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Promises and challenges of perovskite solar cells The efficiencies of perovskite solar cells have gone from single digits to a certified 22.1% in a few years’ time. At this stage of their development, the key issues concern how to achieve further improvements in efficiency and long-term stability. We review recent developments in the quest to improve the current state of the art. Because photocurrents are near the theoretical maximum, our focus
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Gizmodo
Rian Johnson Is Developing a New Trilogy of Star Wars Movies Image: Jesse Grant / Getty When Colin Trevorrow left Star Wars: Episode IX , fans wondered if Last Jedi director Rian Johnson would be taking his place. He didn’t, but that’s apparently because instead he’s working on three new Star Wars movies that are wilder than anyone could have possibly imagined. The news was announced by Disney CEO Bob Iger during an conference call discussing Disney’s fina
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Ingeniøren
Signalkaos: Nu overvejer Banedanmark at sætte lokomotivet i midtenDet bliver voldsomt dyrt og besværligt at ombygge DSB's gamle lokomotiver med nyt signalsystem. Derfor overvejer Banedanmark helt utraditionelt at sætte lokomotiverne i midten af dobbeltdækkervognene.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows that the consumption of antioxidant-rich foods is associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetesA lower risk of type 2 diabetes has been observed among individuals consuming food rich in antioxidants. This effect is largely contributed by fruit, vegetables, tea and other hot beverages, as well as moderate consumption of alcohol, as shown in a recent study from an Inserm research group, published in Diabetologia.
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Popular Science
The curious case of the Cortana speaker: Harmon Kardon Invoke review Gadgets Microsoft's digital assistant gets an audio-oriented home Cortana gets a stylish home.
23min
Ars Technica
EA buys out a game studio after shutting another one down 3 weeks ago (credit: Respawn Entertainment / EA ) EA confirmed via a press release on Thursday that it had acquired the video game studio Respawn Entertainment. The studio, co-founded by former Infinity Ward chiefs and Call of Duty co-creators in the wake of their departure from Activision, has been bought out in a deal whose total value could reach $455 million. The news by itself may seem odd, considering
26min
The Atlantic
Louis C.K. and Abuse of Power in the Comedy World The behavior described by various comedians in The New York Times ’s story on Louis C.K.’s alleged history of sexual misconduct is largely consistent: C.K. would find a way to get women alone in a room, and then masturbate in front of them. Just as disturbing, however, is the pattern of what the comedians said came next: Male comedians would ignore or avoid the story when they heard it, and the r
28min
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
The Beer Cooler Marks The Spot At This Gold Claim | Gold Rush #GoldRush | Friday 9p Rick and Brennan work to remove a zone of overburden the size of two football fields so the sun can thaw out the pay so they can feed Big Red. The reward? A cooler waiting for them at the end of the line. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebo
38min
Big Think
The Story of How the Americas Were Peopled Is Radically Changing Researchers believe they have enough evidence to support the “kelp highway hypothesis.” Read More
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NeuWrite San Diego
SfN 2017 NeuWriter Picks!You’ve probably heard about music festivals like Coachella, ACL and Bonnaroo: these are multi-day extravaganzas where thousands of individuals converge to sample from an elaborate menu of musical acts. As an attendee, you would likely be constantly shuffling back and forth across the festival grounds, trying to see as many of your favorite artists as […]
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Gizmodo
DOJ Fires Up New War With Apple Over Encryption Photo: Getty The DOJ and FBI have been in a bit of a cold war with Apple and the tech community ever since the controversy in 2015 over unlocking the San Bernardino shooter’s iPhone. This week, the war heated up again with the FBI and Apple exchanging words about encryption, and on Thursday, the Deputy Attorney General of the United States stepped into the fray. The FBI is currently investigating
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Gizmodo
The 10 Best Deals of November 9, 2017 We see a lot of deals around the web over on Kinja Deals , but these were our ten favorites today. Head over to our main post for more deals, and follow us on Twitter and Facebook to never miss a chance to save. You can also join our Kinja Deals Community Facebook group to connect with your fellow deal hunters. #1: Horizon Zero Dawn Horizon Zero Dawn , $20 Update : Sold out for today, but we’ll s
44min
The Atlantic
Senate Republicans Go Their Own Way on Tax Reform Republicans promised tax reform would be different. The party, one leader after another insisted, had learned its lesson from its failure on health care, when fundamental policy disagreements split the Capitol in two and left the Affordable Care Act in one piece. There would be no such meltdown on taxes, and to that end, top Republican officials spent months negotiating what they called a “unifie
53min
Feed: All Latest
The Fans Made Louis C.K.—Now They Might Undo HimPart of the comedian's appeal was his relatability—the sense that underneath the curmudgeonliness, he was a good guy. Given the harassment allegations, what happens now?
53min
Big Think
What Know-It-Alls Don’t Know, or the Illusion of CompetenceOne day in 1995, a large, heavy middle-aged man robbed two Pittsburgh banks in broad daylight. He didn’t wear a mask or any sort of disguise. And he smiled at surveillance cameras before walking out of each bank. Later that night, police arrested a surprised McArthur Wheeler. When they showed him ... Read More
57min
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Allegations and the Aftermath Today in 5 Lines The Washington Post reports that Roy Moore, the GOP nominee in Alabama for a U.S. Senate seat, initiated a sexual encounter with a 14-year-old girl in the 1970s. Multiple senators called for Moore to drop out of the race if the allegations detailed in the Post are true. “If these allegations are true, he must step aside,” said Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. The House Way
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NYT > Science
NASA’s Rocket to Deep Space May Not Be Ready Until 2020Technological hiccups, a tornado and other factors have slowed the Space Launch System that NASA hopes will carry astronauts to the moon and Mars.
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Live Science
Time to Celebrate: Ancient Sundial Made to Honor Roman PoliticianAbout 2,000 years ago, a Roman politician celebrated his victory by commissioning a sundial and putting it on display for all to see, according to archaeologists who just found the ancient timekeeping device in Italy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Report from groundbreaking 'EndoVators Summit' offers guidance for obesity treatmentA recently published white paper from the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy and the Association for Bariatric Endoscopy breaks new ground in defining the role and value of the latest approaches for obesity management. The paper reports on the scope and impact of the obesity problem as well as the multiple factors and players involved in treating this chronic condition.
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The Atlantic
The Nature of the AR-15 Back in the early 1980s, I described the origins of the AR-15 rifle, and its military counterpart the M-16, in an Atlantic article called “ A Bureaucratic Horror Story ” and a book called National Defense . This week I did an item about the AR-15’s role as the main weapon in America’s modern mass shootings. It explained that one reason for the AR-15’s killing power is that its bullets were design
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Ars Technica
Disney announces new feature-length Star Wars trilogy, live-action TV series We're as stunned as you are, Rey. (credit: Lucasfilm ) During a Disney earnings call today, CEO Bob Iger announced plans for a live-action Star Wars TV series and a new trilogy likely coming after 2020. The series will apparently be part of the previously announced Disney streaming service. In August, Disney unveiled those plans after it acquired a video-streaming company called BAM Tech. Current
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Science | The Guardian
New images show Aaron Hernandez suffered from extreme case of CTE Dr Ann McKee said Hernandez suffered severe damage to key brain areas Images show damage to areas important to impulse control and behavior Hernandez, the former NFL star, killed himself in prison in April aged 27 Former New England Patriots player Aaron Hernandez suffered severe damage to parts of the brain that play an important role in memory, impulse control and behavior, a researcher who stu
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Big Think
Scientists Discover Why Your Brain Can't Block Out Unwanted Thoughts A new study explains why some people seem to be better than others at ridding their minds of intrusive thoughts. Read More
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The Atlantic
Roy Moore Presents Republicans With a Familiar Dilemma Stop me if you’ve heard this one before: A Republican candidate, widely loathed by the party establishment and known for his inflammatory comments, has defeated rivals more embedded in the party hierarchy. Now, about a month until election day, accusations of sexual impropriety have upended his campaign. That is, of course, where things stood a little more than a year ago, when The Washington Pos
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ozanimod successful in clinical trials for multiple sclerosisCelgene Corporation recently announced results from two phase 3 trials evaluating the efficacy and safety of the drug ozanimod. Ozanimod was invented by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hospital Elder Life Program (HELP) lowers 30-day readmission ratesIn a new study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, researchers examined the Hospital Elder Life Program (HELP), an evidence-based treatment plan developed in the 1990s to prevent hospitalized older adults from developing delirium. They wanted to learn how effective it was at preventing older people from being readmitted to the hospital within 30 days, which is often harmfu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Obese older adults who survive cardiac surgery may have higher risk for poor functioningAlthough we know that obese older adults may be surviving heart surgery with more complications, few researchers have studied how well they can manage daily activities like eating, bathing, walking short distances, dressing, getting in or out of bed, and using the toilet. To learn more about this key issue, researchers examined information from the University of Michigan Health and Retirement Stud
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research shows ice sheets as large as Greenland's melted fast in a warming climateNew research published in Science shows that climate warming reduced the mass of the Cordilleran Ice Sheet by half in as little as 500 years, indicating the Greenland Ice Sheet could have a similar fate.
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Inside Science
Detecting Fake Drugs Detecting Fake Drugs Counterfeit drugs are a serious global health problem that technology may help to address by separating the pharma from the fake. Detecting Fake Drugs Video of Detecting Fake Drugs Human Thursday, November 9, 2017 - 16:15 Karin Heineman, Executive Producer Contributing author: Jason Socrates Bardi (Inside Science) -- The World Health Organization reports that counterfeit medi
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Inside Science
BRIEF: Like Dogs, Dingoes Make Eye Contact With Familiar Humans BRIEF: Like Dogs, Dingoes Make Eye Contact With Familiar Humans Scientists studied dingoes to understand the development of social bonds between humans and dogs. Dingo.jpg Image credits: Kim via flickr Rights information: CC BY-SA 2.0 Creature Thursday, November 9, 2017 - 16:00 Kimberly Hickok, Contributor (Inside Science) -- Domesticated dogs are exceptionally willing to make eye contact with hu
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Gizmodo
Board Games Are the Hidden Feature of 280-Character Tweets Image: Getty Anyone who tells you Twitter is social media’s closest approximation to hell on Earth is utterly, unimpeachably correct. This is, after all, the company that decided to deal with its role in a rising tide of digital fascism by verifying a white supremacist, and doubling the amount of space anyone can use to shout racial epithets at strangers. Arguments that 280 characters are an unne
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The Scientist RSS
Long-term Study Finds That the Pesticide Glyphosate Does Not Cause CancerThe report provides evidence that goes against concerns that Monsanto's popular herbicide, Roundup, is carcinogenic.
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Science | The Guardian
Spacewatch: Nasa space telescope faces cuts to reduce costs Rising costs of a flagship telescope designed to have 100 times the field of view of Hubble are forcing Nasa to cut back to ensure the mission goes ahead at all Nasa plans to “downscope” one of its flagship missions to keep it within cost estimates. This almost certainly means reducing its scientific capabilities. The Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFirst) is designed to study essential as
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Perfectly frustrated' metal provides possible path to superconductivity, other new quantum statesThe U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has discovered and described the existence of a unique disordered electron spin state in a metal that may provide a unique pathway to finding and studying frustrated magnets.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Some Chinese coal ash too radioactive for reuseManufacturers are increasingly using encapsulated coal ash from power plants as a low-cost binding agent in concrete, wallboard, bricks, roofing and other building materials. But a new study by U.S. and Chinese scientists cautions that coal ash from high-uranium deposits in China may be too radioactive for this use.
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Ars Technica
DOJ: Strong encryption that we don’t have access to is “unreasonable” Enlarge / US Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein delivers remarks at the 65th Annual Attorney General's Awards Ceremony at the Daughters of the American Revolution Constitution Hall October 25, 2017 in Washington, DC. (credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images ) Just two days after the FBI said it could not get into the Sutherland Springs shooter's seized iPhone, Politico Pro published a lengthy i
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NYT > Science
When the Media Is in on the ExperimentSeveral dozen news outlets participated in a new study, which finds that even a few stories can substantially increase discussion about a topic on Twitter.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Some Chinese coal ash too radioactive for reuseMany manufacturers use coal ash from power plants as a low-cost binding agent in concrete and other building materials. But a new study finds that coal ash from high-uranium deposits in China is too radioactive for this use. Some coal ash analyzed in the study contained radiation 43 times higher than the maximum safe limit set for residential building materials by the U.N. Scientific Committee on
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Perfectly frustrated' metal provides possible path to superconductivityThe US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has discovered and described the existence of a unique disordered electron spin state in a metal that may provide a unique pathway to finding and studying frustrated magnets.Their unique properties are of interest in the development of quantum computing and high-temperature superconductivity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hubble shows light echo expanding from exploded starLight from a supernova explosion in the nearby starburst galaxy M82 is reverberating off a huge dust cloud in interstellar space.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Changing climate to bring more landslides on logged land, say researchersResearchers say landslides on logged forests will be more widespread as the Northwest climate changes. In a study modelled on clear-cut lands on the Olympic Peninsula, they anticipate the climate of 2045 and conclude that there will be a 7 -11 percent increase in the land that is highly vulnerable to landslides. The researchers say their findings are applicable to the Cascade Mountain Range area a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Traditional Amazonian drug linked to improved sense of wellbeing, study suggestsA psychedelic drug traditionally used in South America improves people's general sense of wellbeing and may offer a treatment for alcoholism and depression, new research suggests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New DNA antenatal screening for Down's syndrome shown to be a 'transformational advance'Medical scientists have demonstrated for the first time that it is possible to incorporate DNA analysis into antenatal screening for three serious chromosome disorders, including Down's syndrome, in a way that is far more accurate than existing methods, and safer and less stressful for mothers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists find missing clue to how HIV hacks cells to propagate itselfComputer modeling has helped a team of scientists to decode previously unknown details about the 'budding' process by which HIV forces cells to spread the virus to other cells. The findings may offer a new avenue for drugs to combat the virus.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Climate-influenced changes in flowering, fruiting also affect bird abundance, activitiesA new study has documented shifts in Hawaiian bird abundance, breeding and molting based on climate-related changes to native vegetation. Researchers with the US Forest Service's Pacific Southwest Research Station recently reviewed extensive climate, vegetation and bird data collected between 1976 and 1982 at a 40-acre monitoring site about 5 miles outside Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park on Hawai'
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Science : NPR
Algae Toxins In Drinking Water Sickened People In 2 Outbreaks In Ohio, more than 100 people got sick in 2013 and 2014 when municipal drinking water was contaminated with toxins from algae blooms in Lake Erie. The CDC says these are the first known instances. (Image credit: The Washington Post/Getty Images)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dawn explores Ceres' interior evolutionSurface features on Ceres—the largest world between Mars and Jupiter—and its interior evolution have a closer relationship than one might think.
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Gizmodo
Dino-Killing Asteroid Struck an Unfortunate Spot, Claim Scientists Drawn by Patryk Zawistowski, Image: Charlotta Wasteson /Flickr Hindsight is 20/20. Maybe you’d be more productive if you didn’t stay up until 3 am binge watching Stranger Things. Maybe you’d be a Nobel-winning scientist if you didn’t smoke too much pot during undergrad and sleep through your lectures. Maybe the dinosaurs wouldn’t have gone extinct if the giant meteor hit...somewhere else. That’s
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Gizmodo
Alphabet X's Project Loon Has Provided Internet to 100,000 People in Puerto Rico Photo: ilitephoto/ Flickr Project Loon has provided mobile data to more than 100,000 people in Puerto Rico, according to Google parent company Alphabet, which operates the enterprise. The project, which began as a Google X Lab offshoot, provides basic internet to crisis zones and out-of-network areas using weather balloons. In the wake of Hurricane Maria devastation, Project Loon procured an emer
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Scientific American Content: Global
Scientists Decry Arctic Oil Expansion in Letter to U.S. SenatorsResearchers say that drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge would harm critical habitat -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica
Excessively large laser is key to creating gamma ray sources Enlarge / Room-sized lasers should always glow green. (credit: Lawrence Berkeley Lab ) In the dark and distant past, I called myself a laser physicist. I would speak with pride of lasers that produced incredible power: the thought of a petawatt laser system would bring a tear to my remaining eye. But I have to admit that our best hardware is relatively wimpy when compared to natural sources of en
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA CubeSat to test miniaturized weather satellite technologyBehind every weather forecast—from your local, five-day prediction to a late-breaking hurricane track update—are the satellites that make them possible. Government agencies depend on observations from weather satellites to inform forecast models that help us prepare for approaching storms and identify areas that need evacuating or emergency first responders.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Student self-reporting can help educators catch academic and mental health problems earlyAt the start of the school year, many students expect to go through the process of getting their ears and eyes checked by school nurses for hearing and vision issues. Increasingly, students might also expect to be screened for potential mental health problems. Stephen Kilgus, an associate professor in the Department of Educational, School and Counseling Psychology in the College of Education at th
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
The biggest risks facing cities -- and some solutions | Robert MuggahWith fantastic new maps that show interactive, visual representations of urban fragility, Robert Muggah articulates an ancient but resurging idea: cities shouldn't just be the center of economics -- they should also be the foundation of our political lives. Looking around the world, from Syria to Singapore to Seoul and beyond, Muggah submits six principles for how we can build more resilient citie
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Live Science
Pet Snake Nearly Kills Teen: Why the Inland Taipan Is So DeadlyAn Australian teenager was left fighting for his life after being bitten by his pet inland taipan, one of the most dangerous snake species in the world, according to news reports.
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Popular Science
This truly bizarre exploding star might be a zombie of sorts Space It just keeps exploding. Scientists are genuinely perplexed by a star that seems to keep exploding—possibly over the course of decades.
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Ars Technica
Check out the genes on this huge ‘shroom Enlarge (credit: Missouri Department of Conservation ) As is the case with most titles that end in “-est,” the competition for The World’s Largest Organism is fierce. The Great Barrier Reef certainly has its proponents, most of them Australian. There's a stand of quaking aspens growing in Utah that's a single clonal organism, rather than genetic individuals. If it does not merit the title of larg
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Not all milkweed is equal for egg-laying monarchs, study revealsMilkweed plants in agricultural areas have 3 1/2 times more monarch butterfly eggs than milkweed growing in urban gardens, natural areas and roadsides, according to a new study. The researchers also found monarchs prefer small patches of the plant to larger ones. These findings have implications for current initiatives underway that involve planting milkweed to help the survival of this endangered
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Gizmodo
Snag a 128GB MicroSD Card For $30 - Perfect For Your Nintendo Switch SanDisk 128GB MicroSD Card , $30 Need a lot of extra storage for your Nintendo Switch or action cam? The advent of 200GB+ cards means that 128GB cards , which until relatively recently sold in the $60-$80 range, are finally inching towards affordability. $30 is the best price we’ve ever seen, and a match for what we expect to see on Black Friday.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Increasing hydroxyurea dose helps to keep young sickle cell patients out of the hospitalSt. Jude Children's Research Hospital researchers report that maximizing the dose of hydroxyurea increased levels of fetal hemoglobin and reduced the odds of hospitalizations for young sickle cell anemia patients.
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Gizmodo
The Fungus That Turns Ants Into Zombies Is More Diabolical Than We Realized A dead carpenter ant with fungal spores erupting out of its head. (Image: David Hughes/Penn State University) Carpenter ants of the Brazilian rain forest have it rough. When one of these insects gets infected by a certain fungus, it turns into a so-called “zombie ant” and is no longer in control of its actions. Manipulated by the parasite, an infected ant will leave the cozy confines of its arbor
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Ars Technica
AT&T says it’s “prepared to litigate” if US tries to block Time Warner deal Enlarge / AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson speak onstage at The New York Times 2017 DealBook Conference on November 9, 2017 in New York City. (credit: Getty Images | Michael Cohen ) AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson today said his company is ready to fight the Trump administration in court in order to complete its $85.4 billion purchase of Time Warner Inc. The Department of Justice is reviewing AT&T's propo
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Breeding highly productive corn has reduced its ability to adaptResearchers wanted to know whether the last 100 years of selecting for corn that is acclimated to particular locations has changed its ability to adapt to new or stressful environments. By measuring populations of corn plants planted across North America, they could test how the corn genomes responded to different growing conditions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
HPV vaccine also prevents uncommon childhood respiratory disease, study suggestsThe vaccine that protects against cancer-causing types of human papillomavirus (HPV) also prevents an uncommon but incurable childhood respiratory disease, according to a new study.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
This deep-sea fish uses weird eyes to see in dark and lightThe eyes of deep-sea fish called pearlsides contain cells that look like rods but act like cones.
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Ars Technica
Dealmaster: Get a pair of Bose noise-cancelling headphones for $179 Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our friends at TechBargains , we have another round of deals to share. Today's list should be good news for anyone in the market for a pair of noise-cancelling headphones, as Bose's QuietComfort 25 are down to $179 at Amazon. Note that this is Bose's wired flagship —the QuietComfort 35 is its wireless pair —so you may need a dongle. But for frequent flyers or anyon
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The Atlantic
A Contemporary Artist Is Helping Princeton Confront Its Ugly Past These days, public sculptures often seem seem intertwined with historical regret. There’s the bronze Robert E. Lee statue in Charlottesville, Virginia; the Roger Taney effigy outside the Maryland State House; the Confederate soldier in front of North Carolina’s Durham County Courthouse. This historical regret has inspired a rush to topple sculptures. But the feelings of remorse and shame have als
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA CubeSat to test miniaturized weather satellite technologyThe NASA-funded CubeSat, called Microwave Radiometer Technology Acceleration (MiRaTA), will be launched into Earth's orbit from the rocket carrying the next big US weather satellite (NOAA's JPSS-1) into space. MiRaTA is designed to demonstrate that a small satellite can carry instrument technology that's capable of reducing the cost and size of future weather satellites and has the potential to ro
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Risk of cholera epidemics estimated with new rule-bookCholera has repeatedly traveled out of Asia to cause epidemics in Africa and Latin America, an international research team has found. Researchers studied outbreaks in Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean from the last 60 years. The results of two studies in Science, present a new 'rule-book' to estimate the risk of different cholera strains causing an epidemic.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cancer drug parity laws lower costs for many, but not everyoneIn an analysis of the impact of parity laws, researchers report modest improvements in costs for many patients. However, patients who were already paying the most for their medications, saw their monthly costs go up.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study reveals how a very low calorie diet can reverse type 2 diabetesA research team has uncovered how a very low calorie diet can rapidly reverse type 2 diabetes in animal models. If confirmed in people, the insight provides potential new drug targets for treating this common chronic disease, said the researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fatty molecule in human blood controls malaria parasites' decision to leap to mosquitoesDepletion of a fatty molecule in human blood propels malaria parasites to stop replicating and causing illness in people and instead to jump ship to mosquitoes to continue the transmission cycle, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cognitive behavioral therapy for chronic painBy teaching patients better strategies for coping with chronic pain, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a valuable treatment alternative for the millions of Americans taking opioids for noncancer pain, according to an article.
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Ars Technica
After online outrage, Logitech will now replace Harmony Link devices for free Enlarge (credit: Logitech ) Customers were rightfully outraged when Logitech announced it would end service and support for its Harmony Link devices next year. Now, Logitech is attempting to right some of the wrongs of this situation, even though its plans to end the life of all Link devices hasn't changed. According to a Logitech blog post , the company will now provide all Harmony Link users wi
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Big Think
This Education Strategy Can Break the Cycle of Poverty Researchers tracked academic achievement, social cognition, executive function, and creativity in a longitudinal study of kids across the socioeconomic spectrum. Read More
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Ars Technica
Regulators are eager for driverless cars—and I might lose a bet Enlarge / Today, Waymo cars have safety drivers when they're on public streets. But the company envisions a future with no one in the driver's seat. (credit: Waymo ) Waymo made history on Tuesday , announcing that fully driverless cars—with no one sitting behind the wheel—were already roaming public streets near the Phoenix suburb of Chandler. It's happening way earlier than I expected it would.
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Gizmodo
After Outrage, Logitech Gives Free Upgrade to Owners of Soon to Be Obsolete Device Image: Gizmodo When Logitech decided to end support for its Harmony Link universal media hubs, customers were pissed. And rightly so, because despite the device being a little old (it originally debuted back in 2011), through no fault of their own, their devices would cease to function on March 16, 2018. Originally, Logitech planned to only offer Harmony Link owners with active warranties free up
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Feed: All Latest
Twenty Years after His Death, Carl Sagan Is Still RightIn an interview, the famed astronomer and communicator fought for the idea that science is the best way to know things
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Gizmodo
'Real Life Iron Man' Sets Record For Fastest Jetpack Flight We’ve been waiting to get our hands on real life jetpacks for almost a century now . And while you can’t buy them at Costco yet, they seem to be one modest step closer to reality. Richard Browning, test pilot for the British tech company Gravity Industries and “real life Iron Man,” just set the Guinness World Record for fastest flight. Browning made three attempts before hitting 32.02 mph (51.53
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Reducing the burden of neglected tropical diseases requires investments in basic researchInternational support for measures to prevent neglected tropical diseases has resulted in public health gains, but eliminating these debilitating conditions will require significant investments in basic research, a new article argues.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists unravel likely causes of blood vessel leakage in severe dengueA protein secreted by cells infected with dengue virus can cause dangerous leakage of fluid from blood vessels, and new research supports a primary underlying mechanism: disruption of a molecular barrier that lines the vessels.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Th1/17 hybrid T cells offer potent and durable anti-tumor response in preclinical modelAdoptive cell therapy for cancer involves harvesting T cells from a patient and expanding and sometimes modifying them in the laboratory before reinfusion. It has been challenging to create T cells that are both potent and durable. In a new study, researchers report the potent anti-tumor properties of hybrid Th1/Th17 cells that combine the cancer-fighting properties of Th1 cells and the ability of
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New strategies for reducing achievement gapSuccessful implementation of preschool to third grade programs yields benefits in increasing school readiness, improving attendance, and strengthening parental involvement in school education -- strategies that can close the achievement gap for children at risk, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Induced pluripotent stem cells show astrocyte-neuron impact on brain pathology in autismUsing human induced pluripotent stem cells to model autism spectrum disorder, researchers have revealed for the first time that abnormalities in the supporting cells of the brain, called astrocytes, may contribute to the cause of the disorder.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Older donor lungs should be considered for transplantationWith a scarcity of lungs available for transplantation, the use of lungs from donors older than age 60 has been shown to achieve reasonable outcomes and should be considered as a viable option, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Walk this way: A better way to identify gait differencesHuman traits such as the face, voice, and gait are commonly used for biometric-based person recognition. Although gait is one of the most practical traits for video-based surveillance and forensics, this approach is susceptible to intra-subject variations. Researchers have proposed a new convolutional neural network-based approach to gait recognition, which exhibits robustness (insensitiveness) to
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Low protein diet in early life increases lifespan in fruit fliesFruit flies raised on a low protein diet early in life can live over twice as long as their peers.
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The Atlantic
Syria's Students: Going to School in a War Zone More than six years of conflict in Syria have reduced much of the countryside and area surrounding Damascus to rubble, damaging or destroying nearly everything that might hold a community or society together. Yet thousands of families still live in these besieged towns and villages, or in nearby camps for the internally displaced—and they still try their best to give their children chances to lea
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The Atlantic
Russian Money in Silicon Valley A new trove of leaked documents, the so-called Paradise Papers, have revealed that Yuri Milner, a Russian businessman with extensive investments in Silicon Valley, used funds from two Kremlin-controlled—and now U.S.-sanctioned—banks to make large investments in Facebook and Twitter. Both stakes have been sold off, but Milner’s path to Silicon Valley, where he continues be a power player and lives
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The Atlantic
'If These Allegations Are True, He Must Step Aside' Updated at 4:42 p.m. ET Roy Moore, the controversial GOP nominee for a U.S. Senate seat in Alabama, had sexual contact with a 14-year-old in the 1970s, and pursued two other teenaged girls, according to a bombshell Washington Post report published early Thursday afternoon. Leigh Corfman told the Post that she met Moore, then a 32-year-old district attorney, outside a courtroom in Etowah County, A
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study helps make microgrids a more reliable power sourceEngineers at MIT have developed a method for guaranteeing the stability of any microgrid that runs on direct current, or DC -- an architecture that was originally proposed as part of the MIT Tata Center's uLink project. The researchers found they can ensure a microgrid's stability by installing capacitors, which are devices that even out spikes and dips in voltage, of a particular size, or capacit
3h
Ars Technica
Delhi becomes “gas chamber” as air pollution reaches ludicrous levels Enlarge / Indian visitors walk through the courtyard of Jama Masjid amid heavy smog in the old quarters of New Delhi on November 8, 2017. SAJJAD HUSSAIN/ AFP/ Getty Images) With calm winds, seasonal crop burns, and the usual vehicle and industrial emissions, an extremely thick, toxic fog of pollution has settled on Delhi, choking and sickening residents. Pollution measurements and indexes have ex
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Popular Science
Apple just fixed that annoying autocorrect bug in iOS 11 so go download it Gadgets No more "?" where your "I" should be. Typing got weird on the iPhone for a minute, but a new software patch should fix it up.
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New Scientist - News
Power really can corrupt people. Here’s what to do about itSleazy scandals show the link between power and bad behaviour. To stop people at the top getting away with it, we need much more scrutiny, says James Bloodworth
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New Scientist - News
Giant star smash-up may have made the biggest neutron star everThe collision that produced recent gravitational waves may have left behind the biggest neutron star ever seen. But it might have collapsed into a black hole
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Live Science
'Holy Grail' Hadron: Scientists Are Close to Detecting the Elusive Tetraquark ParticleLike finding a needle in a haystack of haystacks
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Expanding light echo spotted around supernovaHubble images reveal an expanding shell of light from a supernova explosion sweeping through interstellar space three years after the stellar blast was discovered. The "echoing" light looks like a ripple expanding on a pond. The supernova, called SN 2014J, was discovered on Jan. 21, 2014.
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Science | The Guardian
The Guardian view on pesticides: give bees a chance | EditorialIt may be hard to tie the neonicotinoid group of chemicals directly to the global bee decline but they do cause widespread harm. A ban is the right call Michael Gove, the leading Brexiter who’s now in charge of the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, is a natural iconoclast, sometimes a valuable characteristic in government. His education revolution left a damaging legacy of unacco
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Student self-reporting can help educators catch academic and mental health problems earlyStephen Kilgus, an associate professor in the Department of Educational, School and Counseling Psychology in the College of Education at the University of Missouri, is analyzing how a new screening tool, which is completed by students, can help teachers identify potential academic, social and emotional problems. The data might help give teachers better tools to improve children's lives in the clas
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Simple blood test identifies critically ill patients who misuse alcohol, study findsA simple blood test for a compound called PEth can accurately identify critically ill hospital patients who misuse alcohol, a study has found. The finding is important because patients who misuse alcohol tend to have worse outcomes. If validated in further studies, the PEth test could help doctors anticipate and perhaps ward off alcohol-related complications such as organ failure and impaired heal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Extreme swings in blood pressure are just as deadly as having consistently high blood pressureExtreme ups and downs in systolic blood pressure may be just as deadly as having consistently high blood pressure, according to a new study from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Driving national discussionsIn the first large scale randomized media experiment ever conducted, researchers found that if just three outlets write about a particular major national policy topic -- such as jobs, the environment, or immigration -- discussion of that topic across social media rose by more than 62 percent, and the balance of opinion in the national conversation could be swayed several percentage points based on
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Risk of cholera epidemics estimated with new rule-bookCholera has repeatedly traveled out of Asia to cause epidemics in Africa and Latin America, an international research team has found. Researchers at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Institut Pasteur in France, and collaborators from across the world, studied outbreaks in Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean from the last 60 years. The results of two studies in Science, present a new 'rule-b
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
LEDs light the way for better drug therapiesA revolutionary new technique to create radioactive molecules, pioneered in the lab of Princeton University chemistry professor David MacMillan, has the potential to bring new medicines to patients much faster than before -- using light. While the previous approach took months, MacMillan's photocatalytic process replaces hydrogen with tritium in just hours.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lessons from the fly brain improve search algorithmsTo develop better search algorithms for images and data, a group of researchers has turned to the fruit fly brain.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new timeline for glacial retreat in Western CanadaMuch of western Canada was ice-free as early as 14,000 years ago, a new study reports.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Charting the course of the current cholera pandemic throughout Africa and Latin AmericaFrançois-Xavier Weill and colleagues used expansive genomic data to chart the course of the seventh -- and current -- cholera pandemic throughout its most affected continent, Africa.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Small news outlets have big impact on public discourseIf three small news outlets wrote about a topic such as jobs, the environment or immigration, discussion of that topic rose notably across social media, a new large-scale study reports, and public opinion on the topic could be swayed several percentage points in the stories' ideological directions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fruit fly brains inform search engines of the futureThe way fruit flies identify similarities between odors offers a new approach for search algorithms
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists unravel likely causes of blood vessel leakage in severe dengueA protein secreted by cells infected with dengue virus can cause dangerous leakage of fluid from blood vessels, and new research published in PLOS Pathogens supports a primary underlying mechanism: disruption of a molecular barrier that lines the vessels.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reducing the burden of neglected tropical diseases requires investments in basic researchInternational support for measures to prevent neglected tropical diseases has resulted in public health gains, but eliminating these debilitating conditions will require significant investments in basic research, argues Dr. Peter Hotez in a new article publishing Nov. 9 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Autonomous Vehicles: Are You Ready for the New Ride?Automakers are joining with Google, Uber, and high-profile start-ups to harness the technological advances that will power next-generation autonomous vehicles.
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Ars Technica
iOS 11.1.1 is here: It fixes the autocorrect bug and a “Hey Siri” issue Enlarge (credit: Samuel Axon) iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch users running iOS 11 have complained of a bug with autocorrect that converts the letter "i" into any number of things that are not in fact "i," such as the letter A or an exclamation point. A report earlier this week suggested that Apple would soon release an update to address the issue. Today, iOS 11.1.1 became available on supported dev
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dawn spacecraft explores dwarf planet Ceres' interior evolutionSurface features on Ceres -- the largest world between Mars and Jupiter -- and its interior evolution have a closer relationship than one might think. A recent study analyzed Ceres' surface features to reveal clues about the dwarf planet's interior evolution.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Crested pigeons use feathers to sound the alarmMany animals will sound an alarm to alert other members of their group of impending danger. Now, researchers have shown that crested pigeons do this in a surprisingly non-vocal way. One of their main flight feathers produces a critical high-pitched sound as the birds fly away. As they flap faster to escape a predator, that alarm signal automatically increases in tempo.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hubble spots expanding light echo around supernovaLight from a supernova explosion in the nearby starburst galaxy M82 is reverberating off a huge dust cloud in interstellar space.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Physicists shrink plans for next major collider Large Hadron Collider’s failure to detect new particles beyond the Higgs has eroded the case for Japan’s proposed linear accelerator. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22983
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Self-driving shuttle collision mars Las Vegas debutA self-driving shuttle test in Las Vegas streets resulted in a minor bang-up with a delivery truck on Wednesday, with city officials blaming the human driver.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Uber IPO 'target' is 2019: CEOUber is on track for a 2019 public stock offering and the plan is not dependent on new funding from Japan's SoftBank, the global ride-sharing giant's CEO said Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study shows even smaller media outlets can have wide impact on national conversationWith a readership that runs into the millions, few would argue that the New York Times doesn't influence public debate on a host of issues. But what about a news outlet with a circulation of only about 50,000?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
LEDs light the way for better drug therapiesRadioactivity may have a bad rap, but it plays a critical role in medical research. A revolutionary new technique to create radioactive molecules, pioneered in the lab of Princeton chemistry professor David MacMillan, has the potential to bring new medicines to patients much faster than before.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fruit fly brains inform search engines of the futureEvery day, websites you visit and smartphone apps that you use are crunching huge sets of data to find things that resemble each other: products that are similar to your past purchases; songs that are similar to tunes you've liked; faces that are similar to people you've identified in photos. All these tasks are known as similarity searches, and the ability to perform these massive matching games
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Gizmodo
The USDA Is Scrapping Terrible, Nonsense GMO Rules Image: Getty In January, as the Obama era was winding down, both the Food and Drug Administration and the Department of Agriculture quietly snuck through proposed regulations set to substantially overhaul the regulation of genetically engineered organisms for the first time in 30 years—and create drastic roadblocks to the development and commercialization of genetically engineered foods. Scientis
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Feed: All Latest
Logitech Is Giving Every Harmony Link Owner a Free Harmony HubLogitech's still going to brick the Harmony Link, but now it's going to do right by current owners, giving them a Harmony Hub.
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Gizmodo
Tesla Introduces 'Chill Mode' So Owners Can Tone Down Acceleration Speeds Screengrab via DragTimes on YouTube More importantly than zero emissions and saving the planet and all of that stuff, electric cars have a lot of torque. That means they can accelerate like small land rockets that’ll make you lose whatever you ate last, but apparently not everyone wants that in a car. Weird. So, as shown in a YouTube video from DragTimes and in Electrek ’s excerpt from the notes
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Gizmodo
Black Friday Started Early For These Noise Cancelling Sony Bluetooth Headphones Sony Extra Bass Noise Cancelling Over-Ear Headphones , $123 There aren’t a ton of Bluetooth headphones that also include noise cancelling, and at an all-time low $123 (besting our last mention by $25), Sony’s Extra Bass over-ears offer great sound quality at a fair price. Advertisement These headphones have all the features you’d expect in a good pair of Bluetooth headphones these days: NFC pairi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Zuckerberg nears end of US tour, wants to boost small bizWhat's Mark Zuckerberg's biggest takeaway as he wraps up a year of travel to dozens of U.S. states? The importance of local communities.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists create cosmic sounds of Voyager 1Music created entirely from data beamed back from the Voyager 1 spacecraft will receive its world premiere at the NASA booth at the SC17 Supercomputing Conference in Denver, Colorado, at 8pm local time (MST) on Monday, 13 November.
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Ars Technica
Windows Mixed Reality headsets get SteamVR games and apps November 15 Enlarge / An array of Windows Mixed Reality headsets. (credit: Microsoft) As promised back in August, all owners of Windows Mixed Reality headsets who are running Windows 10 will be able to run much of SteamVR's library of VR software. This is an expansion of the SteamVR preview program for Windows Mixed Reality headsets, which was previously open to developers but will open up to all users on No
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Science current issue
Comment on "The extent of forest in dryland biomes" The study by Bastin et al . (Reports, 12 May 2017, p. 635) is based on an incomplete delimitation of dry forest distribution and on an old and incorrect definition of drylands. Its sampling design includes many plots located in humid ecosystems and ignores critical areas for the conservation of dry forests. Therefore, its results and conclusions may be unreliable.
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Science current issue
Science for global understanding
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Science current issue
News at a glance
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Science current issue
North Atlantic right whale faces extinction
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Science current issue
Giant radio telescope lends a hand in Puerto Rico relief
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Science current issue
New tools offer clues to how the human brain takes shape
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Science current issue
Genomes rewrite cholera's global story
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Science current issue
Polarizing head of House science panel to retire
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Science current issue
Medical centers spearhead China's pharma push
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Science current issue
Brain implant trials spur ethical discussions
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Science current issue
The perfect wave
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Science current issue
Killer clones
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Science current issue
Cell cycle proteins moonlight in multiciliogenesis
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Science current issue
Linking smell to metabolism and aging
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Science current issue
Tricks for noncovalent catalysis
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Science current issue
A record of ice sheet demise
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Science current issue
The need to regulate replication fork speed
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Science current issue
Plant invasions in the Anthropocene
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Science current issue
Small media, big impact
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Science current issue
A trove of biodiversity, at risk
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Science current issue
Engineered emotions
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Science current issue
Canada fails to protect its caribou
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Science current issue
North Atlantic right whales in danger
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Science current issue
Let experts judge research potential
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Science current issue
Natural and engineered perovskites
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Science current issue
Perovskite in Earths deep interior Silicate perovskite-type phases are the most abundant constituent inside our planet and are the predominant minerals in Earth’s lower mantle more than 660 kilometers below the surface. Magnesium-rich perovskite is a major lower mantle phase and undergoes a phase transition to post-perovskite near the bottom of the mantle. Calcium-rich perovskite is proportionally minor but may host numerous trace
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Science current issue
Properties and potential optoelectronic applications of lead halide perovskite nanocrystals Semiconducting lead halide perovskites (LHPs) have not only become prominent thin-film absorber materials in photovoltaics but have also proven to be disruptive in the field of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs). The most important feature of LHP NCs is their so-called defect-tolerance—the apparently benign nature of structural defects, highly abundant in these compounds, with respect to
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Science current issue
Perovskites in catalysis and electrocatalysis Catalysts for chemical and electrochemical reactions underpin many aspects of modern technology and industry, from energy storage and conversion to toxic emissions abatement to chemical and materials synthesis. This role necessitates the design of highly active, stable, yet earth-abundant heterogeneous catalysts. In this Review, we present the perovskite oxide family as a basis for developing suc
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Science current issue
Wave upon wave of disease
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Science current issue
Disappearance of an ice sheet
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Science current issue
Metabolic regulation of genome stability
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Science current issue
Measuring the impact of the media
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Science current issue
Evaluating author contribution statements
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Science current issue
Scattered light, it is all the same
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Science current issue
De-stressing cancer with {beta}-blockers
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Science current issue
Fly brain inspires computing algorithm
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Science current issue
Topological or trivial?
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Science current issue
Transporter layers improve stability
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Science current issue
Lewis acid catalysis tackled by tag team
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Science current issue
Regulated lysosomal efflux of amino acids
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Science current issue
SAMTOR joins the family
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Science current issue
Taming mitosis for differentiation
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Science current issue
Humans shape how plants invade
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Science current issue
Connecting smell to metabolism
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Science current issue
Balancing translation and Rac1 signaling
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Science current issue
Calibrating antifungal responses
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Science current issue
Controlling cellular calcium concentration
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Science current issue
A drug that fights both heart attack and cancer
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Science current issue
Jail or bail? Machines versus judges
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Science current issue
Modeling human tumors--an imperfect art
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Science current issue
Not all STEM teachers work in a classroom
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Science current issue
Astrocytes regulating synaptogenesis
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Science current issue
Healing powers of dressing well
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Science current issue
Lewis acid enhancement by hydrogen-bond donors for asymmetric catalysis Small-molecule dual hydrogen-bond (H-bond) donors such as ureas, thioureas, squaramides, and guanidinium ions enjoy widespread use as effective catalysts for promoting a variety of enantioselective reactions. However, these catalysts are only weakly acidic and therefore require highly reactive electrophilic substrates to be effective. We introduce here a mode of catalytic activity with chiral H-b
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Science current issue
Observation of mean path length invariance in light-scattering media The microstructure of a medium strongly influences how light propagates through it. The amount of disorder it contains determines whether the medium is transparent or opaque. Theory predicts that exciting such a medium homogeneously and isotropically makes some of its optical properties depend only on the medium’s outer geometry. Here, we report an optical experiment demonstrating that the mean p
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Science current issue
Perovskite solar cells with CuSCN hole extraction layers yield stabilized efficiencies greater than 20% Perovskite solar cells (PSCs) with efficiencies greater than 20% have been realized only with expensive organic hole-transporting materials. We demonstrate PSCs that achieve stabilized efficiencies exceeding 20% with copper(I) thiocyanate (CuSCN) as the hole extraction layer. A fast solvent removal method enabled the creation of compact, highly conformal CuSCN layers that facilitate rapid carrier
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Science current issue
Distinguishing a Majorana zero mode using spin-resolved measurements One-dimensional topological superconductors host Majorana zero modes (MZMs), the nonlocal property of which could be exploited for quantum computing applications. We use spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy to show that MZMs realized in self-assembled Fe chains on the surface of Pb have a spin polarization that exceeds that stemming from the magnetism of these chains. This feature, captur
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Science current issue
How the news media activate public expression and influence national agendas We demonstrate that exposure to the news media causes Americans to take public stands on specific issues, join national policy conversations, and express themselves publicly—all key components of democratic politics—more often than they would otherwise. After recruiting 48 mostly small media outlets, we chose groups of these outlets to write and publish articles on subjects we approved, on dates
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Science current issue
Cordilleran Ice Sheet mass loss preceded climate reversals near the Pleistocene Termination The Cordilleran Ice Sheet (CIS) once covered an area comparable to that of Greenland. Previous geologic evidence and numerical models indicate that the ice sheet covered much of westernmost Canada as late as 12.5 thousand years ago (ka). New data indicate that substantial areas throughout westernmost Canada were ice free prior to 12.5 ka and some as early as 14.0 ka, with implications for climate
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Science current issue
Genomic history of the seventh pandemic of cholera in Africa The seventh cholera pandemic has heavily affected Africa, although the origin and continental spread of the disease remain undefined. We used genomic data from 1070 Vibrio cholerae O1 isolates, across 45 African countries and over a 49-year period, to show that past epidemics were attributable to a single expanded lineage. This lineage was introduced at least 11 times since 1970, into two main re
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Science current issue
Integrated view of Vibrio cholerae in the Americas Latin America has experienced two of the largest cholera epidemics in modern history; one in 1991 and the other in 2010. However, confusion still surrounds the relationships between globally circulating pandemic Vibrio cholerae clones and local bacterial populations. We used whole-genome sequencing to characterize cholera across the Americas over a 40-year time span. We found that both epidemics
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Science current issue
A neural algorithm for a fundamental computing problem Similarity search—for example, identifying similar images in a database or similar documents on the web—is a fundamental computing problem faced by large-scale information retrieval systems. We discovered that the fruit fly olfactory circuit solves this problem with a variant of a computer science algorithm (called locality-sensitive hashing). The fly circuit assigns similar neural activity patte
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Science current issue
Redox-sensitive alteration of replisome architecture safeguards genome integrity DNA replication requires coordination between replication fork progression and deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP)–generating metabolic pathways. We find that perturbation of ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) in humans elevates reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are detected by peroxiredoxin 2 (PRDX2). In the oligomeric state, PRDX2 forms a replisome-associated ROS sensor, which binds the fork accel
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Science current issue
Calibrated mitotic oscillator drives motile ciliogenesis Cell division and differentiation depend on massive and rapid organelle remodeling. The mitotic oscillator, centered on the cyclin-dependent kinase 1–anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (CDK1-APC/C) axis, spatiotemporally coordinates this reorganization in dividing cells. Here we discovered that nondividing cells could also implement this mitotic clocklike regulatory circuit to orchestrate subce
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Science current issue
Lysosomal metabolomics reveals V-ATPase- and mTOR-dependent regulation of amino acid efflux from lysosomes The lysosome degrades and recycles macromolecules, signals to the cytosol and nucleus, and is implicated in many diseases. Here, we describe a method for the rapid isolation of mammalian lysosomes and use it to quantitatively profile lysosomal metabolites under various cell states. Under nutrient-replete conditions, many lysosomal amino acids are in rapid exchange with those in the cytosol. Loss
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Science current issue
SAMTOR is an S-adenosylmethionine sensor for the mTORC1 pathway mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) regulates cell growth and metabolism in response to multiple environmental cues. Nutrients signal via the Rag guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) to promote the localization of mTORC1 to the lysosomal surface, its site of activation. We identified SAMTOR, a previously uncharacterized protein, which inhibits mTORC1 signaling by interacting with GATOR1, the GTPase activating
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Science current issue
New Products
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Science current issue
Webinar | Deciphering cancer: Investigating cell death mechanisms
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Science current issue
Fighting for my Dream
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Science current issue
Response to Comment on "The extent of forest in dryland biomes" De la Cruz et al . question the reliability of our results, claiming that we do not refer to the most appropriate spatial extent of drylands. In our response, we explain why we chose an existing and internationally recognized delineation of drylands among several options, and why our findings are due to a difference of remote sensing technique and not to the definition of drylands we have selecte
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cell biology: How to control traffic on cellular highwaysInside cells, protein 'motors' act like trucks on tiny cellular highways to deliver life-sustaining cargoes. Now a team of researchers has discovered how cells deploy enzymes to place traffic control and 'roadway under construction' signs along cellular highways.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Finger and toe fossils belonged to tiny primates 45 million years agoA new study identifies nearly 500 minuscule finger and toe bones as belonging to 45-million-year-old tiny primates. Many of the fossils are so small they rival the diminutive size of a mustard seed. Representing nine different taxonomic families of primates and as many as 25 species, the specimens from China include numerous fossils attributed to Eosimias, the very first anthropoid known to date,
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The next generation of power electronics? Gallium nitride doped with berylliumPhysicists have made a breakthrough in revising methods largely discarded 15 years ago. They have discovered a microscopic mechanism that will allow gallium nitride semiconductors to be used in electronic devices that distribute large amounts of electric power.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Rift Valley fever virus: An infection mechanism identifiedRift Valley fever virus is responsible for outbreaks in livestock in Africa and can also be fatal in humans. Scientists have characterized the mechanism used by the virus to insert one of its envelope proteins into the host cell membrane, thereby enabling it to infect the cell. Understanding these interactions should pave the way for the identification of new therapeutic strategies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Twin study finds genetics affects where children look, shaping mental developmentA study that tracked the eye movement of twins has found that genetics plays a strong role in how people attend to their environment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How and why blood clots shrinkResearchers have used high-powered microscopy and rheometry -- the measurement of how materials become deformed in response to applied force -- to view the blood clotting process in real time and at the cellular level. The findings will be useful in the development of new therapies for clotting disorders.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Live from Falling WallsScientists from around the world gather in Berlin to present life-changing research -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica
US House Science Committee just had a rational hearing about climate Enlarge / Congressman Randy Weber feeling curious about some atmospheric science. House Science Committee hearings on climate change are many things to many people. For members of the committee, they are typically soapbox pageants, with long, blustery declarations punctuated by leading questions to witnesses who have been invited because they will give a desired answer. For well-known contrarians
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Hurricane Maria devastation prompts Ocean XPRIZE rethinkSeptember's Maria storm disrupts the international competition to find innovative ways to map the seafloor.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Suomi NPP sees Tropical Depression Haikui formNASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Philippines and saw the thirtieth tropical cyclone of the northwestern Pacific Ocean typhoon season form. On Nov. 9 at 0454 UTC (Nov. 8 at 11:54 p.m. EST) NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image of Tropical Depression Haikui over the central Philippines. The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard NASA-NOA
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Brain research is underserved by statistics, says Carnegie Mellon's Rob KassBrain-related disorders impact almost everyone, either directly or through family or friends. For many of the disorders, whether they're psychiatric or neurological, there are basic scientific descriptions and valuable treatment options, but none has a satisfactory cure because the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood.
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Popular Science
How to test your tap water for lead DIY Nearly half of Americans suspect that their water might be unsafe. Luckily, homeowners who suspect that their drinking water might be contaminated have more options than ever before.
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The Scientist RSS
ResearchGate Restricts Access to Nearly 2 Million ArticlesThe academic social network is bending to pressure from publishing giants that demand it removes copyrighted material from its site.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study affirms new strategies for reducing achievement gapSuccessful implementation of preschool to 3rd grade programs yields benefits in increasing school readiness, improving attendance, and strengthening parental involvement in school education—strategies that can close the achievement gap for children at risk, according to a new University of Minnesota study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fueling the future: Scientists promote new method of algal hydrogen productionChanging the way the nation generates and consumes energy is at the heart of a new NSF grant awarded to Arizona State University and Kevin Redding, professor in the School of Molecular Sciences and director of the Center for Bioenergy and Photosynthesis (CB&P).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Transfer technique produces wearable gallium nitride gas sensorsA transfer technique based on thin sacrificial layers of boron nitride could allow high-performance gallium nitride gas sensors to be grown on sapphire substrates and then transferred to metallic or flexible polymer support materials. The technique could facilitate the production of low-cost wearable, mobile and disposable sensing devices for a wide range of environmental applications.
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Gizmodo
North Korea's Apple Obsession Brings New Meaning to the Phrase 'Walled Garden' Image: KCNA The Democratic People’s Republic of North Korea is not known for embracing outside influences. But the country’s ruling elite are such big fans of Apple that North Korean technology has been designed to mimic hardware and software developed by the company. And Pyongyang’s admiration for Cupertino apparently goes much deeper—and darker. New details from the peninsula suggest that Kim J
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Gizmodo
How to Read a Camera Lens Image credit: Giuseppe Cirasino/ Flickr When it comes to purchasing a lens for your digital camera, the sheer number of options, specifications, acronyms, and features is enough to make anyone throw up their hands in frustration and resort to simply using their smartphone. But dedicated cameras are still worth it , and produce high-quality photos that smartphone cameras just can’t match with thei
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Transfer technique produces wearable gallium nitride gas sensorsA transfer technique based on thin sacrificial layers of boron nitride could allow high-performance gallium nitride gas sensors to be grown on sapphire substrates and then transferred to metallic or flexible polymer support materials. The technique could facilitate the production of low-cost wearable, mobile and disposable sensing devices for a wide range of environmental applications.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Crested pigeons sound the alarm with their wingsCrested pigeons have specialized feathers that signal danger when they flee from an apparent threat.
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Feed: All Latest
Twitter's 280-Character Limit Is Forcing Users to Be Creative All Over Again (Kinda)The platform hooked people with brevity—can it do the same with levity?
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The Atlantic
The 'Weinstein Effect' Is Changing Movie-Making Usually, when a film goes through last-minute reshoots, it’s to remove a location, or a specific set piece—like how Spider-Man removed an action scene involving the World Trade Center post–9/11, or how Gangster Squad spent weeks changing a gun battle set inside a movie theater because of the 2012 Aurora shooting. But with his film All the Money in the World , Ridley Scott is excising a person: Th
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The Atlantic
The CMA Awards Address Las Vegas, Lightly Perhaps Hootie and the Blowfish can heal America? The 2017 Country Music Association Awards opened how you might expect an annual summit would for a community that, a little more than a month earlier, was targeted in the worst mass shooting in modern U.S. history. On a darkened stage, under one spotlight, Eric Church began singing “Amazing Grace.” But then came incongruously bright guitar sounds,
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Live Science
Americans' Well-Being Declines for 1st Time Since 2014After three years of improvement, the well-being of Americans ticked downward in 2017, according to a new poll, though some demographics were spared.
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Science | The Guardian
How Wellcome sent a medicine collector to wander Asia for a decade UK exhibition tells story of Paira Mall, an Indian doctor dispatched by a millionaire in 1911 to send back Ayurvedic materials In 1911 a young Indian doctor was kitted out by the patent medicines millionaire and obsessive collector Henry Wellcome, to go back to India and collect material relating to the ancient practice of Ayurvedic medicine. Related: V&A acquires segment of Robin Hood Gardens co
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Ingeniøren
Dansk landmand giver forskerne uvurderligt datamaterialeTo læserbreve og et protestbrev danner rammen for ugens rundtur i den videnskabelige nyhedstrøm, hvor vi møder en usædvanlig relation mellem π og massen af protoner og elektroner.
5h
Ars Technica
Net neutrality rules should apply to ISPs and websites, senator says Enlarge / Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.). (credit: Getty Images | Justin Sullivan) Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.) wants the US to impose net neutrality rules on Google, Facebook, Amazon, Twitter, and other Web companies. Net neutrality rules today apply only to Internet service providers , such as cable companies and mobile carriers. ISPs are not allowed to block, throttle, or demand payments to prioritize
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Popular Science
This temperature-control mug is the best product I've tried in 2017 Gadgets Honestly, it changed my coffee drinking habits. After a few weeks of trying Ember's new temperature control mug, it's changed my coffee drinking habits.
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Viden
1+2+3 = 24: Apples lommeregner regner pivforkertEn fejl i det nyeste styresystem til iPhone har slået lommeregneren ud af kurs.
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The Atlantic
How John Wayne Became a Hollow Masculine Icon John Ford first noticed him in 1928, herding a flock of geese on the set of Mother Machree , an otherwise forgettable shanty-Irish weepie. The kid was huge, but innocent—or at least innocent-seeming. He had (he later claimed) “no desire” to be an actor. He was just a college football player earning spare cash as a property boy, an extra. Ford noticed him, but concluded that he wasn’t ready. (“I w
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The Atlantic
'Our Surfing Is Revolutionary' Professional big wave surfer Bianca Valenti first took to the ocean when she was five. Because there were no girls’ divisions, she competed with the boys. Throughout her career in professional big wave surfing, which she calls “a whole different ball game,” Valenti has dedicated herself to empowering female surfers. “Women in surfing are portrayed [with] a sexualized lens,” Valenti recounted in a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
U of M study affirms new strategies for reducing achievement gapSuccessful implementation of preschool to third grade programs yields benefits in increasing school readiness, improving attendance, and strengthening parental involvement in school education -- strategies that can close the achievement gap for children at risk, according to a new University of Minnesota study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How and why blood clots shrinkIn an article published in Nature Communications, researchers at the University of California, Riverside and the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine used high-powered microscopy and rheometry -- the measurement of how materials become deformed in response to applied force -- to view the blood clotting process in real time and at the cellular level. The findings will be useful in the deve
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Transfer technique produces wearable gallium nitride gas sensorsA transfer technique based on thin sacrificial layers of boron nitride could allow high-performance gallium nitride gas sensors to be grown on sapphire substrates and then transferred to metallic or flexible polymer support materials. The technique could facilitate the production of low-cost wearable, mobile and disposable sensing devices for a wide range of environmental applications.
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Live Science
Dinosaurs Might Have Survived the Asteroid, Had It Hit Almost Anywhere ElseThe age of dinosaurs met an unlikely end — because had the cosmic impact that doomed it hit just about anywhere else on the planet, the "terrible lizards" might still roam the Earth, a new study finds.
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Ars Technica
Intel to build discrete GPUs, hires AMD’s top graphics guy to do it (credit: Intel) One might have thought that with Monday's announcement that Intel is going to produce processors with embedded AMD GPUs , the two processor companies were on good terms. That's looking a little less likely now. On Tuesday, AMD announced that Raja Koduri, its chief GPU architect, will leave the company. Where is he going? That question was resolved on Wednesday : Intel. And what's
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New on MIT Technology Review
Reid Hoffman: It’s Time to Change Silicon Valley CultureThe LinkedIn cofounder and venture capitalist explains how he’s trying to combat sexual harassment and economic inequality in the tech industry and beyond.
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Gizmodo
Even a Novice Hacker Could Breach the Network Hosting Kris Kobach's Bogus Voter Fraud Program Kansas Secretary of State, Kris Kobach (L) and US Vice President Mike Pence, attend the first meeting of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, on July 19, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images) A program overseen by the head of President Trump’s so-called “election integrity” commission—which is now largely a t
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The Atlantic
Why Sign-Language Gloves Don't Help Deaf People Along with jet packs and hover boards, a machine to translate from any language to any other is so appealing as a fantasy that people are willing to overlook clunky prototypes as long as they can retain the belief that the future promised by science fiction has, at last, arrived. One particularly clunky subspecies of the universal language translator has a rather dismal history: the sign-language
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The Atlantic
Why the GOP’s Dream of Tax Reform Is (Probably) Doomed The Republican Party has long billed itself as being for family values, for the dignity of work, for lower taxes, and (at least, as the minority party) for balanced budgets. The House GOP tax bill cuts against all of these positions. It would raise taxes on about one-third of the middle class by 2027. By eliminating the estate tax, it would benefit heirs of large estates, even if they don’t work
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
Science Says These Police Tactics Reduce CrimeThe verdict is in: a scientific review of different policing approaches -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP sees Tropical Depression Haikui formNASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Philippines and saw the thirtieth tropical cyclone of the northwestern Pacific Ocean typhoon season form.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
HPV vaccine also prevents uncommon childhood respiratory disease, study suggestsThe vaccine that protects against cancer-causing types of human papillomavirus (HPV) also prevents an uncommon but incurable childhood respiratory disease, according to a new study published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Twin study finds genetics affects where children look, shaping mental developmentA study published Nov. 9 in the journal current Biology and co-led by Indiana University that tracked the eye movement of twins has found that genetics plays a strong role in how people attend to their environment.
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: Dinosaurs Might Not Be Extinct Had the Asteroid Struck ElsewhereHad the asteroid that doomed dinosaurs crashed nearly anywhere other than the coast of Mexico, they might not have gone extinct, researchers say.
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The Economist: The world this week
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The Economist: The world this week
Politics this week
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The Economist: The world this week
KAL's cartoon
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New on MIT Technology Review
AI Could Help Reporters Dig Into Grassroots Issues Once MoreTwitter’s media science chief says machine learning will help journalists understand a world fragmented by digital technologies and political polarization.
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The Atlantic
Trump Insults People From Afar, Then Praises Them in Person When Donald Trump addressed South Korea’s parliament earlier this week, The Associated Press noted his “striking shift in tone.” After Trump journeyed from Seoul to Beijing, The New York Times made a video entitled “ Trump’s striking change in tone on China .” But the change isn’t all that striking. It’s predictable. Trump insults people from afar and then praises them in person. He demands they
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Gizmodo
New Brain Technologies Could Lead to Terrifying Invasions of Privacy, Warn Scientists Image: Warner Brothers Imagine for a minute that you survive a terrible accident, and lose function of your right arm. You receive a brain implant able to interpret your brain’s neural activity and reroute commands to a robotic arm. Then one day, someone hacks that chip, sending malicious commands to the robotic arm. It’s a biological invasion of privacy in which you are suddenly no longer in con
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Extinct wolf-sized otter had powerful biteA giant otter that roamed China six million years ago had a surprisingly strong bite, say scientists.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Star kills its 'congenial' to form together a dwarf-binary system, astronomers confirmGroup of scientists in Brazilian universities and research institutions observe star demoted to white dwarf status because of companion. Star was pronounced dead once its helium core ended up exposed after it had a great part of its mass ejected by means of the gravitational interaction between both objects.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Metagenomic analysis software reveals new causes of superbug emergenceResearchers from ITMO University and Center of Physical and Chemical Medicine developed an algorithm capable of tracking the spread of antibiotic resistance genes in gut microbiota DNA and revealed additional evidence of resistance genes transfer between different bacterial species. The method can not only contribute to the development of effective therapy schemes, but also curb the spread of supe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists figure out how cell division timer worksHuman cells use a timer to divide: each cell gets at least 30 minutes to divide its genetic material between the nuclei of two daughter cells. Researchers at KU Leuven, Belgium, have unravelled how this timer is switched on and off. Their findings open up perspectives for the treatment of cancer, as keeping the timer going would stop cancer cells from dividing.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Parasites suck it upDepletion of a fatty molecule in human blood propels malaria parasites to stop replicating and causing illness in people and instead to jump ship to mosquitoes to continue the transmission cycle, according to a new study by an international research team.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Frequent alcohol drinking kills new brain cells in adults, females are more vulnerableResearchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston recently discovered that alcohol killed the stem cells residing in adult mouse brains. The researchers also found that brain stem cells in key brain regions of adult mice respond differently to alcohol exposure, and they show for the first time that these changes are different for females and males. The findings are available in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How to control traffic on cellular highwaysInside cells, protein 'motors' act like trucks on tiny cellular highways to deliver life-sustaining cargoes. Now a team led by Rutgers University-New Brunswick researchers has discovered how cells deploy enzymes to place traffic control and 'roadway under construction' signs along cellular highways.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study reveals how a very low calorie diet can reverse type 2 diabetesIn a new study, a Yale-led research team uncovers how a very low calorie diet can rapidly reverse type 2 diabetes in animal models. If confirmed in people, the insight provides potential new drug targets for treating this common chronic disease, said the researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Th1/17 hybrid T cells offer potent and durable anti-tumor response in preclinical modelAdoptive cell therapy for cancer involves harvesting T cells from a patient and expanding and sometimes modifying them in the laboratory before reinfusion. It has been challenging to create T cells that are both potent and durable. In a Cell Metabolism article, Medical University of South Carolina investigators report the potent anti-tumor properties of hybrid Th1/Th17 cells that combine the cance
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Crested pigeons use feathers to sound the alarmMany animals will sound an alarm to alert other members of their group of impending danger. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on Nov. 9 have shown that crested pigeons do this in a surprisingly non-vocal way. One of their main flight feathers produces a critical high-pitched sound as the birds fly away. As they flap faster to escape a predator, that alarm signal automatically increases
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Heart attacks more likely in those with low blood phosphate levelsLow phosphate in the blood is linked to the risk of heart attack and coronary artery disease, a new study reports.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mending hearts in three dimensionsResearchers have made biodegradable aligned nanofibers as a scaffold for culturing cardiomyocytes (CMs) derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Significant financial stress associated with 13-fold higher odds of having a heart attackSignificant financial stress is associated with a 13-fold higher odds of having a heart attack, according to research.
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Dagens Medicin
Hvor gik data hen, da Sundhedsplatformen gik ind?Mulighederne for kvalitetsudvikling ikke bare er forringet, men ofte umuliggjort efter indførelsen af Sundhedsplatformen. Den har medført et tab af værdifulde sundhedsdata, som nærmest må betegnes som uopretteligt.
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Viden
Selvmåling gav Thomas en kur mod allergiI et regneark på sin computer kan Thomas Blomseth Christiansen se, at han nyste 486 gange i 2014. I år er han indtil videre kun på 164 nys.
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Viden
Fremtidens læge får hjælp af dit ur og telefonDe store teknologivirksomheder vil i stigende grad følge med i vores helbred, men overvågningen kan komme os til gode.
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Scientific American Content: Global
U.K. Government Appoints Next Chief Scientific AdviserA former pharmaceutical boss will help navigate the U.K.'s exit from the European Union -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rift Valley fever virus: An infection mechanism identifiedRift Valley fever virus is responsible for outbreaks in livestock in Africa and can also be fatal in humans. Scientists from the Institut Pasteur and the CNRS, working with the University of Göttingen, have characterized the mechanism used by the virus to insert one of its envelope proteins into the host cell membrane, thereby enabling it to infect the cell. Understanding these interactions should
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The next generation of power electronics? Gallium nitride doped with berylliumPhysicists at Aalto University have made a breakthrough in revising methods largely discarded 15 years ago. They have discovered a microscopic mechanism that will allow gallium nitride semiconductors to be used in electronic devices that distribute large amounts of electric power.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Crested pigeons use feathers to sound the alarmMany animals will sound an alarm to alert other members of their group of impending danger. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on November 9 have shown that crested pigeons do this in a surprisingly non-vocal way. One of their main flight feathers produces a critical high-pitched sound as the birds fly away. As they flap faster to escape a predator, that alarm signal automatically incre
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fatty molecule in human blood controls malaria parasites' decision to leap to mosquitoesDepletion of a fatty molecule in human blood propels malaria parasites to stop replicating and causing illness in people and instead to jump ship to mosquitoes to continue the transmission cycle, according to a new study by an international research team.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Kindle with your kale? Amazon to open shops in Whole FoodsYou may see more of Amazon inside Whole Foods soon: The online retailer, which has already been selling its voice-activated Echos at Whole Foods, will start to sell Kindles, Fire tablets and other Amazon devices at its grocery stores.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sri Lanka plans to scrap state-owned fossil fuel vehicles by 2025Sri Lanka announced Thursday plans to replace all state-owned vehicles with electric or hybrid models by 2025, a move that will be extended to private vehicles by 2040.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Philadelphia Zoo euthanizes popular Asiatic black bearOne of the Philadelphia Zoo's most popular animals has died.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Activists occupy ranger headquarters in primeval forest disputeSeveral dozen environmental activists on Thursday occupied the Warsaw headquarters of Poland's state forest management agency to protest against logging in the Bialowieza forest, a protected UNESCO site that includes Europe's last primeval woodland.
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Gizmodo
Crested Pigeons Sound the Alarm With Whistling Wings A crested pigeon in flight. Primary feathers are spread and the narrow eighth primary is visible. (Image: Geoffrey Dabb) A small contingent of chunky, dove-like birds cautiously patter around a clearing in a park in suburban Sydney. Suddenly, a feral cat pounces out from some nearby brush, narrowly missing a flock member’s feather plume-festooned head with a paw. In a panicked huff, the birds tak
6h
New on MIT Technology Review
A Mind-Bending Cryptographic Trick Promises to Take Blockchains MainstreamCryptographers have researched zero-knowledge proofs for two decades, but the technique is only just now poised to redefine the concept of online privacy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Breeding highly productive corn has reduced its ability to adaptStuck where they are, plants have to adapt to their environments, responding to stresses like drought or pests by changing how they grow.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A number of proactive policing practices are successful at reducing crimeA number of strategies used by the police to proactively prevent crimes have proved to be successful at crime reduction, at least in the short term, and most strategies do not harm communities' attitudes toward police, finds a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. However, the committee that conducted the study and wrote the report said there is insufficient
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Telling teeth: More accurate aging of teeth could hold the key to identifying health-compromised children in AfricaResearchers have investigated dental development for better estimations of chronological age in African populations.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Neighborhood's quality influences children's behaviors through teens, study suggestsThe quality of the neighborhood where a child grows up has a significant impact on the number of problem behaviors they display during elementary and teenage years, a study suggests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
E-cigarette online vendors triple, concerns raised about marketing, deliveryTwo studies reveal trends in the marketing practices, pricing, delivery methods of online e-cigarette vendors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cell signaling interaction may prevent key step in lung cancer progression, study showsA novel cell signaling interaction that may prevent a key step in lung cancer progression, new findings reveals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mushrooms are full of antioxidants that may have antiaging potentialMushrooms may contain unusually high amounts of two antioxidants that some scientists suggest could help fight aging and bolster health, according to a team of researchers.
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Gizmodo
Jezebel Charlie Sheen ‘Absolutely Denies’ Claim That He Raped Corey Haim On the Set of Lucas | Deads Jezebel Charlie Sheen ‘Absolutely Denies’ Claim That He Raped Corey Haim On the Set of Lucas | Deadspin Roger Goodell Reportedly “Furious” At Being Offered Non-Guaranteed Contract | Very Smart Brothas The Most Useless Types of White People, Ranked | Splinter The Tragic Story of Althea Garrison, the First Trans Person to Hold State Office in America | Earther Republicans Decided to Talk About a Dr
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Gizmodo
Thursday's Best Deals: Roku Premiere+, Horizon Zero Dawn, Clear the Rack, and More Dig through Nordstrom’s Clear the Rack sale. Plus check out a $50 4K-ready Roku , and Horizon Zero Daw n is back in stock. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Roku Premiere+ , $50 Roku’s Premiere+ is one of the only streaming boxes in town capable of playing HDR 4K video at 60 FPS , and at $50, it’s by far the cheapest. That’s the best price Amazon’s
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Ars Technica
Doom definitely works on the Switch, but it looks noticeably worse Thus far in the Nintendo Switch's short life, we've seen games like The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild and Super Mario Odyssey prove that strong art design can create engaging, good-looking 3D worlds even with the system's relatively low-powered hardware. But we have yet to see how a high-end game created with more powerful consoles and PCs in mind holds up when ported to the Switch (ports l
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How spatial navigation correlates with languageCognitive neuroscientists from the Higher School of Economics and Aarhus University experimentally demonstrate how spatial navigation impacts language comprehension. The results of the study have been published in NeuroImage.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Older donor lungs should be considered for transplantationWith a scarcity of lungs available for transplantation, the use of lungs from donors older than age 60 has been shown to achieve reasonable outcomes and should be considered as a viable option, according to research published online today in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery.
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Big Think
To End Foreign Civil Wars, Should the US Intervene? Civil wars are a particularly brutal type of conflict. Warring sides are trapped inside a single border, the fighting can last decades, and peace may not last once the fighting stops. Read More
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The Atlantic
The Future Has Arrived for Mohammed bin Salman Thus far, last weekend’s apparent anti-corruption “purge” of Saudi princes and senior officials by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman (MbS) has been depicted as a power play that consolidated all authority in the young royal’s hands. But that’s not quite correct: In truth, his power grab ended on June 21, the day he was appointed crown prince. This process only became possible with the deaths of th
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Quanta Magazine
How to Triumph and Cooperate in Game Theory and Evolution At the heart of game theory, one of the foundations of modern economics, lies the foundational concept of “ Nash equilibrium ,” named after the late mathematician and Nobel laureate John Nash. Nash showed that for any competitive situation or “game,” there exists a set of strategies upon the use of which, players cannot further improve their winnings. His work continues to appear in important new
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Gizmodo
Twitter Halts All Verifications After Verifying Charlottesville Neo-Nazi Rally Organizer Jason Kessler speaks to the media on Sunday, August 13th, 2017 before getting chased away by a crowd upset about the death of Heather Heyer. (Photo: AP) Yesterday, Twitter decided to verify Jason Kessler, an organizer of the August neo-Nazi rally in Charlottesville that left one woman dead. Shortly after her death, Kessler even tweeted that the woman was a “fat disgusting Communist” and character
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Gizmodo
Watch This GoPro Experience What It's Like To Be Consumed By Molten Lava GIF The big advantage to compact action cams like the GoPro is that they’re tiny enough to capture shots in places where regular cameras can’t fit. And as Hawaii volcano guide Erik Storm discovered, they’re also remarkably resilient, even to the point of surviving an 1,100+ degrees Fahrenheit lava flow . PetaPixel has the whole story of what happened to this GoPro, but long story short: Storm pla
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Scientific American Content: Global
Island Nations Urge Aggressive Action at U.N. Climate MeetingSome islands may see large strips of territory disappear by the end of the century -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science
Lab-Grown Skin Saves Dying Boy with Rare DiseaseScientists created fully functional skin for a 7-year-old boy with a genetic skin disease. Here's how they accomplished the medical feat.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Breeding highly productive corn has reduced its ability to adaptResearchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison wanted to know whether the last 100 years of selecting for corn that is acclimated to particular locations has changed its ability to adapt to new or stressful environments. By measuring populations of corn plants planted across North America, they could test how the corn genomes responded to different growing conditions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cognitive behavioral therapy for chronic pain -- can CBT help fight the Opioid epidemic?By teaching patients better strategies for coping with chronic pain, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a valuable treatment alternative for the millions of Americans taking opioids for noncancer pain, according to an article in the Journal of Psychiatric Practice. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A number of proactive policing practices are successful at reducing crimeA number of strategies used by the police to proactively prevent crimes have proved to be successful at crime reduction, at least in the short term, and most strategies do not harm communities' attitudes toward police, finds a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. However, the committee that conducted the study and wrote the report said there is insufficient
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Opioid use by patients after rhinoplastyRhinoplasty patients used an average of nine of 20 to 30 hydrocodone-acetaminophen tablets prescribed for pain relief, suggesting that over-prescription of opioids after the common procedure could be a source available for diversion and misuse.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cancer drug parity laws lower costs for many, but not everyoneState laws designed to ensure that the pill form of cancer drugs is not costlier than treatments given through an infusion in a clinic or hospital have had a mixed impact on patients' pocketbooks, according to University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers. Many patients experienced modest improvements in costs, but patients paying the most for their medications sa
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Gizmodo
It's About Time the Nintendo Switch Got a Real Streaming Video App GIF Image: Gizmodo Since it’s release, the Switch has been a dedicated gaming machine. But that wasn’t necessarily by choice; there just weren’t any other apps available for Nintendo’s hybrid console. However, that’s about to change now that the Switch is getting Hulu, sometime this week. Hulu should be available as a download from Nintendo’s eShop after the next update, which could happen as ear
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Popular Science
16 essential kitchen tools from around the world for $20 or less Gadgets Our favorite workhorse appliances, blades, and containers to buy on a budget without sacrificing quality. Our favorite workhorse appliances, blades, and containers to buy on a budget without sacrificing quality.
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Ars Technica
Some in Congress start to question ongoing SLS rocket delays Enlarge / This artist rendering shows an aerial view of the liftoff of the SLS rocket during Exploration Mission 1. (credit: NASA) The US Congress championed the creation of NASA's Space Launch System rocket in 2010, at which time its members also successfully beat back an effort by the Obama administration to end support for the Orion spacecraft. Since then, Republicans and Democrats in the Hous
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Gizmodo
TripAdvisor Has Added Warnings For Hotels With Reports of Sexual Assault and Other Issues Image: TripAdvisor Following a report that TripAdvisor deleted multiple comments warning users about sexual assault, the company has announced a new system that will make it loud and clear if a destination might present safety risks. Last week, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel ran an in-depth expose about TripAdvisor’s history of deleting comments that were written to warn other travelers about pot
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
China's sulfur dioxide emissions fell significantly while India's grew over last decadeSulfur dioxide is an air pollutant that causes acid rain, haze and many health-related problems. It is produced predominantly when coal is burned to generate electricity. Although China and India remain the world's largest consumers of coal, a new study found that China's sulfur dioxide emissions fell by 75 percent since 2007, while India's emissions increased by 50 percent.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Racial profiling by retailers creates an unwelcome climate for black shoppers, study showsDiscrimination endured by black shoppers forces them to downplay their race or shy away from an activity among the most common and celebrated in American culture, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Majority of hospice workers don't have end-of-life wishes themselvesOne might assume that health care providers, especially those dealing with terminally ill patients, such as hospice workers would have a living will or advance directive. Surprisingly, researchers found that the majority of hospice workers did not have an advance directive. Procrastination, fear of the subject and costs were reported as the most common barriers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New method developed to 3-D print fully functional electronic circuitsResearchers have pioneered a breakthrough method to rapidly 3-D print fully functional electronic circuits.
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Feed: All Latest
The Iranian Smugglers Trafficking Fuel Into PakistanPhotographer Sadegh Souri followed them on seven dangerous treks to the border.
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Gizmodo
Extinct Giant Otter Ruled With Powerful Jaws Image Mauricio Antón You might have heard about that insane extinct otter that lived around 6 million years ago and weighed around 11o pounds—about as much as a wolf. Further research shows its powerful jaw could have made it a dominant predator. Last we checked in, scientists wanted to delve deeper into studying this strange species, Siamogale melilutra. They had a complete skull and mandible sp
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rina now a large post-Tropical Storm in North Central AtlanticTropical Storm Rina has lost its tropical characteristics and has become post-tropical as it continues to move through the Central North Atlantic Ocean. NOAA's GOES East satellite provided a visible image of the storm.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Induced pluripotent stem cells show astrocyte-neuron impact on brain pathology in autismUsing human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to model autism spectrum disorder (ASD), researchers at the University of São Paulo, Brazil and University of California, San Diego have revealed for the first time that abnormalities in the supporting cells of the brain, called astrocytes, may contribute to the cause of the disorder.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New Stanford University study reports sex differences in lupus-related premature deathResearchers have shown that women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in the US have an average 22-year shorter life expectancy compared to the general population, versus a 12-year average reduced life-span for men with SLE.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rina now a large post-Tropical Storm in North Central AtlanticTropical Storm Rina has lost its tropical characteristics and has become post-tropical as it continues to move through the Central North Atlantic Ocean. NOAA's GOES East satellite provided a visible image of the storm.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
We should aim for perfection -- and stop fearing failure | Jon BowersSometimes trying your best isn't enough; when the situation demands it, you need to be perfect. For Jon Bowers, who runs a training facility for professional delivery drivers, the stakes are high -- 100 people in the US die every day in car accidents -- and it's perfection, or "a willingness to do what is difficult to achieve what is right," that he looks to achieve. He explains why we should all
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New on MIT Technology Review
Robo-cars and Humans Will Struggle to Coexist, at Least For Now
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA team studies CubeSat mission to measure water on the moonA team of NASA scientists wants to draw a more complete picture of where water exists on the Moon and whether it migrates across the lunar surface, including in the permanently shadowed regions that haven't seen sunlight in perhaps a billion years or more.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nearly 500 finger and toe bones belonged to tiny primates 45 million years agoAt Northern Illinois University, Dan Gebo opens a cabinet and pulls out a drawer full of thin plastic cases filled with clear gelatin capsules. Inside each numbered capsule is a tiny fossil—some are so small they rival the diminutive size of a mustard seed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Aviation renaissance: NASA advances concepts for next-gen aircraftAn aviation renaissance, one focused on energy efficiency and economic impact, is on the horizon, and it's changing how engineers look at aircraft power and design.
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Gizmodo
Uber Needs Obamacare to Work Just as Much as Trump Wants It to Fail Photo: Getty As the Trump administration guts spending on marketing campaigns for Obamacare, aiming ( unsuccessfully ) to undercut enrollment, tech companies are launching their own campaigns to promote insurance plans offered under the Affordable Care Act. Uber is among a number of tech companies launching programs and events to help contractors enroll in Obamacare. Uber’s project, which started
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NYT > Science
From Brussels to Arkansas, a Tough Week for MonsantoFrench and Italian opposition torpedoed an E.U. vote to reauthorize the world’s most popular herbicide, while Little Rock moved to restrict an alternative.
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Gizmodo
Intel Is Finally Working on Proper Graphics Cards Image: Intel AMD has been going hard at Intel this year thanks to its new Ryzen chips , but Intel may get the last laugh now that it’s poached AMD’s lead GPU architect, Raja Koduri, to become Intel’s new senior vice president, and head of its newly formed Core and Visual Computing Group. The biggest CPU-maker in PCs is finally properly investing in GPUs. That means soon, it’s going to be a real t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Eating at night could increase risk of heart disease and diabetesEating during the night is associated with higher risk of heart disease and diabetes, and the body's 24-hour cycle is to blame, according to recent research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why did the Earth's ancient oceans disappear?We think of oceans as being stable and permanent. However, they move at about the same speed as your fingernails grow. Geoscientists have now found a novel way of mapping the Earth’s ancient oceans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How challenges change the way you thinkNew research shows that challenging situations make it harder to understand where you are and what's happening around you. Researchers showed participants three clips from feature films -- one neutral, two challenging. After watching the challenging scenes, the participants were less able to acquire spatial and sequential context -- that is, they became worse at mapping out where objects were and
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A giant, prehistoric otter's surprisingly powerful biteA massive, wolf-sized otter that lived about 6 million years ago may have been a dominant predator in its time, according to a new analysis of the animal's jaws. When scientists used computers to simulate how biting would strain S. melilutra's jaws, they concluded that the animal had much firmer jaw bones than expected, giving it a surprisingly strong bite.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Building better silkEngineers can make a material that is stiffer than the real thing. Starting with silk produced by silkworms, breaking it down chemically, and then reassembling it, the new material can be shaped into complex structures such as meshes and lattices.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brace yourself for coming heatwaves, there are at least 27 ways they can kill youA new systematic synthesis shows that there are at least 27 different physiological pathways in which a heatwave can kill a human being, and everyone is at risk.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Neolithic farmers coexisted with hunter-gatherers for centuries in EuropeNew research answers a long-debated question among anthropologists, archaeologists and geneticists: when farmers first arrived in Europe, how did they interact with existing hunter-gatherer groups? Did the farmers wipe out the hunter-gatherers, through warfare or disease, shortly after arriving? Or did they slowly out-compete them over time? The current study suggests that these groups likely coex
7h
Futurity.org
People with depression report wanting to work out Mental health providers may want to take a closer look at including exercise in their patients’ treatment plans, a new study suggests. Researchers asked 295 patients receiving treatment at a mental health clinic whether they wanted to be more physically active and if exercise helped improve their mood and anxiety. They also asked if patients wanted their therapist to help them become more active.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Finger and toe fossils belonged to tiny primates 45 million years agoA new study identifies nearly 500 minuscule finger and toe bones as belonging to 45-million-year-old tiny primates. Many of the fossils are so small they rival the diminutive size of a mustard seed. Representing nine different taxonomic families of primates and as many as 25 species, the specimens from China include numerous fossils attributed to Eosimias, the very first anthropoid known to date,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Not all milkweed is equal for egg-laying monarchs, U of G study revealsMilkweed plants in agricultural areas have 3 1/2 times more monarch butterfly eggs than milkweed growing in urban gardens, natural areas and roadsides, according to a new University of Guelph study. The researchers also found monarchs prefer small patches of the plant to larger ones. These findings have implications for current initiatives underway that involve planting milkweed to help the surviv
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Gizmodo
8 Annoying iOS 11 Problems and How to Deal With Them Image: Gizmodo Updating your iDevice to the latest version of iOS gets you the newest features and the best security protection, but it can also bring with it a slew of bugs and issues. Since its release, iOS 11 has caused myriad problems, so here’s an easy reference guide to some of the issues you might be seeing and what you can do about them. Reports indicate that iOS 11 is a particularly flaw
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Science : NPR
Monks For A Month: College Kids Give Up Talking — And Technology Students in this "Living Deliberately"' class embrace asceticism and challenge stereotypes of college kids who can't put down their cellphones, says anthropologist Barbara J. King. (Image credit: PeopleImages/Getty Images)
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Dagens Medicin
Hospitalsdirektør beklager fejl ved udbud af sygehusbyggeri Region Hovedstaden har handlet i strid med reglerne i bedømmelsesprocessen, da der skulle vælges et totalrådgiverhold til at tegne det nye akuthus på Bispebjerg Hospital. Hospitalsdirektør beklager.
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Viden
Hjælp NASA med et bedre navn til (486958) 2014 MU69Nu har du muligheden for at finde på navnet til et objekt, der befinder sig mere end fire milliarder kilometer fra Jorden.
8h
Ars Technica
Ford will launch a new brand of electric cars just for China Enlarge / Ying Jianren, chairman of Tech-New Group Ltd. and board director of Zotye Auto, and Peter Fleet, Ford group vice president and president, Ford Asia Pacific. (credit: Ford) Ford and Chinese automaker Zotye will partner up on a new line of electric vehicles, we learned Wednesday. The pair is creating a joint venture—Zotye Ford Automobile Company—that they say will offer "a range of stylis
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Not all milkweed is equal for egg-laying monarchs, study revealsA new University of Guelph study reveals that not all milkweed plants are the same for endangered monarch butterflies looking to lay their eggs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hydrogen-powered trains to run on German rails from 2021Commuters in northern Germany will be able to travel on the world's first hydrogen-powered trains in four years' time.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Here comes La Nina, El Nino's flip side, but it will be weakLa Nina, the cool flip side to El Nino, has returned, forecasters said Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EU agrees to reform world's largest carbon marketThe EU struck a deal Thursday to overhaul Europe's carbon market after 2021, hailing it as a key step toward meeting its pledges to cut greenhouse gases under the Paris climate agreement.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A neighborhood's quality influences children's behaviors through teens, study suggestsThe quality of the neighborhood where a child grows up has a significant impact on the number of problem behaviors they display during elementary and teenage years, a study led by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers suggests.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ghana's pineapple farmers need more intensive trainingSimple technologies can be learned effectively through imitation, while complex methods require professional training. If Ghanaian pineapple farmers are to achieve higher yields through more sustainable agriculture, they will need to be trained in exactly these types of complex applications. This was the conclusion reached by a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Kiel Instit
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: More neuroscience research articles are reporting the sex of laboratory animalsIn the largest-ever survey of neuroscience research, scientists found that the number of research studies reporting the sex of lab animals increased significantly in the current decade, though sex bias remains present. The findings demonstrate progress in addressing both males and females in neuroscience research but also highlight the continued need for improved research design.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Super-resolution photoacoustic imaging could allow scientists to watch blood vessels with improved resolutionResearchers have reported an approach to photoacoustic imaging that offers vastly improved resolution, setting the stage for detailed in vivo imaging of deep tissue.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Victorian child reformatories were more successful than today's youth justice systemVictorian institutions designed to reform delinquent or vulnerable children were much more successful than today's youth justice system in assisting children to recover from troubled starts in life, according to new research my colleagues and I have published.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Intelligence study IDs key factors for government, academia, industry collaborationA study of government and industry teamwork at a National Security Agency-funded research center found that an established suite of factors are key to fostering effective collaboration in a novel partnership to conduct research for the intelligence community. The work highlights the importance of organizational innovation and adaptation in light of the challenges that emerge in interinstitutional
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds how to increase the survival time of stem cellsA team of researchers from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Coimbra, led by Dr. Lino Ferreira, MIT Portugal Program Faculty and researcher at the Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology (CNC) in collaboration with Langer Lab at MIT (USA), has developed a new technology, which is promising to understand and treat ischemic diseases. This research is the result of the work initiated by B
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China's sulfur dioxide emissions fell significantly while India's grew over last decadeSulfur dioxide is an air pollutant that causes acid rain, haze and many health-related problems. It is produced predominantly when coal is burned to generate electricity.
8h
Feed: All Latest
Review: Plantronics BackBeat FIT 305Wireless headphones that pass the toughest test of all—being shoved in a gym bag.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New bioresources for plant peptide hormones using gene editing technologyPeptide hormones are important growth regulators that play various roles in many organisms. Although the importance of genes that encode peptide hormones is broadly recognized, most peptides have yet to be functionally characterized. Using genome editing technology, researchers from Kumamoto University, Japan generated a new, comprehensive genetic resource collection of plants with knocked out CLE
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Unless we regain our historic awe of the deep ocean, it will be plunderedIn the memorable second instalment of Blue Planet II, we are offered glimpses of an unfamiliar world – the deep ocean. The episode places an unusual emphasis on its own construction: glimpses of the deep sea and its inhabitants are interspersed with shots of the technology – a manned submersible – that brought us these astonishing images. It is very unusual and extremely challenging, we are given
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Dagens Medicin
Her har Hovedstaden overtrådt reglerne ved udbud af hospitalsbyggeriKlagenævnet for Udbud har afsagt kendelse i sag om udbud af sygehusbyggeri. Hovedstaden har overtrådt reglerne på en række punkter.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Grads receive James Dyson Award for cancer detection deviceWhat started as a final year engineering class project at McMaster University is now an internationally recognized improved solution for the early detection of melanoma, the most dangerous form of skin cancer.
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Gizmodo
Don't Wait For Black Friday: The 4K and HDR-Ready Roku Premiere+ Is Already Down to $50 Roku Premiere+ , $50 Roku’s Premiere+ is one of the only streaming boxes in town capable of playing HDR 4K video at 60 FPS , and at $50, it’s by far the cheapest. That’s the best price Amazon’s ever offered on this model, and a match for what we expect to see on Black Friday, so if it’s been on your wish list, don’t hesitate. More Deals
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Popular Science
Check your phone less by sending those notifications to your computer DIY You don't want to miss a thing. Tired of constantly checking your phone? With the latest versions of Windows and macOS, you can shoot those notifications over to your computer.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mushrooms are full of antioxidants that may have antiaging potentialMushrooms may contain unusually high amounts of two antioxidants that some scientists suggest could help fight aging and bolster health, according to a team of Penn State researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UK study shows cell signaling interaction may prevent key step in lung cancer progressionNew findings from University of Kentucky faculty published in Scientific Reports reveals a novel cell signaling interaction that may prevent a key step in lung cancer progression.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Theranostic nanoparticles for tracking and monitoring disease stateAlthough the most basic definition of a "theranostic" nanoparticle is a nanoparticle that simply has a therapeutic moiety and imaging or diagnostic moiety on the same particle, the authors of a new SLAS Technology review article pay particular attention to and emphasize the platforms in which self-reporting and disease monitoring is possible in real-time through the synergistic nature of the compo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Super-resolution photoacoustic imaging could allow scientists to watch blood vessels with improved resolutionResearchers have reported an approach to photoacoustic imaging that offers vastly improved resolution, setting the stage for detailed in vivo imaging of deep tissue. The technique is based on computational improvements, so it can be performed with existing imaging hardware, and thus could provide a practical and low-cost option for improving biomedical imaging for research and diagnostics.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Opinion: Science's credibility crisis will get worse before it can get betterScience's credibility crisis is making headlines once more thanks to a paper from John P. A. Ioannidis and co-authors. Ioannidis, an expert in statistics, medicine and health policy at Stanford University, has done more than anyone else to ring the alarm bells on science's quality control problems: scientific results are published which other researchers cannot reproduce.
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Futurity.org
Visual skills aren’t connected to your I.Q. There is a broad range of differences in people’s ability to visually recognize objects and faces—and those skills aren’t linked to general intelligence, a new study suggests. Just because someone is smart and well-motivated doesn’t mean he or she can learn the visual skills needed to excel at tasks like matching fingerprints, interpreting medical X-rays, keeping track of aircraft on radar displa
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Autoimmunity may underlie newly discovered painful nerve-damage disorderAn analysis of the medical records of patients treated at Massachusetts General Hospital for an often-mysterious condition involving damage to small nerve fibers supports the hypothesis that some cases are caused by autoimmune disease and also identifies the first effective treatment option.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Golden' potato delivers bounty of vitamins A and EAn experimental 'golden' potato could hold the power to prevent disease and death in developing countries where residents rely heavily upon the starchy food for sustenance, new research suggests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists create a recipe to make human blood-brain-barrierA defined, step-by-step process to make a more exact mimic of the human blood-brain-barrier in the laboratory dish has now been detailed by researchers in a new report. The new model will permit more robust exploration of the cells, their properties and how scientists might circumvent the barrier for therapeutic purposes.
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Gizmodo
Former Facebook President Admits It's 'Exploiting a Vulnerability in Human Psychology' Photo: Getty Sean Parker, the visionary techno-elf who cofounded Napster and served as Facebook’s first president, seems to have some regrets about building the social behemoth that’s taken over our world, telling an audience this week, “God only knows what it’s doing to our children’s brains.” At an Axios event on Wednesday, Parker reportedly described as himself becoming “something of a conscie
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Children of criminal parents have a greater chance of becoming criminals themselves: studyIn general, children of criminal parents are more than twice as likely to exhibit criminal behaviour themselves. The journal Aggression and Violent Behavior published the results of a study led by Sytske Besemer about the intergenerational transfer of criminal behaviour. Besemer subjected 23 samples in 25 publications to a systematic review and these included data from 3,423,483 children. She perf
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Access to jobs by transit increases in many U.S. metrosAnnually updated research from the Accessibility Observatory at the University of Minnesota ranks 49 of the 50 largest (by population) metropolitan areas in the United States for connecting workers with jobs via transit.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Smartphone study highlights a 'digital divide'A research project into smartphone use across the life span has shone a light on some interesting insights into modern Australian life.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Walk this way—a better way to identify gait differencesBiometric-based person recognition methods have been extensively explored for various applications, such as access control, surveillance, and forensics. Biometric verification involves any means by which a person can be uniquely identified through biological traits such as facial features, fingerprints, hand geometry, and gait, which is a person's manner of walking.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists create 'tracking' nanoagents to illuminate very small diseased tissuesPolymer nanoagents that can 'light up' tiny areas of diseased tissues that conventional methods fail to detect, have been created by a research team led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New land cover atlas reveals just 6 percent of UK is developedThe UK is a green and pleasant land with more than half the country classed as pasture or arable land, according to a new set of maps created by an academic at the University of Sheffield.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ocean monuments face possible loss of protectionThe Trump administration is considering rolling back federal protections for a number of national monuments. While most are on land and relatively accessible, three are deep below the ocean's surface and many miles from the mainland: the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument and the Rose Atoll Marine National Monument, both in the central Pacific Ocean, and the Northeast Canyons and Seam
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
U.S. had 3rd warmest and 2nd wettest year to dateOctober typically ushers in those crisp, sunny days of fall. But last month was no ordinary October, as warm and wet conditions dampened peak leaf viewing across many parts of the Midwest and New England and fires devastated parts of Northern California and the West.
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Scientific American Content: Global
U.S. Cities and States Try to Keep Washington's Climate PromisesMayors, governors and CEOs tell world leaders the Trump administration does not speak for them -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study led by MIT Portugal faculty and alumni finds how to increase the survival time of stem cellsA team of researchers from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Coimbra, led by Dr. Lino Ferreira, MIT Portugal Program Faculty and researcher at the Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology (CNC) in collaboration with Langer Lab at MIT (USA), has developed a new technology, which is promising to understand and treat ischemic diseases.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: E-cigarette online vendors triple, concerns raised about marketing, deliveryTwo studies by UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers reveal trends in the marketing practices, pricing, delivery methods of online e-cigarette vendors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A neighborhood's quality influences children's behaviors through teens, study suggestsThe quality of the neighborhood where a child grows up has a significant impact on the number of problem behaviors they display during elementary and teenage years, a study led by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers suggests.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Intelligence study IDs key factors for government, academia, industry collaborationA study of government and industry teamwork at a National Security Agency-funded research center found that an established suite of factors are key to fostering effective collaboration in a novel partnership to conduct research for the intelligence community. The work highlights the importance of organizational innovation and adaptation in light of the challenges that emerge in inter-institutional
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Telling teethResearchers at the University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg have investigated dental development for better estimations of chronological age in African populations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Teacher-to-student knowledge transfer studied in joint Russia-Us effortThe field of studies is essential for both the scientific research and teacher education. Current cross-cultural research examines and compares teacher's influence on students' academic attainments in Russia and the USA. That allows to trace the peculiarities of education processes in the two countries and to have a multi-faceted comprehensive view on the matter.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers offer new information warfare modelRussian experts managed to define the mechanism of the very manipulation of the minds of the masses. Mathematics brought a number of formulas that describe the behavior of participants of the information war that allows you to determine the next steps of media propaganda. The model that researchers developed can help to accurately predict the outcome of media battle.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Practical superconducting nanowire single photon detector with record detection efficiency over 90 percentSuperconducting nanowire single photon detectors (SNSPDs) have been proven as one of the key enabling technologies for quantum information processing, such as quantum key distribution. We first demonstrate SNSPDs made of polycrystalline NbN with system detection efficiency of 90.2 percent for 1,550-nm-wavelength photons at 2.1 K (1.8 K), accessible with a compact cryocooler. We expect the results
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ghana's pineapple farmers need more intensive trainingSimple technologies can be learned effectively through imitation, while complex methods require professional training. If Ghanaian pineapple farmers are to achieve higher yields through more sustainable agriculture, they will need to be trained in exactly these types of complex applications. This was the conclusion reached by a team from the Technical University of Munich and the Kiel Institute fo
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Neolithic farmers coexisted with hunter-gatherers for centuries in EuropeNew research answers a long-debated question among anthropologists, archaeologists and geneticists: when farmers first arrived in Europe, how did they interact with existing hunter-gatherer groups? Did the farmers wipe out the hunter-gatherers, through warfare or disease, shortly after arriving? Or did they slowly out-compete them over time? The current study, published today in Nature, suggests t
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New technology makes oak wilt detection faster, more affordableOak wilt fungus is another invasive plant pathogen that often goes unnoticed, until it's too late. Not anymore. New technology developed by University of Minnesota College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences (CFANS) Assistant Professor Abdennour Abbas and his research team offers a simple, affordable diagnostic test utilizing nanotechnology and gold.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Melting ice sheets will have global impact on ocean tidesWhilst it is widely accepted that sea level is rising because of the melting of the massive sheets covering Greenland and Antarctica, a new paper in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans by scientists at Bangor University in collaboration with Harvard and Oregon State Universities in the US, and McGill University in Canada, shows that the impact of the melting of these ice sheets will go far
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study speeds transformation of biofuel waste into useful chemicalsA Sandia National Laboratories-led team has demonstrated faster, more efficient ways to turn discarded plant matter into chemicals worth billions. The team's findings could help transform the economics of making fuels and other products from domestically grown renewable sources.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers offer new information warfare modelResearchers have collaborated to develop a mathematical model of information warfare in a society under periodic destabilization. The authors of the paper, which was published in Mathematical Models and Computer Simulations, have determined for the first time how periodic surges of propaganda in the mass media can disturb the balance between two opposing parties. In addition to providing an analyt
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Futurity.org
Bonobos are nice to strangers, no strings attached Acts of kindness to strangers aren’t the unique domain of humans, research shows. Bonobos that live in Africa’s Congo Basin will go out of their way to help strangers too, says Jingzhi Tan, a postdoctoral associate in evolutionary anthropology at Duke University. A previous study by Tan and associate professor of evolutionary anthropology Brian Hare found that bonobos share food with strangers. N
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Dagens Medicin
Yngre Læger vil drøfte lægers retssikkerhed med minister Efter Procesbevillingsnævnet har afgjort, at Svendborgsagen kan ankes til Højesteret, vil Yngre Læger i dialog med ministeren om lægers dagligdag og retssikkerhed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How can man-made climate change be proven?If observed climate variables such as temperature or precipitation change over time, it raises the question as to whether human influence plays a role. To investigate this, scientists are applying a method for estimating causal relationships.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Standards to iron out 'weekend effect' in English hospitals don't make any differenceThe introduction of four priority standards for emergency care in hospitals in England has not made any difference to curbing excess deaths on Saturdays and Sundays, known as the 'weekend effect,' reveals the first study of its kind.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Primary care consultations last less than 5 minutes for half the world's populationPrimary care consultations last less than 5 minutes for half the world's population, but range from 48 seconds in Bangladesh to 22.5 minutes in Sweden, reveals the largest international study of its kind.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nanoparticles can limit inflammation by distracting the immune systemAn injection of nanoparticles may be able to help fight the immune system when it goes haywire, a new surprise finding suggests. The nanoparticles divert immune cells that cause inflammation away from an injury site.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fighting cancer with cancer: 3-D cultured cells could drive precision therapyHoneycomb-like arrays of tiny, lab-grown cancers could one day help doctors zero in on individualized treatments for ovarian cancer, an unpredictable disease that kills more than 14,000 women each year in the United States alone.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genetic discovery another tool in battle against wheat pestsGreenbug and Hessian fly infestations can significantly reduce wheat yield and quality in Texas and worldwide. Breeding for resistance to these two pests using marker-assisted selection just got a new tool from a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New mechanism for battling influenza discoveredJust as flu season swings into full gear, researchers have uncovered a previously unknown mechanism by which the human immune system tries to battle the influenza A virus. The discovery sheds new light on how the virus -- which kills 12,000 to 56,000 people in the United States annually -- often wins, and it could ultimately lead to new treatments.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Visual intelligence is not the same as IQThe first study of individual variation in visual ability has shown that there is a broad range of differences in people's capability for recognizing and remembering novel objects and has determined that these variations are not associated with individuals' general intelligence, or IQ.
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Futurity.org
Laser triggers ‘nanoshells’ to deliver drugs inside tumors Researchers have developed a method for delivering cancer-killing drugs inside tumors with gold nanoparticles they can activate remotely using a laser. The researchers employed gold nanoshells to deliver toxic doses of two drugs—lapatinib and docetaxel—inside breast cancer cells, showing they could use a laser to remotely trigger the particles to release the drugs after they entered the cells. Th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
RUDN chemists: A new compound will be used against tumors and Alzheimer's diseaseResearchers from RUDN University conducted an effective three-component reaction, obtaining unusual organic compounds. The latter are structurally similar to a number of biologically active compounds -- which makes it possible to use them in pharmaceutics (for example, as anti-tumor drugs and agents for Alzheimer's disease). The results of the work are presented in the journal Mendeleev Communicat
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists are developing biologically active compounds for an anti-tumor drugEmployees of RUDN University are actively involved in the development of chemical compounds isoxazoles, capable of suppressing the growth of malignant tumors. The results of the study were published in Tetrahedron.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers uncover genetic basis of natural variation in aging rateLifespan extension induced by genetic mutations has been shown in recent studies not to necessarily delay age-related behavioral decline. Now, a new study carried out by researchers from Dr. CAI Shiqing's lab at the Institute of Neuroscience, CAS Center for Excellence in Brain Science and Intelligence Technology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has uncovered a genetic basis for natural variation
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New method developed to 3-D print fully functional electronic circuitsResearchers at the University of Nottingham have pioneered a breakthrough method to rapidly 3-D print fully functional electronic circuits.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The use of tablet computers during math lessons may help increase the quality of teachingAbout 300 seven-year-old children from 12 Slovenian schools took part in the research which lasted for seven months. Accessibility of applications on the basis of cross-curricular modules was examined with regard to learning and ergonomics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NTU Singapore scientists create 'tracking' nanoagents to illuminate very small diseased tissuesPolymer nanoagents that can 'light up' tiny areas of diseased tissues that conventional methods fail to detect, have been created by a research team led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Majority of hospice workers don't have end-of-life wishes themselvesOne might assume that health care providers, especially those dealing with terminally ill patients, such as hospice workers would have a living will or advance directive. Surprisingly, Florida Atlantic University researchers found that the majority of hospice workers did not have an advance directive. Procrastination, fear of the subject and costs were reported as the most common barriers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Survey finds pediatric doctors attempts to address parental health issues are limited by barriersA national survey of more than 200 pediatric primary care physicians found that while over three-quarters addressed at least one parental health issue, such as maternal depression or parental tobacco use, during child health visits and a majority recognized the impact of such issues on children's health, fewer felt responsible for addressing them.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
China's sulfur dioxide emissions fell significantly while India's grew over last decadeSulfur dioxide is an air pollutant that causes acid rain, haze and many health-related problems. It is produced predominantly when coal is burned to generate electricity. Although China and India remain the world's largest consumers of coal, a new University of Maryland-led study found that China's sulfur dioxide emissions fell by 75 percent since 2007, while India's emissions increased by 50 perc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Significant financial stress associated with 13-fold higher odds of having a heart attackSignificant financial stress is associated with a 13-fold higher odds of having a heart attack, according to research presented at the 18th Annual Congress of the South African Heart Association.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Theranostic nanoparticles for tracking and monitoring disease stateA new SLAS Technology review article by researchers at the University of Southern California and the University of California, Los Angeles, sheds light on the growing number and more sophisticated designs of theranostic nanoparticles.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Identify the best drought index to study global drylandsDrought is the world's costliest natural disaster. To monitor, detect and quantify drought, many drought indices have been developed. Previous studies have shown that different indices can yield diverse results for a specific drought event, and a drought index can also give different results depending on the method used for the calculation of potential evapotranspiration (PET). Scientists from the
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New bioresources for plant peptide hormones using gene editing technologyPeptide hormones are important growth regulators that play various roles in many organisms. Although the importance of genes that encode peptide hormones is broadly recognized, most peptides have yet to be functionally characterized. Using genome editing technology, researchers generated a new, comprehensive genetic resource collection of plants with knocked out CLE peptide-encoding genes. This op
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Walk this way: A better way to identify gait differencesHuman traits such as the face, voice, and gait are commonly used for biometric-based person recognition. Although gait is one of the most practical traits for video-based surveillance and forensics, this approach is susceptible to intra-subject variations. Osaka University-based researchers proposed a new convolutional neural network-based approach to gait recognition, which exhibits robustness (i
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New Scientist - News
Giant coconut crab sneaks up on a sleeping bird and kills itCoconut crabs were thought to be purely opportunistic scavengers, but these huge arthropods are actually active predators that may dominate their island homes
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Gizmodo
This Guy Hacked Together a Glove That Makes Time Appear to Slow Down GIF We could all probably use a little more time in our days, whether it’s to get some extra work done, spend some quality time with the family, or in the case of YouTube’s MadGyver , to engineer and build a special glove that makes time actually appear to slow down and stop . The glove, which genuinely looks like something a mad scientist would cook up, features an Arduino-controlled strobe ligh
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BBC News - Science & Environment
UK 'will support' neonicotinoid pesticide banAn extended ban on controversial neonicotinoid pesticides will be supported by the UK, Michael Gove says.
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Science | The Guardian
‘Unlucky’ dinosaurs: no extinction if asteroid had hit almost any other part of Earth Only 13% of the Earth’s surface harboured rich enough hydrocarbon deposits to cause a mass extinction following an impact, research reveals The massive asteroid that slammed into Earth and wiped out the dinosaurs might never have triggered a mass extinction had it struck almost any other part of the planet, scientists claim. In work that reveals just how unlucky the prehistoric beasts were, resea
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Gizmodo
Our First Look at Samuel L. Jackson's Return to the Unbreakable Universe The Metal Gear Solid movie has found a writer. Guillermo del Toro’s plans for a Pinocchio movie are dead. A Stranger Things star could be headed to Narnia. Plus, new footage from Coco , Chadwick Boseman on Black Panther’s tech-genius sister, and The Flash ’s Elongated Man in costume. Spoilers, go! Glass The Daily Mail has set pics of Samuel L. Jackson in full costume as Mr. Glass. Crater Shawn Le
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Futurity.org
Higher unemployment risk after growing up in tough area The neighborhood in which children grow up can have an impact on their economic well-being into adulthood, a new study indicates. “…it’s important to improve the resources that surround children in these disadvantaged neighborhoods as early as possible…” The research suggests that children who live in disadvantaged neighborhoods at any point up to age 18 are 75 percent more likely to be unemploye
9h
Feed: All Latest
Facebook Posts Aren’t Going to Help the Rohingya RefugeesOpinion: Calls for help on social media are well-intentioned but counterproductive.
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Feed: All Latest
Steven Soderbergh on Virtual Reality, iPhone Filmmaking, and Harvey WeinsteinThe filmmaker has a new project out, but it's far from the only thing on his mind right now.
9h
Ars Technica
Bitcoin compromise collapses, leaving future growth in doubt Enlarge (credit: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images ) A group of prominent developers and executives backing a plan to expand the capacity of the Bitcoin network threw in the towel on Wednesday. "It is clear that we have not built sufficient consensus for a clean blocksize upgrade at this time," wrote developer Mike Belshe in a Wednesday afternoon e-mail . In the short run, the announceme
9h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Honeybees fumble their way to blueberry pollinationBlueberry flowers drive honeybees to grappling, even stomping a leg or two down a bloom throat, to reach pollen.
9h
The Atlantic
Bad Luck (and Fossil Fuels) May Have Doomed the Dinosaurs You know the story, or at least some of it. Sixty-five million years ago, a rock about the size of Mount Everest careened out of space and slammed into modern-day Mexico. It opened a Hawaii-sized hole in the crust, launching soot and sulfur high into the atmosphere, blocking out the sun. Within days, air and water temperatures plummeted around the world. Within weeks, the food chain on both the l
9h
The Atlantic
Staging Bird Murders to Save a Species The chatty green parrots had a front-row seat to a spine-chilling show. Tethered to a tree branch not far from their cage, another parrot, similar in appearance but of a different species, was armored in a small leather vest. As the green parrots looked on, a man approached the lone parrot with yet another bird leashed to his arm: a red-tailed hawk. The hawk lunged at the parrot in the vest, wrap
9h
The Atlantic
'The High Holy Day of MAGA' WARREN, Mich.—Macomb County is the kind of place that has become a familiar totem of our current politics: a blue-leaning county in middle America that flipped from Barack Obama in 2012 to Trump in 2016. It’s the kind of place that Republicans had in past years written off, and which holds special symbolic value for people like ex-White House chief strategist and campaign CEO Steve Bannon, who ga
9h
The Atlantic
Now It's Democrats Who Feel Their Values Threatened—and Are Voting In Karen Stenner’s penetrating 2005 study of the forces that tear societies apart, she explains that some people strongly prefer diversity, dynamism, and difference, while others have a powerful, possibly innate need for oneness and sameness. Politicians can exploit the latter predisposition, as Donald Trump did when he told his fellow Americans that their usurping Kenyan president was too lazy,
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cell phone-based microscope leads to possible strategy for treating river blindnessRiver blindness, or onchocerciasis, is a disease caused by a parasitic worm (Onchocerca volvulus) found primarily in Africa. Ivermectin is used to treat onchocerciasis. This treatment can be fatal when a person has high blood levels of another worm, Loa loa. In a paper published in NEJM, scientists describe how a cell phone-based videomicroscope can provide fast, effective testing for L. loa paras
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Futurity.org
These ‘at-risk’ preschoolers beat expectations Dual-language learners in Head Start show significant growth in cognitive and academic areas, report researchers. Once they gained basic English proficiency, the dual-language learners eventually outperformed students who only spoke English. Not all dual-language learners (DLLs) are at risk academically, but as a group, they are often labeled that way. As reported in Early Childhood Research Quar
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Ingeniøren
Kronik: Hvad har Niels Bohr-byggeriet lært os om kontraktstyring? Højhuse Projektering
9h
The Atlantic
'The Animal Instincts at the Heart of Human Nature' In the run-up to this week’s election results in Virginia, New Jersey, and elsewhere, I ran a series of items on how to think of “tribal”-style loyalties in American politics, and whether that was the right term for “We’re right, you’re wrong” political intransigence. As I mentioned in the latest installment , one reason for continuing the discussion was as a sample of the nuance and erudition wi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook, Twitter, Google and where Silicon Valley's money comes fromTech companies face dilemma after conundrum after balancing act, and now the spotlight is on their funding sources.
9h
Gizmodo
Doctor Who's New Doctor Has a New Outfit Image: BBC Ladies and Gentlemen, the 13th Doctor has finally arrived. Sure, Jodie Whittaker might have been cast as Doctor Who ’s groundbreaking new Doctor months ago , but does a Time Lord truly arrive until they’re dressed for the occasion? The BBC has released the first official picture of Whittaker in her 13th Doctor outfit, and it’s certainly a very different look to the Doctor’s previous in
9h
Dagens Medicin
Hovedstaden har handlet i strid med regler ved udbud af hospitalsbyggeriKlagenævnet for Udbud har netop afsagt kendelse i sag om udbud af nyt sygehusbyggeri ved Bispebjerg. Region Hovedstaden har handlet i strid med ligebehandlings- og gennemsigtighedsprincippet.
10h
Inside Science
BRIEF: Like Rasputin, This Star Refuses to Die BRIEF: Like Rasputin, This Star Refuses to Die The gigantic celestial body has exploded multiple times, confounding scientists. SUPERNOVA_topNteaser.jpg An artist's impression of a supernova explosion. Image credits: ESO/M. Kornmesser Space Wednesday, November 8, 2017 - 13:00 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- When the astronomers first saw the supernova in 2014, it looked like a standard
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The Scientist RSS
Gender Disparity in Science Publishing Among PhD StudentsA new survey finds a consistent gap between men and women across numerous fields of science.
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Red AlertResearchers unveil the neural basis of alertness in larval zebrafish.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
The FDA Needs More Power to Regulate Toxic Chemicals in CosmeticsLaws need to change to allow the FDA to protect people -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
DNA study shows Neolithic Europeans interbred with Anatolian migrants(Phys.org)—A large international team of researchers has found that Neolithic hunter-gatherers living in several parts of Europe interbred with farmers from the Near East. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the team describes comparing DNA from several early groups in Europe and evidence of interbreeding.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
EU split over use of major weedkiller glyphosateCritics say widely-used glyphosate is harmful, as the EU postpones a decision on it.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How challenges change the way you thinkNew research shows that challenging situations make it harder to understand where you are and what's happening around you. Researchers showed participants three clips from feature films -- one neutral, two challenging. After watching the challenging scenes, the participants were less able to acquire spatial and sequential context -- that is, they became worse at mapping out where objects were and
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Popular Science
Why some sharks are like blimps, and others are like airplanes Animals A brief lesson in buoyancy and aerodynamics. When you think of a zeppelin, you probably don’t picture a large, cartilaginous fish with rows of pointed teeth. But perhaps you should.
10h
Science | The Guardian
The neuroscience of no regrets: why people still support Brexit and Trump Many people still strongly support Brexit and Trump , despite mounting evidence that both are problematic. Much of this is not politics, but the workings of the human brain It’s now over a year since the Brexit referendum and the election of Donald Trump, plenty of time to witness the consequences of both. And, from an entirely objective perspective, going solely by the ever-increasing evidence,
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Live Science
Uber Teams with NASA on 'Flying Car' ProjectThe space agency has signed an agreement to help develop an air- traffic- control system for Uber Elevate, the ride-hailing company's official name for the flying-car project, according to USA Today.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Beluga whales modifying what they eat due to climate change, study findsFinally, some good news for the Greenland halibut, a deep-water flatfish with two eyes on one side of its head: climate change has altered its ecosystem and beluga whales, at times, are less likely to eat them.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ion qubits offer early glimpse of quantum error detectionComputers based on quantum physics promise to solve certain problems much faster than their conventional counterparts. By utilizing qubits—which can have more than just the two values of ordinary bits—quantum computers of the future could perform complex simulations and may solve difficult problems in chemistry, optimization and pattern-recognition.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Electronics and optics on one chipElectronics and light don't go well together on a standard "CMOS' chip. Researcher Satadal Dutta of the University of Twente now succeeds in introducing a light connection into the heart of a semiconductor chip. In this way, two circuits can be isolated and still communicate. Or: the worlds of electronics and photonics are connected.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researcher studies birds that break all the mating rulesWhat can the mating behavior of birds tell us about evolution, climate change and species survival? For Peter Dunn, UWM distinguished professor of biological sciences, bird-watching offers clues to overarching ecological questions. He wants to know the purpose behind bird preferences such as feather brightness and why some birds follow the same mating playbook, while others deviate. He and Profess
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Live Science
Here's Another Reason Bonobo 'Hippie Chimps' Are AwesomeBonobos, one of our closest primate relatives, could teach some humans a thing or two about helping others before being asked.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Tackling the toxic danger inside our carsPollution in a car can be worse than outside, as it traps nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and soot-like particles.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Geologists uncover Antarctica's fossil forestsDuring Antarctica's summer, from late November through January, UW-Milwaukee geologists Erik Gulbranson and John Isbell climbed the McIntyre Promontory's frozen slopes in the Transantarctic Mountains. High above the ice fields, they combed the mountain's gray rocks for fossils from the continent's green, forested past.
10h
The Atlantic
The Tower at the Heart of the Tech Boom The Salesforce Tower is everywhere. The business-software company’s future headquarters is the tallest building in San Francisco, and now easily its most prominent. Compared with the rest of the city’s skyscrapers, it looks like the kid in sixth grade who went through puberty early. No matter where you are in the Bay—Marin, Japantown, Hayward, Oakland—you see this thing, seemingly half again as t
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The Atlantic
The Cutthroat World of Capitalist Reality TV Viagra was such a fantastic name that Pfizer trademarked it long before the company had a drug to go with it, and perhaps the same is true of Steve Harvey’s Funderdome , a title so capacious that it might contain almost any kind of hijinks. In fact, the ABC show , which completed its first season this fall, has a specific and narrow focus: Aspiring inventors pitch their products to the host and h
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Feed: All Latest
Container Ships Use Super-Dirty Fuel. That Needs to ChangeIf the cargo industry doesn’t switch away from climate-warming bunker fuel, we’re all sunk.
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Feed: All Latest
Al Franken Just Gave the Speech Big Tech Has Been DreadingIn talk to Washington think tank, Al Franken ties together complaints against Google, Facebook, and Amazon and calls for more control over their market power.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Machine learning and deep learning programs provide a helping hand to scientists analyzing imagesPhysicists on the MINERvA neutrino experiments at the Department of Energy's Fermilab faced a conundrum. Their particle detector was swamping them with images. The detector lights up every time a neutrino, a tiny elementary particle, breaks into other particles. The machine then takes a digital photo of all of the new particles' movements. As the relevant interactions occur very rarely, having a h
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Stars that vary in brightness shine in the oral traditions of Aboriginal AustraliansAboriginal Australians have been observing the stars for more than 65,000 years, and many of their oral traditions have been recorded since colonisation. These traditions tell of all kinds of celestial events, such as the annual rising of stars, passing comets, eclipses of the Sun and Moon, auroral displays, and even meteorite impacts.
10h
cognitive science
Language Patterns Reveal Body’s Hidden Response to Stress. Volunteers' use of certain words predicted stress-related changes in gene expression better than their self-reported feelings. submitted by /u/parrishthethought [link] [comments]
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Scientific American Content: Global
How to Read Old MS Word Files When Word Says You Can't -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science : NPR
Exploring Why Hurricane Harvey Caused Houston's Worst Flooding Scientists and citizens are still piecing together the story of why the flooding in Houston was so bad. A lot of the damage comes down to how people built the city in the first place.
10h
New Scientist - News
Meet the winners of the biggest ever face-recognition challengeEveryone from Apple to the security services is scrambling to improve their face-recognition software – just how good is it?
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Making communities more resilient to modern slaveryAgencies and community groups in the UK need more dedicated funding to help fight modern slavery, according to a new report.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Higher biodiversity due to river-expanding measuresLower flood risk and the start of biodiversity recovery - those two things can go together quite well. Multiple groups of endangered and protected species are returning to river areas in the Netherlands, reveal researchers of Utrecht University and Radboud University today in Science Advances.
10h
Live Science
Prehistoric Mammals Wouldn't Have Messed with This Huge OtterSix million years ago, the shallow swamps of what's now southern China may have been dominated by massive, 110-lb. (50 kilograms) otters with a bite so strong it could crush the bones of small mammals.
10h
Gizmodo
Horizon Zero Dawn For $20 Might Be the Gaming Deal of the Year Horizon Zero Dawn , $20 Update : Back in stock ! Horizon Zero Dawn is an instant classic, and one of the best games you can buy for the PS4 , so you shouldn’t hesitate to buy it for $20, an all-time low, and a match for what we expect on Black Friday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Genes don't always dictate that 'boys will be boys'As an evolutionary biologist focusing on animal behaviour, I'm sometimes asked what relevance our research has for human behaviour. Years ago, I would duck the question because it was such a passionately polarising, political and social issue, and respond lamely that I thought probably none.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Time is right to capitalise on artificial intelligenceJust weeks after the publication of the UK government's review of the country's capabilities in artificial intelligence, Southampton Professor Dame Wendy Hall, co-chair of the review, says the time is right to capitalise while the time is right.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple's Venmo rival launches in betaTime for Venmo, Square Cash and PayPal to play defense?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Parker Solar Probe comes to NASA Goddard for testingOn Monday, Nov. 6, 2017, NASA's Parker Solar Probe spacecraft arrived at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, for environmental tests. During the spacecraft's stay at Goddard, engineers and technicians will simulate extreme temperatures and other physical stresses that the spacecraft will be subjected to during its historic mission to the Sun.
10h
Dagens Medicin
Svendborg-sagen kalder på mere end hurtige slagord og parolerSagen er principiel og kræver større grundighed, end 1. reservelæge Frederik Philip Treschow lægger op til i sit indlæg i Dagens Medicin. Også derfor er det vigtigt, at den nu kommer for Højesteret.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researcher reports on collaborative social archaeology with homeless peopleAn archaeologist has written about her experiences of working with homeless people as part of her PhD at the University of York.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Emissions worldwide—gas vs. battery-electric vehiclesGasoline vehicles would produce lower emissions than the average battery-electric vehicle only if their fuel economy was higher than 51.5 mpg worldwide, say researchers at the University of Michigan.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
From racehorses to bananas—the importance of biosecurityIrish horse Rekindling's win in the 2017 Melbourne Cup follows months of training, an aeroplane journey across the world, and, because this is Australia, a month in quarantine.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Japanese whalers head to AntarcticJapanese whaling vessels left port Thursday for an annual hunting voyage in the Antarctic, this time to kill 333 minke whales, despite international calls to stop the practice.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Bizarre Supernova Defies UnderstandingSupernovas are thought to be the explosive deaths of stars. So what happens when one is found repeating? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Scientist - News
Facebook can make your profile pic wink and scowlLike portraits and pictures in Harry Potter, your Facebook image will soon react to visitors’ actions with happiness, sadness, or anger
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New data suggests increased vulnerability for island countriesAs island nations prepare for a lead role in the 23rd annual Conference of Parties (COP23) in Bonn, Germany, Nov. 6-17, the latest data released by the Notre Dame Global Adaptation Initiative (ND-GAIN) shows that small island states face increasing challenges to address the impact of climate change.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why is Australia so slow at adopting electric cars?In the race to adopt electric vehicles, Australia is sputtering along in the slow lane. Rather than growing, Australian sales of electric cars are actually in decline. In 2016 they represented just 0.02% of new car sales – even lower than in 2013.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Solar Dynamics Observatory spies rare encircling filamentNASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory came across an oddity that the spacecraft has rarely observed before: a dark filament encircling an active region (Oct. 29-31, 2017). Solar filaments are clouds of charged particles that float above the sun, tethered to it by magnetic forces.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
'Butterfly child' given life-saving skinHassan was born with skin so delicate it would tear and blister
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researcher proposes 'blocked ambition' hypothesis to explain why some Muslim clerics become jihadistsWhat turns people into radical jihadist clerics? A new book by an MIT political scientist offers a new answer: thwarted career ambitions.
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Feed: All Latest
How Journalists Fought Back Against Crippling Email and Subscription BombsAfter ProPublica journalists wrote about hate groups, the trolls retaliated by signing them up for thousands of subscriptions. That was only the beginning.
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Feed: All Latest
How the Mimikatz Hacker Tool Stole the World's PasswordsHow a program called Mimikatz became one of the world's most widespread and powerful hacking tools.
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Feed: All Latest
HP Spectre 13 Review: The Most Ultra UltrabookOne of the best ultrabooks on the market just got a little bit more polished.
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Feed: All Latest
Uber's Flying Car Plan for Los Angeles Really Could Take Off by 2020Somehow, the plan to bring electric VTOL aircraft to America's traffic hellscape might work.
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Feed: All Latest
The Subtle Art and Serious Physics of Subway SurfingFirst, use your phone to record the car's acceleration. Then start solving for the minimum coefficient of friction.
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Feed: All Latest
Cryptocurrency Mania Fuels Hype and Fear at Venture FirmsEven as VCs race to invest in cryptocurrency companies, the novelty of the field poses legal, administrative, and PR challenges.
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Ars Technica
When will the Earth try to kill us again? Enlarge “The revolutions and changes which have left the earth as we now find it, are not confined to the overthrow of the ancient layers” - Georges Cuvier , 1831. Our planet Earth has extinguished large portions of its inhabitants several times since the dawn of animals. And if science tells us anything, it will surely try to kill us all again. Working in the 19th century, paleontology pioneer G
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Technologies shine spotlight on climate role of undersea canyonsUnprecedented high-resolution data from undersea canyons off Vancouver Island's west coast is bringing new understanding of the importance of these canyons as rapid-transit corridors for carrying carbon from the ocean surface to the deep sea.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
New Map Reveals Who's Actually Taking Charge of the Paris AgreementThe president plans to withdraw the U.S. from the landmark climate agreement, but a wealth of city, state and regional governments, along with a broad spectrum of private groups, has other ideas -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Headlines | Science News
See these first-of-a-kind views of living human nerve cellsA catalog of live brain cells reveals stunning diversity and intricate shapes, and may help scientists understand the abilities of the human brain.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biologists determine how long microorganisms can live on MarsResearchers from Lomonosov Moscow State University have studied the resistance of microorganisms against gamma radiation in very low temperatures. The results have been published in Extremophiles.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Size matters—how thrips choose their partnersThe bigger the male, the higher his chances to successfully mate—this applies, at least, to thrips, insects measuring only two to three millimetres in length that are hard to recognise with the naked eye. The larger males not only drive off their smaller rivals, they also have better immune systems and produce more sperm. This discovery was made by biologists at Martin Luther University Halle-Witt
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers have created an effective solution for collecting spilled petroleumChemists from RUDN University have synthesized new surfactants and studied their characteristics. The compounds obtained can efficiently collect petroleum spilled on the surface of water. The scientists have reported their findings in the Journal of Molecular Liquids.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Australia might water down illegal logging laws – here's why it's a bad ideaIllegal logging is an immensely profitable global activity, linked to corruption, human rights abuses, criminal networks, and environmental destruction. A 2017 study by the Global Financial Integrity ranked illegal logging as the third largest global crime in value, after counterfeiting and drug trafficking.
11h
Ingeniøren
Australsk myndighed: Send dine nøgenbilleder til Facebook Et noget alternativt forsøg på at stoppe hævnporno og ulovlig deling af nøgenbilleder er blevet sat i gang i Australien. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/australsk-myndighed-send-dine-noegenbilleder-facebook-1082569 Version2
11h
Ingeniøren
Tiden løber ud for landbrugets foretrukne sprøjtemiddelEndnu en gang har EU-Kommissionen måttet opgive at samle tilstrækkeligt flertal for at forlænge tilladelsen til verdens mest udbredte ukrudtsmiddel, glyphosat.
11h
Ingeniøren
Lækkede tal afslører: Landbrugspakken kan have forværret vandmiljøetMiljøministeren beskyldes for at lyve om statusrapport over landbrugspakkens effekter.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
Steven Pinker: This Is History's Most Peaceful Time--New Study: "Not So Fast"War deaths have increased dramatically in the modern era, new research contends, despite other statistics that suggest the risks of becoming a victim of violence have lessened -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Trump's poor climate record sends America's green business to ChinaTesla knew just where to look when the California company decided to expand its business in manufacturing electric cars: China.
11h
Ingeniøren
To milliarder kroners kryptovaluta går tabt ved et uheld En fejl i Ethereum gjorde det muligt for en tilfældig bruger at få adgang til over to milliarder kroner i kryptovalutaen Ether. Da brugeren ikke forstod, hvad der skete fik vedkommende ved et uheld låst alle pengene fast, så de nu ikke kan bruges. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/to-milliarder-kroners-kryptovaluta-gaar-tabt-ved-uheld-1082571 Version2
12h
Ingeniøren
Lockheed skal udvikle laserforsvar til amerikanske jagerflyDet amerikanske våbenfirma Lockheed Martin har fået tildelt opgaven med at udvikle en laser, som kan nedskyde indkommende mål.
12h
The Atlantic
Obamacare Becomes Popular Again In Donald Trump’s America, government-run health care isn’t in retreat—it’s on the march. Voters in Maine on Tuesday decisively chose to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act to more than 70,000 additional residents, overruling a conservative governor who vetoed similar measures five separate times. In Virginia, health care buoyed Democrat Ralph Northam to a nine-point victory, with exit
12h
The Atlantic
Democrats Win Phase One of the Redistricting Wars After Virginia, the Democratic Party is breathing a sigh of relief. The rather easy victory for Governor-elect Ralph Northam stems the tide of recent hemorrhaging of key positions across the United States to Republicans, and continues Democrats’ control over a blue-ish state. Northam’s victory, and that of Justin Fairfax, the second black official elected in a statewide race in Virginia, also off
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The Atlantic
The Plan to Rescue a Nearly Extinct Porpoise Goes Terribly Awry To understand the lengths Vaquita CPR has gone to rescue vaquitas from the brink of extinction, consider that the team mobilized not just fellow humans but also four U.S. Navy–trained dolphins. Andrea, Fathom, Katrina, and Splash— chosen for their “gentle nature” —arrived in Mexico in early October. Since then, they have assisted in the delicate task of locating vaquitas, a species of porpoise of
12h
The Atlantic
What Flannery O'Connor's College Journal Reveals “I AM. THIS IS NOT PURE CONCEIT. I am not self-satisfied but I feel that God has made my life empty in this respect so that I may fill it in some wonderful way—the word ‘wonderful’ frightens me. It may be anything but wonderful. I may grovel the rest of my life in a stew of effort, of misguided hope.” Flannery O’Connor wrote these solemn words, weighty for a young woman of just 18, in 1943, in he
12h
Ingeniøren
Små danske startups testes på stor tech-konferenceDet kræver is i maven og en god salgstale for at få opmærksomhed. Men en lang række små danske virksomheder har vovet pelsen og booket en mikrostand på årets Web Summit i Lissabon
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Science | The Guardian
Jon Ronson webchat – post your questions now! The journalist and screenwriter has hunted UFOs with Robbie Williams, hung out with secret US army battalions and played keyboards for Frank Sidebottom. He’ll be around to answer your questions on Monday 13 November at 1.30pm . 9.59am GMT If you need a conspiracy theory investigated, a charismatic cult leader profiled or a shadowy cabal of experimental pseudo-scientists infiltrated, Jon Ronson is
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists developing a pharmaceutical that stops convulsionsScientists from RUDN University took an active part in the development of a chemical compound to stop convulsions during epileptic seizures. The results of the study were published in Chirality.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
In harsh corner of Uganda, herders fight climate changeThe sun is setting over Karamoja. Time for the nomadic herders to return their cattle to thorn-ringed enclosures. They've roamed since first light, searching for pasture in Uganda's poorest region where water and grazing land are scarce.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Algae used to depollute sewage and produce compostSewer treatment systems are designed to avoid discarding large amounts of carbon, phosphorus and nitrogen, components of the organic matter load mainly comprising feces and urine, into watercourses. The massive dumping of such substances in watercourses causes eutrophication, the excessive growth of aquatic microorganisms, especially algae. This leads to potentially serious imbalances in aquatic c
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study reveals decadal variation of relationship between East Asian summer monsoon and El NinoEast Asian summer monsoon (EASM) is one of the most dominant climate systems in East Asia. The anomalous EASM can cause extreme high temperatures, floods or drought. And the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the dominating mode in the tropical Pacific, is the most important factor affecting EASM. Understanding the processes for interannual to interdecadal variability of EASM-ENSO relationship i
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brace yourself for coming heatwaves, there are at least 27 ways they can kill youA new systematic synthesis by researchers at the University of Hawaii at Manoa shows that there are at least 27 different physiological pathways in which a heatwave can kill a human being, and everyone is at risk.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Low protein diet in early life increases lifespan in fruit fliesFruit flies raised on a low protein diet early in life can live over twice as long as their peers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Traditional Amazonian drug linked to improved sense of wellbeingA psychedelic drug traditionally used in South America improves people's general sense of wellbeing and may offer a treatment for alcoholism and depression, new research suggests.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Building better silkEngineers at MIT and Tufts can make a material that is stiffer than the real thing. Starting with silk produced by silkworms, breaking it down chemically, and then reassembling it, the new material can be shaped into complex structures such as meshes and lattices.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A giant, prehistoric otter's surprisingly powerful biteA massive, wolf-sized otter that lived about 6 million years ago may have been a dominant predator in its time, according to a new analysis of the animal's jaws. When scientists used computers to simulate how biting would strain S. melilutra's jaws, they concluded that the animal had much firmer jaw bones than expected, giving it a surprisingly strong bite.
13h
Big Think
These Chinese Cities have GDPs that Match Those of Entire Countries Do you know you Hangzhous from your Changzhous? Read More
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Dagens Medicin
Klinikchef ser fordel i at behandle flere hæmatologiske patienter uden for hospitalet Patienter med akut leukæmi og lymfekræft fik for år tilbage mulighed for at få kemoterapi hjemme. Omlægninger af den art så klinikchef på Rigshospitalets hæmatologiske afdeling, Lars Kjeldsen, gerne flere af. Det vil reservere hospitalets ressourcer til de patienter, der har mest brug for dem.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Low protein diet in early life increases lifespan in fruit fliesFruit flies raised on a low protein diet early in life can live over twice as long as their peers, according to new research from the Francis Crick Institute.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A giant, prehistoric otter's surprisingly powerful biteA massive, wolf-sized otter that lived about 6 million years ago may have been a dominant predator in its time, according to a new study analyzing the animal's jaws.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Reconstituted silk can be several times stronger than the natural fiber and made in different formsWhen it comes to concocting the complex mix of molecules that makes up fibers of natural silk, nature beats human engineering hands down. Despite efforts to synthesize the material, artificial varieties still cannot match the natural fiber's strength.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sprint turns to improving its wireless network now that a T-Mobile merger is deadUnwilling to turn control of Sprint over to rivals at T-Mobile US, Sprint's chairman vowed this week to spend more money on the Overland Park-based company's wireless network.
13h
The Atlantic
Have You Ever Tried to Decline an Airplane Napkin? In the interest of cutting costs, airlines have taken away everything that used to be free—so the refrain goes. Gone are the meals that used to be included in the ticket price for flights that verged on mealtime hours. First checked bags started carrying an additional charge, and now sometimes you have to pay for a carry-on. On planes, I like to joke to whoever is seated next to me that soon we’l
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple defends tax setup amid reportsFor years, Apple and other multinational firms have faced inquiries from government authorities about tactics they employed to lower their tax bills.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple iPhone X strikes viral gold with 'Animoji Karaoke'Earlier this year, Apple spun off the viral late-night show skit "Carpool Karaoke" to a full-blown TV show exclusive on Apple Music. The show received mixed reviews critically and never took off commercially.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gadgets: Backup device offers peace of mind, sleek designYou might not think of an external hard drive as fun, sexy or cool, but the OWC Mercury Elite Pro Dual mini can be any or all of them. I can say first hand you'll find it useful at home, work, play, and even consider taking it on vacation.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
CVS to offer nationwide next-day delivery in preemptive shot at AmazonCVS Health plans to begin offering next-day delivery of prescriptions and retail merchandise from its nationwide network of more than 9,700 stores, marking a potentially preemptive strike at Amazon as the online giant weighs entry into the pharmacy business.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
We can brighten clouds to reflect heat and reduce global warming. But should we?Ever-higher temperatures are melting the ice sheets faster than projected. Sea level is rising. International efforts to reduce greenhouse gases are taking longer than expected. It's a nightmare scenario that could soon demand an emergency response. What to do?
14h
Ingeniøren
ATV sætter fuld tryk på at gøre Danmark til en af verdens førende videnregionerAkademiet for de Tekniske Videnskaber har fået kortlagt Science & Engineering i Danmark og S&E-virksomhedernes betydning for den danske økonomi.
14h
Dagens Medicin
Habilitetspolitik drøftes i MedicinrådetKræftens Bekæmpelse ønsker at få diskussion om, hvordan overgangsordning for Medicinrådets habilitetspolitik afvikles.
15h
cognitive science
3 Riddles Popular on Logic That Will Blow Your Mind submitted by /u/Animated_videos [link] [comments]
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
North Korea, ever so cautiously, is going onlineEver so cautiously, North Korea is going online.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
John Glenn's Ohio birthplace to get historic markerThe Ohio birthplace of the late John Glenn is celebrating its place in history with a historic marker commemorating the astronaut and U.S. senator who died last year.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Animals aplenty, space at a premium in Africa's oldest zooBoba springs left and right for a Cairo zookeeper feeding him fruit, but the chimp's exuberance contrasts with the pitiful lack of space and natural habitat in Africa's oldest zoo.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Weedkiller glyphosate, controversial but still most usedIt is the most popular weedkiller in the world but concerns about the toxicity of glyphosate have led to growing demands for restrictions.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Thousands of schools close as smog envelopes India, PakistanSchools closed across large swathes of north India on Thursday as pollution hit hazardous levels for the third day, with growing calls for urgent government action to tackle what doctors are calling a public health emergency.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fresh EU bid fails to renew controversial weedkillerThe European Union on Thursday failed to win approval from members to renew a five-year licence for the controversial weedkiller glyphosate, which critics say causes cancer.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Delhi's poor bear the brunt of deadly smogRickshaw driver Sanjay can only afford a handkerchief to shield his face from the smog-filled streets of Delhi, even as many residents rush to buy protective masks to combat the toxic menace.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate-influenced changes in flowering, fruiting also affect bird abundance, activities"You are what you eat" might give way to "you are when you eat," based on a new study tracking shifts in Hawaiian bird abundance, breeding and molting based on climate-related changes to native vegetation.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Changing climate to bring more landslides on logged land, researchers sayWashington State University researchers say landslides on logged forests will be more widespread as the Northwest climate changes.
16h
Ingeniøren
Fintech fiksede Apple Pay-problematik i 2015: »Det var tydeligt, at det ville skabe problemer« Ekstra trin i betalingsprocessen gør det muligt for brugeren at vælge, hvordan man vil betale, mener virksomheden GoAppified. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/fintech-fiksede-apple-pay-problematik-2015-var-tydeligt-at-ville-skabe-problemer-1082563 Version2
16h
Science-Based Medicine
Another “Chronic Lyme” VIP disciplined by NY medical authorities: Bernard RaxlenAnother "Lyme literate" NY physician is on probation and under orders to clean up his act. Will other physicians treating "chronic Lyme" take note?
16h
Science | The Guardian
Doctors develop 'transformational' new DNA test for Down's syndrome New test more accurate than current screening in detecting Down’s, Edwards and Patau syndromes and could simplify screening process, say researchers Doctors have developed a more accurate test for Down’s syndrome and two rarer genetic disorders that are so serious the children often die soon after birth. UK hospitals that adopted the test as part of a medical project found that it picked up nearl
17h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Danmark har fået et internationalt grundforskningscenter i privathedGrundforskningscenteret Centre for Privacy Studies (PRIVACY) er nu officielt åbnet ved en ceremoni...
17h
Science | The Guardian
The climate has changed before. But this is different – look at the archeological record A major new report states unequivocally that humans are changing the planet. Archaeology puts those changes into context – and explains why action is crucial The United States government recently published the Climate Science Special Report authored by 13 federal agencies, which states unequivocally that climate change is occurring and it is caused by human actions. The report follows several mon
17h
Gizmodo
Here's What Snapchat's Desperate Gamble on a Redesign Allegedly Looks Like Photo: AP Snapchat, which desperately needs to attract more users as its parent company Snap finds itself swirling the drain just eight months post-IPO ( it’s fucked ), announced in an earnings report earlier this week it is planning a major redesign in an attempt to attract a new demographic ( the olds ). According to Business Insider , the launch date for Snap’s last-ditch gamble is pretty soon
17h
NYT > Science
Trump Ignores Climate Change. That’s Very Bad for Disaster Planners.The Federal Emergency Management Agency is trying to prepare for bigger floods even as the White House is hostile to talking about climate change.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Racial profiling by retailers creates an unwelcome climate for black shoppers, study showsDiscrimination endured by black shoppers forces them to downplay their race or shy away from an activity among the most common and celebrated in American culture, according to new research.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Changing climate to bring more landslides on logged land, say WSU researchersWashington State University researchers say landslides on logged forests will be more widespread as the Northwest climate changes. In a study modelled on clear-cut lands on the Olympic Peninsula, they anticipate the climate of 2045 and conclude that there will be a 7 -11 percent increase in the land that is highly vulnerable to landslides. The researchers say their findings are applicable to the C
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
All forms of sexual harassment can cause psychological harmEven the least severe forms of sexual harassment can have serious consequences for high school students who are targeted. Girls struggle the most.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Efforts are needed to study elder abuse among veteransExperts are calling on the Veterans Administration (VA) to promote research, clinical care, and education in the area of elder abuse, furthering the VA's mission of serving those who have served.
18h
Science | The Guardian
Low-cost device to diagnose skin cancer wins international Dyson award Hand-held device dubbed sKan measures skin temperature to quickly and accurately identify melanoma, and could save lives around the world A low-cost hand-held device which could help save lives across the world by diagnosing skin cancer early has won its inventors a prestigious international award and cash prize of £30,000. Four graduates of McMaster University in Canada have scooped the James Dy
18h
New on MIT Technology Review
Under Trump, Biologists Seek a Low Profile for Controversial ResearchScientists fear a crackdown on embryo research if President Trump pays attention to scientific advances.
18h
Ingeniøren
6 måder at skræmme HR- og rekrutteringsfolk væk Lige så vigtigt det er at imponere, lige så afgørende er det, at du ikke skræmmer arbejdsgivere væk, når du er på jobjagt. Jobfinder leverer tips til, hvordan du undgår at afskrække HR-afdelingen fra at ansætte dig. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/6-maader-at-skraemme-hr-rekrutteringsfolk-vaek-11019 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
18h
Gizmodo
Logitech Will Be Intentionally Bricking All Harmony Link Units on March 16th, 2018 Image: Gizmodo Logitech will be deliberately bricking every unit of the Harmony Link, a universal hub which allows users to control their home theater systems and a variety of other devices from their smartphones, on March 16th, 2018. According to Bleeping Computer , on that date Logitech will issue a firmware update that permanently disables the devices. As Popular Science additionally noted , t
19h
Science | The Guardian
Canada decides the F-word is not taboo for radio listeners' ears Country’s broadcast watchdog rules that the word is now so commonplace that it is no longer as vulgar as it once was It may be still be too blue for English speakers, but authorities in Canada have ruled that the word “fuck” is no longer taboo on French language broadcasts as its use is so commonplace. The Canadian Broadcasting Standards Council (CBSC) had previously classified the word as being
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cockatoos select the right key to insert into a 'keyhole'The Goffin's cockatoo is not a specialized tool user in the wild but has shown the capacity to invent and use different types of tools in captivity. Now cognitive biologists have tested these parrots in a tool use task, requiring the birds to move objects in relation to a surface. The animals had to choose the correct "key" to insert into a "keyhole" in a box, aligning its shape to the shape of a
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Liquid shock absorbersRemarkable liquid materials called colloids stiffen under impact. Researchers have studied the effect of powerful impacts such as those produced by firearms or micrometeorites. At first glance, colloids resemble homogeneous liquids such as milk or blood plasma. But in fact they consist of particles in suspension. Some colloids have remarkable properties: they may stiffen following an impact and ab
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Deep-sea fish reveals twilight trickA new type of cell has been found in the eye of a deep-sea fish, and scientists say the discovery opens a new world of understanding about vision in a variety of light conditions. Scientists found the new cell type in the deep-sea pearlside fish (Maurolicus spp.), which have an unusual visual system adapted for twilight conditions.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Flexible, stretchable photonic devicesResearchers have developed a way to make optically based microchips that can flex and bend like rubber and could be used for skin-mounted diagnostics or flexible strain sensors.
20h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Ben Nevis gets automatic weather stationFor the first time in 113 years, live data is streaming from the top of the UK's tallest mountain.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Exposure to BPA during pregnancy may cause health problems for offspringA chemical called bisphenol A -- BPA -- used in plastic packaging and in the linings of food and beverage cans, may be passed from a mother to her offspring during pregnancy and cause changes in the gut bacteria of the offspring, according to an international team of researchers.
21h
Gizmodo
A Lot of People Rushed to Buy This Stranger Things Dino Hoodie [Updated] Still via Netflix Looks like the non-profit Science Museum of Minnesota in St. Paul is going to have a bit more cash for upcoming exhibits. The facility sold at least $600,000 worth of purple Brontosaurus hoodies , all thanks to the popularity of Stranger Things . Update : It was originally reported that the Science Museum sold 80,000 hoodies, totalling about $3 million in sales. They’ve told io9
21h
Science | The Guardian
Colouring books for adults benefit mental health, study suggests New Zealand researchers say their study shows anxiety and depression may be reduced by colouring in for as little as 10 minutes a day The adult colouring book craze has thereupeutic mental health benefits, New Zealand researchers have found, including reducing symptoms of depression and anxiety. Colouring-in books for adults first caught on two years ago with bookshops around the globe devoting s
21h
Scientific American Content: Global
Sheep's Face-Reading Skills Stand Out from the FlockWith some training, sheep were able to select a celebrity's face over that of a stranger they'd never seen. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
21h
Gizmodo
Report: InfoWars Ran Years-Long Conspiracy to, Uh, Rip Off RT and the Rest of the Media Photo: AP Local Texas man Alex Jones, the conspiracy theorist best known for screaming about gay frogs, riding horses while shirtless, hawking lead-contaminated dietary supplements , and claiming he is in communication with President Donald Trump , has been up to something pretty suspicious himself. According to an investigation by BuzzFeed , Jones’ site InfoWars has been ripping off content from
22h
Popular Science
Here's the weird alphabet soup that scientists use to name stuff in space Space I is for interstellar. What’s in a name? An asteroid by any other name would smell as singed, and would still be a rock orbiting the sun on some far-flung journey.
22h
Ars Technica
To prevent revenge porn, Facebook will look at user-submitted nude photos (credit: Jessica Rabbit's Flickr ) Facebook is experimenting with a new way to prevent the posting of so-called revenge porn that involves a highly questionable requirement. Potential victims must send nude pictures of themselves through the social network's official messenger so the images can be viewed, in full, unedited form, by an employee of the social network. A Facebook spokeswoman said th
22h
Feed: All Latest
AT&T Should Dump CNN to Seal Time Warner DealReports say Justice Department wants AT&T to sell Turner Broadcasting or DirecTV, or face an antitrust lawsuit over its proposed acquisition of Time Warner.
22h
Futurity.org
How groups of lifeless particles become ‘life-like’ Physicists have shown how a system of lifeless particles can become “life-like” by collectively switching back and forth between crystalline and fluid states—even when the environment remains stable. Physical Review Letters recently published the findings, the first experimental realization of such dynamics. “We’ve discovered perhaps the simplest physical system that can consistently keep changin
22h
Big Think
A Hackathon Reveals Most Any Hacker Can Break Into Election Equipment DEFCON hackers find it’s really easy to hack U.S. voting machines. Read More
22h
Gizmodo
The DJI Spark's Black Friday Deal Is Cleared For an Early Departure DJI Spark , $400 DJI’s Spark is the most exciting new drone of the year . It’s roughly the size and weight of those cheap toy drones you see out there, but with significantly better flight time and performance, an automatic follow-me mode, and most crucially of all, a gimbal-stabilized 1080p camera that shoots some seriously great footage. It was already a bargain at its $500 launch price, but it
22h
Futurity.org
Gene cluster lets microbes eat dioxane Researchers have discovered a bacteria-borne gene that helps degrade a form of dioxane, a groundwater contaminant and suspected carcinogen. The discovery could be the basis for a much-needed tool to decide how to treat contaminated sites. The Rice University lab of civil and environmental engineer Pedro Alvarez found a novel gene cluster in Mycobacterium dioxanotrophicus PH-06, a mold-like bacter
23h
NYT > Science
Are Mass Murderers Insane? Usually Not, Researchers SayDevin P. Kelley, who killed 26 churchgoers in Texas, may have been deeply disturbed. But severe mental illness cannot explain most cases of mass murder.
23h
Futurity.org
Hormone could be new target for fatty liver disease Researchers may have found a new treatment target for treating fatty liver disease. The researchers discovered that increasing the levels of the fat hormone Neuregulin 4 (Nrg4) protected liver cells from metabolic stress in mice. Loss of this hormone had the opposite effect; mouse livers deteriorated and progressed to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, or NASH, more quickly. “I think in the coming dec
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Half of UK's kids fib about brushing their teethAlmost half of UK kids fib to some degree about brushing their teeth, with a fifth trying to trick their parents into thinking they've done the job properly, according to a new survey investigating the tooth brushing habits of the nation.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New DNA antenatal screening for Down's syndrome shown to be a 'transformational advance'Medical scientists at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have demonstrated for the first time that it is possible to incorporate DNA analysis into antenatal screening for three serious chromosome disorders, including Down's syndrome, in a way that is far more accurate than existing methods, and safer and less stressful for mothers.
23h
Gizmodo
The FBI Is Seeking Access to the Sutherland Springs Shooter's iPhone Photo: Getty The Federal Bureau of Investigation apparently missed a key window in which they could have sought Apple’s assistance with accessing data on an iPhone used by the Sutherland Springs shooter. The FBI announced at a press conference yesterday that it was unable to decrypt the phone, calling it yet another example of tech companies thwarting law enforcement’s ability to investigate crim
23h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Learned the Hard Way What We’re Following Election Day: Voters in Virginia, New Jersey, and several other states brought a wave of Democrats into office in Tuesday’s gubernatorial and legislative races. The results are being interpreted as a referendum on the Trump presidency—which, by a number of measures, hasn’t been going well . For the Democratic Party, the victories could foreshadow a path to regain control of C
23h
Latest Headlines | Science News
EPA OKs first living pest-control mosquito for use in United StatesFeds approve non-GM male tiger mosquitoes for sale as fake dads to suppress local pests.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nanoshells could deliver more chemo with fewer side effectsResearchers investigating ways to deliver high doses of cancer-killing drugs inside tumors have shown they can use a laser and light-activated gold nanoparticles to remotely trigger the release of FDA-approved cancer drugs inside cancer cells in laboratory cultures.
23h
Futurity.org
Why rising temps pose deadlier risk in Nairobi slums The health effects of climate change are likely to be worse in Africa’s crowded urban settlements because temperatures will climb sooner to levels dangerous for children and the elderly. Residents of these “slum” settlements often experience “micro-climates” warmer even than very close-by urban neighborhoods. The difference is due to home construction materials in the slums, along with lack of ve
23h
Futurity.org
Bursts of beta waves in the brain block distractions A new study stands to substantially refine what neuroscientists think goes on when the brain filters distraction and processes sensation. What really matters, researchers have found, is not a sustained elevation in beta wave power, but instead the rate of specific bursts of beta wave activity, ideally with perfect timing. The new insight arose from the scientists looking beneath the covers of the
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Standards to iron out 'weekend effect' in English hospitals don't make any differenceThe introduction of four priority standards for emergency care in hospitals in England has not made any difference to curbing excess deaths on Saturdays and Sundays, known as the 'weekend effect,' reveals the first study of its kind, published online in Emergency Medicine Journal.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Primary care consultations last less than 5 minutes for half the world's populationPrimary care consultations last less than 5 minutes for half the world's population, but range from 48 seconds in Bangladesh to 22.5 minutes in Sweden, reveals the largest international study of its kind, published in the online journal BMJ Open.
23h
The Atlantic
Is Donald Trump Using the DOJ to Crush CNN? The Department of Justice may finally be getting tough on corporate mergers. But it picked a politically explosive case to bring back the forgotten art of trust-busting. On Wednesday afternoon, The New York Times reported that AT&T and Time Warner, in order to win government approval of their $85 billion merger, are under pressure from the Justice Department to sell off either DirecTV or Turner B
23h
Gizmodo
A Human Driver Crashed Into Las Vegas's Driverless Shuttle In Its First Hour Of Service Image: KSNV/YouTube On Wednesday, a driverless shuttle debuted in Las Vegas. The shuttle, made by the French company Navya ARMA, began a route looping it around Vegas’s downtown. Within an hour, the shuttle was already involved in a crash. The crash, apparently, was not the shuttle’s fault. Sponsored by AAA, the shuttle is intended less for its actual utility and more to get people used to the id
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How human cognition can affect the spreading of diseases like EbolaPsychologists have applied science to health communication and found that the way the message is conveyed can have a significant impact on awareness about diseases, like Ebola, that jump from animals to people. The researchers found that the more animals that are known to carry a virus, the more people will perceive a risk from any animal.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Microbial murder mystery solvedTheir findings reveal that killer cells act methodically, shooting deadly enzymes into bacteria to 'program' a complete internal breakdown and cell death.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Boy is given new skin thanks to gene therapyA medical team has successfully treated a child suffering from extensive skin damage using transplants derived from genetically modified stem cells. The boy is a so-called butterfly child: he suffers from epidermolysis bullosa, a genetic skin disease that had destroyed approximately 80 percent of his epidermis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Should exercise be what the doctor orders for depression?More mental health providers may want to take a closer look at including exercise in their patients' treatment plans, a new study suggests. Researchers asked 295 patients receiving treatment at a mental health clinic whether they wanted to be more physically active and if exercise helped improve their mood and anxiety. They also asked if patients wanted their therapist to help them become more act
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Manta ray robot swims faster and operates up to 10 hoursResearchers have created MantaDroid, an aquatic robot that emulates the swimming locomotion of manta rays. The robotic manta ray, which swims at the speed of twice its body length per second and can operate for up to 10 hours, could potentially be employed for underwater surveillance in future.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
After repeated C. diff infections, people change their behaviorsAfter suffering repeated bouts of debilitating Clostridium difficile infections, many patients significantly change their behaviors, but some precautions may do little to prevent future infections, according to a first-of-its-kind study.
1d
NYT > Science
Congress Weighs Repeal of Tax Credit for Rare Disease DrugsLong untouchable, the incentive for development of orphan drugs is now a Republican target as lawmakers consider a broad tax overhaul.
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Gizmodo
If You Want to Use Facebook’s Revenge Porn Blocker, An Employee Will Have to Review Your Uncensored Photo Photo: Getty Facebook announced on Tuesday that it is deploying a new revenge porn reporting tool , first piloted in Australia, that will allow users to send photos that they don’t want shared online directly to Facebook. Facebook says its community operations team will use a hash system to prevent the photo from being shared across Facebook, Instagram, or Messenger. But before an image is hashed
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Popular Science
Logitech is killing its Harmony Link service and the hardware will die with it Gadgets The device will cease working in March 2018 The Logitech Harmony Link will stop working next year.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Dive Into the Blackness | Auckland, New Zealand 360 VR Video | Discovery TRVLR Subscribe to Discovery VR for NEW EPISODES Every Friday - Tuesday: https://goo.gl/bnzvkQ Enter through cracks in the rock and explore a sacred cave. Discovery TRVLR takes you to meet Angus Stubbs, an underground explorer in Auckland, New Zealand. Rappel down a slippery rock wall and float on an underground river as you dive deeper into the heart of the mountain. Angus Stubbs has spent his life un
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Endurance training helpful in recovery from muscle inflammation, new study showsEndurance training can actually be helpful in dealing with muscle inflammation, according to a new article.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cooling in high and mid-latitudes led to aridification in Northern AfricaAnalyses of ancient plant leaf wax found in the sediments of the Gulf of Guinea told the researchers about rainfall in Cameroon and the central Sahel-Sahara over the past several millennia and showed a rapid aridification around 5500 years before now.
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Ars Technica
Bay Area: Join us 11/15 for a brief history of encryption and the law Enlarge / Riana Pfefferkorn is an expert in crypto and the law. She's an attorney and the Cryptography Fellow at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society. (credit: Riana Pfefferkorn) With the DOJ recently bringing back the "Going Dark" debate and now calling for "responsible encryption," what does the Trump administration have to say about strong crypto? Do we know yet? Do they? If there's an
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Big Think
How Charismatic are You? Just 6 Questions Can Tell You Charisma comes down to two things. Read More
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Gizmodo
The 10 Best Deals of November 8, 2017 A lot of Black Friday deals are going live early, but whether they were included in a leaked ad or not, these are the 10 best discounts we saw today. Head over to our main post for more deals, and follow us on Twitter and Facebook to never miss a chance to save. You can also join our Kinja Deals Community Facebook group to connect with your fellow deal hunters. #1: Clear the Rack Clear the Rack Y
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Virginia Is for Voters Today in 5 Lines Today marked the first anniversary of Donald Trump’s election. Ralph Northam’s victory in the Virginia governor’s race energized Democrats nationwide, as they look to make gains in 2018. During his visit to China , Trump called on Beijing to put greater economic pressure on North Korea. In her confirmation hearing, Kirstjen Nielsen, Trump’s pick to lead the Department of Homeland
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Live Science
First Cat in Space to Receive a Proper MemorialOne spacefaring feline who helped to pave the way for humans to go to space has gone largely unrecognized, and a new Kickstarter campaign aims to change that.
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Gizmodo
How to Hide the iPhone X’s Ugly Notch With a Custom Wallpaper Gizmodo /Alex Cranz The iPhone X design might be perfect if it wasn’t for that notch. The bit of bezel at the top of the screen may be necessary for Apple’s new Face ID to work, but that doesn’t mean we don’t hate the way it looks. If you’d rather have a regular black bar along the top of the iPhone X instead of an awkward notch, there’s a simple solution: just get a custom wallpaper designed to
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Live Science
Drinking Alcohol Really Does Raise Your Cancer Risk, Doctors WarnDrinking alcohol, even a light or moderate amount, increases the risk of several common cancers, according to a leading group of cancer doctors.
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Big Think
Survey Predicts Huge Amount of Non-Religious Americans by 2035 The U.S. has been steadily losing its religion for decades — but that trend might ramp up significantly in the years to come. Read More
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The Atlantic
What Can Trump's China Visit Really Achieve? The American president may have expected to use his meeting with China’s Xi Jinping on Wednesday to press China to “do more” to address the North Korean nuclear threat. As the 19th Congress of the Chinese Communist Party has just concluded, securing Xi’s place at the top of Chinese politics for at least the next five years, many analysts believe Xi now has more latitude to address the North Korea
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New on MIT Technology Review
GOP Embraces Geoengineering ... Which Terrifies Geoengineers
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New on MIT Technology Review
Content May Be Cheap, but Snapchat and Others See a Savvy Move in Paying Their Creators
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Four reasons that could explain ACOs' sluggish savingsDartmouth Institute researchers paired data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and the National Survey of ACOs to compare performance in the first three years of ACO contracts for three types of ACOs: integrated delivery systems, out-patient-physician-practice ACOs and coalitions of independent hospitals and practices. They identified four reasons -- two economic and two organizat
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Ars Technica
Still in Model 3 “production hell,” Tesla buys factory technology supplier Enlarge (credit: Tesla ) On Tuesday, Tesla announced that it had purchased an automation and machining company called Perbix. Perbix has supplied Tesla with parts for its high-tech factories in Fremont, California, and Sparks, Nevada, for the past three years, according to CNBC . Although it’s unclear how much Tesla paid for Perbix, the company says it made an offer of cash and stock, and SEC fil
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Big Think
A Temporary Marriage Makes More Sense Than Marriage for Life Most marriages end in resentment. Why should longevity be the sole marker of a successful marriage? Read More
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Gizmodo
Let's All Calm Down and Make Sense of That Antarctic Mantle Plume Image; NASA/Jim Yungel/ Flickr Three decades ago, scientists began to study the possibility that there was a plume of hot rock coming up from the mantle, heating parts of Western Antarctica. Back in September, researchers published results of a model showing how such a plume might affect the Antarctic ice sheet. Today, these headlines started to appear: Image: Screenshot And my brain felt like it
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Live Science
Why a Woman's Wrists Glowed with Gold Filaments on an X-RayIt's a medical treatment that Louis XIV, the French king who presided over the gold-drenched Palace of Versailles, might have liked.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate-influenced changes in flowering, fruiting also affect bird abundance, activitiesA new study has documented shifts in Hawaiian bird abundance, breeding and molting based on climate-related changes to native vegetation. Researchers with the US Forest Service's Pacific Southwest Research Station recently reviewed extensive climate, vegetation and bird data collected between 1976 and 1982 at a 40-acre monitoring site about 5 miles outside Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park on Hawai'
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Feed: All Latest
Blockbuster Virginia Election Should Mean Bigger Risks from DemocratsAfter results that far exceeded expectations, data-driven progressive groups might widen their aperture as they look to 2018.
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Gizmodo
Soon, There Will Be A Harry Potter Version Of Pokemon Go There are two major franchises that every ‘90s kid desperately wished were real: Pokemon and Harry Potter . Over a year after publisher Niantic tried to make Pokemon real with the augmented reality mobile game Pokemon Go , they’re continuing their takeover of the nostalgia market with Harry Potter: Wizards Unite . Harry Potter: Wizards Unite , co-developed by Warner Bros. Interactive, will use si
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Live Science
Earthquakes Jolt Icelandic Volcano As It Refills with MagmaEarthquakes are shaking the ground around Iceland's Bardarbunga volcano, but experts say there's a perfectly reasonable explanation for this: The volcano is likely refilling its tank with magma and preparing, albeit slowly, for its next eruption.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetic discovery another tool in battle against wheat pestsAMARILLO - Greenbug and Hessian fly infestations can significantly reduce wheat yield and quality in Texas and worldwide. Breeding for resistance to these two pests using marker-assisted selection just got a new tool from a Texas A&M AgriLife Research study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exercise may benefit patients with leg ulcersA preliminary British Journal of Dermatology study suggests that ulcers in the legs may heal faster with exercise.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
What it's like spending a year in spaceFar from home, with great views... the International Space Station is not your typical holiday spot.
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Live Science
Glimmers of Link Found Between Heart Problems and Alzheimer'sA weak heart may age parts of the brain by 15 to 20 years.
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Big Think
Humanity's Earliest-Known Ancestors Have Been Discovered in Southern England This is the oldest fossil ever found belonging to the line that leads to us. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Efforts to capture, save Mexico's endangered porpoise endExperts say they have suspended effort to capture the few remaining vaquita porpoises in Mexico's Gulf of California after the one they managed to catch died quickly in captivity.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists find missing clue to how HIV hacks cells to propagate itselfComputer modeling has helped a team of scientists, including several scholars from the University of Chicago, to decode previously unknown details about the process by which HIV forces cells to spread the virus to other cells. The findings, published Nov. 7 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, may offer a new avenue for drugs to combat the virus.
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New on MIT Technology Review
The Woman Battling Hate Speech, Censorship, and Extremism Online (and Off)Yasmin Green, head of R&D for Alphabet’s Jigsaw, is using technology in hopes of making the world a better place. It’s not easy.
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The Atlantic
Theresa May and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Week Theresa May had already lost one cabinet minister this week, and now she’s lost another. On Wednesday, U.K. Secretary of State for International Development Priti Patel submitted her resignation from the prime minister’s cabinet over her breach of the U.K.’s ministerial code during a family vacation to Israel in August. “I accept that in meeting with organizations and politicians during a private
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The Atlantic
Why Mike Pompeo Released More bin Laden Files In January, the intelligence community announced the end of a 30-month project to de-classify the documents recovered from Osama bin Laden’s lair in Abbottabad, Pakistan. While the documents, grabbed by the U.S. commandos who killed the long-hunted leader of al-Qaeda in 2011, contained more chaff than wheat—duplicate records, widely available literature, and more than enough pornography to make a
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Popular Science
Gene therapy just saved a young boy’s life—by giving him new skin Health It’s an early success for stem cell therapies. Researchers replaced almost all of a young boy’s outer skin layer to treat a life-threatening skin condition, a genetic disease called epidermolysis bullosa.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists find missing clue to how HIV hacks cells to propagate itselfComputer modeling has helped a team of scientists, including several scholars from the University of Chicago, to decode previously unknown details about the 'budding' process by which HIV forces cells to spread the virus to other cells. The findings, published Nov. 7 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, may offer a new avenue for drugs to combat the virus.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fighting cancer with cancer: 3-D cultured cells could drive precision therapyHoneycomb-like arrays of tiny, lab-grown cancers could one day help doctors zero in on individualized treatments for ovarian cancer, an unpredictable disease that kills more than 14,000 women each year in the United States alone.
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Live Science
The Surprising Reason Nighttime Injuries Are Worse Than Daytime OnesBe careful of things that go bump in the night, especially if those bumps lead to skin injuries.
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Ars Technica
An experimental SpaceX rocket engine has exploded in Texas Enlarge / Nine Merlin engines power the first stage of a Falcon 9 rocket. (credit: SpaceX ) A Merlin rocket engine exploded Sunday at SpaceX's test facilities in Central Texas. According to the company, no one was injured during the mishap, which damaged two bays in a Merlin engine test stand at the MacGregor facility. "All safety protocols were followed during the time of this incident," said a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Human-caused warming increasing likelihood of record-breaking hot yearsA new study finds human-caused global warming is significantly increasing the rate at which hot temperature records are being broken around the world.
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The Scientist RSS
Catalog of the Small Intestine Reveals New Cell SubtypesSingle-cell analyses from mouse samples detail the changes in cell distribution during infections.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
AT&T deal delay? Reports say gov't wants TV properties soldAT&T says it's uncertain when its $85 billion deal for Time Warner will close, making investors worry that regulators may try to block it or require significant changes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanoparticles can limit inflammation by distracting the immune systemA surprise finding suggests that an injection of nanoparticles may be able to help fight the immune system when it goes haywire, researchers at the University of Michigan have shown. The nanoparticles divert immune cells that cause inflammation away from an injury site.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Golden' potato delivers bounty of vitamins A and EAn experimental "golden" potato could hold the power to prevent disease and death in developing countries where residents rely heavily upon the starchy food for sustenance, new research suggests.
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Live Science
These Rodent-Like Creatures Are the Earliest Known Ancestor of Humans, Whales and ShrewsThe discovery of the little creatures, which lived about 145 million years ago, may push the evolution of this mammal group back dozens of millions of years, the researchers said.
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Big Think
Anti-Aging Stem Cell Therapy Shows “Remarkable” Results in Human Trials The results of two human clinical trials involving elderly patients suffering from frailty showed no adverse side effects and “remarkable” physical improvement. Read More
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The Atlantic
Why Notre Dame Reversed Course on Contraception Notre Dame announced on Tuesday that faculty, students, and staff will be able to obtain coverage for contraceptives through their university-sponsored insurance plans. The surprise decision is a reversal of the school’s announcement last week that it would discontinue birth-control coverage in light of new religious-freedom protections put in place by the Trump administration. The Catholic unive
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Human-caused warming increasing likelihood of record-breaking hot yearsA new study finds human-caused global warming is significantly increasing the rate at which hot temperature records are being broken around the world.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Twitter purists mourn end of 140-character limit on postsIt was a sad day for Twitter purists, dismayed that the 140-character limit restricting users on the social media platform to crisp, succinct posts had been doubled to a gaudy 280.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nanoparticles can limit inflammation by distracting the immune systemA surprise finding suggests that an injection of nanoparticles may be able to help fight the immune system when it goes haywire, researchers at the University of Michigan have shown. The nanoparticles divert immune cells that cause inflammation away from an injury site.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Human-caused warming increasing likelihood of record-breaking hot yearsHuman-caused warming increasing likelihood of record-breaking hot years.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Autoimmunity may underlie newly discovered painful nerve-damage disorderAn analysis of the medical records of patients treated at Massachusetts General Hospital for an often-mysterious condition involving damage to small nerve fibers supports the hypothesis that some cases are caused by autoimmune disease and also identifies the first effective treatment option.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Golden' potato delivers bounty of vitamins A and EAn experimental 'golden' potato could hold the power to prevent disease and death in developing countries where residents rely heavily upon the starchy food for sustenance, new research suggests.
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Ars Technica
Trump’s DOJ wants AT&T/Time Warner to sell CNN or DirecTV before merger Enlarge / On July 2, President Donald Trump tweeted a video of himself wrestling CNN. (credit: President Donald Trump ) The Trump administration is asking AT&T and Time Warner Inc. to sell off either CNN or DirecTV in order to win government approval of their merger, multiple news outlets reported today. AT&T has owned DirecTV since 2015 and is now seeking federal approval to purchase Time Warner
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bear or chipmunk? Engineer finds how brain encodes soundsWhen you are out in the woods and hear a cracking sound, your brain needs to process quickly whether the sound is coming from, say, a bear or a chipmunk. A biomedical engineer now has a new interpretation for an old observation, debunking an established theory in the process.
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Gizmodo
SpaceX Launches Investigation After Rocket-Engine Explodes During Tests (Updated) A Merlin 1D rocket undergoing an ignition test. (Image: SpaceX) On Sunday, a rocket-engine exploded during ignition tests at the SpaceX facility in Texas. The incident marks a setback for the company in what has otherwise been a pretty good year. As The Washington Post reports , the explosion happened during a “qualification test” of a new Merlin engine, which SpaceX uses on its Falcon 1 and Falc
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Gizmodo
Black Friday Pricing Is Already Live For This 70" 4K TV Sony 70" 4K HDR TV , $1198 If you’ve been saving your nickels for a big TV purchase this Black Friday, you don’t necessarily have to wait until the end of the month. This 70" 4K Sony is already down to its Black Friday pricing of $1198 , an all-time low by about $300. This set is on the low end of Sony’s current lineup, so you’re not getting features like local dimming or Dolby Vision H
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New on MIT Technology Review
Brain-Controlled Typing May Be the Killer Advance That AR NeedsWhy type when you can just think?
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Ars Technica
“Resume Assistant” uses LinkedIn’s data to make Word a better résumé builder Enlarge (credit: Microsoft ) Writing and updating your résumé is a task that few of us enjoy. Microsoft is hoping to make it a little less painful with a new feature coming to Word called Resume Assistant . Resume Assistant will detect that you're writing a résumé and offer insights and suggestions culled from LinkedIn. LinkedIn is a vast repository of both résumés and job openings and lets you s
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NYT > Science
Ending Medical Tax Break Could Be a ‘Gut Punch’ to the Middle ClassThe tax deduction on medical expenses helps millions of Americans cope with high health care costs. The Republican tax proposal would eliminate it.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A star that would not dieUCSB astrophysicists and LCO astronomers study a supernova that challenges known theories of how certain stars end their lives.
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The Atlantic
How the War in Yemen Explains the Future of Saudi Arabia Suffice it to say, this past weekend was a varied and busy one for Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. Between arresting a reported 11 cousins as part of an anti-corruption crackdown, apparently orchestrating the surprise resignation of the Lebanese prime minister, reading (likely with glee) President Donald Trump’s tweet expressing hope that the national oil company, Aramco, would sell its s
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The Atlantic
The Opening of the Louvre Abu Dhabi Topped by an enormous signature dome of overlapping geometric lattices that weighs more than 7,500 tons, the Louvre Abu Dhabi Museum, designed by French architect Jean Nouvel, will open to the public this weekend, on November 11, 2017. The new museum will showcase hundreds of works of art from around the world. Back in 2007, the Louvre Museum in Paris signed a $525 million agreement to allow the
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Gizmodo
Yeah, CNN Is Getting Stepped On Photo: AP After AT&T and Time Warner announced their planned $85 billion merger last year, it became clear that there might be a political problem: President Donald Trump’s seething hatred of CNN, which is owned by Time Warner. And now, it is all coming to pass. The FT reports that US Justice Department regulators have told AT&T that it needs to sell CNN if it wants to get the merger appr
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Ars Technica
Scientists on new supernova: WTF have we been looking at? Enlarge / A more typical Type-IIp supernova. (credit: NASA SWIFT ) A supernova may be one of the most extraordinary events in the Universe, but the Universe is a very big place, and the extraordinary happens with great regularity. We've now observed a huge number of these events and have managed to break them down into categories based on patterns in the light they produce. Astrophysicists have b
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How do Facebook ads target you?The House Intelligence Committee is preparing to release to the public the 3,000 ads the Russian-based Internet Research Agency bought on Facebook as part of its coordinated disinformation campaign to sway the electorate, information that may help explain how voters were duped and which campaign benefited.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Great Barrier Reef protected zones help fish in even lightly exploited areasProtected zones of the Great Barrier Reef benefit fish even at the relatively lightly-fished northern reefs, according to a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Boy is given new skin thanks to gene therapyA medical team at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum's burn unit and the Center for Regenerative Medicine at the University of Modena (Italy) were the first ever to successfully treat a child suffering from extensive skin damage using transplants derived from genetically modified stem cells. The boy is a so-called butterfly child: he suffers from epidermolysis bullosa, a genetic skin disease that had des
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microbial murder mystery solvedImmune cells called "killer cells" target bacteria invading the body's cells, but how do they do this so effectively? Bacteria can quickly evolve resistance against antibiotics, yet it seems they have not so readily been able to evade killer cells. This has caused researchers to become interested in finding out the exact mechanism that killer cells use to destroy bacterial invaders.
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Gizmodo
Google Is Mapping California's Air Pollution in Mesmerizing Detail GIF Credit: Google / Aclima Residents across the country sometimes see Google Street Cars driving down their blocks. In California, these vehicles are gathering air quality data block by block, which could ultimately help shape local policy to benefit people’s health. Google released video footage Tuesday showing how the Golden State is doing when it comes to nitrogen dioxide , a gas released in
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why male and female bodies of the same species differTwo new studies provide insights on why male and female bodies of the same species differ. The studies show factors that regulate the expression of doublesex1, a gene responsible for the growth of male traits in the ancient crustacean Daphnia magna and the subsequent spatial expression of doublesex1 in embryo development. The studies shed light on the evolution of sexual dimorphism.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanoshells could deliver more chemo with fewer side effectsResearchers investigating ways to deliver high doses of cancer-killing drugs inside tumors have shown they can use a laser and light-activated gold nanoparticles to remotely trigger the release of approved cancer drugs inside cancer cells in laboratory cultures.
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Gizmodo
Just How Fucked Is Snapchat? Image Source: Snapchat Snap is fucked. Following an earnings call on Tuesday, a fifth of the company’s value disappeared in after-hours trading, Mark Zuckerberg is eating its lunch, Snap Spectacles are in the toilet. Yes, things are bad. But are they Vine-levels of bad? Or Twitter-bad? Trick question, Twitter’s very fucked! It’s only been eight months since Snap went public and one of the few suc
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BBC News - Science & Environment
'Zombie' star survived going supernovaAstronomers discover the astronomical equivalent of a horror film villain: a star that wouldn't stay dead.
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Ars Technica
With Amazon Key’s launch, customers and lawyers have lots of questions Enlarge / IoT products like Amazon Key come with a whole set of risks that consumers aren't equipped to assess themselves. (credit: Amazon ) Last week, Amazon announced a new voluntary service that allows its own contracted delivery personnel to temporarily access customers' homes through a new service dubbed "Amazon Key," which begins Wednesday, November 8. Privacy experts have wondered what put
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Gizmodo
This Little Box Can Make Even the Junkiest Laptop a Gaming PC GIF All images: Sam Rutherford/Gizmodo You are probably surrounded by more computers than you know what to do with, whether it’s the phone in your pocket, the old clunker at home, or the sleek little ultraportable you got from work. And while they are more than enough for everyday tasks, when it comes to real graphics prowess, I’m talking about serious gaming, 3D design, or photo/video editing, m
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Should exercise be what the doctor orders for depression?More mental health providers may want to take a closer look at including exercise in their patients' treatment plans, a new study suggests. Michigan State University and University of Michigan researchers asked 295 patients receiving treatment at a mental health clinic whether they wanted to be more physically active and if exercise helped improve their mood and anxiety. They also asked if patient
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers discover new mechanism for battling influenzaJust as flu season swings into full gear, researchers from the University of Colorado Boulder and University of Texas at Austin have uncovered a previously unknown mechanism by which the human immune system tries to battle the influenza A virus. The discovery sheds new light on how the virus -- which kills 12,000 to 56,000 people in the United States annually -- often wins, and it could ultimately
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The Atlantic
The Challenge of Teaching War to Today's Students This is the first installment in our series of essays written by veterans. We asked service members to share how their time in uniform shaped their perspectives on American life. The first time that I taught the Middle East to my high-school students, I expected questions on terrorism and the war in Iraq. My students knew that I was a Marine and a veteran of the war, and even though the history c
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Survival of the least-fit: Antiviral drug selectively targets the nastiest virusesAn antiviral drug that inhibits a virus' replication machinery selectively targets the most aggressive viruses, according to new research that looked at the infection of individual cells by a virus and the consequence of antiviral intervention.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Wireless handheld spectrometer transmits data to smartphoneA new smartphone-compatible device that is held like a pencil could make it practical to acquire spectral images of everyday objects and may eventually be used for point-of-care medical diagnosis in remote locations.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A focus on dental health can protect children from becoming overweightTalking about dental health with children and parents - about what is healthy and unhealthy for your teeth - can be one way to prevent children from becoming overweight.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Early intervention may hold key to treatment of Friedreich's ataxiaCurrent treatments may be administered too late to target Friedreich's ataxia effectively. New research using a slow-onset frataxin knock-in/knockout mouse model showed significantly reduced levels of mitochondrial biosynthesis proteins and early mitochondrial deficiency in the cerebellar cortex, even at pre-symptomatic stages of development. This suggests that the progressive degeneration in mito
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Easing the soil's temperatureMany factors influence the ability of soil to buffer against temperature changes. Recent research shows both perennial biofuel and cover crops help soils shield against extreme temperatures.
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Gizmodo
Apparently These Sheep Can Recognize Emma Watson and Barack Obama Image: Knoelle et al, RSOS (2017) Sheep seemed to recognize the faces of Barack Obama, Emma Watson, and even Jake Gyllenhaal in a new study. And you thought you were so special, human. Recognizing human faces is a skill you may take for granted—but you’re also a human. Can you tell fish or bird faces apart? Past research has shown that horses, dogs, and even mockingbirds can discern between indiv
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Scientific American Content: Global
Mysterious "Geomagnetic Spike" 3,000 Years Ago Challenges Our Understanding of Earth's InteriorEarth’s magnetic field protects life and satellites from the sun’s harmful radiation, but this effect is far from constant -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Popular Science
This American auto rivals the speed and power of racecars Cars Gone in 2.3 seconds. It takes just a little more than two seconds for the Dodge Challenger SRT Demon to reach 60 miles per hour.
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Ars Technica
In Amazon’s game engine, voice actors can now be replaced with robots Enlarge / There's nothing creepy about this disembodied head used to demo a robot-powered voice service, Amazon. Nothing creepy at all. (credit: Amazon ) Want to add voice acting to your next epic video game but don't want to deal with those pesky real-life actors to populate your virtual towns and castles? Amazon has your money-saving back. The company's Lumberyard game engine now supports a ful
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New on MIT Technology Review
This Chatbot Will Help You Sue AnyoneAn AI system that started as a way to fight parking tickets will, by the end of this year, allow you to sue anyone.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Microbial murder mystery solvedTheir findings, published in the journal Cell, reveal that killer cells act methodically, shooting deadly enzymes into bacteria to 'program' a complete internal breakdown and cell death.
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Science : NPR
EPA Approval Of Bacteria To Fight Mosquitoes Caps Long Quest Scientists have long sought a way to fight mosquito-borne viruses without pesticides. For researchers like Scott O'Neill, the Wolbachia bacteria offered that chance. But they had to prove it. (Image credit: Colyn Huber)
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Gizmodo
Greta Van Susteren Made an App Or Something—Really We Have No Clue What She Is Talking About Image: Getty Have you been wondering what Greta Van Susteren has been up to since she ended her brief stint as a MSNBC host? Well regardless, she’s been working on a nutty app that appears to be called Sorry. The anchor-turned-developer announced Sorry this morning in a long, bizarre, stream-of-consciousness Facebook post filled with random capitalizations and awkward asides. Advertisement “SNAPC
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook wants nude photos from Australian users—for a good reasonFacebook's latest attempt to wipe revenge porn off its platform: asking users to send their own nude photos.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Adolescents use dietary supplements to increase sports performance and improve immunityAdolescents in developed countries frequently use dietary supplements despite a lack of knowledge about possible harmful effects or drug interactions. Often males turn to dietary supplements in an attempt to increase their performance for sports while females are more concerned with preventing illness and disease. To understand the underlying reasons and sources of recommendation for dietary suppl
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A warbler's flashy yellow throat? There are genes for thatBirds get their bright red, orange and yellow plumage from carotenoid pigments -- responsible for many of the same bright colors in plants. But how songbirds turn carotenoids into the spectacular variety of feathered patches found in nature has remained a mystery. Now research might have pinpointed some of the genetic machinery responsible for the plumage coloration in Audubon's and myrtle warbler
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A gel that does not break or dry outResearchers have developed a highly robust gel that includes large amounts of ionic liquid.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel layered superconductor based on tin and arsenicResearchers have recently discovered a novel layered superconductor containing tin (Sn) and arsenic (As) as its major components.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Size matters: How thrips choose their partnersThe bigger the male, the higher his chances to successfully mate -- this applies, at least, to thrips, insects that are hard to recognize with the naked eye. The larger males not only drive off their smaller rivals, they also have better immune systems and produce more sperm.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fully integrated circuits printed directly onto fabricResearchers have successfully incorporated washable, stretchable and breathable electronic circuits into fabric, opening up new possibilities for smart textiles and wearable electronics. The circuits were made with cheap, safe and environmentally friendly inks, and printed using conventional inkjet printing techniques.
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New Scientist - News
Daytime injuries heal twice as fast as wounds sustained at nightBurn injuries sustained during the day take an average of 11 days less to heal than night-time burns
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Review: Google Pixel 2 XL is almost perfect, but the screen gives me the bluesThe pressure on smartphone manufacturers must be intense.
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Ars Technica
Apple is working on an AR headset with a new OS, report says Bloomberg reported today that Apple is working on an augmented reality headset that it hopes to bring to market in 2020. The headset would feature its own display rather than relying on an iPhone, and it would run a new spin-off from iOS in the vein of watchOS or tvOS, currently called rOS internally, for "reality operating system." The project is one of many AR-related initiatives that fall unde
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sports psychologists suffer fear and uncertainty working with elite footballersSports psychologists have to cope with 'fear and uncertainty', job insecurity and long working hours when working with elite footballers, research shows.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nanoshells could deliver more chemo with fewer side effectsResearchers investigating ways to deliver high doses of cancer-killing drugs inside tumors have shown they can use a laser and light-activated gold nanoparticles to remotely trigger the release of FDA-approved cancer drugs inside cancer cells in laboratory cultures.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers develop flexible, stretchable photonic devicesResearchers at MIT and elsewhere have developed a way to make optically based microchips that can flex and bend like rubber and could be used for skin-mounted diagnostics or flexible strain sensors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The key to a nutCognitive biologists from the University of Vienna and the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna tested Goffin cockatoos in a tool use task, requiring the birds to move objects in relation to a surface. The parrots were not only able to select the correct key but also required fewer placement attempts to align simple shapes than primates in a similar study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How human cognition can affect the spreading of diseases like EbolaPsychologists from the University of Sydney and Texas Tech have applied science to health communication and found that the way the message is conveyed can have a significant impact on awareness about diseases, like Ebola, that jump from animals to people. The researchers found that the more animals that are known to carry a virus, the more people will perceive a risk from any animal.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Heart attacks more likely in those with low blood phosphate levelsLow phosphate in the blood is linked to the risk of heart attack and coronary artery disease, a new study in the journal PLOS ONE reports.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chronic stress hormones may promote resistance to EGFR inhibitors in lung cancer patientsElevated levels of chronic stress hormones, such as those produced by psychological distress, may promote resistance to drugs commonly used to treat lung cancer patients with EGFR mutations, according to new research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Retrospective analysis of clinical patient data suggests that beta blocker drugs may slow or prevent the development of resista
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ecological Restoration success higher with natural measures than active measuresIn forest restoration, letting nature take its course may be the most effective and least expensive means of restoring biodiversity and vegetation structure of tropical forests. With global efforts to secure pledges for restoration of 350 million hectares of degraded forests, researchers argue these commitments don't have to be as costly or labor intensive as many think as long as a well-informed,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Deep-sea fish reveals twilight trickA new type of cell has been found in the eye of a deep-sea fish, and scientists say the discovery opens a new world of understanding about vision in a variety of light conditions.University of Queensland scientists found the new cell type in the deep-sea pearlside fish (Maurolicus spp.), which have an unusual visual system adapted for twilight conditions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UW scientists create a recipe to make human blood-brain-barrierIn a report published this week (Nov. 8, 2017) in Science Advances, researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison detail a defined, step-by-step process to make a more exact mimic of the human blood-brain-barrier in the laboratory dish.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Wound healing guided by cellular clockProviding insight into why wound healing outcomes vary depending on the time of the injury, researchers report that fibroblasts -- cells critical to this process -- contribute to healing differently based on cues from their circadian clocks.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nature bests humans at restoring tropical forestsThe spontaneous recovery of native tree species is more successful in restoring tropical forests than human interventions like planting seedlings, a new study reports.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Endocrine Society experts examine how diabetes harms body's smallest blood vesselsThe Endocrine Society issued a new Scientific Statement today examining how diabetes damages the body's smallest blood vessels as well as how the condition affects the body's natural repair processes designed to protect the eyes, kidneys, nerves and other organs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel approach could limit common complications of immunotherapyConnecting cancer immunotherapy drugs such as anti-CTLA4 and anti-PD-L1 to peptides that bind to tissues in and around tumors enhanced their effects while limiting adverse events.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New care model closes significant gap in addiction treatmentA new program is showing that connecting patients to addiction treatment when they are hospitalized for other conditions can be a powerful tool in closing a gap in addiction treatment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First mathematical model that predicts immunotherapy successResearchers have created the first mathematical model that can predict how a cancer patient will benefit from certain immunotherapies, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Misregulated protein breakdown promotes leukemias and brain cancerAn enzyme that is responsible for the breakdown of specific amino acids in food plays a key role in the development of leukemias and brain cancer, scientists have now reported. The researchers have hence discovered a surprising link between energy metabolism and the so-called epigenetic code. The authors think that blocking this enzyme is a promising possibility to combat cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How cells detect, mend DNA damage may improve chemotherapyHuman cells have a way of detecting and mending DNA damage caused by some common chemotherapy drugs, according to a new study. The findings could have important implications for treating cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How chronic inflammation tips the balance of immune cells to promote liver cancerChronic inflammation is known to drive many cancers, especially liver cancer. Researchers have long thought that's because inflammation directly affects cancer cells, stimulating their division and protecting them from death. But researchers have now found that chronic liver inflammation also promotes cancer by suppressing immunosurveillance -- a natural defense mechanism in which it's thought the
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sheep are able to recognize human faces from photographsSheep can be trained to recognise human faces from photographic portraits -- and can even identify the picture of their handler without prior training -- according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bringing natural killer cells to the tumor battlefieldBy studying melanoma, a highly malignant form of skin cancer, medical researchers have revealed a mechanism by which the immunosuppressive environment can be switched to an immunosupportive one. They found that if autophagy -- the intracellular recycling process -- is blocked in tumor cells, they produce cytokines that attract NK cells. The massive recruitment of NK cells allows killing cancer cel
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Infrared imaging better than touch at detecting defects in protective lead apronsInfrared thermal imaging is a much better detective, with 50 percent of study participants picking out all holes intentionally drilled into a test apron compared with just 6 percent of participants who detected the same defects using the tactile method, according to research.
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The Atlantic
Trump's Oddly Quiet November 8 The moment had all the makings of an epic presidential meltdown. It was the eve of Donald Trump’s election anniversary, and Republicans were getting pummeled in races across Virginia, New Jersey, and New York. Pundits on TV and Twitter were blaming the party’s struggles on Trump’s deep unpopularity, and some were predicting a cataclysmic wipeout in next year’s midterms. Under normal circumstances
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The Atlantic
'We Thought You'd Like to Look Back on This Post from 1 Year Ago’ One year ago today, I stared across a vast sea of “I Voted” stickers. Everywhere my head turned on the street, and everywhere my cursor roamed online, American flags were stuck to people’s lapels, fun souvenirs from doing a civic duty. The Hillary Clinton supporters in my News Feed had a particular excited glow to them, a sense of pride that they had helped to accomplish what was then thought by
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The Scientist RSS
Child Receives Transgenic Skin Over Most of His BodyA combination gene-and-cell therapy has given a boy with a grievous skin disease a new lease on life, and has resolved a dermatology debate to boot.
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The Scientist RSS
Many Editors of US Medical Journals Receive Industry FundingThe authors of two new studies on the payments suggest stricter guidelines are needed.
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Live Science
Intricately Carved Gemstone Found in Ancient Warrior's TombAn incredibly detailed carving from a 3,500-year-old tomb has archaeologists questioning what they know about the origins of ancient Greek art.
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Ars Technica
Call of Duty: WWII review—The less things change… Enlarge / Setting all else aside, the game is usually nice to look at. Call of Duty: WWII certainly has some interesting timing. It has the dubious duty of returning the landmark first-person series to its titular roots at a time when any game centered on fascism, nationalism, and especially Nazism is under extra scrutiny. And it just so happened to release a week after another game dealt with th
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Viden
Sår heler hurtigst, hvis du slår dig om dagenKroppen er meget bedre til at håndtere sår og skader, som opstår om dagen end om natten, viser ny forskning.
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Viden
VIDEO Får genkender Obama og Hermione GrangerEn flok får har lært at genkende billeder Barack Obama og andre kendte. Dyrene er et vigtigt redskab i forskning af sjældne hjernesygdomme.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Watch Live Today: Unveiling the Fabric of the Universe, One Fundamental Question at a TimeParticle physicist Pauline Gagnon will discuss the importance of fundamental research to society during a live Webcast tonight at 7 P.M. Eastern time -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: The Circadian Clock in Your NoseAdolescents’ sense of smell worked best during evening hours, a pattern that may be rooted in human evolution.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cockatoos match objects into corresponding frames in a tool-use taskCognitive biologists from the University of Vienna and the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna tested Goffin cockatoos in a tool use task, requiring the birds to move objects in relation to a surface. The parrots were not only able to select the correct key but also required fewer placement attempts to align simple shapes than primates in a similar study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Twilight trick: A new type of cell has been found in the eye of a deep-sea fishA new type of cell has been found in the eye of a deep-sea fish, and scientists say the discovery opens a new world of understanding about vision in a variety of light conditions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ecological restoration success higher with natural measures than active measuresEcological restoration success is higher for natural regeneration than for active restoration in tropical forests
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New postcranial skeleton of ancient dolphin Albertocetus meffordum found in South CarolinaA partial skeleton from an Oligocene dolphin species was found in South Carolina, according to a study published November 8, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Robert Boessenecker from the College of Charleston, South Carolina, USA, and Erum Ahmed and Jonathan Geisler from the New York Institute of Technology, New York.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Great Barrier Reef protected zones help fish in even lightly exploited areasProtected zones of the Great Barrier Reef benefit fish even at the relatively lightly-fished northern reefs, according to a study published November 8, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Carolina Castro-Sanguino from the University of Queensland, Australia, and colleagues.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Gene-Therapy Grafts Have Repaired a Child’s Devastating Skin DisorderThe skin transplant replaced almost all of a patient’s skin.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Probe thinner than a human hair provides high definition recording of brain activityScientists have developed a new device that could revolutionize our understanding of the brain by allowing researchers to map the activity of complex neural networks that control behavior and decision making, in a way never before possible.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dysfunction of intricate astrocyte cells may underlie autism, schizophrenia and epilepsyThe unique architecture of star-shaped brain cells called astrocytes plays a key role in regulating the development and function of neural synapses in the brain, says new research. The findings indicate that astrocyte dysfunction may underlie neuronal problems observed in devastating diseases like autism, schizophrenia and epilepsy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How ice in clouds is born: More disorderedWhen water droplets freeze in clouds, the structure of the ice crystal isn't necessarily the classic hexagonal snowflake structure. Rather, a more disordered ice structure forms more easily than hexagonal ice under certain cloud conditions, allowing the water droplets in clouds to turn to ice more rapidly than previously predicted. The work reconciles theoretical models of clouds with observations
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First draft cell atlas of the small intestineResearchers have produced a first-draft atlas of the mammalian small intestine's cellular composition. This atlas provides a high-resolution, gene expression-based census of the cells constituting the lining of the small intestine, using more than 53,000 individual cells from the mouse gut or gut-organoid models
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Astronomers discover a star that would not dieAstronomers have made a bizarre discovery; a star that refuses to stop shining.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Seagrass biodiversity is both a goal and a means for restorationPlanting multiple seagrass species, rather than a single species, could be better for restoring damaged coastal ecosystems in Indonesia's Coral Triangle.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Video of blood clot contraction reveals how platelets naturally form unobtrusive clotsThe first view of the physical mechanism of how a blood clot contracts at the level of individual platelets is giving researchers a new look at a natural process that is part of blood clotting. The team describes how specialized proteins in platelets cause clots to shrink in size.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Neurodegenerative diseases: Transforming fibrils into crystalsResearchers have discovered a new type of transition in protein folding: amyloid crystals formed from amyloid fibrils by a decrease in energy. The crystals are even more stable than the fibrils, which are responsible for a number of serious neurodegenerative diseases in humans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Early breastfeeding success not affected by epidural pain relief with fentanylIncluding the opioid fentanyl in the solution used to maintain an epidural during childbirth does not appear to affect the success of breastfeeding six weeks after delivery, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Learning two languages does not limit academic potential for Head Start studentsNot all dual-language learners are at risk academically, but as a group, these students are often labeled as such, despite differences in their English skills. A new study found as dual-language learners gained English proficiency, they had significant growth in cognitive and academic development, eventually outperforming students who only spoke English.
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NYT > Science
Democrats Assail Environmental Nominees Over Climate ChangeSenator Edward Markey, a Massachusetts Democrat, called the views of Kathleen Hartnett White, slated for the top White House environmental job, “outrageous.”
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NYT > Science
Gene Therapy Creates Replacement Skin to Save a Dying BoyDoctors grew sheets of healthy skin that were transplanted onto a boy with a genetic disease that caused blistering and tearing all over his body.
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Popular Science
Five animals that do our dirty work for us Animals Dogs and crows with unusual nine to fives. Other species do endless amounts of work crucial to continued human existence. Even without the motivation of cash, we persuade animals to do our bidding.
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Gizmodo
Speed Up Your Thanksgiving Dinner Prep With an Early Black Friday Instant Pot Deal Instant Pot IP-DUO60 , $80 If you don’t own a pressure cooker , today’s a great day to fix that, as Amazon’s knocked the highly-rated Instant Pot IP-DUO60 down to $80 , matching the price we’ve seen in multiple Black Friday ads. While that’s not as good as a one-day $70 deal they ran at the beginning of October, it’s still $20 less than usual, and a great chance to save if you want to use it to h
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Ars Technica
Cryptojacking craze that drains your CPU now done by 2,500 sites Enlarge / A music streaming site that participated in Coinhive crypto mining maxes out the visitor's CPU. (credit: Malwarebytes ) A researcher has documented almost 2,500 sites that are actively running cryptocurrency mining code in the browsers of unsuspecting visitors, a finding that suggests the unethical and possibly illegal practice has only picked up steam since it came to light a few weeks
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The Atlantic
Donald Trump: Unlikely Defender of U.S. Allies It’s been a remarkable few days for a man who once accused America’s “so-called allies” Japan and South Korea of “making billions screwing us.” A man who, as recently as last year, argued that “we’re better off” if both countries protected themselves from North Korea—by acquiring their own nuclear weapons if need be—rather than freeloading off U.S. military power. A guy who said , of a potential
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The Atlantic
The 'Horrifying' Consequence of Lead Poisoning When the city of Flint, Michigan, temporarily switched its water source to the Flint River in 2014, it didn’t treat the water properly. The untreated river water corroded pipes , allowing lead to leach into the water. Tests found lead levels in the region’s water to be higher than that of hazardous waste, but the city failed to warn residents of the danger for months. State officials are now faci
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Scientists replaced 80 percent of a ‘butterfly’ boy’s skinBy correcting genes in stem cells and growing new skin in the lab, a new therapy repaired a genetic skin disease.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Blue Planet II: Eel suffers toxic shock in underwater lakeRe-live the talked-about moment when an eel suffers the consequences of diving into a brine pool for food.
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Science : NPR
Genetically Altered Skin Saves A Boy Dying Of A Rare Disease An inherited disease called epidermolysis bullosa destroyed the 7-year-old's skin. Scientists grew new skin in the lab without the genetic flaw, and replaced 80 percent of his skin. He is thriving. (Image credit: CMR Unimore/Nature )
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
For seagrass, biodiversity is both a goal and a means for restorationCoral reefs, seagrass meadows and mangrove forests work together to make the Coral Triangle of Indonesia a hotspot for marine biodiversity. The system supports valuable fisheries and endangered species and helps protect shorelines. But it is in global decline due to threats from coastal development, destructive fishing practices and climate change.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Turning jellyfish from a nuisance to useful productGlobal climate change and the human impact on marine ecosystems have led to dramatic decreases in the number of fish in the ocean. It has also had an unforseen side effect: because overfishing decreases the numbers of jellyfish competitors, their blooms are on the rise.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Risk of cardiac and stroke death increases after discontinuing hormone therapyHormone therapy (HT) continues to be a hotly debated topic. The benefits of estrogen to the heart, however, appear to be universally accepted. A new study demonstrates that the risk of cardiac and stroke death actually increases in the first year after discontinuation of HT.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A new way to mix oil and waterMIT researchers discovered a new way to get oil and water to mix, and stay mixed, by harnessing the condensation of water onto an oil-surfactant mixture. The process creates a nanoscale emulsion that remains stable for months.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Increasing rates of chronic conditions putting more moms, babies at riskPregnant women today are more likely to have chronic conditions that could cause life-threatening complications than at any other time in the past decade -- particularly poor women and those living in rural communities.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Neuroscientists find promise in intervention to normalize biological functions in Fragile X miceA team of neuroscientists have developed an intervention that normalizes multiple biological functions in mice afflicted with Fragile X Syndrome.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Quantum Computers Pose Imminent Threat to Bitcoin SecurityThe massive calculating power of quantum computers will be able to break Bitcoin security within 10 years, say security experts.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Astronomers discover a star that would not dieAn international team of astronomers has made a bizarre discovery; a star that refuses to stop shining.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Star exploded, survived, and exploded again more than 50 years laterIt's the celestial equivalent of a horror movie villain--a star that wouldn't stay dead. An international team of astronomers including Carnegie's Nick Konidaris and Benjamin Shappee discovered a star that exploded multiple times over a period of 50 years. The finding, published by Nature, completely confounds existing knowledge of a star's end of life, and Konidaris' instrument-construction playe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Probe thinner than a human hair provides high definition recording of brain activityScientists have developed a new device that could revolutionise our understanding of the brain by allowing researchers to map the activity of complex neural networks that control behaviour and decision making, in a way never before possible.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Misregulated protein breakdown promotes leukemias and brain cancerAn enzyme that is responsible for the breakdown of specific amino acids in food plays a key role in the development of leukemias and brain cancer, scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) in Heidelberg have now reported in Nature. The researchers have hence discovered a surprising link between energy metabolism and the so-called epigenetic code. The authors think that blocking this
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers produce the first draft cell atlas of the small intestineResearchers have produced a first-draft atlas of the mammalian small intestine's cellular composition. This atlas provides a high-resolution, gene expression-based census of the cells constituting the lining of the small intestine, using more than 53,000 individual cells from the mouse gut or gut-organoid models.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How cells detect, mend DNA damage may improve chemotherapyHuman cells have a way of detecting and mending DNA damage caused by some common chemotherapy drugs, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings could have important implications for treating cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How ice in clouds is bornWhen water droplets freeze in clouds, the structure of the ice crystal isn't necessarily the classic hexagonal snowflake structure. Rather, a more disordered ice structure forms more easily than hexagonal ice under certain cloud conditions, allowing the water droplets in clouds to turn to ice more rapidly than previously predicted. The work reconciles theoretical models of clouds with observations
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How chronic inflammation tips the balance of immune cells to promote liver cancerChronic inflammation is known to drive many cancers, especially liver cancer. Researchers have long thought that's because inflammation directly affects cancer cells, stimulating their division and protecting them from death. But University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers have now found that chronic liver inflammation also promotes cancer by suppressing immunosurveillance --
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Star-shaped brain cells orchestrate neural connectionsThe unique architecture of star-shaped brain cells called astrocytes plays a key role in regulating the development and function of neural synapses in the brain, says new research by Duke University. The findings indicate that astrocyte dysfunction may underlie neuronal problems observed in devastating diseases like autism, schizophrenia and epilepsy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mount Sinai scientists create first mathematical model that predicts immunotherapy successResearchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have created the first mathematical model that can predict how a cancer patient will benefit from certain immunotherapies, according to a study published in Nature.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New silicon probes record activity of hundreds of neurons simultaneouslyNeuroscientists who want to follow the nervous system's cellular conversations will soon have access to easy-to-use technology that simultaneously monitors neural activity at hundreds of different sites within the brain.
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Gizmodo
Thor: Ragnarok's Valkyrie Shows How Far We've Got to Go for LGBTQ Representation on the Big Screen Image: Marvel Studios Thor: Ragnarok is a great movie—but one area where it falters is with Valkyrie. Not because of characterization, because she’s just as great, kickass, and engaging as the rest of the cast. But Ragnarok ’s Valkyrie was meant to be bisexual, and the erasure of that identity in the film is profoundly disappointing. A few weeks ago during an online Q&A with fans, Tessa Thomp
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New on MIT Technology Review
An Apple AR Headset, Coming in 2020?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How the skin becomes inflamed: Toxin-producing bacteriaResearchers report the discovery of a key underlying immune mechanism that explains why to how our skin becomes inflamed from conditions such as atopic dermatitis, more commonly known as eczema. Toxin-producing bacteria on the surface of our skin induces a protein that causes our own cells to react and cause inflammation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
When you're tired, your brain cells actually slow downA new study finds that individual neurons slow down when we are sleep deprived, leading to delayed behavioral responses to events taking place around us. The slowdown affects the brain's visual perception and memory associations.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Extensive loss of trees in African savannas: Blame human-started fires not elephantsElephants are often blamed for extensive loss of woody vegetation in Northern Botswana, but study results suggest that this may not be the case.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Protect the skin, build barriers: Old acquaintance in a new roleTo ensure the barrier function of the skin, mutual regulation of connections between epidermal cells and a receptor for growth factors is necessary. These findings can help to reduce the effects of inflammatory skin diseases and the decreased barrier function of the aged skin.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
True impact of diabetic foot ulcersThe prognosis for people with an infected diabetic foot ulcer is worse than was previously thought, according to new research. More than half the patients in the research study did not see their ulcer heal over a year -- and one in seven had to have part or all of their foot amputated.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why do we believe in gods? Religious belief 'not linked to intuition or rational thinking'Religious beliefs are not linked to intuition or rational thinking, according to a new study. Previous studies have suggested people who hold strong religious beliefs are more intuitive and less analytical, and when they think more analytically their religious beliefs decrease. But new research suggests that is not the case, and that people are not 'born believers'.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fat cells may inactivate chemotherapeutic drugAdipocytes, or fat cells, can absorb and metabolize the chemotherapeutic agent daunorubicin, reducing the effectiveness of the drug and potentially contributing to poorer treatment outcomes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sensors applied to plant leaves warn of water shortageEngineers have created sensors that can be printed onto plant leaves and reveal when the plants are experiencing a water shortage, which could give farmers an early warning when their crops are in danger.
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Ars Technica
As epidemic rages, ER study finds opioids no better than Advil and Tylenol Enlarge (credit: Getty | Roberto Machado Noa ) The easiest way to avoid getting hooked on opioids may be to never take them in the first place. After all, an initial prescription of just a few days' worth of pills can trap patients into using the highly addictive, often deadly drugs for a year or more. But despite the dangers, many patients don’t have the luxury of passing on potent pain killers—
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New Scientist - News
Letting robots kill without human supervision could save livesCalls to ban killer robots ignore the fact that human soldiers can make lethal mistakes. If driverless cars will save lives, perhaps armed machines can as well
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New Scientist - News
Boy with a genetic disease has had almost all his skin replacedGene therapy has saved the life of a boy with a rare skin-peeling disease. The boy received grafts of sheets of genetically-altered skin grown in the lab
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New Scientist - News
A bizarre supernova keeps exploding over and over againThe weirdest supernova ever seen is a zombie star that keeps collapsing and coming back to life. It’s so strange, it may be a whole new kind of celestial object
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New Scientist - News
When it comes to climate, Donald Trump is in a club by himselfWith pariah state Syria now backing the UN pact to curb global warming, the US stands against the other 195 nations of the world. What a disgrace, says Owen Gaffney
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Types of Reproduction: Sexual versus Asexual Reproduction - iBiology & Youreka Science Youreka Sciences describes the benefits and tradeoffs of both types of reproduction (sexual and asexual) and explains why many organisms favor sexual reproduction. https://www.ibiology.org/ibiomagazine/types-reproduction-sexual-versus-asexual-reproduction.html Talk Overview: There are two types of reproduction: asexual and sexual reproduction. Though asexual reproduction is faster and more energy
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Ingeniøren
Supernova bryder med alle kendte teorierEn supernova, der blev opdaget i 2014, har nu lyst seks gange længere end forventet. Desuden er der noget der tyder på, at den også eksploderede for 60 år siden. Astronomer og astrofysikere er forvirrede - og begejstrede.
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Feed: All Latest
Scientists Grow a New Set of Skin to Cure a Lethal Genetic DiseaseWhen a genetic skin-peeling disease threatened the life of a 7-year-old boy, doctors turned to an experimental mashup of stem cells and gene therapy.
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Gizmodo
US Air Force Wants to Put Lasers on Fighter Jets By 2021 Image: Air Force Research Lab The US Air Force’s scientific research wing is giving Lockheed Martin $26.3 million “for the design, development, and production of a high power fiber laser,” which it expects to start testing on a tactical fighter jet in four years. Sounds cool and certainly futuristic, but the jury’s still out on whether these weapons have any real tactical value. It sounds like sc
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Live Science
There's a Huge Plume of Magma Bulging Against AntarcticaA massive magma plume is surging against the crust beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, but that isn't why the ice is melting.
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Science | The Guardian
'Zombie star' amazes astronomers by surviving multiple supernovae Star has exploded in ‘fatal’ supernovae multiple times since 1954 – and is the first star astronomers have witnessed doing so Astronomers have spotted a “zombie star” that refused to die when massive explosions that are normally considered fatal rocked the heavenly body. The star, which lies half a billion light years away in the constellation of the Great Bear, has exploded multiple times since
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Science | The Guardian
Scientists grow replacement skin for boy suffering devastating genetic disorder Seven-year-old boy suffering illness causing untreatable wounds over 80% of his body has had his skin replaced by new, genetically modified epidermis Scientists have grown a replacement, genetically modified skin to cover almost the entire body of a seven-year-old Syrian boy who was suffering from a devastating genetic disorder. The treatment marks a rare and striking success for the field of reg
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Video of blood clot contraction reveals how platelets naturally form unobtrusive clotsThe first view of the physical mechanism of how a blood clot contracts at the level of individual platelets is giving researchers a new look at a natural process that is part of blood clotting. The team describes how specialized proteins in platelets cause clots to shrink in size.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Seagrass biodiversity is both a goal and a means for restorationPlanting multiple seagrass species, rather than a single species, could be better for restoring damaged coastal ecosystems in Indonesia's Coral Triangle.
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The Atlantic
The Star That Refused to Die The death of a big star, much more massive than our sun, usually proceeds like this: After millions and millions of years of shiny existence, the star starts to run out of hydrogen. Without this fuel, the star can’t power the nuclear fusion that produces its light. Its core shrinks and heats up, spawning heavier and heavier elements until mostly iron remains. Within a second, the core collapses a
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The Atlantic
A Dying Boy Gets a New, Gene-Corrected Skin At the age of 7, Hassan had already seen more than his fair share of hardship. A week after he was born in Syria, a blister appeared on his back. The doctors there diagnosed him with a genetic disorder called epidermolysis bullosa, or EB, which leaves one’s skin extremely fragile and prone to tearing. There was no cure, they said. When Hassan’s family fled Bashar al-Assad’s regime and moved to Ge
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The Atlantic
Democrats' Narrow Path to Winning the House The Democrats’ “coalition of transformation” flexed its muscles Tuesday to deliver a resounding repudiation of Donald Trump and crystallize the risk the GOP has taken by allowing him to redefine the party in his image. But despite the party’s sweep in Virginia, New Jersey, and scattered other local races, the results also showed that Democrats are unlikely to solve all of their electoral problems
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Quanta Magazine
‘Crazy’ Supernova Looks Like a New Kind of Star Death In September 2014, astronomers saw a dimming point of light in a small galaxy half a billion light-years away. It looked like an ordinary supernova — a dying star that exploded and whose light was now petering out. But the following January, Zheng “Andrew” Wong, a student intern at Las Cumbres Observatory in Goleta, California, noticed that the light was getting brighter again. When he showed thi
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Ars Technica
The future is here: Genetically engineered stem cells save a patient The pink layer in the image is the extracellular matrix, which helps the epidermis stay attached to the underlying dermis. (credit: University of Chicago ) The genetic disorder epidermolysis bullosa is the stuff of nightmares. The epidermis contains the cells that form our body's boundary with the outside world; in epidermolysis bullosa, they lose their ability to hold on to the cells underneath
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How ice in clouds is bornSomething almost magical happens when you put a tray full of sloshing, liquid water into a freezer and it comes out later as a rigid, solid crystal of ice. Chemists at the University of Utah have pulled back the curtain a little more on the freezing process, particularly in clouds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Star exploded, survived, and exploded again more than 50 years laterIt's the celestial equivalent of a horror movie villain—a star that wouldn't stay dead.
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Gizmodo
Remarkable New Supernova Discovery Is Unlike Anything Seen Before Image: Arvavi et al (2017) Astronomers have spotted something truly baffling: a new light 500 million light years away that looked exactly like a supernova...but acted like no supernova observed before. The new discovery and its spectral lines (the colors of light it sent our way) allowed scientists to classify it as a typical Type IIa supernova, the kind from large exploding stars. But this one
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Gizmodo
Gene Therapy Restores Seven-Year-Old Boy's Skin in 'Major Biomedical Triumph' Image: CMR Unimore Junctional epidermolysis bullosa is the sort of rare disease you are probably lucky to have never heard of. An often lethal genetic condition, from infancy it plagues its victim with painful blisters all over the body that causes the skin to become extremely fragile. In a major medical breakthrough, on Wednesday Italian researchers announced that they were able to almost entire
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Latest Headlines | Science News
This star cheated death, exploding again and againThe weirdest supernova ever has lasted more than three years, and may be the third outburst from the same star.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Massive Skin Replacement Saves Child's LifeEuropean doctors use gene therapy to correct an inherited disease and replace 80 percent of Syrian refugee's epidermis -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
AT&T exec says 'uncertain' when Time Warner deal will closeAT&T now says it's "uncertain" when its $85 billion Time Warner purchase will close, making investors worry that regulators may try to block it or require significant changes to the deal for approval.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Poland eyes cybersecurity in skiesPoland on Wednesday agreed to test a cybersecurity pilot programme for the aviation sector as Europe's EASA civil aviation authority tackles the potential threats posed by hackers to air traffic.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Philosopher addresses global environmental degradation head-onAt the heart of a new book about the future of environmental sustainability, University of Cincinnati's Adrian Parr looks for radical, yet positive solutions through the lens of an "environmental imagination."
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Gizmodo
Don't Use the Calculator on iOS 11.1 We already know that for various users, iOS 11.1 makes media playback stutter , breaks audio control on the lock screen , and autocorrects the word “I” to an unrecognizable character . But there’s more! It also breaks the Calculator app. For many users, the Calculator app on iOS 11.1 is so slow that it doesn’t register all your button presses. For example, as tech blog Select All points out , if
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The Atlantic
How Should Hollywood Respond to Mass Shootings? A little under six weeks ago, a new eight-part docuseries debuted on Showtime. Titled Active Shooter: America Under Fire , the show—executive produced by Eli Holzman and Aaron Saidman—explores the subject of mass shootings in the U.S., with each episode dedicated to a different tragedy. The goal, Saidman told me, wasn’t to advocate for any particular policy changes, but rather to “spark a healthi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Survival of the least-fit: Antiviral drug selectively targets the nastiest virusesAn antiviral drug that inhibits a virus' replication machinery selectively targets the most aggressive viruses, according to new research that looked at the infection of individual cells by a virus and the consequence of antiviral intervention. This new insight into the dynamics of an infection and the mechanism of an antiviral drug could not be seen by the typical approach of studying populations
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Employee volunteerism? Only if you think your boss is ethicalA new study shows that people who perceive their employer as committed to environmental and community-based causes will, in turn, engage in green behavior and local volunteerism, with one caveat: their boss must display similarly ethical behavior.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Has protecting marine species become a job for statisticians?Fishermen have no way of separating the fish they catch when they cast their nets at sea. Protected species and fish with no market value—the hammerhead shark, for example—end up being trapped and dying for no reason. In an attempt to minimize this incidental fishing, statisticians from the University of Geneva (UNIGE, Switzerland), Dalhousie University (Halifax, Canada) and the Australian Nationa
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Gizmodo
Equifax and Yahoo Complain They Are Helpless Against State-Sponsored Hacks Photo: Getty Former and current Equifax and Yahoo executives appeared on Capitol Hill on Wednesday to testify about the major consumer data breaches that occurred under their watch. An executive at Verizon, which acquired Yahoo this summer, was also called as a witness. The hearing took place this morning before the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee. Former Yahoo CEO Marissa M
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New care model closes significant gap in addiction treatmentA new program at Boston Medical Center's Grayken Center for Addiction is showing that connecting patients to addiction treatment when they are hospitalized for other conditions can be a powerful tool in closing a gap in addiction treatment.
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