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GOP Tax Plan Would Change Who Can Afford to Get a PhDYour PhD could mean Pretty Huge Debt.
5h
Ingeniøren
Rigsrevisionen starter fuld undersøgelse af Sundhedsplatformen Efter forundersøgelse beslutter Rigsrevisionen at gennemføre en fuld undersøgelse af Sundhedsplatformen. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/rigsrevisionen-starter-fuld-undersoegelse-sundhedsplatformen-1082511 Version2
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why do we believe in gods? Religious belief 'not linked to intuition or rational thinking'Religious beliefs are not linked to intuition or rational thinking, according to new research by the universities of Coventry and Oxford.
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Science | The Guardian
Don't know your spleen from your adrenals? Take our vital organs quiz New research suggests we are dangerously ignorant of the location of some of our anatomical structures When it comes to the human body, it’s not merely our posteriors that most of us have trouble distinguishing from our elbows. In a recent survey, fewer than 15% of participants could pinpoint their adrenal glands. The spleen was correctly located by 20% of participants and the gallbladder by 25%.
1min
Ars Technica
FBI can’t break the encryption on Texas shooter’s smartphone Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Peter Dazeley) The Federal Bureau of Investigation has not been able to break the encryption on the phone owned by a gunman who killed 26 people in a Texas church on Sunday. "We are unable to get into that phone," FBI Special Agent Christopher Combs said in a press conference yesterday ( see video ). Combs declined to say what kind of phone was used by gunman Devin
2min
Popular Science
The best kits and gadgets that encourage your kids to be more creative Gadgets I love Youtube. Your kids love Youtube. But there's more to life than Youtube. The internet is wonderful, but still, sometimes it’s good to get your kids out from behind the computer and in a place where they can be creative and get their hands…
4min
New on MIT Technology Review
More Evidence that Humans and Machines Are Better When They Team UpBy worrying about job displacement, we might end up missing a huge opportunity for technological amplification.
4min
Dagens Medicin
Stop klapjagten på hårdtarbejdende lægerSager som den fra Svendborg tvinger læger til at foretage en stor mængde ekstra registreringer, hvis de vil undgå at ende i samme situation. Og de lokale ledelser fratages i praksis ansvar for patienternes sikkerhed, som overlades til styrelsen og domstolene.
6min
Ars Technica
IBM’s plan to regulate pot with blockchains isn’t as crazy as it sounds Enlarge (credit: Aurich Lawson) Canada is legalizing marijuana and leaving it up to provincial governments to regulate its sale and distribution. The government of British Columbia asked for comments on the best way to manage the province's marijuana market. In a regulatory filing, IBM argued that the province should use a blockchain to manage its legal marijuana market. That is probably not a se
7min
Viden
Uber indgår aftale med NASA om flyvende taxaerDet amerikanske firma skal udvikle et system til at håndtere lavtflyvende lufttrafik.
8min
Inside Science
Lung Cancer Recurrence, Predictable at Last? Lung Cancer Recurrence, Predictable at Last? Blood biomarker may tell whether early-stage lung cancer is cured or soon-to-be recurred. LungCancer_topNteaser.jpg A biopsy shows an invasive form of lung cancer. Image credits: Yale Rosen via flickr Rights information: CC BY-SA 2.0 Human Wednesday, November 8, 2017 - 12:15 Jason Socrates Bardi, Editor (Inside Science) -- When lung cancer is caught in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Learning two languages does not limit academic potential for Head Start studentsNot all dual-language learners are at risk academically, but as a group, these students are often labeled as such, despite differences in their English skills.
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New on MIT Technology Review
An Apple AR Headset, Coming 2020?
11min
The Atlantic
The Middle East Has Not Been Kind to Lebanon BEIRUT—Lebanon has long been a mirror for the broader Middle East. The region’s more powerful actors use it, variously, as a venue for their proxy wars, an arena in which to play out the Arab-Israeli conflict, and a testing ground for periodic bouts of Saudi-Iranian coexistence. It’s where the region wages its wars and brokers its temporary truces. This past week, like in so many others, the Midd
16min
New on MIT Technology Review
Automation Will Make Megacities Grow Way FasterUnless policymakers take action, it could decimate smaller cities, too.
19min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Learning two languages does not limit academic potential for Head Start studentsNot all dual-language learners are at risk academically, but as a group, these students are often labeled as such, despite differences in their English skills. A new Iowa State University study found as dual-language learners gained English proficiency, they had significant growth in cognitive and academic development, eventually outperforming students who only spoke English.
19min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How the skin becomes inflamedPublishing online this week in Cell Host & Microbe, researchers at Johns Hopkins report the discovery of a key underlying immune mechanism that explains why to how our skin becomes inflamed from conditions such as atopic dermatitis, more commonly known as eczema. Toxin-producing bacteria on the surface of our skin induces a protein that causes our own cells to react and cause inflammation.
19min
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Three Best Midweek Deals on Security, DNA Tests, and MorePre-game for Black Friday with these three deals (and one reminder for you forgetful Xbox gamers).
24min
Feed: All Latest
Google Chrome Will Stop Sketchy Redirects SoonWith its latest update, Chrome's going to quash the junky redirects that turn the web into a house or horror.
30min
Ars Technica
Ringing black holes may glow in the dark Enlarge (credit: NASA/ESA ) Ever since LIGO (and now Virgo) started picking up gravitational waves, theorists have gone nuts. The volume of papers on exciting possibilities seems to grow faster than the disk space available to accommodate them. If I were sensible, I would probably ignore them. But I'm not, and you, dear reader, will suffer along with me. When two black holes collide and merge, th
36min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research examines impact of coral bleaching on Western Australia's coastlineResearchers from The University of Western Australia (UWA), ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, and Western Australian Marine Science Institution have examined the impact of the 2016 mass bleaching event on reefs in Western Australia (WA). They found significant bleaching occurred in the inshore Kimberley region, despite Kimberley corals being known as exceptionally stress resistant.
39min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA eyes a comma-shaped Tropical Storm RinaThe NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Storm Rina and found that the storm has taken on a tight comma-cloud appearance.
39min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Survival of the least-fit: Antiviral drug selectively targets the nastiest virusesAn antiviral drug that inhibits a virus' replication machinery selectively targets the most aggressive viruses, according to new research that looked at the infection of individual cells by a virus and the consequence of antiviral intervention.
40min
Scientific American Content: Global
Alcohol Consumption Increases Risk of Breast and Other Cancers, Doctors SayAlthough heavy drinking poses the greatest problem, even low consumption can increase the risk -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
42min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Research on reversing negative effects of maternal obesityA drug that increases energy metabolism may lead to a new approach to prevent obesity in children born to overweight mothers, researchers have found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Has protecting marine species become a job for statisticians?Fishermen have no way of separating the fish they catch when they cast their nets at sea. Protected species with no market value end up being trapped and dying for no reason. In an attempt to minimize this incidental fishing, statisticians have devised a new statistical method for predicting bycatches more accurately in the future. The technique can also be applied to other research fields.
43min
Gizmodo
Wednesday's Best Deals: Early Black Friday Sales, Clear the Rack, Philips Hue, and More Take advantage of some early Black Friday deals like an Instant Pot and Bose QuietComfort headphones , plus a Philips Hue starter kit , Nordstrom’s Clear the Rack , and many more kick off today’s best deals. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Philips Hue White Starter Kit , $60 Update : Sold out on Amazon, but still available from Best Buy . If you’
45min
New Scientist - News
AI binges on CSI crime shows and learns to guess whodunnitPredicting the twists and turns of a crime drama are hard enough for us - teaching computers to do it will make them better at understanding complex scenarios
45min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
IMERG adds up heavy rainfall from Tropical Storm DamreyUsing a fleet of satellites, NASA calculated the heavy rainfall in Vietnam left by Typhoon Damrey at the beginning of November.
45min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New 'sugar-glass' film uses viruses to kill harmful bacteria in foodWith antibiotic resistance on the rise, bacterial contamination of food is becoming more problematic. Now in a study appearing in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, scientists report that they have developed an antibacterial "sugar-glass" coating in which viruses that destroy bacteria are embedded and are kept stable for up to three months. The coating could someday be used in the food packag
45min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cool textiles to beat the heatAir-conditioned buildings bring welcome relief to people coming in from the heat. But creating that comfort comes with a cost to our wallets and the environment in the form of increased energy bills and greenhouse gas emissions. Now researchers report in ACS Nano the development of a new material for clothing that we could one day don as our own personal cooling unit, without any external energy n
45min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research could 'untangle' vexing problem in computer-simulation technologyThe computer simulations used to design, optimize, test or control a vast range of objects and products in our daily lives are underpinned by finite element methods.
51min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New needle-free vaccines could mean the end of the flu shotAutumn has arrived, leaves are changing colors, and pumpkin spice aromas are sweeping stores. It's also the season for flu shots. The good news is that the annual jab in the arm designed to protect us from the flu might one day be a thing of the past. An article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, describes advances in injection-free vac
51min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wireless handheld spectrometer transmits data to smartphoneSpectral images, which contain more color information than is obtainable with a typical camera, reveal characteristics of tissue and other biological samples that can't be seen by the naked eye. A new smartphone-compatible device that is held like a pencil could make it practical to acquire spectral images of everyday objects and may eventually be used for point-of-care medical diagnosis in remote
51min
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Rohingya refugees, Bulgarian protests and a prize for negative results The week in science: 3–9 November 2017. Nature 551 146 doi: 10.1038/551146a
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
UK government appoints next chief scientific adviser A former pharmaceutical boss will help navigate the UK's exit from the European Union. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22956
53min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exposure to chemical during pregnancy may cause health problems for offspringA chemical called bisphenol A -- BPA -- used in plastic packaging and in the linings of food and beverage cans, may be passed from a mother to her offspring during pregnancy and cause changes in the gut bacteria of the offspring, according to an international team of researchers.
54min
The Atlantic
Remembering Roy Halladay, Baseball’s Steady Marvel Because of its uniquely frustrating nature, and because it is played every day, no game is better than baseball at displaying persistence—the willingness to try a difficult task again and again. Roy Halladay, who died Tuesday afternoon at the age of 40 when his single-engine plane crashed into the Gulf of Mexico, was perhaps the most persistent player of his era. In sum, Halladay’s career looks l
57min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Senate committee narrowly backs Trump pick for NASA chiefA Senate committee on Wednesday narrowly backed President Donald Trump's nominee to serve as the next NASA chief.
57min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Former Yahoo CEO says no company or agency immune from hacksFormer Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer has told lawmakers that the threat from state-sponsored hackers has changed the playing field so dramatically that even the best-defended companies can fall victim.
57min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
German officials celebrate doubled Twitter character limitGerman bureaucrats—notorious for their ability to create lengthy tongue twisters consisting of one single word—are celebrating the doubling of Twitter's character limit.
57min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Moscow says Twitter to store user data in RussiaRussia's telecoms watchdog said Wednesday that Twitter had agreed to store the personal data of Russian nationals on servers located in Russia by mid-2018 to avoid the prospect of a ban.
57min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers explore causes of land cover change in African savannasA new study by Virginia Tech researchers tracks land cover changes in the Chobe district of Northern Botswana and provides information that will allow governments and nonprofit organizations to improve dryland management strategies in the region.
57min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees the end of Tropical Depression 29WBorn from the remnants of Tropical Cyclone 28W, Tropical Depression 29W only lasted a few days before it began rapidly decaying. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite found the disorganized storm weakening over the Malay Peninsula.
57min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sifting gold from the data delugeNext-generation DNA sequencing technologies have flooded databases and hard drives worldwide with large data sets, but are researchers getting the most they can out of this deluge of data? In a new study in the October issue of Applications in Plant Sciences, Dr. Brent Berger and colleagues propose one way to sift the remaining gold out of large sequence data sets. The authors show that a new data
57min
Ingeniøren
Nyt EU-krav til bilers CO2-udledning er for slapt, mener flere landeEU-Kommissionen foreslår at stramme kravene til nye bilers CO2-udledning med 30 procent. Dansk Energi roser forslaget, mens Det Økologiske Råd og flere medlemslande mener, at der sagtens kan strammes mere
58min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A warbler's flashy yellow throat? There are genes for thatBirds get their bright red, orange and yellow plumage from carotenoid pigments—responsible for many of the same bright colours in plants. But how songbirds turn carotenoids into the spectacular variety of feathered patches found in nature has remained a mystery.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers discover a novel layered superconductor based on tin and arsenicThe layered superconducting material is characterized by a crystal structure in which a SnAs layer (wherein Sn and As are two-dimensionally bonded to develop superconductivity) and a Na layer (the spacer layer) are alternately laminated. Considering that such a layered structure is similar to that of a cuprate- or iron-based high-temperature (high-Tc) superconductor, it is possible that in SnAs-ba
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sensors applied to plant leaves warn of water shortageForgot to water that plant on your desk again? It may soon be able to send out an SOS.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists narrow down the search for dark photons using decade-old particle collider dataIn its final years of operation, a particle collider in Northern California was refocused to search for signs of new particles that might help fill in some big blanks in our understanding of the universe.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
An interview with Mauritius's first female president | Ameenah Gurib-Fakim and Stephanie BusariAmeenah Gurib-Fakim has been an academic, an entrepreneur and is now the president of Mauritius -- the first Muslim female head of state in Africa. In a wide-ranging conversation with journalist Stephanie Busari, Gurib-Fakim discusses the humble beginnings of her political career, what it's like to be both a person of faith and a scientist and why we need to value traditional African knowledge, am
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Sheep 'trained to recognise celebrities' in Cambridge studyThe animals have demonstrated the ability to recognise familiar human faces, according to a study.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Easing the soil's temperature: Cover crops shield soil from extreme tempsSoil characteristics like organic matter content and moisture play a vital role in helping plants flourish. It turns out that soil temperature is just as important. Every plant needs a certain soil temperature to thrive. If the temperature changes too quickly, plants won't do well. Their seeds won't germinate or their roots will die.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Not so different after all: Human cells, hardy microbes share common ancestorTo Tom Santangelo, single-celled microorganisms called archaea are like ancient mariners, surviving among the most extreme conditions on Earth, including volcanic vents in the deep ocean.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dozens of new wildlife corridors identified for African mammalsResearchers have identified 52 potential wildlife corridors linking protected areas across Tanzania. Using a combination of interviews with local residents and a land conversion data set for East Africa, they found an additional 23 corridors over those previously identified by Tanzanian government reports.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tumor analysis post-surgery provides breakthrough in how patients respond to treatmentResearchers have developed a new platform for assessing anti-cancer drug efficacy in lung cancer that is more reflective of patient response than previously used model systems. The platform relies on the derivation of 'explants' from tumor tissue obtained fresh from surgery and treatment of these samples ex vivo with anti-cancer drugs. The platform has the potential to significantly reduce drug at
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New 'sugar-glass' film uses viruses to kill harmful bacteria in foodWith antibiotic resistance on the rise, bacterial contamination of food is becoming more problematic. Now in a study, scientists report that they have developed an antibacterial 'sugar-glass' coating in which viruses that destroy bacteria are embedded and are kept stable for up to three months. The coating could someday be used in the food packaging and processing industries to help prevent food-b
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tracking collars uncover the secrets of baboons' raiding tacticsNew research shows how canny baboons in Cape Town use a sit-and-wait tactic before raiding people's homes in search of food.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Transforming fibrils into crystalsAn international team of researchers have discovered a new type of transition in protein folding: amyloid crystals formed from amyloid fibrils by a decrease in energy. The crystals are even more stable than the fibrils, which are responsible for a number of serious neurodegenerative diseases in humans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Endurance training helpful in recovery from muscle inflammation, new study showsEndurance training can actually be helpful in dealing with muscle inflammation, according to a new paper co-written by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York, and Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Visual intelligence is not the same as IQThe first study of individual variation in visual ability has shown that there is a broad range of differences in people's capability for recognizing and remembering novel objects and has determined that these variations are not associated with individuals' general intelligence, or IQ.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new way to mix oil and waterMIT researchers discovered a new way to get oil and water to mix, and stay mixed, by harnessing the condensation of water onto an oil-surfactant mixture. The process creates a nanoscale emulsion that remains stable for months.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research reveals the true impact of diabetic foot ulcersThe prognosis for people with an infected diabetic foot ulcer is worse than was previously thought, according to new research. More than half the patients in the research study did not see their ulcer heal over a year -- and one in seven had to have part or all of their foot amputated.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Clinical trial examines online care for mood, anxiety disorders in primary careFor primary care patients with depression or anxiety, providing an online computerized cognitive behavioral therapy (CCBT) program through a collaborative care program was more effective than primary care physicians' usual care for these conditions. However, adding moderated access to an internet support group (ISG) provided no additional benefit over the CCBT program alone.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is there a difference in patient outcomes if a surgeon is involved in overlapping surgeries?Overlapping surgery, defined as a surgeon's involvement in two operations scheduled at the same or overlapping times, appeared safe for patients undergoing neurosurgery.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gene breakthrough on lithium treatment for bipolar disorderGenes linked to schizophrenia in psychiatric patients suffering from bipolar disorder are the reason why such patients don't respond to the 'gold standard' treatment for bipolar -- the drug lithium -- according to international research led by the University of Adelaide.
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The Atlantic
A Toxic, Closed-Off City on the Edge of the World Every day for two years, filmmaker Victoria Fiore tried to gain access to a toxic, closed city in Siberia with no ground transportation connections to the rest of the world. Located nearly 250 miles north of the polar circle, Norilsk is home to 177,00 people, many of whom are employed by the world’s largest mining and metallurgy complex, Norilsk Nickel. It spews more than two million tons of gas
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Gizmodo
Instagram Stories Now Lets You Post Old Photos Without a Workaround Photo: Instagram I have an evening routine where I lay in my bed, tapping from Instagram story to Instagram story, mindlessly consuming what feels like a mundane montage of all of my friends’ days. That’s because, up until today, users were limited to posting photos and videos from within the last 24 hours. But now, Instagram has updated the feature to let you go wild from your camera roll. No mo
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Big Think
NASA Invites You to Nickname a Mysterious Distant World NASA and SETI invite the public to nickname a small icy world, or pair of worlds, in the distant Kuiper Belt ahead of a New Horizons 2019 flyby. Read More
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Ars Technica
Sorry, Comcast: Voters say “yes” to city-run broadband in Colorado Enlarge / Still from an industry-funded ad warning against municipal broadband in Fort Collins, Colorado. (credit: Priorities First Fort Collins ) Voters in Fort Collins, Colorado, yesterday approved a ballot question that authorizes the city to build a broadband network, rejecting a cable and telecom industry campaign against the initiative. Fort Collins voters said "yes" to a ballot question th
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Research examines impact of coral bleaching on Western Australia's coastlineThe 2016 mass bleaching event on Western Australia's coastline is the most severe global bleaching event to ever be recorded. New research records the impact of this event to the rugged reefs of Western Australia.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Better, bolder printing with silicon nanostructuresFrom textbooks to artwork to newspapers, printed items are a part of our everyday life. But the ink used in today's printers are limited in colors and resolution. Now in a new study, scientists have found a way to expand the printable color spectrum with a novel nanostructure system.
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Gizmodo
Why You Don't Need an iPhone X—Or Any Other Expensive New Phone An example of a 2017 flagship. Image: Apple Hold on just a moment before you drop $1,000 (or more!) on an iPhone X . Don’t spend buckets on an expensive phone from Samsung , Googl e, or anyone else. Do you really need that flagship handset? The list of reasons not to buy one of the latest and most expensive phones gets longer every year. Mid-range phones are better than ever The Moto G5 Plus, a b
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Popular Science
2017 is set to be among the three hottest years on record—and that's even worse than it sounds Environment It's the hottest year without an El Niño boost. We can already be sure that 2017 will be among the hottest years on record for the globe.
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Science | The Guardian
Reconstructed Roman Temple of Mithras opens to public in London Visitors to new museum will uncover mystery cult of Mithras the bull slayer in multi-sensory experience London’s Roman-era Temple of Mithras , once displayed on a car park roof with a crazy paving floor, is to reopen to the public – this time on its original site. Visitors to the temple will now descend through steep, black stone-lined stairs, in Bloomberg’s new European headquarters , to seven m
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Feed: All Latest
After Harvey Weinstein, It's Time to Ask: Can the System Change?In the ever-widening aftermath of the Harvey Weinstein scandal, the question is as obvious as it is complicated.
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Ars Technica
Nearly a year later, video game voice actors end their strike Enlarge / SAG-AFTRA members picket near the start of what would become a long strike. (credit: SAG-AFTRA ) Nearly a year after voting to strike against 11 major video game publishers , voice actors in the SAG-AFTRA union voted overwhelmingly to approve a tentative agreement that will get them back to work for at least the next three years. A full 90 percent of voting union members agreed to the n
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Ars Technica
Logitech to shut down “service and support” for Harmony Link devices in 2018 (credit: Logitech ) Logitech customers are not happy, as they recently found out that the company would be discontinuing service for its popular Harmony Link remote system. The device and its cloud-based system allow users to control home theater and sound equipment from a mobile app. Customers received an e-mail explaining that Logitech will "discontinue service and support" for the Harmony Link
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Early breastfeeding success not affected by epidural pain relief with fentanylIncluding the opioid fentanyl in the solution used to maintain an epidural during childbirth does not appear to affect the success of breastfeeding six weeks after delivery, according to a study published in Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A waterway bounces back following the passage of the Clean Water ActThe BioScience Talks podcast features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA eyes a comma-shaped Tropical Storm RinaThe NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Storm Rina and found that the storm has taken on a tight comma-cloud appearance.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Protect the skin, build barriers: Old acquaintance in a new roleTo ensure the barrier function of the skin, mutual regulation of connections between epidermal cells and a receptor for growth factors is necessary. These findings can help to reduce the effects of inflammatory skin diseases and the decreased barrier function of the aged skin. The mechanism was described by a team of researchers led by Carien Niessen of the Cluster of Excellence for aging research
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
JRC at COP23: A cleaner, greener planet is both possible and affordableIf countries invest in additional climate mitigation measures, hundreds of thousands of lives could be saved and the co-benefits will already offset the costs by 2030.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers teach computer to recognize emotions in speechExperts of the Faculty of Informatics, Mathematics, and Computer Science at the Higher School of Economics have created an automatic system capable of identifying emotions in the sound of a voice. Their report was presented at a major international conference -- Neuroinformatics-2017.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Virginia Tech researchers explore causes of land cover change in African savannasElephants are often blamed for extensive loss of woody vegetation in Northern Botswana, but study results suggest that this may not be the case.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees the end of Tropical Depression 29WBorn from the remnants of Tropical Cyclone 28W, Tropical Depression 29W only lasted a few days before it began rapidly decaying. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite found the disorganized storm weakening over the Malay Peninsula.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA's IMERG adds up heavy rainfall from Tropical Storm DamreyUsing a fleet of satellites, NASA calculated the heavy rainfall in Vietnam left by Typhoon Damrey at the beginning of November.
1h
The Atlantic
What Happens If China Makes First Contact? Last January, the Chinese Academy of Sciences invited Liu Cixin, China’s preeminent science-fiction writer, to visit its new state-of-the-art radio dish in the country’s southwest. Almost twice as wide as the dish at America’s Arecibo Observatory, in the Puerto Rican jungle, the new Chinese dish is the largest in the world, if not the universe. Though it is sensitive enough to detect spy satellit
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Gizmodo
Apple's Reportedly Shooting to Have its AR Headset Ready For Manufacture By 2019 Patent drawing of VR device filed by Apple . Image: US Trademark Office The iPhone X is selling well , and Apple profits are just fine, but Tim Cook has been explicit in saying that augmented reality is the next big thing. And now we have a load of new details about the AR device that Apple is reportedly building. According to Bloomberg ’s reliable Apple leak machine, the team in Cupertino is har
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Futurity.org
Worms hooked on nicotine offer clues to addiction A previously dismissed genetic mechanism may contribute to nicotine dependence and withdrawal, new research suggests. “We, as a field, need to take another look at this mechanism in nicotine addiction.” Scientists in the lab of Shawn Xu, a professor in the molecular and integrative physiology department at the University of Michigan Medical School, examined withdrawal responses in the millimeter-
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New on MIT Technology Review
For Brain-Computer Interfaces to Be Useful, They’ll Need to Be WirelessA leading researcher says he’s working on such a model but can’t get funding.
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Gizmodo
Poor Guy Accidentally Steals and Then Destroys $300 Million Worth of Ether Cryptocurrency Image: Gizmodo / Pixabay Thanks to a string of screw-ups and bugs, an unsuspecting developer recently took possession of an estimated $300 million worth of the Ethereum cryptocurrency by accident. In an attempt to give back the money, however, the poor guy ended up locking up the funds permanently . In effect, that money is just gone. So, this sucks for everyone. And obviously, hackers started th
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Stamceller åbner for ny behandling af diabetesSe video her: På verdensplan er 415 millioner mennesker diagnosticeret med diabetes. Og tallet...
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Gizmodo
MIT Could Revolutionize Salads With a New Stable Way to Mix Oil and Water GIF GIF: YouTube If you’re a fan of a simple oil and vinegar dressing for your salad, your days of having to shake the bottle for a few seconds to mix both ingredients could soon be over. Researchers at MIT have found a way to combine water and oil-based substances so that they stay mixed for months on end. There are several reasons why oil and water (and water-based solutions like vinegar) resis
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Scientific American Content: Global
Dark-Matter Hunt Fails to Find the Elusive ParticlesPhysicists begin to embrace alternative explanations for the missing material -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic
From Frederick Douglass to Edith Wharton: Portraits of Influential Atlantic Contributors At the time of its first issue in November 1857, the magazine, then The Atlantic Monthly , billed itself as a “journal of literature, politics, science, and the arts.” Since then, the magazine has hosted significant debates around the American idea—from slavery to women’s issues to war and the presidency— put forth by some of the most prominent writers of the last two centuries. As our former edi
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Ingeniøren
Menneskerettighedsdomstolen starter sag om masseovervågning i Storbritannien Den Europæiske Menneskerettighedsdomstol har gennemført en høring om masseovervågning i England og behandler nu sagen om Storbritanniens overvågningsprogrammer. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/menneskerettighedsdomstolen-starter-sag-masseovervaagning-storbritannien-1082528 Version2
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Risk of cardiac and stroke death increases after discontinuing hormone therapyHormone therapy (HT) continues to be a hotly debated topic. The benefits of estrogen to the heart, however, appear to be universally accepted. A new study demonstrates that the risk of cardiac and stroke death actually increases in the first year after discontinuation of HT. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel nuclear medicine test can identify kidney transplant infectionGerman scientists have developed a novel nuclear medicine test that can determine whether a kidney transplant patient has developed infection in the transplanted tissue. The study, which utilizes positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI), is presented in the December issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Adolescents use dietary supplements to increase sports performance and improve immunityAdolescents in developed countries frequently use dietary supplements despite a lack of knowledge about possible harmful effects or drug interactions. Often males turn to dietary supplements in an attempt to increase their performance for sports while females are more concerned with preventing illness and disease. To understand the underlying reasons and sources of recommendation for dietary suppl
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When you're tired, your brain cells actually slow downA new Tel Aviv University study finds that individual neurons slow down when we are sleep deprived, leading to delayed behavioral responses to events taking place around us. The slowdown affects the brain's visual perception and memory associations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cool textiles to beat the heatAir-conditioned buildings bring welcome relief to people coming in from the heat. But creating that comfort comes with a cost to our wallets and the environment in the form of increased energy bills and greenhouse gas emissions. Now researchers report in ACS Nano the development of a new material for clothing that we could one day don as our own personal cooling unit, without any external energy n
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bringing natural killer cells to the tumor battlefieldBy studying melanoma, a highly malignant form of skin cancer, Dr Bassam Janji's research team at the Luxembourg Institute of Health (LIH) has revealed a mechanism by which the immunosuppressive environment can be switched to an immunosupportive one. They found that if autophagy -- the intracellular recycling process -- is blocked in tumor cells, they produce cytokines that attract NK cells. The ma
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Wireless handheld spectrometer transmits data to smartphoneA new smartphone-compatible device that is held like a pencil could make it practical to acquire spectral images of everyday objects and may eventually be used for point-of-care medical diagnosis in remote locations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Employee volunteerism? Only if you think your boss is ethicalA new study shows that people who perceive their employer as committed to environmental and community-based causes will, in turn, engage in green behavior and local volunteerism, with one caveat: their boss must display similarly ethical behavior.
1h
Scientific American Content: Global
Can California Eliminate Gas Cars?State leaders are discussing banning the sale of cars that run on gasoline or diesel -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Not so different after all: Human cells, hardy microbes share common ancestorResearchers have found striking parallels between how archaeal cells and more complex cells, including humans' and animals', package and store their genetic material. The breakthrough study provided evidence that archaea and eukaryotic cells share a common mechanism to compact, organize and structure their genomes.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Engineering microbial communities? Paradoxes in microbial economiesScientist have described a trio of paradoxical dynamics that can arise in simple microbial economies. The work could be important for approaching engineered microbial communities and better understanding microbiomes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Academic performance predicts risk of suicide attempt in adultsPoor academic performance, measured as grade point average (GPA) at age 16, was a robust and strong predictor of suicide attempt up to middle age.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
We should use central pressure deficit, not wind speed, to predict hurricane damageNew research provides a physical understanding for why central pressure deficit is a better indicator of economic damage from hurricanes than peak wind speed.
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Gizmodo
Uber Is Still Trying to Do that Flying Car Thing Screengrab: Uber Since the world we are currently living in is very much not the future we all dreamed of, NASA is teaming up with Uber to try to at least make a sliver of our flying-car dreams come true. Uber chief product officer Jeff Holden announced today at the Web Summit conference in Lisbon that the ride-hailing company has made a deal with NASA to create software that will help manage fly
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
North Korean nuclear test measured in southwest GermanyThe recent nuclear test by the regime in North Korea was even measurable in Southwest Germany. Two seismic stations run by scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in the Karlsruhe city center and in Durlach recorded vibrations of 6.3 in body wave magnitude in the night from Saturday to Sunday.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MSU biologists have found out how long can microorganisms live on MarsResearchers from Lomonosov MSU, Faculty of Soil Science, have studied the resistance microorganisms have against gamma radiation in very low temperatures. The results have been published in the Extremophiles journal
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research examines impact of coral bleaching on Western Australia's coastlineThe 2016 mass bleaching event is the most severe global bleaching event to ever be recorded. New research records the impact of this event to the rugged reefs of Western Australia.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New 'sugar-glass' film uses viruses to kill harmful bacteria in foodWith antibiotic resistance on the rise, bacterial contamination of food is becoming more problematic. Now in a study appearing in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, scientists report that they have developed an antibacterial 'sugar-glass' coating in which viruses that destroy bacteria are embedded and are kept stable for up to three months. The coating could someday be used in the food packag
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Has protecting marine species become a job for statisticians?Fishermen have no way of separating the fish they catch when they cast their nets at sea. Protected species with no market value end up being trapped and dying for no reason. In an attempt to minimize this incidental fishing, statisticians from UNIGE, Dalhousie University and the Australian National University have devised a new statistical method for predicting bycatches more accurately in the fu
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Early intervention may hold key to treatment of Friedreich's ataxiaCurrent treatments may be administered too late to target Friedreich's ataxia effectively. New research using a slow-onset frataxin knock-in/knockout mouse model showed significantly reduced levels of mitochondrial biosynthesis proteins and early mitochondrial deficiency in the cerebellar cortex, even at pre-symptomatic stages of development. This suggests that the progressive degeneration in mito
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dozens of new wildlife corridors identified for African mammalsResearchers at the University of California, Davis, have identified 52 potential wildlife corridors linking protected areas across Tanzania. Using a combination of interviews with local residents and a land conversion data set for East Africa, they found an additional 23 corridors over those previously identified by Tanzanian government reports.
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Gizmodo
Jezebel Plane Makes Emergency Landing After Passenger Goes Through Sleeping Husband’s Phone and Disc Jezebel Plane Makes Emergency Landing After Passenger Goes Through Sleeping Husband’s Phone and Discovers His Infidelity | Deadspin Roy Halladay Was “Your Favorite Player’s Favorite Player” | Earther Thousands of Idled, Dirty Railroad Cars Are Littering the American Landscape | The Root Say Something Nice: 7 Things That Have Actually Improved During Trump’s Presidency | Splinter We Don’t Have to
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New Scientist - News
How YouTube Kids can solve its Peppa Pig cannibalism problemWhen a flesh-eating Peppa Pig ends up on a channel for young viewers, it means YouTube must put its house in order, say Charlie Beckett and Sonia Livingstone
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Improving climate observations offers major return on investmentA well-designed climate observing system could help scientists answer knotty questions about climate while delivering trillions of dollars in benefits by providing decision makers information they need to protect public health and the economy in the coming decades.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Bursts' of beta waves, not sustained rhythms, filter sensory processing in brainScientists have found that people and mice alike use brief bursts of beta brainwaves, rather than sustained rhythms, to control attention and perception.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Huge carbon sink in soil minerals: New avenue for offsetting rising greenhouse gasesSoil holds more than three times the carbon found in the atmosphere, yet its potential in reducing atmospheric carbon-dioxide levels and mitigating global warming is barely understood. A researcher has discovered that vast amounts of carbon can be stored by soil minerals more than a foot below the surface. The finding could help offset the rising greenhouse-gas emissions helping warm the Earth's c
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New technique to mine genetic information from genome-skimming data setsNext-generation DNA sequencing technologies have flooded databases and hard drives worldwide with large data sets, but are researchers getting the most they can out of this deluge of data? A new study demonstrates a data mining technique that can be used to glean valuable information from existing data sets, and proves the concept by retrieving sequence from genes influencing the peculiar floral s
2h
The Scientist RSS
Mass Resignation from Scientific Reportss Editorial BoardNineteen researchers have stepped down after the journal decided not to retract a paper that they say plagiarized the work of a John Hopkins biomedical scientist.
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Gizmodo
Cut the Cord With This $90 Stick Vacuum, Today Only Hoover Linx Signature, $90 It’s 2017, and your vacuum shouldn’t have a cord anymore. The Hoover Linx Signature features an 18-volt battery, a motorized brush that you can turn on and off, and a low profile to get under furniture, all for an all-time low price of $90. Just note that this is a Gold Box deal, so be sure to get yours before they’re all vacuumed up.
2h
New on MIT Technology Review
Uber Made Its Homegrown AI Language Open Source, but Not Entirely out of Altruism
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Feed: All Latest
Steven Soderbergh's New App, Mosaic, Will Change How You Watch TVHis latest project is a monumental effort designed to keep you glued to your phone.
2h
The Atlantic
Can a New Vogue Editor Make Britain Great Again? LONDON—To misquote a great Londoner, if these aren’t necessarily the worst of times for post-Brexit Britain, they aren’t the best of times, either. The nation has suffered through what feels like one disaster after another this year, from terrorist attacks to political catastrophes to the increasingly dysfunctional organization of its impending divorce from the European Union. Britain, according
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fully integrated circuits printed directly onto fabricResearchers have successfully incorporated washable, stretchable and breathable electronic circuits into fabric, opening up new possibilities for smart textiles and wearable electronics. The circuits were made with cheap, safe and environmentally friendly inks, and printed using conventional inkjet printing techniques.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists are developing a compound for a pharmaceutical that stops convulsionsScientists from RUDN University took an active part in the development of a chemical compound that would help to stop convulsions during epileptic seizures. The results of the study were published in Chirality.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tumor analysis post-surgery provides breakthrough in how patients respond to treatmentUniversity of Leicester and Medical Research Council researchers lead study to monitor effectiveness of drugs on cancer patients.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Size matters: How thrips choose their partnersThe bigger the male, the higher his chances to successfully mate -- this applies, at least, to thrips, insects that are hard to recognise with the naked eye. The larger males not only drive off their smaller rivals, they also have better immune systems and produce more sperm. This is a discovery that was made by biologists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) that recently appeared i
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers from RUDN have created an effective solution for collecting spilled petroleumChemists from the RUDN University have synthesized new surfactants and studied their characteristics. The compounds obtained can efficiently collect petroleum spilled on the water surface. The scientists have given an account of their work in the Journal of Molecular Liquids.
2h
Scientific American Content: Global
5 Easy Ways to Help Your Anxious Child (and Your Anxious Self)Worry and anxiety can eat away at kids’ comfort and confidence, especially at stressful transition times like going back to school or to summer camp. Here are 5 helpful tips to ease the mind of... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cleaning up aquatic pollution with musselsScientists and activists alike have been looking for a solution to the problem of aquatic nutrient pollution. Now one group reports that ribbed mussels are up to the clean-up challenge.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
No significant difference in pain relief for opioids vs. non-opioid analgesics for treating arm or leg painFor adults coming to the emergency department for arm or leg pain due to sprain, strain, or fracture, there was no difference in pain reduction after two hours with ibuprofen-acetaminophen vs three comparison opioid-acetaminophen (paracetamol) combinations.
2h
Popular Science
How to convert any file to any format DIY Organize your work your way. Got a Microsoft Word doc that needs to be a PDF? A JPEG image you want to change to TIFF? Here's everything you need to know about converting file formats.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Japanese researchers discover a novel layered superconductor based on tin and arsenicTokyo, Japan - Researchers from the Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University have recently discovered a novel layered superconductor (NaSn 2 As 2 ) containing tin (Sn) and arsenic (As) as its major components.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A gel that does not break or dry outResearchers have developed a highly robust gel that includes large amounts of ionic liquid. The research team was led by Professor MATSUYAMA Hideto and Assistant Professor KAMIO Eiji (Kobe University Graduate School of Science, Center for Membrane and Film Technology). These findings were published on November 8 in Advanced Materials.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A warbler's flashy yellow throat? There are genes for thatBirds get their bright red, orange and yellow plumage from carotenoid pigments -- responsible for many of the same bright colours in plants. But how songbirds turn carotenoids into the spectacular variety of feathered patches found in nature has remained a mystery. Now University of British Columbia (UBC) research might have pinpointed some of the genetic machinery responsible for the plumage colo
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists narrow down the search for dark photons using decade-old particle collider dataA fresh analysis of particle-collider data, co-led by Berkeley Lab physicists, limits some of the hiding places for one type of theorized particle -- the dark photon, also known as the heavy photon -- that was proposed to help explain the mystery of dark matter.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UNSW research on reversing negative effects of maternal obesityA drug that increases energy metabolism may lead to a new approach to prevent obesity in children born to overweight mothers, UNSW Sydney researchers have found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New possibility to prevent and treat Parkinson's disease with licorice extractResearchers in Korea newly found the mechanism of inhibition of dopamine neuronal cell death using licorice extract 'liquiritigenin'. It scientifically proves the possibility of treating degenerative brain diseases using natural materials.
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Gizmodo
Watch a Simulated Launch of the Rocket That Will Get Us to Mars and Beyond GIF NASA engineers are currently hard at work developing Space Launch System 1 —what will be the biggest, most powerful rocket ever built. The inaugural launch of this behemoth won’t happen any earlier than 2019, but NASA has released a spectacular simulation of the launch to whet our appetites. If we’re ever going to send humans and heavy equipment to Mars or further out into the Solar System, w
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Dagens Medicin
Sundhedsminister ser nødvendighed i brug af voksenmedicin til børn Der er behov for at få testet og godkendt flere lægemidler specifikt til børn. Men når et lægemiddel kun er godkendt til voksne, kan det i visse tilfælde alligevel være nødvendigt at bruge til børn, mener sundhedsministeren.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
BroadwayHD to offer West End plays and musicalsThe digital theater streaming network BroadwayHD is growing bigger than its name. It will soon be the first to stream hits from London's West End.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hard computing problem might be solvable only by quantum computers(Phys.org)—Researchers have introduced a new computing problem and shown that it would be extremely difficult, if not impossible, for a classical computer to solve, but in theory it could be efficiently solved using quantum techniques. The problem, which is called Gaussian boson sampling, is a new version of boson sampling, which is a similar computing problem that was introduced a few years ago w
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
IUDs may have a surprising benefit: Protection against cervical cancerIUD use is associated with a dramatic decrease in the incidence of cervical cancer, a new study has found.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lessons from marine sponges could lead to novel glass technologyScientists have uncovered some clues about the abilities of some marine creatures to form glass structures in cold water. The findings could lead to nature-inspired recipes for creating novel glass technologies at room temperature.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Common 'oxygen sponge' catalyst soaks up hydrogen too, neutron spectroscopy revealsA workhorse catalyst of vehicle exhaust systems — an “oxygen sponge” that can soak up oxygen from air and store it for later use in oxidation reactions — may also be a “hydrogen sponge,” scientists have discovered.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Science meets archaeology with discovery that dental X-rays reveal Vitamin D deficiencyHuman teeth hold vital information about Vitamin D deficiency, a serious but often hidden condition that can now be identified by a simple dental X-ray, anthropologists have found.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gender roles in ancient timesTwo new studies by Osaka University researchers provide insights on why male and female bodies of the same species differ. The studies show factors that regulate the expression of doublesex1, a gene responsible for the growth of male traits in the ancient crustacean Daphnia magna and the subsequent spatial expression of doublesex1 in embryo development. The studies provide information on how the e
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain imaging reveals ADHD as a collection of different disordersResearchers have found that patients with different types of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have impairments in unique brain systems, indicating that there may not be a one-size-fits-all explanation for the cause of the disorder. Based on performance on behavioral tests, adolescents with ADHD fit into one of three subgroups, where each group demonstrated distinct impairments in th
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study reveals decadal variation of relationship between EA summer monsoon and ENSOOwing to the limited available time of the observational data, the related studies of decadal or multidecadal variation of ENSO and East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM) have their own drawbacks. Therefore, climate model becomes an important tool. Using a coupled climate model with a 1000-year simulation, scientists from CAS Institute of Atmospheric Physics investigate the multidecadal variations of th
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sifting gold from the data delugeNext-generation DNA sequencing technologies have flooded databases and hard drives worldwide with large data sets, but are researchers getting the most they can out of this deluge of data? A new study demonstrates a data mining technique that can be used to glean valuable information from existing data sets, and proves the concept by retrieving sequence from genes influencing the peculiar floral s
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Easing the soil's temperatureMany factors influence the ability of soil to buffer against temperature changes. Recent research shows both perennial biofuel and cover crops help soils shield against extreme temperatures.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sensors applied to plant leaves warn of water shortageMIT engineers have created sensors that can be printed onto plant leaves and reveal when the plants are experiencing a water shortage, which could give farmers an early warning when their crops are in danger.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mice prefer rules over fightsMice resolve conflicts by observing 'social rules' to enhance long-term mutual benefits.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
After repeated C. diff infections, people change their behaviorsAfter suffering repeated bouts of debilitating Clostridium difficile infections, many patients significantly change their behaviors, but some precautions may do little to prevent future infections, according to a first-of-its-kind study.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Not so different after all: Human cells, hardy microbes share common ancestorResearchers have found striking parallels between how archaeal cells and more complex cells, including humans' and animals', package and store their genetic material. The breakthrough study, published in Science earlier this year, provided evidence that archaea and eukaryotic cells share a common mechanism to compact, organize and structure their genomes.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tencent buys 10 percent stake in SnapThe Chinese internet company Tencent has acquired a 10 percent stake in Snap, with the social media company struggling to boost user growth.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
WeChat Pay arrives in Paris department storesChinese tourists visiting Paris are now able to pay for their purchases in two of the city's famous department stores with their smartphones, thanks the adoption of the payment app of the popular Chinese social media network, WeChat.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Better, bolder printing with silicon nanostructuresFrom textbooks to artwork to newspapers, printed items are a part of our everyday life. But the ink used in today's printers are limited in colors and resolution. Now in a new study in ACS' journal Nano Letters, scientists have found a way to expand the printable color spectrum with a novel nanostructure system.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cleaning up aquatic pollution with musselsScientists and activists alike have been looking for a solution to the problem of aquatic nutrient pollution. Now one group reports in Environmental Science & Technology that ribbed mussels are up to the clean-up challenge.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The challenge of authenticating real humans in a digital worldProving identity is a routine part of modern daily life. Many people must show a driver's license to buy alcohol at a store, flash an ID card to security guards at work, enter passwords and passcodes to retrieve email and other private information, and answer security validation questions when calling banks or credit card companies for customer service.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Archaeologists uncover rare 2,000-year-old sundial during Roman theatre excavationA 2,000-year-old intact and inscribed sundial – one of only a handful known to have survived – has been recovered during the excavation of a roofed theatre in the Roman town of Interamna Lirenas, near Monte Cassino, in Italy.
3h
Gizmodo
Surprising Rumors About Which Movie DC's Black Adam Could Show Up in First Image: DC Comics Guillermo del Toro discusses the future of his Fantastic Voyage adaptation. Legends of Tomorrow casts a Fringe star. Ben Affleck offers the briefest of updates on his future as the Batman. The Duffer brothers are already teasing Stranger Things ’ third season. Plus, new footage from Arrow and The Flash . To me, my spoilers! Suicide Squad 2 According to The Wrap , “two insiders fa
3h
Ingeniøren
Robotten Sophia er måske ikke så dum enddaEfter en begivenhedsfuld tur til Saudi-Arabien, ankom den humanoide robot Sophia til Web Summit i Lissabon. Her vakte både robotten og den farverige tyske AI-forsker Ben Goertzel behørig opsigt.
3h
Futurity.org
In the 16th century, sainthood began with an autopsy Autopsy was commonly used during the 16th and 17th centuries to determine sainthood, according to a new book that explores the connection between the spiritual and physical realms in Catholicism. During a 16th-century posthumous examination, the enlarged heart of recently deceased Fillipo Neri was found to have an enormous left ventricle and artery. It was so muscular, in fact, that two of Neri’s
3h
Feed: All Latest
Amazon Cloud Cam Review: Get Alexa to Watch Over Your HouseKeep an electronic eye on your home with the help of Amazon's Alexa.
3h
Feed: All Latest
'Call of Duty: WWII' Review: It Shares a Premise With the Series' Best Games, But Not the PlayThe juggernaut series' newest game apes the pedigree of its best ones, but fails to do anything new—or to even do the old stuff half as well as it used to.
3h
Ars Technica
In-depth study: Commercial cargo program a bargain for NASA Enlarge / The first Cygnus commercial cargo spacecraft built by Orbital Sciences Corp. flew to the International Space Station in 2013. (credit: NASA) It has generally been assumed that NASA will save money by spurring the development of services by US companies to supply the International Space Station, but such conclusions have largely been based on estimates. Now, a rigorous new review authore
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Condensation-based method could create stable nanoscale emulsionsThe reluctance of oil and water to mix together and stay that way is so well-known that it has become a cliché for describing any two things that do not go together well. Now, a new finding from researchers at MIT might turn that expression on its head, providing a way to get the two substances to mix and remain stable for long periods—no shaking required. The process may find applications in phar
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mysterious 'geomagnetic spike' 3,000 years ago challenges our understanding of the Earth's interiorThe Earth's magnetic field, generated some 3,000km below our feet in the liquid iron core, threads through the whole planet and far into space – protecting life and satellites from harmful radiation from the sun. But this shielding effect is far from constant, as the field strength varies significantly in both space and time.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NUS-developed manta ray robot swims faster and operates up to 10 hoursResearchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) have created MantaDroid, an aquatic robot that emulates the swimming locomotion of manta rays. The robotic manta ray, which swims at the speed of twice its body length per second and can operate for up to 10 hours, could potentially be employed for underwater surveillance in future.
3h
Dagens Medicin
Sundhedsminister: Der sker ikke kun fejl, når der arbejdes hurtigt Sundhedsministeren afviser på et samråd, at der kun sker fejl i sundhedsvæsenet, fordi personalet arbejder hurtigt. Fejl kan reduceres med god arbejdstilrettelæggelse og ledelse, mener ministeren.
3h
Dagens Medicin
Kære sundhedsminister, vi har 13.500 underskrifter til digLæger efterlyser, at Ellen Trane Nørby tilkendegiver, hvordan læger kan overholde både etiske forpligtigelser overfor patienterne og juridiske forpligtigelser.
3h
New on MIT Technology Review
Advanced Nuclear Finds a More Welcome Home in CanadaAn early regulatory review may put Terrestrial Energy on track to commission the first fourth-generation reactor in North America.
3h
Science-Based Medicine
Risks of a Gluten-Free DietNon-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity does not seem to be a real entity according the current evidence, but this has not stopped the gluten-free fad, which may be causing real harm.
3h
Viden
Snapchat: Vores app er for svær at brugeFirmaet vil nu ændre brugerfladen radikalt for at tiltrække nye brugere.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Accretion theory suggests gas giants might start out as steamy worlds(Phys.org)—John Chambers, a planetary scientist with the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism at Carnegie Institution has suggested a new theory regarding the formation of gas giant planets. In his paper uploaded to the preprint server arXiv, soon to be published in the Astrophysical Journal, he describes his theory and its possible implications.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The climate science report Trump hoped to ignore will resonate outside of Washington, DCLast week, without comment, the White House published a study officially titled the Climate Science Special Report. Contrary to many statements and positions articulated by President Trump, members of his Cabinet, his surrogates and his supporters, the report clearly states that Earth's climate is changing, and "it is extremely likely that human influence has been the dominant cause of the observe
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China and the US are both shooting for the moon – but don't call it a space raceOn the face of it, it looks like two of the world's biggest powers are racing to get astronauts back on the lunar surface. China is aiming to land crew on the moon by 2036, while on the other side of the Pacific, US vice president, Mike Pence, has announced that the US will return there too. But declaring that a new space race is underway is probably the single quickest way to irritate space polic
3h
Scientific American Content: Global
A Female General's Climb up the Air Force LadderMy journey to four stars was inspired by one very strong-willed heart -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Trouble with Fish StockingStocking rivers and lakes with game fish is good for anglers. But it is wreaking ecological havoc -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global
Does Success Come Mostly from Talent, Hard Work--or Luck?Does it come from talent, hard work—or luck? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Droplet friction found to be similar to that of solid objects(Phys.org)—A team of researchers working at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research has found through experimentation that friction in sliding drops is similar in some ways to that of solid objects. In their paper published in the journal Nature Physics, the group describes experiments they conducted in their lab with drops on solid surfaces and what they learned from them.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fully integrated circuits printed directly onto fabricResearchers have successfully incorporated washable, stretchable and breathable electronic circuits into fabric, opening up new possibilities for smart textiles and wearable electronics. The circuits were made with cheap, safe and environmentally friendly inks, and printed using conventional inkjet printing techniques.
3h
Science : NPR
The Interdependence Of Humanity And Earth We owe our existence to little photosynthetic bacteria — but there is much more to this story, as life can only mutate and adapt when the planet offers the right conditions, says Marcelo Gleiser. (Image credit: Auscape/UIG via Getty Images)
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Futurity.org
A.I. system finds cracks in nuclear reactors A new system that uses artificial intelligence to find cracks captured in videos of nuclear reactors could help reduce accidents as well as maintenance costs, researchers report. “Regular inspection of nuclear power plant components is important to guarantee safe operations,” says Mohammad R. Jahanshahi, an assistant professor in the Lyles School of Civil Engineering at Purdue University. “Howeve
4h
Dana Foundation
Cerebrum Podcasts Feature Top Neuroscientists Since May of 2016, I’ve had the good fortune to interview the authors of our monthly Cerebrum articles for a podcast . Why a podcast? We suspect that visitors to Dana Foundation website —with already quite a bit to read—would welcome an audio option. We also thought it would be valuable to hear some of the top researchers in the field offer their opinions and explain some of the complex advances
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Dagens Medicin
Læge varslet bortvist for ikke at ville på kursus i SundhedsplatformenOverlæge fra distrikspsykiatrien nægter at følge kurser i at bruge Sundhedsplatformen.
4h
Dagens Medicin
Rigsrevisionen starter fuld undersøgelse af SundhedsplatformenEfter at forundersøgelsen er færdig har Rigsrevisionen besluttet at gennemføre en fuld undersøgelse af Sundhedsplatformen.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nickel-78 confirmed to be doubly magic(Phys.org)—Two teams of researchers working independently of one another and using wildly different approaches have confirmed nickel-78 to be doubly magic. In the first effort, an international team led by Louis Olivier with the National Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics produced a copper-79 nucleus and used it as a framework for describing nickel-78. In the second effort, a team with memb
4h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
The bitter battle over the world’s most popular insecticides As regulators consider a ban on neonicotinoids, debate rages over the harm they cause to bees. Nature 551 156 doi: 10.1038/551156a
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Futurity.org
Research teams with women more likely to consider sex and gender When women contribute to medical research, that research is more likely to include consideration of sex and gender, including the differences between the way men and women react to diseases and treatments, research shows. The paper also explores increasing the participation of women in medical research and the resulting quality of the research in terms of accounting for diversity. “If you don’t i
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Popular Science
Do you know enough basic anatomy to keep yourself healthy? It's time to find out. Health Because most people don't. Most people couldn't tell you where their diaphragm is, even though we us it—consciously—every day.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cleaning up aquatic pollution with musselsScientists and activists alike have been looking for a solution to the problem of aquatic nutrient pollution. Now one group reports in Environmental Science & Technology that ribbed mussels are up to the clean-up challenge.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Better, bolder printing with silicon nanostructuresFrom textbooks to artwork to newspapers, printed items are a part of our everyday life. But the ink used in today's printers are limited in colors and resolution. Now in a new study in ACS' journal Nano Letters, scientists have found a way to expand the printable color spectrum with a novel nanostructure system.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study lists foods for fighting rheumatoid arthritis symptoms and progressionScientists propose a list of foods that can help patients manage rheumatoid arthritis, based on a new comprehensive review of foods with proven long-term beneficial effects on inflammation, joint stiffness and pain, joint destruction and oxidative stress.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cooling in high and mid-latitudes led to aridification in Northern AfricaIt is one of the driest regions of the Earth, yet, in a cave in the Egyptian Sahara, researchers have found paintings depicting people swimming. This stone-age art is thought to be up to ten thousand years old and falls into the so-called African Humid Period between 11,500 and 5,500 years before now. Climate scientists still puzzle about the rapidity of aridification and the climate processes tha
4h
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Review: LG V30We review the LG V30, an understated phone that can go toe-to-toe with the best Android devices.
4h
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Meet the Woman Making Uber's Self-Driving Cars Smarter, CheaperRaquel Urtasun, head of Uber's autonomous-vehicle lab, believes cameras can replace expensive lidar in steering cars.
4h
Feed: All Latest
Keanu Reeves Unveils 3 New Arch Motorcycles at EICMA 2017With his partner Gard Hollinger, the man from The Matrix has created a trio of custom two-wheelers.
4h
The Atlantic
Washington, D.C., Is Home to America's Largest Collection of Parasites Anna Phillips is delighted because I’ve just found her favorite parasite, which she had misplaced a year ago. We are walking through what, at first glance, could be mistaken for an oddly macabre Italian deli. The shelves around us are full of chaotically arrayed jars, which contain what look like formless bits of meat and coiled balls of pasta. But this is actually part of the largest collection
4h
The Atlantic
Why There Are Pop-Ups for Everything Now The term pop-up , most often used to mean a small, temporary shop for selling or showing off products, first cropped up in the early 2000s. It’s since been applied far beyond traditional retail. There are pop-up pizzerias , Game of Thrones bars , concert-merch outlets (followed by pop-up concerts ), Pop-Tarts bars , cat cafés , even—for pop-ups need no longer be material—pop-up email newsletters
4h
The Atlantic
Placebo Effect of the Heart A doctor stands over you and feeds a long wire up the inside of your body, from your groin into your heart. You are conscious and comfortable, if not necessarily calm. For nearly half a century, cardiologists have been performing angioplasty, or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The point is to open up arteries that have become clogged and hardened by years of life—to reverse and improve
4h
The Atlantic
The Computer Scientist Who Prefers Paper F or years, Barbara Simons was the loneliest of Cassandras—a technologist who feared what technology had wrought. Her cause was voting: Specifically, she believed that the electronic systems that had gained favor in the United States after the 2000 presidential election were shoddy, and eminently hackable. She spent years publishing opinion pieces in obscure journals with titles like Municipal Wo
4h
Dagens Medicin
Svendborg-sagen skal prøves ved Højesteret Procesbevillingsnævnet har givet grønt lys for, at den såkaldte Svendborg-sag kommer for Højesteret. Lægeforeningen er tilfredse.
4h
Viden
145 mio. år gammel mus er måske menneskets forfaderForskere har fundet ældgamle fossiler fra den gren af pattedyr, der førte til mennesker.
4h
Futurity.org
This molecule may stop glaucoma’s progress Naturally occurring molecules known as lipid mediators could potentially halt the progress of glaucoma, new research suggests. “We know of no drug that can do this.” The world’s second-leading cause of blindness, glaucoma is a neurodegenerative disease in which fluid buildup in the frontal eye causes irreversible damage to the optic nerve and vision loss. At present, there is no cure for glaucoma
4h
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Guess Whose LegScientists have developed a computer tomography device capable of visualizing objects at nanoscale.
4h
Scientific American Content: Global
Is Addiction a Disease?The current medical consensus about addiction may very well be wrong -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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cognitive science
How Our Brains Dream submitted by /u/OestlundMartin [link] [comments]
4h
Gizmodo
Welcome Back, Clear The Rack, Welcome Back Clear the Rack Yes, it’s already happening again. Nordstrom Rack has brought back their Clear the Rack sale and it’s full (and I mean FULL) of really incredible deals. Designer clothing, brands you’ve never heard of, everything in clearance an extra 25% off . This lasts through Sunday, so you have a good amount of time to pick up some discounts. More Deals
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cognitive science
The Trauma after the Storm. Following hurricanes and other major disasters comes another wave of trouble: post traumatic stress submitted by /u/symonsymone [link] [comments]
4h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Sewing for NasaFrom the Apollo spacesuits to the Mars rovers, women behind the scenes have stitched vital spaceflight components.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Liquid shock absorbersRemarkable liquid materials called colloids stiffen under impact. Researchers funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation have studied the effect of powerful impacts such as those produced by firearms or micrometeorites.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A gel that does not break or dry outResearchers have developed a highly robust gel that includes large amounts of ionic liquid. The research team was led by Professor MATSUYAMA Hideto and Assistant Professor KAMIO Eiji (Kobe University Graduate School of Science, Center for Membrane and Film Technology). These findings were published on November 8 in Advanced Materials.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gender roles in ancient timesTwo new studies by Osaka University researchers provide insights on why male and female bodies of the same species differ. The studies show factors that regulate the expression of doublesex1, a gene responsible for the growth of male traits in the ancient crustacean Daphnia magna and the subsequent spatial expression of doublesex1 in embryo development. The studies provide information on how the e
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A robotic spy among the fishA new miniature robot developed by EPFL researchers can swim with fish, learn how they communicate with each other and make them change direction or come together. These capabilities have been proven on schools of zebrafish.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Graphene performs under pressureScientists at The University of Manchester have fabricated highly miniaturised pressure sensors using graphene membranes which can detect minute changes in pressure with high sensitivity, over a wide range of operating pressures.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Targeting a single protein might treat a broad range of virusesMost drugs that fight viruses are designed to target individual pathogens. But scientists at The Rockefeller University have identified a protein that a broad range of viruses require to spread within a host—a discovery that could lead to fighting viruses as varied as parainfluenza, West Nile, and Zika with a single drug.
4h
Ingeniøren
Rækkevidde på 1.000 km: Firma vil ombygge Teslaer til brintEt hollandsk firma vil tilbyde Tesla-ejere, der ønsker større rækkevidde, en ombygning af deres biler.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facing uncertain future, fossil fuel workers want retraining in renewablesA top talking point at the United Nations climate talks in Bonn, Germany, this month is President Donald Trump's plan to withdraw the United States from the Paris Agreement. The decision follows Trump's campaign commitment to get coal miners back to work.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Can you make a 10-year malt whisky in weeks? The chemistry says yesOver the past few years the whisky-drinking world has been introduced to several new products that claim to produce high-quality liquor in just a fraction of the time usually required to age single malt spirits. Instead of maturing the whisky for a decade or more in oak barrels, some distillers say they can replicate the quality and taste in a matter of weeks.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New architecture could prove essential for high-performance quantum photonic circuitsScientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and their collaborators have taken a new step forward in the quest to build quantum photonic circuits—chip-based devices that rely on the quantum properties of light to process and communicate information rapidly and securely.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New insights on 'captured' electrons could improve flash memoryAn entirely new model of the way electrons are briefly trapped and released in tiny electronic devices suggests that a long-accepted, industry-wide view is just plain wrong about the way these captured electrons affect the behavior of hardware components such as flash memory cells.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Bursts' of beta waves, not sustained rhythms, filter sensory processing in brainScientists at Brown University have found that people and mice alike use brief bursts of beta brainwaves, rather than sustained rhythms, to control attention and perception.
5h
Feed: All Latest
Venture Capital's Messiest Breakup: The Inside Story of the XfundThe Xfund venture capital firm started with a bold idea and ended with one of its founders banished from the country. Here's how it all went so wrong.
5h
Feed: All Latest
Snapchat to Redesign Its App Following Disappointing ResultsSnap reports fewer users, less revenue than expected, says it plans redesign of signature Snapchat app.
5h
Feed: All Latest
In Startup World, No Shock Over Yuri Milner Role in Paradise PapersOffshore-banking documents called the Paradise Papers reveal Russian investor Yuri Milner has close ties to the Kremlin. Entrepreneurs and VCs say it’s not something they could have known.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
You may be sick of worrying about online privacy, but 'surveillance apathy' is also a problemWe all seem worried about privacy. Though it's not only privacy itself we should be concerned about: it's also our attitudes towards privacy that are important.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chinese icebreaker steams for Antarctica in polar power playThe Chinese ice-breaker Xuelong steamed south from Shanghai on Wednesday bound for Antarctica, where it will establish China's newest base as Beijing strives to become a polar power.
5h
The Guardian's Science Weekly
Running smart: the science of completing a marathon – Science Weekly podcastHannah Devlin discusses the limits of human performance with sports scientist Professor John Brewer and amateur marathon runner Vicky Solly
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Science | The Guardian
Running smart: the science of completing a marathon – Science Weekly podcast Hannah Devlin discusses the limits of human performance with sports scientist Professor John Brewer and amateur marathon runner Vicky Solly Subscribe & Review on iTunes , Soundcloud , Audioboom , Mixcloud & Acast , and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter In May of this year, Kenyan long-distance runner Eliud Kipchoge attempted to run a marathon in under two hours – something nobody has do
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers devise an algorithm to combat gerrymanderingAs the Supreme Court considers Gill v. Whitford, a challenge to the practice of partisan gerrymandering that may rewrite the rules used to draw congressional districts, a team of computer scientists has come up with a new algorithmic approach to redistricting that's less political and more mathematical.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EU pushes cut in car emissions, boost for electric vehiclesThe European Commission said Wednesday it wants to cut emissions of carbon dioxide from cars by 30 percent by 2030, and boost the use of electric vehicles by making them cheaper and easier to charge.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ford, Chinese partner form electric car ventureFord Motor Co. announced Wednesday that it is launching a venture with a Chinese partner to develop electric vehicles for sale in China, the biggest market for the technology.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Uber reaches for the skies with plan for sleek flying taxiCommuters of the future could get some relief from congested roads if Uber's plans for flying taxis work out.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
We should use central pressure deficit, not wind speed, to predict hurricane damageThe system for categorizing hurricanes accounts only for peak wind speeds, but research published in Nature Communications explains why central pressure deficit is a better indicator of economic damage from storms in the United States.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Religious belief 'not linked to intuition or rational thinking': studyReligious beliefs are not linked to intuition or rational thinking, according to new research by the universities of Coventry and Oxford.
5h
Feed: All Latest
Tech Companies Are Seeing the End of the Cult of the FounderTech companies today are facing incredibly complex problems. Wunderkind founders might not be the best people to solve them.
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Feed: All Latest
Silicon Valley Benefits from Founder-Led CompaniesSometimes, bringing in an MBA for "adult supervision" can kill vision and ambition in Silicon Valley.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Paradoxes in microbial economiesMicrobes can produce many of the metabolic resources they need to survive. But because they have permeable cell walls, those resources can leak out into the surrounding environment. Since microbes often live in communities with many other types of microbes, they can also take in the metabolic resources that other microbes have leaked. And, they can respond to their environments, shifting what and
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tracking collars uncover the secrets of baboons' raiding tacticsScientists from Swansea University are part of an international team who have revealed how canny baboons in Cape Town, South Africa, use a sit-and-wait tactic before raiding people's homes in search of food.
5h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Human study supports theory on why dengue can be worse the next time aroundThe amount of dengue antibodies leftover in the blood may up the chances of a severe second dengue infection, a study finds.
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Dagens Medicin
Flest danskere dør fortsat af kræftSelvom dødeligheden af kræft er faldende, er det stadig den sygdomsgruppe, som flest danskerne dør af, viser årsrapporten Dødsårssagsregistret 2016
5h
Dagens Medicin
Baltimore, 2250 DanmarkDe interventioner, vi gennemfører for at få borgerne til at håndtere deres sygdom, er præget af en antagelse om en indsigt, der næppe findes.
5h
The Atlantic
Syria Is Joining the Paris Agreement. Now What? It’s official. When it comes to climate change, there’s now literally everyone else—and then there’s the United States. Syria, the last remaining holdout from the Paris Agreement on climate change, announced at a United Nations meeting in Germany Tuesday that it will sign the agreement. The Syrian Arab News Agency, a state-sponsored news outlet, also reported that the country’s legislature voted
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Virtual farm' website provides a plethora of dairy sustainability informationChanging weather patterns pose significant challenges for modern dairy farmers—excessive hot or cold temperatures, drought and humidity can have a detrimental effect on cows' health, which ultimately can lead to decreased milk production.
5h
Live Science
Women Who Use IUDs May Have Lower Risk of Cervical CancerWomen who use an intrauterine device for birth control may have a lower risk of developing cervical cancer, according to a new review and meta-analysis.
5h
Live Science
How Big Is the 'Alien Megastructure'?Any aliens building around Tabby's star would have to be thinking very big.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers take aim at invasive, 'pernicious' spotted lanternflyAs populations of the invasive spotted lanternfly explode—and the state-imposed quarantine area in southeastern Pennsylvania expands—researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences are looking for solutions to help stop the insect's spread and save agricultural crops from serious damage.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Neutron spectroscopy reveals common 'oxygen sponge' catalyst soaks up hydrogen tooHaving the right tool for the job enabled scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and their collaborators to discover that a workhorse catalyst of vehicle exhaust systems—an "oxygen sponge" that can soak up oxygen from air and store it for later use in oxidation reactions—may also be a "hydrogen sponge."
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dozens of new wildlife corridors identified for African mammalsResearchers at the University of California, Davis, have identified 52 potential wildlife corridors linking protected areas across Tanzania. Using a cost-effective combination of interviews with local residents and a land conversion dataset for East Africa, they found an additional 23 corridors over those previously identified by Tanzanian government reports.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Space station crew sees lots of clouds over SudanExpedition 53 Flight Engineer Paolo Nespoli of the European Space Agency (ESA) photographed cloudy skies over Sudan during an International Space Station flyover on Oct. 22, 2017.
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Feed: All Latest
The Lean Startup Pioneer Wants Everyone to Think Like a FounderEric Ries won Silicon Valley fame for his Lean Startup techniques. Now, he wants to apply them everywhere.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
Here's How Drones Do (and Don't) Threaten Passenger AircraftQuadcopter crashes with a helicopter and plane—the first-ever in the U.S. and Canada, respectively—show that such encounters are no longer hypothetical -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chimpanzees and sooty mangabeys interfere with other group members' relationshipsHumans do not only form complex and long-lasting social relationships with friends, family, and romantic partners, but also keep track of threats to these relationships and protect them jealously against outsiders. We also observe changes in the relationships around us and try to prevent alliances that could harm us in the long run. Researcher of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropol
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Vega launches Earth observation satellite for MoroccoArianespace has launched a Vega rocket to deliver an Earth observation satellite into orbit for the Kingdom of Morocco.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Veterinarians caution that antifreeze is poisonous to pets and humansAs it gets colder, more people will take out the antifreeze to keep their radiator from freezing, but the brightly colored liquid can cause more harm than good for pets and children alike.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop flexible, stretchable photonic devicesResearchers at MIT and several other institutions have developed a method for making photonic devices—similar to electronic devices but based on light rather than electricity—that can bend and stretch without damage. The devices could find uses in cables to connect computing devices, or in diagnostic and monitoring systems that could be attached to the skin or implanted in the body, flexing easily
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Stressed seedlings in spaceLife on Earth has a myriad of problems, but gravity isn't one of them – staying grounded means organisms can soak up the light and heat that enables growth.
5h
Science | The Guardian
Is it weird to be talking to myself so much? | Notes and queries The long-running series in which readers answer other readers’ questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific concepts I seem to spend a lot of time talking to myself. From murmuring back to myself as I read or type, to having full practice conversations (that I will never actually have) in the shower. Is this normal? I doubt it. But do other people do it? Toni
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study bolsters theory of heat source under AntarcticaA new NASA study adds evidence that a geothermal heat source called a mantle plume lies deep below Antarctica's Marie Byrd Land, explaining some of the melting that creates lakes and rivers under the ice sheet. Although the heat source isn't a new or increasing threat to the West Antarctic ice sheet, it may help explain why the ice sheet collapsed rapidly in an earlier era of rapid climate change,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mice in social conflict show rule-observance behaviorHumans have learned to live together by solving most conflicts with compromises and rules rather than aggression. But how did this evolve in the first place? But do animals learn to set up new social rules? A new study from the Center for Cognition and Sociality shows that laboratory mice establish rules that provide equal long-term rewards, even if this requires a certain degree of tolerance and
6h
Dagens Medicin
Ellen Trane, jeg undrer migJeg håber, at ministeren vil se fornuftigt på journalføringsloven.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Modeling strategy allows scientists to explore ways to limit warming, reduce side effectsUsing a sophisticated computer model, scientists have demonstrated for the first time that a new research approach to geoengineering could potentially be used to limit Earth's warming to a specific target while reducing some of the risks and concerns identified in past studies, including uneven cooling of the globe.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Theoretical physicists model complex quantum processes with cold atoms and ionsA group of researchers from Russia, Germany and Iran have developed computational methods toward a theory describing the behavior of cold atoms and ions in optical and electromagnetic traps. Such methods could allow modeling with completely controlled quantum systems of complex processes in solid-state physics and high-energy physics. Other possible applications include designing elements of a qua
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mechanochemistry paves the way to higher quality perovskite photovoltaicsFor several years, tension has been rising in line with the approaching commercialization of perovskite photovoltaic cells. Now, researchers have developed devices based on these materials that can convert solar energy into electricity even more efficiently by producing perovskites via grinding rather than conventional methods.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biological consequences of climate change on epidemics may be scale-dependentConventional thinking holds that current climate warming will increase the prevalence and transmission of disease. However, a recent study led by Prof. ZHANG Zhibin of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Prof. Nils Christian Stenseth of the University of Oslo in Norway show that the impact of climate change on the prevalence of epidemics may be scale dependent.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Open digital mapping for assessing carbon storage in tropical peatlandsSoil researchers from Sydney, Australia, and Bogor, Indonesia demonstrate that tropical peatland can be mapped accurately using freely-available remote sensing data using open source software.
6h
Live Science
Amazing Physics: How 245 People Jumped Off a Bridge at Once — and SurvivedHow did 245 people jump off a bridge in Brazil, while attached to ropes, and survive? Here's the physics behind the daring feat.
6h
Live Science
Doggone: Your Best Friend Is Red-Green ColorblindIf you're ever deciding between throwing a red ball or a green ball for your dog to fetch, know this: It doesn't matter to Fido because dogs are red-green colorblind, a new small study suggests.
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Live Science
That's Baa-rack! Sheep Can ID Obama, Other CelebsA recent study showed that sheep could be trained to recognize people from photos — including actress Emma Watson and former U.S. President Barack Obama.
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Ingeniøren
Store konsulenthuse fra hele landet søger ingeniører På dagens liste finder du firmaer som Rambøll, Netcompany, Cowi, Sweco og Teknologisk Institut, der alle jagter dygtige konsulentkræfter. Find det rette job for dig. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/store-konsulenthuse-hele-landet-soeger-ingenioerer-it-folk-10379 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
6h
Ingeniøren
Banedanmark undlod at opkræve bøder for to års forsinkelse af nyt signalsystemBanedanmark har ret til at opkræve bøder fra entreprenørerne oven på de store forsinkelser i den landsdækkende signaludskiftning, men har undladt at gøre det for ikke at »flytte fokus fra et konstruktivt samarbejde«, viser centrale dokumenter.
6h
The Atlantic
David Boies's Complicated Conflicts The New York Times said on Tuesday night that it had severed its ties with David Boies, one of the country’s most prominent litigators, after he was linked to a clandestine effort to spy on the newspaper’s reporters and prevent the publication of a damaging story about disgraced Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein. “We never contemplated that the law firm would contract with an intelligence firm
6h
The Atlantic
America's Crisis of Courage The American crisis is, at its root, a crisis of character. Yes, many other forces and phenomena are in play: the crash of 2008; technologically driven changes to the economy; gerrymandering and sociological divisions between coast and heartland, urban and rural life; cultural clashes over the norms of marriage, drug use, and religious liberty; wars that have not gone well; the splintering of nat
6h
The Atlantic
Grading President Trump Supporters of President Trump like to say that despite all the tumult, the commander in chief is doing just fine. While the pundits rant and rave about whatever the “unprecedented” action of the day happens to be as he seems to move from one scandal to the next, the president’s allies dismiss the fireworks as nothing more than passing noise. Even many cynical Democrats conclude in frustration tha
6h
Ingeniøren
Ministerium erkender: 2020-energikrav til nye bygninger er langt fra rentableBygningsklasse 2020 bliver ikke gjort obligatorisk for nybyggeri. Det skriver Bygningsministeriet i en ny evaluering, som understreger, at det ikke betaler sig at gøre 2020-kravene lovpligtige.
7h
Ingeniøren
DTU-professor: Sådan kommer din virksomhed i gang med grafenHvis din virksomheder står og savner det ekstra teknologiske indspark, som skal bringe jer foran konkurrenterne, så var det måske en idé at se nærmere på grafen.
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Ingeniøren
Virksomheder: »Grafen skal give os et forspring«Grafen kan være det stof danske virksomheders fremtidige succes er gjort af, mener i hvert fald to virksomheder, der allerede udvikler produkter med stoffet.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tracking collars uncover the secrets of baboons' raiding tacticsNew research shows how canny baboons in Cape Town use a sit-and-wait tactic before raiding people's homes in search of food.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cooling in high and mid-latitudes led to aridification in Northern AfricaAnalyses of ancient plant leaf wax found in the sediments of the Gulf of Guinea told the researchers about rainfall in Cameroon and the central Sahel-Sahara over the past several millennia and showed a rapid aridification around 5500 years before now.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Paradoxes in microbial economiesIn a new paper in Nature Communications, three Santa Fe Institute researchers describe a trio of paradoxical dynamics that can arise in simple microbial economies. The work could be important for approaching engineered microbial communities and better understanding microbiomes.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
We should use central pressure deficit, not wind speed, to predict hurricane damageNew research provides a physical understanding for why central pressure deficit is a better indicator of economic damage from hurricanes than peak wind speed.
7h
The Atlantic
A 'Warped and Degrading' Culture in Westminster On Sunday, Downing Street announced the resignation of Chris Pincher, the Conservative parliamentarian and government whip, over allegations that he made an unwanted advance towards former Olympic rower and Tory activist Alex Story. “Whatever may or may not have happened or been said was obviously many years before I became an MP,” Pincher said of the allegations. “If Mr. Story has ever felt offe
7h
Science : NPR
Pavlovian Conditioning And Marriage A new study finds that people who looked at positive images of things like puppies next to a pictures of their spouses went on to have more positive feelings toward their spouses.
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Science : NPR
Potential Trump Adviser Suggests Climate Change Regulations Are Communist Conspiracy President Trump has tapped a former Texas regulator to be his senior adviser on environmental policy. Like a string of other controversial picks, she questions the science behind climate change.
7h
Dagens Medicin
Praktiserende læge i Vejle åbner klinik med hjælp fra Falck Falck har fundet to læger og leveret it-system til praksis i Vejle, hvilket gjorde det muligt for Peder Anhfeldt-Mollerup at få etableret klinikken på godt en måned.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Malaysia rescues 140 pangolins from suspected smugglersDozens of live pangolins were seized from suspected traffickers close to Malaysia's border with Thailand, officials said Wednesday, thwarting the latest attempt to smuggle the critically endangered creatures.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Snapchat and Twitter adopting new looks to gain more usersA pair of struggling social-media darlings have decided they need to take on new looks if they want to prosper.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
FBI again finds itself unable to unlock a gunman's cellphoneThe Texas church massacre is providing a familiar frustration for law enforcement: FBI agents are unable to unlock the gunman's encrypted cellphone to learn what evidence it might hold.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Walking beaches, volunteers amass data on dead seabirdsBarbara Patton scans the expansive beach on Washington's outer coast looking for telltale signs of dead seabirds: a feather sticking straight up, dark colors in the sand, unusual seaweed clumps that could mask a carcass.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
France to oppose EU's 5-year renewal for weedkiller glyphosateFrance will oppose a European Commission proposal to renew authorisation for controversial weedkiller glyphosate for five years instead of 10, saying Wednesday the new cutoff should be three years.
7h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Dark-matter hunt fails to find the elusive particles Physicists begin to embrace alternative explanations for the missing material. Nature 551 153 doi: 10.1038/551153a
8h
Ingeniøren
»AI kan blive det bedste, som er sket for menneskeheden – eller det værste«Hverken deltagerne eller oplægsholderne på årets Web Summit er i tvivl: Robotter og kunstig intelligens er de vigtigste emner, når det gælder fremtidens teknologi.
8h
Ars Technica
Doctor with no computer skills vows to battle medical board in court Enlarge (credit: Jeffrey Greenberg/UIG via Getty Images ) Dr. Anna Konopka, the 84-year-old New Hampshire physician who recently lost her medical license in part due to a lack of computer skills , has an uphill battle ahead of her. In two lengthy phone interviews with Ars on Tuesday, Konopka said if she is reinstated by the state's medical board—at this point, a big if—she would be willing to lea
8h
Popular Science
China's future satellite navigation will be millimeter accurate Eastern Arsenal The Beidou 3 will guide military munitions and drones. Updates to the Chinese Beidou satellite navigation system will result in super accurate guidance for military users, like guided munitions and drones.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lifeline trails restored to Nepal's quake-hit villagesAs the dust settled from Nepal's massive earthquake, a fresh humanitarian crisis was just beginning: supply lines to remote communities had been destroyed, and villagers were starving.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hunting Africa's Einstein with a science lab on wheelsA dozen other students look on as Umar Amadu uses a glass pipette to draw a solution from a conical flask as part of a chemistry experiment.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Snap shares dive as loss widensShares of Snapchat parent Snap plunged Tuesday after reporting a widening loss and user numbers that fell short of market expectations.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Could the peatlands of Congo be a carbon bomb?Gruelling talks are unfolding in Bonn for implementing the UN's Paris Agreement on climate change, but many kilometres (miles) away, there are fears that any progress may be wiped out by a lurking carbon threat.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Schools shut as toxic smog hits DelhiDelhi shut all primary schools on Wednesday as pollution hit 70 times the World Health Organization's safe level, prompting doctors in the Indian capital to warn of a public health emergency.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wind turbine breaks apart at Australia Antarctic baseThe blades of a wind turbine at an Australian Antarctic base broke off and narrowly missed a storage building as they crashed to the ground, officials said Wednesday, forcing the icy outpost to switch to backup power.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The revolt of the Rust Belt may explain Trump's electionA new British Journal of Sociology article explains that Donald Trump's victory was less about the candidate himself and more about a rejection of the Democratic Party by white and black working-class voters across the Rust Belt.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Improving climate observations offers major return on investmentA well-designed climate observing system could help scientists answer knotty questions about climate while delivering trillions of dollars in benefits by providing decision makers information they need to protect public health and the economy in the coming decades, according to a new paper published today.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researcher sees huge carbon sink in soil mineralsA Washington State University researcher has discovered that vast amounts of carbon can be stored by soil minerals more than a foot below the surface. The finding could help offset the rising greenhouse-gas emissions helping warm the Earth's climate.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researcher finds that when sperm compete, eggs have a choiceThe delicately mannered dance between discerning eggs and vying sperm is more complicated than scientists once believed, and it may hold secrets about the evolution of new species.
10h
BBC News - Science & Environment
The dog that orbited the EarthThe first living creature to be sent into orbit around the Earth was a Soviet stray dog called Laika. She was a pioneer of the space race.
10h
Ingeniøren
»Jeg har hørt topchefer sige, it-sikkerhedschefer skal hyres, så de kan fyres« Det er på tide at få en diskussion omkring, hvordan bestyrelser, ledere, politikere og samfundet forstår it-sikkerhed, mener koncernsikkerhedschef i Tryg https://www.version2.dk/artikel/jeg-har-hoert-topchefer-sige-it-sikkerhedschefer-skal-hyres-saa-de-kan-fyres-1082201 Version2
11h
The Scientist RSS
LabQuiz: Stem Cells - From Bench to BedsideCell therapy is now a reality. Time to brush up on stem cells!
11h
Science | The Guardian
Dick Gordon, Apollo 12 astronaut, dies aged 88 ‘Cool guy and best possible crewmate’ Richard F Gordon Jr piloted orbiting command module while Alan Bean and Charles Conrad explored moon’s surface The Apollo 12 astronaut Richard “Dick” F Gordon Jr, one of a dozen men who flew to the moon but didn’t land, has died aged 88. Gordon was a test pilot when he was chosen for Nasa’s third group of astronauts in 1963. He flew on Gemini 11 in 1966, walk
11h
Viden
Fejlslagen forskning får ny prisVidenskaben vrimler med priser. Nu kommer der én, som belønner resultater, der ikke falder ud som forventet og håbet.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
WSU researcher sees huge carbon sink in soil mineralsA Washington State University researcher has discovered that vast amounts of carbon can be stored by soil minerals more than a foot below the surface. The finding could help offset the rising greenhouse-gas emissions helping warm the Earth's climate.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A 'virtual wall' that improves wireless security and performanceAn inexpensive device could finally solve the problem of improving wireless signal strength and security for indoor spaces with multiple rooms.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Improving climate observations offers major return on investmentA well-designed climate observing system could help scientists answer knotty questions about climate while delivering trillions of dollars in benefits by providing decision makers information they need to protect public health and the economy in the coming decades.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Parental sexual orientation and children's psychological well-beingIn a Child Development study of 21,103 children aged 4-17 years, those with lesbian and gay parents did not differ from children of heterosexual parents in terms of emotional and mental health difficulties, as assessed on parental questionnaires.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Academic performance predicts risk of suicide attemptIn a recent Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica study, poor academic performance, measured as grade point average (GPA) at age 16, was a robust and strong predictor of suicide attempt up to middle age.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fat cells may inactivate chemotherapeutic drugAdipocytes, or fat cells, can absorb and metabolize the chemotherapeutic agent daunorubicin, reducing the effectiveness of the drug and potentially contributing to poorer treatment outcomes.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The revolt of the Rust Belt may explain Trump's electionA new British Journal of Sociology article explains that Donald Trump's victory was less about the candidate himself and more about a rejection of the Democratic Party by white and black working-class voters across the Rust Belt.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How science has shaped the international response to climate changeThe Royal Meteorological Society is publishing a special issue in Weather focused on the science of climatic change.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can lavender aromatherapy reduce anxiety in surgery patients?Lavender aromatherapy reduced preoperative anxiety in a study of ambulatory surgery patients undergoing procedures in general otolaryngology.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In vitro fertilization linked with increased risk of spontaneous preterm birthA new analysis of published studies found an approximate 80 percent increased risk of spontaneous preterm birth (both before 37 and 34 weeks) when women become pregnant via in vitro fertilization (IVF) than through spontaneous conception.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study reveals racial differences in the use of rehabilitation servicesIn a Journal of the American Geriatrics Society study of 6,309 community-dwelling Medicare enrollees (1,276 of whom reported receiving rehabilitation services in the previous 12 months), the likelihood of receiving rehabilitation services was 1.4-times greater in whites than in blacks.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New model may provide insights on neurocognitive disorders caused by HIVHIV infects certain cells in the brain called microglia, and infected microglia release toxic and inflammatory molecules that can impair or kill surrounding neurons.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Certain factors are linked to sleep disturbance in patients with diabetesIn a Journal of Advanced Nursing study of 90 adults with type 2 diabetes, female gender, elevated blood sugar levels, neuropathic pain, and fatigue were related to sleep disturbance, even after controlling for factors such as age, diabetes duration, depressive symptoms, and distress.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lupus linked with increased risk of dementiaA new International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry study indicates that the risk of dementia may be elevated in individuals with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune disease affecting a range of systems including the peripheral and central nervous system.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Low value surgical procedures should be avoided to reduce costs and improve patient careReducing the use of 'low value' interventions that deliver little benefit is vital to cut healthcare costs.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dietary isoflavones linked to increased risk of advanced prostate cancerDietary intake of isoflavones was linked with an elevated risk of advanced prostate cancer in a recent International Journal of Cancer study.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study identifies targets to lessen the effects of alcoholic liver diseaseChronic alcohol consumption causes abnormal fat accumulation in liver cells (steatosis) and liver fibrosis, which can lead to hepatitis, cirrhosis, and sometimes liver cancer. A new study in The American Journal of Pathology offers insights into the cellular aging that may trigger excessive fibrosis formation in the liver as well as possible means to inhibit these changes, which may lead to new th
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Infrared imaging better than touch at detecting defects in protective lead apronsInfrared thermal imaging is a much better detective, with 50 percent of study participants picking out all holes intentionally drilled into a test apron compared with just 6 percent of participants who detected the same defects using the tactile method, according to research published online Nov. 8, 2017 in Journal of the American College of Radiology.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Survey: Parents should be allowed to be present during trauma careA new national survey by Orlando Health Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children found that 90 percent of Americans think parents should be able to stay with their child during treatment of a life-threatening injury or condition. It's a policy that the hospital has had in place for years, but experts say this is still not the norm among pediatric trauma centers.
12h
Gizmodo
Secret Service Agent Who Stole Silk Road Bitcoins Sentenced to Two More Years for Stealing Even More Photo: AP Shaun Bridges, the 35-year-old Secret Service agent from Baltimore who was sentenced to 71 months in prison in 2016 for stealing over $800,000 in Bitcoin during a government investigation into notorious deep-web market Silk Road, has been sentenced to an additional two years in jail for money-laundering charges, Reuters reported . Per Ars Technica , the second set of charges pertained t
12h
Gizmodo
Do You Dare Disturb The Thing in the Apartment? Sam is dead asleep when her best friend Lindsay calls in a total panic, barely making sense and completely freaking out about the creature she swears she saw lurking in her bedroom. Was it night terrors? A bad reaction to a sleeping pill? Or... something far too nightmarish to comprehend? Lindsay’s absolutely against it, but Sam can’t resist heading right over to her place to investigate. John Wi
12h
Ingeniøren
Pris for at gøre ét lokomotiv klar til nye signaler: Op til syv mio. kr.Det er så dyrt at ombygge Europas tog, så de kan køre med det nye signalsystem ERTMS, at Banedanmark i januar undervurderede omkostningerne markant, viser revisionsrapport.
13h
Ingeniøren
Sådan løfter du engagementet blandt kollegerne Motivation er altafgørende for gode resultater. Jobfinder lister tre måder at løfte engagementet på projekthold. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/saadan-loefter-du-engagementet-blandt-kollegerne-10995 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
13h
The Atlantic
Voters Deliver Victories to Democrats—and a Rebuke to Trump What a difference a year makes. On the eve of the anniversary of Donald Trump’s surprise victory in the 2016 presidential election, Democrats in Virginia, New Jersey, and elsewhere notched a surprisingly robust round of victories Tuesday night in elections that have been widely interpreted as a referendum on the Trump presidency and a potential augur of the 2018 elections. The results in Virginia
13h
Scientific American Content: Global
Nearby Exoplanets Invigorate Search for E.T.SETI pioneer Jill Tarter and Berkeley researcher Dan Werthimer talk about how the discovery of nearby exoplanets is inspiring new efforts to gain info about these galactic neighbors. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
13h
Gizmodo
Instagram Is Trying to Get More 'Influencers' to Disclose Their Obvious Product Plugs Are Sponsored Photo: AP Facebook subsidiary Instagram, the Twitter for people who only want to tweet about how hot and rich they are, has long been overrun with paid product endorsements from both genuine celebrities and nebulously influential “influencers”—and so many of them have openly flaunted Federal Trade Commission rules requiring disclosures of paid endorsement deals that the FTC has begun to warn them
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Eating at night could increase risk of heart disease and diabetesEating during the night is associated with higher risk of heart disease and diabetes, and the body's 24-hour cycle is to blame, according to research published today in Experimental Physiology.
16h
New Scientist - News
Sheep learn to recognise celebrity faces from different anglesThe animals were as good as humans at recognising mugshots of the same celebs from different angles, showing sophisticated brain processing of imagery
16h
Popular Science
The physics keeping Star Wars' Cloud City afloat Entertainment And why it has a limited lifespan in the sky. Other planets tend to be less hospitable than Earth, so it makes sense that the imagination would go to an idealized, fully controllable environment like a floating…
16h
Science | The Guardian
Six Russians locked into 'spacecraft' for 17 days in moon flight simulation The three men and three women are the first group in a programme which will see teams spend up to a year in isolation Three men and three women were sealed in an artificial spacecraft unit in Moscow on Tuesday in a simulation of a 17-day flight to the moon, a preparation for long-term missions. The experiment is the first of several in the Sirius (Scientific International Research In a Unique ter
16h
Big Think
Why Do We Love Music? Music is our oldest and most cherished ritual. How we treat it is reflective of who we are. Read More
16h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Sheep 'can recognise human faces'University researchers trained sheep to recognise famous people, including Barack Obama and Fiona Bruce.
16h
Gizmodo
Any Advice For A New Drone Pilot? (Image Credit: Andrew P. Collins) The unmanned aerial vehicles, quadcopters and/or aerobats we all call “drones” have become so commonplace that you can pick one up in a drug store along with your toilet paper and candy. I have big dreams of flying a fancy one, but today my quest begins modestly. While I was off-roading across Peru last week, which you’ll hear a lot more about soon, my co-driver
16h
Gizmodo
Dress Up For the Holidays In Our Favorite Men's Button-Ups, Now Just $33 Each [Exclusive] Newbury Mills Shirts , 3 for $99 with promo code kinja330. All additional shirts $33 each. Update : Sold out on Amazon, but the code is also valid on Newbury Mills’ own site . Newbury Mills has quickly become one of our favorite shirt makers, with offerings that can be dressed up or down, worn tucked or untucked, and with or without a tie. They also resist wrinkles well and are 100% soft SUPIMA c
16h
Gizmodo
The Stunts of Hulu's New Action Comedy Future Man Look Both Goofy and Badass Image: Hulu Hulu’s Future Man premieres next week, and the Seth Rogan and Evan Goldberg-produced action comedy has just shared a new behind-the-scenes video. Its focus: the wild stunts we can expect from the show’s time-traveling warriors (as well as the fish-out-of-water character played by Josh Hutcherson). What’s really cool to see is the emphasis on practical effects. The show may be called F
16h
Futurity.org
Can stem cells restore hearing without causing cancer? Converting inner ear stem cells to auditory neurons could potentially reverse deafness, but the process also poses a cancer risk if the cells divide too quickly. Now, scientists know the transformation can be controlled, at least in a petri dish. “It’s a cautionary tale,” says Kelvin Y. Kwan, an assistant professor of cell biology and neuroscience at Rutgers University. “People say, ‘we’ll just p
17h
Futurity.org
Could having too many synapses contribute to autism? Some of autism’s symptoms may stem from malfunctioning communication between cells in the brain due to having more synapses than necessary, new research with mice suggests. “You might think that having more synapses would make the brain work better, but that doesn’t seem to be the case.” Researchers found that a defective gene linked to autism influences how neurons in the brain connect and commu
17h
Futurity.org
Wikipedia isn’t as democratic as you might think New research examines just who is adding to and editing the pages on the free online encyclopedia Wikipedia. Sorin Adam Matei, a professor in the Brian Lamb School of Communication at Purdue University, and Brian Britt, an assistant professor in the journalism and mass communication department at South Dakota State University, sought to define just who is providing the massive amount of content.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Call for Europe-wide screening of babies for heart defectsAll babies across Europe should be routinely screened for critical congenital heart defects (CCHD) within 24 hours of their birth, say a group of experts led by a University of Birmingham Professor and Honorary Consultant Neonatologist at Birmingham Women's Hospital.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quantum tunnelling in water opens the way to improved biosensingHydrogen-based solar energy storage and biosensing techniques could be dramatically improved after University of Sydney researchers show the validity of theory first proposed in 1931.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sheep are able to recognize human faces from photographsSheep can be trained to recognise human faces from photographic portraits -- and can even identify the picture of their handler without prior training -- according to new research from scientists at the University of Cambridge.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Height and weight evolved at different speeds in the bodies of our ancestorsThe largest study to date of body sizes over millions of years finds a 'pulse and stasis' pattern to hominin evolution, with surges of growth in stature and bulk occurring at different times. At one stage, our ancestors got taller around a million years before body mass caught up.
17h
Futurity.org
Order wine to suit your ‘vinotype’ instead of your entrée Wine drinkers generally fall into certain categories, called “vinotypes,” and servers or sommeliers offering wine pairings should be cognizant of these customer preferences, a new study suggests. “The palate rules—not someone else’s idea of which wine we should drink with our food…” Traditional wine and food pairings too often miss the mark—leaving people confused and intimidated—and should be sc
17h
Ars Technica
After admitting to new crime, ex-Secret Service agent sentenced to 2 years Shaun Bridges was captured by CCTV security cameras, leaving a Secret Service field office with a large bag. The government said the bag may have contained hard drives with keys needed to access his Bitstamp wallet. (credit: US Attorney's Office San Francisco ) SAN FRANCISCO—Former United States Secret Service agent Shaun Bridges was sentenced to an additional two years of prison on Tuesday. US D
17h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Face it: Sheep are just like us when it comes to recognizing peopleSheep trained to recognize celebrity faces demonstrate that the animals have face-recognition capabilities similar to humans and other primates.
17h
Science | The Guardian
Thousands with advanced cancer are surviving two years or more, data shows Figures from Macmillan Cancer Support and Public Health England show 17,000 people survived for several years with 10 types of stage 4 cancer Thousands of people in England with the most advanced stage of cancer are surviving for several years after diagnosis thanks to improved treatment and care, research shows. Macmillan Cancer Support and Public Health England’s (PHE) National Cancer Registrat
17h
Futurity.org
Afghan politics sway how textbooks portray women The way Afghan schoolbooks portray women and girls fluctuates sharply—from egalitarian to nearly nonexistent to largely traditional—depending on the regime in power. “In almost all other nations, if you look at gender representation in textbooks, the trend is progressive,” says coauthor Somaye Sarvarzade, who earned a master’s degree in international educational administration and policy analysis
17h
Science | The Guardian
Is it ... Baa-rack Obama? Sheep able to recognise celebrities, say neuroscientists Sheep able to distinguish pictures of celebrities from unfamiliar faces with near-human accuracy, with implications for research into Huntington’s disease It has all the makings of a pub quiz teaser: what do Barack Obama, Emma Watson, Jake Gyllenhaal and the British TV presenter Fiona Bruce have in common? The answer, courtesy of neuroscientists in Cambridge, is that all have been recognised by s
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Height and weight evolved at different speeds in the bodies of our ancestorsA wide-ranging new study of fossils spanning over four million years suggests that stature and body mass advanced at different speeds during the evolution of hominins - the ancestral lineage of which Homo sapiens alone still exist.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sheep are able to recognize human faces from photographsSheep can be trained to recognise human faces from photographic portraits - and can even identify the picture of their handler without prior training - according to new research from scientists at the University of Cambridge.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quantum tunnelling in water opens the way to improved biosensingResearchers at the University of Sydney have applied quantum techniques to understanding the electrolysis of water, which is the application of an electric current to H2O to produce the constituent elements hydrogen and oxygen.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Virtual driving instructor and close-to-reality driving simulatorChinese driving schools are currently experiencing a strong demand, the number of learner drivers is growing constantly. A new type of driving simulator based on a car modified for virtual training of learner drivers in advance and an automatic feedback is to help meet this demand. For the close-to-reality driving exercises, complex projection technology and virtual-reality hardware and software a
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Severely bleeding patients must receive lifesaving drug within minutes, not hoursMajor bleeds must be treated with tranexamic acid (TXA) as fast as possible since deaths occur quickly and the drug's life-saving benefits diminish with each passing minute, according to a new study published in The Lancet.
17h
Science | The Guardian
Rapid use of blood drug could save thousands of lives, study finds Analysis shows chance of death from blood loss is 70% less likely if cheap, widely used tranexamic acid is administered promptly Immediate treatment with a cheap and widely available clot-stabilising drug could save the lives of thousands of people each year, including women with severe bleeding after childbirth, a study has found. A meta-analysis of more than 40,000 patients found that the likel
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Can virtual reality be used to manage pain at a pediatric hospital?In a study conducted to determine if virtual reality (VR) can be effectively used for pain management during medical procedures such as blood draw, findings showed that VR significantly reduced patients' and parents' perception of acute pain, anxiety and general distress during the procedure.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cities can cut greenhouse gas emissions far beyond their urban bordersGreenhouse gas emissions caused by urban households' purchases of goods and services from beyond city limits are much bigger than previously thought. These upstream emissions may occur anywhere in the world and are roughly equal in size to the total emissions originating from a city's own territory, a new study shows. This is not bad news but in fact offers local policy-makers more leverage to tac
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Reformulation of Markowitz theoremBy combining concepts from landscape ecology and Markowitz's portfolio theory, researchers have developed a unified 'landscape portfolio platform' to quantify and predict the behavior of multiple stochastic populations across spatial scales. The landscape portfolio platform, however, is applicable to any situation where subsystems fluctuate with a certain level of synchrony, from trade analysis in
18h
Live Science
Why Private Planes Are Nearly As Deadly As CarsA private plane claimed another life when the famous baseball pitcher Roy Halladay, age 40, died in a plane crash in the Gulf of Mexico today (Nov. 7), according to news sources.
18h
Ars Technica
Twitter officially doubles character count, says most 280 testers didn’t use it Enlarge / Now you can pack so much more gibberish into a single tweet. (credit: Twitter / Sam Machkovech) If you logged into Twitter on Tuesday to rant about the news of the day, from various elections across the United States to the launch of the Xbox One X, you may have noticed some more breathing room in your rants. That's because the social networking service's character limit has now officia
18h
Live Science
Outbreak in Uganda: What Is the Marburg Virus?Three people in Uganda and Kenya have died from an extremely rare and deadly disease caused by the Marburg virus, the World Health Organization reported today (Nov. 7). What is the Marburg virus?
18h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Evolve and Unify What We’re Following Election Ups and Downs : Newly released Congressional testimony from Carter Page, a former Trump campaign aide, reveals an extensive, complex, and at times contradictory web of connections between Page and Russia. Meanwhile, turning to this year’s campaign, Democrat Ralph Northam is facing off against President Trump’s pick Ed Gillespie in a high-stakes governor’s race in Vir
18h
The Atlantic
The Law Firm Playing Both Sides of the Weinstein Scandal The first rule of crisis management, one might imagine, is to avoid becoming embroiled in the crisis yourself. That’s a rule that the attorney David Boies, the chairman of the law firm Boies Schiller Flexner, broke this week. On Monday, The New Yorker reported that Boies had helped Harvey Weinstein try to suppress a New York Times story that would name him in a series of sexual-harassment and ass
18h
The Atlantic
Disney's Bullying Tactics Against the Press Failed The Walt Disney Company is a juggernaut that delivers the kind of product people often (somewhat facetiously) call “critic-proof.” Star Wars , Marvel superhero movies, Pixar films, Frozen —these are projects that seem almost guaranteed to succeed whenever they hit theaters. But a recent clash between Disney and the Los Angeles Times , one that spilled over into a brief national critical boycott ,
18h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Page Turner Today in 5 Lines Voters head to the polls to cast their ballots in gubernatorial races in Virginia and New Jersey. Polls close at 7 p.m. ET in Virginia and 8 p.m. ET in New Jersey. During his testimony before the House Intelligence Committee on November 2, Carter Page, a former Trump aide, said he told campaign officials about his trip to Russia over the summer, contradicting his earlier statemen
18h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
In This Garage Full Of Corvettes, There's A Pace Car With Only 300 Miles! #FastNLoud | Mondays at 9p Richard and Dennis take a trip to see a house previously owned by the President of the local Corvette Club who collected vehicles and parts. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/fast-n-loud/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Test your Fast N' Loud car smarts: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jyV4MUe346Y Follow Us on Twit
18h
Viden
Milepæl: Googles førerløse biler klar til at køre med passagererBiler uden et menneske bag rattet kører nu for første gang på offentlig vej i USA.
18h
Gizmodo
Snapchat Is Redesigning Its App Because It Knows It's Too Hard to Use Image: Snap To make Snapchat more usable for olds, Snap is planning a “disruptive” redesign that could piss off the young. The social app’s parent company announced in an earnings report today that it’s “currently redesigning our application to make it easier to use,” because “one thing that we have heard over the years is that Snapchat is difficult to understand or hard to use.” Advertisement An
18h
Gizmodo
The FBI Can't Decrypt the Texas Shooter's Phone Photo: AP The Federal Bureau of Investigation revealed today that it has been unable to decrypt a phone belonging to the gunman who killed 26 people in Sutherland Springs, Texas—an announcement that is likely to start another battle between law enforcement and technology companies over encryption. The phone was flown to Quantico for examination, Christopher Combs, an FBI special agent who leads t
18h
Gizmodo
The 10 Best Deals Of November 7, 2017 We see a lot of deals around the web over on Kinja Deals , but these were our ten favorites today. Head over to our main post for more deals, and follow us on Twitter and Facebook to never miss a chance to save. You can also join our Kinja Deals Community Facebook group to connect with your fellow deal hunters. #1: Logitech Gold Box Logitech Gold Box Amazon’s back at it again with another big Log
18h
Popular Science
Use your phone to identify a mosquito's species by its buzz Technology Mosquito sounds are annoying, but helpful to scientists. The irritating noise of a mosquito is a rich source of information for researchers who study the insects.
18h
Feed: All Latest
Russia's 'Fancy Bear' Hackers Exploit a Microsoft Office Flaw—and NYC Terrorism FearsKremlin hackers are adapting their phishing tactics with both the latest software vulnerabilities and the latest news, new McAfee findings show.
19h
Gizmodo
Wacky Firework Effect Created in Special Quantum Gas Color added. Image: Cheng et al, Nature (2017) If you’re into physics making your brain leak out of your ears, you should familiarize yourself with Bose-Einstein condensates. These strange arrangements of atoms can be all the states of matter at once, can look like they have negative mass , and essentially bring the weirdness of quantum mechanics to larger scales. That means physicists sometimes
19h
Live Science
Poisoned, Then Buried: Before Vesuvius, Toxic Water Likely Sickened PompeiiResidents of Pompeii were likely already sickened by toxins in their water when they were buried by volcanic ash after an eruption in A.D. 79.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
IUDs may have a surprising benefit: Protection against cervical cancerA new study from the Keck School of Medicine of USC has found that IUD use is associated with a dramatic decrease in the incidence of cervical cancer.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Increasing rates of chronic conditions putting more moms, babies at riskPregnant women today are more likely to have chronic conditions that could cause life-threatening complications than at any other time in the past decade -- particularly poor women and those living in rural communities.
19h
Gizmodo
Oath Senior Vice President to Staff: 'Go Fuck Yourself' [Updated] Image: Getty Back in June, Verizon closed a $4.5 billion merger to swallow Yahoo, agglomerate its legacy AOL brands into the mix, and rename the big, mess of memorable (and not so memorable) brands to Oath. The transition has not been terribly smooth for some employees, as evidenced by an exchange during an “Oath: All-In” full company meeting today. During the Q&A portion of the meeting today
19h
Gizmodo
The EPA Just Approved Lab-Grown Mosquitoes to Fight Disease Image: Getty Killer mosquitoes are coming—mosquitoes that help kill other mosquitoes, that is. The Environmental Protection Agency has approved lab-reared mosquitoes infected with the bacterium Wolbachia pipientis to be released into the wilds of 20 states and Washington, DC. The mosquitoes are engineered by the company MosquitoMate so that they deliver the bacterium to wild mosquitoes when relea
19h
Gizmodo
Twitter Goes Through With It: You're All Getting 280 Damn Characters After several weeks of Twitter users tweeting about how much they hate the idea of expanded character limits, Twitter has officially announced that it’s doubling the previous 140-character limit for all users. Twitter has been considering increasing the limit since at least last year . In September, the company finally announced the plan and started giving the long-tweet superpower to some test u
19h
The Atlantic
Why the AR-15 Is So Lethal Americans who know nothing else about firearms are all too familiar with the name AR-15. It’s the semi-automatic weapon that murderers have used in many of the most notorious and highest-casualty gun killings of recent years: Aurora, Colorado. Newtown, Connecticut. Orlando, Florida, San Bernardino, California. Now, with modified versions, in Las Vegas, Nevada, and Sutherland Springs, Texas. What
19h
Science : NPR
Shark Fin Trade Faces Troubled Waters As Global Pressure Mounts Congress is once again considering a federal ban on shark fins, used in soup. But scientists are divided about whether a ban is the best way to protect the creatures, which are imperiled worldwide. (Image credit: Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images)
19h
New on MIT Technology Review
Why This Geoengineering Pioneer’s Worst Nightmare Is a Trump TweetHarvard professor David Keith worries that politicians opposed to emissions cuts will “recklessly” promote altering the atmosphere instead.
19h
New on MIT Technology Review
Yibiao Zhao Is Giving Machines a Sense of ImaginationA new approach to AI will help make autonomous vehicles safer and let robots learn how to use tools as a human might.
19h
Gizmodo
Facebook's Latest Bright Idea to Fight Hoaxes Was to Promote Comments That Said 'Fake' Photo: Getty Facebook wants you to know that it is committed to stopping the spread of internet hoaxes. But it requires some mental gymnastics to understand how signal-boosting comments with the word “fake” in them would help fight misinformation. In a recent test, however, that’s exactly what the social network did. As the BBC reports , Facebook conducted an experiment last month where messages
19h
Ars Technica
Microsoft will have game streaming within 3 years as focus shifts to software Enlarge / A lot of tech packed into this svelte box. (credit: Kyle Orland ) Microsoft is renewing its focus on Xbox software and services, according to Xbox chief Phil Spencer speaking to Bloomberg . The company's original ambition for the Xbox One spanned not just gaming but also a wide range of TV and media capabilities, coupled with a Steam-like download-based distribution model. Sony, in cont
19h
Science | The Guardian
IUDs may cut risk of cervical cancer by a third, study indicates More work is needed to understand how the contraceptive device works to protect against cancer, but researchers say discovery could be “very impactful” Women who use intrauterine contraceptive devices may also be cutting their chances of getting cervical cancer, according to a new study. Research from the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California analysed data from several
19h
The Atlantic
A Big Night for Democrats Tuesday delivered a string of high-profile victories for Democrats in gubernatorial races. Democrat Ralph Northam won the Virginia governor’s race in what had become a nail-biter of a contest, defeating Republican Ed Gillespie in the election to replace outgoing Democratic Governor Terry McAuliffe. In New Jersey, Democrat Phil Murphy prevailed in the race to replace Republican governor Chris Chri
19h
cognitive science
A new paper in JEP:General explores ways that distractors interfere with short-term memory. submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
19h
Feed: All Latest
The Virginia Election Will Boost Data-Driven Progressives, Win or LoseOn Virginia's election day, startups like Flippable and The Arena hope for the best—and prepare to learn from the worst.
19h
Gizmodo
Snap Lost a Buttload of Money on Spectacles Image: Snap “Excess” Spectacles have cost Snapchat’s parent company Snap $39.9 million in the last three months. This news is not a great look for Snap, which reportedly had “ hundreds of thousands ” of pairs of the Spectacles camera sunglasses piling up in warehouses as of last month. We knew about the inventory; now we’re learning about the cancelled orders for more. Snap disclosed the nearly $
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Zombie ant' brains left intact by fungal parasiteA fungal parasite that infects ants and manipulates their behavior to benefit the fungus' reproduction accomplishes this feat without infecting the ants' brains, according to a study led by Penn State researchers.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rival sperm and choosy eggsThe delicately mannered dance between discerning eggs and vying sperm is more complicated than scientists once believed, and it may hold secrets about the evolution of new species.
19h
The Atlantic
North Korea and the Science of Death Tolls Talk of war with North Korea to remove its nuclear capabilities remains active and anxious. The Trump administration has made clear its determination to deal with a threat that might cause terrible damage to North Korea’s neighbors, and even the continental United States. But this has to be set against the immediate death and destruction that would unavoidably follow the first shots in a new Kore
19h
Big Think
Your Diet May Not Be Clogging Your Arteries. Instead, This Might Be the Culprit These results may someday offer doctors an early warning biomarker for heart disease. Read More
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Targeting a microRNA shows potential to enhance effectiveness of diabetes drugsResearchers have found a vital role for miR-204 in beta cells -- regulating the cell surface receptor that is the target of many of the newer type 2 diabetes drugs, such as Byetta, Victoza, Trulicity, Januvia, Onglyza and Tradjenta. This drug target is the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor, or GLP1R. Activation of GLP1R with these drugs helps the beta cell produce and secrete more insulin.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
SMART: Facial recognition for molecular structuresResearchers have developed a method to identify the molecular structures of natural products that is significantly faster and more accurate than existing methods. The method works like facial recognition for molecular structures -- it uses a piece of spectral data unique to each molecule and then runs it through a deep learning neural network to place the unknown molecule in a cluster of molecules
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stimulating formation of new neural connections in the adult brainScientists have found a way to stimulate formation of new neural connections in the adult brain in a study that could eventually help humans fend off memory loss, brain trauma and other ailments in the central nervous system.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New model reveals possibility of pumping antibiotics into bacteriaResearchers have discovered that a cellular pump known to move drugs like antibiotics out of E. coli bacteria has the potential to bring them in as well, opening new lines of research into combating the bacteria.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Rival sperm and choosy eggs: When sperm compete , eggs have a choiceThe delicately mannered dance between discerning eggs and vying sperm is more complicated than scientists once believed, and it may hold secrets about the evolution of new species.
20h
Inside Science
Climate Change May Mean More Waterborne Epidemics Climate Change May Mean More Waterborne Epidemics Rainstorms deposit sediment that hampers the effects of sunlight on lakes and rivers. Lake-Tahoe-and-paddleboard.jpg Boats on the shore of Lake Tahoe. Image credits: Adventures On Wheels via Flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Earth Tuesday, November 7, 2017 - 15:45 Joel Shurkin, Contributor (Inside Science) -- Sunlight glistening on rippling wat
20h
Live Science
What's Really in Marijuana Extracts? These Products Are Often MislabeledA new study finds cannabidiol products frequently contain higher or lower doses of cannabidiol than what's listed on the label.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Zombie ant' brains left intact by fungal parasiteA fungal parasite that infects ants and manipulates their behavior to benefit the fungus' reproduction accomplishes this feat without infecting the ants' brains, according to a study led by Penn State researchers.
20h
The Atlantic
The Saudi Crown Prince Is Gambling Everything on Three Major Experiments Call it shock and awe. Call it a purge. Call it a clean sweep. However it’s characterized, the mass arrest of some of Saudi Arabia’s most prominent royals , administrators, and tycoons last weekend has completely upended both the structure of the Saudi elite and the country’s way of doing business. It’s not exactly the Night of the Long Knives, as the luxurious Ritz-Carlton hotel in which the det
20h
Ars Technica
Disney forced to backpedal after banning LA Times from Thor screening Enlarge / Bob Chapek, chairman of Walt Disney Parks and Resorts, shows off plans for Disney's forthcoming Star Wars -themed park in Anaheim. (credit: Joshua Sudock/Disney Parks ) When the Los Angeles Times wrote a two-part exposé about the tax breaks Disneyland gets from the city of Anaheim, California, Disney retaliated by banning Times reporters from screenings of Disney movies like Thor: Ragna
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Optimizing workplace design for Health: UA Institute on Place and Wellbeing at GreenbuildOn Nov. 9 at the world's largest conference and expo for design-related industry professionals, UAIPW Director Esther Sternberg, MD, and the US General Services Administration will discuss findings of their Wellbuilt for Wellbeing study, which have the potential to positively impact the health of millions of office workers and the cost of lost time due to workplace-related illnesses.
20h
Gizmodo
Bandage-Like Gadget Could Make Stitches and Staples a Thing of the Past Image: KitoTech Medical A Seattle-based startup has developed an innovative “skin closure device” that exhibits the anchoring strength of sutures and staples, but is nearly as easy to apply as a bandage. Called microMend, the device is performing well in clinical studies, and it may only be a matter of time before one gets stuck on you. The device, developed by KitoTech Medical, consists of a thi
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Twitter to double tweet limit to 280 characters (Update)Twitter announced Tuesday it would double the limit for tweets to 280 characters, a bid to draw in more users and boost engagement at the social network.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New approach to geoengineering simulations is significant step forwardUsing a sophisticated computer model, scientists have demonstrated for the first time that a new research approach to geoengineering could potentially be used to limit Earth's warming to a specific target while reducing some of the risks and concerns identified in past studies, including uneven cooling of the globe.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apollo 12 astronaut Richard Gordon, who circled moon, diesFormer Apollo 12 astronaut Richard Gordon, one of a dozen men who flew around the moon but didn't land there, has died, NASA said. He was 88.
20h
New on MIT Technology Review
Trump’s Energy R&D Policies Ignore the Long-Term Impact of InnovationPresident Obama’s former chief science advisor says the Trump administration’s promise to slash funding for energy research is short-sighted.
20h
Gizmodo
Three Of Your Favorite Bluetooth Speakers Are On Sale Right Now Anker SoundCore Mini , $24 with code QUM7D9ED Anker SoundCore 2 , $34 with code 6XYGBCPW Anker SoundCore Sport XL , $56 with code QUM7D9ED Anker’s SoundCore line of speakers have been huge hits among our readers, and you can choose from three different models on sale today, ranging from tiny to booming. On the small end, the SoundCore Mini packs impressively loud audio into a speaker the size of
20h
Science : NPR
How Do Gravitational Waves Really Work? Gravitational waves — ripples in the fabric of space-time — are a big deal in the world of science. Here's a video that helps explain how they work. (Image credit: Sebastian Scheiner/AP)
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
SMART: Facial recognition for molecular structuresA team of researchers at the University of California San Diego developed a method to identify the molecular structures of natural products that is significantly faster and more accurate than existing methods. The method works like facial recognition for molecular structures--it uses a piece of spectral data unique to each molecule and then runs it through a deep learning neural network to place t
20h
Popular Science
Eleanor the sea turtle swam through a tropical storm and survived Nexus Media News She can teach scientists a lot about how ocean animals deal with extreme weather. Eleanor is a turtle on a mission, navigating the stormy seas of climate change.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Targeting a microRNA shows potential to enhance effectiveness of diabetes drugsResearchers have found a vital role for miR-204 in beta cells -- regulating the cell surface receptor that is the target of many of the newer type 2 diabetes drugs, such as Byetta, Victoza, Trulicity, Januvia, Onglyza and Tradjenta. This drug target is the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor, or GLP1R. Activation of GLP1R with these drugs helps the beta cell produce and secrete more insulin.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Immigrants living in US near California-Mexico border have history of traumaMore than 80 percent of immigrants residing in the U.S. without authorization near the California-Mexico border have a lifetime history of traumatic events, according to a new study from a psychologist at Rice University.
20h
New on MIT Technology Review
Are Big Tech Companies Doing Right by America’s Students?
20h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
Why wildfires have gotten worse -- and what we can do about it | Paul HessburgMegafires, individual fires that burn more than 100,000 acres, are on the rise in the western United States -- the direct result of unintentional yet massive changes we've brought to the forests through a century of misguided management. What steps can we take to avoid further destruction? Forest ecologist Paul Hessburg confronts some tough truths about wildfires and details how we can help restor
20h
The Scientist RSS
Wolbachia-Laced Mosquitoes to Be Released for Population ControlThe US government has approved the deployment of the lab-raised insects to eliminate the Zika- and dengue-transmitting Asian tiger mosquito.
20h
Gizmodo
The Surprising New Way Facebook Is Helping Fight Revenge Porn Photo: AP As part of its new nationwide reporting portal to combat revenge porn, Australia is partnering with Facebook to let users preemptively block uploads of “intimate” pictures and videos on the platform—by sending the images in question to Facebook. Australia is the first country to pilot the new program. A startling one in five Australians report having intimate photos shared without their
21h
Big Think
Did Ramen Noodles—Gasp!—Just Become Healthy? Ramen isn't going to be the next superfood, but it's a little better than before. Read More
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
It takes a microclimate to raise a pinyon treeNew research shows that the microclimate is an important factor in regional pinyon pine tree recovery after drought.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
HIV patients at greater risk of both heart and kidney diseaseHIV patients and their doctors are urged to be more aware of the additional health risks associated with treated HIV infection. This follows new research that shows HIV patients at high risk for a heart attack or stroke are also at substantially greater risk for chronic kidney disease and vice versa.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Out of balance: Gut bacterial makeup may exacerbate pain in sickle cell diseaseAn overabundance of the bacteria Veillonella in the digestive tract may increase pain in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD).
21h
Inside Science
Shining A Light On Soils Shining A Light On Soils Researchers look at what’s in soil to help farmers improve crops and their lives. Shining A Light On Soils Video of Shining A Light On Soils Earth Tuesday, November 7, 2017 - 15:00 Karin Heineman, Executive Producer (Inside Science) -- "We’re working on various applications of spectroscopy in low resource settings. So, what that means is using optical technology to really
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Position statement opposing sex/porn addiction modelFollowing AASECT's position statement on sex addiction, CPS, NCSF, and TASHRA publish their collective position opposing the sex/porn addiction model. This is based on current and reliable scientific data.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate change, sparse policies endanger right whale populationNorth Atlantic right whales -- a highly endangered species making modest population gains in the past decade - may be imperiled by warming waters and insufficient international protection, according to a new Cornell University analysis published in Global Change Biology.
21h
New on MIT Technology Review
Are Big Tech Companies Doing Right by America’s School Students?
21h

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