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Gizmodo
Disney May Buy Fox, Which Could Change Everything About the Marvel Cinematic Universe [UPDATED] Image: Marvel CNBC is reporting that Disney is in talks to buy 21st Century Fox, an entertainment arm within the larger Fox company that is reportedly looking to focus its efforts more on news and sports. If the deal were to go through, it could have potentially huge ramifications for a number of Marvel characters. According to CNBC , the buzz around the talks is that a deal will come to fruition
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Acoustic monitoring provides holistic picture of biodiversityEcologists are using a network of 'outdoor recording studios' to better monitor the subtropical Japanese island of Okinawa. Now a pilot study, in which more than 1,100 hours of birdsong were analyzed, is available in the journal Ecological Research which is the official journal of the Ecological Society of Japan and is published by Springer.
9h
Ingeniøren
Banedanmark sagde nej til flere opfordringer om at sikre tog til halvtom RingstedbaneAllerede for to år siden henvendte Bombardier, der leverer sikringsanlæg, sig første gang til Banedanmark med et projekt om at garantere tog på den nye jernbane fra København til Ringsted. Men både dengang og senere blev leverandøren afvist.
19h

LATEST

The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Power to Test the Faith What We’re Following The Church Shooting in Texas: Twenty-six people were killed when a gunman opened fire on congregants at a rural church in Sutherland Springs, Texas. The alleged shooter has been identified as 26-year-old Devin Patrick Kelley. In the hours after the attack, conspiracy theories about his motivations crept into Google’s search suggestions, leading its algorithm to unintentionall
4min
Popular Science
Last week in tech: The one where iOS forgot how to type the letter ‘I’ Technology Also: Meet the new Xbox, and Wi-Fi comes from the sky. A software bug screwed up typing on the iPhone and all sorts of other interesting stuff that happened in the tech world last week.
19min
Ars Technica
Trump space adviser: Blue Origin and SpaceX rockets aren’t really commercial Enlarge / Elon Musk of SpaceX, left, and Scott Pace, right, of George Washington University, testify before the Senate Subcommittee on Defense under the Committee on Appropriations in 2014. (credit: George Washington University ) In recent months, the executive secretary of the National Space Council, Scott Pace, has worked assiduously behind the scenes to develop a formal space policy for the Tr
39min
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Misfit Garage Goes Airborne To Spot Rare Cars From The Sky #MisfitGarage | Wednesdays 9p The Misfit crew take to the sky to try and find their next big project. Is that a rare 440 Magnum Charger they see? Full episodes streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/misfit-garage/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/misfitgarage https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter:
41min
NYT > Science
Trilobites: After the Dinosaurs’ Demise, Many Mammals Seized the DayThe first mammals active during both day and night emerged 65.8 million years ago, a study found, just 200,000 years after the event that made dinosaurs go extinct.
44min
Gizmodo
The 10 Best Deals of November 6, 2017 We see a lot of deals around the web over on Kinja Deals , but these were our ten favorites today. Head over to our main post for more deals, and follow us on Twitter and Facebook to never miss a chance to save. You can also join our Kinja Deals Community Facebook group to connect with your fellow deal hunters. #1: Ecobee4 Smart THermostat Ecobee4 , $209 While not nearly as ubiquitous as Nest’s L
53min
Popular Science
These ‘two yahoos from the middle of Ohio’ designed the ultimate drone buster Technology A tale from the field. Insurgents have been using armed drones to attack U.S. troops worldwide, so my co-inventor Alex Morrow and I built the DroneDefender to help protect them.
1h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: A Shooting in Sutherland Springs Today in 5 Lines Texas Governor Greg Abbott confirmed that 26 people, ranging from 18 months to 77 years old, were killed in a shooting at First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, on Sunday. Officials said the alleged gunman, Devin Patrick Kelley, had previously sent threatening text messages to his mother-in-law, who attended the church, and revealed that Kelley had been discharged fro
1h
The Atlantic
If Disney Bought 21st Century Fox Disney was recently in talks to buy 21st Century Fox, with the exception of its news and live-sports divisions, according to reporting by CNBC . The negotiations are not currently active (they may resume), but the simple fact that two of the country’s largest entertainment conglomerates are discussing a partial merger is a significant development for the TV and film industry, where legacy compani
1h
New on MIT Technology Review
Intel and AMD Team Up to Take On Nvidia’s AI Chip Dominance
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Gizmodo
The Xbox One X's Hard Drive Can Fill Up Pretty Fast Games optimized for the Xbox One X can look better on the new console than they do on older hardware, but adding HDR support, 4K textures and other enhancements takes a bit more space. With three games taking up over a third of my console’s drive, 1TB of storage isn’t gonna cut it. I’ve spent the past year slowly filling up 2TB of storage on my Xbox One, so it was alarming to see the storage mete
1h
Ars Technica
Piracy site for science research dinged again in court—this time for $4.8M Enlarge (credit: Sci-Hub ) First came the $15 million fine a New York federal judge imposed on Sci-Hub, a scientific research piracy site that has freed tens of thousands of research papers from behind paywalls. That was in June, and the site's overseas operator, Alexandra Elbakyan, said she'd never pay plaintiff Elsevier or stop the infringing behavior. Elbakyan Now on Friday, a Virginia federal
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
18-month twinkle in a forming star suggests the existence of a very young planetAn international team of researchers have found an infrequent variation in the brightness of a forming star. This 18-month recurring twinkle is not only an unexpected phenomenon for scientists, but its repeated behavior suggests the presence of a hidden planet.
1h
Gizmodo
Startup Under Federal Scrutiny for Selling Genetic Tests Without Legal Certification https://gizmodo.com/what-dna-testing-companies-terrifying-privacy-policies-1819158337Image: Orig3n When a consumer genetic testing company planned to give away free DNA tests to Baltimore Ravens fans in September, the federal government intervened and prompted a last-minute cancellation . Now, a federal agency has found that the startup, Orig3n, does not have the necessary legal certification to
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Calls for end to Mexico's capture of endangered porpoiseCalls are mounting for the Mexican government and international experts to stop an operation to capture and enclose the few remaining vaquita porpoises, after one of the animals died soon after being caught over the weekend.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Signs may help may help history buffs get more buffVisitors to the country's national parks and historic sites may be just a sign—and a few steps—away from improving their health and fitness while enjoying their park trips, according to a team of researchers.
1h
Ars Technica
Flaw crippling millions of crypto keys is worse than first disclosed Enlarge / A digital identity card issued by the Republic of Estonia. (credit: Republic of Estonia, Interior Department ) A crippling flaw affecting millions—and possibly hundreds of millions—of encryption keys used in some of the highest-stakes security settings is considerably easier to exploit than originally reported, cryptographers declared over the weekend. The assessment came as Estonia abr
1h
Feed: All Latest
How Level 3's Tiny Error Shut Off the Internet for Parts of the USA simple misconfiguration spiraled into outages for internet service providers and large internet platforms around the US.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Broadcom's megadeal for Qualcomm would top tech deal listBroadcom's $103 billion bid for Qualcomm would rank as the biggest acquisition ever in the tech industry, if it goes through. Here's a look back at some other big deals:
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Government agrees to halt use of cyanide traps in ColoradoU.S. officials have agreed to stop using predator-killing cyanide traps on Colorado public lands amid pressure to ban the devices nationwide after one injured an Idaho teenager and killed his dog.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple tax avoidance plan laid bare in leaked documentsApple shifted much of its offshore wealth in the face of a tax crackdown on a haven it had in Ireland, according to reporting Monday on the Paradise Papers on the iPhone maker's tax strategy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Controlling nerve injury repair revealed in Monash University studyMonash University scientists are one step closer to solving the riddle of how nerves can self-heal.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Important new insights into RECIST criteria measuring cancer's response to treatmentUniversity of Colorado Cancer Center study examines current RECIST guidelines in an effort to bring them up to speed with new complexities presented by the latest targeted therapies.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Signs may help may help history buffs get more buffVisitors to the country's national parks and historic sites may be just a sign -- and a few steps -- away from improving their health and fitness while enjoying their park trips, according to a team of researchers.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Higher estrogen levels linked to increased alcohol sensitivity in brain's 'reward center'The reward center of the brain is much more attuned to the pleasurable effects of alcohol when estrogen levels are elevated, an effect that may underlie the development of addiction in women, according to a study on mice at the University of Illinois at Chicago.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Where did those electrons go? X-ray measurements solve decades-old mysteryThere's been an unsolved mystery associated with mixed valence compounds: When the valence state of an element in these compounds changes with increased temperature, the number of electrons associated with that element decreases, as well. But just where do those electrons go? Using a combination of state-of-the-art tools, including X-ray measurements at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Archaeologists unearth 'masterpiece' sealstone in Greek tombArchaeologists with the University of Cincinnati are documenting artifacts contained within their amazing 2015 find, the tomb of the Griffin Warrior in Greece. But the 3,500-year-old treasures include their most stunning historical offering yet: an intricately carved gem, or sealstone, that represents one of the finest works of prehistoric Greek art ever found.
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Gizmodo
Why Buy an iPhone X When You Can Pay Tiffany & Co. $1,000 For a Tin Can? Image: Tiffany & Co. “I love the dumb notch! And the face-scanning thing I don’t want! The iPhone X is exactly the kind of absurd luxury good I crave,” you say, having not even scratched the diamond-encrusted surface of true decadence. Sit right there like the tiny, foolish baby you are and I’ll tell you about an even newer, more exciting bauble, the likes of which have not been seen since No
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Where did those electrons go? Decades-old mystery solvedThe concept of "valence" - the ability of a particular atom to combine with other atoms by exchanging electrons - is one of the cornerstones of modern chemistry and solid-state physics.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team discovers a rare Minoan sealstone in the treasure-laden tomb of a Bronze Age Greek warriorIn the more than two years since University of Cincinnati researchers unearthed the 3,500-year-old tomb of a Bronze Age warrior in southwest Greece, an incredible trove of riches has emerged, including four gold signet rings that have challenged accepted wisdom among archaeologists about the origins of Greek civilization.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biological clock found in fungal parasite sheds more light on 'zombie ants' phenomenonCharissa de Bekker, Ph.D., came to UCF earlier this year to continue her research on a fungal parasite that infects ants, hijacks their brains and controls their behavior to spread its fungal spores - a phenomenon that's led to those infected being called "zombie ants."
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Inside Science
A Tabletop Experiment For Quantum Gravity A Tabletop Experiment For Quantum Gravity Researchers' experiment could test concepts of quantum gravity and reveal a potential key to a "theory of everything." Choi-Story.jpg Image credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech Physics Monday, November 6, 2017 - 16:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) -- Quantum mechanics can explain all the known forces of nature except gravity. Now researchers suggest
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Ars Technica
This lawsuit against a Cosby rape documentary is why fair use exists THE COSBY SHOW—"Where's Rudy?" Episode 10—Pictured: (l-r) Malcolm-Jamal Warner as Theodore 'Theo' Huxtable, Bill Cosby as Dr. Heathcliff 'Cliff' Huxtable, Keshia Knight Pulliam as Rudy Huxtable, Tempestt Bledsoe as Vanessa Huxtable. (credit: NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images) The production company that made The Cosby Show has sued the BBC (.pdf) over a documentary the British network aired about
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
GPM radar spots tornado spawning thunderstorms in Ohio ValleySevere weather that rolled through the Ohio Valley on Nov. 5 was analyzed by NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM satellite. GPM provided forecasters at the National Weather Service with rain rates and cloud heights that showed where strongest storms were located.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists develop a device that could provide conclusive evidence for the existence (or not) of non-Abelian anyonsWhat kinds of 'particles' are allowed by nature? The answer lies in the theory of quantum mechanics, which describes the microscopic world.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Beyond good vibrations: New insights into metamaterial magicIf invisibility cloaks and other gee-whiz apps are ever to move from science fiction to science fact, we'll need to know more about how these weird metamaterials actually work. Michigan Tech researcher Elena Semouchkina has gone back to basics and shed more light on the physics behind the magic.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A quasiparticle questPhysicists have developed a device that could provide conclusive evidence for the existence (or not) of non-Abelian anyons.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Computer system finds 'recipes' for producing materialsSystem could pore through millions of research papers to extract 'recipes' for producing materials, explain investigators.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
NASA satellite tracks ozone pollution by monitoring its key ingredientsOzone pollution near Earth's surface is one of the main ingredients of summertime smog. It is also not directly measurable from space due to the abundance of ozone higher in the atmosphere, which obscures measurements of surface ozone. New research has devised a way to use satellite measurements of the precursor gases that contribute to ozone formation to differentiate among three different sets o
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Is anticoagulant warfarin associated with lower risk of cancer incidence?The use of the blood thinner warfarin was associated with a lower risk of new cancers in people over 50.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nuclear energy programs do not increase likelihood of proliferation, study findsContrary to popular thought, nuclear proliferation is not more likely to occur among countries with nuclear energy programs, according to research. In a historical analysis of the relationship between nuclear energy programs and proliferation from 1954 to 2000, the study finds that the link between the two has been overstated.
2h
Scientific American Content: Global
Language Patterns Reveal Body's Hidden Response to StressVolunteers' use of certain words predicted stress-related changes in gene expression better than their self-reported feelings -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
Can Sapphire Crystals Capture Exotic Dark Matter? A sapphire crystal nothing like the one used in this experiment ( Géry Parent /Flickr) Physicists often build experiments looking for a specific something . Maybe that something consists of dark matter, new kinds of particles, or new ways that particles might interact with one another. Other physicists are trying to use these experiments’ old data in new ways, to look for something other than tha
2h
Dagens Medicin
Samfund, sundhed og psykiatri – hvor bliver mennesket af?VALG. Vi er nødt til at vende bøtten sammen og finde en balance, hvor der dokumenteres meningsskabende samt frigives tid til reel kvalitet og direkte kontakt med patienter. Det er muligt!
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ludwig scientists share research at The Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer Annual MeetingLudwig Cancer Research has released the scope of its participation at the 2017 Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) Annual Meeting in National Harbor, Maryland, Nov. 8-12.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UHN vision scientists discover potential neuroprotective treatment for glaucomaA research team led by scientists at the Krembil Research Institute in Toronto has identified a new neuroprotective factor that has the potential to help people suffering from the common blinding disease glaucoma.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists discover potential treatment to stop glaucoma in its tracksVision scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of Toronto have discovered that naturally occurring molecules known as lipid mediators have the potential to halt the progression of glaucoma, the world's second-leading cause of blindness.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Microfinance institutions are found effective in giving health products to underserved communitiesMicrofinance institutions are found effective in delivering essential health products to underserved communities on a national scale while reducing costs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fat hormone linked to progression of fatty liver disease may hold key to new treatmentsThe rising obesity epidemic has brought with it an army of maladies. One, in particular, is threatening to outpace many of the disorders that accompany obesity, in terms of occurrence and severity: nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers probe brain disease-causing proteins at the atomic levelResearchers studying a protein that causes a hereditary degenerative brain disease in humans have discovered that the human, mouse and hamster forms of the protein, which have nearly identical amino acid sequences, exhibit distinct three-dimensional structures at the atomic level.
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Science : NPR
A Quest: Insulin-Releasing Implant For Type-1 Diabetes People who have Type-1 diabetes would love to be free of insulin injections and pumps. Researchers in San Francisco are now testing in animals an implantable pouch of living, insulin-releasing cells. (Image credit: Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source)
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Live Science
2017 Is Slated to Be in Top 3 Hottest Years of All TimeThe year isn't over yet, but 2017 is already expected to be the second- or third-hottest year on record, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) announced today (Nov. 6) at the United Nations climate change conference in Bonn, Germany.
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Big Think
How Eating on the Go Tricks Your Memory and Expands Your Waistline A new study illustrates how marketing affects our memory of what we eat, and how that translates to a bigger waistline. Read More
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The Atlantic
All the Angry Ladies Last month, at an event promoting her new play, The Parisian Woman , Uma Thurman was interviewed by a journalist from Access Hollywood . In vague terms, they discussed Harvey Weinstein, the man who had served as a producer for each of the Quentin Tarantino films Thurman has starred in. “What are your thoughts,” the reporter asked the celebrity, “about women speaking out about inappropriate behavi
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Gizmodo
Buy One Of Our Readers' Favorite Wallets Without Emptying...Your Wallet. Just $13 Today. Nomatic Basics Wallet , $13 The Nomatic BASICS wallet is one of our readers’ four favorite front pocket wallets , and you can try one out for just $13 today, down from its usual $20. We’ve seen it dip as low as $10 on a few occasions, but if your current wallet has seen better days, this is still a great deal. You even get to pick from three different colors.
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Popular Science
Hospitals are helping make us all sick Environment Greenhouse gas emissions from health care will be responsible for the loss of thousands of years of life. The U.S. healthcare system is responsible for a solid chunk of the greenhouse gas emissions in the country that contribute to climate change.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Biological clock found in fungal parasite sheds more light on 'zombie ants' phenomenonA working biological clock has been found in a fungal parasite that infects ants to control their behavior and lead them away from their nests in an effort to spread their fungal spores more effectively.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Depressed with a chronic disease? Many find antidepressants are not workingScientists are finding more evidence that commonly prescribed antidepressants aren't effective in people battling both depression and a chronic medical disease, raising a critical question of whether doctors should enact widespread changes in how they treat millions of depressed Americans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Afterschool program environments linked to academic confidence and skillsAfterschool programs with positive, responsive, and organized environments can have academic benefits for students, finds a new American study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fish provide insight into the evolution of the immune systemNew research reveals how immune systems can evolve resistance to parasites. The study solves the enigma of how species can adapt and change their immune system to cope with new parasitic threats -- whilst at the same time showing little or no evolutionary change in critical immune function over millions of years. It help to explain why we humans have some immune genes that are almost identical to
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Saving neurons may offer new approach for treating Alzheimer's diseaseTreatment with a neuroprotective compound that saves brain cells from dying also prevents the development of depression-like behavior and the later onset of memory and learning problems in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease, according to new research. Although the treatment protects the animals from Alzheimer's-type symptoms, it does not alter the buildup of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tan
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Antiferromagnetic dysprosium reveals magnetic switching with less energyPhysicists compared how different forms of magnetic ordering in the rare-earth metal named dysprosium react to a short laser pulse. They discovered that the magnetic orientation can be altered much faster and with considerably less energy if the magnetic moments of the individual atoms do not all point in the same direction (ferromagnetism), but instead point are rotated against each other (anti-f
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA's GPM radar spots tornado spawning thunderstorms in Ohio ValleySevere weather that rolled through the Ohio Valley on Nov. 5 was analyzed by NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM satellite. GPM provided forecasters at the National Weather Service with rain rates and cloud heights that showed where strongest storms were located.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
For the love of birds | Washington WachiraFrom the glorious crested guinea fowl to the adulterous African jacana to vultures that can pick a zebra carcass clean in 30 minutes, Washington Wachira wants us all to get to know the marvelous species of birds that share the planet with us. If you're not already a fan of earth's feathermakers -- or concerned about their conservation -- you will be after you watch this delightful talk.
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Big Think
How Do Companies Engineer Our Unhappiness? In The Hacking of the American Mind, Robert Lustig holds up a much needed mirror to our consumption habits. Read More
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: The Cool Beginnings of a Volcano’s SupereruptionThe eruption that caused California’s Long Valley Caldera to form likely started with magma that was chilled to a solid.
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Ars Technica
An AT&T drone is now providing cellular service to people in Puerto Rico Enlarge / An AT&T Cell on Wings. (credit: AT&T ) AT&T is using an LTE-equipped drone to reconnect some Puerto Ricans who lost wireless service after Hurricane Maria. This obviously isn't a permanent fix for Puerto Rico, where 48 percent of cell sites are still out of service more than a month after the hurricane wrecked telecom infrastructure on the island. But the drone—AT&T calls it a Flying CO
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Science : NPR
Sleepless Night Leaves Some Brain Cells As Sluggish As You Feel Scientists have found an underlying reason why it's dangerous to drive when you're sleepy. Brain recordings show cells involved in perception fire more slowly in somebody who has been up all night. (Image credit: Darren Pryce/Getty Images/Imagezoo)
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Gizmodo
One of the Secrets Guarding the Secure Internet Is a Wall of Lava Lamps GIF GIF Source: Tom Scott Cloudflare provides security and domain name services for millions of the most prominent sites on the web. The company has built a solid reputation for its secure encryption and one of the key factors in its system is a wall of 100 lava lamps in the lobby of its San Francisco headquarters. Prolific YouTuber Tom Scott visited the home of the lava lamps for this video that
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel Nano-CT device creates high-resolution 3D-X-rays of tiny velvet worm legsComputer Tomography (CT) is a standard procedure in hospitals, but so far, the technology has not been suitable for imaging extremely small objects. In PNAS, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) describes a Nano-CT device that creates three-dimensional x-ray images at resolutions up to 100 nanometers. The first test application: Together with colleagues from the University of Kasse
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Immune cell policing offers insights into cancer, autoimmune diseaseSalk researchers discover that cutting off energy production in regulatory T cells impairs their function.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
H3N2 mutation in last year's flu vaccine responsible for lowered efficacyThe below average efficacy of last year's influenza vaccine (which was only 20 to 30 percent effective) can be attributed to a mutation in the H3N2 strain, a new study reports. With the mutation, most people receiving the egg-grown vaccine did not have immunity against H3N2 viruses that circulated last year.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tiny bees play big part in secret sex lives of treesWhen it comes to sex between plants, tiny bees the size of ladybugs play a critical role in promoting long-distance pairings. That's what scientists at The University of Texas at Austin discovered after one of the most detailed paternity tests in wild trees ever conducted. The research gives new insights into how certain bees promote genetic diversity that is essential for plants to adapt to vario
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cool idea: Magma held in 'cold storage' before giant volcano eruptionLong Valley, California, has long defined the 'super-eruption.' About 765,000 years ago, a pool of molten rock exploded into the sky. Within one nightmarish week, 760 cubic kilometers of lava and ash spewed out in the kind of volcanic cataclysm we hope never to witness. A new study shows that the giant body of magma -- molten rock -- at Long Valley was much cooler before the eruption than previous
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Crocs take a bite out of claims of ancient stone-tool useReptiles with big bites complicate claims of Stone Age butchery.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Astronomers Use Shadowy Alien Worlds to Peer Inside StarsNew analyses allow scientists to measure stellar densities using orbiting planets -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Scientist RSS
Washington State University Researchers Complain of Industry InfluenceAgriculture faculty members allege funding from industry organizations is tied to their employment status.
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The Scientist RSS
Republican Tax Plan Eliminates Popular Education ExemptionsThe proposal draws criticism from higher-education groups.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Beyond good vibrations: New insights into metamaterial magicMetamaterials have amazing potential -- think invisibility cloaks and perfect lenses -- but they are more likely to be found in a Harry Potter novel than a lab. To help bring them closer to reality, scientists have gone back to basics and demonstrated that the fundamental physics of metamaterials is more complex than scientists once thought.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chicken embryo illuminates role of thyroid hormone in brain developmentA thyroid hormone transporter is essential for the earliest stages of brain development, according to a new study of a region of the developing chicken brain with a layered structure similar to the human cerebral cortex.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Could this be malaria's Achilles heel?Researchers have identified a defense mechanism by which the malaria parasite can survive inside its host's liver cells.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
FDG PET shows tumor DNA levels in blood are linked to NSCLC aggressivenessResearches have demonstrated a better way of determining the aggressiveness of tumors in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). They used 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT imaging to show that the amount of cell-free tumor DNA circulating in the bloodstream correlates with tumor metabolism (linked to cancer aggressiveness), not tumor burden (amount of cancer in the body).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Excavation in Northern Iraq: Sasanian loom discoveredArchaeologists have returned from the Iraqi-Kurdish province of Sulaymaniyah with new findings: The discovery of a loom from the 5th to 6th century AD.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Liquid biopsy spots aggressive pediatric brainstem cancer earlier without surgeryA particularly aggressive form of pediatric cancer can be spotted reliably by the genetic fragments it leaves behind in children's biofluids, opening the door to non-surgical biopsies and providing a way to gauge whether such tumors respond to treatment, according to researchers.
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Feed: All Latest
Scientists Are Developing a Breath-Based Test for MalariaMicrobiologists are dissecting the breath of patients infected with malaria in search of a new kind of diagnostic test.
3h
Live Science
'Robutt' Simulates 10 Years of Butts on Car SeatsWhile crash-test dummies and other assembly-line machines seem to get the raw end of the deal, a different robot has a much cushier job: It tests car seats. Meet Robutt, a robot that's here to make sure your car stays comfy after years of wear.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biological clock found in fungal parasite sheds more light on 'zombie ants' phenomenonA working biological clock has been found in a fungal parasite that infects ants to control their behavior and lead them away from their nests in an effort to spread their fungal spores more effectively.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cool idea: Magma held in 'cold storage' before giant volcano eruptionLong Valley, California, has long defined the "super-eruption." About 765,000 years ago, a pool of molten rock exploded into the sky. Within one nightmarish week, 760 cubic kilometers of lava and ash spewed out in the kind of volcanic cataclysm we hope never to witness.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tiny bees play big part in secret sex lives of treesWhen it comes to sex between plants, tiny bees the size of ladybugs play a critical role in promoting long-distance pairings. That's what scientists at The University of Texas at Austin discovered after one of the most detailed paternity tests in wild trees ever conducted. The research gives new insight into how tiny pollinating animals promote genetic diversity that is essential for plants' adapt
3h
Scientific American Content: Global
Flu Vaccine "Factories" Create Errors That Reduce ProtectionEggs used to grow viruses for flu shots trigger changes that leave people vulnerable -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Subatomic Discovery That Physicists Considered Keeping SecretTiny particles called bottom quarks could fuse together in a shockingly powerful reaction -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic
The Master of a Secret Machete Martial Art The Haitian Revolution of 1791 was the only successful slave rebellion in recorded history. Without access to guns or ammunition, the rebels defeated Napolean’s army with the only tool at their disposal: the machete, which they used to toil sugarcane fields. Thus was born the martial art of machete fencing. Known as Tire Machet, it is shrouded in secrecy; only a select few Haitians have mastered
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Gizmodo
Rare Photos From Atmospheric Nuclear Tests of the 1960s PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY; UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY/Topic The last American nuclear weapons test conducted in the atmosphere was on November 4, 1962. And the website Topic got its hands on some newly declassified photos from that period, which look like exquisitely macabre art. Topic has the absolutely fascinating story behind the newly released photos , som
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Federal climate science report for U.S. releasedThe newly released Climate Science Special Report describes current trends in the climate globally and for the U.S., and projects trends in temperature, precipitation, sea-level rise and Arctic sea ice for the remainder of this century.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Age-old malaria treatment found to improve nanoparticle delivery to tumorsA new study shows that a 70-year-old malaria drug can block immune cells in the liver so nanoparticles can arrive at their intended tumor site, overcoming a significant hurdle of targeted drug delivery.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Subset of carbon nanotubes poses cancer risk similar to asbestos in miceResearchers have shown for the first time in mice that long and thin nanomaterials called carbon nanotubes may have the same carcinogenic effect as asbestos: they can induce the formation of mesothelioma. The findings were observed in 10 percent -- 25 percent of the 32 animals included in the study, which has not yet been replicated in humans.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stem cells from muscle could address diabetes-related circulation problemsStem cells taken from muscle tissue could promote better blood flow in patients with diabetes who develop peripheral artery disease, a painful complication that can require surgery or lead to amputation. A new study found that an injection of the stem cells prompted new blood vessels to grow, improving circulation in the affected tissues and function in the affected limbs.
3h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Reluctant to talk to your mentor about your research? We had to change the link in order to get this event to work. Please visit this link to participate in the event: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qWtyij6FI50. We sincerely apologize for the major hiccups. Please click on the link above to see the new event. From: iBiology
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Beyond good vibrations: New insights into metamaterial magicMetamaterials have amazing potential--think invisibility cloaks and perfect lenses--but they are more likely to be found in a Harry Potter novel than a lab. To help bring them closer to reality, Michigan Technological University's Elena Semouchkina has gone back to basics and demonstrated that the fundamental physics of metamaterials is more complex than scientists once thought.
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Live Science
What in the World Is This? Weird, Amazing Image Goes ViralAn otherworldly image reveals the complexity of small things.
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The Atlantic
Color Photos of the 1939 New York World's Fair The famous theme of the 1939 New York World's Fair was "The World of Tomorrow.” One part of that world, another theme showcased throughout the fair, was “electrification”— the growing use of electricity to light and power not only factories and businesses, but also homes and public spaces. Photographer Peter Campbell captured many scenes from the fair in full color, both during the day and at nig
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NYT > Science
A Grecian Artifact Evokes Tales From the ‘Iliad’ and ‘Odyssey’An engraved stone with a finely detailed battle scene was found in the grave of a warrior buried about 1450 B.C.
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Viden
Klimaforskeres nye rettesnor: ”Hvor galt kan det gå?”Politikerne har brug for at kende de værst tænkelige scenarier om temperaturer og vandstand, siger dansk klimaprofessor.
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NYT > Science
For Patients With Heart Failure, Little Guidance as Death NearsAmericans are living longer with heart disease, managing it as a chronic condition. But there are few rules for these patients as they near the end of life.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
HCI study identifies enhanced impact of treatment for hereditary cancer patientsPeople with an inherited syndrome called familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) have a 100 percent lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer if they do not seek appropriate medical care. Recent findings published by researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah identified a promising prevention treatment for patients with FAP.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate change likely to be more deadly in poor African settlementsConditions in crowded urban settlements in Africa make the effects of climate change worse, pushing temperatures to levels dangerous for children and the elderly in those areas.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Quantum computing on the moveNew work marks a decisive milestone for bringing the idea for scaling up quantum computers into the realm of feasibility.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Protecting 'high carbon' rainforest areas also protects threatened wildlifeProtecting 'high carbon' rainforest areas also protects threatened wildlife.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Creating images of minute structuresScientists gain an insight into the fascinating world of atoms and molecules using x-ray microscopes. Ground-breaking research by physicists has paved the way towards new imaging techniques. The team of scientists have successfully developed and tested a method which is considerably more effective than conventional procedures.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists make significant breakthrough on superbug-killing antibiotic teixobactinScientists working to develop a 'game-changing' new antibiotic have made a significant advance towards creating commercially viable drug treatments by producing two simplified synthetic versions of the substance which are just as potent at killing superbugs like MRSA as its natural form.
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The Atlantic
Is Making a Marvel Movie Good for Directors? There are plenty of advantages to getting hired to direct the next Marvel movie. You’re working with near-limitless resources, can hire Oscar-winning actors like Cate Blanchett and Tilda Swinton for supporting roles, and your film is essentially guaranteed to be one of the most watched of the year. Lately, the company has become more comfortable hiring idiosyncratic young talent, the best (and mo
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Gizmodo
WeWork Wants to Teach Kindergartners to Disrupt Shit Up Artist rendering of WeGrow school. (Image: BIG) WeWork has an unsettling vision for disrupting education by prepping kids to become the next Zuckerberg before they start learning their times tables. And while it’s a hell of a lot better than anything Betsy DeVos could dream up, the company’s technocratic, seemingly Shark Tank -inspired take on Montessori makes me fear for my unborn children. This
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Scientific American Content: Global
Artificial Sweeteners Are Used to Track Water PollutionSucralose turns out to be a perfect substance for tracing household wastewater -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change likely to be more deadly in poor African settlementsConditions in crowded urban settlements in Africa make the effects of climate change worse, pushing temperatures to levels dangerous for children and the elderly in those areas, according to a new study led by a Johns Hopkins University scientist.
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Gizmodo
Google's Top Suggestion for the Sutherland Springs Killer is a Debunked Antifa Theory Screenshot showing Google’s autosuggestions for searches that include the name of America’s latest mass killer (Screenshot/Google) Was America’s latest mass shooting committed by a member of antifa, the leaderless anti-fascist collective? No. But Google’s autocomplete results are still suggesting that he might be. Americans watched social media in horror yesterday in the aftermath of a familiar s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
US-born workers receive disability benefits more often than workers from abroadPeople born elsewhere who work in the United States are much less likely to receive Social Security Disability Insurance benefits than those born in the US or its territories. Foreign-born adults are less likely to report health-related impediments to working, to be covered by work-disability insurance and to apply for disability benefits.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Depressed with a chronic disease? Consider alternative therapiesScientists are finding more evidence that commonly prescribed antidepressants aren't effective in people battling both depression and a chronic medical disease, raising a critical question of whether doctors should enact widespread changes in how they treat millions of depressed Americans.
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Gizmodo
Give Your Wrist a Rest With This $11 Vertical Mouse From Anker Anker Wireless Vertical Mouse , $11 with code SELLMUBA Whether your current mouse is giving you chronic wrist pain, or you just want to try something different, this 4.2 star rated wireless ergonomic vertical mouse from Anker is only $11 today, easily the best price we’ve ever seen. In addition to the clever design, it even comes with three adjustable DPI settings and forward/back buttons, which
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Popular Science
Animated fossils are helping scientists rediscover extinct species Technology Combining cartoons with paleontology can show us how dinosaurs moved. Without the actual animal to study, artists have to bridge the gap between bones and the creature’s fully fleshed appearance.
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Ars Technica
Drop test concludes iPhone X is the “most breakable iPhone” Enlarge / A functional iPhone X, unlike the ones that went through recent stress testing. (credit: Samuel Axon) As we suspected in our review , the iPhone X is not faring well in the first drop and durability tests. Two different drop tests showed immediate damage to the device. Consumer electronics site CNET ran a drop test from a height of three feet. The glass at the corner of the phone cracke
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows lupus support line has positive impactA free telephone support and education program for people with lupus is a valuable resource to help them cope with the disease, according to a study at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) in New York City.
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The Atlantic
Mass Shootings in America Are Spreading Like a Disease Twenty-six people shot dead in Sutherland Springs, November 5. Fifty-nine people shot dead in Las Vegas, October 1. Forty-nine people shot dead in Orlando, June 12 of last year. These are three of the five worst mass shootings in modern U.S. history. All happened in the past two years. Two occurred within the same two months. Is there a connection? Several years ago, Malcolm Gladwell wrote an art
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Computer system finds 'recipes' for producing materialsSystem could pore through millions of research papers to extract 'recipes' for producing materials.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chicken embryo illuminates role of thyroid hormone in brain developmentA thyroid hormone transporter is essential for the earliest stages of brain development, according to a JNeurosci study of a region of the developing chicken brain with a layered structure similar to the human cerebral cortex.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Same gene, different mating techniques in fliesA study of two related species of fruit fly published in JNeurosci reveals that a gene known to regulate behavior for attracting a mate in one species gives rise to unique wooing techniques observed in the other species.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How marketing decoys influence decision-makingThe neural underpinnings of the decoy effect -- a marketing strategy in which one of three presented options is unlikely to be chosen but may influence how an individual decides between the other two options -- are investigated in new neuroeconomic research published in JNeurosci using neuroimaging and brain stimulation.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
US government approves 'killer' mosquitoes to fight disease US Environmental Protection Agency will allow release of insects in 20 states and Washington DC. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22959
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The Atlantic
How Kristaps Porzingis Became New York’s New King of Sports For a time, at least, New York Knicks fans hated Kristaps Porzingis. When the 7-foot-3, 19-year-old Latvian’s name was announced as the No. 4 overall pick in the 2015 NBA Draft in Brooklyn, supporters of Manhattan’s team unleashed a barrage of boos. Cameras zeroed in on one man in a Knicks jersey burying his face in his hands, then cut to a child sobbing and raising a thumbs-down. To devotees of
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Launches “Life Up Close,” A Multi-Year Series Featuring Science Writing from Around the World Washington, D.C. (November 6, 2017)—The Atlantic is expanding the global footprint of its science writing today with a multi-year series to investigate life in all of its multitudes. The series, “ Life Up Close ,” created with support from Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education (HHMI), begins today at TheAtlantic.com. In the first piece for the project, “ The Zombie Dis
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The Atlantic
The Rise and Fall of Rolling Stone When I got to Rolling Stone , the party was over. I turned up just in time to see a cigarette floating in the last cocktail of the night. It was 1993, and I was in my mid-20s. I went on the road with the Rolling Stones, but they were cranky and old, bickering with reporters who called them the Strolling Bones. I hung out with Hunter S. Thompson in Woody Creek, Colorado, but he’d hurt his back and
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Ars Technica
Supreme Court won’t hear Apple v. Samsung round two People line up to enter the federal courthouse in San Jose, California, in July 2012. It was the first day of trial in the patent battle between Apple and Samsung. (credit: Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images) The colossal courtroom clash between Apple and Samsung over patents won't be making a second appearance at the Supreme Court. The two tech titans went at it in front of juries in San Jose
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mandatory state policies work best to curb power plant emissions, study findsU.S. state policies aimed at mitigating power plant emissions vary widely in effectiveness, finds a new study. The analysis shows that policies with mandatory compliance are associated with the largest reductions in power plant emissions.
5h
Gizmodo
How to Pitch Gizmodo and io9 Illustration: Jim Cooke/Gizmodo We’re always open to original feature pitches from writers! Please see specific guidelines for Gizmodo and io9 below to get you started. Our rates vary according to experience and the scale of the project. You can reach us at pitches@gizmodo.com or email me directly at marina@gizmodo.com. Gizmodo: What we’re looking for Pitches related to technology and science are
5h
Ars Technica
Cost of wind keeps dropping, and there’s little coal, nuclear can do to stop it installation A battery installation built by BYD in 2015 in LaSalle County, Illinois. (credit: BYD) Though a lot has changed since 2016, not much has changed for energy economics in the US. The cost of wind generation continues to fall, solar costs are falling, too, and the cost of coal-power energy has seen no movement, while the cost of building and maintaining nuclear plants has gone up. And n
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Feed: All Latest
'Assassin's Creed Origins': More of the Same Can Be a Joy All Its OwnDespite its best intentions, the franchise's prequel is business as usual. Thankfully, business is good.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Flavonoid derivatives targeting NF-kappaBThe aim of the study was to develop new synthetic anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic agents targeting NF-kappaB.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A quasiparticle questUCSB physicists develop a device that could provide conclusive evidence for the existence (or not) of non-Abelian anyons.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Same gene, different mating techniques in fliesA study of two related species of fruit fly published in JNeurosci reveals that a gene known to regulate behavior for attracting a mate in one species gives rise to unique wooing techniques observed in the other species.
5h
New Scientist - News
Maths can make sense of Trump’s ‘madman’ North Korea strategyOutlandish threats in the standoff between North Korea and Donald Trump are bluffs whose main aim is to bolster support at home, says game theorist Petros Sekeris
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
Tiny Human Brain Organoids Implanted in Rodents“Micro quasi-brains” could aid disease research, but trigger ethical concerns -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Big Think
Would the World Be More Peaceful If There Were More Women Leaders? Men are barbarians, while women are civilizing. Or at least, that's how the stereotype goes. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Heating ocean moon Enceladus for billions of yearsEnough heat to power hydrothermal activity inside Saturn's ocean moon Enceladus for billions of years could be generated through tidal friction if the moon has a highly porous core, a new study finds, working in favour of the moon as a potentially habitable world.
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Gizmodo
Sprint Won't Stop Emailing Customers' Personal Information to This Random Person Photo: Getty For years, Amy Kono, a 35-year-old project manager from California, has been getting emails from Sprint that aren’t meant for her. She doesn’t get them frequently—she estimates she’s received 30 or 40 over the years—but they contain other customers’ leasing agreements for new phones and cell service agreements, which often include sensitive information like addresses, phone numbers,
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Viden
Ny gadget: Nu kan du taste løs i virtual realityNy prototype vil gøre fysiske tastaturer virtuelle.
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Gizmodo
James Comey Goes Legit on Twitter Just in Time to Promote His New Book Image: Twitter / Gizmodo Former FBI director and Anchorman enthusiast James Comey just joined Twitter. Well, to be precise, Comey just confirmed that the account that once had the handle @projectexile7 and the name Reinhold Niebuhr indeed belongs to him . It now bears the username @Comey and sports a little blue “verified” checkmark. Oh and also he’s writing a book that you can buy next spring. O
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Early bloomers: Statistical tool reveals climate change impacts on plantsScientists announce statistical tool to extract information from current and historical plant data.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Has adolescent preventive care increased since the Affordable Care Act?Preventive care visits for adolescents increased moderately after implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) but most US adolescents still do not attend doctor 'well visits' or receive preventive care.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Blame tired brain cells for mental lapses after poor sleepA new study is the first to reveal how sleep deprivation disrupts brain cells' ability to communicate with each other, leading to mental lapses that affect memory and visual perception.
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Science | The Guardian
Is your gut microbiome the key to health and happiness? Research suggests the vast ecosystem of organisms that lives in our digestive systems might be as complex and influential as our genes in everything from mental health to athleticism and obesity. But is ‘poop doping’ really the way ahead? John Cryan was originally trained as a neuroscientist to focus on everything from the neck upwards. But eight years ago, an investigation into irritable bowel s
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Age-old malaria treatment found to improve nanoparticle delivery to tumorsA new study shows that a 70-year-old malaria drug can block immune cells in the liver so nanoparticles can arrive at their intended tumor site, overcoming a significant hurdle of targeted drug delivery, according to a team of researchers led by Houston Methodist.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Age-old malaria treatment found to improve nanoparticle delivery to tumorsA new study shows that a 70-year-old malaria drug can block immune cells in the liver so nanoparticles can arrive at their intended tumor site, overcoming a significant hurdle of targeted drug delivery.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Academy of Rheumatology Medical educators at HSS fosters innovation to improve careThe Academy of Rheumatology Medical Educators at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) has created a stimulating academic environment for educators, promoted teaching excellence and supported innovative research in rheumatology education.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New research targets cancer's 'Achilles' Heel'Northwestern Engineering's Vadim Backman has developed an effective new strategy for treating cancer that prevents cancer from evolving to withstand treatment, making the disease an easier target for existing drugs. If the cells cannot evolve to resist chemotherapy, for example, they die.
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Science | The Guardian
Bonn climate talks will aim to meet goals laid out in Paris, says UN Delegates ‘do not have the luxury of lots of philosophical discussions’ but must focus on advancing the pledges set out in the Paris agreement The UN hopes to create an “operating manual” for implementing the Paris agreement on climate change, with talks in the next two weeks in Bonn . “We want to advance further, faster, together to meet the goals set out in the Paris agreement ,” said Patricia
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Science | The Guardian
Mammals switched to daytime activity after dinosaurs died out, says study Earliest mammals were nocturnal to avoid dinosaurs, which may be why there are relatively few modern daytime-active mammals, say researchers The earliest mammals were night creatures which only emerged from the cover of darkness after the demise of the daytime-dominating dinosaurs, according to new research. This would explain why relatively few mammals follow a daytime-active – or “diurnal”– lif
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees late season Atlantic Tropical Depression formNASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Depression Nineteen shortly after it formed in the Central Atlantic Ocean on Nov. 6. A visible image from Terra showed the storm formed despite being under wind shear conditions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Uncovering bacterial cell wall secrets to combat antibiotic resistanceCell walls—the jacket-like structures that surround all known bacteria—may turn out to be bacteria's undoing , holding the key to developing new drugs that target it for destruction.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists improve vertical stability of superconducting Korean fusion deviceA major challenge facing the development of fusion energy is maintaining the ultra-hot plasma that fuels fusion reactions in a steady state, or sustainable, form using superconducting magnetic coils to avoid the tremendous power requirement of copper coils. While superconductors can allow a fusion reactor to operate indefinitely, controlling the plasma with superconductors presents a challenge bec
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Autonomously growing synthetic DNA strandsEngineers have developed a method that allows pre-designed sequences of DNA to autonomously grow and concatenate along specific assembly routes, hence providing the basis for a new generation of programmable molecular devices. Putting their new concept of so-called 'Primer Exchange Reaction' (PER) cascades to the test, they successfully engineered a first set of devices with diverse functions, suc
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Can cannabinoids be used to treat cancer?When cannabinoids activate signaling pathways in cancer cells they can stimulate a cell death mechanism called apoptosis, unleashing a potent anti-tumor effect.
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Ars Technica
US judge says “global de-indexing order” against Google threatens free speech (credit: Photo by Michael Gottschalk/Photothek via Getty Images) Canadian courts can't rule the Internet—at least not outside Canada. A US federal judge has stopped a ruling from the Canadian Supreme Court from going into effect in the US. The Canadian order would have ordered Google to de-index all pages belonging to a company called Datalink, which was allegedly selling products that violated t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new method accelerates the mapping of genes in the 'Dark Matter' of our DNAScientists at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona, have developed a new method, which improved the most important catalogue of genes -GENCODE-, including characterization of new genes in the DNA "Dark Matter". Their new method, published today in Nature Genetics, offers a way of mapping genes in a more accurate, faster and cheaper way.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stem cells from muscle could address diabetes-related circulation problemsStem cells taken from muscle tissue could promote better blood flow in patients with diabetes who develop peripheral artery disease, a painful complication that can require surgery or lead to amputation. A new study in mice at the University of Illinois found that an injection of the stem cells prompted new blood vessels to grow, improving circulation in the affected tissues and function in the af
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can cannabinoids be used to treat cancer?When cannabinoids activate signaling pathways in cancer cells they can stimulate a cell death mechanism called apoptosis, unleashing a potent anti-tumor effect.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quantum computing on the moveThe work by Kaufmann and coworkers appeared in the high rank international journal Physical Review Letters 119, 150503 and marks a decisive milestone for bringing this idea for scaling up quantum computers into the realm of feasibility.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees late season Atlantic Tropical Depression formNASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Depression Nineteen shortly after it formed in the Central Atlantic Ocean on Nov. 6. A visible image from Terra showed the storm formed despite being under wind shear conditions.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
For these baleen whales, hunting requires little more than treading waterRorqual whales are known for their lunge-feeding behavior. As the name suggests, this method involves lunging forward with mouth opened wide to engulf large quantities of water, which is then strained through baleen plates to leave tiny prey behind. But researchers have made the surprising discovery that Bryde's whales also find food in a much more relaxed way: they simply lift their heads at the
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Subset of carbon nanotubes poses cancer risk similar to asbestos in miceResearchers have shown for the first time in mice that long and thin nanomaterials called carbon nanotubes may have the same carcinogenic effect as asbestos: they can induce the formation of mesothelioma. The findings were observed in 10 percent -- 25 percent of the 32 animals included in the study, which has not yet been replicated in humans. The work appears Nov. 6 in Current Biology.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First-ever protein hydrogels made in living cellsCell biologists report what they believe is the first-ever creation of tiny protein-based gelatin-like clumps called hydrogels inside living cells. The ability to create hydrogels on demand, they say, should advance the long scientific struggle to study the elusive structures -- which form in nature when proteins or other molecules aggregate under certain conditions -- and to uncover their suspect
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Group B Streptococcus infection causes estimated 150,000 stillbirth, infant death21.7 million pregnant women carry the Group B Streptococcus bacteria, according to the first global study of Group B Strep -- most of them are currently unidentified and untreated. A new study shows for first time that a maternal vaccine may prevent 231,000 infant and maternal GBS cases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New techniques give blood biopsies greater promiseResearchers develop an efficient method for capturing and quantifying tumor DNA from blood prior to sequencing, thereby making blood biopsies cost-effective and scalable. The study demonstrates that nearly 90 percent of the genetic features of a tumor can be detected in blood using standard whole-exome sequencing. Researchers discovered that this approach could be effectively applied in 33 to 49 p
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The Atlantic
Why the White House Dreads a Flynn Indictment In the indictments sweepstakes ahead of last week’s first moves by special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia probe, Paul Manafort was the odds-on favorite, but Michael Flynn, the former national-security adviser, was a good bet too. Monday, and the rest of the week, came and went, bringing indictments for Manafort and his deputy Rick Gates and a guilty plea from George Papadopoulos , but nothing on
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Gizmodo
Nobel-Winning Physicist Worried About 100 Chocolate Coin Wager Over New Particles Image: Adam Baker /Flickr Nobel Prize winner Frank Wilczek was optimistic back in 2012. After all, he’d just won a wager after scientists had just announced their Higgs boson discovery at the Large Hadron Collider particle physics experiment in Switzerland. He made another bet—but he’s doesn’t feel as confident today. Wilczek made his new bet with Swedish physicist Tord Ekelöf. The terms were sim
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Satellite imagery reveals decline in ISIS oil productionOil production by the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) steadily declined between 2014 and 2016, indicating that the group was financing itself in other ways, like taxation or extortion.
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Science | The Guardian
Did you solve it? Secrets of Russian intelligence The solutions to today’s puzzles Earlier today on my puzzle blog I set you the following puzzles: 1. Find a solution to the equation Continue reading...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Subset of carbon nanotubes poses cancer risk similar to asbestos in miceNanotechnology, the science of developing materials containing very small fibers, is having a growing influence on daily life. Now researchers have shown for the first time in mice that long and thin nanomaterials called carbon nanotubes may have the same carcinogenic effect as asbestos: they can induce the formation of mesothelioma. The findings were observed in 10%-25% of the 32 animals included
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
For these baleen whales, hunting requires little more than treading waterRorqual whales are known for their impressive lunge-feeding behavior. As the name suggests, this method involves lunging forward with mouth opened wide to engulf large quantities of water, which is then strained through a series of baleen plates to leave many individually tiny prey behind. But researchers reporting in Current Biology on November 6 have made the surprising discovery that Bryde's wh
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rich nations far behind on $100 bn climate pledge: studyWealthy countries are falling well short of their pledge to provide $100 billion a year to developing countries by 2020 as part of the Paris climate accord, a report published Monday said.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Afghanistan overturns suspension of WhatsApp, TelegramAfghanistan on Monday overturned a temporary ban on WhatsApp and Telegram following outcry among social media users who had branded the move an attack on free speech.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mandatory state policies work best to curb power plant emissions, study findsU.S. state policies aimed at mitigating power plant emissions vary widely in effectiveness, finds a new study by researchers at Emory University.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds racial disparities in hip replacement outcomes in impoverished communitiesA combination of race and socioeconomic factors play a role in hip replacement outcomes, according to a study at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Lupus patients endorse PROMIS assessment tool as relevant, valuable and potentially useful in improving clinical careA study at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) evaluating the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) finds that patients with lupus endorse the assessment tool as relevant, valuable and potentially useful in improving clinical care.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Satellite imagery reveals decline in ISIS oil productionOil production by the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) steadily declined between 2014 and 2016, indicating that the group was financing itself in other ways, like taxation or extortion, according to a report issued by Princeton University and the World Bank.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Multi-racial facial recognition system provides more accurate results, says Surrey studyA multi-racial facial recognition system delivers more accurate results than those typically used today, a new study published in Pattern Recognition journal has revealed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Revealed new target for development of antibiotics aimed at highly resistant bacteriaResearch for new treatment against resistant pathogens is one of the most important branches of the pharmaceutical industry -- in USA medical literature, there is a record of one bacillus-type bacteria resistant to 26 different antibiotics. Brazilian and French scientists show that inhibiting the interaction of two key proteins for cell wall elongation can be an effective strategy to kill bacteria
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NYT > Science
Chopin’s Heart, Pickled in a Jar, Offers Clues to His DeathThe heart of the Polish composer, preserved for nearly 170 years, was examined by scientists who say he most likely died of tuberculosis.
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New Scientist - News
Enceladus’s hot, gritty core may cook up ingredients for lifeSaturn’s moon Enceladus seems to have a sandy core that warms water passing between the grains. This heating could help create conditions that are right for life
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New Scientist - News
Dinosaur mass-extinction let mammals come out in the dayThe extinction of the dinosaurs allowed our distant mammalian ancestors to start foraging during the day for the first time – and shaped our early evolution
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New Scientist - News
Your brain signals weaken and slow down when you’re really tiredWe’ve seen how sleep deprivation disrupts the way neurons communicate with each other, and it may explain why a bad night’s sleep makes it hard to concentrate
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Infrastructure optimization tool helps design future basesWhere do you get your water? How do you generate electricity to cook your food and keep it fresh? What happens to your waste after you toss it or flush it?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First-ever US experiments at new X-ray facility may lead to better explosive modelingFor the first time in the U.S., time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering (TRSAXS) is used to observe ultra-fast carbon clustering and graphite and nanodiamond production in the insensitive explosive Plastic Bonded Explosive (PBX) 9502, potentially leading to better computer models of explosive performance.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Autonomously growing synthetic DNA strandsSynthetic biologists and nanobiologists are re-purposing DNA, the hereditary material present in nearly all the body's cells, as a smart and stable self-assembling material to build nanofactories, drug-delivering nanostructures and molecular devices that can sense their environment and respond in different ways by, for example, detecting inflammation in the body or toxins in the environment. These
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA satellite tracks ozone pollution by monitoring its key ingredientsOzone pollution near Earth's surface is one of the main ingredients of summertime smog. It is also not directly measurable from space due to the abundance of ozone higher in the atmosphere, which obscures measurements of surface ozone. New NASA-funded research has devised a way to use satellite measurements of the precursor gases that contribute to ozone formation to differentiate among three diff
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Live Science
In Photos: Cave Art from Mona IslandScientists have uncovered thousands of well-preserved paintings in caves on Mona Island that date to before Europeans arrived on the island.
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Popular Science
Could brighter clouds make hurricanes less destructive? Environment Ever-so-slightly more reflective clouds could, theoretically, slow down storms. Have you ever wondered “Is there any way to slow hurricanes down?” A plan by climate physicists aims to tackle this problem—by making clouds brighter.
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Ars Technica
Broadcom wants to buy Qualcomm in unprecedented $130 billion deal Enlarge According to a report from Bloomberg , chipmaker Broadcom is launching an ambitious campaign to acquire Qualcomm, best known as the default System on a Chip (SoC) and cellular modem vendor in most smartphones. Broadcom has reportedly made an unsolicited offer to buy Qualcomm in a deal valued at $130 billion, which, if it succeeds, would be the largest acquisition in tech history. It's not
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
States go after third-party sellers on Amazon MarketplaceA chapter in Amazon.com's long tax saga closed this spring when the online retailer began collecting sales tax on purchases in all 45 states that have one, long a goal of the online retailer's brick-and-mortar rivals.
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Gizmodo
Monday's Best Deals: Smart Thermostat, Waterproof Speaker, iTunes Gift Card, and More A smart thermostat , a waterproof speaker , an iTunes gift card and more kick off today’s best deals. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Anker SoundCore Sport XL , $56 with code QUM7D9ED Anker’s SoundCore line of Bluetooth speakers dominated our Co-Op voting, but the largest member of the family just got its first discount in a long time. The Anker
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mammals switched to daytime activity after dinosaur extinctionMammals only started being active in the daytime after non-avian dinosaurs were wiped out about 66 million years ago (mya), finds a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
One of the oldest objects in the universe observedAstronomers report that they have detected the second most distant dusty, star-forming galaxy ever found in the universe -- born in the first one billion years after the Big Bang. It is the oldest object ever detected by the LMT.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Potential 'missing link' in chemistry that led to life on Earth discoveredChemists have found a compound that may have been a crucial factor in the origins of life on Earth, explains a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stem cells pave the way for new treatment of diabetesA new stem cell study shows how we may increase the vital production of insulin in patients suffering from diabetes. The discovery helps to more efficiently at less cost make insulin-producing beta cells from human stem cells. Therefore, the research paves the way for more effective treatment of diabetes. The method may also prove significant to the treatment of a series of other diseases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Depressed fathers risk not getting helpPostnatal depression among new mothers is a well-known phenomenon. Knowledge about depression in new fathers, however, is more limited. A new study shows that depression among new fathers may be more common than previously believed. There is also a major risk that it remains undetected using today's screening instruments, and that fathers do not receive the help they need.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hearing an opinion spoken aloud humanizes the person behind itPeople attribute more humanlike qualities to those expressing opinions they disagree with when the opinions are spoken as opposed to written, according to new research. The findings explore how specific aspects of speech, such as intonation and frequent pauses, may serve as cues that humanize the people who are speaking, making them seem more intellectual and emotionally warm than those whose opin
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Caribbean islands reveal a 'lost world' of ancient mammalsAn analysis of the incredibly diverse "lost world" of Caribbean fossils includes dozens of ancient mammals, a new study reports. The study reveals that the arrival of humans throughout the islands was likely the primary cause of the extinction of native mammal species there.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers develop data bus for quantum computerThe quantum world is fragile; error correction codes are needed to protect the information stored in a quantum object from the deteriorating effects of noise. Quantum physicists have developed a protocol to pass quantum information between differently encoded building blocks of a future quantum computer, such as processors and memories. Scientists may use this protocol in the future to build a dat
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Saving seagrasses from dredging as new research finds solutionsTiming of dredging and finding an 'ecological window' is the key to helping preserve one of the world's most productive and important ecosystems -- seagrass meadows, a new study has found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Coloring the heartbeatHeart disease is one of the leading causes of death around the world. Now researchers assert that easy, early ways to screen for good drugs is vital.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Poor social skills may be harmful to healthWhile social skills deficits have long been linked to mental health problems like depression, a new study links poor social skills to poor physical health as well. Those who struggle in social situations experience more stress and loneliness, which can take a toll on the body.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
More physical activity and higher intensity physical activity may significantly reduce risk of death in older women in the short termUsing wearable devices to measure activity showed that the amount of moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity was associated with an up to 70 percent lower risk of death among older women in a four-year study. The amount of light intensity physical activity was not associated with death risk, but that may not negate the benefits of light activity for other health outcomes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Autonomously growing synthetic DNA strandsA Wyss Institute team has developed a method that allows pre-designed sequences of DNA to autonomously grow and concatenate along specific assembly routes, hence providing the basis for a new generation of programmable molecular devices. Putting their new concept of so-called 'Primer Exchange Reaction' (PER) cascades to the test, they successfully engineered a first set of devices with diverse fun
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First-ever US experiments at new X-ray facility may lead to better explosive modelingFor the first time in the US, time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering (TRSAXS) is used to observe ultra-fast carbon clustering and graphite and nanodiamond production in the insensitive explosive Plastic Bonded Explosive (PBX) 9502, potentially leading to better computer models of explosive performance.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA satellite tracks ozone pollution by monitoring its key ingredientsOzone pollution near Earth's surface is one of the main ingredients of summertime smog.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
High risk sex behaviors impact women's health: McMasterThe research team compared samples of vaginal microbiota of both women who were involved in sex work and those who were not sex workers in Nairobi, Kenya.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers discover eight new epilepsy genesA new study examining 200 children with epileptic encephalopathy -- epilepsy combined with intellectual or overall developmental disability -- identified eight new genes involved in this type of epilepsy thanks to their use of whole-genome sequencing, which had never been done before in an epileptic study of this scope.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mandatory state policies work best to curb power plant emissions, study finds"Based on the results of our study, we recommend that states adopt a policy of mandatory greenhouse gas emissions registry and reporting by power plants," says Eri Saikawa, an assistant professor in Emory's Department of Environmental Sciences. "We also found a significant impact in states that adopt public benefit funds aimed at energy efficiency and renewable energy programs."
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Ars Technica
New hybrid rules for F1 have teams in a tizzy; Ferrari threatens to quit Enlarge / Renault, Mercedes, and Ferrari engines power the first three cars off the grid in this year's Mexican Grand Prix. (credit: Clive Mason | Getty Images) The 2017 Formula 1 season is rapidly drawing to a close. There are two races left to run, though with ever-decreasing stakes. Mercedes' Lewis Hamilton sealed his fourth championship in Mexico at the end of October after a series of compon
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Gizmodo
Watch an Oil Painting Instantly Lose 200 Years of Grimy Varnish GIF Image: Philip Mould What you’re seeing is a valuable painting being partially dissolved on purpose. Fine art is often coated with varnish for the same reason furniture is: it provides a protective barrier to the elements. But varnish turns yellow over time, and an even less attractive color after a few centuries—which is why art restoration experts need to strip old varnish off and reapply it
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Calorie counts on menus make a differenceOne the most comprehensive pieces of research into the impact of displaying calories on menus reveals it not only influences consumers to make lower calorie choices but also encourages retailers to provide lower calorie options.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Autism: Relational factors in music therapyRelational factors in music therapy can contribute to a positive outcome of therapy for children with autism.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New mathematical model gives courts valuable DNA toolA DNA profile is often important evidence in cases of rape or other sexual assault of women, but if investigators have only scant biological material, the results may be difficult to interpret and use in a court of law. A researcher is now putting numbers on the evidential value of DNA from Y chromosomes, providing courts with a valuable tool.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Animation meets biology: Shedding new light on animal behaviorMany animals rely on movement to find prey and avoid predators. Movement is also an essential component of the territorial displays of lizards, comprising tail, limb, head and whole-body movements.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dental filling failure linked to smoking, drinking and geneticsResearchers find that people who drink alcohol or men who smoke are more likely to suffer a failed dental filling. The research team also found a genetic difference in some patients associated with increased filling failure rates. In contrast, no major difference in filling failure rates was found between traditional amalgam and newer composite resin fillings. The results suggest that personalized
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Federal study: Climate change sucks moisture from the West, adding to droughts, firesThe Trump administration released a sweeping report Friday that pegged man-made climate change to droughts and wildfires in California and the West, but for reasons you may not expect.
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Ars Technica
StarCraft II goes free-to-play seven years after launch Enlarge If you've been zealously guarding your money since 2010, waiting for the day StarCraft II would finally be cheap enough to try out, you're in luck. At Blizzcon over the weekend, Blizzard announced the game would be transitioning to a free-to-play model, offering significant portions of the single- and multiplayer content for no charge starting November 14. As explained on the Battle.net b
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Scientific American Content: Global
New Maps Show How Greenland's Ice Sheet Is Melting from the Bottom UpThe mapping project will help scientists understand how much of the Greenland ice sheet is threatened -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
FDG PET shows tumor DNA levels in blood are linked to NSCLC aggressivenessItalian researches have demonstrated a better way of determining the aggressiveness of tumors in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In a study presented in the featured clinical investigation article of the November issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, they used 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT imaging to show that the amount of cell-free tumor DNA circulating in th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows electric bandages can fight biofilm infection, antimicrobial resistanceResearchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center have shown -- for the first time -- that special bandages using weak electric fields to disrupt bacterial biofilm infection can prevent infections, combat antibiotic resistance and enable healing in infected burn wounds. The dressing becomes electrically active upon contact with bodily fluids.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hearing an opinion spoken aloud humanizes the person behind itPeople attribute more humanlike qualities to those expressing opinions they disagree with when the opinions are spoken as opposed to written, according to new research in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The findings explore how specific aspects of speech, such as intonation and frequent pauses, may serve as cues that humanize the people who are speaki
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ACP says patient safety must be improved in office-based practice settingMore needs to be done to improve patient safety in the outpatient setting, said the American College of Physicians (ACP) in a new policy paper released today. Patient Safety in the Office-Based Practice Setting offers a set of recommendations aimed at improving patient care in office-based practices.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Could this be malaria's Achilles heel?Portuguese researchers at Instituto de Medicina Molecular (iMM) Lisboa have identified a defence mechanism by which the malaria parasite can survive inside its host's liver cells.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Immune cells mistake heart attacks for viral infectionsA study led by Kevin King, a bioengineer and physician at the University of California San Diego, has found that the immune system plays a surprising role in the aftermath of heart attacks. The research could lead to new therapeutic strategies for heart disease. Researchers present the findings in the Nov. 6 issue of Nature Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists find potential 'missing link' in chemistry that led to life on earthChemists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found a compound that may have been a crucial factor in the origins of life on Earth.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Higher brain glucose levels may mean more severe Alzheimer'sNIA scientists have found a connection between abnormalities in how the brain breaks down glucose and the severity of the signature amyloid plaques and tangles in the brain, as well as the onset of eventual outward symptoms, of Alzheimer's disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is anticoagulant warfarin associated with lower risk of cancer incidence?Bottom Line: Use of the blood thinner warfarin was associated with a lower risk of new cancers in people over 50.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Using powerful new telescope astronomers observe one of the oldest objects in the universeAstronomers using the Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT), which is operated jointly by UMass Amherst and Mexico's Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica, report today in Nature Astronomy that they have detected the second most distant dusty, star-forming galaxy ever found in the universe -- born in the first one billion years after the Big Bang. It is the oldest object ever detected
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Swapping where crops are grown could feed an extra 825 million peopleRedrawing the global map of crop distribution on existing farmland could help meet growing demand for food and biofuels in coming decades, while significantly reducing water stress in agricultural areas.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers report first-ever protein hydrogels made in living cellsJohns Hopkins cell biologists report what they believe is the first-ever creation of tiny protein-based gelatin-like clumps called hydrogels inside living cells. The ability to create hydrogels on demand, they say, should advance the long scientific struggle to study the elusive structures -- which form in nature when proteins or other molecules aggregate under certain conditions -- and to uncover
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Blame tired brain cells for mental lapses after poor sleepA new study is the first to reveal how sleep deprivation disrupts brain cells' ability to communicate with each other, leading to mental lapses that affect memory and visual perception.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Has adolescent preventive care increased since the Affordable Care Act?Preventive care visits for adolescents increased moderately after implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) but most US adolescents still do not attend doctor 'well visits' or receive preventive care.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Early bloomers: Statistical tool reveals climate change impacts on plantsScientists from Utah State University, Harvard University, the University of Maryland, Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory, Boston University and McGill University announce statistical tool to extract information from current and historical plant data.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Deadly lung cancers are driven by multiple genetic changesA new UC San Francisco-led study challenges the dogma in oncology that most cancers are caused by one dominant 'driver' mutation that can be treated in isolation with a single targeted drug. Instead, the new research finds one of the world's most deadly forms of lung cancer is driven by changes in multiple different genes, which appear to work together to drive cancer progression and to allow tumo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mammals switched to daytime activity after dinosaur extinctionMammals only started being active in the daytime after non-avian dinosaurs were wiped out about 66 million years ago (mya), finds a new study led by UCL and Tel Aviv University's Steinhardt Museum of Natural History.
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Inside Science
BRIEF: How Droplets Can Act Like Solids BRIEF: How Droplets Can Act Like Solids Researchers investigate one of the classic physics lessons, substituting liquids for solids. Water-on-a-blade-of-grass.jpg Image credits: Michele Dorsey Walfred via Flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Physics Monday, November 6, 2017 - 11:00 Katharine Gammon, Contributor (Inside Science) – Researchers are conquering an enduring mystery -- how drops form an
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Asymptomatic infection helps norovirus to spread in IndonesiaNorovirus, also referred to as the 'winter vomiting bug', is the most common cause of acute gastroenteritis in humans. A Japanese research team has shown that norovirus is significantly present in the stools of healthy volunteers in Indonesia who are asymptomatically infected with the virus. This suggests that asymptomatic infection is a source of norovirus outbreaks, and sheds light on the transm
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Acoustic monitoring provides holistic picture of biodiversityEcologists are using a network of 'outdoor recording studios' to better monitor the subtropical Japanese island of Okinawa.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Do violent communities foster violent kids?Children and adolescents regularly confronted with violence in their community have a greater tendency to show antisocial behavior. The new study examined the link between exposure to community violence and antisocial behavior in over 1000 children and adolescents from seven European countries.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gelatin accelerates healing of the blood brain barrier in acute brain injuryResearchers already know that gelatin-covered electrode implants cause less damage to brain tissue than electrodes with no gelatin coating. Researchers have now shown that microglia, the brain's cleansing cells, and the enzymes that the cells use in the cleaning process, change in the presence of gelatin.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Clear effect of art therapy on severe depressionCreate a picture of how you are feeling on this particular day, said the first exercise in the art therapy. After ten treatments the patients who suffered from severe or moderately severe depression had shown more improvement than the patients in the control group, shows research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Microcolumns: Elementary neural processing units that tile the mouse brainA hexagonal lattice organizes major cell types in the cerebral cortex, researchers in Japan have discovered. The pattern repeats across the brain, with similar cells synchronizing their activity in 'microcolumns', which could represent an essential computational unit in the brain.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mapping brain connectivity with MRI may predict outcomes for cardiac arrest survivors, study findsA new study found that measures of connectivity within specific cerebral networks were strongly linked to long-term functional outcomes in patients who had suffered severe brain injury following a cardiac arrest.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
'I inject myself with snake venom'Steve Ludlow has been injecting himself with venom for more than 30 years.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Startup fights fraud as hackers breach networksWith every new hack of computer networks comes questions about how it happened and what kind of security can prevent the next one.
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Science : NPR
What's Your (Epistemic) Relationship To Science? Tania Lombrozo looks at a new paper arguing that research on the public's understanding of science often conflates knowledge and understanding — and that this conflation has costs. (Image credit: turk_stock_photographer/Getty Images/iStockphoto)
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Popular Science
Oh, the places your blood will go after you donate it Health Blood donations are actually full of important disease data. Many large organizations in the United States that collect and distribute blood take advantage of the millions and millions of samples at their disposal to conduct…
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Quanta Magazine
From the Edge of the Universe to the Inside of a Proton The sumptuous new coffee table book The Zoomable Universe: An Epic Tour Through Cosmic Scale, From Almost Everything to Nearly Nothing , written by Caleb Scharf and illustrated by Ron Miller and 5W Infographics, arrives at a special time in human history when we are experiencing rapid scientific discovery, but also at a cosmically special time when the universe itself is as accessible as it ever
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Ars Technica
Intel will ship processors with integrated AMD graphics and memory Enlarge / Intel's render of an 8th-generation H-series processor. The discrete GPU and stacked HBM2 memory are side by side. (credit: Intel) In a bid to build better chips for gamers and other PC enthusiasts, Intel has announced the 8th-generation H-series mobile processors will have a feature that's nothing short of astonishing: they'll integrate AMD GPUs. The 8th-generation mobile processors cu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pandora loses listeners, ad revenueSo many listeners have turned off Pandora that Friday could have been called the day the music died for the internet radio streaming pioneer.
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Gizmodo
Can Joker Venom Be Real? GIF Gif: Batman , Gizmodo As long as there has been a Joker—and we’re going on eighty years with this guy—there has been, as well, a Joker venom. It debuted alongside him, in 1940s Batman #1, and has been a part of his arsenal ever since. Though its side effects have varied over the years, it has remained in each iteration a gruesomely unpleasant murder tool (or non-fatal face-mangling tool, as t
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The Scientist RSS
Hormone Loss Prevents Obesity and Diabetes in MiceAsprosin-involved in a rare disease called neonatal progeroid syndrome-targets neurons to stimulate appetite, and blocking the hormone wards off weight gain in rodents.
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Science | The Guardian
Ban killer robots, experts urge Australian and Canadian leaders Development and use of autonomous weapons crosses a ‘clear moral line’, pioneers in robotics and AI warn Malcolm Turnbull and Justin Trudeau Pioneers in robotics and artificial intelligence have called on the Australian and Canadian governments to ban killer robots ahead of a United Nations meeting on weapons this month. Leading researchers from the countries urged prime ministers Malcolm Turnbul
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Afterschool program environments linked to academic confidence and skillsAfterschool programs with positive, responsive, and organized environments can have academic benefits for students, finds a new study by NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
A sandy core may have kept Enceladus’ ocean warmFriction in Enceladus’ porous core could help heat its ocean enough to keep it liquid for billions of years.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study finds widespread consequences after traumatic spinal cord injuryResearchers have shown that some of the critical pathophysiological responses to traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), evidence of insufficient oxygen levels and metabolic stress that can permanently damage tissue, persist for at least a week post-injury at and extending away from the injury site in a large animal model.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Afterschool program environments linked to academic confidence and skillsAfterschool programs with positive, responsive, and organized environments can have academic benefits for students, finds a new study by NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astronomy team image one of the first massive galaxies to form, 12.8 billion years agoAstronomers using the Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT), which is operated jointly by the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Mexico's Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica, report today in Nature Astronomy that they have detected the second most distant dusty, star-forming galaxy ever found in the universe - born in the first one billion years after the Big Bang.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Swapping where crops are grown could feed an extra 825 million peopleRedrawing the global map of crop distribution on existing farmland could help meet growing demand for food and biofuels in coming decades, while significantly reducing water stress in agricultural areas, according to a new study. Published today in Nature Geoscience, the study is the first to attempt to address both food production needs and resource sustainability simultaneously and at a global s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists find potential 'missing link' in chemistry that led to life on EarthChemists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found a compound that may have been a crucial factor in the origins of life on Earth.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers report first-ever protein hydrogels made in living cellsJohns Hopkins cell biologists report what they believe is the first-ever creation of tiny protein-based gelatin-like clumps called hydrogels inside living cells. The ability to create hydrogels on demand, they say, should advance the long scientific struggle to study the elusive structures—which form in nature when proteins or other molecules aggregate under certain conditions—and to uncover their
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Early bloomers: Statistical tool reveals climate change impacts on plantsEarly flowering, early fruiting: Anecdotal evidence of climate change is popping up as quickly as spring crocuses, but is it coincidence or confirmation of shifts in plant phenology caused by global warming?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mammals switched to daytime activity after dinosaur extinctionMammals only started being active in the daytime after non-avian dinosaurs were wiped out about 66 million years ago (mya), finds a new study led by UCL and Tel Aviv University's Steinhardt Museum of Natural History.
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Gizmodo
Mammals Literally Came Out of the Dark Once the Dinos Were Gone Artist’s impression of the mouse-sized Xianshou Songae, a tree-dweller in Jurassic forests. (Illustration by Zhao Chuang) The first mammals emerged during the reign of the dinosaurs , adopting a nocturnal lifestyle to stay safe. It was only until the dinosaurs were wiped off the face of the planet that certain mammals began to assert themselves during the daylight hours, according to new research
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Ingeniøren
Tre forskellige selvkørende forsøg skal på danske veje i starten af 2018Den danske importør Autonomous Mobility har planer om at iværksætte tre danske projekter med selvkørende busser i første kvartal af 2018.
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Scientific American Content: Global
15 Mathematical Curiosities to Celebrate Marie Curie's 150th BirthdaySome numerical oddities fall out of this anniversary of the only person to win Nobel prizes in two separate scientific fields -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic
The Zombie Diseases of Climate Change F rom the air , the coast of Greenland appears vast and tranquil. Hundreds of fjords, their surfaces a mirror of blue sky and cloud bottoms, divide the territory. In the gaps between them, the terrain folds over itself, hill over hill, descending into obsidian lakes. The turf is covered in the waxy pastels of alpine dwarf willows and the dull white of age-bleached lichen. Though an immense ice sh
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The Atlantic
Google's Mass-Shooting Misinformation Problem It happened again. After a horrifying mass shooting, searching for the shooter’s name on Google surfaced an editor of the conspiracy site InfoWars , a wannabe Julian Assange account claiming the shooter had converted to Islam, and a “news” Twitter feed that’s tweeted a few dozen times since it was created last month. * All of these links appeared high up in the search results, just below the “Top
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The Atlantic
A 'Completely Unelectable' Progressive Will Probably Win Philadelphia's DA Race PHILADELPHIA—When civil-rights attorney Larry Krasner won the Democratic primary for district attorney here last spring, it made national headlines—not because he won with a large margin, which he did, but because in a race crowded with progressives, he stood distinctly in left field. Krasner was the outsider candidate, offering voters zero experience as a prosecutor. As a defense attorney, he su
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Viden
2017 på vej i top 3 over varmeste år nogensindeOg det kan blive det varmeste år, hvor klimafænomenet El Niño ikke spiller en rolle.
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Gizmodo
Twitter User Exploits Loophole to Post 35,000-Character Tweet Image Source: Twitter Do you remember when Twitter stopped limiting the number of usernames you could tag in a post and suddenly for a few days people started tagging dozens of users at once just to be annoying? Well, if people start duplicating this hack, it’ll make your timeline a hell of a lot worse than that. On November 4th, Twitter user Timrasett sent out a tweet that was 35,000 characters
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers probe brain disease-causing proteins at the atomic levelResearchers studying a protein that causes a hereditary degenerative brain disease in humans have discovered that the human, mouse and hamster forms of the protein, which have nearly identical amino acid sequences, exhibit distinct three-dimensional structures at the atomic level.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Crime-scene technique used to track turtlesScientists have used satellite tracking and a crime-scene technique to discover an important feeding ground for green turtles in the Mediterranean.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The impact of the 'war on drugs' for female 'mules'University of Kent research on women working as drug 'mules' has found they aren't victims of their sex but of the trade, and its illegal status.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Diffused light shows clear structuresScientists gain an insight into the fascinating world of atoms and molecules using x-ray microscopes. Ground-breaking research by physicists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), the Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY) in Hamburg, and the University of Hamburg has paved the way towards new imaging techniques. The team of scientists have successfully developed and tested a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers probe brain disease-causing proteins at the atomic levelResearchers studying a protein that causes a hereditary degenerative brain disease in humans have discovered that the human, mouse and hamster forms of the protein, which have nearly identical amino acid sequences, exhibit distinct three-dimensional structures at the atomic level.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Depressed fathers risk not getting helpPostnatal depression among new mothers is a well-known phenomenon. Knowledge about depression in new fathers, however, is more limited. A new study from Lund University in Sweden shows that depression among new fathers may be more common than previously believed. There is also a major risk that it remains undetected using today's screening instruments, and that fathers do not receive the help they
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists make significant breakthrough on superbug-killing antibiotic teixobactinScientists working to develop a 'game-changing' new antibiotic have made a significant advance towards creating commercially viable drug treatments by producing two simplified synthetic versions of the substance which are just as potent at killing superbugs like MRSA as its natural form.
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The Atlantic
Politicians Aren’t Talking About the Biggest Challenge to the Labor Market Whenever Nigel Cameron gets into an Uber or Lyft, he says to the driver, “You do realize you’re just cannon fodder here, right?” Cameron, the president and CEO of the Center for Policy on Emerging Technologies (C-PET) , isn’t trying to be rude—he’s trying to prepare them for an imminent reality. Jobs as drivers are among those at risk of becoming obsolete because of automation, and the ridesharin
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Gizmodo
Uber (Belatedly) Commits $5 Million to Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Prevention Photo: Getty Uber announced on Sunday that it’s taking new steps toward preventing sexual assault and domestic violence, starting with a $5 million donation to its partners—Raliance, National Network to End Domestic Violence, No More, Women of Color Network, Casa de Esperanza, A Call to Men, and The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs—along with an employee training program and in-app me
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop data bus for quantum computerThe quantum world is fragile; error correction codes are needed to protect the information stored in a quantum object from the deteriorating effects of noise. Quantum physicists in Innsbruck have developed a protocol to pass quantum information between differently encoded building blocks of a future quantum computer, such as processors and memories. Scientists may use this protocol in the future t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Excavation in Northern Iraq: Sasanian loom discoveredA team of Frankfurt-based archaeologists has returned from the Iraqi-Kurdish province of Sulaymaniyah with new findings. The discovery of a loom from the 5th to 6th century AD in particular caused a stir.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Acoustic monitoring provides holistic picture of biodiversityEcologists are using a network of "outdoor recording studios" to better monitor the subtropical Japanese island of Okinawa. Now a pilot study, in which more than 1,100 hours of birdsong were analyzed, is available in the journal Ecological Research which is the official journal of the Ecological Society of Japan and is published by Springer.
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Ingeniøren
Nu skal robotten i neural træningslejrVision-eksperter barsler med et robottræningssystem, der kombinerer traditionel vision med hyperspektrale kameraer og deep learning. Spørgsmålet er bare, hvor lidt robottræning man kan nøjes med.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Higher air pollution in Chinese cities tied to higher mortality rateNew research examined the burden of air pollution and its association with mortality in Chinese cities.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Firearm Injuries Becoming More SevereNew research has revealed that the severity of firearm injuries has increased over the past 20 years.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Breaking the chain: Catalyzing a green future for chemistryResearchers create catalyst for refining chemicals in plant waste, allowing a green way to produce valuable raw materials.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Breaking cell symmetryA team of researchers has uncovered a novel mechanism for establishing cell polarity that relies on tension force induced clustering of proteins.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New drug shows potential as a different kind of antidepressant in mouse trialsA potential new antidepressant and anti-anxiety treatment with a unique mechanism of action has been developed.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Love actually: Americans agree on what makes people 'feel the love'Americans may disagree on many things, but love might not be one of them. According to researchers, people in the US largely agree about what makes them feel loved, coming to a general consensus that it may be small gestures that matter most.
8h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
How we can end sexual harassment at work | Gretchen CarlsonWhen Gretchen Carlson spoke out about her experience of workplace sexual harassment, it inspired women everywhere to take their power back and tell the world what happened to them. In a remarkable, fierce talk, she tells her story -- and identifies three specific things we can all do to create safer places to work. "We will no longer be underestimated, intimidated or set back," Carlson says. "We w
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Diffused light shows clear structuresScientists gain an insight into the fascinating world of atoms and molecules using x-ray microscopes. Ground-breaking research by physicists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), the Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY) in Hamburg, and the University of Hamburg has paved the way towards new imaging techniques. The team of scientists have successfully developed and tested a
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stem cells pave the way for new treatment of diabetesA new stem cell study conducted at the University of Copenhagen shows how we may increase the vital production of insulin in patients suffering from diabetes. The discovery helps to more efficiently at less cost make insulin-producing beta cells from human stem cells. Therefore, the research paves the way for more effective treatment of diabetes. The method may also prove significant to the treatm
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The impact of the 'war on drugs' for female 'mules'University of Kent research on women working as drug 'mules' has found they aren't victims of their sex but of the trade, and its illegal status.Dr Nayeli Urquiza Haas of the University's Kent Law School compared different legal developments and strategies in Europe and Latin America
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Protecting 'high carbon' rainforest areas also protects threatened wildlifeProtecting 'high carbon' rainforest areas also protects threatened wildlife.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brisk walking/physical activity of similar intensity may lower risk of death among older womenModerate to vigorous intensity physical activity (e.g. brisk walking) was associated with 60-70 percent lower risk of death at the end of the four-year study among the most active women, compared to the least active.
8h
Gizmodo
Star Trek: Discovery Riffs on an Original Series Episode With Muddled Results All images: CBS Last night’s “Si Vis Pacem, Para Bellum” ended on a cliffhanger that sets up a big showdown for next week’s finale. Meanwhile, everyone, save Burnham, is wandering around acting suspicious as hell. And for some reason, the show seems like it’s doing its own version of a classic Klingon-Federation moment from the original series. The tides in this war have turned again—and at some
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Forest of molecular signals in star forming galaxyAstronomers have found a rich molecular reservoir in the heart of an active star-forming galaxy with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). Among eight clouds identified at the center of the galaxy NGC 253, one exhibits very complex chemical composition, while in the other clouds many signals are missing. This chemical richness and diversity shed light on the nature of the baby b
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Vitamin D may be key for pregnant women with polycystic ovary syndromeVitamin D may play a key role in helping some women seeking treatment for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)-related infertility get pregnant. PCOS is a hormonal disorder affecting 5 to 10 percent of women of reproductive age. Results of the study show women who were Vitamin D deficient when starting fertility treatments were 40 percent less likely to achieve a pregnancy.
8h
Science | The Guardian
Ben Shephard obituary Historian who focused on the psychological effects of 20th-century warfare The historian and writer Ben Shephard, who has died aged 69 of cancer, had a lifelong interest in the psychological effects of war. His book A War of Nerves (2000) changed our understanding of military psychiatry by describing entirely unsentimentally those who emerged from the wars of the 20th century uprooted, brutalised
8h
Gizmodo
Broadcom's $105 Billion Bid for Qualcomm Could Be the Biggest Tech Acquisition Ever Image: Qualcomm In the competition to supply the world’s ever-increasing demand for wireless modems, a bid by Broadcom to purchase Qualcomm announced on Monday could result in a major shift in power. With an offer of $105 billion (plus another $25 billion to cover net debt), Broadcom’s purchase of Qualcomm would be the biggest tech acquisition in history, almost doubling Dell’s $67 billion buyout
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Gizmodo
Save $14 On Anker's Loud and Rugged SoundCore Sport XL Anker SoundCore Sport XL , $56 with code QUM7D9ED Anker’s SoundCore line of Bluetooth speakers dominated our Co-Op voting, but the largest member of the family just got its first discount in a long time. The Anker SoundCore Sport XL features the same one-meter waterproofing of the original SoundCore Sport , plus added dust resistance, making it even more rugged. And since it’s the “XL” version, i
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hearing the dawn chorus: Okinawa's new acoustic monitoring networkIn Okinawa's thick, hot jungle and amid its urban sprawl, a collection of green boxes has sprung up in the past year. These monitoring stations are simple, yet they have the potential to remotely track animal life and weather conditions on the island, collecting vast stores of information about species on the island.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nuclear energy programs do not increase likelihood of proliferation, study findsContrary to popular thought, nuclear proliferation is not more likely to occur among countries with nuclear energy programs, according to research published in International Security.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Briny pool bacteria can clean up and power upWarm and salty wastewater is a by-product of many industries, including oil and gas production, seafood processing and textile dyeing. KAUST researchers are exploring ways to detoxify such wastewater while simultaneously generating electricity. They are using bacteria with remarkable properties: the ability to transfer electrons outside their cells (exoelectrogenes) and the capacity to withstand e
8h
Gizmodo
Amazon's Echo Plus Gets Close to Giving Us the Easy Smart Home We Deserve All photos: Adam Clark Estes / Gizmodo Despite what you may have read, the Amazon Echo was never a do-anything smart home device. Sure it could tell you about the weather and maybe control your lights, but it lacked the under-the-hood hub capabilities that could make all your connected devices work together. The new Amazon Echo Plus offers just that. I’m not sure it’s worth it, but that absolutel
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
G7 on health, science suggests global action to reduce the impact of climate on healthItalian Minister of Health Beatrice Lorenzin presented the results of the research in Milan during the meeting on Health attended by the G7 ministers.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers develop data bus for quantum computerThe quantum world is fragile; error correction codes are needed to protect the information stored in a quantum object from the deteriorating effects of noise. Quantum physicists in Innsbruck have developed a protocol to pass quantum information between differently encoded building blocks of a future quantum computer, such as processors and memories. Scientists may use this protocol in the future t
8h
Gizmodo
Incredible Gravitational Technique Reveals Oldest Spiral Galaxy on Record Image: Yuan et al, ApJ (2017) Galaxies didn’t always take on the beautiful spiral shape we’ve come to associate with Andromeda and our own Milky Way. Looking far away into deep space—and into the past—ancient galaxies mostly look like giant blobs. But thanks to gravity’s light-bending properties, scientists have spotted a confounding thing in the distance: what appears to be the oldest spiral yet
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple's $120 mn patent award from Samsung upheld by top US courtThe US Supreme Court on Monday upheld a $120 million patent award Samsung was ordered to pay Apple in the latest ruling in a series of legal skirmishes between the top two smartphone makers.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Coloring the heartbeatIn the 17th Century two giants of science, Isaac Newton and Robert Hooke, were both trying to understand how the wings of butterflies and peacocks, which are made of the same material as our fingernails and hair, could colors of such brilliant quality. They both came to the same conclusion, the color was a result of tiny structures on the wing, structures so small that they could not observe it th
8h
Live Science
On an Uninhabited Caribbean Island, a Trove of Pre-Columbian Cave ArtImagine a social- networking site that not only predates not only the internet but even a European presence in the Americas. That's how researchers from the University of Leicester describedare theirdescribing the discoveries they've made after three year
8h
Dagens Medicin
Vejle stikker ikke af fra de andre sygehuse ved knoglemarvskræftDagens Medicin bidrager til at skabe usikkerhed og utryghed for danske patienter med myelomatose ved énsidigt og ukommenteret at lægge spalteplads til markedsføring af et enkelt sygehus.
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Dagens Medicin
Funktionel lidelse kan skyldes hormon-mangelEpilepsiagtige anfald, som læger har troet udelukkende var psykologisk betingede, kan skyldes et for lavt niveau af et stressbeskyttende hormon, viser ny forskning fra Aarhus Universitet.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Breaking the chain: Catalyzing a green future for chemistryOsaka University researchers create catalyst for refining chemicals in plant waste, allowing a green way to produce valuable raw materials.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Excavation in Northern Iraq: Sasanian loom discoveredA team of Frankfurt-based archaeologists has returned from the Iraqi-Kurdish province of Sulaymaniyah with new findings. The discovery of a loom from the 5th to 6th century AD in particular caused a stir.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gelatin accelerates healing of the blood brain barrier in acute brain injuryResearchers already know that gelatin-covered electrode implants cause less damage to brain tissue than electrodes with no gelatin coating. Researchers at the Neuronano Research Centre (NRC) at Lund University in Sweden have now shown that microglia, the brain's cleansing cells, and the enzymes that the cells use in the cleaning process, change in the presence of gelatin.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New drug shows potential as a different kind of antidepressant in mouse trialsA potential new antidepressant and antianxiety treatment with a unique mechanism of action has been developed by scientists at the University of Bath.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Do violent communities foster violent kids?Children and adolescents regularly confronted with violence in their community have a greater tendency to show antisocial behavior. This finding was reported by researchers from the University of Basel and the University Psychiatric Hospital Basel. Their new study examined the link between exposure to community violence and antisocial behavior in over 1000 children and adolescents from seven Europ
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fish provide insight into the evolution of the immune systemNew research reveals how immune systems can evolve resistance to parasites.The study published in Nature Communications, solves the enigma of how species can adapt and change their immune system to cope with new parasitic threats -- whilst at the same time showing little or no evolutionary change in critical immune function over millions of years. It help to explain why we humans have some immune
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Inorganic-organic halide perovskites for new photovoltaic technologyPerovskite solar cells (PSCs) have received worldwide attention due to excellent power-to-electricity conversion efficiency (PCE). Currently, 22.1 percent certified PCE has been achieved, comparative to those of CIGS and CdTe solar cells. However, there are still some critical issues to be solved in order to promote PSCs' commercialization. Scientists from China summarize the latest advances in PS
8h
Big Think
Tesla Is Set to Enable a New Autopilot on Its Cars Powered by AI Tesla Motors released updated plans for when its cars will be fully self-driving. Read More
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Milestone for ultra-fast communications and computingResearchers have discovered that a special kind of perovskite, a combination of an organic and inorganic compound that has the same structure as the original mineral, can be layered on a silicon wafer to create a vital component for the communications system of the future. That system would use the terahertz spectrum, the next generation of communications bandwidth that uses light instead of elect
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New pathway for handling stress discoveredResearchers at the University of California San Diego studying how animals respond to infections have found a new pathway that may help in tolerating stressors that damage proteins. Naming the pathway the Intracellular Pathogen Response or 'IPR,' the scientists say it is a newly discovered way for animals to cope with certain types of stress and attacks, including heat shock.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How underwater gardening can rewild the Atlantic OceanFrom the use of seaweed for bleaching linen, to Roman emperors eating oysters as aphrodisiacs, human culture along the North Atlantic coast has been integrally linked to the exploitation of the sea for centuries. But as populations have expanded and economies grown, people have impoverished the ocean.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Distinguishing between humans and computers in the game of go(Phys.org)—By analyzing the statistical features of thousands of go games played by humans and computers, researchers have found that it's surprisingly easy to tell whether a game is being played by a human or by a computer. The results point to fundamental differences in the ways that humans and computers solve problems and may lead to a new kind of Turing test designed to distinguish between the
9h
Futurity.org
Americans agree about what makes them feel loved People in the United States may largely agree about what gestures and actions make them feel most loved. “Our results show that people do agree, and the top scenarios that came back weren’t necessarily romantic…” In a new study, researchers found that small, non-romantic gestures—like someone showing compassion or snuggling with a child—topped the list of what makes people feel loved. Meanwhile,
9h
Gizmodo
That Viral Photo of President Trump Dumping Fish Food Is Very Misleading Photo: Toru Hanai/Pool Photo via AP Did you see that photo from yesterday of President Trump with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at the koi pond? It purportedly shows Trump crudely dumping fish food into the pond as Abe looks on in horror. The photo went viral last night as people ridiculed Trump for being such a buffoon. But the photo is actually misleading. Yes, Americans rightly have plent
9h
Dagens Medicin
Direktionen kan ikke løbe fra ansvaret i SvendborgsagenI sundhedsvæsenet foretages talløse mundtlige ordinationer, som ifølge domstolene er »ulovlige og groft forsømmelige«. Direktionen er fuldt vidende herom og ansvarlig for det som fænomen.
9h
Dagens Medicin
Stamceller åbner for ny behandling af diabetes Nyt stamcelle-studie fra Københavns Universitet afdækker, hvordan man kan øge den livsvigtige insulinproduktion hos diabetespatienter.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Together for more food safety in Europe and its neighboring countriesStrawberries from Spain, tomatoes from the Netherlands, spices from Morocco and citrus fruits from Georgia -- the globalization of food production and food trading is posing new challenges for consumer health protection. The range of foods is getting bigger and their safety has to be guaranteed in increasingly more complex supply chains.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brighter flexible electroluminescent film by adopting eye structure of nocturnal animalsA research team from Korea has improved the luminance of electroluminescent devices by 422% compared to the conventional ones by applying retro-reflection electrodes The result is expected to be applied in next generation display and signage lighting technology.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Briny pool bacteria can clean up and power upPromising electrochemical technologies for cleaning wastewater are boosted by discovery of extremophilic microbes in the Red Sea.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nuclear energy programs do not increase likelihood of proliferation, Dartmouth study findsContrary to popular thought, nuclear proliferation is not more likely to occur among countries with nuclear energy programs, according to research published in International Security. In a historical analysis of the relationship between nuclear energy programs and proliferation from 1954 to 2000, the study finds that the link between the two has been overstated.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Breaking cell symmetryA team of researchers from the Mechanobiology Institute, Singapore at the National University of Singapore, along with colleagues from Temasek Life Sciences Laboratory and A*STAR's Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology in Singapore, has uncovered a novel mechanism for establishing cell polarity that relies on tension force induced clustering of proteins.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Simple green synthesis is a breath of fresh airA method for creating nanoparticles without using solvents could lead to environment-friendly electronics.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Calorie counts on menus make a differenceOne the most comprehensive pieces of research into the impact of displaying calories on menus reveals it not only influences consumers to make lower calorie choices but also encourages retailers to provide lower calorie options.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hearing the dawn chorus: Okinawa's new acoustic monitoring networkUsing remote acoustic monitoring to track bird activity on Okinawa for the first time, scientists examined the distribution of birds on Okinawa.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Asymptomatic infection helps norovirus to spread in IndonesiaNorovirus, also referred to as the 'winter vomiting bug', is the most common cause of acute gastroenteritis in humans. A Japanese research team has shown that norovirus is significantly present in the stools of healthy volunteers in Indonesia who are asymptomatically infected with the virus. This suggests that asymptomatic infection is a source of norovirus outbreaks, and sheds light on the transm
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Crime-scene technique used to track turtlesScientists have used satellite tracking and a crime-scene technique to discover an important feeding ground for green turtles in the Mediterranean.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Coloring the heartbeatHeart disease is one of the leading causes of death around the world. Finding easy early ways to screen for good drugs is vital
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Microcolumns: Elementary neural processing units that tile the mouse brainA hexagonal lattice organizes major cell types in the cerebral cortex, researchers in Japan have discovered. The pattern repeats across the brain, with similar cells synchronizing their activity in 'microcolumns', which could represent an essential computational unit in the brain.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Saving seagrasses from dredging as new research finds solutionsTiming of dredging and finding an 'ecological window' is the key to helping preserve one of the world's most productive and important ecosystems -- seagrass meadows, a new study led by QUT researchers has found.
9h
Viden
Opsamling: Anmeldere tager pænt imod iPhone XDer er store roser til Apples nye, hundedyre iPhone X, men ikke alt er rosenrødt i æbleland. Læs uddrag fra anmeldelserne.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How telling the right stories can make people act on climate changeThe latest UN Climate Change Conference since the 2015 Paris Agreement is taking place in Bonn between November 6-17 – and the world will be watching. The conference will be presided over by the government of Fiji, a country that is no stranger to the devastation that climate change brings.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers discover new pathway for handling stressBalance is key to many physiological functions and it is especially true in the production and regulation of proteins. A balance of proteins in cells helps maintain health, but an unhealthy clumping can lead to a variety of diseases, including those connected to aging such as Alzheimer's.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Extremely massive exoplanet discovered in the Milky Way's bulge(Phys.org)—As a result of NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope observations of a microlensing event, astronomers have found an extremely massive alien world circling a star located in the Milky Way's bulge. The newly discovered planet, designated OGLE-2016-BLG-1190Lb, is the first Spitzer microlensing exoworld residing in the galactic bulge. The finding was presented October 27 in a paper published on a
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
An investigation of the Rose window instabilityRoyal Society Open Science recently published "The Electric Honeycomb; an investigation of the Rose window instability" with a single author, Muhammad Shaeer Niazi. Nothing unusual in that, you might think, but Muhammad is 17 years old, and this is his first published manuscript. His work has generated a lot of attention both for breaking new scientific ground and his relative youth, we were delig
9h
The Scientist RSS
Equivocal Findings of Alzheimers Trial Using Young BloodA team of Stanford University researchers say that administering young people's blood plasma to Alzheimer's patients could improve cognitive function, but the results have been criticized.
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Gizmodo
Krypton Casts a Major Superman Villain Jason Momoa talks about evolving Aquaman through Justice League and beyond. Jon Bernthal teases Frank’s relationship with Micro in The Punisher . Chris Hemsworth discusses what Ragnarok leaves for Infinity War to pick up on. Plus, Nightwing ’s director on casting Dick Grayson, and Deathstroke returns in new Arrow pictures. Spoilers get! Hasbro Though details are sparse, Variety reports Paramount
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Gizmodo
How to Stop Your iPhone From Autocorrecting "i" to "A" Image credit: Pexels If you updated your iPhone to iOS 11.1 you maybe have noticed a weird bug: your iPhone or iPad autocorrects the letter i to an A with a crazy symbol beside it. It’s annoying, makes typing messages a pain, and is a known issue that Apple is working on a fix for. In the meantime, Apple put up a Support page for the issue with a quick workaround for fixing it using Text Replacem
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers discover new pathway for handling stressResearchers at the University of California San Diego studying how animals respond to infections have found a new pathway that may help in tolerating stressors that damage proteins. Naming the pathway the Intracellular Pathogen Response or 'IPR,' the scientists say it is a newly discovered way for animals to cope with certain types of stress and attacks, including heat shock.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Web-based social media intervention can positively influence parental vaccine behaviorsPregnant women who received vaccine information through an interactive website monitored by a clinical expert were more likely to vaccinate their children than those who did not use the web resource, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published today in the journal Pediatrics.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Younger women with advanced breast cancer needlessly excluded from treatment trialsPre-menopausal women with the most common type of advanced breast cancer are usually excluded from medical research unnecessarily, according to an expert panel at the Advanced Breast Cancer Fourth International Consensus Conference.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Vitamin D may be key for pregnant women with polycystic ovary syndromeVitamin D may play a key role in helping some women seeking treatment for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)-related infertility get pregnant. PCOS is a hormonal disorder affecting 5 to 10 percent of women of reproductive age. Results of the study show women who were Vitamin D deficient when starting fertility treatments were 40 percent less likely to achieve a pregnancy.
9h
Ars Technica
Video: Team Xbox dishes on the new One X, fields our ridiculous requests (video link) REDMOND, Wash.—Ahead of Xbox One X 's November 7 launch, Ars Technica was invited to hang out at the company's Xbox campus and chat with one of the console's leading managers. With this opportunity in mind, we grabbed a camera crew and asked as many questions of Kevin Gammill, the Xbox division's "core platform group program manager," as we could. For the most part, we stuck with que
9h
Feed: All Latest
Valkyrie: The Comic History of the Breakout Star of 'Thor: Ragnarok'Her only constant is that she's always evolving.
9h
Feed: All Latest
Microsoft Surface Pro Review: This Windows Portable Still Defines the 2-in-1 CategoryWe review the newest $800 Windows laptop-tablet hybrid from Microsoft.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Big tech tie-up: Broadcom bids $130 bn for Qualcomm (Update 3)In what could be the biggest deal ever in the tech sector, Broadcom on Monday bid $130 billion for rival chip maker Qualcomm to gain position in the booming sector fueled by growth in smartphones and an array of connected devices from cars to wearables.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Animation meets biology—shedding new light on animal behaviourMany animals rely on movement to find prey and avoid predators. Movement is also an essential component of the territorial displays of lizards, comprising tail, limb, head and whole-body movements.
9h
BBC News - Science & Environment
The giant mass of plastic waste taking over the CaribbeanThe giant build-up of plastic bottles, cutlery and polystyrene plates was captured by underwater photographer Caroline Power.
9h
Ingeniøren
Fremtidens energibar indeholder protein fra dansk græsDTU forsker i alternative proteiner til dem, vi i dag får fra mælkeprodukter og kød.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
Inside Mount Saint Helens, Scientists Find Clues to Eruption PredictionFrom underneath Mount Saint Helens, a new picture of volcanic “plumbing” is emerging, with important clues for predicting deadly eruptions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global
Microbes Could Recycle Astronauts' Waste to Make Nutrients and ToolsMicrobes could turn astronauts’ waste into nutrients or plastic -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Simple green synthesis is a breath of fresh airA method for creating nanoparticles without using solvents could lead to environmentally friendly electronics.
9h
Dagens Medicin
Kurator: Regionen kunne have droppet Bios før konkursRegion Syddanmark kunne have afbrudt samarbejdet med skandaleramt ambulanceselskab før tid, vurderer kuratorer.
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Dagens Medicin
Ny hospitalsvicedirektør skal koble Sundhedsplatformen og det kliniske Gitte Fangel bliver ny vicedirektør på Bispebjerg og Frederiksberg Hospital, men er samtidig udnævnt til en ny regional stilling, hvor hun skal koble Sundhedsplatformens udvikling og det kliniske.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Breaking the chain—catalyzing a green future for chemistryOsaka University researchers create catalyst for refining chemicals in plant waste, allowing a green way to produce valuable raw materials.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Theoretical quark fusion found to be more powerful than hydrogen fusion(Phys.org)—A pair of researchers with Tel Aviv University and the University of Chicago has found evidence suggesting that fusing quarks can release much more energy than anyone thought. In their paper published in the journal Nature, Marek Karliner and Jonathan Rosner describe their theories surrounding the amount of energy involved when various types of quarks are fused together.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists make significant breakthrough on road to new superbug-killing antibiotic teixobactinScientists working to develop a 'game-changing' new antibiotic have made a significant advance towards creating commercially viable drug treatments by producing two simplified synthetic versions of the substance which are just as potent at killing superbugs like MRSA as its natural form.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Black holes with 'dreadlocks' offer insight into quantum matterPhysicists understand little about quantum matter, which is a building block of future quantum computers. Theorists have now discovered that black holes with 'dreadlocks' harbor a similarly exotic order pattern, which makes calculations on quantum matter easier. The research is published in Physical Review Letters.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Saturn's moon Daphnis in the Keeler GapDaphnis, one of Saturn's small ring-embedded moons, is seen here kicking up waves as it orbits within a gap between rows of icy ring particles.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Renewable coal on the horizonCoal fueled the Industrial Revolution, but it took eons to form. Now, a team of researchers at the University of Minnesota Duluth has introduced what might be called "instant coal": an energy-dense biofuel made from wood and agricultural waste in the Natural Resources Research Institute's (NRRI) Renewable Energy Lab.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Poor social skills may be harmful to healthWhile social skills deficits have long been linked to mental health problems like depression, a new study links poor social skills to poor physical health as well. Those who struggle in social situations experience more stress and loneliness, which can take a toll on the body.
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Futurity.org
This protein keeps bacteria from building biofilm defenses A protein the human body produces naturally could counter the problem of bacterial build-up on medical implants causing infection. “On any sort of device that you try to put in a human, a biofilm will form.” Artificial hip implants, knee implants, and catheters are all susceptible to infections. Bacteria that flow through the blood system can collect on these foreign surfaces and hunker down to p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How some dinosaur discoveries might be wishful scientific thinkingAccording to Catholic doctrine, transubstantiation is the process whereby the bread and wine of the Holy Mass are transformed into the body and blood of Christ. I am unaware of any rigorous chemical investigations into this claim – but I doubt the conclusions would please those who favour a literal interpretation of the Eucharist sacrament.
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Futurity.org
Microbiome database spans 7 continents, 27,000 samples Researchers have created the first database of the bacteria colonizing the planet. Called the Earth Microbiome Project, the work involves over 27,000 samples from environments around the world. “There are large swathes of microbial diversity left to catalogue…” Researchers analyzed the collections of microbes, or microbiomes, in each sample to generate the database. The project, founded in 2010,
10h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Blue Planet II: The moment giant sharks attack crew submarineAt a depth of 750 metres, a Blue Planet II submarine was shoved by enormous sharks.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The principle of optical illusions technically imitated in electronic circuitThe human brain must cope with a large variety of information simultaneously so we can orientate ourselves in our environment and make quick decisions. How exactly it processes the gigantic data stream provided by our sense organs has still not been fully researched. For a deeper understanding of how the brain works, scientists at Kiel University's Faculty of Engineering attempt to imitate this bi
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
2017 likely to be third warmest year on recordThe latest estimate for 2017 suggests the year will be the second or third warmest in a record stretching back to 1850.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Crime-scene technique used to track turtlesScientists have used satellite tracking and a crime-scene technique to discover an important feeding ground for green turtles in the Mediterranean.
10h
Popular Science
This fungus has over 23,000 sexes and no qualms about it Science Sex is extra strange if you're a shroom. Fungi have the most complex reproduction in existence, and they’re wonderful.
10h
Ars Technica
Essen 2017: Best board games from the biggest board game convention Enlarge / Behold the craziness of Essen... (credit: Owen Duffy) Welcome to Ars Cardboard, our weekend look at tabletop games! Check out our complete board gaming coverage at cardboard.arstechnica.com . Every October, the German city of Essen becomes the epicenter of tabletop gaming geekdom. Tens of thousands of visitors descend on the International Spieltage fair, where publishers from around the
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mapping brain connectivity with MRI may predict outcomes for cardiac arrest survivors, study findsA new study led by Johns Hopkins researchers found that measures of connectivity within specific cerebral networks were strongly linked to long-term functional outcomes in patients who had suffered severe brain injury following a cardiac arrest.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Future IT: Antiferromagnetic dysprosium reveals magnetic switching with less energyThe physicists compared how different forms of magnetic ordering in the rare-earth metal named dysprosium react to a short laser pulse. They discovered that the magnetic orientation can be altered much faster and with considerably less energy if the magnetic moments of the individual atoms do not all point in the same direction (ferromagnetism), but instead point are rotated against each other (an
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Saving neurons may offer new approach for treating Alzheimer's diseaseTreatment with a neuroprotective compound that saves brain cells from dying also prevents the development of depression-like behavior and the later onset of memory and learning problems in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease, according to new research from the Iowa Neuroscience Institute at the University of Iowa. Although the treatment protects the animals from Alzheimer's-type symptoms, it does n
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Forest of molecular signals in star forming galaxyAstronomers found a rich molecular reservoir in the heart of an active star-forming galaxy with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). Among eight clouds identified at the center of the galaxy NGC 253, one exhibits very complex chemical composition, while in the other clouds many signals are missing. This chemical richness and diversity shed light on the nature of the baby boom g
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How much does a kilogram weigh?The kilogram doesn't weigh a kilogram any more. This sad news was announced during a seminar at CERN on Thursday, 26 October by Professor Klaus von Klitzing, who was awarded the 1985 Nobel Prize in Physics for the discovery of the quantised Hall effect. "We are about to witness a revolutionary change in the way the kilogram is defined," he declared.
10h
The Atlantic
Why Aren’t U.S. Cars Popular in Japan? TOKYO, Japan—The last time Shujiro Urata wanted to buy a new car in Japan, his phone happened to ring. It was the local Toyota dealer on the phone, asking him if he was thinking about buying a new car. When he replied in the affirmative, the dealer and a coworker showed up at Urata’s doorstep an hour later with two demo cars, which Urata and his wife test-drove around the neighborhood. The Uratas
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The Atlantic
Republican Is Not a Synonym for Racist Is American conservatism inherently bigoted? Many conservatives would be enraged by the question. Many liberals suspect the answer is yes. These different reactions stem, in part, from different definitions of bigotry . Conservatives tend to define it in terms of intention: You’re guilty of bigotry if you’re trying to harm people because of their race, gender, or the like. Liberals are more likel
10h
The Atlantic
What Happens When You Put 500,000 People's DNA Online Every big, ambitious project has to start somewhere, and for U.K. Biobank, it was at an office building south of Manchester, where the project convinced its very first volunteer to pee into a cup and donate a tube of blood in 2006. U.K. Biobank would go on to recruit 500,000 volunteers for a massive study on the origins of disease. In addition to collecting blood and urine, the study recorded vol
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A force-driven mechanism for establishing cell polarityA team of researchers from the Mechanobiology Institute, Singapore (MBI) at the National University of Singapore, along with colleagues from Temasek Life Sciences Laboratory and A*STAR's Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology in Singapore, has uncovered a novel mechanism for establishing cell polarity that relies on tension force induced clustering of proteins. This work was published in the scie
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The element erbium could pave the way to a quantum internetIf you were to try reciting the periodic table, you might stumble before you got to the rare earth elements.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research team creates powerful system to identify biological threatsA team led by investigators from the Biocomplexity Institute of Virginia Tech has been selected through a competitive process to participate in a multimillion dollar program sponsored by the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA).
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Antiferromagnetic dysprosium reveals magnetic switching with less energyDysprosium is not only the atomic element with the strongest magnetic moments, but it also possesses another interesting property: Its magnetic moments point either all the same direction (ferromagnetism) or are tilted against each other, depending on the temperature. This makes it possible to investigate within a single sample how differently oriented magnetic moments behave when they are excited
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Forest of molecular signals observed in star-forming galaxyRyo Ando, a graduate student of the University of Tokyo, and his colleagues have observed the galaxy NGC 253 and resolved its locations of star formation down to the scale of a molecular cloud, a star formation site with a size of about 30 light-years. As a result, they identified eight massive, dusty clouds aligned along the center of the galaxy.
10h
New on MIT Technology Review
Making Job-Training Software People Actually Want to UseSalesforce will start selling its online learning platform, which has helped its own employees change roles and get promotions.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The future of climate refugeesAs climate change causes sea levels to rise, vulnerable populations in countries like Tuvalu, Bangladesh and Vietnam are threatened with the very real prospect of losing their homes and migrating inland.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A fleeting visit—an asteroid from another planetary system just shot past EarthThe discovery of an unusual small object in the solar system last month caught the imagination of the global astronomical community. Scientists around the world were asking "what is it?" and "where did it come from?"
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fiji calls for urgency in talks to implement climate accordFiji's prime minister called for a sense of urgency Monday, telling negotiators that "we must not fail our people" as he opened two weeks of talks on implementing the Paris accord to fight climate change, which is already affecting his Pacific island nation.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Archeologists discover ancient gymnasium near Egypt's CairoEgypt's antiquities ministry says archaeologists have discovered remnants of an ancient gymnasium dating back about 2,300 years, from the Hellenistic period. The discovery was made by a German-Egyptian mission at the site of Watfa in Fayoum province, about 80 kilometers, or 50 miles, southwest of the capital, Cairo.
10h
Gizmodo
Here's a Rare Chance to Save on the Alexa-Packing Ecobee4 Thermostat Ecobee4 , $209 While not nearly as ubiquitous as Nest’s Learning Thermostats, Ecobee’s smart thermostats one-up the competition by pairing with wireless remote sensors that you can place elsewhere in your house, giving the thermostat a more accurate picture of your home’s overall temperature. The new Ecobee4 is especially notable in that it doesn’t just work with Alexa...it actually is a fully-fe
11h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Trailblazing womenMore than half of people in the UK can't name a famous woman in science - this week, BBC 100 Women aims to change that number.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Liquid biopsy spots aggressive pediatric brainstem cancer earlier without surgeryA particularly aggressive form of pediatric cancer can be spotted reliably by the genetic fragments it leaves behind in children's biofluids, opening the door to non-surgical biopsies and providing a way to gauge whether such tumors respond to treatment, according to Children's National Health System researchers.
11h
New Scientist - News
I went on a data diet and all I got was ads and paranoiaTired of your dirty data habits? Here's how to regain control over your privacy and stop leaking more than you need to the big tech companies
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hubble cashes in Abell's richest clusterThe universe contains some truly massive objects. Although we are still unsure how such gigantic things come to be, the current leading theory is known as hierarchical clustering, whereby small clumps of matter collide and merge to grow ever larger. The 14-billion-year history of the universe has seen the formation of some enormous cosmic structures, including galaxy groups, clusters, and superclu
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Circadian clock discovery could help boost water efficiency in food plantsA discovery by Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientists in Dallas provides new insights about the biological or circadian clock, how it regulates high water-use efficiency in some plants, and how others, including food plants, might be improved for the same efficiency, possibly to grow in conditions uninhabitable for them today.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First luxury Perigord truffle is cultivated in BritainA black Perigord truffle has been cultivated in Britain for the first time, and the scientists who announced the breakthrough on Monday said climate change could make it a new British crop.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
2017 set to be hottest non-El Nino year: UN2017 is on track to be the hottest year on record except for two warmed by El Nino phenomena, the UN's World Meteorological Organization said Monday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop milestone for ultra-fast communications and computingA mineral discovered in Russia in the 1830s known as a perovskite holds a key to the next step in ultra-high-speed communications and computing.
11h
Feed: All Latest
How to Build a Robot That Won't Take Over the WorldThe computer scientist Christoph Salge is trying to circumvent the need for rules that guide robots’ behavior. His strategy: Give them a goal of making us more powerful.
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Feed: All Latest
Green Bank Observatory Embraces Its Alien-Hunting FutureThe billionaire-backed Breakthrough Listen SETI project is keeping a beleaguered telescope running—at the expense of other science.
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Feed: All Latest
The Bus Factor: Life for Open-Source Projects After a Developer's DeathOpen-source software is increasingly popular, but some modules rely on just a single developer. What happens when they die?
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Feed: All Latest
Star Wars News: The Secrets of 'The Last Jedi' Are Starting to LeakSomething Adam Driver said in a recent interview might be a huge spoiler for the current Star Wars saga.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
One More Pioneering Woman in Science You've Probably Never Heard ofElizabeth Stern’s research led the way to our modern understanding of the prevention, treatment and diagnosis of cervical cancer -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanosensors could monitor health in real timePublic health organizations have long warned about the devastating potential of superbugs—bacteria that are immune to any existing antibiotics. If left unchecked, by 2050 these microorganisms could kill 10 million people per year, which is more than the current number of annual deaths from cancer and diabetes combined.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Oil and gas emissions a major contributor to bad ozone daysOn certain days in 2014, oil and gas emissions made a big contribution to high summertime ozone levels in northeastern Colorado, according a new study led by CIRES and NOAA researchers. High concentrations of summertime ozone in the northern Front Range of Colorado aren't limited to the urban Denver area. High ozone levels were also observed in rural areas where oil and gas activity was the primar
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
Q&A: Plotting U.S. Space Policy with White House Adviser Scott PaceThe Executive Secretary of the National Space Council discusses the Trump administration’s plans to “make America great again”—in space -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
Science | The Guardian
2017 set to be one of top three hottest years on record Data so far this year points to 2017 continuing a long-term trend of record breaking temperatures around the world, says World Meteorological Organization 2017 is set to be one of the hottest three years on record, provisional data suggests, confirming yet again a warming trend that scientists say bears the fingerprints of human actions. The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) said temperatur
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tests ensure astronaut, ground crew safety before Orion launchesNASA is performing a series of tests to evaluate how astronauts and ground crew involved in final preparations before Orion missions will quickly get out of the spacecraft, if an emergency were to occur on the pad prior to launch. This testing took place the week of Oct. 30, 2017, using the Orion mockup in the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston. In this photo,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Five reasons not to spray the bugs in your gardenThe weather is getting warmer, and gardens are coming alive with bees, flies, butterflies, dragonflies, praying mantises, beetles, millipedes, centipedes, and spiders.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Artificial intelligence aids materials fabricationIn recent years, research efforts such as the Materials Genome Initiative and the Materials Project have produced a wealth of computational tools for designing new materials useful for a range of applications, from energy and electronics to aeronautics and civil engineering.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new kind of quantum computerQuantum mechanics incorporates some very non-intuitive properties of matter. Quantum superposition, for example, allows an atom to be simultaneously in two different states with its spin axis pointed both up and down, or combinations in between. A computer that uses quantum mechanical manipulation of atoms or particles therefore has many more possible options than a conventional one that works wit
12h
Live Science
Puppers! Our History with Canines Unfolds in 'Science Comics: Dogs'The humorous new book "Science Comics: Dogs" entertainingly explains why today's canines look and behave very differently from their wolf ancestors.
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Live Science
Do Animals Have Humor?Between verbal jokes, slapstick comedy and tickling, there are numerous reasons we laugh. But are humans the only species with a sense of humor?
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Live Science
Under Her Spell: A 'Witch' Shows Her Face, 300 Years After Her DeathForensic experts have reconstructed the face of a Scottish woman imprisoned on suspicion of witchcraft 300 years ago.
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Live Science
16th-Century Shipwreck Off Florida Is Causing an International DisputeA Florida court is hearing arguments about who has the right to recover artifacts from the remains of a 16th-century shipwreck lying on the seafloor near Cape Canaveral.
12h
Live Science
Why Tough, Tiny Tardigrades May Be the 1st Interstellar Travelers'Water bears' are going laser surfing!
12h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Patient scans being sent from ambulances in new trialThe European Space Agency has part-funded the pilot project involving five ambulances in the Highlands.
12h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Relocated squirrels moving to new areas, says charityMore than 80 had been stuck and were moved to other Highland areas with no red squirrels.
12h
Ingeniøren
Unik komponent var årsag til spektakulær vindmøllebrandMHI Vestas har nu fundet årsagen til branden i toppen af en 9,5 MW prototype vindmølle den 4. august på teststationen i Østerild.
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Ingeniøren
Ny blogger på ing.dk: Hvordan bruger vi intelligent teknologi klogt?Vores nye blogger skriver om de nyeste tendenser inden for IoT og AI.
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Ingeniøren
Techtopia #25: Kan teknologi frelse verden?Podcast: Siden det første transatlantiske telegrafkabel blev trukket mellem USA og Storbritannien for 165 år siden, har vi diskuteret teknologi. Ofte gennem historiske manifester.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lightning-fast communicationsResearchers from the University of Utah have discovered that a special kind of perovskite, a combination of an organic and inorganic compound that has the same structure as the original mineral, can be layered on a silicon wafer to create a vital component for the communications system of the future. That system would use the terahertz spectrum, the next generation of communications bandwidth that
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dental filling failure linked to smoking, drinking and geneticsResearchers find that people who drink alcohol or men who smoke are more likely to suffer a failed dental filling. The research team also found a genetic difference in some patients associated with increased filling failure rates. In contrast, no major difference in filling failure rates was found between traditional amalgam and newer composite resin fillings. The results suggest that personalized
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Science | The Guardian
Universities are part of the solution to dysfunctional Brexit debates Academics have every right to teach and talk about Brexit, because they can help to address the problems it has raised We live in febrile times. Two weeks ago government whip Chris Heaton-Harris unleashed a wave of academic consternation when it was discovered that he had written to every university in the UK to ask what they were teaching about Brexit and which of their professors were involved.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gold nanoparticles enhance light emissions from tungsten disulphideNUS physicists have discovered that gold nanoparticles can enhance light emissions from tungsten disulphide (WS2) flakes and reveal minute changes in the material composition.
12h
The Atlantic
Could a Tax Fix the Gig Economy? Sohail Rana has driven passengers around New York City for 25 years, first as a taxi driver, then for black-car companies, and now for Uber. He works around 60 hours a week and has no plans to stop working, partially because he can’t afford to stop. “I have no health insurance, no retirement, no other benefits, so I have to keep working,” he told me. When he gets sick, he goes to the emergency ro
12h
New Scientist - News
Bitcoin: what a waste of resourcesThe cryptocurrency’s insistence on meaningless computer tasks is outdated, profligate and holds the technology back
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Premature death of star confirmed by astronomersA group of Brazilian astronomers observed a pair of celestial objects rarely seen in the Milky Way: a very low-mass white dwarf and a brown dwarf.
12h
BBC News - Science & Environment
2017 'very likely' in top three warmest years on recordScientists say that 2017 shows a continuing trend of high temperatures and extreme weather events.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Giant Magellan Telescope organization casts fifth mirrorThe Giant Magellan Telescope Organization (GMTO) announced that it has initiated the casting of the fifth of seven mirrors that will form the heart of the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT). The mirror is being cast at the University of Arizona's Richard F. Caris Mirror Laboratory, the facility known for creating the world's largest mirrors for astronomy. The 25-meter diameter GMT will be sited in the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Characterisation of the structure of grapheneGraphene, the world's first two-dimensional material, is many times stronger than steel, more conductive than copper, lightweight, flexible and one million times thinner than a human hair.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ultrafast magnetic reversal points the way toward speedy, low-power computer memoryResearchers at UC Berkeley and UC Riverside have developed a new, ultrafast method for electrically controlling magnetism in certain metals, a breakthrough that could lead to greatly increased performance and more energy-efficient computer memory and processing technologies.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Identifying pathogens that cause soybean stem cankerScouting soybean fields and identifying diseases are some of the tasks that Kristina Petrović performs as a research associate at the Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops in Serbia. She is expanding her work on pathogens that affect soybeans as a visiting scientist at South Dakota State University, where she is working with field crops pathologist Febina Mathew, an assistant professor in the Dep
12h
New on MIT Technology Review
Is Technology About to Decimate White-Collar Work?Kai-Fu Lee, the former head of Google research in China and a top tech investor, sees a huge opportunity to automate routine office work.
12h
Ingeniøren
Ugens job: Siemens, MT Højgaard og Rambøll søger ingeniører til store projekter På dagens liste finder du job for ingeniører og naturvidenskabelige kandidater i flere forskellige firmaer. Blandt andet som specialist, projektleder, konsulent og mere endnu. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/ugens-job-siemens-mt-hoejgaard-ramboell-soeger-ingenioerer-store-projekter-10938 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
12h
Ingeniøren
Facebook hyrer 10.000 efter russisk angreb på valgkamp Facebook vil fordoble antallet af medarbejdere i sikkerhedsgrenen, efter at firmaet de seneste uger har modtaget megen kritik for ukritisk at lade russiske agenter reklamere under den amerikanske valgkamp. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/facebook-ansaetter-10000-ekstra-efter-kritik-politiske-annoncer-1082422 Version2
12h
Ingeniøren
San Francisco forpligter sig til at slutte samtlige borgere til et fiberoptisk netværk Tech-hovedstaden på den amerikanske vestkyst har forpligtiget sig til at bygge en fiberoptisk infrastruktur, så samtlige borgere - rige som fattige - kan få adgang til højhastighedsinternet. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/san-francisco-forpligter-sig-at-slutte-samtlige-borgere-fiberoptisk-netvaerk-1082421 Version2
12h
Ingeniøren
Gamle danske IC2-tog solgt til rumænsk jernbaneselskabDen ukendte køber af DSB's skandaleramte IC2-togsæt er et rumænsk jernbaneselskab. I første omgang er kun tre togsæt indkøbt, mens de øvrige 12 tilsyneladende også er på vej til at blive købt af Astra Trans Carpatic.
12h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Alzheimer’s protein can travel from blood to build up in the brainExperiments in mice show Alzheimer’s protein can travel from the blood of an affected mouse to the brain of a healthy animal.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemists discover a new formation mechanism of anti-cancer substancesRUDN University chemists revised the formation mechanism of organophosphorus complexes with metal. The results of the study may help in the production of organophosphorus compounds, polymers with specified properties as well as in the synthesis of anti-cancer drugs, as reported by Journal of Organometallic Chemistry.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Social repercussions on places declared World Heritage SitesA researcher from the Economic and Business Sciences Faculty of the University of Seville, together with a group of teachers from Malaysia, has published a study of the factors that influence the perception of tourism of rural and urban residents living in declared UNESCO World Heritage sites. This project was carried out in Malaysia, in the city of George Town, on the island of Penang, in the nor
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemists have created compounds that can treat glaucomaGlaucoma is a serious disease associated with increased intraocular pressure, often leading to blindness. One treatment is to reduce aqueous humour secretion in the ciliary body of the eye by inhibiting the activity of special enzymes called carbonic anhydrases. Russian scientists from RUDN University have designed new compounds that can effectively reduce intraocular pressure by isoform selective
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Protecting 'high carbon' rainforest also protects threatened wildlifeConservation efforts focused on protecting forests using carbon-based policies also benefit mammal diversity, new research at the University of Kent has found.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New techniques give blood biopsies greater promiseResearchers develop an efficient method for capturing and quantifying tumor DNA from blood prior to sequencing, thereby making blood biopsies cost-effective and scalable. The study demonstrates that nearly 90 percent of the genetic features of a tumor can be detected in blood using standard whole-exome sequencing. Researchers discovered that this approach could be effectively applied in 33 to 49 p
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More physical activity and higher intensity physical activity may significantly reduce risk of death in older women in the short termUsing wearable devices to measure activity showed that the amount of moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity was associated with an up to 70 percent lower risk of death among older women in a four-year study. The amount of light intensity physical activity was not associated with death risk, but that may not negate the benefits of light activity for other health outcomes.
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Science | The Guardian
Welcome, new ape relative: can you teach us not to kill you? | Jules HowardNo sooner has the Tapanuli orangutan been discovered than it’s facing extinction. The indifference of humans – the one thriving great ape – is the culprit If I could be a fly on the wall at any point in the history of science, it would be to watch the young(ish) Charles Darwin – long before his ideas on our shared ancestry with apes were published – enter the orangutan enclosure at London Zoo in 1
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Ingeniøren
Spørg Scientariet: Hvorfor kommer der en glorie om flyets skygge?En læser har oplevet, at skyggen fra det fly, han sad i, blev omkranset af en gul lysende cirkel. Klimatolog forklarer fænomenet.
13h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Ny foredragsserie på Nordic Food Lab: Monday AperitivoNordic Food Lab ved Institut for Fødevarevidenskab på Københavns Universitet har...
13h
Science-Based Medicine
ORBITA: Another clinical trial demonstrating the need for sham controls in surgical trialsLast week, the results of ORBITA were published. This clinical trial tested coronary angioplasty and stunting versus optimal medical management in patients with single-vessel coronary artery disease. It was a resoundingly negative trial, meaning that adding stunting to drug management t didn't result in detectable clinical improvement. What was distinctive about this trial is that it used a sham p
14h
NYT > Science
If You Tear a Knee Ligament, Arthritis Is Likely to Follow in 10 YearsThe limited research on the long-term effects of damage to connective tissue indicates that a patient, no matter how young, has a 50 percent chance of developing arthritis within a decade.
14h
Ingeniøren
Energiminister skal besvare byge af spørgsmål om Viking LinkEnhedslisten truer med samråd om de hemmelige tal bag milliardinvestering i elkabel til England.
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Science | The Guardian
Is there any benefit to daydreaming?We spend up to 50% of our waking time letting our minds wander. Is this just wasted time or does it perform a useful function? You have won £4m on the lottery – how will you spend it? Before you know it, that’s 10 minutes gone on daydreaming. But what about driving in your car and arriving at your destination without remembering how you got there. There is a time and a place for daydreaming, but w
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amid booming economy, homelessness soars along US West CoastIn a park in the middle of a leafy, bohemian neighborhood where homes list for close to $1 million, a tractor's massive claw scooped up the refuse of the homeless - mattresses, tents, wooden frames, a wicker chair, an outdoor propane heater. Workers in masks and steel-shanked boots plucked used needles and mounds of waste from the underbrush.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
For Amazon tribe, rainforest is a whole worldWhen Japarupi Waiapi looks into the dense foliage of the Amazon rainforest, he sees the equivalent of a supermarket, pharmacy, furniture store—and that's just the beginning.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mexico says endangered vaquita porpoise died in captivityResearchers were thrilled to have captured one of the few remaining vaquita porpoises, but announced Sunday that the adult female died after a few hours in captivity in a floating pen, raising questions about the last-ditch effort to enclose the world's smallest porpoises to save them from extinction.
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Viden
Theilgaard: Amerikanerne bliver den store joker på årets klimakonferenceDR’s klimaekspert giver et overblik over FN’s klimakonference, der går i gang i dag.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
25 new genomes to celebrate 25 years of the Sanger InstituteTo commemorate the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute turning 25 in 2018, the Institute and its collaborators are sequencing 25 new genomes. From the blackberry to the robin, bush cricket to brown trout, the 25 species all reside in the UK and represent the richness of species in this country. Twenty species have already been decided, and the remaining five will be voted for by the public and school
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Perigord black truffle cultivated in the UK for the first timeThe Mediterranean black truffle, one of the world's most expensive ingredients, has been successfully cultivated in the UK, as climate change threatens its native habitat.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Advancing the science and management of European intermittent rivers and ephemeral streamsIntermittent rivers and ephemeral streams (IRES) are waterways that cease to flow and sometimes dry. However, there is much left to learn about them, including their occurrence in the landscape, ecology, economic and societal values and incredible biodiversity. For efficient and adequate management and protection actions, these knowledge gaps need to be closed sooner rather than later.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Love actually: Americans agree on what makes people 'feel the love'Americans may disagree on many things, but love might not be one of them. According to researchers, people in the U.S. largely agree about what makes them feel loved, coming to a general consensus that it may be small gestures that matter most.
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Science | The Guardian
Can you solve it? Secrets of Russian intelligence Three puzzles that came in from the cold UPDATE: The solutions to the puzzles can now be found here. Hi guzzlers, Every day we read stories concerning the prowess of Russian hackers. But why are they so good? A clue may lie in the fact that Russia has long excelled in maths outreach, which has been instrumental in creating a supply of people with the right skills. More of this later. Meanwhile, h
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Science | The Guardian
Hope or hype? The chilling truth about freezing your eggs Cryogenic egg-storage techniques have improved dramatically in recent years.But as one woman says, ‘If this is your Plan B, you’ll need a Plan C’ Egg freezing, the process by which eggs are removed and cryogenically stored to prevent age-related decline, has seen a rise in popularity , with a threefold increase since 2014, according to research from the London Women’s Clinic. Meanwhile, recent co
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Love actually: Americans agree on what makes people 'feel the love'Americans may disagree on many things, but love might not be one of them. According to researchers, people in the US largely agree about what makes them feel loved, coming to a general consensus that it may be small gestures that matter most.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Advancing the science and management of European intermittent rivers and ephemeral streamsIntermittent rivers and ephemeral streams are prevalent waterways that cease toflow and sometimes dry. However, there is much left to learn about their occurrence, origins, incredible biodiversity and ecosystem service they provide. European researchers have initiated a project bringing together scientists and stakeholders to close knowledge gaps and improve the management and protection of these
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Group B Streptococcus infection causes estimated 150,000 stillbirth & infant death21.7 million pregnant women carry this bacteria according to the first global study of Group B Strep -- most of them are currently unidentified and untreated. Study shows for first time that a maternal vaccine may prevent 231,000 infant and maternal GBS cases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Indigenous young people who use drugs in BC 13 times more likely to dieIndigenous young people in British Columbia who use drugs are 13 times more likely to die than other young people of the same age, and young women and people who use drugs are even more likely to die, according to research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study reveals large disparities in survival for patients with HPV-associated cancersA new study found large disparities by sex, race, and age in survival for patients diagnosed with different cancers caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV).
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Science | The Guardian
Streptococcus vaccine 'could prevent over 100,000 baby deaths worldwide' Experts call for more work to be done to develop vaccine for infection commonly carried by pregnant women, which can cause stillbirth and death More than 100,000 stillbirths and baby deaths worldwide could be prevented by the development of a vaccine against an infection commonly carried by pregnant women, according to a groundbreaking report. The impact of disease caused by group B streptococcus
18h
Ingeniøren
Patientforening om statens samling af sundhedsdata: Danskerne mangler at blive spurgt Både Dansk Selskab for Almen Medicin og Patientdataforeningen mener, det giver god mening at samle det danske sundhedsvæsen i et nationalt indeks, men begge parter peger på, at danskerne fortjener at blive spurgt inden hele sektoren får adgang til dine personlige aftaler. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/patientforening-samling-sundhedsdata-danskerne-mangler-at-blive-spurgt-1082276 Version2
19h
Ingeniøren
Slukket mobil gør dig dårligere til dit arbejde Amerikanske forskere har fundet frem til, at både smartphones uden strøm og mobiler på lydløs begrænser menneskets kognitive kapacitet. Det har derfor stor betydning, hvor du lægger din telefon, mens du arbejder. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/slukket-mobil-goer-dig-daarligere-dit-arbejde-10932 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
19h
Gizmodo
Once Again, Google Promoted Disinformation and Propaganda After a Mass Shooting [Updated] Photo: AP As authorities named Devin Patrick Kelley as the shooter in a horrifying massacre in Sutherland Springs, Texas which resulted in at least 26 deaths on Sunday, Google once again served up misinformation and posts from conspiracy theorists at the top of search results for his name. On Sunday evening, Googling “Devin Patrick Kelley” delivered results from Paul Joseph Watson, the far-right
20h
Big Think
“Mind-Reading” Technology Has Been Developed by Purdue Scientists Does this mean they can read your mind against your will? Read More
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Vitamin D may be simple treatment to enhance burn healingPatients with severe burns who have higher levels of vitamin D recover more successfully than those with lower levels, according to a study presented at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Harrogate. This study is the first to investigate the role of vitamin D in recovery from burn injury and suggests that vitamin D supplementation may be a simple and cost-effective treatment to enh
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Women with PCOS should be screened for mental health disordersWomen with PCOS are more likely to suffer from mental health disorders and should be routinely screened for these during medical assessments, according to a study presented at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Harrogate. These findings support previous work showing that the condition may negatively affect mental health and highlight the importance of screening PCOS patients for me
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drinking glasses can contain potentially harmful levels of lead and cadmiumEnamelled drinking glasses and popular merchandise can contain more than 1000 times the limit level of lead and up to 100 times the limit level of cadmium, a study by the University of Plymouth has shown.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Booze and pot use in teens lessens life successYoung adults dependent on marijuana and alcohol are less likely to achieve adult life goals, according to new research.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Périgord black truffle cultivated in the UK for the first timeThe Mediterranean black truffle, one of the world's most expensive ingredients, has been successfully cultivated in the UK, as climate change threatens its native habitat.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New method to preserve tissue yields more viable cells for rheumatoid arthritis researchA new method for acquiring viable cells from cryopreserved tissue samples could provide researchers with a model for collecting and analyzing samples from different study sites to conduct more centralized research.
22h
Futurity.org
4-in-1 system makes power, water, A/C, and heat Engineers have developed a 4-in-1 smart utilities plant that produces electricity, water, air-conditioning, and heat in an environmentally friendly and cost-effective way. The eco-friendly system harvests waste energy and is suitable for building clusters and underground cities, especially those in the tropics. “Currently, significant amount of energy is required for the generation of electricity
22h
Futurity.org
Universal vaccine could target flu virus ‘stalk’ Scientists are working to make annual flu shots a thing of the past with a universal flu vaccine that would protect against most or all seasonal and pandemic strains. One of the most promising strategies—creating a vaccine that targets the “stalk” of a protein that covers the flu virus—is a strong one, but it isn’t completely bulletproof. The flu virus results in an estimated 1 billion infections
22h
Futurity.org
5 screen-time tips for children’s sleep In a new manuscript on digital media and sleep, researchers recommend removing electronic media from children’s bedrooms and encouraging calming bedtime routines to help kids sleep better. The manuscript is based on previous studies that suggest the use of digital devices before bedtime leads to insufficient sleep. The recommendations, for clinicians and parents, are: Make sleep a priority by tal
23h
Futurity.org
How obesity can make knee injuries much worse A new study examines how the nation’s obesity epidemic is changing the risk, severity, and cost of a traumatic knee injuries. “Obesity greatly increases the complications and costs of care,” says lead author Joey Johnson, orthopedic trauma fellow at Brown University’s Warren Alpert Medical School and a physician at Rhode Island Hospital. “As the rate of obesity increases, the rate of knee disloca
23h
Futurity.org
Early childhood adversity may lead to health issues by 9 Living through multiple adverse experiences—such as the death of a parent, growing up in poverty, physical or sexual abuse, or having a parent with a psychiatric illness—before the age of eight may be linked to depression and physical health problems in kids as young as nine to 15, new research suggests. “We did not expect we would see health problems in children so young…” Further, the researche
23h
Futurity.org
Why some people’s bodies store fat more healthily One little understood paradox in the study of obesity is that overweight people who break down fat at a high rate are less healthy than peers who store their fat more effectively. That’s because when fat breaks down, many of the fatty acids released from the adipose tissue (body fat) just go somewhere else. And if that happens too much, fat can accumulate to harmful levels in other tissues and or
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Périgord black truffle cultivated in the UK for the first timeThe Mediterranean black truffle, one of the world's most expensive ingredients, has been successfully cultivated in the UK, as climate change threatens its native habitat.
23h
Science | The Guardian
Joining in the fungi: black truffle grown in UK for first time Dog unearths Périgord black truffle successfully grown in Wales, the furthest north the delicacy has ever been found An expensive Mediterranean black truffle has been cultivated in the UK for the first time, the farthest north that the species has been found. Researchers believe the truffle, mostly found in northern Spain, southern France and northern Italy, was able to grow in Wales due to clima
23h
Gizmodo
Saudi Prince Alwaleed bin Talal, Billionaire Tech Investor, Arrested on Corruption Charges Photo: AP Saudi Arabian Prince Alwaleed bin Talal, one of the world’s richest individuals and a major investor in firms including Citigroup, Euro Disney, Apple, Twitter, 21st Century Fox, and Lyft, was arrested on Saturday night as “part of a sweeping anti-corruption crackdown that included detaining 10 other Saudi princes, four country ministers and dozens of other ministers,” USA Today reported
1d
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Get To Know The First-Ever Diesel Brothers Lowrider | Diesel Brothers #DieselBrothers | Mondays 9p This Chevy C-10 is low but not slow thanks to a souped up motor and a custom look Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/diesel-brothers/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DieselBrothersTV https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dieselbrostv
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Ars Technica
Forest Service suggests Trump could reopen uranium mining near Grand Canyon Canyon Uranium Mine Tower, Arizona, 2013. (credit: Kaibab National Forest ) The US Forest Service recently submitted a report (PDF) to the Trump administration, suggesting that an Obama-era order could be revised to allow uranium mining on National Forest land, reopening old tensions in an area that sustains tribal interests, mining operations, and outdoor activities. The report was submitted in
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Gizmodo
At Least 26 People Killed in Texas Church Shooting [UPDATING] AP Update, 10:45 PM: Devin Patrick Kelley, who was previously identified as the shooter, received a bad conduct discharge from the Air Force for assaulting his wife and their child, the Associated Press confirmed . Kelley was court-martialed and received 12 months confinement. He reportedly used an AR-15 semiautomatic weapon in Sunday’s attack. Officials also said that the 20 people were being tr
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Gizmodo
This Loki Clothing Line for Ladies is Incredible Image: Hot Topic In celebration of Loki’s most recent outing in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, there’s a new clothing line celebrating the trickster god’s aesthetic. And it’s awesome. The clothes, put out by Hot Topic and nerd-themed fashion designer Her Universe , take Loki’s signature look—the dark greens, sharp lines and embossed golds of his various outfits—and turns it into some fantastic la
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