We Learned From the Tech Giants at the Senate Hearings During three Congressional hearings spread over two days, we heard a lot of bluster from senators and pat answers from tech-company lawyers about the role their firms played in the 2016 election. Scattered among all the questions, some new facts entered the public record. Here we attempt to catalog the important new information we learned. Some of the biggest disclosures came in the prepared test
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
4-in-1 flu shot may mean lifelong protection against the fluScientists with the Nebraska Center for Virology find a vaccine combining centralized ancestral genes from four major influenza strains could be a path toward a universal flu shot.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Several reasons why whole grains are healthyWhen overweight adults exchange refined grain products -- such as white bread and pasta -- with whole grain varieties, they eat less, they lose weight and the amount of inflammation in their bodies decreases. These are some of the findings of a large Danish study headed by the National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark. The study supports the scientific basis for the Danish dietary r
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Risk of oversharing in conversation increases with age, study saysThe risk of oversharing in conversation -- or providing a listener with too much irrelevant detail -- increases as we age, research suggests.Tests carried out on a group of 100 people show the thinking skills that influence how we respond to people's points of view deteriorate with age.Linguists used a series of computerised listening and visual tests to assess thinking skills in the group, whose
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What effect has substance abuse on outcome of schizophrenia treated with antipsychotics?Review in the journal Current Drug Abuse Reviews: Long-term administration of antipsychotics and the influence of drug abuse on the disease outcome
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Two important signalling pathways in cancer and ageing are connected for the first timeTwo years ago, a group led by Maria A. Blasco at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) hit upon several compounds that caused injury to the telomeres and now, in a study published in Nature Communications, they show that these drugs achieve this effect by acting on PI3K, a key protein in cancer and ageing. This is the first time that a functional link has been described between this p
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MIPT scientists enlist lichens to monitor air pollutionRussian researchers have shown free radical concentrations in lichens to be directly related to air pollution. By showing that atmospheric air quality determines the concentration of radicals in lichens, we prove that electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy can be used for environmental monitoring in cities.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Get Ready For Discovery TRVLR | A VR Adventure Off The Beaten Path 360° Virtual Reality Series - WATCH NOW! Subscribe to Discovery VR Now: https://goo.gl/bnzvkQ Discovery TRVLR is a white-knuckle ride into the curious lives of locals from all seven continents. Get ready to explore mind-blowing locations and experiences as if you were there yourself. See this trailer in 360° VR on the Discovery VR channel: https://youtu.be/NupYQGh5gCM In the first season, visit A
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Futurity.org
Nearly 1 in 3 women miss follow-up breast cancer treatment Nearly a third of women with breast cancer reject their doctors’ advice and either skip or fail to finish treatment to kill leftover tumor cells after surgery. A new survey of 2,754 breast cancer patients in Florida and Pennsylvania shows that “treatment discordance”—not following a recommended treatment plan in its entirety—is more likely among patients who report a general distrust of medical i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dozens of fires spotted in the southeastern United StatesMost of the fires that are showing up on this satellite image from the Suomi NPP satellite are prescribed fires. The Southern Area Coordination Center report for November 01, 2017 (this report changes daily) is reporting the following fires in the area:
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wind satellite vacuum packedWith liftoff on the horizon, ESA's Aeolus satellite is going through its last round of tests to make sure that this complex mission will work in orbit. Over the next month, it is sitting in a large chamber that has had all the air sucked out to simulate the vacuum of space.
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Dagens Medicin
Mænd med kræft får nyt mødested i København Center for Kræft & Sundhed indvier i denne uge et mødested for mænd, der har – eller har haft – kræft. Her skal tingene foregå på mændenes præmisser.
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Dagens Medicin
Vagtplaner for 1813 opererer konsekvent med underbemanding1813 havde i 4 ud af 10 dage i 2016 vagtsat mindre personale, end der ifølge normeringen burde være.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study of W Hydrae suggests condensed aluminum oxide dust plays key role in accelerating stellar wind(Phys.org)—A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Japan has found evidence showing that condensed aluminum oxide dust surrounding the star W Hydrae plays a key role in accelerating the stellar wind. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the team describes their study of the star and the gases that surround it.
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Popular Science
How to check on all the app subscriptions you’ve forgotten you’re still paying for DIY Don’t throw your money into the app-byss If you haven't been keeping track of your app subscriptions, you could be losing dozens of dollars a month. Here's how to check on what you're paying.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ions in the spotlightThe results of a research group from the Institute of Physics at the University of Freiburg has been given a special place in the Nature Photonics journal: an accompanying 'News & Views' article in the print version of the science journal highlights the work of the team led by Alexander Lambrecht, Julian Schmidt, Dr. Leon Karpa and Prof. Dr. Tobias Schätz.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
WSU researchers document transformation of graphite into hexagonal diamondA team of WSU researchers has for the first time observed and recorded the creation of hexagonal diamond under shock compression, revealing crucial details about how it is formed. The discovery could help planetary scientists use the presence of hexagonal diamond at meteorite craters to estimate the severity of impacts.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biocompatible photonic crystals expand their use from optics to medicineResearchers at ITMO University developed a new approach for obtaining non-toxic magnetic photonic crystals, expanding their applications from mainly photonics to biomedicine. Nanospheres made with the new method may be used for designing drugs to fight thrombosis and cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How caries-causing bacteria can survive in dental plaqueExtracellular polysaccharides play a central role in the survival capabilities of caries-causing bacteria in dental plaque, report researchers from the University of Basel's Preventative Dentistry and Oral Microbiology Clinic and Department of Biomedical Engineering in the journal Plos One.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Synaptic disorderA Würzburg research team describes a hitherto unknown pathogenic mechanism of motor neuron disorders. This should lead to a rethinking in drug development.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
SUTD researchers solve mystery behind red blood cell maturationA team of SUTD researchers profiled the human red blood cell proteome and discovered which proteins were changed during the maturation accounting for the transition in shape and deformability of reticulocytes.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Cosmic-Ray Particles Reveal Secret Chamber in Egypt's Great PyramidResearchers use muon detectors to find a hidden 30-meter-long space, which could help reveal how the 4,500-year-old monument was built -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hacking evolution, screening technique may improve most widespread enzymePlants evolved over millions of years into an environment that has dramatically changed in the last 150 years since the Industrial Revolution began. While natural adaptation has been unable to keep up, scientists have developed tools to simulate millions of years of evolution in days to help plants adapt.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Unlocking the potential of magnetic skyrmionsMagnetic skyrmions offer the promise of next-generation memory and computing technologies, such as cache memory devices and cloud computing. Now A*STAR researchers have developed an innovative technique for making tunable skyrmions that could help unlock their potential.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Differences in feelings of tension contribute to divorceWomen are twice as likely as men to file for divorce, and a new University of Michigan study sheds a little light on why.
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Gizmodo
Hundreds of Flashlight Paintings Bring This Skeleton's Night Out to Life GIF It doesn’t matter what medium you choose, animation is a tedious process requiring you to painstakingly bring every frame to life. But it’s even more challenging when your brush is an LED flashlight , the air is your canvas, and you can’t actually see what you just drew. And yet, artist Darren Pearson managed to create a two-minute short film featuring a skeleton exploring, skateboarding, and
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A powerful duoAn important aspect of pharmacology is understanding how active drug ingredients cross-react with endogenous molecules. But until now, such reactions could only be determined after the event. The precise details of the interacting factors remained unclear. Fraunhofer researchers have developed a new technology that enables biochemical reactions to be monitored from start to finish at the single-mo
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Viden
Futuristisk 3D-brille får dansk debut til jul... men ender næppe under træetMicrosofts HoloLens får en hamper pris, der understreger, at brillen i første omgang ikke er tiltænkt almindelige forbrugere.
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Viden
Kæmperum er fundet i KeopspyramideVidenskabsmænd har fundet et skjult rum på størrelse med et passagerfly i en af pyramiderne i Egypten.
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The Atlantic
Faking Toughness on Terrorism On Wednesday, prosecutors filed charges in civilian court against 29-year-old Sayfullo Saipov, the man accused of using a truck to kill eight in New York City. Critics like Senator Lindsey Graham, Senator John McCain, and President Donald Trump quickly suggested that America should get tough and declare him an enemy combatant instead. The public should reject that view as ill-considered and idiot
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Australian tourism policies fail to address climate changeDespite evidence that tourism contributes to climate change, Australia's Federal and State governments are failing to produce effective long-term tourism policy to address climate change, according to the findings of new QUT-led research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The secret lives of ancient land plantsRevealing of the liverwort genome brings insight into the evolution of land plants.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
This drug could block harmful impact of teen binge drinkingAlcohol-fueled parties might be seen as a rite of passage for many high school students, but they have an unexpected impact: binge-drinking behavior as teenagers can lead to problems with alcohol and other drug dependence later on in life.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New link found between gut bacteria and age-related conditionsNew research shows for the first time that an imbalance in the good and bad bacteria in the gut of old mice causes inflammatory responses in young mice -- responses that are linked to age-related conditions such as stroke, dementia and cardiovascular disease. Therapies that target the bacterial composition of the gut in elderly people, through changes to diet and pre- and probiotic supplements, ma
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is he really that into you?New research published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology finds that women who were reminded of a time that their dad was absent from their lives -- or who actually experienced poor quality fathering while growing up -- perceived greater mating intent in the described behaviors of a hypothetical male dating partner and when talking with a man. These women also 'saw' more sexual ar
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Landmark asbestos study published in The Lancet Public HealthA landmark study from The Australian National University into the health impacts of living in a house with loose-fill asbestos insulation has been published in the international journal The Lancet Public Health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Should patients be asleep or awake during brain surgery?Deep brain stimulation eases the effects of Parkinson's disease and tremor. A new study indicates no demonstrable difference in clinical outcomes between patients who underwent the implantation under general anesthesia versus those who went through it while awake.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Oregon team says physics explains protein unpredictabilityUniversity of Oregon scientists theorized that they could manipulate a protein one mutation at a time and predict its evolution. They sought to prove it. And failed. They do think, however, that they've found a fundamental truth underlying unpredictability in a biological system.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
One year results from the REDUCE trial reported at TCT 2017Results from the prospective, multicenter, randomized investigator-initiated REDUCE trial were reported today at the 29th annual Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) scientific symposium. Sponsored by the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF), TCT is the world's premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine.
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Gizmodo
DNC Hackers Had a 'Hit List' Chock-Full of Putin Foes Photo: AP Concluding an exhaustive review of evidence, the Associated Press presented a powerful case Thursday morning that further ties the perpetrators of the DNC breach to a Kremlin-directed plot. For eight weeks, AP reporters pored over a database of roughly 4,700 Gmail accounts targeted by the hackers who also leaked more than two thousand confidential files last year, stolen from the Democr
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Neurons UnveiledResearchers have succeeded in mapping the complex paths of 300 neurons in the mouse brain.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Aussie snakes and lizards trace back to Asia 30 million years agoDeadly snakes are among Australia's most iconic animals but a new study led by The Australian National University (ANU) has helped explain how they descended from creatures that have emigrated from Asia over the past 30 million years.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New and faster method to determine material properties of graphenePeter Steeneken (professor) and Farbod Alijani (assistant professor) from the Dynamics of Micro and Nanosystems Section at the Department of Precision and Microsystems Engineering have developed a new method to determine the material properties of graphene with the aid of high-frequency non-linear dynamics. Their new method makes it possible to accurately measure the Young's modulus (elastic modul
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
In Israel, searching for droughts past and futurePerched on a cliff face in Israel's Negev Desert, close to where the book of Genesis says the wicked cities of Sodom and Gomorrah were burned with divine fire, geologist Steven Goldstein was excitedly uncovering evidence of events even more ancient. Jackknife in hand, Goldstein carved into soft sediments making up the cliff, exposing layers left year by year going back 70,000 years by a now long-g
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Futurity.org
‘Molecular trap’ could better deal with nuclear waste Scientists have developed an extremely efficient “molecular trap” that can be recycled and reused to capture radioactive iodides in spent nuclear reactor fuel. The trap is like a tiny, porous super-sponge. The internal surface area of just one gram could stretch out to cover five 94-by-50-foot basketball courts, or 23,500 square feet. And, once caught inside, radioactive iodides will remain trapp
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How Moneyball Tactics Built a Basketball JuggernautA new book documents how venture capitalist Joe Lacob built the Golden State Warriors into NBA champs.
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Review: Samsung IconX (2018)These wireless buds are decent, but there's still room for improvement.
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Gizmodo
Kathleen Kennedy on the Future of Star Wars' Newest Heroes Beyond Episode IX Tessa Thompson talks about her hopes for a female-driven Marvel movie. Danny Elfman says he’s resurrecting his classic Batman theme for Justice League . James Marsters discusses the Daredevil inspiration he took for his Runaways villain. Plus, goofy new Flash footage, and Thandie Newton on Solo ’s director change. Spoilers get! Star Wars: Episode IX Meanwhile, speaking during an interview with th
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Scientific American Content: Global
Falling Walls: How Repairing the Ozone Hole Helped the ClimateThirty years ago, policy makers banned CFCs, which are powerful greenhouse gases—and the story is not yet over -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica
Nvidia GTX 1070 Ti review: A fine graphics card—but price remains high Enlarge (credit: Mark Walton) Specs at a glance: GeForce GTX 1070 Ti CUDA CORES 2432 TEXTURE UNITS 152 ROPS 64 CORE CLOCK 1,607MHz BOOST CLOCK 1,683MHz MEMORY BUS WIDTH 256-bit MEMORY BANDWIDTH 256GB/s MEMORY SIZE 8GB GDDR5 Outputs 3x DisplayPort 1.4, 1x HDMI 2.0b with support for 4K60 HDR 10/12b HEVC Decode, 1x dual-link DVI Release date November 2 PRICE Founders Edition (as reviewed): £419/$449
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Futurity.org
‘Sunscreen snow’ falls on hot planet’s dark side Using the Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers have discovered that a blistering-hot, giant planet outside our solar system has “snow” made of titanium dioxide—the active ingredient in sunscreen. These Hubble observations are the first detections of this “snow-out” process, called a “cold trap,” on an exoplanet. This discovery, and other observations made by the same team, provide insight into the
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Cosmic-ray particles reveal secret chamber in Egypt's Great Pyramid Researchers have used muon detectors to discover a mysterious, 30-metre-long space — which could help to reveal how the 4,500-year-old monument was built. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22939
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Gizmodo
HTC's New Midrange Phone Proves the Company Isn't Dead Yet All images: Sam Rutherford/Gizmodo Even though Google recently purchased a billion dollars of personnel and intellectual property from HTC , the Taiwanese smartphone maker isn’t dead yet. In fact, today HTC announced two new phones: the new U11 Plus and the U11 Life. Unfortunately, folks here in the States are only going to have access to the latter, as the 6-inch U11 Plus with its larger 18:9 di
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Scientific American Content: Global
Falling Walls: The Past, Present and Future of Artificial IntelligenceThis is more than just another industrial revolution—it is something that transcends humankind and even biology -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Scientist - News
Cosmic rays have revealed a new chamber in Egypt’s Great PyramidParticles from outer space have helped scientists uncover a hidden chamber within Egypt’s most famous pyramid, the first such finding in over a century
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Artificial neural networks could power up curation of natural history collectionsFed with new knowledge for centuries, natural history collections contain critical data for many scientific endeavors. While recent efforts in mass digitization have already provided unprecedented insight by generating large datasets from these collections, a new pilot project -- one of the first of its kind -- suggests that the key to efficiently studying these data might lie in the new-age deep
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Popular Science
We just found the king of all extinct giraffe cousins, and it’s very goofy looking Animals Giraffids are dead. Long live giraffids. Our planet used to be filled with beautiful giraffids, roaming about on spindly legs with their dinky pseudo-horns. Let's go back to that time.
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Science | The Guardian
Archaeologists discover mysterious void deep within Great Pyramid of Giza Muon-detecting sensors have revealed a huge cavity hidden within the pyramid – the first major structural find since the 19th century Archaeologists have uncovered a mysterious enclosure hidden deep inside the Great Pyramid of Giza, the oldest of the seven wonders of the ancient world. The massive cavity stretches for at least 30 metres and lies above the grand gallery, an impressive ascending co
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NYT > Science
Inside Giza’s Great Pyramid, Scientists Discover a VoidUsing a technique from particle physics, researchers detected a 100-foot-long space within the monument, but Egyptologists questioned the discovery’s value.
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How to Use Plex to Build a Seamless Media LibraryPlex software and a dedicated PC are all you need to tame your movie and music collection.
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This Robot Snake Means You No Harm, ReallyIt has 16 windpipe-constricting actuators, but this steely serpent is more likely to save your life than suck it out of you.
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Science : NPR
Scientists Say They've Found Hidden Space In Great Pyramid Of Giza Researchers used equipment that detects muons. Measuring the density of the tiny particles yielded an image of what's behind the pyramid walls with no damage to the ancient structure. (Image credit: Amr Nabil/AP)
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Science-Based Medicine
Liver cancer, naturallyAristolochic acid, a highly toxic substance naturally found in some traditional herbal medicines, may be a significant cause of liver cancer.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Mystery void is discovered in the Great Pyramid of GizaHigh-energy particle imaging helps scientists peek inside one of the world’s oldest, largest monuments.
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Ingeniøren
Stort skjult rum er fundet i KeopspyramidenTre forskerhold fra Japan og Frankrig har uafhængigt af hinanden fundet et ukendt hulrum i Keopspyramiden med en længde på mindst 30 meter og et tværsnit svarende til pyramidens Store Galleri.
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Gizmodo
US Considers Charges Against at Least 6 Russian Government Officials in 2016 Hack of DNC Emails (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images) Earlier this year, US intelligence agencies concluded that the Russian government was behind the 2016 hack of Democratic National Committee (DNC) emails that many believe swayed the election in favor of President Donald Trump. And now the US Justice Department is considering charges against at least six members of the Russian government over the hack. The Wall
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Gizmodo
Stunned Scientists Detect Suspected Hidden Chamber Within Great Pyramid of Giza Khufu’s Pyramid 3D cut aerial view. The fuzzy white dots represent the location of the newly discovered void. (Image: ScanPyramids Mission) Though they were constructed nearly 5,000 years ago, the Great Pyramids of Egypt are still packed with secrets. Using a technique that leverages the power of cosmic rays, scientists have confirmed the presence of a large empty space within Khufu’s pyramid—a v
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BBC News - Science & Environment
'Big void' identified in Khufu's Great Pyramid at GizaScanning technology suggests there is a large, previously unknown cavity in the ancient monument.
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Live Science
In Photos: Looking Inside the Great Pyramid of GizaA group of scientists working on the Scan Pyramids project claims to have found two unknown voids or cavities within the Great Pyramid of Giza.
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Live Science
Secret Chamber? Cosmic Rays Reveal Possible Void Inside Great PyramidBut does this empty space mean anything?
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The Atlantic
Is This the Upside Down? This post discusses minor plot points for Stranger Things 2 . “There’s an H.P. Lovecraft sort of approach,” Matt Duffer put it —“this inter-dimensional being that is sort of beyond human comprehension.” The co-creator of Stranger Things was explaining the way the show’s primary monster had changed between its first season and its second—the way it had expanded from a slimy beast with muscular lim
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The Atlantic
An Unknown 'Void' Found in the Great Pyramid Using Cosmic Rays On the Giza Plateau in Egypt rise three large pyramids—the tallest and oldest of which is the Pyramid of Khufu. It is also known as simply the Great Pyramid of Giza. You know what it looks like. It’s one of the seven great wonders of the world. Yet, for all its fame and antiquity, so many questions remain. How was it built? Why is there nothing in the pyramid, except a broken sarcophagus missing
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Scientific American Content: Global
Falling Walls: Untangling the Mystery of SleepWe know it’s important to physical and mental health, but exactly how it works, and how to optimize it, are only beginning to be understood -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org
Going with your gut may mean harsher moral judgments Going with your intuition could make you judge others’ moral transgressions more harshly and keep you from changing your mind, even after considering all the facts, a new study suggests. The findings show that people who strongly rely on intuition automatically condemn actions they perceive to be morally wrong, even if there is no actual harm. In psychology, intuition, or “gut instinct,” is defin
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Gizmodo
US Homeland Security Wants Facial Recognition to Identify People in Moving Cars (AP Photo/Denis Poroy) The US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) wants to develop technology that scans the faces of travelers as they enter and leave the US. The difficult part? The agency wants to do it without anyone needing to get out of their cars. First spotted by Nextgov , DHS has posted a public notice calling on technology companies to submit proposals for the system by January 2018.
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Gizmodo
Our Favorite Battery-Powered Lighter Is Just $22 Right Now Sparkr Mini , $22 with code XJP69HQB Plasma lighters are the lighter, evolved . They can light things on fire while fixing the three biggest problems with traditional lighters: Fuel - This lighter doesn’t need fuel; you recharge it over USB. How cool is that? Wind - Since it’s using tiny electrical coils to create heat rather than an open flame, it can’t be blown out. Orientation - You can use a
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Live Science
Bad Buzz: Bee Stinger Gets Stuck in Teen's ThroatOne honeybee's stinger wound up in a pretty weird location: lodged in the back of a teen girl's throat, a recent report of the case reveals.
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Live Science
What Darwin Can Tell Us About AliensAliens may have something in common with life on Earth.
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Ingeniøren
USA frigiver russiske valgreklamer fra Facebook Der er nu offentliggjort flere eksempler på de Facebook-reklamer, som menes at være brugt til at påvirke den amerikanske valgkamp i 2016. Som det kan ses i artiklen, så spænder reklamerne fra alt mellem våbenelskende 'patrioter' til Bernie Sanders-elskende homoseksuelle. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/like-if-you-want-jesus-to-win-kongressen-frigiver-russiske-reklamer-blev-brugt-under Version2
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Ingeniøren
Skandaleramt spansk Niels Bohr-entreprenør bygger stadig på Herlev HospitalDen spanske installationsentreprenør Inabensa har fået hård kritik for sin indsats på Niels Bohr Bygningen, men på Herlev Hospital er bygherren stadig tilfreds trods mindre forsinkelser.
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Ingeniøren
Kom med ind i DTU's nye prisbelønnede life science-kompleksOnsdag var en festdag på DTU i Lyngby med besøg af kronprinsen og uddannelses- og forskningsministeren. Med indvielsen af bygningskomplekset 201-205 udvider DTU fundamentet for ingeniørvidenskabelig forskning, uddannelse, forskningsbaseret rådgivning og innovation baseret på et biologisk fundament. Her har vi samlet nogle billeder fra byggeriet.
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Opioids Haven't Solved Chronic Pain. Maybe Virtual Reality CanThe mind can play tricks on your body. Luckily, VR can play tricks right back.
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Feed: All Latest
Thor: Ragnarok Makes Superhero Movies Fun AgainMarvel's latest is the most effortlessly enjoyable hangout movie to emerge in a long time, which might be Thor's most heroic feat yet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
November weather spells a troublesome time for turtlesNovember is Turtle Month, and according to a Western Sydney University researcher it is also an important time to be on the look-out for our river-dwelling friends.
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Gizmodo
Experts Question Details From the Story of Two Women Stranded at Sea for 5 Months Jennifer Appel, right, and Tasha Fuiava sit with their dogs on the deck of the USS Ashland Monday, Oct. 30, 2017, at White Beach Naval Facility in Okinawa, Japan. (AP Photo/Koji Ueda) The story of two women who were stranded at sea for 5 months in shark-infested waters seemed almost too cinematic to be true. And now some experts are questioning the veracity of some of their claims. Jennifer Appel
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Ars Technica
To keep the weight off, Biggest Loser contestants must exercise like crazy Enlarge / THE BIGGEST LOSER -- Season 13 Live Finale. (credit: Getty | NBC ) Switching up your diet can help you shed pounds. But to keep that lost bulge at bay, ambitious dieters may have to turn to exercise— a lot of exercise—according to a study on 14 former contestants of The Biggest Loser. On average, the contestants who kept their weight down six years after the television contest did so by
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists create device for ultra-accurate genome sequencing of single human cellsAn interdisciplinary team of researchers at the University of California San Diego has developed a technology for very accurate sequencing and haplotyping of genomes from single human cells. Their findings were published online in advance of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) print edition.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemists develop method to quickly screen, accurately identify fentanyl and a broad range of other drugs of abuseResearchers at McMaster University have developed a new drug screening technique that could lead to the rapid and accurate identification of fentanyl, as well as a vast number of other drugs of abuse, which up until now have been difficult to detect by traditional urine tests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Neutron star merger confirms decades of predictionsOn Aug. 17, the Laser Interferometry Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) detected the fifth fingerprint of a massive disturbance in spacetime since LIGO began operations in September 2015. Unlike the first four sets of ripples, which reflected collisions between two black holes, the shape of these spacetime distortions suggested a collision between two neutron stars.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New white paper maps the very real risks that quantum attacks will pose for BitcoinCombining expertise in quantum technologies and cryptography, researchers have been projecting future dates that quantum computers could jeopardise the security of current cryptocurrencies, a market now worth over USD $150 billion, and assessing countermeasures to such attacks.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New sensor provides real-time detection of heavy metals, bacteria, nitrates and phosphates in waterWater quality monitoring currently occurs mainly at water supply intakes or water treatment plants, rather than along water distribution lines or at the point of use. This is inadequate because negative changes can occur in water quality between the water source and your faucet. It is essential to monitor this key natural resource for various contaminants, such as toxic heavy metal ions, within wa
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The Atlantic
John Grisham Skewers the For-Profit Law-School Industry John Grisham’s most recent novel, The Rooster Bar , turns the the staid world of for-profit law schools into a gripping thriller. For-profit law schools first became an interest of Grisham’s when he stumbled across the issue in a 2014 article in The Atlantic by Paul Campos, “ The Law-School Scam .” Campos’s article explained how for-profit law schools, some of which are owned by private-equity fi
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The Atlantic
Humans Are Bad at Predicting Futures That Don’t Benefit Them Between 1956 and 1962, the University of Cape Town psychologist Kurt Danziger asked 436 South African high-school and college students to imagine they were future historians. Write an essay predicting how the rest of the 20th century unfolds, he told them. “This is not a test of imagination—just describe what you really expect to happen,” the instructions read. Of course, everyone wrote about apa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop a gel for growing large quantities of neural stem cellsIn many ways, stem cells are the divas of the biological world. On the one hand, these natural shapeshifters can transform themselves into virtually any type of cell in the body. In that regard, they hold the promise of being able to cure ills ranging from spinal cord injuries to cancers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
3-D origami circuits could revolutionize electronic designsOrigami, the well-known Japanese art of paper folding, generates complex 3-D structures from flat 2-D paper. While the creation of a paper swan may be intriguing, the idea of creating 3-D circuits based on similar design principles is simply mindboggling. This science fiction-sounding research is a project that Jiwoong Park and colleagues from the University of Chicago have been developing over th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Solar surface from hot to hottestThis sequence of images shows the Sun from its surface to its upper atmosphere all taken at about the same time on Oct. 27, 2017. The first shows the surface of the Sun in filtered white light; the other seven images were taken in different wavelengths of extreme ultraviolet light. Note that each wavelength reveals somewhat different features.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Longest living dolphin in captivity dies at Japan aquariumA female bottlenose dolphin has died at a Japanese aquarium only weeks after breaking a national record of more than four decades in captivity, an official said Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
German chemical sector lifts 2017 forecast on strong Q3Germany's powerful chemical industry on Thursday raised its forecast for output this year as strong export demand boosted the sector's performance in the third quarter.
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cognitive science
A new paper in JEP:General explores how the mode for making a choice affects confidence in that choice. submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video: Exploring 'stillsuits' for citiesAs a child, David Sedlak was inspired by Frank Herbert's sci-fi novel Dune, which depicts a desert world where people wear "stillsuits" to capture their water waste and distill it for reuse.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Technique gives detailed view into how certain polymers form, unlocking answers about nucleationImagine a tiny drop. It contains water, the fizzy antiseptic hydrogen peroxide, and a common, yellowish chemical called glyoxal. When the droplet is exposed to light, a cascade of reactions occurs, producing new materials. These reactions occur on the surface, where liquid meets air. Scientists didn't have many details about the reactions until Dr. Xiao-Ying Yu from DOE's Pacific Northwest Nationa
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Scientific American Content: Global
Mail-Order CRISPR Kits Allow Absolutely Anyone to Hack DNAExperts debate what amateur scientists could accomplish with the powerful DNA editing tool—and whether its ready availability is cause for concern -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Exploring biomimicry—building the next generation of adaptable materials from nature"Adapt, grow, heal" probably sounds like sage parental advice to students just off to college. In fact, it is the biological rationale behind recent research at the University of Maine studying biomimicry. One of biomimicry's foundational questions is how do organisms adapt, grow, heal, and even survive.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Electron microscopy provides clues into the colorful chemistry of dragonfly wingsDazzling dragonfly wings may send poets rhapsodizing, but scientists yearn for a better understanding. In particular, they want to know the chemistry of the different layers giving rise to natural photonic crystals that help create color.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New data on gender inequality in sciences salariesThere is a difference between male and female physics faculty salaries and the culture of physics is partly to blame, according to an article that is available for free this month from Physics Today, the world's most influential and closely followed magazine devoted to physics and the physical sciences community.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Versatile marine bacteria could be an influence on global warming, scientists discoverScientists have discovered that a 'rare' type of marine bacteria is much more widespread than previously thought—and possesses a remarkable metabolism that could contribute to greenhouse gas production.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cannabis crop expansion into forests threatens wildlife habitat, causes other environmental damagePlanting cannabis for commercial production in remote locations is creating forest fragmentation, stream modification, soil erosion and landslides. Without land-use policies to limit its environmental footprint, the impacts of cannabis farming could get worse, according to a new study published in the November issue of Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Microfluidic' device simulates cancer treatment as effectively as research animalsA new technology that simulates tumors has been shown to perform as well as research animals in testing chemotherapy drugs, representing a potential tool for screening drugs before treating a patient.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Overlooked treasure—the first evidence of exoplanetsBeneath an elegant office building with a Spanish-style red tiled roof in Pasadena, California, three timeworn storerooms safeguard more than a century of astronomy. Down the stairs and to the right is a basement of wonder. There are countless wooden drawers and boxes, stacked floor to ceiling, with telescope plates, sunspot drawings and other records. A faint ammonia-like smell, reminiscent of ol
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Ingeniøren
En bitcoin-handel bruger nu samme mængde strøm som en husstand gør på en uge Bitcoins høje værdi gør det tilsvarende rentabelt at bruge mange penge på strøm til at udvinde dem. https://v2.dk/1082319 Version2
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