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Syria Joins Paris Climate Accord, Leaving Only U.S. OpposedSyria announced Tuesday it would sign the Paris agreement. Now the United States stands alone among nations on climate change.
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Gizmodo
Brian Michael Bendis Leaves Marvel, Signs Exclusive Deal With DC Comics Image: Marvel Comics For years, Brian Michael Bendis has been one of the biggest and best-known writers of Marvel Comics. The author helped create Miles Morales and Jessica Jones and has spent years writing them and other iconic Marvel characters like Iron Man, the Guardians of the Galaxy, Daredevil, and more. And now he’s jumped ship to DC. The shock move was confirmed this morning in a statemen
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Man's earliest ancestors discovered in southern EnglandFossils of the oldest mammals related to mankind have been discovered on the Jurassic Coast of Dorset.
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Ars Technica
With deletion of one wallet, $280M in Ethereum wallets gets frozen Enlarge / What's in your Ethereum wallet? It might not matter right now. (credit: Getty Images) Digital currencies and the wallets that hold them have become an increasingly attractive target for digital pickpockets, resulting in millions of real dollars' worth of lost currency. A $50 million heist of Ethereum currency last year exploiting weaknesses in the cryptocurrency's underlying software th
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First large-scale doxing study reveals motivations and targets for cyber bullyingThe first large-scale study of a low-tech, high-harm form of online harassment known as doxing, which involves collecting and publishing sensitive personal information to exact revenge, seek justice, or intimidate victims, revealed the primary motivations are revenge and justice. Researchers created a custom text classifier to sort through 1.7 million files. They found new abuse filters on Faceboo
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Need entangled atoms? Get 'Em FAST! with NIST's new patent-pending methodPhysicists have come up with a way to link a group of atoms' quantum mechanical properties among themselves far more quickly than is currently possible, potentially providing a tool for highly precise sensing and quantum computer applications.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Improving sensor accuracy to prevent electrical grid overloadElectrical physicists have provided additional evidence that new current sensors introduce errors when assessing current through iron conductors. The researchers show how a difference in a conductor's magnetic permeability, the degree of material's magnetization response in a magnetic field, affects the precision of new sensors. They also provide recommendations for improving sensor accuracy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New drug targets for a form of muscular dystrophyA new paper details success in identifying new drug targets that potentially could slow or halt the progression of a form muscular dystrophy, an illness characterized by progressive muscle degeneration.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
It takes a microclimate to raise a pinyon treeWith all the discussion about global climate change effects, new research shows that another kind of climate is an important factor in regional pinyon pine tree recovery after drought events - the microclimate.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New model reveals possibility of pumping antibiotics into bacteriaResearchers in the University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Biochemistry have discovered that a cellular pump known to move drugs like antibiotics out of E. coli bacteria has the potential to bring them in as well, opening new lines of research into combating the bacteria.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The 17th big Atlantic storm takes shape in busy seasonThe 17th storm large enough to earn its own name has formed in the Atlantic Ocean, making Tropical Storm Rina the latest in an already above-average hurricane season, forecasters said Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Science meets archaeology with discovery that dental X-rays reveal Vitamin D deficiencyHuman teeth hold vital information about Vitamin D deficiency, a serious but often hidden condition that can now be identified by a simple dental X-ray, McMaster anthropologists Lori D'Ortenzio and Megan Brickley have found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
It takes a microclimate to raise a pinyon treeNew research shows that the microclimate is an important factor in regional pinyon pine tree recovery after drought.
20min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New model reveals possibility of pumping antibiotics into bacteriaResearchers in the University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Biochemistry have discovered that a cellular pump known to move drugs like antibiotics out of E. coli bacteria has the potential to bring them in as well, opening new lines of research into combating the bacteria.
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The Atlantic
A Collection of Lenins, on the 100th Anniversary of the Russian Revolution Russia is marking the 100th anniversary of the 1917 October Revolution on November 7, 2017. Vladimir Lenin’s Bolsheviks stormed the Winter Palace, in the second of two revolutions in 1917, which, combined, ended Tsarist rule and set the stage for the creation of the Soviet Union. Lenin died in 1924, but his legacy and image have lived on for nearly a century. With the backing of the Soviet govern
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The Atlantic
Self-Driving Cars Are Roaming Public Roads Outside Phoenix Mark another milestone on the road to fully autonomous vehicles. Today, Waymo, the self-driving car company that spun out of Google, announced they are putting cars with no drivers onto the roads around Phoenix. Regular people in the area can apply to be “ early riders ,” and use the cars as a mobility service. The move has been widely rumored around Silicon Valley, but Waymo CEO John Krafcik con
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Ars Technica
Dealmaster: Add another year of PlayStation Plus for $40 Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our friends at TechBargains , we have another round of deals to share. Today's list includes the return of a great deal on Sony's PlayStation Plus online service, which is typically a must if you own a PlayStation 4. You can tack on another 12 months of service for $40 as of this writing, a good ways off from Sony's usual $60 going rate. Beyond that, we've got a va
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Scientific American Content: Global
A Porous Core May Heat the Ocean of EnceladusStudy suggests the internal ocean could remain warm for billions of years -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Popular Science
Disney Research created a fireworks display you can feel with your hands Technology A cheap solution using water jets brings creates fireworks displays for the blind. Water jets behind a flexible sheet make a fireworks display you can feel with your hands.
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Ars Technica
Taylor Swift threatens to sue blogger who connected her to white supremacists Enlarge / Taylor Swift performing onstage in in Houston, Texas. (credit: Mike Coppola/Getty Images for DIRECTV ) Lawyers representing pop star Taylor Swift sent a cease-and-desist letter to a politics and culture blog, demanding the retraction of an article tying Swift to white supremacist culture . But instead of removing the article, PopFront editor Meghan Herning called the ACLU, which wrote b
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bringing back large herbivores to the steppesOn 24th October 2017, the first group of nine kulan (Asiatic wild ass) was released into an acclimatization enclosure on the edge of the Altyn Dala protected area in central Kazakhstan. The animals had been transported 1200 km by helicopter from Altyn Emel National Park in the southeast of the country. They will be released in early spring. This is the first step in a multi-year project that aims
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mice prefer rules over fightsHumans have learned to live together by solving most conflicts with compromises and rules, rather than aggression, but how did this evolve in the first place? And, is it true for animals as well? Can animals learn to set up new social rules? A new study shows that laboratory mice establish rules that provide equal long-term rewards, even if this requires a certain degree of tolerance and patience.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Color me purple, or red, or green, or ...Scientists have, for the first time, developed nanoscale devices that divide incident white light into its component colors based on the direction of illumination, or directs these colors to a predetermined set of output angles.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cosmos code helps probe space odditiesCosmos code testbed helps develop new techniques for computational astrophysics. CosmosDG utilizes discontinuous Gelarkin methods, which improved accuracy over previous versions by several orders of magnitude.
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Live Science
Here's What Happens in the Brain When You Don't Get Enough SleepAfter a sleepless night, you likely feel sluggish the next morning, and a small new study suggests why: Your brain cells feel sluggish, too.
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Big Think
Panpsychism Is Crazy, but It’s Also Most Probably True The idea is just as ‘crazy’ as Einstein telling us that time slows down at high speeds, or Darwin saying that our ancestors were apes. Read More
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The Atlantic
The 243 Pages of Carter's Testimony The old adage that a man who represents himself has a fool for a client has seldom been demonstrated quite so colorfully as in the transcript of Carter Page’s testimony before the House Intelligence Committee on November 2 . Page, who does not have a lawyer, agreed to testify on the condition that the transcript be made public, and while it’s hard to know what motivated him to make that deal—in f
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New on MIT Technology Review
Despite All of Our Fancy AI, Solving Intelligence Remains “The Greatest Problem in Science”Autonomous cars and Go-playing computers are impressive, but we’re no closer to machines that can think like people, says neuroscientist Tomaso Poggio.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
U of I-led team reports connections that will fuel future brain trauma researchA team led by University of Idaho scientists has found a way to stimulate formation of new neural connections in the adult brain in a study that could eventually help humans fend off memory loss, brain trauma and other ailments in the central nervous system.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Science meets archaeology with discovery that dental X-rays reveal Vitamin D deficiencyHuman teeth hold vital information about Vitamin D deficiency, a serious but often hidden condition that can now be identified by a simple dental X-ray, McMaster anthropologists Lori D'Ortenzio and Megan Brickley have found.
42min
Feed: All Latest
Do Nike's Zoom Vaporfly 4% Marathon Shoes Actually Make You Run Faster?We dug into race data to find out if runners wearing Vaporfly shoes posted better times at the New York Marathon.
47min
New on MIT Technology Review
Every Spreadsheet Has a Narrative to Tell—Just Add Some AITo make sense of data, we are teaching computers to speak our language.
48min
Ars Technica
FCC tries to help cable companies avoid state consumer protection rules Enlarge / A Charter Spectrum vehicle. (credit: Charter ) The Federal Communications Commission is intervening in a court case in order to help Charter Communications avoid utility-style consumer protections related to its phone service in Minnesota. The FCC and Charter both want to avoid a precedent that could lead other states to impose stricter consumer protection rules on VoIP (Voice over Inte
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain imaging reveals ADHD as a collection of different disordersResearchers have found that patients with different types of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have impairments in unique brain systems, indicating that there may not be a one-size-fits-all explanation for the cause of the disorder. Based on performance on behavioral tests, adolescents with ADHD fit into one of three subgroups, where each group demonstrated distinct impairments in th
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How climate change may reshape subalpine wildflower communitiesAn unseasonably warm, dry summer in 2015 on Washington state's Mount Rainier caused subalpine wildflowers to change their bloom times and form 'reassembled' communities, with unknown consequences for species interactions among wildflowers, pollinators and other animals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A little stress is good for cellular health and longevityMolecular bioscientists have discovered that a little stress can be good for cellular health. The findings will help researchers better understand the molecular mechanisms that drive aging and risk for age-associated degenerative diseases.
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The Atlantic
The Pitfalls of Taylor Swift's Anti-PR Campaign It’s four days until Taylor Swift’s Reputation comes out, and the singer herself has not said a word to the public about it. There has been no in-depth magazine profile of the once omnipresent star. No magazine covers. No radio station call-ins. No live stream of her addressing the world from a talk-show set —though, Tuesday, she posted some short videos letting the world know that a group of han
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
HIV patients at greater risk of both heart and kidney diseaseHIV patients and their doctors are urged to be more aware of the additional health risks associated with treated HIV infection. This follows new research that shows HIV patients at high risk for a heart attack or stroke are also at substantially greater risk for chronic kidney disease and vice versa.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists find promise in intervention to normalize biological functions in Fragile X miceA team of neuroscientists have developed an intervention that normalizes multiple biological functions in mice afflicted with Fragile X syndrome.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MRIs of West Nile virus victims -- even symptom-free -- show evidence of long-term neurological damageBrain images of people who developed neurological complications from West Nile virus found that many of them -- including those who had experienced mild symptoms or none all -- showed evidence of brain damage years after the original infection, according to a new study presented today at the 66th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Advances in HIV Prevention, Treatment and Cure: a special issue of PLOS MedicineThis week, publication of a special issue on Advances in HIV Prevention, Treatment and Cure begins in PLOS Medicine, advised by guest editors Linda-Gail Bekker of the Desmond Tutu HIV Centre, University of Cape Town, South Africa; Steven Deeks of the University of California San Francisco, USA; and Sharon Lewin of the Peter Doherty Institute of Infection and Immunity, University of Melbourne and R
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tiny worms may offer new clues about why it's so hard to quit smokingResearchers have found that a previously dismissed genetic mechanism may contribute to nicotine dependence, and to the withdrawal effects that can make quitting smoking so difficult.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bonobos help strangers without being askedThe impulse to be kind to strangers was long thought to be unique to humans, but research on bonobos suggests our species is not as exceptional in this regard as we like to think. Famously friendly apes from Africa's Congo Basin, bonobos will go out of their way to help a stranger get food even when there is no immediate payback, researchers show. What's more, they help spontaneously, without havi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New way to shut down cancer cells' ability to consume glucoseMany cancers depend on glucose consumption for energy, but good pharmacological targets to stop cancers' ability to uptake and metabolize glucose are missing. A new study finally identifies a way to restrict the ability of cancer to use glucose for energy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Shocking results of galaxy-cluster collisionsCombining new images from the Very Large Array with X-Ray and visible-light images reveals the spectacular, energetic outcome when clusters of hundreds of galaxies each collide with each other.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Circulating tumor cells associated with relapse in late-stage melanoma patientsA study revealing a connection between circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and relapse in stage IV melanoma patients points to liquid biopsy as a potential predictor of patients at high risk for disease progression. CTCs, tumor cells shed into the bloodstream or lymphatic system, can lead to additional tumor growth and/or metastasis to distant sites.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How Helicobacter pylori causes gastric cancerGastric cancer is one of the five most fatal types of cancer. According to the statistics of the World Health Organization about 750,000 patients die each year after developing the disease. The main cause is thought to be the bacterium Helicobacter pylori. Researchers have now identified two mechanisms through which this bacterium can cause gastric cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Molecular biology: Novel intermolecular surface force reveals actomyosin driving mechanismThe actin and myosin complex (actomyosin) generates contraction force of a muscle utilizing the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis reaction. Many attempts have thus been made to explain the molecular origin of the actomyosin motility.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chemists unlock the potential of fluoroalkenesResearchers master chemical transformation of fluoroalkenes, paving the way for new pharmaceuticals and advanced materials.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Potential treatment to stop glaucoma in its tracksVision scientists have discovered that naturally occurring molecules known as lipid mediators have the potential to halt the progression of glaucoma, the world's second-leading cause of blindness.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tiny bees play big part in secret sex lives of treesWhen it comes to sex between plants, tiny bees the size of ladybugs play a critical role in promoting long-distance pairings. That's what scientists discovered after one of the most detailed paternity tests in wild trees ever conducted. The research gives new insights into how certain bees promote genetic diversity that is essential for plants to adapt to various threats, from disease to climate c
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Science : NPR
WHO To Farmers: Stop Giving Your Animals So Many Antibiotics The World Health Organization is calling for strict limits on antibiotic use in animals raised for food. The guidelines could push many countries, including the U.S., to restrict drug use on farms. (Image credit: Stacey Wescott/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images)
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Gizmodo
I Have a Few Questions About This Video of a Woman Stealing From an Uber Driver's Tip Jar [Updated] GIF Gif source: YouTube An unsettling video went viral on Reddit late Monday night. It shows a young woman in an Uber who empties out the driver’s tip jar and then flees the scene with two friends. I have a few questions about what’s going on here. Update 2:52pm - The thief has apparently confessed on social media . Scroll down for details. Question 1: What the hell?! This is more of a reaction t
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Feed: All Latest
Waymo Finally Takes the Driver Out of Its Self-Driving CarsThe company that started as Google's self-driving car project is running human-free trials in Arizona, and will soon invite passengers aboard.
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Feed: All Latest
Review: Jibo Social RobotThis robot roommate holds a lot of promise but still has a long way to go.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
NASA wants your help naming New Horizons’ next destinationNASA’s New Horizons mission team is asking the public to vote on a nickname for the spacecraft’s next destination.
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Live Science
Pew-Pew! Laser Weapons May Arm Air Force Fighter JetsYesterday (Nov 6), the U.S. Air Force Research Lab signed a $26.3 million contract with Lockheed Martin to develop high-energy laser weapons that are lightweight and compact enough to be mounted on fighter jets.
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The Atlantic
The Chilling Implications of a Disney-Fox Merger Reports of the film industry’s impending death have been greatly exaggerated. It’d be more accurate to say the business is consolidating, with earnings for some major studios soaring in recent years and others taking big write-downs. Head and shoulders above everyone else is Disney, which reported profits of $2.5 billion in 2016 and made five of the 10 most successful films of the year (including
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Gizmodo
Ingress Players Use Unofficial Tools To Stalk One Another Ingress In May, Nicci Kay and her wife moved 25 miles south to the port city of Tacoma, Washington where, in time, they planned to overtake the Resistance’s hold on the area. Kay is an Ingress player, an agent in a great and invisible cyberwar over territory that spans the globe, involving two factions: the Resistance and the Enlightened, of which Kay is a member. Between leaving her new home and
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Viden
Marie Curie forandrede videnskaben og kvindernes verdenHun opdagede to grundstoffer, stod bag frontlinjen i 1. Verdenskrig og var Frankrigs første kvindelige professor. 150 år efter hun kom til verden, er Marie Curie stadig en af videnskabens største pionerer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fireworks from atoms at ultra-low temperaturesScientists aren't normally treated to fireworks when they discover something about the universe. But a team of researchers found a show waiting for them at the atomic level -- along with a new form of quantum behavior.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Circadian clock discovery could help boost water efficiency in food plantsA discovery provides new insights about the biological or circadian clock, how it regulates high water-use efficiency in some plants, and how others, including food plants, might be improved for the same efficiency.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Potential long-term negative impact of high protein dietsHigh protein diets may lead to long-term kidney damage among those suffering from chronic kidney disease, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Measuring atoms for better navigation and mineral detectionBetter navigation systems and tracking of minerals and water may be the result of a new discovery by physicists studying atom measurement devices.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How a 'flipped' gene helped butterflies evolve mimicryScientists analyzed genetic data from a group of swallowtail species to find out when and how mimicry first evolved, and what has been driving those changes since then.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New quantum materials offer novel route to 3-D electronic devicesResearchers have shown how the principles of general relativity open the door to novel electronic applications such as a three-dimensional electron lens and electronic invisibility devices.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The 'DNA corrector' is more efficient in the most important regions of the genomeError surveillance and repair mechanisms during DNA replication do not show the same competence in all regions of the human genome. Scientists have discovered that the mechanism that repairs errors in DNA is more efficient in the regions of genes that hold information for the production of proteins.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tech increases microfluidic research data output 100-foldResearchers have developed a technique that allows users to collect 100 times more spectrographic information per day from microfluidic devices, as compared to the previous industry standard. The novel technology has already led to a new discovery: the speed of mixing ingredients for quantum dots used in LEDs changes the color of light they emit -- even when all other variables are identical.
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Big Think
Among Tech Giants, Netflix Employees Are Happiest with Their Pay A new survey reveals how satisfied employees of different tech companies are with their pay and whether they'd like to leave. Read More
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Gizmodo
This 4K Monitor Uses Quantum Dots, and Is Surprisingly Affordable [Exclusive] Samsung UH750 28" 4K Monitor , $400 with code KINJA4K You might have heard of quantum dots in the context of TVs, but Samsung uses them in a 4K computer monitor as well , and we’ve got an exclusive all-time low price on it today with promo code KINJA4K . You can read all about quantum dots here , but the long and short of it that they’re the backbone of a backlighting technology that can pro
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Live Science
Antarctic Danger: Ice Shelf Cracks Close British Base … AgainA mobile British research station in Antarctica will close for the winter, threatened by cracks in an ice shelf.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Is Big Tech Doing Right By School Students?
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Gizmodo
The Lasting Magic of Eve's Bayou Image: Lionsgate In “Back to Cool,” the 20th episode of The Cleveland Show ’s second season, there is what may be the only casual joke about director Kasi Lemmons’ film Eve’s Bayou that’s ever been made in television history. The joke’s about how often the movie airs on TV and the thing that makes it funny is how accurate it is. In a single day, the elder Cleveland Brown explains to his wife Donn
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hot news from the Antarctic undergroundA new study adds evidence that a geothermal heat source called a mantle plume lies deep below Antarctica's Marie Byrd Land, explaining some of the melting that creates lakes and rivers under the ice sheet.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First coast-to-coast land motion map of Scotland derived from satellite radar imagesUsing hundreds of satellite radar images a research team has created a complete map of mainland Scotland.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Use of glow sticks in traps greatly increases amphibian captures in studyWith amphibian populations declining around the world and funds to find the causes scarce, a team of researchers has shown that an unorthodox tactic will make it easier and therefore less expensive to capture adult salamanders and frogs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Yeast genes behind rose and honeyed flavors in beer and wineA flavor compound called phenylethyl acetate imparts a hint of rose or honey to wherever it's found -- a dab of perfume, a sip of wine, a slug of beer. Microbiologists have used genetic mapping to identify, for the first time, specific yeast genes that produce higher levels of this aroma in alcoholic beverages. The new finding joins other recent work connecting genes to flavors in wines and beers,
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Two meds not always better than one for seasonal allergic rhinitisIn a newly updated clinical practice guideline, allergists offer practical advice on the best types and amounts of medications to treat seasonal allergic rhinitis.
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Gizmodo
350-Year-Old Map of Australia Restored to Its Former Glory A portion of the Blaeu Map showing the northern, western, and southern contours of the Australian coastline. (Image: National Library of Australia) Lost for hundreds of years, a recently recovered map of Australia dating back to the 17th century has finally been restored and put on display at a museum in Canberra. The document chronicles the mapping efforts of explorers a full 100 years before Ca
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Color me purple, or red, or green, or ...A team led by scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has, for the first time, developed nanoscale devices that divide incident white light into its component colors based on the direction of illumination, or directs these colors to a predetermined set of output angles.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study finds extra bite of blood transforms invasive Asian tiger mosquito from poor to potent spreader of Zika virusThe invasive Asian tiger mosquito now rapidly spreading in parts of the United States and Europe may have been significantly underestimated as a potential source of Zika and dengue virus infections -- and for one simple reason: they were underfed, according to a new study presented today at the 66th American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH) Annual Meeting.
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Popular Science
After the NYC marathon, where does all the poop go? Health The tons of excrement, urine and that mysterious blue liquid have to go somewhere. The poop from the more than 2,000 portable toilets ultimately ends up in treatment plants throughout the five boroughs and the tri-cities, which turn them into…
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The Atlantic
Four Defenses of Trump's Dissembling on Russia When President Trump spoke about Russia in a press conference shortly after taking office, he dismissed the notion that his campaign had ties to the country as fake news, declaring, “I have nothing to do with Russia. To the best of my knowledge no person that I deal with does.” That was blatantly untrue, I pointed out last week , citing evidence unearthed by Robert Mueller’s FBI investigation as
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop color filters that respond to the angle of incident lightImagine a miniature device that suffuses each room in your house with a different hue of the rainbow—purple for the living room, perhaps, blue for the bedroom, green for the kitchen. A team led by scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has, for the first time, developed nanoscale devices that divide incident white light into its component colors based on the direct
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Roman road discovered during digging in German city AachenAuthorities say workers digging in the western German city of Aachen have uncovered an ancient Roman road.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Shocking results of galaxy-cluster collisionsA giant collision of several galaxy clusters, each containing hundreds of galaxies, has produced this spectacular panorama of shocks and energy. The collisions generated shock waves that set off a celestial fireworks display of bright radio emission, seen as red and orange. In the center of the image, the purple indicates X-rays caused by extreme heating.
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Gizmodo
Deadspin Josh Gordon Says He Got Drunk Or High Before Every Game | The Root ‘That’s How People Like Deadspin Josh Gordon Says He Got Drunk Or High Before Every Game | The Root ‘That’s How People Like You Get Shot’: Ga. Teacher on Administrative Leave, Accused of Student Threat | Jezebel Foodgoddammit, Jonathan Cheban’s Legal Name May Soon Be ‘Foodgod’ | Splinter How Prisoners on the Verge of Freedom Are Getting Screwed by the Feds | Earther One of the World’s Most Gourmet Foods Is Threatened by
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Relocating bus stops would cut riders' pollution exposure, study findsMoving bus stops away from intersections would substantially reduce the amount of pollution bus riders breathe, report scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Take charge, wine lovers, and trust your palateThe traditional pairing of wine and food too often misses the mark - leaving people confused and intimated - and should be scrapped in favor of a more consumer-focused approach, a new study indicates.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Neuroscientists identify source of early brain activityA new study neuroscientists is the first to identify a mechanism that could explain an early link between sound input and cognitive function, often called the 'Mozart effect.' Working with an animal model, the researchers found that a type of cell present in the brain's primary processing area during early development, long thought to form structural scaffolding with no role in transmitting sensor
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Artificial sweeteners in groundwater indicate contamination from septic systemsThe presence of artificial sweeteners in rural groundwater shows evidence for contamination by local septic system wastewater, researchers have found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How SORLA protects against Alzheimer's diseaseResearchers have identified a new protective function for a brain protein genetically linked to Alzheimer's. The findings could inform novel treatment strategies to combat neurodegenerative diseases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Inner ear stem cells may someday restore hearingWant to restore hearing by injecting stem cells into the inner ear? Well, that can be a double-edged sword. Inner ear stem cells can be converted to auditory neurons that could reverse deafness, but the process can also make those cells divide too quickly, posing a cancer risk, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Immune cell policing offers insights into cancer, autoimmune diseaseCutting off energy production in regulatory T cells impairs their function, new research has discovered.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
H3N2 mutation in last year's flu vaccine responsible for lowered efficacyThe below average efficacy of last year's influenza vaccine (which was only 20 to 30 percent effective) can be attributed to a mutation in the H3N2 strain, a new study reports. With the mutation, most people receiving the egg-grown vaccine did not have immunity against H3N2 viruses that circulated last year.
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New Scientist - News
What we’re doing now will make the ocean completely unlivableClimate change could reduce oxygen levels in the oceans by 40 per cent over the next 8000 years, leading to dramatic changes in marine life
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New Scientist - News
UK is right to worry that tech takeovers may let hackers inElectronic chips made abroad can be altered to allow foreign powers to disrupt critical infrastructure. Nations are right to fret about it, says Paul Marks
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How climate change may reshape subalpine wildflower communitiesWith climate change, Mount Rainier floral communities could 'reassemble' with new species relationships, interactions
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Suomi NPP finds disorganized storms in Tropical Depression 29WNASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite measured cloud top temperatures as it passed over Tropical Depression 29W and found some disorganized storms.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First large-scale doxing study reveals motivations and targets for cyber bullyingResearchers at the New York University Tandon School of Engineering and the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) have published the first large-scale study of a low-tech, high-harm form of online harassment known as doxing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists see fireworks from atoms at ultra-low temperaturesScientists aren't normally treated to fireworks when they discover something about the universe. But a team of University of Chicago researchers found a show waiting for them at the atomic level—along with a new form of quantum behavior.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA tracking Atlantic's Tropical storm RinaNASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite has been providing forecasters with imagery of Tropical Storm Rina as it moves north through the Central Atlantic Ocean.
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Gizmodo
Amazon Echo Dot Vs. Google Home Mini: The Cheap Speaker Showdown In the gadget-world, it’s cliché to compare something to The Jetsons . But when it comes to a cheap little box that you talk to and that answers your questions and that controls your entire home, the comparison is just too perfect. The $50 Amazon Echo Dot and the $50 Google Home Mini are two such boxes. They’re not perfect gadgets, but they offer a lot for the money. Which one is more amazing? Go
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Waymo rolls out autonomous vans without human driversA self-driving car company created by Google is pulling the human backup driver from behind the steering wheel and will test vehicles on public roads with only an employee in the back seat.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Russia locks up six for Moon flight simulationThree men and three women were sealed in an artificial spacecraft unit in Moscow on Tuesday in a simulation of a 17-day flight to the Moon, a preparation for long-term missions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers identify the yeast genes behind rose and honeyed flavors in beer and wineA flavor compound called phenylethyl acetate imparts a hint of rose or honey to wherever it's found—a dab of perfume, a sip of wine, a slug of beer. Microbiologists in Belgium have used genetic mapping to identify, for the first time, specific yeast genes that produce higher levels of this aroma in alcoholic beverages. The new finding joins other recent work connecting genes to flavors in wines an
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Current cattle injections increase the risk of injury, research findsResearch by experts at The University of Nottingham suggests that current injection techniques in UK dairy cattle need to change to avoid the risk of nerve injury.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Take charge, wine lovers, and trust your palateThe traditional pairing of wine and food too often misses the mark - leaving people confused and intimated - and should be scrapped in favor of a more consumer-focused approach, a new study indicates.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bonobos help strangers without being askedA passer-by drops something and you spring to pick it up. Or maybe you hold the door for someone behind you. Such acts of kindness to strangers were long thought to be unique to humans, but recent research on bonobos suggests our species is not as exceptional in this regard as we like to think.
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Gizmodo
Waymo Announces 'Fully Self-Driving Cars are Here,' Taxi Service Coming GIF GIF Source: Waymo We are in the midst of a pretty historic moment. Leaping ahead of the competition, Waymo has announced that its self-driving cars will no longer use a human safety driver while they are tested on the roads of Phoenix. But the even bigger news is that the company is gearing up to launch the first commercial driverless taxi service. Yup, the time has come. On Tuesday, Waymo, t
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Blog » Languages » English
Toilet Paper: Over vs. Under Here at HQ we do our best to avoid potty humor, shall we say, but of course there is one lavatory debate that we can’t resist solving Eyewire-style. Namely… HOW IS TOILET PAPER SUPPOSED TO DRAPE OFF THE ROLL? If you think this is no big deal, Wikipedia helpfully informs us that “advice columnist Ann Landers said that the subject was the most responded to (15,000 letters in 1986) and controversial
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The Atlantic
We're All Tax Havens Two years ago, the leak of the Panama Papers showed the world how the wealthiest people conceal their assets in offshore tax havens. The leak prompted outrage, political scandals, and calls for an overhaul of the laws that permit such tax-avoidance or tax-evasion strategies. On Sunday, there was another leak: This one, dubbed the Paradise Papers , provided details on the offshore assets of more t
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The Atlantic
Can Unions Stop the Far Right? N ot long ago, Yasin Günay overheard colleagues at the steel company where he works, Hüttenwerke Krupp Mannesmann, in Duisburg, Germany, complaining bitterly about immigration. Chancellor Angela Merkel had accepted hundreds of thousands of asylum seekers the previous year, and with the right-wing Alternative for Germany party stirring up ugly stereotypes, anti-immigration talk had intensified thr
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Scientific American Content: Global
Earth's Nearest Neighbor May Harbor More PlanetsCold dust observed around Proxima Centauri suggests the presence of hidden worlds -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP finds disorganized storms in Tropical Depression 29WNASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite measured cloud top temperatures as it passed over Tropical Depression 29W and found some disorganized storms.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA tracking Atlantic's Tropical storm RinaNASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite has been providing forecasters with imagery of Tropical Storm Rina as it moves north through the Central Atlantic Ocean.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Theoretical physicists are modeling complex quantum processes with cold atoms and ionsResearchers develop computational methods for creating a theory describing the behavior of cold atoms and ions in optical and electromagnetic traps. There is a high demand for these works due to the possibility of modeling with such completely controlled quantum systems of complex processes, from solid-state physics to high-energy physics. The projects on designing elements of a quantum computer a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Use of glow sticks in traps greatly increases amphibian captures in studyWith amphibian populations declining around the world and funds to find the causes scarce, a team of Penn State researchers has shown that an unorthodox tactic will make it easier and therefore less expensive to capture adult salamanders and frogs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Keeping harsh punishment in check helps kids with ADHD, study findsCutting back on yelling, criticism and other harsh parenting approaches, including physical punishment, has the power to calm children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Perfect storm' that led to Colombia's antibiotic resistance epidemicThe nearly simultaneous emergence of a gene responsible for producing carbapenemases -- enzymes that kill the most powerful antibiotics used against life-threatening, multidrug-resistant bacterial infections -- coupled with the introduction of a bacterial clone that spread between patients created the 'perfect storm' that led to today's antibiotic resistance epidemic in Colombia.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Healthiest college students keep weight down, spirits upOptimists and happy people are healthier overall, enjoying lower blood pressure and less depression and anxiety, among other measures, research shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Two-dimensional materials unlock the path to ultra-low-power transistorsAn international team of scientists has discovered a new route to ultra-low-power transistors using a graphene-based composite material.
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Framework and resource for more than 11,000 gene-transcript-protein-reaction associations in human metabolism [Systems Biology]Alternative splicing plays important roles in generating different transcripts from one gene, and consequently various protein isoforms. However, there has been no systematic approach that facilitates characterizing functional roles of protein isoforms in the context of the entire human metabolism. Here, we present a systematic framework for the generation of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Tong et al., IgH isotype-specific B cell receptor expression influences B cell fate [Correction]IMMUNOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION Correction for “IgH isotype-specific B cell receptor expression influences B cell fate,” by Pei Tong, Alessandra Granato, Teng Zuo, Neha Chaudhary, Adam Zuiani, Seung Seok Han, Rakesh Donthula, Akritee Shrestha, Debattama Sen, Jennifer M. Magee, Michael P. Gallagher, Cees E. van der Poel, Michael C. Carroll, and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Koster et al., Mycobacterium tuberculosis is protected from NADPH oxidase and LC3-associated phagocytosis by the LCP protein CpsA [Correction]MICROBIOLOGY Correction for “Mycobacterium tuberculosis is protected from NADPH oxidase and LC3-associated phagocytosis by the LCP protein CpsA,” by Stefan Köster, Sandeep Upadhyay, Pallavi Chandra, Kadamba Papavinasasundaram, Guozhe Yang, Amir Hassan, Steven J. Grigsby, Ekansh Mittal, Heidi S. Park, Victoria Jones, Fong-Fu Hsu, Mary Jackson, Christopher M. Sassetti, and Jennifer...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Salguero-Gomez et al., Fast-slow continuum and reproductive strategies structure plant life-history variation worldwide [Correction]POPULATION BIOLOGY Correction for “Fast–slow continuum and reproductive strategies structure plant life-history variation worldwide,” by Roberto Salguero-Gómez, Owen R. Jones, Eelke Jongejans, Simon P. Blomberg, David J. Hodgson, Cyril Mbeau-Ache, Pieter A. Zuidema, Hans de Kroon, and Yvonne M. Buckley, which was first published December 22, 2015; 10.1073/pnas.1506215112 (Proc Natl...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction to Supporting Information for Brown and Sivak, Allocating dissipation across a molecular machine cycle to maximize flux [SI Correction]BIOPHYSICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY Correction to Supporting Information for “Allocating dissipation across a molecular machine cycle to maximize flux,” by Aidan I. Brown and David A. Sivak, which was first published October 3, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1707534114 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114:11057–11062). The authors note that, due to a printer’s error,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Genomic history of Italian brown bears Apennine bear. Photo by Valentino Mastrella and image courtesy of Archive from the Abruzzo, Lazio e Molise National Park. Apennine bears are a critically endangered population of approximately 50 Italian brown bears that live in the central Apennine Mountains. Apennine bears (Ursus arctos marsicanus)...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Phylogenomic red flags: Homology errors and zombie lineages in the evolutionary diversification of placental mammals [Biological Sciences]Phylogenomic studies can settle long-standing debates but should be scrutinized when well-established clades are contradicted and divergence dates are highly incompatible with the fossil record. Liu et al. (1) construct a species tree for Mammalia based on 4,388 protein-coding genes from 90 taxa to derive a novel model for the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Gatesy and Springer: Claims of homology errors and zombie lineages do not compromise the dating of placental diversification [Biological Sciences]Gatesy and Springer (1) consider 3 out of 89 nodes in our “preferred STAR tree” (2) unusual, raising suspicions that underlying alignment errors have generated these and other perceived misestimations in our analysis. As in their other critiques of our work, their claims are based on subjective and unrepeatable logic....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Cytokine signature in chronic fatigue syndrome [Biological Sciences]One of the major findings in the publication by Montoya et al. (1) on cytokine signatures in chronic fatigue syndrome is elevation of circulating TGF-β in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Unfortunately, the materials and methods of ref. 1 do not give much information on how the controls were...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Roerink et al: Methods for recruitment, serum separation, and storage were the same for patients and controls [Biological Sciences]Roerink et al. (1) raise important and potential methodological biases that could have accounted for our finding regarding elevated TGF-β levels in patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) (2). Here, we provide additional information as requested by Roerink et al. (1) that supports that the elevation of TGF-β in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Artificial microtubules burst with energy [Chemistry]Among the multitude of biological machines that nature employs to keep the cell operational, molecular motor proteins are certainly among the most captivating. These proteins convert chemical energy into mechanical work and drive most forms of motion (1). Cytoplasmic motors, for example, are proteins that move along a track and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Rising hazard of storm-surge flooding [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]The 2017 Atlantic hurricane season is one for the history books. It has blown a number of records out of the water. Harvey dumped more rain on the United States than any previous hurricane. Irma maintained the highest category 5 longer than any storm anywhere in the world. September 2017...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Helicase SPRNTing through the nanopore [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Enzymes that move directionally on single-stranded nucleic acids are at the core of emerging nanopore sequencing technology. Of a particular use are DNA helicases, molecular motors that bind single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) independently of its sequence and use ATP to fuel their directional motion along the DNA (1). In nanopore-based sequencing,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Controlling orientational order in block copolymers using low-intensity magnetic fields [Applied Physical Sciences]The interaction of fields with condensed matter during phase transitions produces a rich variety of physical phenomena. Self-assembly of liquid crystalline block copolymers (LC BCPs) in the presence of a magnetic field, for example, can result in highly oriented microstructures due to the LC BCP’s anisotropic magnetic susceptibility. We show...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Clinical validation of a nanodiamond-embedded thermoplastic biomaterial [Engineering]Detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) are promising drug delivery and imaging agents due to their uniquely faceted surfaces with diverse chemical groups, electrostatic properties, and biocompatibility. Based on the potential to harness ND properties to clinically address a broad range of disease indications, this work reports the in-human administration of NDs through...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Three-dimensional mesostructures as high-temperature growth templates, electronic cellular scaffolds, and self-propelled microrobots [Engineering]Recent work demonstrates that processes of stress release in prestrained elastomeric substrates can guide the assembly of sophisticated 3D micro/nanostructures in advanced materials. Reported application examples include soft electronic components, tunable electromagnetic and optical devices, vibrational metrology platforms, and other unusual technologies, each enabled by uniquely engineered 3D ar
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Neurobiology of culturally common maternal responses to infant cry [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]This report coordinates assessments of five types of behavioral responses in new mothers to their own infants’ cries with neurobiological responses in new mothers to their own infants’ cries and in experienced mothers and inexperienced nonmothers to infant cries and other emotional and control sounds. We found that 684 new...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reconstitution of UCP1 using CRISPR/Cas9 in the white adipose tissue of pigs decreases fat deposition and improves thermogenic capacity [Agricultural Sciences]Uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) is localized on the inner mitochondrial membrane and generates heat by uncoupling ATP synthesis from proton transit across the inner membrane. UCP1 is a key element of nonshivering thermogenesis and is most likely important in the regulation of body adiposity. Pigs (Artiodactyl family Suidae) lack a...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Identification and characterization of Sr13, a tetraploid wheat gene that confers resistance to the Ug99 stem rust race group [Agricultural Sciences]The Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt) Ug99 race group is virulent to most stem rust resistance genes currently deployed in wheat and poses a threat to global wheat production. The durum wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. durum) gene Sr13 confers resistance to Ug99 and other virulent races, and is more...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
A unique surface on Pat1 C-terminal domain directly interacts with Dcp2 decapping enzyme and Xrn1 5'-3' mRNA exonuclease in yeast [Biochemistry]The Pat1 protein is a central player of eukaryotic mRNA decay that has also been implicated in translational control. It is commonly considered a central platform responsible for the recruitment of several RNA decay factors. We demonstrate here that a yeast-specific C-terminal region from Pat1 interacts with several short motifs,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Crystal structures of Mmm1 and Mdm12-Mmm1 reveal mechanistic insight into phospholipid trafficking at ER-mitochondria contact sites [Biochemistry]The endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES) comprises mitochondrial distribution and morphology 12 (Mdm12), maintenance of mitochondrial morphology 1 (Mmm1), Mdm34, and Mdm10 and mediates physical membrane contact sites and nonvesicular lipid trafficking between the ER and mitochondria in yeast. Herein, we report two crystal structures of the synaptotagmin-like mitochon
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Bacteriorhodopsin-like channelrhodopsins: Alternative mechanism for control of cation conductance [Biochemistry]The recently discovered cation-conducting channelrhodopsins in cryptophyte algae are far more homologous to haloarchaeal rhodopsins, in particular the proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (BR), than to earlier known channelrhodopsins. They uniquely retain the two carboxylate residues that define the vectorial proton path in BR in which Asp-85 and Asp-96 serve as acceptor...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structural insights into binding of STAC proteins to voltage-gated calcium channels [Biochemistry]Excitation–contraction (EC) coupling in skeletal muscle requires functional and mechanical coupling between L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (CaV1.1) and the ryanodine receptor (RyR1). Recently, STAC3 was identified as an essential protein for EC coupling and is part of a group of three proteins that can bind and modulate L-type voltage-gated calcium...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Cryo-EM structure of Mcm2-7 double hexamer on DNA suggests a lagging-strand DNA extrusion model [Biochemistry]During replication initiation, the core component of the helicase—the Mcm2-7 hexamer—is loaded on origin DNA as a double hexamer (DH). The two ring-shaped hexamers are staggered, leading to a kinked axial channel. How the origin DNA interacts with the axial channel is not understood, but the interaction could provide key...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structural basis of human kinesin-8 function and inhibition [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Kinesin motors play diverse roles in mitosis and are targets for antimitotic drugs. The clinical significance of these motors emphasizes the importance of understanding the molecular basis of their function. Equally important, investigations into the modes of inhibition of these motors provide crucial information about their molecular mechanisms. Kif18A regulates...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Evolutionary and molecular foundations of multiple contemporary functions of the nitroreductase superfamily [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Insight regarding how diverse enzymatic functions and reactions have evolved from ancestral scaffolds is fundamental to understanding chemical and evolutionary biology, and for the exploitation of enzymes for biotechnology. We undertook an extensive computational analysis using a unique and comprehensive combination of tools that include large-scale phylogenetic reconstruction to determine...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Large G protein {alpha}-subunit XL{alpha}s limits clathrin-mediated endocytosis and regulates tissue iron levels in vivo [Cell Biology]Alterations in the activity/levels of the extralarge G protein α-subunit (XLαs) are implicated in various human disorders, such as perinatal growth retardation. Encoded by GNAS, XLαs is partly identical to the α-subunit of the stimulatory G protein (Gsα), but the cellular actions of XLαs remain poorly defined. Following an initial...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Numerous interactions act redundantly to assemble a tunable size of P bodies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae [Cell Biology]Eukaryotic cells contain multiple RNA–protein assemblies referred to as RNP granules, which are thought to form through multiple protein–protein interactions analogous to a liquid–liquid phase separation. One class of RNP granules consists of P bodies, which consist of nontranslating mRNAs and the general translation repression and mRNA degradation machinery. P...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
GATA2/3-TFAP2A/C transcription factor network couples human pluripotent stem cell differentiation to trophectoderm with repression of pluripotency [Developmental Biology]To elucidate the molecular basis of BMP4-induced differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) toward progeny with trophectoderm characteristics, we produced transcriptome, epigenome H3K4me3, H3K27me3, and CpG methylation maps of trophoblast progenitors, purified using the surface marker APA. We combined them with the temporally resolved transcriptome of the preprogenitor phase...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Survival and divergence in a small group: The extraordinary genomic history of the endangered Apennine brown bear stragglers [Evolution]About 100 km east of Rome, in the central Apennine Mountains, a critically endangered population of ∼50 brown bears live in complete isolation. Mating outside this population is prevented by several 100 km of bear-free territories. We exploited this natural experiment to better understand the gene and genomic consequences of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Induction of H3K9me3 and DNA methylation by tethered heterochromatin factors in Neurospora crassa [Genetics]Functionally different chromatin domains display distinct chemical marks. Constitutive heterochromatin is commonly associated with trimethylation of lysine 9 on histone H3 (H3K9me3), hypoacetylated histones, and DNA methylation, but the contributions of and interplay among these features are not fully understood. To dissect the establishment of heterochromatin, we investigated the relationships...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Quantitative proteomics identifies STEAP4 as a critical regulator of mitochondrial dysfunction linking inflammation and colon cancer [Immunology and Inflammation]Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder and is a major risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC). Hypoxia is a feature of IBD and modulates cellular and mitochondrial metabolism. However, the role of hypoxic metabolism in IBD is unclear. Because mitochondrial dysfunction is an early hallmark of hypoxia...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Necroptosis controls NET generation and mediates complement activation, endothelial damage, and autoimmune vasculitis [Immunology and Inflammation]Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) constitutes life-threatening autoimmune diseases affecting every organ, including the kidneys, where they cause necrotizing crescentic glomerulonephritis. ANCA activates neutrophils and activated neutrophils damage the endothelium, leading to vascular inflammation and necrosis. Better understanding of neutrophil-mediated AAV di
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Humanized mouse model supports development, function, and tissue residency of human natural killer cells [Immunology and Inflammation]Immunodeficient mice reconstituted with a human immune system represent a promising tool for translational research as they may allow modeling and therapy of human diseases in vivo. However, insufficient development and function of human natural killer (NK) cells and T cell subsets limit the applicability of humanized mice for studying...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Off-tumor targets compromise antiangiogenic drug sensitivity by inducing kidney erythropoietin production [Medical Sciences]Anti-VEGF drugs are commonly used for treatment of a variety of cancers in human patients, and they often develop resistance. The mechanisms underlying anti-VEGF resistance in human cancer patients are largely unknown. Here, we show that in mouse tumor models and in human cancer patients, the anti-VEGF drug-induced kidney hypoxia...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Neuron-specific methylome analysis reveals epigenetic regulation and tau-related dysfunction of BRCA1 in Alzheimer’s disease [Medical Sciences]Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease characterized by pathology of accumulated amyloid β (Aβ) and phosphorylated tau proteins in the brain. Postmortem degradation and cellular complexity within the brain have limited approaches to molecularly define the causal relationship between pathological features and neuronal dysfunction in AD. To overcome...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Taurine ameliorates particulate matter-induced emphysema by switching on mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase genes [Medical Sciences]Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been linked to particulate matter (PM) exposure. Using transcriptomic analysis, we demonstrate that diesel exhaust particles, one of the major sources of particulate emission, down-regulated genes located in mitochondrial complexes I and V and induced experimental COPD in a mouse model. 1-Nitropyrene was identified...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Lack of BACE1 S-palmitoylation reduces amyloid burden and mitigates memory deficits in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease [Neuroscience]Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder characterized by pathological brain lesions and a decline in cognitive function. β-Amyloid peptides (Aβ), derived from proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP), play a central role in AD pathogenesis. β-Site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), the transmembrane aspartyl protease which initiates...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Dephosphorylation by protein phosphatase 2A regulates visual pigment regeneration and the dark adaptation of mammalian photoreceptors [Neuroscience]Resetting of G-protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) from their active state back to their biologically inert ground state is an integral part of GPCR signaling. This “on–off” GPCR cycle is regulated by reversible phosphorylation. Retinal rod and cone photoreceptors arguably represent the best-understood example of such GPCR signaling. Their visual pigments (opsins)...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Thin myelin sheaths as the hallmark of remyelination persist over time and preserve axon function [Neuroscience]The presence of thin myelin sheaths in the adult CNS is recognized as a marker of remyelination, although the reason there is not a recovery from demyelination to normal myelin sheath thickness remains unknown. Remyelination is the default pathway after myelin loss in all mammalian species, in both naturally occurring...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Organizing principles for the cerebral cortex network of commissural and association connections [Neuroscience]Cognition is supported by a network of axonal connections between gray matter regions within and between right and left cerebral cortex. Global organizing principles of this circuitry were examined with network analysis tools applied to monosynaptic association (within one side) and commissural (between sides) connections between all 77 cortical gray...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
PIP2 mediates functional coupling and pharmacology of neuronal KCNQ channels [Pharmacology]Retigabine (RTG) is a first-in-class antiepileptic drug that suppresses neuronal excitability through the activation of voltage-gated KCNQ2–5 potassium channels. Retigabine binds to the pore-forming domain, causing a hyperpolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of channel activation. To elucidate how the retigabine binding site is coupled to changes in voltage sensing,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Albendazole and antibiotics synergize to deliver short-course anti-Wolbachia curative treatments in preclinical models of filariasis [Pharmacology]Elimination of filariasis requires a macrofilaricide treatment that can be delivered within a 7-day period. Here we have identified a synergy between the anthelmintic albendazole (ABZ) and drugs depleting the filarial endosymbiont Wolbachia, a proven macrofilaricide target, which reduces treatment from several weeks to 7 days in preclinical models. ABZ...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reciprocal cross-regulation of VND and SND multigene TF families for wood formation in Populus trichocarpa [Plant Biology]Secondary cell wall (SCW) biosynthesis is the biological process that generates wood, an important renewable feedstock for materials and energy. NAC domain transcription factors, particularly Vascular-Related NAC-Domain (VND) and Secondary Wall-Associated NAC Domain (SND) proteins, are known to regulate SCW differentiation. The regulation of VND and SND is important to...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Similarity between soybean and Arabidopsis seed methylomes and loss of non-CG methylation does not affect seed development [Plant Biology]We profiled soybean and Arabidopsis methylomes from the globular stage through dormancy and germination to understand the role of methylation in seed formation. CHH methylation increases significantly during development throughout the entire seed, targets primarily transposable elements (TEs), is maintained during endoreduplication, and drops precipitously within the germinating seedling. By...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Competing English, Spanish, and French alabaster trade in Europe over five centuries as evidenced by isotope fingerprinting [Anthropology]A lack of written sources is a serious obstacle in the reconstruction of the medieval trade of art and art materials, and in the identification of artists, workshop locations, and trade routes. We use the isotopes of sulfur, oxygen, and strontium (S, O, Sr) present in gypsum alabaster to unambiguously...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Electron leak from NDUFA13 within mitochondrial complex I attenuates ischemia-reperfusion injury via dimerized STAT3 [Applied Biological Sciences]The causative relationship between specific mitochondrial molecular structure and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation has attracted much attention. NDUFA13 is a newly identified accessory subunit of mitochondria complex I with a unique molecular structure and a location that is very close to the subunits of complex I of low electrochemical...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Biological conservation law as an emerging functionality in dynamical neuronal networks [Applied Physical Sciences]Scientists strive to understand how functionalities, such as conservation laws, emerge in complex systems. Living complex systems in particular create high-ordered functionalities by pairing up low-ordered complementary processes, e.g., one process to build and the other to correct. We propose a network mechanism that demonstrates how collective statistical laws can...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Cyclic activation of endplate acetylcholine receptors [Biochemistry]Agonists turn on receptors because they have a higher affinity for active versus resting conformations of the protein. Activation can occur by either of two pathways that connect to form a cycle: Agonists bind to resting receptors that then become active, or resting receptors activate and then bind agonists. We...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Fluorothreonyl-tRNA deacylase prevents mistranslation in the organofluorine producer Streptomyces cattleya [Biochemistry]Fluorine is an element with unusual properties that has found significant utility in the design of synthetic small molecules, ranging from therapeutics to materials. In contrast, only a few fluorinated compounds made by living organisms have been found to date, most of which derive from the fluoroacetate/fluorothreonine biosynthetic pathway first...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Increased intracellular Ca2+ concentrations prevent membrane localization of PH domains through the formation of Ca2+-phosphoinositides [Biochemistry]Insulin resistance, a key etiological factor in metabolic syndrome, is closely linked to ectopic lipid accumulation and increased intracellular Ca2+ concentrations in muscle and liver. However, the mechanism by which dysregulated intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis causes insulin resistance remains elusive. Here, we show that increased intracellular Ca2+ acts as a negative...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Strong attractions and repulsions mediated by monovalent salts [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Controlling interactions between proteins and nanoparticles in electrolyte solutions is crucial for advancing biological sciences and biotechnology. The assembly of charged nanoparticles (NPs) and proteins in aqueous solutions can be directed by modifying the salt concentration. High concentrations of monovalent salt can induce the solubilization or crystallization of NPs and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Revealing dynamics of helicase translocation on single-stranded DNA using high-resolution nanopore tweezers [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Enzymes that operate on DNA or RNA perform the core functions of replication and expression in all of biology. To gain high-resolution access to the detailed mechanistic behavior of these enzymes, we developed single-molecule picometer-resolution nanopore tweezers (SPRNT), a single-molecule technique in which the motion of polynucleotides through an enzyme...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Molecular ensembles make evolution unpredictable [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Evolutionary prediction is of deep practical and philosophical importance. Here we show, using a simple computational protein model, that protein evolution remains unpredictable, even if one knows the effects of all mutations in an ancestral protein background. We performed a virtual deep mutational scan—revealing the individual and pairwise epistatic effects...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Twenty-five years of mTOR: Uncovering the link from nutrients to growth [Cell Biology]In my PNAS Inaugural Article, I describe the development of the mTOR field, starting with efforts to understand the mechanism of action of the drug rapamycin, which ∼25 y ago led to the discovery of the mTOR protein kinase. I focus on insights that we have contributed and on work...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
PELI1 functions as a dual modulator of necroptosis and apoptosis by regulating ubiquitination of RIPK1 and mRNA levels of c-FLIP [Cell Biology]Apoptosis and necroptosis are two distinct cell death mechanisms that may be activated in cells on stimulation by TNFα. It is still unclear, however, how apoptosis and necroptosis may be differentially regulated. Here we screened for E3 ubiquitin ligases that could mediate necroptosis. We found that deficiency of Pellino 1...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Requirement of the fusogenic micropeptide myomixer for muscle formation in zebrafish [Cell Biology]Skeletal muscle formation requires fusion of mononucleated myoblasts to form multinucleated myofibers. The muscle-specific membrane proteins myomaker and myomixer cooperate to drive mammalian myoblast fusion. Whereas myomaker is highly conserved across diverse vertebrate species, myomixer is a micropeptide that shows relatively weak cross-species conservation. To explore the functional conservatio
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
HSPB7 is indispensable for heart development by modulating actin filament assembly [Cell Biology]Small heat shock protein HSPB7 is highly expressed in the heart. Several mutations within HSPB7 are associated with dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure in human patients. However, the precise role of HSPB7 in the heart is still unclear. In this study, we generated global as well as cardiac-specific HSPB7 KO...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Efficient synthesis of phycocyanobilin in mammalian cells for optogenetic control of cell signaling [Cell Biology]Optogenetics is a powerful tool to precisely manipulate cell signaling in space and time. For example, protein activity can be regulated by several light-induced dimerization (LID) systems. Among them, the phytochrome B (PhyB)–phytochrome-interacting factor (PIF) system is the only available LID system controlled by red and far-red lights. However, the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
KO of 5-InsP7 kinase activity transforms the HCT116 colon cancer cell line into a hypermetabolic, growth-inhibited phenotype [Cell Biology]The inositol pyrophosphates 5-InsP7 (diphosphoinositol pentakisphosphate) and 1,5-InsP8 (bis-diphosphoinositol tetrakisphosphate) are highly energetic cellular signals interconverted by the diphosphoinositol pentakisphosphate kinases (PPIP5Ks). Here, we used CRISPR to KO PPIP5Ks in the HCT116 colon cancer cell line. This procedure eliminates 1,5-InsP8 and raises 5-InsP7 levels threefold. Expressio
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Living supramolecular polymerization achieved by collaborative assembly of platinum(II) complexes and block copolymers [Chemistry]An important feature of biological systems to achieve complexity and precision is the involvement of multiple components where each component plays its own role and collaborates with other components. Mimicking this, we report living supramolecular polymerization achieved by collaborative assembly of two structurally dissimilar components, that is, platinum(II) complexes and...
2h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Molecular photoswitches mediating the strain-driven disassembly of supramolecular tubules [Chemistry]Chemists have created molecular machines and switches with specific mechanical responses that were typically demonstrated in solution, where mechanically relevant motion is dissipated in the Brownian storm. The next challenge consists of designing specific mechanisms through which the action of individual molecules is transmitted to a supramolecular architecture, with a...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Rat embryonic stem cells produce fertile offspring through tetraploid complementation [Developmental Biology]Pluripotency of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can be functionally assessed according to the developmental potency. Tetraploid complementation, through which an entire organism is produced from the pluripotent donor cells, is taken as the most stringent test for pluripotency. It remains unclear whether ESCs of other species besides mice can pass...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Dual origin of enteric neurons in vagal Schwann cell precursors and the sympathetic neural crest [Developmental Biology]Most of the enteric nervous system derives from the “vagal” neural crest, lying at the level of somites 1–7, which invades the digestive tract rostro-caudally from the foregut to the hindgut. Little is known about the initial phase of this colonization, which brings enteric precursors into the foregut. Here we...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Impact of climate change on New York City’s coastal flood hazard: Increasing flood heights from the preindustrial to 2300 CE [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]The flood hazard in New York City depends on both storm surges and rising sea levels. We combine modeled storm surges with probabilistic sea-level rise projections to assess future coastal inundation in New York City from the preindustrial era through 2300 CE. The storm surges are derived from large sets...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Nitrous oxide emissions are enhanced in a warmer and wetter world [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Nitrous oxide (N2O) has a global warming potential that is 300 times that of carbon dioxide on a 100-y timescale, and is of major importance for stratospheric ozone depletion. The climate sensitivity of N2O emissions is poorly known, which makes it difficult to project how changing fertilizer use and climate...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Integrated field, laboratory, and theoretical study of PKD spread in a Swiss prealpine river [Ecology]Proliferative kidney disease (PKD) is a major threat to wild and farmed salmonid populations because of its lethal effect at high water temperatures. Its causative agent, the myxozoan Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae, has a complex lifecycle exploiting freshwater bryozoans as primary hosts and salmonids as secondary hosts. We carried out an integrated...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Evolutionary cascades induced by large frugivores [Ecology]Large, fruit-eating vertebrates have been lost from many of the world’s ecosystems. The ecological consequences of this defaunation can be severe, but the evolutionary consequences are nearly unknown because it remains unclear whether frugivores exert strong selection on fruit traits. I assessed the macroevolution of fruit traits in response to...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Opinion: The Next Generation Researchers Initiative at NIH [Economic Sciences]Growing concerns about the wellbeing and stability of the biomedical research workforce are well documented. Over the last 15 years (since the end of the doubling of the NIH budget), we have observed worsening “hypercompetition” as more scientists vie for fewer available dollars (1, 2). Within this hypercompetitive environment, the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Extensive gene tree discordance and hemiplasy shaped the genomes of North American columnar cacti [Evolution]Few clades of plants have proven as difficult to classify as cacti. One explanation may be an unusually high level of convergent and parallel evolution (homoplasy). To evaluate support for this phylogenetic hypothesis at the molecular level, we sequenced the genomes of four cacti in the especially problematic tribe Pachycereeae,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Unique growth strategy in the Earth’s first trees revealed in silicified fossil trunks from China [Evolution]Cladoxylopsida included the earliest large trees that formed critical components of globally transformative pioneering forest ecosystems in the Mid- and early Late Devonian (ca. 393–372 Ma). Well-known cladoxylopsid fossils include the up to ∼1-m-diameter sandstone casts known as Eospermatopteris from Middle Devonian strata of New York State. Cladoxylopsid trunk structure...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
GPCRs globally coevolved with receptor activity-modifying proteins, RAMPs [Evolution]Receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) are widely expressed in human tissues and, in some cases, have been shown to affect surface expression or ligand specificity of G-protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs). However, whether RAMP−GPCR interactions are widespread, and the nature of their functional consequences, remains largely unknown. In humans, there are three RAMPs...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Development of functional ectopic compound eyes in scarabaeid beetles by knockdown of orthodenticle [Evolution]Complex traits like limbs, brains, or eyes form through coordinated integration of diverse cell fates across developmental space and time, yet understanding how complexity and integration emerge from uniform, undifferentiated precursor tissues remains limited. Here, we use ectopic eye formation as a paradigm to investigate the emergence and integration of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Alk and Ltk ligands are essential for iridophore development in zebrafish mediated by the receptor tyrosine kinase Ltk [Genetics]Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (Alk) and leucocyte tyrosine kinase (Ltk) were identified as “orphan” receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) with oncogenic potential. Recently ALKAL1 and ALKAL2 (also named “augmentor-β” and “augmentor-α” or “FAM150A” and “FAM150B,” respectively) were discovered as physiological ligands of Alk and Ltk. Here, we employ zebrafish as a model...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Growth hormone-releasing hormone attenuates cardiac hypertrophy and improves heart function in pressure overload-induced heart failure [Medical Sciences]It has been shown that growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) reduces cardiomyocyte (CM) apoptosis, prevents ischemia/reperfusion injury, and improves cardiac function in ischemic rat hearts. However, it is still not known whether GHRH would be beneficial for life-threatening pathological conditions, like cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure (HF). Thus, we tested the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
IncV, a FFAT motif-containing Chlamydia protein, tethers the endoplasmic reticulum to the pathogen-containing vacuole [Microbiology]Membrane contact sites (MCS) are zones of contact between the membranes of two organelles. At MCS, specific proteins tether the organelles in close proximity and mediate the nonvesicular trafficking of lipids and ions between the two organelles. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) integral membrane protein VAP is a common component of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Synergistic malaria vaccine combinations identified by systematic antigen screening [Microbiology]A highly effective vaccine would be a valuable weapon in the drive toward malaria elimination. No such vaccine currently exists, and only a handful of the hundreds of potential candidates in the parasite genome have been evaluated. In this study, we systematically evaluated 29 antigens likely to be involved in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Exploitation of an iron transporter for bacterial protein antibiotic import [Microbiology]Unlike their descendants, mitochondria and plastids, bacteria do not have dedicated protein import systems. However, paradoxically, import of protein bacteriocins, the mechanisms of which are poorly understood, underpins competition among pathogenic and commensal bacteria alike. Here, using X-ray crystallography, isothermal titration calorimetry, confocal fluorescence microscopy, and in vivo photo
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Intersectin associates with synapsin and regulates its nanoscale localization and function [Neuroscience]Neurotransmission is mediated by the exocytic release of neurotransmitters from readily releasable synaptic vesicles (SVs) at the active zone. To sustain neurotransmission during periods of elevated activity, release-ready vesicles need to be replenished from the reserve pool of SVs. The SV-associated synapsins are crucial for maintaining this reserve pool and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Conductivity and dissociation in liquid metallic hydrogen and implications for planetary interiors [Physics]Liquid metallic hydrogen (LMH) is the most abundant form of condensed matter in our solar planetary structure. The electronic and thermal transport properties of this metallic fluid are of fundamental interest to understanding hydrogen’s mechanism of conduction, atomic or pairing structure, as well as the key input for the magnetic...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
A stromal region of cytochrome b6f subunit IV is involved in the activation of the Stt7 kinase in Chlamydomonas [Plant Biology]The cytochrome (cyt) b6f complex and Stt7 kinase regulate the antenna sizes of photosystems I and II through state transitions, which are mediated by a reversible phosphorylation of light harvesting complexes II, depending on the redox state of the plastoquinone pool. When the pool is reduced, the cyt b6f activates...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
NTRC-dependent redox balance of 2-Cys peroxiredoxins is needed for optimal function of the photosynthetic apparatus [Plant Biology]Thiol-dependent redox regulation allows the rapid adaptation of chloroplast function to unpredictable changes in light intensity. Traditionally, it has been considered that chloroplast redox regulation relies on photosynthetically reduced ferredoxin (Fd), thioredoxins (Trxs), and an Fd-dependent Trx reductase (FTR), the Fd-FTR-Trxs system, which links redox regulation to light. More recently,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Search predicts and changes patience in intertemporal choice [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Intertemporal choice impacts many important outcomes, such as decisions about health, education, wealth, and the environment. However, the psychological processes underlying decisions involving outcomes at different points in time remain unclear, limiting opportunities to intervene and improve people’s patience. This research examines information-search strategies used during intertemporal choice
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Individual differences in associative memory among older adults explained by hippocampal subfield structure and function [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Older adults experience impairments in episodic memory, ranging from mild to clinically significant. Given the critical role of the medial temporal lobe (MTL) in episodic memory, age-related changes in MTL structure and function may partially account for individual differences in memory. Using ultra–high-field 7T structural MRI and high-resolution 3T functional...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
One- to four-year-olds connect diverse positive emotional vocalizations to their probable causes [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]The ability to understand why others feel the way they do is critical to human relationships. Here, we show that emotion understanding in early childhood is more sophisticated than previously believed, extending well beyond the ability to distinguish basic emotions or draw different inferences from positively and negatively valenced emotions....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Temporary sharing prompts unrestrained disclosures that leave lasting negative impressions [Social Sciences]With the advent of social media, the impressions people make on others are based increasingly on their digital disclosures. However, digital disclosures can come back to haunt, making it challenging for people to manage the impressions they make. In field and online experiments in which participants take, share, and evaluate...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Modeling and replicating statistical topology and evidence for CMB nonhomogeneity [Statistics]Under the banner of “big data,” the detection and classification of structure in extremely large, high-dimensional, data sets are two of the central statistical challenges of our times. Among the most intriguing new approaches to this challenge is “TDA,” or “topological data analysis,” one of the primary aims of which...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reduction of solar photovoltaic resources due to air pollution in China [Sustainability Science]Solar photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation is expanding rapidly in China, with total capacity projected to be 400 GW by 2030. However, severe aerosol pollution over China reduces solar radiation reaching the surface. We estimate the aerosol impact on solar PV electricity generation at the provincial and regional grid levels in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Species richness accelerates marine ecosystem restoration in the Coral Triangle [Sustainability Science]Ecosystem restoration aims to restore biodiversity and valuable functions that have been degraded or lost. The Coral Triangle is a hotspot for marine biodiversity held in its coral reefs, seagrass meadows, and mangrove forests, all of which are in global decline. These coastal ecosystems support valuable fisheries and endangered species,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Finding water scarcity amid abundance using human-natural system models [Sustainability Science]Water scarcity afflicts societies worldwide. Anticipating water shortages is vital because of water’s indispensable role in social-ecological systems. But the challenge is daunting due to heterogeneity, feedbacks, and water’s spatial-temporal sequencing throughout such systems. Regional system models with sufficient detail can help address this challenge. In our study, a detailed...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Algorithm for cellular reprogramming [Systems Biology]The day we understand the time evolution of subcellular events at a level of detail comparable to physical systems governed by Newton’s laws of motion seems far away. Even so, quantitative approaches to cellular dynamics add to our understanding of cell biology. With data-guided frameworks we can develop better predictions...
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Big Think
There's a Lot of Moral Superiority Going Around. Is It Good or Bad? Is moral superiority the reason American society is so polarized? Read More
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Indian scientists urged to speak out about pseudoscience Cancelled astrology workshop prompts calls for researchers to be vigilant about stamping out unscientific beliefs. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22957
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New on MIT Technology Review
Waymo Will Be First to Test Robo-Taxis Without Safety Drivers on Regular Americans
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Ars Technica
Study: Nearly 70% of online CBD marijuana extracts are mislabeled Enlarge / This dark oil is the pure concentrated form of cannabis extracted in numerous different ways. (credit: Getty | NurPhoto ) With 29 states and the District of Columbia having now legalized medical marijuana, many consumers are trying out various types of extracts containing cannabidiol (CBD)—a relatively safe, non-addictive component of marijuana that does not generate a “high” and has sh
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How far did you fall from the tree? Scientists estimate the mutation rate from chimpanzee parents to their offspringMutations generate genetic variation, and are a major driving force of evolution. Therefore, examining mutation rates and modes are essential to better understand the genetic basis for physiology and evolution.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How climate change may reshape subalpine wildflower communitiesAn unseasonably warm, dry summer in 2015 on Washington state's Mount Rainier caused subalpine wildflowers to change their bloom times and form 'reassembled' communities, with unknown consequences for species interactions among wildflowers, pollinators and other animals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
For cancer patients with HIV, immunotherapy appears safeA new category of immunotherapies called checkpoint inhibitors that has been highly effective against many different cancers appears safe to use in patients with both advanced malignancies and HIV, a population excluded from earlier trials of such therapies, according to an early-phase trial.
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The Atlantic
Attending a School Named After a Confederate General For decades, students at Robert E. Lee High School in Tyler, Texas, have sung their alma mater at pep rallies, assemblies, sporting events, and other functions. Robert E. Lee we raise our voice in praise of your name May honor and glory e'er guide you to fame. … And so the times will not divide us for united we'll be Our Memories will bind us to Robert E. Lee. But not everyone cherishes the song.
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The Atlantic
Governments Don’t Stand a Chance Against Rich People Who Don’t Like Taxes People and corporations stash an enormous amount of money—an estimated $8.7 trillion —in tax havens around the world. In recent days, the public has gotten a glimpse of the industry that enables such stashing, as media organizations reported on a trove of leaked documents known as “the Paradise Papers.” The documents originate from several tax-haven nations and two law firms that help individuals
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The Scientist RSS
Mitochondrial Networks Explain Why Caloric Restriction Extends Worms LivesMaintaining dynamic connections among the body's mitochondria is required for the health and life-extending benefits of low-calorie diets for nematodes.
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Feed: All Latest
Why the Netflix Phishing Email Works So WellThat Netflix phishing scheme has been around for months—and it's clever enough to stick around.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Need entangled atoms? Get 'Em FAST! With NIST's new patent-pending methodPhysicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have come up with a way to link a group of atoms' quantum mechanical properties among themselves far more quickly than is currently possible, potentially providing a tool for highly precise sensing and quantum computer applications. NIST has applied for a patent on the method, which is detailed in a new paper in Physical Revie
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Two-dimensional materials unlock the path to ultra-low-power transistorsAn international team of scientists has discovered a new route to ultra-low-power transistors using a graphene-based composite material.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lending late neurons a helping handResearchers have discovered that even a slight delay of the neuronal migration may lead to behavioral disorders that are similar to autistic characteristics in human. Furthermore, they found that these disorders are due to the abnormally low activity of the late neurons, which leads to permanent deficit of interneuronal connections. They succeeded in correcting the activity of the relevant neurons
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Red giant star gives a surprising glimpse of the sun's futureAstronomers have for the first time observed details on the surface of an aging star with the same mass as the sun. ALMA's images show that the star is a giant, its diameter twice the size of Earth's orbit around the sun, but also that the star's atmosphere is affected by powerful, unexpected shock waves.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Promising new drug for Hep B testedNew treatment has advanced toward human trials for chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, report scientists.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is the UK's energy policy fit for purpose?Business as usual' is not an option for the UK's nuclear energy sector; our energy companies' 'regressive and unjust funding approach' is causing fuel poverty, and the Northern Powerhouse could play a key role in shaping the UK's climate change future.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New approach uses light instead of robots to assemble electronic componentsAn international team of researchers has developed a new light-based manipulation method that could one day be used to mass produce electronic components for smartphones, computers and other devices. A cheaper and faster way to produce these components could make it less expensive to connect everyday objects—from clothing to household appliances—to the internet, advancing the concept known as the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers model Coulomb crystals to understand star evolutionMatter in the cores of old white dwarfs and the crusts of neutron stars is compressed to unimaginable densities by intense gravitational forces. The scientific community believes this matter is composed of Coulomb crystals that form at temperatures potentially as high as 100 million Kelvin.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Pirate paper website Sci-Hub dealt another blow by US courts American Chemical Society wins lawsuit against the site, and could seek to block access to the portal in the United States. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22971
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Language patterns reveal body's hidden response to stress Volunteers' use of certain words predicted stress-related changes in gene expression better than their self-reported feelings. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22964
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Viden
Kunstig intelligens gør grynede billeder bedreNy hjemmeside viser dig, hvad machine learning kan gøre for dine feriefotos.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researcher seeks to tame 'ghost' of uncertainty in complex dynamic systemsWe're surrounded by dynamic systems—systems demonstrating behavior changing through time—in engineering, nature, civilization, even our personal lives. Even an ordinary bathtub could be considered a dynamic system with inflow and outflow of water and a reservoir level in the tub (along with a few rubber ducks, maybe). More complex dynamic systems include aircrafts, robots, glaciers, traffic flows,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cosmos code helps probe space odditiesBlack holes make for a great space mystery. They're so massive that nothing, not even light, can escape a black hole once it gets close enough. A great mystery for scientists is that there's evidence of powerful jets of electrons and protons that shoot out of the top and bottom of some black holes. Yet no one knows how these jets form.
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Gizmodo
Google Is Adding Wait Times For Restaurants Because It Follows You Everywhere Image: Google Google does a lot of bad and creepy things that often seem to benefit Google more than users. But, dear reader, I have to say that I hate waiting in line so much that the site’s newly announced “wait times” feature has me feeling great about the fact that my every movement is being tracked by a terrifying conglomerate. For a while now, Google Search has displayed a “popular times” w
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First large-scale doxing study reveals motivations and targets for cyber bullyingThe first large-scale study of a low-tech, high-harm form of online harassment known as doxing, which involves collecting and publishing sensitive personal information to exact revenge, seek justice, or intimidate victims, revealed the primary motivations are revenge and justice. Researchers created a custom text classifier to sort through 1.7 million files. They found new abuse filters on Faceboo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can virtual reality be used to manage pain at a pediatric hospital?In a study conducted to determine if virtual reality (VR) can be effectively used for pain management during medical procedures such as blood draw, findings showed that VR significantly reduced patients' and parents' perception of acute pain, anxiety and general distress during the procedure.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
University of Chicago scientists see fireworks from atoms at ultra-low temperaturesScientists aren't normally treated to fireworks when they discover something about the universe. But a team of University of Chicago researchers found a show waiting for them at the atomic level -- along with a new form of quantum behavior.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Shocking results of galaxy-cluster collisionsCombining new images from the Very Large Array with X-Ray and visible-light images reveals the spectacular, energetic outcome when clusters of hundreds of galaxies each collide with each other.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A little stress is good for cellular health and longevityNorthwestern University molecular bioscientists have discovered that a little stress can be good for cellular health. The findings will help researchers better understand the molecular mechanisms that drive aging and risk for age-associated degenerative diseases.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tiny worms may offer new clues about why it's so hard to quit smokingResearchers at the University of Michigan Life Sciences Institute found that a previously dismissed genetic mechanism may contribute to nicotine dependence, and to the withdrawal effects that can make quitting smoking so difficult.
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Quanta Magazine
A Zombie Gene Protects Elephants From Cancer Elephants and other large animals have a lower incidence of cancer than would be expected statistically, suggesting that they have evolved ways to protect themselves against the disease. A new study reveals how elephants do it: An old gene that was no longer functional was recycled from the vast “genome junkyard” to increase the sensitivity of elephant cells to DNA damage, enabling them to cull p
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New on MIT Technology Review
AI Could Set Us Back 100 Years When It Comes to How We Consume NewsFake videos could become so convincing that we may have to get used to getting our news without them.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Andrew Ng Wants a New “New Deal” to Combat Job AutomationAI is coming for jobs, but one of the field’s masters has an idea that he thinks can help.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA-developed drone aircraft offer one-of-a-kind capabilitiesNASA scientists, who always are on the hunt for new platforms from which to carry out their research, now may avail themselves of two agency-developed unmanned aerial systems, or UASs, that some say represent the future for drone aircraft.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Factors associated with increases in US health care spendingHealth care spending increased by more than $900 billion from 1996 to 2013. More than half of the spending increase was attributed to increased prices for health care services, with lesser contributions from growth and aging of the US population.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Humankind's earliest ancestors discovered in southern EnglandFossils of the oldest mammals related to humankind have been discovered on the Jurassic Coast of Dorset in the UK. The two teeth are from small, rat-like creatures that lived 145 million years ago in the shadow of the dinosaurs. They are the earliest undisputed fossils of mammals belonging to the line that led to human beings.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How far did you fall from the tree?Mutations generate genetic variation, and are a major driving force of evolution. Therefore, examining mutation rates and modes are essential to better understand the genetic basis for physiology and evolution.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Muscles out of the spray can put us one step closer to an artificial heartAn artificial heart would be an absolute lifesaver for people with cardiac failure. However, to recreate the complex organ in the laboratory, one would first need to work out how to grow multi-layered, living tissues. Researchers have now come one step closer to this goal: by means of a spraying process, they have created functioning muscle fibers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Using light instead of robots to assemble electronic componentsAn international team of researchers has developed a new light-based manipulation method that could one day be used to mass produce electronic components for smartphones, computers and other devices.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Modeling coulomb crystals to understand star evolutionMatter in the cores of old white dwarfs and the crusts of neutron stars is compressed to unimaginable densities by intense gravitational forces. The scientific community believes this matter is composed of Coulomb crystals that form at temperatures potentially as high as 100 million Kelvin.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Serving water with school lunches could prevent child, adult obesityA kinesiology and community health professor's analysis suggests that nationwide expansion of a program in New York City schools that encouraged children to consume water with their lunches could reduce child and adult obesity rates in the US significantly, saving billions in medical costs and other expenses over children's lifetimes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Eight new epilepsy genes discoveredA new study examining 200 children with epileptic encephalopathy – epilepsy combined with intellectual or overall developmental disability –identified eight new genes involved in this type of epilepsy thanks to their use of whole-genome sequencing, which had never been done before in an epileptic study of this scope.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why plants form sprouts in the darkA signal from the cell wall decides that, in the dark, seeds grow into long yellow sprouts, instead of turning green and forming leaves. The signal that switches on the darkness program in seedling development has not hitherto been identified. Earlier studies had shown that these processes involve photoreceptors inside plant cells.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Introducing autonomous vehicles sooner could save hundreds of thousands of livesAutonomous vehicles should only have to be moderately better than human drivers before being widely used in the United States, an approach that could save thousands of lives annually even before the technology is perfected, according to a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Swapping where crops are grown could feed an extra 825 million peopleRedrawing the global map of crop distribution on existing farmland could help meet growing demand for food and biofuels in coming decades, while significantly reducing water stress in agricultural areas.
3h
New on MIT Technology Review
Waymo Will Be First to Test Robo-Taxis Without Safety Drivers on Real Americans
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Improving sensor accuracy to prevent electrical grid overloadElectrical physicists from Czech Technical University have provided additional evidence that new current sensors introduce errors when assessing current through iron conductors. It's crucial to correct this flaw in the new sensors so that operators of the electrical grid can correctly respond to threats to the system. The researchers show how a difference in a conductor's magnetic permeability, th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Paradoxical persistence of all negative growths from reformulation of Markowitz theoremAn improvement on the famous Markowitz theorem may have the potential to not only more accurately predict the next financial crises, but also the outbreak of pests and diseases, or whether a patient will have a heart attack in two hours or not.
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Science | The Guardian
From the Nullarbor to the nuclear age: what fossils reveal about South Australia's past The Ediacarans have vanished from the state but deep time is always waiting to burst through the surface As an archaeologist working in the remote areas around Woomera and the Nullarbor Plain, my understanding of South Australia was first informed by rocks and soil. There were fossils of extinct boneless animals underfoot, caught in the shadows of a long-evaporated sea. The angles of deliberately
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Let most babies eat food containing peanuts. Really.Pediatricians are not yet peanut-savvy when it comes to convincing parents to feed babies food containing peanuts, a new survey suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A little stress is good for cellular health and longevityNorthwestern University molecular bioscientists have discovered that a little stress can be good for cellular health. The findings will help researchers better understand the molecular mechanisms that drive aging and risk for age-associated degenerative diseases.
3h
Gizmodo
A Computer Randomly Generated These Nebulae That Look More Spectacular Than Hubble Images GIF Unless we find a way to travel infinitely faster than the speed of light, there’s no way you’ll ever see the farthest reaches of the galaxy in person. But that harsh reality is made somewhat easier to digest thanks to this short film by Teun van der Zalm , featuring fly-bys of computer-generated nebulae that even our most sophisticated space telescopes can’t photograph. If you’ve ever gone st
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Big Think
This Twitter Algorithm Predicts Mental Illness Better Than Trained Professionals A supervised learning algorithm can predict clinical depression much earlier and more accurately than trained health professionals. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds a new way to shut down cancer cells' ability to consume glucoseMany cancers depend on glucose consumption for energy, but good pharmacological targets to stop cancers' ability to uptake and metabolize glucose are missing. A University of Colorado Cancer Cancer Center study published today finally identifies a way to restrict the ability of cancer to use glucose for energy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bonobos help strangers without being askedThe impulse to be kind to strangers was long thought to be unique to humans, but research on bonobos suggests our species is not as exceptional in this regard as we like to think. Famously friendly apes from Africa's Congo Basin, bonobos will go out of their way to help a stranger get food even when there is no immediate payback, researchers show. What's more, they help spontaneously, without havi
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Scientific American Content: Global
Genetically Modified Browning-Resistant Apple Reaches U.S. StoresSuccess for the “Arctic apple” could herald a new wave of lab-grown foods -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica
Marvel loses creator of Jessica Jones, Miles Morales to DC Some Marvel fans may shed a tear or two today. (credit: Marvel Entertainment via knowyourmeme.com ) Longtime Marvel comics writer Brian Michael Bendis surprised fans of the medium today with a simple tweet: This is real. I love you all. Change is good. Change is healthy. I am bursting with ideas and inspirations. Details to come! Stay tuned DOCPm8KUMAIXHXY.jpg — Brian Michael Bendis (@BRIANMBENDI
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Old human cells rejuvenated in breakthrough discovery on ageingA new way to rejuvenate old cells in the laboratory, making them not only look younger, but start to behave more like young cells, has now been discovered.
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Gizmodo
What It's Like To Drive The Biggest Failure In British Motoring History I don’t know what the hell is wrong with me, exactly, but I just love a good, solid failure. And while I’m not sure you can apply the words “good” or “solid” to this thing, you really can’t argue that the Sinclair C5 was anything but a glorious failure. And it’s how we’re kicking off the new season of Jason Drives . The Sinclair C5 wasn’t really a car, it wasn’t really a scooter, it was just sort
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Live Science
Could Men Really Get Pregnant? Why Experts Say It Won't Be Anytime SoonA fertility doctor says that in theory, men could attempt to become pregnant as soon as "tomorrow" thanks to advances in uterus transplant surgeries. But others say it won't be anytime soon.
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Gizmodo
Warm Water Has Existed on Saturn’s Moon Enceladus for Potentially Billions of Years Enceladus. (Image: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute) If you were to fly over Enceladus’ southernmost regions, you’d witness a remarkable sight. With surprising frequency, this ice-covered moon spurts a plume of water into space—a telltale sign that a global ocean lies underneath. Scientists have struggled to explain how such a tiny moon could sustain enough energy to maintain a liquid ocean, but
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Gizmodo
Tuesday's Best Deals: Logitech Gold Box, Philips Norelco Shaver, Rosetta Stone, and More A Logitech Gold Box , a Philips Norelco shaver , a Rosetta Stone package , and more are all part of today’s best deals. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Logitech Gold Box Amazon’s back at it again with another big Logitech sale , so whether you’re upgrading your own computer setup, or buying holiday gifts, there’s a lot to choose from in here. Adv
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Ars Technica
Android security update fixes KRACK, slaps Band-Aid on Pixel 2 XL screen Enlarge / The Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL. (credit: Ron Amadeo) It's a new month, and that means a new security update for Android. The November Android security patch is out, and this is more noteworthy than most with its fix for the high-profile key reinstallation attack (KRACK) . It also puts some Band-Aids on the newly released Pixel 2 phones. Google actually released three "November" security pat
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Need entangled atoms? Get 'Em FAST! with NIST's new patent-pending methodPhysicists at NIST have come up with a way to link a group of atoms' quantum mechanical properties among themselves far more quickly than is currently possible, potentially providing a tool for highly precise sensing and quantum computer applications. NIST has applied for a patent on the method, which is detailed in a new paper in Physical Review Letters.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cosmos code helps probe space odditiesCosmos code testbed helps develop new techniques for computational astrophysics. CosmosDG utilizes discontinuous Gelarkin methods, which improved accuracy over previous versions by several orders of magnitude. XSEDE allocations on TACC's Ranger, Stampede supercomputers provided millions of core hours to PI Chris Fragile, College of Charleston, to develop Cosmos code. XSEDE ECSS program helped Frag
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Use of glow sticks in traps greatly increases amphibian captures in studyWith amphibian populations declining around the world and funds to find the causes scarce, a team of Penn State researchers has shown that an unorthodox tactic will make it easier and therefore less expensive to capture adult salamanders and frogs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Current cattle injections increase the risk of injury, research findsResearch by experts at The University of Nottingham suggests that current injection techniques in UK dairy cattle need to change to avoid the risk of nerve injury.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First coast-to-coast land motion map of Scotland derived from satellite radar imagesUsing hundreds of satellite radar images the team, working with Geomatic Ventures Limited (GVL), an innovative University spin-out company, created a complete map of mainland Scotland.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bacteria may help babies' digestive tracts more than suspected, scientists findSome of the first living things to greet a newborn baby do a lot more than coo or cuddle. In fact, they may actually help the little one's digestive system prepare for a lifetime of fighting off dangerous germs. But these living things aren't parents, grandparents or siblings -- they're helpful bacteria. And new research suggests they may help the lining of the newborn gut mature.
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Ingeniøren
Kunstig intelligens skal hjælpe Carlsberg med at smage på ølCarlsberg Laboratorium vil fremstille øl, der skal smages til ved hjælp af kunstig intelligens, der med sensorer og maskinlæring skal gøre det lettere at finde frem til de bedste smage.
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Gizmodo
The FDA Just Made It a Lot Easier for DNA Health Tests to Hit the Market Image: 23andMe In the past, the US Food and Drug Administration has closely scrutinized consumer DNA tests that claim to inform customers whether or not they’re are at risk for a certain health condition, and with good reason: An incorrect interpretation could lead to serious health consequences and stress. But a statement on Monday from FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb indicates that the agency w
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Gizmodo
Update Your Tor Browser to Prevent It From Leaking Your Real IP Address Image credit: Dean Mouhtaropoulos/ Getty Certain users of the privacy-minded Tor web browser should download the app’s latest update , which adds a temporary fix to prevent the browser from leaking identifying information, namely IP addresses. The TorMoil bug, as named by the security research company that discovered the vulnerability, We Are Segment , can take advantage of a flaw in the browser
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
Why women stay silent after sexual assault | Inés HercovichWhy do women who experience sexual assault rarely speak up about it? "Because they fear they won't be believed," says Inés Hercovich. "Because when a woman tells what happened to her, she tells us things we can't imagine, things that disturb us, things we don't expect to hear, things that shock us." In this moving talk, she takes us inside an encounter with sexual assault to give us a clearer idea
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
SLU researcher draws bulls eye around muscular dystrophy drug targetsScientist Francis M. Sverdrup, Ph.D., studies an inherited type of muscular dystrophy that typically begins with weakness in the face and shoulders before spreading to all skeletal muscles.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mechanochemistry paves the way to higher quality perovskite photovoltaicsFor several years, tension has been rising in line with the approaching commercialization of perovskite photovoltaic cells. Now, there has been another small earthquake: it turns out that devices based on these materials can convert solar energy into electricity even more efficiently! There is one condition: instead of producing perovskites by traditional solution methods, they should be produced
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Serving water with school lunches could prevent child, adult obesityUniversity of Illinois kinesiology and community health professor Ruopeng An's analysis suggests that nationwide expansion of a program in New York City schools that encouraged children to consume water with their lunches could reduce child and adult obesity rates in the US significantly, saving billions in medical costs and other expenses over children's lifetimes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Two-dimensional materials unlock the path to ultra-low-power transistorsAn international team of scientists has discovered a new route to ultra-low-power transistors using a graphene-based composite material.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers model coulomb crystals to understand star evolutionMatter in the cores of old white dwarfs and the crusts of neutron stars is compressed to unimaginable densities by intense gravitational forces. The scientific community believes this matter is composed of Coulomb crystals that form at temperatures potentially as high as 100 million Kelvin. Researchers in Russia clarify the physics of these crystals this week in the journal Physics of Plasmas.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Improving sensor accuracy to prevent electrical grid overloadElectrical physicists from Czech Technical University have provided additional evidence that new current sensors introduce errors when assessing current through iron conductors. The researchers show how a difference in a conductor's magnetic permeability, the degree of material's magnetization response in a magnetic field, affects the precision of new sensors. They also provide recommendations for
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study explains why US health care spending increased $1 trillionA new study finds that the cost of health care in the United States increased nearly $1 trillion from 1996 to 2013 and measures the causes behind this immense growth.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exercise may be best intervention to prevent falls among elderly, according to new study published during Falls Prevention MonthExercise alone or in combination with other assessments and interventions appears to be the most effective strategy for preventing falls causing injury among older people, a new study has found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Factors associated with increases in US health care spendingHealth care spending increased by more than $900 billion from 1996 to 2013. More than half of the spending increase was attributed to increased prices for health care services, with lesser contributions from growth and aging of the US population.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Penn study shows nearly 70 percent of cannabidiol extracts sold online are mislabeledBusiness experts estimate that the market for cannabidiol products will grow to more than $2 billion in consumer sales within the next three years. While interest in this area continues to grow, little has been done to ensure regulation and oversight of the sale of products containing CBD.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
No significant difference in pain relief for opioids vs. non-opioid analgesics for treating arm or leg painFor adults coming to the emergency department for arm or leg pain due to sprain, strain, or fracture, there was no difference in pain reduction after two hours with ibuprofen-acetaminophen vs three comparison opioid-acetaminophen (paracetamol) combinations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Marijuana extract products sold online often do not contain content as indicatedProducts sold online containing cannabidiol, a chemical compound found in marijuana and thought to have medicinal benefits, often do not contain the amount of cannabidiol indicated on the label.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How a 'flipped' gene helped butterflies evolve mimicryScientists from the University of Chicago analyzed genetic data from a group of swallowtail species to find out when and how mimicry first evolved, and what has been driving those changes since then.
4h
New on MIT Technology Review
These AI Hotshots Plan to Reboot Manufacturing by Jumping Inside RobotsThe startup Embodied Intelligence is developing smart manufacturing robots that learn from human workers through virtual reality.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Records from Ancient China Reveal Link Between Epidemics and Climate ChangeA new study suggests that long periods of cold, dry weather helped drive epidemics in ancient and pre-modern China -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Scientist - News
Planting trees could mop up ten years’ worth of greenhouse gasesThe planet is still warming inexorably, with 2017 set to be one of the three hottest years on record, but a major programme of tree-planting could help cool the world
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Popular Science
Exploring the Antarctic deep seas took me back in time Environment I got a glimpse of what ocean ecosystems looked like 350 million years ago. Thanks to the crew of the research ship Alucia, we dived in minisubmarines to 1km deep in the Antarctic for the first time.
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Feed: All Latest
NASA's Long, Lonely Mission Inside a Fake SpaceshipThe agency's HERA program is designed to study the psychological effects of space travel.
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Feed: All Latest
Embodied Intelligence Wants to Teach Robots With Virtual RealityEmbodied Intelligence wants to make it easier for anyone to teach robots new tasks. It's like a VR videogame, only you get to control a hulking robot.
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Gizmodo
My Eyes Can't Tell Which Direction These Dominoes Are Falling GIF Using a new stacking technique she calls soniverse, the eternally patient domino master Hevesh5 (or Lily Hevesh, as she’s known off YouTube ) created this mind-melting domino fall that makes it look like the tiny blocks are falling in both directions as they collapse. The technique requires an extra heaping helping of patience during setup, as half the dominoes need to be balanced so that the
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Ingeniøren
Nanomagnetisme skal forbedre energilagring i svinghjulVed at skabe den rette kombination af hårde og bløde magneter helt ned på nanostørrelse vil forskere ved Aarhus Universitet og Teknologisk Institut løse et af de største problemer ved at lagre energi ved hjælp af svinghjulsteknologien.
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Live Science
Ancient Athletes: Greek-Style Gymnasium Unearthed in Egypt
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Ars Technica
Waymo makes history testing on public roads with no one at the wheel Enlarge (credit: Waymo) Driverless cars are here. Waymo, the Alphabet self-driving car company, now has cars driving on public roads in the Phoenix metropolitan area with no one in the driver's seat. Waymo CEO John Krafcik plans to announce the news today in a speech at the Web Summit in Lisbon, Portugal. For the last year, Waymo has offered free taxi rides to ordinary people who live near the Ph
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The Atlantic
Will Democrats Lose the Virginia Governor's Mansion? Voters head to the polls on Tuesday in Virginia to pick the state’s next governor in a close race between Democratic candidate Ralph Northam and Republican Ed Gillespie. Virginia should be favorable territory for Democrats. The current governor, Terry McAuliffe, is a Democrat. Hillary Clinton won the state in the last presidential election. And only 41 percent of likely voters approve of Presiden
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The Atlantic
Why Larry David's Holocaust Joke Was So Uncomfortable Over the weekend, Larry David made headlines—and waves—for his opening monologue on Saturday Night Live. Probably the most provocative of his jokes was the one where he noted that, if he had been a concentration-camp inmate, he’d likely have been checking out some of his fellow prisoners. It’s easy to imagine this as another Larry David life-imitates-art special, an echo of the current season of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Healthiest college students keep weight down, spirits upResearch shows that optimists and happy people are healthier overall, enjoying lower blood pressure and less depression and anxiety, among other measures.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Man's earliest ancestors discovered in southern EnglandFossils of the oldest mammals related to mankind have been discovered on the Jurassic Coast of Dorset in the UK. The two teeth are from small, rat-like creatures that lived 145 million years ago in the shadow of the dinosaurs. They are the earliest undisputed fossils of mammals belonging to the line that led to human beings.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study outlines 'perfect storm' that led to Colombia's antibiotic resistance epidemicThe nearly simultaneous emergence of a gene responsible for producing carbapenemases -- enzymes that kill the most powerful antibiotics used against life-threatening, multidrug-resistant bacterial infections -- coupled with the introduction of a bacterial clone that spread between patients created the 'perfect storm' that led to today's antibiotic resistance epidemic in Colombia.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Take charge, wine lovers, and trust your palateThe traditional pairing of wine and food too often misses the mark - leaving people confused and intimated - and should be scrapped in favor of a more consumer-focused approach, a new study indicates.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Are women and minorities adequately represented in new drug testing?A new study to assess the effects of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations and guidance, intended to encourage greater inclusion of women and minorities in clinical drug trials, has shown appropriate levels of female participation based on the estimated sex ratio of people affected by a particular disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Keeping harsh punishment in check helps kids with ADHD, study findsCutting back on yelling, criticism and other harsh parenting approaches, including physical punishment, has the power to calm children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, according to a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More cardiac arrest victims could survive with dispatcher CPR instruction, rescue breaths for childrenMore people will survive cardiac arrest if emergency medical dispatchers give chest compression-only CPR instructions over the phone and if infants and children receive chest compressions with rescue breaths, according to updated CPR guidelines published today by the American Heart Association (Association), the world's leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular disea
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New approach uses light instead of robots to assemble electronic componentsAn international team of researchers has developed a new light-based manipulation method that could one day be used to mass produce electronic components for smartphones, computers and other devices.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How a 'flipped' gene helped butterflies evolve mimicryFemale swallowtail butterflies do something a lot of butterflies do to survive: they mimic wing patterns, shapes and colors of other species that are toxic to predators. Some - but not all - swallowtail species have evolved several different forms of this trait. But what kind of genetic changes led to these various disguises, and why would some species maintain an undisguised form when mimicry pro
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Ars Technica
Hacking the vote: Threats keep changing, but election IT sadly stays the same Enlarge / A voting machine is submitted to abuse in DEFCON's Voting Village in July. (credit: Sean Gallagher) The outcome of the 2016 presidential election is history. But allegations of voter fraud, election interference by foreign governments, and intrusions into state electoral agencies' systems have since cast a pall over the system that determines who makes the laws and enforces them in the
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Scientific American Content: Global
Massachusetts Court to Weigh Universities' Suicide Prevention RoleThe case raises questions about mental health discrimination -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: A Very Good Dog Hunts Very Bad AntsTobias the Labrador retriever has been trained to sniff out invasive Argentine ants wherever they hide, which could help preserve fragile ecosystems.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Tiny Human Brains Inside Rats Are Sparking Ethical Concern
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Gizmodo
Twitter Blocked 'Bisexual' Searches Because It Was Using a List of Words Linked to Porn Photo: Getty After users noticed last week that the terms “bisexual” and “bisexuality” were turning up no search results on Twitter , the company responded to criticism from LGBTQ advocates on Tuesday, apologizing and blaming a “technical issue” for the error. As it turns out, Twitter used an outdated list of terms associated with porn to determine what constituted sensitive material. In a series
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Scientific American Content: Global
2 Big Problems with U.S. Voting That Have Nothing to Do with Russian HackingTo ensure the U.S. can trust the 2018 election results, officials and communities must prevent misuse of political power to mute citizens’ voices at the ballot box in antidemocratic ways -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Muscles out of the spray canAn artificial heart would be an absolute lifesaver for people with cardiac failure. However, to recreate the complex organ in the laboratory, one would first need to work out how to grow multi-layered, living tissues. Researchers at Empa have now come one step closer to this goal: by means of a spraying process, they have created functioning muscle fibers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Modeling social interactions to improve collective decision-makingHow are we affected by other peoples' opinions? Scientists quantified this impact on our decisions. They identified five behaviors common in France and Japan. The study also shows how social information can help a group collectively improve its performance and the precision of its estimates. From this analysis, a model has been developed that predicts the performance of a group depending on the am
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tech increases microfluidic research data output 100-foldResearchers have developed a technique that allows users to collect 100 times more spectrographic information per day from microfluidic devices, as compared to the previous industry standard. The novel technology has already led to a new discovery: the speed of mixing ingredients for quantum dots used in LEDs changes the color of light they emit -- even when all other variables are identical.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Circadian clock discovery could help boost water efficiency in food plantsA discovery by Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientists in Dallas provides new insights about the biological or circadian clock, how it regulates high water-use efficiency in some plants, and how others, including food plants, might be improved for the same efficiency.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
RUDN University scientists have approved the role of zinc in type 2 diabetes mellitusResearchers from RUDN University and P. G. Demidov Yaroslavl State University have demonstrated the association between changes in the concentration of trace elements in blood (especially zinc) with prediabetes -- a condition preceding the disease. The obtained data suggest that zinc metabolism disorders play an important role in the development of the disease. The results of the study were publis
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The Scientist RSS
American Chemical Society Wins Lawsuit Against Sci-HubA US judge issues a broad injunction that allows the society to demand that technology companies actively associated with the site block access to it.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Networking on a New LevelThe networking industry is undergoing rapid change, with intent-based networking emerging as the latest in a line of innovations.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Archaeologists unearth 'masterpiece' sealstone in Greek tombArchaeologists are documenting artifacts contained within their amazing 2015 find, the tomb of the Griffin Warrior in Greece. But the 3,500-year-old treasures include their most stunning historical offering yet: an intricately carved gem, or sealstone, that represents one of the finest works of prehistoric Greek art ever found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Where did those electrons go? X-ray measurements solve decades-old mysteryThere's been an unsolved mystery associated with mixed valence compounds: when the valence state of an element in these compounds changes with increased temperature, the number of electrons associated with that element decreases, as well. But just where do those electrons go? Using a combination of state-of-the-art tools, including X-ray measurements, researchers have come up with the answer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Signs may help history buffs get more buffVisitors to the country's national parks and historic sites may be just a sign -- and a few steps -- away from improving their health and fitness while enjoying their park trips, according to a team of researchers.
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Dagens Medicin
Medicinrådet er uenig med fagudvalg i vurdering af OpdivoMedicinrådet har hidtil bedt fagudvalgene om at skelne skarpt mellem en vurdering af klinisk merværdi og kvaliteten af evidensen for en behandling. Men den skelnen sender et fagudvalgs vurdering af Opdivo til behandling af en specifik kræftsygdom nu til tælling.
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Inside Science
BRIEF: Geneticists Unlock the Secret of Rose and Honey Scents in Beer BRIEF: Geneticists Unlock the Secret of Rose and Honey Scents in Beer With gene editing technology, newly discovered mutations may become tools for boosting booze flavor. RoseandBeer_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Jasni via Shutterstock Culture Tuesday, November 7, 2017 - 10:15 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- You know that rose or honey scent that wafts from certain fine wines and be
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Gizmodo
NASA to Deny Distant Rock of a Perfectly Good Name Image: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute Humans like naming things. We named a boat Boaty McBoatface . We named a bunch of animals after dicks . But some things already have perfectly good names. Like a distant rock NASA is tasking us with nicknaming. New Horizons, the mission that showed us Pluto’s icy heart , is whizzing into the outer reaches
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The Atlantic
Jon Batiste Becomes Music Director of The Atlantic Jon Batiste’s masterful reinterpretation of “The Battle Hymn of the Republic,” the lyrics of which were first published in The Atlantic in 1862 , is now available to stream on all music platforms following its premiere as the theme song of The Atlantic’s podcast Radio Atlantic . The renowned jazz musician and The Late Show with Stephen Colbert bandleader has also been named Music Director of The
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The 'DNA corrector' is more efficient in the most important regions of the genomeError surveillance and repair mechanisms during DNA replication do not show the same competence in all regions of the human genome. Scientists headed by ICREA researcher Núria López-Bigas at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) reveal that the mechanism that repairs errors in DNA is more efficient in the regions of genes that hold information for the production of proteins.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reformulation of Markowitz theoremBy combining concepts from landscape ecology and Markowitz's portfolio theory, researchers from South Africa and the United States developed a unified 'landscape portfolio platform' to quantify and predict the behaviour of multiple stochastic populations across spatial scales. The landscape portfolio platform, however, is applicable to any situation where subsystems fluctuate with a certain level
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Old human cells rejuvenated in breakthrough discovery on ageingA new way to rejuvenate old cells in the laboratory, making them not only look younger, but start to behave more like young cells, has been discovered by researchers at the Universities of Exeter and Brighton.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How far did you fall from the tree?Mutations generate genetic variation, and are a major driving force of evolution. Therefore, examining mutation rates and modes are essential to better understand the genetic basis for physiology and evolution.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why plants form sprouts in the darkA signal from the cell wall decides that, in the dark, seeds grow into long yellow sprouts, instead of turning green and forming leaves. The signal that switches on the darkness programme in seedling development has not hitherto been identified. Earlier studies had shown that these processes involve photoreceptors inside plant cells. One vital signal outside the cells has now been described by a t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Circulating tumor cells associated with relapse in late-stage melanoma patientsA study revealing a connection between circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and relapse in stage IV melanoma patients points to liquid biopsy as a potential predictor of patients at high risk for disease progression. CTCs, tumor cells shed into the bloodstream or lymphatic system, can lead to additional tumor growth and/or metastasis to distant sites.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers identify the yeast genes behind rose and honeyed flavors in beer and wineA flavor compound called phenylethyl acetate imparts a hint of rose or honey to wherever it's found -- a dab of perfume, a sip of wine, a slug of beer. Microbiologists in Belgium have used genetic mapping to identify, for the first time, specific yeast genes that produce higher levels of this aroma in alcoholic beverages. The new finding joins other recent work connecting genes to flavors in wines
5h
Ars Technica
The soon-to-be-famous object at the Solar System’s edge needs a name Enlarge / One artist’s concept of Kuiper Belt object 2014 MU69, the next flyby target for NASA’s New Horizons mission. (credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI/Alex Parker) A boy named Sue. A girl named Beulah. These are some of the unfortunate names a child can have today. But such children have nothing to complain about in comparison to a cold, dark rock that is 6.5 billion kilometers from Earth. This object,
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Gizmodo
What the Hell Is a Quantum Computer and How Excited Should I Be? They will never sit on your desk, and they will most certainly never fit in your pocket. Today, they’re fragile, and need to be kept at temperatures close to absolute zero. Quantum computers aren’t much like the desktop PCs we’re all so familiar with—they’re a whole new kind of machine, capable of calculations so complex, it’s like upgrading from black-and-white to a full color spectrum. Lately,
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Reaching new heights: Physicists improve the vertical stability of superconducting Korean fusion deviceA new article describes an international collaboration that has improved stability on KSTAR tokamak in South Korea.
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The Atlantic
Can South Korea Trust Trump? As President Trump was kicking off the first state visit under the progressive administration of Moon Jae In, the life-or-death question in South Korean minds was whether Trump intended to take an America-first or an alliance-first approach in response to the growing North Korean threat. How Trump views American alliance commitments to defend South Korea from North Korean aggression has become an
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Scientific American Content: Global
WHO Moves to Contain Superbugs on the FarmThe global health agency wants a massive change in livestock practices. But will it work? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Los Angeles Zoo's old Indian rhinoceros euthanizedA 48-year-old Indian rhinoceros that had survived skin cancer has been euthanized at the Los Angeles Zoo.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Schools shut amid health emergency as smog blankets India's capitalA public health emergency was declared as choking smog blanketed New Delhi on Tuesday, with authorities ordering the temporary closure of all primary schools in the world's most polluted capital city.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cities can cut greenhouse gas emissions far beyond their urban bordersGreenhouse gas emissions caused by urban households' purchases of goods and services from beyond city limits are much bigger than previously thought. These upstream emissions may occur anywhere in the world and are roughly equal in size to the total emissions originating from a city's own territory, a new study shows. This is not bad news but in fact offers local policy-makers more leverage to tac
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Measuring atoms for better navigation and mineral detectionBetter navigation systems and tracking of minerals and water may be the result of a new discovery by physicists studying atom measurement devices.
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Gizmodo
The MOBICASE Laptop Bag Brings Its Own Ergonomics GIF MOBICASE I’ve never been a fan of hard laptop bags, but MOBICASE , with its built-in ergonomics and plethora of smart pockets, is wooing me on the trip to Chicago it’s currently accompanying me on. The MOBICASE was easily able to accommodate my MacBook, Nintendo Switch, external battery pack, and noise-cancelling headphones, along with all the requisite cables for my flight out here. Get it f
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Dagens Medicin
Svendborg-lægens chefer bakker op om #detkuhaværetmig-kampagneDirektionen på Odense Universitetshospital, som Svendborg Sygehus hører under, bakker i et åbent brev op om de yngre læger.
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Dagens Medicin
Rudkjøbing efter møde: Vil holder fortsat skarpt øje med styrelsen Lægerne og Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed er enige om, at der skal komme mere læring ud af styrelsens arbejde, konstaterer Lægeforeningens formand efter møde. Han vil dog fortsat holde godt øje med styrelsens linje.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New quantum materials offer novel route to 3-D electronic devicesResearchers have shown how the principles of general relativity open the door to novel electronic applications such as a three-dimensional electron lens and electronic invisibility devices
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Apixaban -- Metabolism, pharmacologic properties and drug interactionsNew oral anticoagulants (NOACs) represent direct-acting drugs functioning selectively for one specific clotting factor. Their clinical indications are the prophylaxis and treatment of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, the prevention of atherothrombotic episodes of individuals with acute coronary syndromes and atrial fibrillation
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lending late neurons a helping handResearchers at UNIGE have discovered that even a slight delay of the neuronal migration may lead to behavioural disorders that are similar to autistic characteristics in human. Furthermore, they found that these disorders are due to the abnormally low activity of the late neurons, which leads to permanent deficit of interneuronal connections. They succeeded in correcting the activity of the releva
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cities can cut greenhouse gas emissions far beyond their urban bordersGreenhouse gas emissions caused by urban households' purchases of goods and services from beyond city limits are much bigger than previously thought. These upstream emissions may occur anywhere in the world and are roughly equal in size to the total emissions originating from a city's own territory, a new study shows. This is not bad news but in fact offers local policy-makers more leverage to tac
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Higher estrogen levels linked to increased alcohol sensitivity in brain's 'reward center'The reward center of the brain is much more attuned to the pleasurable effects of alcohol when estrogen levels are elevated, an effect that may underlie the development of addiction in women, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cool idea: Magma held in 'cold storage' before giant volcano eruptionLong Valley, California, has long defined the 'super-eruption.' About 765,000 years ago, a pool of molten rock exploded into the sky. Within one nightmarish week, 760 cubic kilometers of lava and ash spewed out in the kind of volcanic cataclysm we hope never to witness. A new study shows that the giant body of magma -- molten rock -- at Long Valley was much cooler before the eruption than previous
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Web-based social media intervention can positively influence parental vaccine behaviorsPregnant women who received vaccine information through an interactive website monitored by a clinical expert were more likely to vaccinate their children than those who did not use the web resource, according to a new study.
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Ars Technica
Fix for iOS “i” autocorrect issue reportedly coming this week Enlarge / A functional iPhone X, unlike the ones that went through recent stress testing. (credit: Samuel Axon) In the past few days, some iPhone , iPad, and iPod Touch users reported a bug that autocorrects the single letter "i" to either "A," an exclamation point, or a symbol that resembles a question mark in a box. While the bug doesn't appear to affect all users, it's widespread enough for Ap
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Genetically modified apple reaches US stores, but will consumers bite? Success for the ‘Arctic apple’ could herald a new wave of lab-grown foods. Nature 551 149 doi: 10.1038/551149a
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Popular Science
Eight apps to help you win National Novel Writing Month DIY Share your work with the world. In November, would-be authors celebrate NaNoWriMo, short for National Novel Writing Month. Want to complete your own opus? These writing apps can help.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Paris climate accord: Syria 'to sign up', isolating USThe reported move will leave the US as the only country now outside or opposed to the climate deal.
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Gizmodo
How Facebook Figures Out Everyone You've Ever Met In real life, in the natural course of conversation, it is not uncommon to talk about a person you may know. You meet someone and say, “I’m from Sarasota,” and they say, “Oh, I have a grandparent in Sarasota,” and they tell you where they live and their name, and you may or may not recognize them. You might assume Facebook’s friend recommendations would work the same way: You tell the social netw
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Science | The Guardian
Big Meat and Big Dairy's climate emissions put Exxon Mobil to shame | Juliette Majot and Devlin Kuyek It is time to stop the dairy and meat giants from destroying the climate and shift our support to making our small farmers, herders and ranchers resilient Did you know that three meat companies – JBS, Cargill and Tyson – are estimated to have emitted more greenhouse gases last year than all of France and nearly as much as some of the biggest oil companies like Exxon, BP and Shell? Few meat and da
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers study human movement to build better robotsDraw a figure eight in the air. It might feel like one swift movement. But in fact, the velocity of your hand and arm likely varies, traveling faster through the straight parts and slowing down during the curves.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biological consequences of climate change on epidemics may be scale-dependentA recent study led by Prof. ZHANG Zhibin from the Chinese Academy of Science and Prof. Nils Chr. Stenseth from University of Oslo indicated that the impacts of climate change on prevalence of epidemics were scale-dependent.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Report of highest incidence of GBS in Africa prompts vaccine study from Wits UniversityScientists at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (Wits) have contributed to the first comprehensive study of Group B Streptococcus (GBS), a bacterium that infects pregnant women and causes stillbirths and severe invasive disease and death in infants. Africa has the highest burden of GBS, with 54% of estimated cases and 65% of stillbirths and infant deaths. Wits researchers have comp
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Measuring atoms for better navigation and mineral detectionBetter navigation systems and tracking of minerals and water may be the result of a new discovery by physicists studying atom measurement devices.University of Queensland PhD candidate Mr Samuel Nolan said the study investigated how to reduce errors in atom interferometers, devices that provide incredibly precise measurements of different physical quantities such as time, electric and magnetic fie
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Relocating bus stops would cut riders' pollution exposure, UCLA study findsMoving bus stops away from intersections would substantially reduce the amount of pollution bus riders breathe, UCLA scientists report in the journal Environmental Pollution.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UCI review points to long-term negative impact of high protein dietsHigh protein diets may lead to long-term kidney damage among those suffering from chronic chronic kidney disease, according to research led by nephrologist Kamyar Kalantar-Zadeh, MD, MPH, PhD, of the University of California, Irvine.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Software vastly improves the ability of ships to reroute through unpredictable weatherMajor research discoveries generate news headlines. But a research undertaking by one University of Connecticut engineering lab seeks to forestall some headlines of a different kind.
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Ingeniøren
»Innovation skabes i skæve makkerskaber«Nybrud sker ofte i kryds­feltet mellem væsensforskellige brancher, og derfor skal man opsøge perifere brancher. Takket være digitalisering er det nemmere end nogensinde, mener Märtha Rehnberg fra DareDisrupt.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hydroelectric dams threaten Brazil's mysterious Pantanal—one of the world's great wetlandThe Pantanal in central South America may not be as globally famous as the Amazon rainforest, but it has the continent's highest concentration of wildlife. Now, however, the region's endangered plants and animals, along with its still undiscovered secrets, may be wiped out in return for cheap hydroelectricity.
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Dagens Medicin
Gentofte beholder sin skadestue I sidste uge lød planen at lukke akutklinikken på Gentofte Hospital. Men nu afviser politikere i Region Hovedstaden, at det vil ske.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Smart' paper can conduct electricity, detect waterA research team wants to simplify the process for discovering detrimental water leaks by developing “smart” paper that can sense the presence of water.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Deadly lung cancers are driven by multiple genetic changesA new study challenges the dogma in oncology that most cancers are caused by one dominant 'driver' mutation that can be treated in isolation with a single targeted drug. Instead, the new research finds one of the world's most deadly forms of lung cancer is driven by changes in multiple different genes, which appear to work together to drive cancer progression and to allow tumors to evade targeted
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Immune cells mistake heart attacks for viral infectionsThe immune system plays a surprising role in the aftermath of heart attacks, new research has found. The study could lead to new therapeutic strategies for heart disease, say investigators.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemists unlock the potential of fluoroalkenesOne of the strongest chemical bonds in organic chemistry is formed between carbon and fluorine, giving unique properties to chemical compounds featuring this group. Pharmaceutical researchers are very interested in carbon-fluorine bond containing molecules because of the way they mimic certain behaviors of biological compounds. However, the strength of the carbon-fluorine bond makes it difficult t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Novel intermolecular surface force reveals actomyosin driving mechanismThe actin and myosin complex (actomyosin) generates contraction force of a muscle utilizing the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis reaction. Many attempts have thus been made to explain the molecular origin of the actomyosin motility.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Highly flexible organic flash memory for foldable and disposable electronicsA KAIST team reported ultra-flexible organic flash memory that is bendable down to a radius of 300 μm. The memory exhibits a significantly-long projected retention rate with a programming voltage on par with the present industrial standards.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Osaka University chemists unlock the potential of fluoroalkenesOsaka University-led researchers master chemical transformation of fluoroalkenes, paving the way for new pharmaceuticals and advanced materials
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel intermolecular surface force reveals actomyosin driving mechanismThe actin and myosin complex (actomyosin) generates contraction force of a muscle utilizing the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis reaction. Many attempts have thus been made to explain the molecular origin of the actomyosin motility.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How SORLA protects against Alzheimer's diseaseResearchers have identified a new protective function for a brain protein genetically linked to Alzheimer's. The findings, published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, could inform novel treatment strategies to combat neurodegenerative diseases.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Family Medicine and Community Health Journal volume 5, issue number 3 publishesBeijing, October 30, 2017: The Autumn 2017 issue, a special issue entitled "Health is Primary", Guest Editor: Li Li, includes an editorial, four original research articles, one case study, one narrative analysis, two commentaries and one China Focus article addressing various topics in family medicine in both China and internationally.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Highly flexible organic flash memory for foldable and disposable electronicsA KAIST team reported ultra-flexible organic flash memory that is bendable down to a radius of 300μm. The memory exhibits a significantly-long projected retention rate with a programming voltage on par with the present industrial standards.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Book describes all 451 families of flowering plants, ferns, lycopods and gymnospermsHumans are completely dependent on plants and their products. Without plants, there would be no food to eat, no air to breathe and no clean water to drink. Plants give us building materials and fibres for paper, clothes and ropes. Dyes and ornamental plants brighten up our lives. Many medicines and drugs are also still harvested directly from plants. Without being able to accurately identify plant
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Volkswagen, Google cooperate on quantum computing researchGerman automaker Volkswagen and Google have announced plans to cooperate in exploring possible uses in the auto industry for quantum computers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Technology increases microfluidic research data output 100-foldResearchers have developed a technique that allows users to collect 100 times more spectrographic information per day from microfluidic devices, as compared to the previous industry standard. The novel technology has already led to a new discovery: the speed of mixing ingredients for quantum dots used in LEDs changes the color of light they emit – even when all other variables are identical.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Transforming fibrils into crystalsAn international team of researchers have discovered a new type of transition in protein folding: amyloid crystals formed from amyloid fibrils by a decrease in energy. The crystals are even more stable than the fibrils, which are responsible for a number of serious neurodegenerative diseases in humans.
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New Scientist - News
We’ve figured out how to ensure quantum computers can be trustedQuantum computers will be useless if we can't trust their calculations. Now, two teams have programmed quantum systems to detect their own errors
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Future robots won't resemble humans – we're too inefficientHumanoid robots are a vanity project: an attempt to create artificial life in our own image – essentially trying to play God. The problem is, we're not very good at it. Ask someone on the street to name a robot and you might hear "Terminator", "the Cybermen" or "that gold one from Star Wars". What you're not going to be given are names like Tesla Model X, Cassini or DJI Inspire 2. These are all ro
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why plants form sprouts in the darkA signal from the cell wall decides that, in the dark, seeds grow into long yellow sprouts, instead of turning green and forming leaves. The signal that switches on the darkness programme in seedling development has not hitherto been identified. Earlier studies had shown that these processes involve photoreceptors inside plant cells. One vital signal outside the cells has now been described by the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new concept for a unidirectional waveguideIn the past decade, a new type of material has attracted raising attraction: the so-called topological insulator. This class of materials exhibits a very peculiar property: they behave like insulators in the interior, but contain conducting states at their boundaries. As these states are "topologically" protected (see below), the states are very robust against imperfections, and electric currents
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wood goes high-techWood could potentially replace petrol in chemistry and concrete in construction, according to studies conducted under the National Research Programme "Resource Wood." They show how precious chemical compounds can be extracted from wood, how its usability as a building material can be improved, and how forest management can be optimsed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The wild ass returnsOn 24th October 2017, a first group of nine animals was released into an acclimatisation enclosure on the edge of the Altyn Dala protected area in central Kazakhstan. The animals had been transported 1200 km by helicopter from Altyn Emel National Park in the southeast of the country. They will be released in early spring. This is the first step in a multi-year project that aims to restore the full
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Europe to test system that uses sunlight to break up plastics in wastewaterHarnessing the sun's radiation to help rid the oceans of microplastics contamination is one of several technical innovations to be developed by a new EU-funded project. Beginning in November 2017, a system developed at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden for breaking down microplastics from personal care products will be tested for implementation in homes and wastewater treatment plants.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Virtual driving instructor and close-to-reality driving simulatorChinese driving schools are currently experiencing a strong demand, the number of learner drivers is growing constantly. A new type of driving simulator based on a car modified for virtual training of learner drivers in advance and an automatic feedback is to help meet this demand. For the close-to-reality driving exercises, complex projection technology and virtual-reality hardware and software a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Social workers aren't incompetent child snatchers – so why are they portrayed that way?Social workers get a bad rap when it comes to their portrayal in the media. Often, they are shown taking children from their families in a heartless and wholly inaccurate manner. This only serves to reinforce already low public opinions of anyone who works in children's services.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why we need a better philosophy of treesOn November 6 1217, Henry III's Charter of the Forest gave ordinary English people back their traditional rights to use royal hunting grounds for livestock grazing and collecting firewood. The freedoms that were restored in the use of ancient woodland reshaped the community's legal and political relationship with nature. But, today, this relationship has broken down. Only 2% of the UK's ancient wo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Simple statistics can be good enoughStudy of the mismatch between spatial environmental data and a commonly used statistical analysis suggests simpler statistics are sufficient in many cases.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Seven new giant radio galaxies discovered(Phys.org)—Mexican astronomers report the discovery of seven new large extragalactic radio sources called giant radio galaxies (GRG). The GRGs were found by visual inspection of radio images provided by two astronomical radio surveys. The findings were presented October 31 in a paper published on arXiv.org.
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Futurity.org
Permissive gun laws linked to higher homicide rates Easier access to concealed firearms is associated with significantly higher rates of handgun-related homicide, report researchers. With gun violence, especially mass shootings, dominating the news recently, gun control is at the forefront of issues Americans say they are concerned about. Now, a new study suggests that more permissive concealed-carry laws not only fail to promote public safety, bu
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Gizmodo
Mark Hamill Explains Luke's Morality in Star Wars: The Last Jedi A charity play sparks even more wild speculation about Avengers 4 . Jessica Chastain wants in on the It sequel. Supergirl casts another member of the Legion of Superheroes, while The Gifted has cast some very sinister comic book twins. Plus, a new Justice League scene, and a snippet of footage from the CW/DC crossover. Behold, spoilers! Star Wars: The Last Jedi In an interview with Disney Rewards
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Scientific American Content: Global
Bolshevik Revolution in Russia and the First World WarInnovation and discovery as chronicled in Scientific American -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global
A Fantastic Journey through Cosmic ScalesA new, epic voyage through all known scales of reality charts the outer limits of existence, from the edge of the observable universe to the subatomic realm -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Physics of When, Exactly, Star Wars Takes PlaceIt occurred “A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away…” But the galaxy shows signs of being very mature. When is Star Wars in the history of the universe?
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Kindle Oasis Review: Way Better, Way BiggerAmazon's latest e-reader lets you read underwater, listen to audiobooks with Audible, and download books anywhere over LTE.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New quantum materials offer novel route to 3-D electronic devicesResearchers have shown how the principles of general relativity open the door to novel electronic applications such as a three-dimensional electron lens and electronic invisibility devices. In a new study funded by the Academy of Finland, Aalto University researchers Alex Westström and Teemu Ojanen propose a method to go beyond special relativity and simulate Einstein's theory of general relativit
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Transporting students to where decisions are madeStarting this spring, students seeking a future in using technology to help solve a wide-range of social and environmental challenges can pursue a Master of Science degree in Geographic Information Science (GIS).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
British Mums getting back to work thanks to grandparents childcare, researchers findThe extent of grandparents providing childcare in the UK is much higher than previously thought and is a factor in assisting mums, who had taken time out from work to have children, to get back into the workplace, according to new research carried out at the University of Birmingham.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How scientists discovered our first interstellar mystery visitorThe astronomy world has been abuzz recently with the discovery of a new object cutting through our solar system. Its path indicates it came from interstellar space—the first body of its kind ever observed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Increasing medical researcher gender diversity found to increase gender related factors in results(Phys.org)—A small team of researchers at Stanford University has found a link between gender diversity in research efforts and gender and sex-related factors in the results that are found. In their paper published in in the journal Nature Human Behavior, the team describes comparing research papers co-authored by female researchers with outcomes and found differences in the results.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New amino acid may lead to progress on major maladiesIt's open to different types, but it's ultimately seeking an exclusive relationship. It knows how to establish a strong bond, but when it does, it tends to develop an unhealthy attachment that can keep a partner from reaching its full potential.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Monster fish of the deepDo bugs gross you out? You haven't seen anything yet. To get some really weird creatures, you've got to look in the deep sea.
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Dagens Medicin
Kræftforsker modtager Lundbeckfondens Yngre Forskerpris Cancer-biolog og professor Janine Erler fra Københavns Universitet modtager som den første kvinde Lundbeckfondens Yngre Forskerpris 2017.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Earthquakes caused by industrial activities—what are the risks and how can they be reduced?On September 3, 2016, a magnitude 5.8 earthquake struck just northwest of Pawnee, Oklahoma, causing moderate to severe damages in buildings near the epicenter. It was the largest ever recorded in the state.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rather than being free of values, good science is transparent about themScientists these days face a conundrum. As Americans are buffeted by accounts of fake news, alternative facts and deceptive social media campaigns, how can researchers and their scientific expertise contribute meaningfully to the conversation?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fluorescent probes to study cellular activityNUS chemists have recently developed selective probes for cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) to determine enzyme levels and activity.
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Futurity.org
See how glass chunks become a giant telescope mirror With the casting of its fifth giant mirror segment, the world’s largest telescope clears a major milestone toward completion. Sporting a flowerlike primary mirror design of six circular segments surrounding a seventh in the center, the Giant Magellan Telescope, or GMT, will give astronomers a one-of-a-kind tool to answer some of the most fundamental questions about the cosmos and our place within
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Futurity.org
To cut power use, put a price tag on carbon New research sheds light on the effectiveness and value of carbon-pricing incentive programs. “…carbon pricing can be a valuable tool to help reduce emissions, especially at a time when there is little activity to reduce emissions at the national level…” In a new paper, based on analysis of a 2015 pilot program on the Yale University campus, researchers examine internal carbon-pricing strategies,
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Futurity.org
‘Smart’ paper conducts electricity and detects leaky pipes Researchers have developed a type of “smart paper” that can conduct electricity and detect water. The paper, laced with conductive nanomaterials, can be employed as a switch, turning on or off an LED light, or as an alarm system indicating the absence or presence of water. In cities and large-scale manufacturing plants, a water leak in a complicated network of pipes can take tremendous time and e
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Fragile XResearchers uncover the central role of a protein linked to Fragile X Syndrome in mice, one of the leading causes of autism and intellectual disability.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Electronics demonstrate operability in simulated Venus conditionsNASA's future planetary exploration efforts, including missions to Venus, require electronics capable of surviving temperatures of 470° C and above for long durations. Such durable electronics eliminate the need for cooling systems to enable sustained operations. Previous operation of electronics at Venus surface conditions (e.g., in Venus missions) has been limited to a few hours in a protected p
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Ingeniøren
Professor: Stop mørklægning af Energinets investeringerEn særlig selskabskonstruktion gør, at Energinet kan investere 11 mia. i et kabel på forbrugernes regning og uden offentligt indsigt i business-casen, forklarer forvaltningsprofessor.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study suggests some ancient bite marks from crocs not stone tools(Phys.org)—A trio of researchers, two with the University of Tübingen in Germany, the other the University of California has found evidence that suggests it is not possible to tell if marks on some ancient artifacts were made by ancient hominids using stone tools or by crocodiles. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Yonatan Sahle, Sireen El Zaatari and Tim
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Dana Foundation
Choose Our New Look for Brain Awareness Week 2018! Submissions for our 2018 Brain Awareness Week (BAW) Sticker Design Contest closed last week, and we were delighted to see many of you sent in creative and beautiful designs! With such unique styles and interpretations, it was a difficult decision, but the submissions have been narrowed down to the top five. Now all we need is your help to pick our winners! Public voting is open from November 7 to
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Dagens Medicin
Direktionen bakker selvfølgelig opBrev til fra direktionen til yngre læger på Odense Universitetshospital.
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Dagens Medicin
Styrelse inviterer flere lægefaglige direktører til mødeStyrelsen for Patientsikkerhed har nu også inviteret de lægefaglige direktører fra de tre regioner vest for Storebælt til møde om patientsikkerhedskultur.
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Popular Science
T. rex arms, wiggly beluga heads, and tentacle-nosed moles: smart evolution sometimes looks stupid Animals Sometimes evolution creates some wacky organisms, but they’re only weird to us. The physiologies that we find absurd are only odd because we see them from a human point-of-view. Here are just a few of the most ogle-worthy animals—and the reasons…
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Yes, Porsche's New Cayenne SUV Drives Like a Sports CarImprovements to the brakes, suspension, and central nervous system make the SUV feel like a 911.
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Review: Modernist Bread Slices Into the Science of the LoafThe new five-volume, $560 book about bread showcases amazing techniques, both old and new.
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The Apple iOS 11 Privacy and Security Settings You Should CheckHeads up, iPhone owners. iOS 11 comes with a batch of security features that merit your attention.
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How Uber's 'Invisible' Workforce Could Affect Your TaxesGig workers are hard to count, distorting our view of the US economy.
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Ars Technica
Xbox One X games at launch: The boosts, the bummers, and the bottom line Enlarge / Xbox One X. But what good is a monolithic box without some software to test on it? (credit: Microsoft ) Our review of the Xbox One X was as comprehensive as we could get at the time. Microsoft set our embargo roughly one week after our systems arrived, along with an assurance: the system's "enhanced" catalog of major games, designed to tap into the X's beefy, $500 spec, would be ready a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Female role models run the risk of being intimidatingThings to remember when recruiting young women to the natural sciences or other male-dominated studies: 1. They are not a homogenous group. 2. Some of the women in recruitment campaigns have been perceived as unrealistic and intimidating.
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Trauma after the StormFollowing hurricanes and other major disasters comes another wave of trouble: post traumatic stress -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic
The Perks of Fasting, With None of the Work “If there’s a downside, it is kind of crazy tasting,” said Geoff Woo, the founder of HVMN, a Silicon Valley company that makes nootropics, or performance-enhancing supplements. We were in a conference room in The Atlantic ’s office building, and he was bracing me for my trial run of his latest product. It was a small, clear vial labeled “Ketone,” a new type of energy drink his company is releasin
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The Atlantic
How to Hire Fake Friends and Family Money may not be able to buy love, but here in Japan, it can certainly buy the appearance of love—and appearance, as the dapper Ishii Yuichi insists, is everything. As a man whose business involves becoming other people, Yuichi would know. The handsome and charming 36-year-old is on call to be your best friend, your husband, your father, or even a mourner at your funeral. His 8-year-old company,
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The Atlantic
Should Children Form Emotional Bonds With Robots? W hen I brought the robot home from the Apple Store, I knew I was inviting a new kind of strangeness into our lives. My wife worried about giving our 4-year-old son a(nother) digital thing, a “smart” thing. I worried that he wouldn’t know what to make of it. Or that his little sister would break it. Or that I’d be jealous. Because I have always wanted a robot. This one was Cozmo , a $179 gadget p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new affordable and easy-to-use technology for dry eye diagnosisUPM researchers have developed an optical biosensor with an easy, fast and affordable method of read-out that allows the in vitro detection of a biological material. The results obtained are promising for the diagnosis of dry eye diseases.
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Gizmodo
Knock Out Some Holiday Shopping Early With Amazon's One-Day Logitech Sale Logitech Gold Box Amazon’s back at it again with another big Logitech sale , so whether you’re upgrading your own computer setup, or buying holiday gifts, there’s a lot to choose from in here. The headliners here are probably the MX Master Mouse and the MX Anywhere 2 , both of which have proven popular with our readers. The Master has a few extra buttons and a more ergonomic design, but they both
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The internal ocean of Saturn's moon Enceladus could be old enough to have evolved life, finds studyWe recently bade farewell to the Cassini spacecraft, which after 13 years of faithfully orbiting Saturn and its moons was directed to plunge into the giant planet's atmosphere. The reason for the "grand finale" was to guard against the possibility that Cassini might crash into one of Saturn's moons – in particular Enceladus.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Improving the Illinois dairy industry, one farm at a timeLike most farmers, Illinois dairy producers want to maximize efficiency and productivity to improve their bottom line. But many don't have the time or objective perspective to audit their own operations for potential improvements. That's why the University of Illinois Dairy Focus Team was formed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How to solve the 'monster' fatberg problemFatbergs – enormous solid masses of oil, grease, wet wipes and other hygiene products that congeal together to cause major blockages – are wreaking havoc on the sewers of cities around the world. A 130 tonne specimen described as a "monster" recently caused backups in sewers in London's Whitechapel, and the cities of Baltimore, Singapore and Dannevirke, New Zealand have also all experienced simila
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The flat and the curiousThe remarkable properties of 2-D materials—made up of a single layer of atoms—have made them among the most intensely studied materials of our time. They have the potential to usher in a new generation of improved electronics, batteries and sensory devices, among other applications.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study explores what really makes a movie successfulAt more than $20 for a Saturday night movie ticket moviegoers don't want to pick a dud. Now, new research on movie marketing reveals how to pick a winner – both for customers and movie makers.
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Viden
Sådan fungerer penis: Derfor får du potensproblemer40-70 procent af alle mænd får problemer med rejsning. Her er 14 ting, du (måske) ikke vidste om penis.
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Live Science
Tasmanian Treasure: Rare 17th-Century Map of Australia ResurfacesConservators have restored a rare map of Australia, from the era before Europeans had fully explored the continent.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The human costs of financial crises: linking market sentiment to human capital lossGlobal financial crises and the severe economic hardships they impose on millions of people worldwide can sometimes lead to violent and fatal outcomes, according to a new study from the University of Maine. The research, which links periods of economic turmoil to increased rates of suicide and murder-suicide, illuminates the often overlooked and understudied loss of human life as a direct conseque
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First coast-to-coast land motion map of Scotland derived from satellite radar imagesUsing hundreds of satellite radar images the team, working with Geomatic Ventures Limited (GVL), an innovative University spin-out company, created a complete map of mainland Scotland.
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How Koenigsegg's Agera RS Set a New World Speed RecordThe Swedish supercar maker just hit 277.9 mph.
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Qualcomm Deal to Create Smartphone Chip Giant Faces Long OddsBroadcom offers to buy Qualcomm for $105 billion in what would be largest tech deal ever, combining two makers of smartphone chips.
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After the Texas Mass Shooting, We Can't Afford to Wage War on Science Any MoreIn the wake of the Texas church shootings, the danger of the Trump administration’s war on knowledge is clearer than ever.
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Artificial Intelligence Is Putting Ultrasound on Your PhoneTwo-thirds of the world's population doesn't have access to medical imaging. A company called Butterfly Network is trying to change that.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Kenya male lions seen in intimate act; bonding, experts sayRecent photos taken in a Kenyan wildlife area show a rare sight: a male lion mounting another male lion in what resembles a sexual act but is possibly a way of showing dominance.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
World's biggest shipping company counts cost of cyberattackThe world's biggest shipping company, Denmark's A.P. Moller-Maersk, has fallen to a quarterly loss due partly to the cost of a cyberattack.
8h
Ingeniøren
Her er teknologierne, som kan forlænge vores livMange forskere arbejder på at øge vores levealder. De skal blandt andet svare på, hvordan man skelner mellem aldring og sygdom.
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Ars Technica
Amazon Echo 2017 review: Alexa isn’t niche anymore Enlarge (credit: Valentina Palladino) The original Amazon Echo was a weird device. Did anyone really want a speaker with an always-on assistant waiting for your next command? As it turns out, people did—so much so that now there are more speakers, lamps, baby monitors, refrigerators, and (soon) cars that have Amazon's Alexa built in. But even though Amazon opened up Alexa to other companies to in
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Psychologist discusses how #metoo creates solidarity for victims of sexual harassmentHarvey Weinstein. Brett Ratner. Kevin Spacey.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using neutrons to study how resistant bacteria evolveThe discovery of penicillin almost 90 years ago ushered in the age of modern antibiotics, but the growth of antibiotic resistance means bacterial infections like pneumonia and tuberculosis are becoming more difficult to treat.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Harnessing lost atoms may aid in crafting new, never-before-seen oxidesUnderstanding how materials form and combine with one another is important to design better energy-harvesting and -storage devices. Now, researchers have directly imaged the loss of a single layer of atoms in a photocatalyst created by layering two oxides. The team examined the structure of a single layer and that of the final composite, finding that a plane of atoms right at the material boundary
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study explores workplace mythmakingAt Jacob Rawlins's first job, he learned he would be preparing food for "guests," not "customers." And to straighten up he'd use "cleaning cloths," not "rags." It's language, he said, that the company's management encouraged to foster a particular kind of culture among employees and customers—scratch that: guests.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Smart' paper can conduct electricity, detect waterIn cities and large-scale manufacturing plants, a water leak in a complicated network of pipes can take tremendous time and effort to detect, as technicians must disassemble many pieces to locate the problem. The American Water Works Association indicates that nearly a quarter-million water line breaks occur each year in the U.S., costing public water utilities about $2.8 billion annually.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global
Don't Convert Africa's Savanna to Agricultural LandLeaving the continent’s grasslands intact is good for the climate, for biodiversity and for the health of the soil -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Dagens Medicin
FDA-studie bekræfter overdødelighed ved brug af clarithromycinEt stort observationelt studie, iværksat af FDA, finder ca. 20 pcts. overdødelighed, der varer ved i mange år efter en afsluttet antibiotikakur med clarithromycin for patienter med åreforkalkning. Jo flere clarithromycin-kure, des større overdødelighed, viser studiet.
8h
New Scientist - News
Why burying loved ones in unmarked graves could save wildlifeIf we all abandoned traditional burials and instead were buried in nature reserves, the money raised could help preserve every endangered species on land
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How belief in pure evil relates to perceptions and punishments of gun violence perpetratorsThe professional journal Personality and Individual Differences published an article co-authored by a Penn State Abington student and his faculty research partner.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study examines hiring, retention of women and underrepresented minorities in STEM facultyWomen and underrepresented minorities have been actively recruited by universities for faculty positions in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) fields for some time now. Has this recruitment been effective? Is faculty makeup becoming – and staying – more diverse?
8h
Scientific American Content: Global
"Slightly Crazy" 19th-Century Weathermen Who Braved Formidable Conditions Could Aid Climate PredictionsA new effort aims to recover meteorology data collected by a group of hardy Victorian Scottish scientists -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Detecting new proteins in active brains of miceThe complexity of living things is driven, in large part, by the huge diversity of cell types. Since all cells of an organism share the same genes, the diversity of cells must come from the particular proteins that are expressed. Cells in the brain are generally divided into neurons and glia. Within these two categories, however, lies a large diversity of cell types that we are only beginning to d
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Pandora, the would-be perturberAs Cassini hurtled toward its fatal encounter with Saturn, the spacecraft turned to catch this final look at Saturn's moon Pandora next to the thin line of the F ring.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New algorithm expands use of advanced camera for biological microscopyA new computer algorithm allows scientists to use a high-performance sensor technology, called scientific complementary metal-oxide semiconductor cameras, for a wide range of biological research.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cells that specialize in groups function more effectivelyCells that specialize in groups track chemical gradients in their environment more precisely than individual cells, according to researchers at Purdue University.
8h
Live Science
Humans Doomed Caribbean's 'Lost World' of Ancient MammalsCaribbean islands hosted plenty of diverse mammal life — until humans showed up 6,000 years ago.
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Live Science
How Your Brain Blocks Out Unwanted Thoughts and MemoriesThe chemical key to controlling thoughts and memories? It might be molecule called GABA.
8h
Ingeniøren
Astronauttvillinger afslører: Rumrejser ændrer vores generForskere er ved at stykke viden sammen fra Nasas tvillingestudie, hvor Scott Kelly var på rejse i 340 dage i rummet. Foreløbige resultater viser, at genernes 'tænd og sluk'-knap bliver påvirket.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is frozen cod just as good as fresh?Is frozen cod just as good as fresh? Yes. As long as it is handled properly, new research reveals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Help nickname New Horizons' next flyby targetNASA's New Horizons mission to Pluto and the Kuiper Belt is looking for your ideas on what to informally name its next flyby destination, a billion miles (1.6 billion kilometers) past Pluto.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
After decades of fire suppression, U.S. forests were ready to burn, specialist saysWith wildfires causing widespread destruction in California, Montana and other western states, it's understandable why officials have been investing in fire suppression efforts for decades. However, nature eventually must run its course—which contributed to record-breaking fires this year, according to a firefighter and wildfire consulting specialist.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Findings probe cell cooperation, 'en masse' migrationNew research findings are revealing secrets about how living cells "cooperate" with each other, joining into groups that migrate collectively and alter tissue.
9h
Feed: All Latest
The Inside Story of Pong and the Early Days of AtariInstalled in a bar in Sunnyvale, CA, the first Pong prototype was so popular that the flood of quarters jammed the machine.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Results of Wikipedia study reveal highest influencing contributorsThe mysterious world of Wikipedia isn't such a mystery anymore to a pair of researchers who conducted a 10-year study on the free online encyclopedia.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Relocating bus stops would cut riders' pollution exposure, study findsMoving bus stops away from intersections would substantially reduce the amount of pollution bus riders are exposed to, UCLA scientists report today in the journal Environmental Pollution.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Touch-sensitive avatar-robotic arm based on real-time hapticsResearchers at Keio University's Haptics Research Center have developed a 'real-time-avatar-robotic arm' that transmits sound, vision, and highly sensitive feelings of touch to remotely located users. This innovative touch sensitive robotic technology was reported in the October 2017 issue of IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics and demonstrated at CEATEC (October 2017, Tokyo). The technolo
9h
Ingeniøren
Mærsk: Cyberangreb kostede os op til 1,9 mia. kr. Rederiet opjusterer omkostninger efter NotPetya-angrebet, der ramte denne sommer. Det har kostet koncernen mellem 1,6 og 1,9 mia. kroner. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/maersk-opjusterer-omkostninger-efter-notpetya-angreb-1082460 Version2
9h
Ingeniøren
Genbrug er blevet moderne i industrienEn af Europas største virksomheder inden for reparation og vedligehold har set fidusen i at give gamle produktions- og værktøjsmaskiner nyt liv. Det sparer kunderne tid og penge.
9h
New on MIT Technology Review
Everyone Wants to Run an AI CompanyBuilding an “AI-first” company requires a change of mind-set as well as new tools and branding.
9h
The Atlantic
‘Thoughts and Prayers’ Could Be Exactly What America Needs Americans have developed a set of rituals around mass shootings. Politicians who oppose gun control pray for the victims. Politicians and journalists who support gun control savage them for praying rather than acting. After the San Bernardino murders in December 2015, the New York Daily News reprinted four Republicans’ tweets about prayer on its cover alongside the words “ God Isn’t Fixing This .
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Science | The Guardian
Stress is bad for your health. Today's political uncertainty makes it worse Americans are exposed to one of the most damaging sources of stress: uncertainty. The assault on our fundamental sense of security can make us sick Outclassed: The Secret Life of Inequality is our new column about class. Read all articles here David Dobbs’ 13-year-old daughter has type 1 diabetes. Since 2015, the 59-year-old freelance writer and author has relied on Obamacare, officially known as
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
ALMA's image of a red giant star gives a surprising glimpse of the sun's futureA Chalmers-led team of astronomers has for the first time observed details on the surface of an aging star with the same mass as the sun. ALMA's images show that the star is a giant, its diameter twice the size of Earth's orbit around the sun; they report that the star's atmosphere is affected by powerful, unexpected shock waves. The research was published in Nature Astronomy.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Novel nano-CT device creates high-resolution 3-D X-rays of tiny velvet worm legsComputer tomography (CT) is a standard procedure in hospitals, but so far, the technology has not been suitable for imaging extremely small objects. In PNAS, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) describes a nano-CT device that creates three-dimensional X-ray images at resolutions up to 100 nanometers. Together with colleagues from the University of Kassel and Helmholtz-Zentrum Gees
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New target for development of innovative antibioticsIn an article published in Nature Communications on October 3, a group of scientists from Brazil and France describes a new strategy that could be useful to treat infection by drug-resistant pathogens.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers identify defense mechanism of malaria parasitePortuguese researchers at Instituto de Medicina Molecular (iMM) Lisboa have identified a defense mechanism by which the Plasmodium parasite can survive inside its host's liver cells, a crucial stage in which it acquires the capacity to infect red blood cells, causing the symptoms associated with malaria.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Inorganic-organic halide perovskites for new photovoltaic technologyPerovskite solar cells (PSCs) have received worldwide attention due to excellent power-to-electricity conversion efficiency (PCE). Currently, 22.1 percent certified PCE has been achieved compared to those of CIGS and CdTe solar cells. However, there are still some critical issues to be solved in order to promote PSC commercialization.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Brighter flexible electroluminescent film by adopting eye structure of nocturnal animalsA research team led by Dr. Byeong-dae Choi of DGIST's Intelligent Devices and Systems Research Group has developed an electroluminescent film that is four times brighter than existing ones. The new film can improve the luminance of electroluminescent devices by 422 percent compared to conventional ones by applying retro-reflection electrodes that adapt the principle of nocturnal animal eyes.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quantum computing on the moveA future quantum computer, using quantum bits, or qubits, might be able to solve problems that are not tractable for classical computers. Scientists are currently struggling to build devices with more than a few qubits, as they mutually hamper each other's proper operation.
9h
Ingeniøren
Efter Ingeniørens afsløringer: Rigsrevisionen skal igen kulegrave jernbanens nye signalerFormanden for Statsrevisorerne vil på baggrund af Ingeniørens artikler have undersøgt de oplysninger, som Banedanmark præsenterede politikerne for, da de i 2009 vedtog at udskifte samtlige signaler langs de danske skinner for 20 mia. kr.
9h
Dagens Medicin
Xarelto får nej til tilskud af frygt for forkert brugNOAK-midlet Xarelto får endnu engang nej til både generelt og klausuleret tilskud af Medicintilskudsnævnet, der frygter, at et ja ville få læger uden den fornødne kardiologiske specialistviden til at iværksætte behandling med det.
9h
Dagens Medicin
Øget risiko for vaskulær demens blandt blodprop-overlevereDansk registerstudie finder 35 pct. øget risiko for vaskulær demens blandt patienter, der har haft blodprop i hjertet. Bypassopererede har særlig høj risiko for at udvikle vaskulær demens.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Selective PDE4D inhibitor shows potential to treat Fragile X autism spectrum disorderNew research suggests the potential utility of BPN14770, a selective PDE4D inhibitor, in the treatment of Fragile X syndrome (FXS) and possibly other autism spectrum disorders. Daily BPN14770 dosing in a mouse Fragile X model showed reduce hyperarousal, improved social interactions and natural behaviors, as well as changes in neuronal dendrite structure. BPM14770 is currently in clinical testing b
10h
The Atlantic
Why Congress Has Done Nothing on Guns In the weeks after Representative Charlie Dent signed on to legislation that would have banned bump stocks following the massacre in Las Vegas, the moderate Pennsylvania Republican was “besieged” by responses from his constituents. These were not thank-you calls. The vast majority of people contacting Dent were angry that he had endorsed even a modest restriction on the use of guns, he told me in
10h
NYT > Science
ScienceTake: Wolves Know How to Work TogetherWolves far outperformed dogs on a widely used test of cooperation in animals.
10h
NYT > Science
Wolves Beat Dogs in Teamwork TestIn a widely used behavioral experiment that requires teamwork, wolves showed up dogs.
10h
NYT > Science
Lab Chimps Are Moving to Sanctuaries — SlowlyMedical experimentation on chimpanzees has ended, but moving all of them into retirement will be a difficult task.
10h
Ingeniøren
Iphone-opdatering kan slå stort 'i' fra Uheldige brugere af Apples mobile enheder kan i disse dage opleve et så usædvanligt problem som, at systemet simpelthen har problemer med at vise de rigtige tegn på skærmen. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/nyeste-version-ios-har-problemer-med-at-vise-stort-1082459 Version2
10h
Ingeniøren
Alarmtryk giver næsten kun falske alarmerI 2016 blev der trykket på et af landets alarmtryk næsten 1.600 gange. Kun 26 gange var der faktisk en brand, der skulle slukkes.
11h
Science-Based Medicine
Update on ASEA, Protandim, and dōTERRAMultilevel marketing distributors of dietary supplements and essential oils point to studies that they think constitute evidence that their products work. They don't understand why those studies are inadequate.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Face to Face with Nest's smartest home security cameraNest's new home security camera is supposed to be so smart that it can identify people it's been introduced to.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A well changes lives in ravaged Mali cityAmong the lines of small mud houses, plastic litter and piles of parched earth, children gaze skywards at a shiny blue tank perched on steel legs.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Doctors warn of health emergency as smog blankets India's capitalA public health emergency was declared in New Delhi Tuesday as a choking blanket of smog descended on the world's most polluted capital city.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Surf's up for startups at Web Summit 2017The next generation of Internet giants gather this week in Portugal for four days of tech-fuelled networking, nights out and—for the first time this year—surfing of the offline variety.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Thailand to require fingerprints, face scans for SIM cardsFace-scans or fingerprints will be needed to buy SIM cards in Thailand from next month as the kingdom tries to crack down on electronic fraud and encourage mobile banking.
12h
Ingeniøren
Hvordan bruger vi den intelligente teknologi klogt?Under et seminar i Schweiz for et par uger siden sad jeg ved siden af en herre, som jeg opdagede var i færd med at styre et skib på plads i en af Grønlands havne. Og det vel at mærke ikke ved at tale i telefonen, men ved via telefonen bogstaveligt talt at se havnen, identificere skibets position ...
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Air pollution battle is crucial to China's public health, study saysChina's measures to improve air quality are working, but more stringent policies should be put in place to safeguard public health, a new study has shown.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Artificial sweeteners in groundwater indicate contamination from septic systemsThe presence of artificial sweeteners in rural groundwater shows evidence for contamination by local septic system wastewater, researchers from the University of Waterloo have found.
12h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Gibbons rescued from pet trade have baby in the wildA gibbon is the first of its species born in the wild to parents rescued from the illegal pet trade.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Public's poor knowledge of anatomy may hamper healthcareHealthcare is being hampered because of the public's poor basic knowledge of anatomy. Middle-aged non-graduates scored better than young graduates in an anatomical quiz given to the public. The only organ which 100 percent of people answered correctly was the brain followed by the biceps muscle and the cornea. The organs which the public knew least about were the adrenal glands which less than 15
14h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Human-elephant conflict destroying lives in IndiaElephants are looking for food in villages in India's forests, with deadly consequences.
14h
Science | The Guardian
Teeth discovered in Dorset reveal secrets of the origins of modern mammals | Elsa Panciroli Two fossil teeth found in Cretaceous rocks could belong to the oldest placental mammal ancestor in Europe Palaeontologists from the University of Portsmouth have discovered two new fossil teeth from the Cretaceous rocks of Dorset. They are from the branch of the mammal tree that led to modern mammals – including humans. Their findings suggest the origin of modern mammals lies even earlier in geol
14h
Gizmodo
We Need To Be Okay With Self-Driving Cars That Crash, Researchers Say Photo: Getty Joshua Brown was just one of the more than 37,000 people who died in car crashes in the US last year—but his death continues to make headlines. Brown became the first person killed by an autonomous vehicle when his Tesla Model S collided with a truck while in Autopilot mode, and his crash launched a debate about the risks and rewards of allowing self-driving cars on the road. People
14h
cognitive science
Language patterns reveal body's hidden response to stress submitted by /u/OestlundMartin [link] [comments]
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Promising new drug for Hep B tested at Texas Biomedical Research InstituteResearch at the Southwest National Primate Research Center (SNPRC) on the campus of Texas Biomedical Research Institute helped advance a new treatment now in human trials for chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UMD neuroscientists identify source of early brain activityA new study led by University of Maryland neuroscientists is the first to identify a mechanism that could explain an early link between sound input and cognitive function, often called the 'Mozart effect.' Working with an animal model, the researchers found that a type of cell present in the brain's primary processing area during early development, long thought to form structural scaffolding with
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Artificial sweeteners in groundwater indicate contamination from septic systemsThe presence of artificial sweeteners in rural groundwater shows evidence for contamination by local septic system wastewater, researchers from the University of Waterloo have found.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ALMA's image of red giant star gives a surprising glimpse of the sun's futureA Chalmers-led team of astronomers has for the first time observed details on the surface of an aging star with the same mass as the sun. ALMA's images show that the star is a giant, its diameter twice the size of Earth's orbit around the sun, but also that the star's atmosphere is affected by powerful, unexpected shock waves. The research is published in Nature Astronomy on Oct. 30, 2017.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How Helicobacter pylori causes gastric cancerGastric cancer is one of the five most fatal types of cancer. According to the statistics of the World Health Organization about 750,000 patients die each year after developing the disease. The main cause is thought to be the bacterium Helicobacter pylori. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now identified two mechanisms through which this bacterium can caus
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Inner ear stem cells may someday restore hearingWant to restore hearing by injecting stem cells into the inner ear? Well, that can be a double-edged sword. Inner ear stem cells can be converted to auditory neurons that could reverse deafness, but the process can also make those cells divide too quickly, posing a cancer risk, according to a study led by Rutgers University-New Brunswick scientists.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Two meds not always better than one for seasonal allergic rhinitisIn a newly updated clinical practice guideline, published in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, allergists offer practical advice on the best types and amounts of medications to treat seasonal allergic rhinitis.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
RAND study: Introducing autonomous vehicles sooner could save hundreds of thousands of livesAutonomous vehicles should only have to be moderately better than human drivers before being widely used in the United States, an approach that could save thousands of lives annually even before the technology is perfected, according to a new RAND Corporation report.
14h
Viden
Tænketank: Slip selvkørende biler løs - trods fejlOfre dør i unødvendige trafikulykker, hvis vi venter på, at teknikken bliver perfekt, siger Tænketank.
15h
Live Science
Knossos: Palace of the MinoansThe civilization known as the Minoans built a huge palace on the island of Crete.
15h
Live Science
Facts About BariumProperties, sources and uses of the element barium.
15h
Feed: All Latest
To Save Lives, Deploy Self-Driving Cars As Soon As You CanA new RAND report argues the sooner you can deploy self-driving cars, the more lives you might save.
15h
New on MIT Technology Review
New Research Aims to Solve the Problem of AI Bias in “Black Box” AlgorithmsAs we automate more and more decisions, being able to understand how an AI thinks is increasingly important.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Introducing autonomous vehicles sooner could save hundreds of thousands of livesAutonomous vehicles should only have to be moderately better than human drivers before being widely used in the United States, an approach that could save thousands of lives annually even before the technology is perfected, according to a new RAND Corporation report.
15h
Scientific American Content: Global
Here's What We Think Alzheimer's Does to the BrainThe main way the disease works is to disrupt communication between neurons, the specialized cells that process and transmit electrical and chemical signals between regions of the brain -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
15h
Gizmodo
Check Out These FTC Complaints Against Tinder Photo: AP Anyone who’s spent any considerable amount of time on Tinder knows that, like any service promising random lonely people quick and easy access to a horde of horned-up singles over the Internet, it kind of sucks . It’s filled with fake profiles, tries to sell you on premium services , and even if you do meet someone, there’s a reasonable chance your date will involve listening to them te
15h
Ingeniøren
Få tårnhøj selvtillid og løft din karriere Selvtillid er vigtigt for at sende signaler til kolleger og ledelsen. De signaler, du udsender, kan skyde din karriere af sted mod toppen eller ned mod afgrunden. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/udstraal-samme-selvtillid-topchef-10959 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
15h
Ingeniøren
Patientindeks skulle oprindeligt testes på 50.000 – men nu er alle patienter fra to regioner indlæst Sundhedsdatastyrelsen har indlæst langt mere data i det Nationale Patientindeks, end der oprindeligt var lagt op til. Den går ikke, mener patientforening. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/patientindeks-skulle-oprindeligt-testes-paa-50000-nu-alle-patienter-to-regioner-indlaest Version2
15h
Ingeniøren
Dansk husdyrgødning bidrager til en stor del af svovlen i atmosfærenVi ser mest på biler og kraftværkers forurening. Men ny forskning viser, at husdyrgødningen står for en tredjedel af den menneskeskabte svovl i atmosfæren.
16h
Science | The Guardian
Drug regulator under fire over herbal supplement company’s claims Therapeutic Goods Administration approved advertising for product said to relieve urologic symptoms, despite scientific evidence to the contrary The Therapeutic Goods Administration has been accused of putting the supplements industry before consumers after it allowed a herbal remedy manufacturer to advertise one of its products as helpful in relieving urologic symptoms – despite scientific evide
16h
Gizmodo
Tesla's Director Of Battery Engineering Is Out Tesla’s Gigafactory in Nevada. Photo: Tesla Tesla is currently working to address manufacturing issues at its Gigafactory in Nevada, which led to a three month delay in the production schedule of the Model 3 sedan. At the same time, Jalopnik has learned the company’s director of battery engineering left the company in recent weeks. Jon Wagner, who joined Tesla in 2013, worked as the team leader f
17h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Fossil of 'our earliest ancestors' found in DorsetTeeth of the oldest mammals related to humans have been discovered on the Jurassic coast of Dorset.
17h
Gizmodo
Air Force Failed to Put Sutherland Springs Shooter in FBI Database Preventing Felons From Getting Guns Photo: AP The U.S. Air Force admitted on Monday that it had failed to put information regarding Devin Patrick Kelley, the man authorities say was the perpetrator of a gun massacre at a church in Sutherland Springs, Texas on Sunday which resulted in at least 26 deaths, into a FBI database retailers use to prevent people with a history of domestic violence from purchasing firearms. Kelley was disch
17h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Endangered apes saved from pet tradeRescued pet apes in Indonesia are being returned to the wild, but traders are still "flouting the law".
18h
Gizmodo
The Concourse Taylor Swift’s Lawyer Sends Deranged Letter Over Blog Suggesting She’s An Alt-Right Sy The Concourse Taylor Swift’s Lawyer Sends Deranged Letter Over Blog Suggesting She’s An Alt-Right Sympathizer | The Root Don’t Let the Smile Fool You. I’m Cringing on the Inside | Jezebel Dozens of Women Who Sold LuLaRoe Have Filed For Bankruptcy, Call It a ‘Pyramid Scheme’ | Splinter Drink More Milk Rand Paul | Earther Kids Are Suing Alaska’s Government for Not Addressing Climate Change |
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mothers exposed to common toxin have lower levels of hormone crucial for brain developmentPregnant women exposed to higher levels of a common environmental pollutant, perchlorate, had lower levels of a thyroid hormone crucial for normal foetal brain development, according to a study presented at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Harrogate. These findings suggest that exposure to this common chemical should be minimised in pregnant women to prevent potential neurodevelo
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
High protein diets point to new anti-obesity treatmentsA component of dietary protein, phenylalanine, can suppress appetite by affecting the release of appetite-regulating hormones in the gut, according to new research presented today at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Harrogate. The study shows how phenylalanine reduces food intake by affecting the gut and the brain, and suggests that it may be used to prevent or treat obesity.
19h
Popular Science
NASA's future Mars robot will take the fastest pictures yet of the red planet Space Here's why that's important for mission scientists here on Earth. If all goes according to plan a robot larger than an SUV is going to blast off from Earth and head towards Mars, packed with the largest number of cameras to date.
19h
Gizmodo
Now This is a Picnic Basket Igloo Daytripper Collection Igloo’s Daytripper bags , unlike some of the competition, won’t keep your ice frozen until the next presidency, but they will arm you for a complete picnic, and do so in style. The Daytripper Backpack is... a backpack, which is a big advantage in terms of your schlepping experience. It includes a cutting board, serving utensils, a bottle opener, multiple separate cold
19h
Futurity.org
3 harmful myths about the opioid epidemic Harmful myths about opioids, opioid addiction, and people with substance use disorders persist and may even prevent people from getting treatment, say experts. Between 2015 and 2016, drug overdose deaths went from 33,095 to 59,000, the largest annual jump ever recorded in the United States. That number is expected to continue unabated for the next several years. Myth #1: Opioid addiction is just
19h
Futurity.org
Hear the ‘minimalist’ way baby birds learn songs Songbirds are minimalists when it comes to learning a new song, research shows. The birds’ learning strategy resembles the methods that computer scientists use for document comparison. For a songbird, learning a new song is akin to a child learning a new language. Zebra finches approach this challenge step by step, and even make a detour in the process—by taking song syllables that they already k
19h
Gizmodo
In Animated Short I Am Here, a Cosmic Search for Meaning Leads to a Most Unexpected Place Image: Eoin Duffy Eoin Duffy’s previous animated short followed the strange quest of a squirrel hunting for his missing scarf . His latest, I Am Here , follows another unusual journey—on a much larger scale. Instead of a forest creature, its protagonist is a cosmic being who’s questioning literally everything. The animation style is simple and modernist, and the score (by Menalon) is appropriatel
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Air pollution battle is crucial to China's public healthChina's measures to improve air quality are working, but more stringent policies should be put in place to safeguard public health, a new study has shown.The study, from Tsinghua University, Beijing, used satellite-derived aerosol optical depth measurements, ground based observations, and air quality simulations to examine the levels of fine particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 2
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Ars Technica
When Apple soured on Irish tax laws, it turned to a tiny English Channel island Enlarge / Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks about the new Apple headquarters during a media event in Cupertino, California on September 12, 2017. (credit: JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images ) According to newly leaked documents , in recent years, Apple used a Bermuda-based law firm to take advantage of highly advantageous (though legal) tax arrangements in Jersey to mitigate its tax burden as much as possible
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New Scientist - News
China’s dreadful air pollution seems to have got a bit betterWhile China’s capital Beijing is once again suffering a severe smog, a new study suggests that nationally pollution has fallen 21 per cent over two years
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New Scientist - News
Five firms aim to power moon-orbiting way station to deep spaceDeep Space Gateway is NASA’s planned outpost at the moon for launches to other worlds. The agency has awarded 5 contracts to start working out how to power it
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Futurity.org
4 genes affect length of survival with pancreatic cancer Alterations in four main genes are responsible for how long patients with pancreatic cancer survive, a new study suggests. Before now, the presence and patterns between the genes and disease progression were not clearly established. The relatively large study in JAMA Oncology involved 356 patients—all with pancreatic adenocarcinoma that could be surgically removed. Adenocarcinoma is by far the mo
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Gizmodo
Wells Fargo Now Expects To Pay $130 Million To Customers Affected By Auto Insurance Scandal Photo: AP Wells Fargo now projects it’ll pay $50 million more than previous expected to people affected by a widespread auto insurance scandal, bringing the total to $130 million, according to a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission . The practice involved selling auto insurance to about 800,000 customers who didn’t need the coverage. In July, the San Francisco-based bank admitted th
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Big Think
This Program Uses Neuroscience to Bring Organizations to Peak Performance Here’s the number one factor for whether an organization is a success or a failure. Read More
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Futurity.org
Poor social skills may harm your physical health New research links struggling in social situations with poor physical health. “We’ve known for a long time that social skills are associated with mental health problems like depression and anxiety,” says Chris Segrin, head of the communication department at the University of Arizona. “But we’ve not known definitively that social skills were also predictive of poorer physical health. Two variables
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Futurity.org
Human brains aren’t ‘hungrier’ than other animals’ Human brains don’t consume a larger share of our daily calories than other animals’ brains do, a new study comparing the relative brain costs of 22 species suggests. For years, scientists assumed that humans devote a larger share of their daily calories to their brains than other animals. Although the human brain makes up only 2 percent of body weight, it consumes more than 25 percent of our base
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