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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain chemistry study shows chronic fatigue syndrome, Gulf War illness as unique disordersResearchers have found distinct molecular signatures in two brain disorders long thought to be psychological in origin -- chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and Gulf War Illness (GWI). In addition, the work supports a previous observation of two variants of GWI.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
IBM says it's reached milestone in quantum computingIBM has announced a milestone in its race against Google and other big tech firms to build a powerful quantum computer.
2h
Ingeniøren
Radioaktiv sky ligger over Europa - ulykke i Kasakhstan eller RuslandFlere europæiske atomsikkerhedsinstitutter har registreret en radioaktiv sky, som på nuværende tidspunkt ligger over Europa. De har regnet sig frem til, at den er drevet hertil fra enten Rusland eller Kasakhstan, men ingen af landene har bekræftet en sådan ulykke.
8h

LATEST

Live Science
Now Hear This: Ancient Amphitheater Acoustics Weren't So Great After AllIf you were sitting in the upper rows of an ancient Greek amphitheater, could you have heard the actors sigh or strike a match?
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Live Science
Tiny Grasshopper Found Hidden in Van Gogh Painting, 128 Years LaterThe little bug was right there all along.
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Popular Science
The ocean harbors unimaginable secrets, but we need to explore them responsibly Environment Familiarity breeds exploitation. Rather than declaring the deep sea off-limits, we think our best course of action is to regain our fascination with it.
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Gizmodo
Redditors Say Sex Toy App Was Secretly Recording Them Image: Lovense Few things sow distrust faster than speculation that apps and internet-connected devices are surveilling their own users in secret. Facebook mining your browsing habits to serve ads is one thing. But what if you found out your sex toy was taping you? That’s what Redditors on the community r/sex claimed they discovered yesterday, when a user said that they noticed a six minute long
5min
Gizmodo
We Need to Talk About Industry Funded Nutrition Science Evidence is great—there’s nothing quite like a science study to help prove your point. But one thing frequently left out when presenting that evidence, especially in the news coverage surrounding it, is industry funding. Industry funding and its potential cause for bias is something we need to speak about in the age of viral and fake news. There’s no shortage of news stories touting studies telli
11min
The Atlantic
What Would Miss Rumphius Do? Nineteen fifty-nine was a year of soft amusements for children. Dr. Seuss’s zany Happy Birthday to You! arrived in bookstores and Mattel introduced Americans to the Barbie doll and her frozen plastic gaze. On TV, suburban comedies like Father Knows Best and Dennis the Menace administered doses of mild humor laced with bland moral guidance. Listen to the audio version of this article: Feature stor
16min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The pros and cons of large earsResearchers have compared how much energy bats use when flying, depending on whether they have large or small ears.
22min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
When electronics, photonics meet on a standard chipElectronics and light don't go well together on a standard 'CMOS' chip. Researchers have succeeded in introducing a light connection into the heart of a semiconductor chip. In this way, two circuits can communicate. Or: the worlds of electronics and photonics are connected.
22min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Customers who pay for their purchases by card are less likely to remember the precise amount paidThe transparency of spending money depends on the mode of payment used: cash, single-function cards that offer only a payment function, or multifunctional cards which may also include bonus programs, user identification or other functions. A recent study has shown that the recall accuracy associated with the act of paying is lower for both card formats than it is for cash transactions.
22min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Biomarker may predict early Alzheimer's diseaseResearchers have identified a peptide that could lead to the early detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The discovery may also provide a means of homing drugs to diseased areas of the brain to treat AD, Parkinson's disease, as well as glioblastoma, brain injuries and stroke.
22min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Consumption of antioxidant-rich foods is associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, study showsA lower risk of type 2 diabetes has been observed among individuals consuming food rich in antioxidants. This effect is largely contributed by fruit, vegetables, tea and other hot beverages, as well as moderate consumption of alcohol, as shown in a recent study.
22min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bad break: Osteoporosis-related bone fractures linked to air pollutionExposure to air pollution is associated with osteoporosis-related loss of bone mineral density and risk of bone fractures, according to a new study.
22min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ozanimod successful in clinical trials for multiple sclerosisResults from two phase 3 trials evaluating the efficacy and safety of the drug ozanimod have now been released.
22min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Patients with depression and advanced cancer survive longer with palliative care interventionA new Dartmouth-led study finds that patients with depression and advanced cancer live longer when exposed to palliative care interventions designed to improve quality of life.
24min
Scientific American Content: Global
How to Watch the Taurid Meteor Shower This WeekendSunday night is probably the best time to catch the celestial fireworks -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
25min
Science | The Guardian
Richard Gordon obituaryApollo 12 astronaut thwarted in his ambition to walk on the moon Of the 24 astronauts Nasa sent to the moon, only a dozen actually landed there. Richard Gordon, who has died aged 88, was one of the 12 who did not, and in some ways the one whose frustration might have been the highest. Gordon piloted the space module Yankee Clipper on the Apollo 12 mission, orbiting above the moon while his fellow
26min
Popular Science
Five rad and random things I found this week Gadgets The end-of-week dispatch from PopSci's commerce editor. Vol. 29. Throughout the week I spend hours scouring the web for things that are ingenious or clever or ridiculously cheap. Below, gadgets that are awesome, rad, and random.
29min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sleep Apnea may increase risk of developing Alzheimer's diseaseObstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may put elderly people at greater risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to new research.
36min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Student self-reporting can help educators catch academic, mental health problems earlyNew research is analyzing how a new screening tool, which is completed by students, can help teachers identify potential academic, social and emotional problems. The data might help give teachers better tools to improve children's lives in the classroom and beyond.
36min
Feed: All Latest
Six Pre-Black Friday Deals to Kick Off Your WeekendWe're about to get snowed under with deals, so grab these discounts from Bose, Dell, Roku, and Amazon today!
38min
Gizmodo
One Of The Most Famous Faces On Twitch Refuses To Let The Haters Win Artist’s rendition of the Trihard emote. Illustration by Sam Woolley According to Mychal “Trihex” Jefferson, there really isn’t much of a difference between speedrunning video games and lifting weights. “You have to be goal-oriented,” he recently said as he beamed live and uncut from a private Discord call. “It’s very easy to get into a speed game and feel intimidated, insecure and inadequate abo
47min
Blog » Languages » English
Toilet Paper: Victory to Team Under! Now that Eyewire has been thoroughly TP’d, the results are in! It appears the winning team for this debate is Team Under. This conflicts directly with the GMs’ opinion, but we’ll forgive you. Congrats to both sides for a battle well fought! Artwork by Rabbit Giraud
53min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Working to reduce brain injury in newbornsResearch-clinicians at Children's National Health System led the first study to identify a promising treatment to reduce or prevent brain injury in newborns who have suffered hypoxia-ischemia, a serious complication in which restricted blood flow deprives the brain of oxygen.
59min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ludwig researchers uncover novel mechanism by which tumors evade cancer immunotherapiesA Ludwig Cancer Research study led by Benoit Van den Eynde, Director of Ludwig Brussels, has identified a novel mechanism by which tumors of the aggressive skin cancer melanoma can resist cancer immunotherapy.
59min
Ars Technica
Nintendo takes a gamble with record-setting Switch production plans Enlarge / Nintendo expects a lot more proud new Switch owners like this one in the coming fiscal year. The Nintendo Switch has been an unqualified success so far, with Nintendo recently promising increased holiday season production to meet demand and expectations of over 16 million total sales by the end of March 2018. Reporting now suggests the company is expecting that sales pace to increase ma
1h
Gizmodo
What Star Wars History May Tell Us About Rian Johnson's New Trilogy Image: Bioware/EA Yesterday, the news dropped that Rian Johnson’s time in the Star Wars universe would not end with The Last Jedi . Instead, Disney CEO Bob Iger announced that Johnson would be working on a brand new trilogy of movies , separate from the main Saga films, that would “introduce new characters from a corner of the galaxy that Star War s lore has never before explored.” It’s big news
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple leadership is more than 80% white and maleApple's leadership remains mostly white and male despite growing pressure on technology companies to diversify their workforces from the board room to the rank-and-file.
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Viden
Dreng får ny hud og overlever farlig sygdomLæger har ved hjælp af eksperimenterende genterapi givet et barn 80 procent ny hud.
1h
Inside Science
Do Stripes Make Lizards Look Slow? Do Stripes Make Lizards Look Slow? Little reptiles may use stripes to trick predators into attacking their tails. Stripey-Lizard.jpg Image credits: Grant Peters via Flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Creature Friday, November 10, 2017 - 11:30 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- Small stripy lizards may be faster than they appear, according to new research. The optical illusion may be
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The Atlantic
Puerto Rico's Massive Telescope Is Still Running on Generators Nearly two months after Hurricane Maria struck Puerto Rico, many residents are still without power and struggling to get access to water, food, and basic services. This week, a failed transmission line knocked out what little of the island’s electrical grid had been restored, temporarily leaving thousands of people in the dark once again. The recovery from the devastating Category 4 hurricane is
1h
The Atlantic
The Hipster Ninja Bats That Sneak Up on Their Prey The sound of death can take many forms: the retort of a gun, the screech of tires, the hack of a cough. But for many moths, death sounds like a series of high-pitched squeaks. Moths are hunted by bats, which track them down by releasing high-frequency calls and analyzing the rebounding echoes. This skill, known as echolocation, allows them to view their world—and their prey—even in total darkness
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Plasma from lasers can shed light on cosmic rays, solar eruptionsLasers that generate plasma can provide insight into bursts of subatomic particles that occur in deep space, scientists have found. Such findings could help scientists understand cosmic rays, solar flares and solar eruptions—emissions from the sun that can disrupt cell phone service and knock out power grids on Earth.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Uneven growth in US medical and health R&D investments across sectorsTotal US investment in medical and health R&D in the US grew by 20.6% from 2013 to 2016 led by industry and the federal government, according to US Investments in Medical and Health Research and Development, a new report from Research!America.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Plasma from lasers can shed light on cosmic rays, solar eruptionsA team of researchers led by PPPL physicist Will Fox recently used lasers to create conditions that mimic astrophysical behavior. The laboratory technique enables the study of outer-space-like plasma in a controlled and reproducible environment.
1h
Ars Technica
Why Orbital ATK’s launch on Saturday won’t get more attention Orbital ATK As one of two partners in NASA's commercial cargo program to deliver supplies to the International Space Station, Orbital ATK has received significantly less attention than the other provider, SpaceX. And with Orbital ATK preparing to make just its second launch attempt in more than three years from its home base of Wallops Flight Facility, Virginia, it is worth reflecting on why. Fir
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Pokemon Go' creators are making a 'Harry Potter' AR gameAccio smartphone! "Harry Potter" fans will soon get a chance to explore the Wizarding World in real life with a new mobile game from "Pokemon Go" creators Niantic.
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Gizmodo
‘Harmless’ Radioactive Cloud Drifts Over Europe Following Mysterious Nuclear Accident Image: D. Markosian/Wikimedia The cloud of radiation that swept through Europe in recent weeks originated at a nuclear facility in either Russia or Kazakhstan, according to a report put out France’s nuclear safety institute. The levels of radiation were never dangerous—at least for Europeans living outside of the immediate area affected—but the exact cause of the incident is still unknown. The re
1h
Scientific American Content: Global
4 Laws That Could Stem the Rising Threat of Mass ShootingsPro-gun advocates claim new laws will not make us safer. But here is evidence the right laws will do exactly that -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
NYT > Science
$300 Billion War Beneath the Street: Fighting to Replace America’s Water PipesTwo powerful industries, plastic and iron, are locked a lobbying war over the estimated $300 billion that local governments will spend on water pipes over the next decade.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Crunch time for food securityFeelings often run high where insects are concerned, with many people even squeamish to look on them, let alone touch or swallow them. And yet insects present a huge nutritional opportunity as an increasing global population seeks sustainable sources of food and feed.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Offshore wind 'could be a bonanza' for UK, says expertAs the world gathers in Bonn for COP23, the UN's annual climate change conference, Professor Mike Barnes, from The University of Manchester's School of Electrical & Electronic Engineering, outlines why he thinks offshore wind could be a boom industry for the UK.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research highlights ethical sourcing of materials for modern technologyResearchers from the Camborne School of Mines have identified methods to predict the environmental and social cost of resourcing new deposits of rare earth minerals used in the production of mobile phones, wind turbines and electric vehicles.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ink from ancient Egyptian papyri contains copperUntil recently, it was assumed that the ink used for writing was primarily carbon-based at least until the fourth and fifth centuries AD. But in a new University of Copenhagen study, analyses of 2,000-year-old papyri fragments with X-ray microscopy show that black ink used by Egyptian scribes also contained copper - an element previously not identified in ancient ink.
1h
New Scientist - News
Watch a monkey floss its teeth with a bird featherNicobar long-tailed macaques have learned to use an array of tools, from wrapping prickly food in leaves to avoid getting hurt, to using bird feathers to floss their teeth
1h
Gizmodo
Friday's Best Deals: Coffee Gadgets, Twillory Shirts, Front Pocket Wallets, and More Happy Friday! Get set for the weekend with deals on rarely discounted coffee gear , front pocket wallets , an ultra-popular carpet cleaner , and more. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Anker Ultra Compact Bluetooth Keyboard , $17 This ultra-slim Bluetooth keyboard from Anker will work with pretty much any phone or desktop operating system, and as y
1h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Resurrected malaria strategy saves thousands of lives in Africa Pre-emptively treating kids for malaria is working, despite logistical challenges. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22982
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Creating a more resilient power system: New studies present models and strategiesDue to the complex interdependencies that exist between the electricity sector and all other critical infrastructures, disruption in the electric power sector can adversely affect national security, public health, and the environment, and have adverse socio-economic impacts. Experts examine these risks in several new presentations.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
World Science Forum 2017 Jordan issues Science for Peace DeclarationOn behalf of the coordinating organizations responsible for delivering the World Science Forum Jordan, the concluding Science for Peace Declaration issued at the Dead Sea represents a global call for action to science and society to build a future that promises greater equality, security and opportunity for all, and in which science plays an increasingly prominent role as an enabler of fair and su
1h
Science | The Guardian
Study AI: 'I believe we could see the end of cancer in our lifetime' PhD research student Sam Cooper, from Imperial College London, explains how artificial intelligence is helping to improve the way we treat cancer Examining images and data is time-consuming and relies on the judgement and skills of highly specialised experts. Here, artificial intelligence (AI) – or deep learning – can save vast amounts of time and give much more accurate results. We’re using deep
1h
Gizmodo
iPhone X Doesn't Work Right in the Cold, Users Say, But Apple Promises to Fix It Photo: Gizmodo/Alex Cranz Just in time for winter, some users discovered a software bug causing the iPhone X to freeze up in cold weather. Disappointing, but what do you expect from a phone that only costs as much as a few cups of coffee ? “It literally takes 2 seconds from going inside to the cold outdoors and my screen stops being very responsive,” Reddit user darus214 wrote. “I try swiping on
1h
Gizmodo
Faraday Future's CFO Actually Resigned On Oct. 14 (UPDATED) On Thursday, Jalopnik reported that Faraday Future’s chief financial officer, BMW and Deutsche Bank veteran Stefan Krause, appeared likely to leave the company in the coming days. As it turns out, we have since learned Krause is already gone. His resignation was effective immediately on Oct. 14. When reached Friday morning, Krause confirmed the move. He declined to comment further. A spokesperson
1h
The Atlantic
A Week Around the World With The Atlantic What We’re Writing Donald Trump Heads East: The president is on an official visit to Asia this week, the longest of any U.S. president since 1991. He showed an unexpected amount of support for U.S. alliances in the region, both with Japan and with South Korea . But questions remain about how the U.S. will deal with a nuclear North Korea: The Trump administration’s policy toward the Hermit Kingdom
1h
The Atlantic
How 'Self-Driving' Trucks Connected the Australian Outback The trucks that roam the highways of the Australian outback are a lot bigger than the average 18-wheeler. Instead of towing one container, these road trains, as Australians refer to them, pull at least three self-tracking semitrailers behind them, which follow each other like train carriages. The trailers are packed with heavy goods—cattle, gas, coal, cars—and sent roaring through the continent’s
1h
The Atlantic
Gangsters of the Mediterranean Among the wealthy sophisticates who came and went from their seaside villas on the Spanish island of Mallorca, there was something that didn’t quite fit about the Russian who lived in a neoclassical mansion on the Avenida Portals Vells. Tall and powerfully built, with a flattened nose and graying, short-cropped hair, he looked more like an aging boxer than an international businessman. Most days,
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The Atlantic
What’s Going to Happen to All the Unsold Snapchat Spectacles? It was only a year ago that New Yorkers were lining up 150 deep to buy Spectacles out of a vending machine. The glasses, which record video for the Snapchat app, had attracted so much buzz that the five-hour line stretched around the block and down into the subway . One tech journalist advised packing “ snacks or a thermos of hot cocoa .” So as far as stunts in artificial scarcity go, it went gre
1h
The Atlantic
The Press and the Election of 2016: One Year Later It’s a year after Donald Trump's upset election victory. Before and after the 2016 election, President Trump referred to journalists as enemies to himself and to the American people. But his victory wasn’t just a success in vilifying the media, it was a success in manipulating it. Trump was a media figure, skilled at drawing attention. And news organizations were unused to being so squarely part
1h
New on MIT Technology Review
Could the AI Talent Shortage Be Eased By Tech Giants Learning to Share?
2h
Ingeniøren
ING BAGSIDEN: Sagen opklaret: Den kaldes et ‘Trossemaal’De seneste uger har mysteriet om en skydelære præget Ingeniørens bagside – men nu skulle sagen være fuldstændigt opklaret!
2h
Feed: All Latest
A Gritty Vision of Mexico Through 7 VolcanoesHector Guerrero has traveled more than 1,000 miles documenting Mexico's tallest volcanoes and the people and landscape surrounding them.
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Gizmodo
5 Things Stranger Things Would Be Missing Without Eight and 'The Lost Sister' All Stills via Netflix I stormed through the second season of S tranger Things during a nine-hour flight back from a social media-free vacation, so I wasn’t around to see how people were reacting to the latest visit to the Upside Down. When I reached the seventh episode, “The Lost Sister,” I remember thinking it was all right. Not the finest hour of television I’d ever seen, but it had some eleme
2h
Science | The Guardian
Lab notes: skin makes me cry, plus a zombie supernova in the sky In a world full of sad news and “harmless” radioactive clouds drifting over Europe, one piece this week stood as a beacon of hope, warmed the cockles of our hearts and mixed any other metaphor you’d care to chuck in there. The story of scientists saving the life of a seven-year-old Syrian boy by growing a whole new skin for him was incredibly moving – and just plain incredible science-wise. That
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Popular Science
Testing your tap water for contamination is way easier than you think Environment There are more options for at-home testing than ever. An increasing number of companies are offering customers the ability to do the kind of environmental testing once limited to municipalities.
2h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
How judges can show respect | Victoria PrattIn halls of justice around the world, how can we ensure everyone is treated with dignity and respect? A pioneering judge in New Jersey, Victoria Pratt shares her principles of "procedural justice" -- four simple, thoughtful steps that redefined the everyday business of her courtroom in Newark, changing lives along the way. "When the court behaves differently, naturally people respond differently,"
2h
The Atlantic
TFW You Can Play 'TFW' in Words With Friends This week, the game developer Zynga is rolling out a refreshed version of Words With Friends, billed as the world’s most popular mobile word game. The new-and-improved Words With Friends 2 boasts various bells and whistles, like the “Solo Challenge” where you square off against bots, and “Lightning Rounds” that pit teams against each other. But a more profound change is going on invisibly: a huge
2h
The Atlantic
Trump Battles Constraints on His Power President Trump has never been shy about making his displeasure known—on any given subject —and last week, he offered criticism regarding the limits of his executive power. In a radio interview , the president declared: You know, the saddest thing is that because I’m the president of the United States, I am not supposed to be involved with the Justice Department. I am not supposed to be involved
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Crunch time for food securityInsects have been a valuable source of nutritional protein for centuries, as both food and feed. The challenge now is to broaden their appeal, safely and sustainably
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ink from ancient Egyptian papyri contains copperUntil recently, it was assumed that the ink used for writing was primarily carbon-based at least until the fourth and fifth centuries AD. But in a new University of Copenhagen study, analyses of 2,000-year-old papyri fragments with X-ray microscopy show that black ink used by Egyptian scribes also contained copper -- an element previously not identified in ancient ink.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Promising sensors for submarines, mines and spacecraftResearchers from the Physics Department of Moscow State University and their colleagues have discovered a mechanism that allows gas sensors, based on nanocrystalline metal oxides, to work at room temperature. This invention will raise the efficiency of environmental monitoring at nuclear power plants, on submarines and spacecrafts. The discovery was reported in Scientific Reports.
2h
New Scientist - News
Neptune’s other moons were normal until Triton crashed the partyNeptune’s moons are unlike anything in the solar system, thanks to Triton barrelling in and laying waste to the moons that were there before it
2h
New Scientist - News
Medical cannabis vendors must stop making bogus health claimsThere are enough real benefits of medical marijuana, so why are people making them up? It’s time to stop overhyping what weed can do
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New Scientist - News
Charge your phone using ambient light and printed solar cellsPrinted plastic solar cells should be able to harvest enough energy from indoor light to power your phone within the next few months
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New Scientist - News
Grow fake versions of rare delicacies like sea urchin at homeJapanese meat culturing project goes beyond hamburger to copy problematic delicacies like sea urchin, foie gras - and someday maybe dinosaur
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Science : NPR
Algae Toxins In Drinking Water Sickened People In 2 Outbreaks In Ohio, more than 100 people got sick in 2013 and 2014 when municipal drinking water was contaminated with toxins from algae blooms in Lake Erie. The CDC says these are the first known instances. (Image credit: The Washington Post/Getty Images)
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Feed: All Latest
Facebook Isn't Listening Through Your Phone's Microphone. It Doesn't Have ToThe internet is awash in theories about Facebook using your smartphone's microphone to eavesdrop on your conversations. It's not. Here's why.
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Ingeniøren
Nye tal om Viking Link beroliger ikke kritikerneEnerginet og Energistyrelsen fremlagde torsdag nye tal fra business-casen omkring den store investering i et kabel til England, kaldet Viking Link. Kritikerne kalder stadig investeringen meget usikker.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Perfectly frustrated' metal provides possible path to superconductivityThe US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has discovered and described the existence of a unique disordered electron spin state in a metal that may provide a unique pathway to finding and studying frustrated magnets. Their unique properties are of interest in the development of quantum computing and high-temperature superconductivity.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research highlights ethical sourcing of materials for modern technologyResearchers from the Camborne School of Mines have identified methods to predict the environmental and social cost of resourcing new deposits of rare earth minerals used in the production of mobile phones, wind turbines and electric vehicles.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Blue lighting is scientifically proven to help us relax faster than white lighting after an argumentResearchers from the University of Granada say that blue light accelerates the relaxation process after acute psychosocial stress such as arguing with a friend or when someone pressures you to quickly finish some task.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The path length of light in opaque mediaA transparent substance will allow the light to travel through on a straight line, in a turbid substance the light will be scattered numerous times, travelling on more complicated zig-zag trajectories. But astonishingly, the average total distance covered by the light inside the substance is always the same.
2h
Ars Technica
The real lesson of that self-driving shuttle’s first-day accident Enlarge / Officials announcing the driverless shuttle program in Las Vegas January. (credit: Navya) Wednesday was supposed to be the triumphant launch of a free, driverless shuttle in downtown Las Vegas. Designed by French company Navya, operated by another French company called Keolis, and sponsored by the city and American Automobile Association, the year-long pilot project was supposed to demo
2h
Viden
Facebook vil bruge nøgenbilleder til at standse hævnpornoUtraditionelt initiativ mod hævnporno: Upload nøgenbilleder af dig selv.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UN to host first talks on use of 'killer robots'The United Nations is set to host the first-ever talks on the use of autonomous weapons, but those hoping for a ban on the machines dubbed killer robots will be disappointed, the ambassador leading the discussions said Friday.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Common genetic fusion event may be associated with low-risk prostate cancerEstablishing the way in which a genetic alteration called a TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion forms in a prostate cancer, rather than the presence of the gene fusion itself, could help identify patients with prostate cancer with a low risk of spreading, which might determine the best course of treatment for the patient.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chronic fatigue syndrome, Gulf War illness as unique disorders, brain chemistry study showsResearchers have found distinct molecular signatures in two brain disorders long thought to be psychological in origin -- chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and Gulf War Illness (GWI). In addition, the work supports a previous observation of two variants of GWI.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Report from groundbreaking 'EndoVators Summit' offers guidance for obesity treatmentResearch breaks new ground in defining the role and value of the latest approaches for obesity management. The paper reports on the scope and impact of the obesity problem as well as the multiple factors and players involved in treating this chronic condition.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Green rooves to reduce the effects of climate changeit would be necessary to have between 207 and 740 hectares of green rooves in a city like Seville (Spain), depending on the scenario that is contemplated, to reduce the effects of climate change in relation to the maximum temperature rises of between 1.5 and 6 ºC that are estimated by the end of the century. This would require between 11 and 40 percent of the buildings in the city
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
No-growth economy could mean fewer crashes and higher wages, study showsAn economy based on zero growth could be more stable -- experiencing fewer crashes -- and bring higher wages, suggests a new University of Sussex study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The end of 'Pump Fiction'Our cells move energy and matter to the places it is needed. But how do they do this in real time, and seen from the perspective of a single molecule? A Danish research team has successfully uncovered new basic insights into this invisible world, by doing experiments that track how a single molecule of the protein 'engine' known as the calcium pump works.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Diagonal methods for expensive global optimization developed by Russian scientistsRussian scientists from Lobachevsky State University of Nizhni Novgorod have improved the method of global optimization by offering the so-called 'diagonal approach.' The goal of global optimization is essentially to search for optimal solutions in various areas of human activity. The principal advantage of the diagonal approach compared to other methods is its speed.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Boys could benefit from greater numbers of girls in schoolsBoys are more likely to perform well in schools with a higher proportion of girls, shedding new light on why girls continue to outperform boys in many educational subjects.
3h
Ars Technica
One way to curb freight emissions: Put trucks on an electric catenary system Siemens Trucks hauling freight from ports emit a lot of greenhouse gases—in fact, freight is the number one source of smog-related emissions in the Los Angeles area —and projected US growth rates mean that by mid-century those emissions could double unless something is done to control them. Daimler , Cummins , Tesla , and others have promised various models of electric freight-hauling trucks, but
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How a 'shadow zone' traps the world's oldest ocean waterNew research from an international team has revealed why the oldest water in the ocean in the North Pacific has remained trapped in a shadow zone around 2km below the sea surface for over 1000 years.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers generate tomatoes with enhanced antioxidant properties by genetic engineeringThe School of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, the University of Hong Kong (HKU), in collaboration with the Institut de Biologie Moléculaire des Plantes (CNRS, Strasbourg, France), has identified a new strategy to simultaneously enhance health-promoting vitamin E by ~6-fold and double both provitamin A and lycopene contents in tomatoes, to significantly boost antioxidant properties.
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Gizmodo
Watch This Incredibly Talented Artist Create a Self-Portrait While Painting Backwards GIF GIF: YouTube I couldn’t even accurately trace a photo of myself to create a self-portrait that looked anything like me. But artist Ewan McClure manages to make a masterpiece by looking at his face and the canvas in a mirror, which must have been incredibly frustrating as all of his brush movements would have been reversed as he reached around to the front of the canvas to paint. I struggle to
3h
Gizmodo
Teen Girl Posed For 8 Years As Married Man To Write About Baseball And Harass Women Illustration by Jim Cooke/Deadspin/GMG For the last eight years, baseball fan-turned-writer Becca Schultz has presented herself online as Ryan Schultz, a false identity she assumed when she was 13 years old, duping and harassing women on Twitter along the way. On Wednesday night, a woman named Erin tweeted a series of screenshots announcing that Schultz is not actually Ryan, a married father of t
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Ars Technica
YouTube to crack down on inappropriate content masked as kids’ cartoons Enlarge (credit: YouTube, CarrotShaker ) Recent news stories and blog posts highlighted the underbelly of YouTube Kids, Google's children-friendly version of the wide world of YouTube. While all content on YouTube Kids is meant to be suitable for children under the age of 13, some inappropriate videos using animations, cartoons, and child-focused keywords manage to get past YouTube's algorithms a
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Feed: All Latest
Aukey KM-G3 RGB Mechanical Keyboard Review: Clicky Keys for CheapIf you want a mechanical keyboard experience for under $70, the loud and proud Aukey KM-G3 will get you there.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers exploit rhythm of DNA replication to kill cancer cellsHuman cells divide and create new cells throughout life. In this process, a steady—even rhythmic—supply of DNA building blocks is needed to create new DNA. Now researchers from the University of Copenhagen are the first to show exactly how human cells regulate this process so it does not fail and cause illness. The researchers also show how they can manipulate the rhythm and suggest how this can b
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Air pollution exposure inequality persists in MassachusettsDespite overall reductions in ambient air pollution in Massachusetts, exposure continues to fall unequally along racial/ethnic, income, and education lines, according to a new study led by a Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researcher.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Taking blood using 'push-pull' method gets accurate results with fewer pokesA new study by University of Pennsylvania veterinary researchers has found that blood samples collected from an intravenous catheter using a special "mixing" technique are as accurate as those collected via venipuncture, in which a needle is used to access the vein directly.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers exploit rhythm of DNA replication to kill cancer cellsHuman cells divide and create new cells throughout life. In this process, a steady -- even rhythmic -- supply of DNA building blocks is needed to create new DNA. Now researchers from the University of Copenhagen are the first to show exactly how human cells regulate this process so it does not fail and cause illness. The researchers also show how they can manipulate the rhythm and suggest how this
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Factors in the fabrication of heterojunctions of 2D-materials through CVDThe results of recent researches on the fabrication of heterojunctions of 2D-materials through chemical vapor deposition (CVD) are reviewed. The influences of different factors on structures and components of heterojunctions or the growth process are discussed. When the growth method is designed for specific heterojunctions we need, all factors should be considered synthetically.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Site of asteroid impact changed the history of lifeThe impact of the asteroid heated organic matter in rocks and ejected it into the atmosphere, forming soot in the stratosphere.
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Gizmodo
Deadspin Teen Girl Posed For 8 Years As Married Man To Write About Baseball And Harass Women | Jezeb Deadspin Teen Girl Posed For 8 Years As Married Man To Write About Baseball And Harass Women | Jezebel Jeremy Piven Says Recent String of Sexual Assault Allegations Aren’t ‘Productive’ | Splinter Sean Hannity ‘Misspoke’ When He Suggested Roy Moore’s Sexual Predation Was ‘Consensual’ | The Grapevine Rahm Emanuel Walks Out on Chance the Rapper Because Rahm Is Evil and Chance Is Better Than All of U
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Gizmodo
Choose From a Bunch of Front Pocket Wallets For $14 Or Less, Today Only Travelambo Front Pocket Wallets , $10-$14 With a 4.4 star rating from over 1,500 reviews, Travelambo’s front pocket wallet is one of the most popular wallets on Amazon, and you can grab one for just $10-$14 today, depending on the material (there are over a dozen to choose from). Leather is nice, but I’m very into the carbon fiber options. More Deals
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why dietary choices have an impact on global wildlife and human populationsTropical climates in the depths of Asia, Africa or South America might seem a world away from the checkout queue in your average Scottish supermarket or corner shop. But if your basket contains chocolate, coffee, bananas or rice, you can almost guarantee that what you eat comes from far warmer places thousands of miles away.
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Popular Science
How to make a sourdough starter—and keep it alive DIY The perfect loaf starts with some bacterial friends. Sourdough bread begins with its starter, a mix of flour and water that houses living wild yeast and bacteria. Here's how to grow your own tasty microbial mix.
3h
Ars Technica
Pixel won’t get KRACK fix until December, but is that really a big deal? Enlarge / *For various interpretations of "Up to date." (credit: Ron Amadeo) In October, security researchers discovered a major vulnerability in a Wi-Fi's WPA2 security called " KRACK ." This "Key Reinstallation Attack" can disrupt the initial encryption handshake that happens when an access point and a device first connect, allowing an attacker to read information assumed to be securely encrypt
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Big Think
U.S. Spent $5.6 Trillion on Wars Since 9/11, More Than Three Times What Pentagon Estimates A new report shows that the true costs of war are much higher than reported by the Pentagon. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
No-growth economy could mean fewer crashes and higher wages, study showsAn economy based on zero growth could be more stable – experiencing fewer crashes – and bring higher wages, suggests a new University of Sussex study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is Iceland's tallest volcano awakening?Two women and a boy took refuge on the roof … but it was carried away by the deluge of water, and as far as the eye could reach, the three unfortunate persons were seen clinging to the roof. One of the women was afterwards found among the mud of the jökulhlaup [Icelandic term for meltwater flood], but burnt, and as it were parboild; her body was so damaged and tender, but it could scarcely be touc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The pros and cons of large ears for bat speciesResearchers at Lund University in Sweden have compared how much energy bats use when flying, depending on whether they have large or small ears.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new nano-sized hexameric molecular capsuleHalonium ions used in this study, are well-known reaction intermediates and halogenating reagents in synthesis, but now they have been used as robust and stable structural units in molecular nanotechnology.
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Science | The Guardian
Yes, the dinosaurs were incredibly ‘unlucky’. Just as well for us | Brian SwitekIf the Yucatán asteroid hadn’t struck, dinosaurs would have continued ruling Earth – and our primate forebears taken a very different evolutionary route Sixty-six million years ago, dinosaurs had an exceptionally bad day. A chunk of space rock nine kilometres across smacked into what’s now Mexico’s Yucatán peninsula, instantaneously triggering an extinction event that for ever changed the nature o
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Ingeniøren
Facebookstifter taler ud: Vi udnyttede menneskets svagheder Det er øjensynligt ikke gode minder, som medstifteren af Facebook, Sean Parker, har om dent tid, hvor Facebook begyndte at få vind i sejlene. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/facebookstifter-taler-ud-vi-udnyttede-menneskets-svagheder-1082625 Version2
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Boys benefit from greater numbers of girls in schoolsBoys are more likely to perform well in schools with a higher proportion of girls. This is shown in a new study by sociologists from Radboud University, which was published in School Effectiveness and School Improvement. The study shows the importance of gender distribution in schools.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New forecast model provides earliest ever awareness of floods and droughts globallyPredicting when rivers across the world are likely to flood months before they do could soon be possible thanks to a unique new forecasting system.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A flexible material that generates electricity when stressedResearchers from Empa have developed a flexible material that generates electricity when stressed. In future, it might be used as a sensor, integrated into clothing or even implanted in the human body, for instance, to power a pacemaker.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The path length of light in opaque mediaA seemingly paradoxical prediction in physics has now been confirmed in an experiment: No matter whether an object is opaque or transparent, the average length of the light's paths through the object is always the same.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
One step closer to crops with twice the yieldScientists from Wageningen University & Research have found natural genetic variation for photosynthesis in plants and are unravelling it to the DNA level. As a result it should be possible to breed crops that use photosynthesis more effectively in the future, increasing their yield and enabling them to capture more CO2 from the air in the soil. This represents a major step on the long road to sol
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Genetic engineering mechanism visualizedResearchers at Kanazawa University and the University of Tokyo report in Nature Communications the visualization of the dynamics of 'molecular scissors'—the main mechanism of the CRISPR-Cas9 genetic-engineering technique.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemist proposes 'sweat analysis' to better secure electronicsJan Halámek believes there is a better method to securing electronic devices – and it relies on our own sweat.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
HKU researchers generate tomatoes with enhanced antioxidant properties by genetic engineeringThe School of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, the University of Hong Kong (HKU), in collaboration with the Institut de Biologie Moléculaire des Plantes (CNRS, Strasbourg, France), has identified a new strategy to simultaneously enhance health-promoting vitamin E by ~6-fold and double both provitamin A and lycopene contents in tomatoes, to significantly boost antioxidant properties.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Russian chemists discovered a surprising effect of a well-known leukemia drugResearchers from RUDN University and Institute of Biomedical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences have identified an alternative mechanism for the effective antitumor drug -- an enzyme called L-asparaginase. Some isoenzymes of L-asparaginase block the growth of telomeres (region of repetitive nucleotide sequences at each end of a chromosome) on DNA molecules, and this limits the number of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Metal membranes in construction: From Russia with loveRUDN University professor brought together disparate information about metal membrane suspended roofs, that allow designing buildings with large spans. These structures are used in the construction of sports complexes, airports and some other buildings. An op-ed article was published in Thin-Walled Structures
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
HKBU Chinese medicine scholars develop HKBU Chinese medicine scholars developChinese Medicine scholars at Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) have succeeded in developing a novel targeted delivery system for CRISPR/Cas9 to achieve therapeutic genome editing of VEGFA in osteosarcoma (OS).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How a 'shadow zone' traps the world's oldest ocean waterNew research from an international team has revealed why the oldest water in the ocean in the North Pacific has remained trapped in a shadow zone around 2km below the sea surface for over 1000 years.
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Science : NPR
Certain And Confident: Predicting The Future In A Climate-Changing World The Climate Science Special Report, released by the White House last week, is a valuable read — it's a primer on how science works when it overlaps with the need to make informed bets on our future. (Image credit: Andrew Harnik/AP)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Winds blowing off a dying starStars like our Sun eject large amounts of gas and dust into space, containing various elements and compounds. Asymptotic giant branch -- AGB -- phase stars, near their end of life, are particularly significant sources of such substances in our galaxy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Boys could benefit from greater numbers of girls in schoolsBoys are more likely to perform well in schools with a higher proportion of girls, shedding new light on why girls continue to outperform boys in many educational subjects.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists investigate how different houses and lifestyles affect which bugs live with usHumans have lived under the same roof with bugs since we first began building shelters 20,000 years ago. Now, scientists are studying how physical factors of our homes -- from the floor plan and the number of windows to even how tidy we are -- may play a role in the diversity of the multi-legged communities populating the indoor environment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
LEDs light the way for better drug therapiesA revolutionary new technique to create radioactive molecules has the potential to bring new medicines to patients much faster than before -- using light. While the previous approach took months, the new photocatalytic process replaces hydrogen with tritium in just hours.
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Science | The Guardian
Astronomers discover a giant world – but is it a planet? A recently-discovered giant world lies right on the boundary between being a star and a planet – and that could answer some big questions ‘When is a planet not a planet?’ is a lot more than the beginning of a poor joke at a drunken astronomers’ Christmas party (but we laughed nonetheless). It is actually a serious question that cuts to the heart of our ignorance about how celestial objects form.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mutant gene network in colon cancer identifiedThe principles of the gene network for colon tumorigenesis have been identified by a KAIST research team. The principles will be used to find the molecular target for effective anti-cancer drugs in the future. Further, this research gained attention for using a systems biology approach, which is an integrated research area of IT and BT.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discovery could lead to new treatment for anxiety, addictionNew research provides fresh insight into how the brain processes reward and punishment, opening new avenues for developing treatment of conditions ranging from anxiety to addictive behaviors such as drug abuse.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New routes to renewables: Sandia speeds transformation of biofuel waste into wealthA Sandia National Laboratories-led team has demonstrated faster, more efficient ways to turn discarded plant matter into chemicals worth billions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
BU: Air pollution exposure inequality persists in MassachusettsDespite overall reductions in ambient air pollution in Massachusetts, exposure continues to fall unequally along racial/ethnic, income, and education lines, according to a new study led by a Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researcher.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Scale of 'nitrate timebomb' revealedBig quantities of nitrate chemicals from farm fertilisers are polluting the rocks beneath our feet.
3h
New on MIT Technology Review
Uber Must Treat Its British Drivers as Employees
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Ingeniøren
DTU forsker om radioaktiv sky over Europa: Vi observerede ruthenium 106 i begyndelsen af oktoberAllerede i begyndelsen af oktober drev ruthenium 106-skyen ind over Europa. På DTU har man aldrig set noget lignende, men forsikrer dog, at der intet er at være bekymret for.
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Dagens Medicin
Direktører på OUH trækker i land: Bistod ikke Svendborg-læge I et åbent brev skrev direktionen på OUH for få dage siden, at de havde tilbudt at bistå den dømte læge i Svendborg-sagen. Men det passer ikke, skriver direktionen nu selv i en meddelelse på OUH’s intranet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New analysis of Chicxulub asteroid suggests it may have struck in vulnerable spot(Phys.org)—A pair of researchers at Tohoku University has found evidence suggesting that if the asteroid that struck the Earth near Chicxulub 66 million years ago had landed almost anywhere else, it would not have been nearly as destructive. In their paper published in the journal Scientific Reports, Kunio Kaiho and Naga Oshima suggest that had the asteroid struck another part of the planet it is
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Futurity.org
Blame these bacteria for itchy eczema skin Researchers may have found why our skin can become itchy and inflamed due to conditions like eczema, also known as atopic dermatitis. A common bacterium called Staphylococcus aureus sometimes stimulates production of a protein that causes our own cells to react and cause the inflammation, the researchers report. “Our skin is covered with bacteria as part of our normal skin microbiome and typicall
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Gizmodo
Gotham Confirms the Return of a Major Villain Denis Villeneuve throws water on the rumors he’ll direct the next Bond . Meet the characters of Black Panther in some stunning new posters. The Umbrella Academy and Deadly Class adaptations find key members of their casts. Plus, a few new teases for the big CW/DC crossover and new footage from Riverdale . Spoilers get! Bond 25 Denis Villeneuve has confirmed to The Playlist he will not be directin
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Gizmodo
IBM’s Newest Quantum Computers Are the Most Powerful of Their Kind An IBM quantum computer cryostat (Image: Andy Aaron, IBM via Flickr ) IBM has announced two powerful new quantum computer processors, one client-ready and another in the works. Today’s announcement includes both a 20 qubit processor ready for use by its IBM Q clients and an operational 50 qubit prototype currently in development. These numbers might be small in the grand scheme of what folks hope
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Scientific American Content: Global
Da Vinci's Genius, Oliver Sacks on Consciousness and Other New Science BooksBook recommendations from the editors of Scientific American -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Quantum computers take a step forward with a 50-qubit prototypeRace to build ever-more-powerful processors edges the technology closer to being able to best traditional machines.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The use of tablet computers during math lessons may help increase the quality of teachingThe conclusion is that the use of tablet computers in teaching cross-curricular modules of math leads to a more effective application of resources from various study fields and improves quality of knowledge with regard to cognitive, social and psychomotor aspects of learning.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Taking blood using 'push-pull' method gets accurate results with fewer pokesA new study by University of Pennsylvania veterinary researchers has found that blood samples collected from an intravenous catheter using a special 'mixing' technique are as accurate as those collected via venipuncture, in which a needle is used to access the vein directly.
4h
Feed: All Latest
Review: Turtle Beach Ear Force Stealth 700 (PS4/Xbox One)Turtle Beach's plush wireless headset is solid, but not the best we've gamed with.
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Feed: All Latest
Waymo Drops the Driver, Congress Attacks Electric Vehicles, and More This Week in the Future of CarsPlus: a video history of the Darpa Grand Challenges that sparked the driverless car industry.
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New on MIT Technology Review
IBM Raises the Bar with a 50-Qubit Quantum ComputerResearchers have built the most sophisticated quantum computer yet, signaling progress toward a powerful new way of processing information.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fruit fly brains inform search engines of the futureThe way fruit flies identify similarities between odors offers a new approach for search algorithms.
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Fruit Fly FactoryA fruit fly ovary can contain up to 20 eggs at a time.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Colombia—a megadiverse paradise still to be discoveredNot so long ago, Colombia was listed as a failed state. People were trapped inside cities because of the high risk of being kidnapped, and for decades armed confrontations affecting civilians happened almost every single day. As a Colombian scientist and field biologist, I learned how to carry out research under those conditions. Countless times I had dangerous encounters with the guerrillas, the
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Futurity.org
We owe these 5 research discoveries to twins Twin research has led to all kinds incredible insights into an important mystery: nature vs. nurture or how the environment and our genes affect our health. “Twins allow us to control perfectly for one of the main variables in our health—genetics. Then we can drill down on the role that environmental factors are playing,” says John Hopper, director of Twins Research Australia at the University of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study sheds light on how earliest forms of life evolved on EarthA new study led by ANU has shed light on how the earliest forms of life evolved on Earth about four billion years ago.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How blockchain technology has medieval rootsBlockchain is an emergent technology that may be as transformative as the internet, according to many predictions. But this innovative new technology has a surprising link to the days of medieval treasuries.
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Live Science
Can You Turn Fat into Muscle?Simply put, your body can't turn fat into muscle. And the reverse is also true: Your body can't turn muscle into fat, either. Here's why.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
LIGO mirror coatings get upgradeStanford scientists will lead a new national cooperative effort, the LIGO Scientific Collaboration Center for Coatings Research, to improve detection of gravitational waves at the twin LIGO facilities.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sharing economy sounds caring, but let's put it to the ethical city testMore than ever, cities face multiple crises posing paradoxical opportunities. Key challenges for cities in the urban century are climate change, inequality and governance. Where are the solutions going to come from? In cities that are dominated by globalised, market-based forces, how can equity and justice be brought centre stage?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research reveals controversial insecticides are toxic to songbirds"Studies on the risks of neonicotinoids have often focused on bees that have been experiencing population declines. However, it is not just bees that are being affected by these insecticides," said Christy Morrissey, U of S biology professor.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Journalists acting as 'referees' could prevent the spread of fake newsWith fake news, alternative facts and false beliefs currently damaging our social and political landscape, EU researchers are examining whether journalists can be effective as adjudicators, pointing out untruths and separating facts from fiction.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How the magnetoelastic effect can control the magnetic properties of nanoelementsRapidly modifying magnetic properties is key for low power magnetic devices. The EU-funded MULTIREV project has contributed to a study which exploits magnetoelastic coupling, for the design of strain-controlled nano-devices.
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Gizmodo
Sony's Truly Wireless Noise-Cancelling Earbuds Are a Vision of the Future All photos: Adam Clark Estes/Gizmodo When I first heard the pitch for the Sony WF-1000X , I thought I was hearing it wrong. Sony made a new set of wireless earbuds that aren’t just completely wireless—they also employ active noise-cancelling tech. This is a first for the wireless earbud industry, and let me be the first to tell you: It’s kind of awesome. I’m not saying “kind of” just to be casual
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Save stormwater at home with a veggie raingardenAfter a storm, millions of litres of water wash off our roofs and roads into stormwater drains. This causes large flows of stormwater into local waterways, damaging these ecosystems.
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The Atlantic
Murder on the Orient Express Is a Ride Worth Skipping In cinema, as elsewhere, there can be too much of a good thing. Quick: Do you remember the film several years back that starred Judi Dench, Penélope Cruz, Daniel Day-Lewis, Marion Cotillard, and Nicole Kidman, among others? If you recall that it was Nine , the director Rob Marshall’s musical follow-up to his Academy Award–winning Chicago , well good on you. I can scarcely summon any memory of the
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Popular Science
A psychologist explains why those Facebook product ads are so darn compelling Science Brands know exactly how to play into your mistrust of. . . brands. You probably want to own a mattress you saw on Facebook. Here's why.
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Futurity.org
E. coli prepares baby bellies for a world of germs Gut bacteria may help newborn babies prepare for the bacteria that will soon enter their bodies, new research suggests. In a new paper, the researchers conclude that nonpathogenic E. coli serves a crucial function of preparing the gut for the development of the microbiome to come, and the onslaught of pathogenic, or harmful, microbes. The new results may help explain what past research has shown
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Argonne forms new divisions to focus on computation and data science strengthsThe U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory has formed two new research divisions to focus its lab-wide foundational expertise on computational science and data science activities.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cellular clean-up can also sweep away forms of cancerTwo new research papers reinforce the benefits of a novel therapy that hijacks the cell's own protein degradation machinery to destroy cancer cells, Yale researchers report Nov. 9 in the journal Cell Chemical Biology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sunshine brings higher auction pricesSunny days predict higher house prices at auctions, but rain and long weekends bring buyers a discount, according to new research led by the University of Technology Sydney.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Effective interventions needed to tackle diabetes prevention in HispanicsA new study finds that diabetes prevalence varies widely among different Hispanic heritage groups and in different Latin American countries. The researchers highlight that further research and more effective, adaptable interventions are needed to prevent and manage diabetes in Hispanics -- the largest minority group in the US and twice as likely to have diabetes compared with non-Hispanic whites.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
France: Russian accident caused recent radioactivity spikeThe French nuclear safety agency says it thinks an apparently minor accident at a Russian facility caused a recent spike in radioactivity in the air over much of Europe.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Antarctic base comes out of deep freezeThe advance party sent in to open up Britain’s mothballed Antarctic base say it is in good shape.
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Futurity.org
This astrobiologist wants you to find ‘extreme’ rocks A new crowdsourcing site called Rockiology asks citizen scientists for help finding rocks. In particular, Jocelyne DiRuggerio is seeking stones harboring tiny creatures so tough they survive in some of Earth’s most hostile environments. “We can go to some places and collect rocks, but we can’t go everywhere.” Studying them, she hopes, may demonstrate that similar critters could exist in extreme c
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Futurity.org
Shot of plastic particles fools haywire immune system Injecting nanoparticles into the body may help distract an out-of-control immune system, diverting immune cells that cause inflammation away from an injury site, new research suggests. Inflammation is a double-edged sword. When it works, it helps the body heal and fights off infections. But sometimes, the immune system overreacts. An acute lung injury, sustained by inhaling smoke, for instance, c
5h
New on MIT Technology Review
GOP Embraces Geoengineering ... Which Terrifies Geoengineering Researchers
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New Scientist - News
Gluten-sensitive? It may actually be a carb making you illRather than gluten, fructan molecules seem to be to blame for sensitive guts. If true, gluten-free people could eat soy sauce and sourdough bread again
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Feed: All Latest
Despite a Las Vegas Crash, Self-Driving Shuttle Buses Could Be the FutureAt least when it comes to moving people around the suburbs.
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Feed: All Latest
Meet Tug, the Helpful Robot Rolling Its Way Into Hospitals and Hotels Around the WorldBetween delivering food and drugs in hospitals to bringing towels to your hotel room, Tug is helping redefine the human-robot frontier.
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Feed: All Latest
After Corralling AI Expertise, Facebook Now Offers to Share SomeTelecoms want to tap artificial-intelligence to plan networks. Facebook, which has AI expertise and needs telcos, offers to help.
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The Atlantic
The Digital Ruins of a Forgotten Future Gidge Uriza lives in an elegant wooden house with large glass windows overlooking a glittering creek, fringed by weeping willows and meadows twinkling with fireflies. She keeps buying new swimming pools because she keeps falling in love with different ones. The current specimen is a teal lozenge with a waterfall cascading from its archway of stones. Gidge spends her days lounging in a swimsuit on
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Scientific American Content: Global
Do Sexual Harassment Prevention Trainings Really Work?Remarkably little research has been performed on the effectiveness of employers’ efforts to raise awareness -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
South Africa tackles crime at sea with ship-spotting satellites Automated vessel-tracking system aims to spy poachers and smugglers. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22977
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Gizmodo
These Extremely Rare Coffee Maker Deals Would Make Great Gifts OXO Good Grips Cold Brew Coffee Maker , $40 Aerobie Aeropress Coffee and Espresso Maker , $24 Keurigs and drip coffee makers are convenient, sure, but the coffee they produce can’t hold a candle to what you’ll get from these discounted gadgets. First up, the legendary Aerobie Aeropress is down to $24 , an extremely rare discount from its usual $30. Even at full price, it’s easily the cheapest and
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Science | The Guardian
Nuclear accident sends 'harmless' radioactive cloud over Europe French institute says pollution suggests release of nuclear material in Russia or Kazakhstan in September A cloud of radioactive pollution over Europe in recent weeks indicates that an accident happened in a nuclear facility in Russia or Kazakhstan in the last week of September, the French nuclear safety institute IRSN has said. The IRSN on Thursday ruled out an accident in a nuclear reactor, say
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Winds blowing off a dying starUsing ALMA, Japanese scientists explain why aluminum oxide is so abundant around AGB stars.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Government urged to act over computer science GCSEsMore than half of England's secondary schools did not offer the subject in 2015-16, a report has found.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How do you stop the next mass extinction? Look to the pastBlack rhinos, red wolves, whooping cranes: the global list of endangered species grows every year to the point where some researchers say we're witnessing the start of Earth's next mass extinction.
5h
Ingeniøren
Fredagspodcast: Ølsmager-robot, Apple Pay og en usædvanlig supernovaI Ingeniørens ugentlige podcast, Transformator, ser vi nærmere på Carlsbergs nye ølsmager-robot, det kaotiske marked for betalinger via mobilen med introduktionen af Apple Pay og en usædvanlig supernova.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Digitally assembled map offers insights into the Battle of Vimy RidgeOn April 9, 1917, after months of careful preparation, the Canadian Corps was ordered to seize Vimy Ridge.
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Feed: All Latest
Department of Defense's 'Hack the Pentagon' Bug Bounty Program Helps Fix Thousands of BugsThe Department of Defense's bug bounty program was a smashing success. And other government agencies have taken notice.
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Feed: All Latest
Yuri Milner's Breakthrough Initiatives and Silicon Valley's Science InfluencersThe Russian billionaire is deeply invested in the science of his Breakthrough Initiatives and Prizes. So are many Silicon Valley elites.
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Feed: All Latest
How the Darpa Grand Challenges Created the Self-Driving Car IndustryThe inside story of how three autonomous vehicle races brought together the community now leading the way toward a world of robotic chauffeurs.
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Feed: All Latest
Twitter's Authentication Policy Is a Verified MessTwitter suspends its process for awarding blue check marks and its CEO calls the policy 'broken' amid criticism for verifying the account of a white supremacist.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Earthquakes Jolt Icelandic Volcano as It Refills with MagmaThe volcano is likely slowly preparing for its next eruption -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Dagens Medicin
Medicinrådet anbefaler cladribin til gruppe af skleroseramte Patienter med attakvis multipel sklerose bliver nu anbefalet cladribin som standardbehandling. Det sker, selv om Medicinrådet udtrykker en vis bekymring.
6h
Science | The Guardian
The age of the driverless bus is coming – and we can't let developers take sole control With the commercial sector providing most of the stimulus for advances in AI, we need to ensure societal goals and values are kept in sight It’s a bit like buses. You wait for one new technology to come along and then three arrive, presenting a range of exciting journeys and destinations, full of promises and possibilities. With rapid developments in genomics; in data and computer science; in neu
6h
Ars Technica
HP Spectre 13 2017 review: A killer laptop, now touch-friendly (video link) There weren't many downsides to last year's HP Spectre 13 . HP made a competent and uniquely stylish notebook that provided a lot of power, connectivity, and battery life in a thin-and-light shell. But HP had bigger plans for the Spectre line, and, after a bit more self-editing, the company has developed the 2017 Spectre 13 notebook. On the surface, this seems like a relatively minor
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Social media key for tracking flu, Zika, depression and more, says new bookSearch the hashtag "flu" on Twitter and you'll find a free-flowing stream of comments from people across the country. In 140 characters or fewer, they offer threads of information about their symptoms, how long they've been sick, whether they received a flu shot, and more.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Observations of a comet's first passage through the solar system reveal unexpected secretsComets are our most direct link to the earliest stages of the formation and evolution of the solar system. Only every few years is a new comet discovered that is making its first trip to the inner solar system from the Oort Cloud, a zone of icy objects enveloping the solar system. Such opportunities offer astronomers a chance to study a special class of comets.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Earth as viewed from 10,000 milesOn November 9, 1967, the uncrewed Apollo 4 test flight made a great ellipse around Earth as a test of the translunar motors and of the high speed entry required of a crewed flight returning from the Moon.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Insurance failing 70 percent of global warming damage, climate experts warnSpecialised schemes could protect lives and jobs against extreme weather, say experts at Imperial's COP23 side-event.
6h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Ancient European farmers and foragers hooked up big timeInterbreeding escalated in regionally distinct ways across Neolithic Europe.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Snake man's venom habit holds hope for new antidoteFor nearly 30 years, London-based reptile enthusiast and musician Steve Ludwin has been injecting snake venom—a practice that has almost killed him.
6h
Ingeniøren
ANALYSE: IC4-skandale og signalkaos - en ekstremt giftig cocktailIngen taler højt om det - endnu: Der er gode argumenter for, at IC4-togene ikke bliver udstyret med nye signalcomputere.
6h
Scientific American Content: Global
More Guns Mean More Violent Crime--or Less? A Researcher Aims at Scientific AmericanThe social scientist behind a pro-gun study objects to the story “Journey to Gunland,” but the reporter says his claims are false -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using catalysts like tweezers to select single enantiomer from a mirrored pair(Phys.org)—A team of researchers at Harvard University has developed a catalytic technique that allows for selecting a single enantiomer (mirror-image isomers) when choosing between one of two mirrored possibilities. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their technique and the possible ways it might be used. Anita Mattson with Worcester Polytechnic Institute offers
6h
Viden
Google-balloner leverer internet til 100.000 katastrofe-ramteEn del af Puerto Ricos indbyggere får basal adgang til nettet fra 20 kilometers højde. Øens mobilnet er hårdt ramt efter orkan i september.
6h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Seahorses found living in River Thames in LondonTwo species of seahorses are among the unexpected creatures found living in London.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How the Pacific seafloor got its 60-degree bendHawaii sits at the end of a chain of volcanoes running across the Pacific Ocean floor, but in the middle of this chain lies a bend of 60 degrees. For many decades geoscientists have struggled to explain exactly how and why this feature occurred around 50 Million years ago. A new study in Science Advances led by postdoctoral researcher Mathew Domeier along with colleagues from the Centre for Earth
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why did the Earth's ancient oceans disappear?We think of oceans as being stable and permanent. However, they move at about the same speed as your fingernails grow. Geoscientists at CEED, University of Oslo have found a novel way of mapping the Earth's ancient oceans.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The road to Orion's launchNASA's Orion spacecraft aims to send humans further into space than ever before, and ESA's European Service Module will provide the essentials for keeping the astronauts alive and on course.
6h
Ingeniøren
Ugens it-job: Efterretningstjeneste, Forsvaret og flere store firmaer søger it-folk På dagens liste er der job for både konsulenter, ledere, specialister, arkitekter og udviklere. Find det rette job for dig. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/ugens-it-job-1 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Digital 3-D-fabrication technology for nursing and healthcare3-D printing technology has important medical applications, such as manufacturing prosthetic parts, implants, and models of human organs. Here, researchers at Keio University in Tokyo, describe the potentially important role of 3-D printing in nursing and long-term care for the elderly. Given Japan's rapidly ageing society, demand for terminal care in hospitals or care facilities will exceed capac
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Metagenomic analysis software reveals new causes of superbug emergenceResearchers from ITMO University and Center of Physical and Chemical Medicine have developed an algorithm capable of tracking the spread of antibiotic resistance genes in gut microbiota DNA and revealed additional evidence of resistance gene transfer between bacterial species. The method can not only contribute to the development of effective therapy schemes, but also curb the spread of superbugs.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers create gallium nitride semiconductors doped with berylliumPhysicists at Aalto University have discovered a microscopic mechanism that will allow gallium nitride semiconductors to be used in electronic devices that distribute large amounts of electric power.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists report chemical basis of the cell division timer, a possible anti-cancer targetHuman cells divide according to a timer—each cell has at least 30 minutes to divide its genetic material between the nuclei of two daughter cells. Researchers at KU Leuven, Belgium, have unraveled how this timer is switched on and off. Their findings open up perspectives for the treatment of cancer, as keeping the timer running would stop cancer cells from dividing.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists are developing biologically active compounds for an anti-tumor drugResearchers at RUDN University are actively involved in the development of isoxazoles, chemical compounds capable of suppressing the growth of malignant tumors. The results of the study were published in Tetrahedron.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop practical superconducting nanowire single-photon detector with record detection efficiencySuperconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) are significantly better at photon detection efficiency (DE) compared to their semiconducting counterparts, and have enabled many breakthrough applications in quantum information technologies. A team headed by Prof. Lixing You from Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology (SIMIT), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have d
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Finding the best drought index to study global drylandsDrought is the world's costliest type of natural disaster. To monitor, detect and quantify drought, many drought indices have been developed. Previous studies have shown that different indices can yield diverse results for a specific drought event, and a drought index can also give different results depending on the method used for the calculation of potential evapotranspiration (PET).
7h
Dagens Medicin
Hovedstaden halter markant bagefter i behandlingen af hjertepatienter På landsplan bliver hver femte hjertepatient udredt for sent, men i Hovedstaden ser det endnu værre ud. Også på en række andre forhold på hjerteområdet halter Hovedstaden langt efter resten af landet.
7h
The Atlantic
The Tax Bill's Fate Won't Float (or Sink) the Republicans in 2018 Surveying the damage of elections in Virginia and New Jersey on Tuesday, Paul Ryan had a clear prescription for ailing Republicans Wednesday morning: The results made it all the more important to pass the tax rewrite currently under consideration. “I fundamentally believe when we deliver on comprehensive tax reform and tax relief, especially for middle income families, people will see their paych
7h
The Atlantic
Why the AR-15 Was Never Meant to be in Civilians' Hands Decades ago I wrote in the Atlantic about the creation of the AR-15, which was the predecessor of the military’s M-16 combat rifle and which now is the weapon most often used in U.S. mass gun murders. After the latest large-scale gun massacre, the one in Texas, I did a follow-up post about the AR-15, and then a range of reader views . Among the responses I got was from a man who as a young engine
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UK panel rules Uber drivers have rights on wages, time off (Update)Uber lost the latest round in the battle over its operating model Friday, when a British panel ruled that the company's drivers are workers, not independent contractors, in a decision with broad implications for the so-called gig economy.
7h
Ingeniøren
Udbudsfusk på hospitalsbyggeri: Bøde på 250.000 kronerRegion Hovedstaden risikerer millioner i sag om favorisering ved konkurrencen om et nyt akuthus til Bispebjerg Hospital.
7h
Ars Technica
Estonia arrests suspected FSB agent accused of “computer-related crime” Enlarge / A car preparing to cross from Estonia into Russia approaches the border control point on March 23, 2017 in Narva, Estonia. Estonia is a member of the European Union and shares its eastern border with Russia. (credit: Sean Gallup/Getty Images)) Estonian authorities announced this week that they had recently arrested a Russian man suspected of being an agent of the Federal Security Servic
7h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Ice ceilingFor decades, there was a ceiling not of glass but of ice, holding women back from doing research in Antarctica.
7h
NYT > Science
What’s at Stake in the Bonn Climate Talks?The talks in Bonn, Germany, will play a significant role in the world’s response to climate change. But what, exactly, is going on? Here are some answers.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New wake-promoting node pinpointed in brainNeurologists had suspected that a component of the 'ascending arousal system' could be found in this part of the brain for more than 100 years. In mice, activating this region using targeted chemical genetic techniques resulted in prolonged wakefulness during the animals' normal sleep periods.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exit through the lymphatic systemETH Zurich scientists have disproved a decades-old orthodoxy: cerebrospinal fluid does not leave the cranial cavity via blood vessels, but instead through the lymphatic system. This finding has far-reaching implications in new treatments for dementia.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Understanding the Berlin patient's unexpected cureResearchers have a new way to understand the much-studied Berlin patient's unexpected cure from HIV and improve outcomes of stem cell transplants for patients with other blood-related diseases such as leukemia and sickle-cell disease. A team at Oregon Health & Science University has shown a species of monkey called Mauritian cynomolgus macaques can successfully receive stem cell transplants.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biomarker may predict early Alzheimer's diseaseResearchers at SBP have identified a peptide that could lead to the early detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The discovery, published in Nature Communications, may also provide a means of homing drugs to diseased areas of the brain to treat AD, Parkinson's disease, as well as glioblastoma, brain injuries and stroke.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists investigate how different houses and lifestyles affect which bugs live with usHumans have lived under the same roof with bugs since we first began building shelters 20,000 years ago. Now, scientists are studying how physical factors of our homes -- from the floor plan and the number of windows to even how tidy we are -- may play a role in the diversity of the multi-legged communities populating the indoor environment.
8h
Science : NPR
In The Age Of Legalization, Talking To Kids About Marijuana Gets Tougher Now that recreational marijuana use in California and other states is legal for adults and marketers are ramping up ads, youth drug educators fear that kids may think it's safe for them to light up. (Image credit: Tomas Rodriguez/Getty Images)
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists investigate how different houses and lifestyles affect which bugs live with usHumans have lived under the same roof with bugs since we first began building shelters 20,000 years ago. Now, scientists are studying how physical factors of our homes—from the floor plan and the number of windows to even how tidy we are—may play a role in the diversity of the multi-legged communities populating the indoor environment. Researchers from the California Academy of Sciences, North Car
8h
Ingeniøren
Huse i Lund skal have fjernvarme fra laboratorierEn ny bydel uden for Lund i Sverige skal få sin fjernvarme fra overskudsvarmen fra to lokale forskningslaboratorier. Løsningen er lavtemperaturfjernvarme, hvor temperaturen skal reguleres så lidt som muligt for at spare på energien.
8h
Ingeniøren
Biologisk bibliotek: DTU giver forskerne adgang til 'ready-to-go'-stofferPlatformen DK-Openscreen vil rumme tusindvis af stoffer til brug inden for life science-forskning, lægge op til øget forskningssamarbejde og give merværdi til også tidligere forskningsprojekter.
8h
Science | The Guardian
Michael Gove is backing a ban on bee-killing pesticides. But it’s only a start | Hannah LownsbroughAt last, the environment secretary has stated his opposition to neonicotinoids. Now he needs to be brave, and confront the use of other poisonous pesticides There was good news this morning for the hundreds of thousands of people who have been calling on the government to endorse a ban on neonicotinoids, the main culprit for the precipitous decline in the world’s bee population. Michael Gove, the
9h
Ars Technica
How AV can open you to attacks that otherwise wouldn’t be possible Enlarge (credit: Florian Bogner ) Antivirus programs, in many cases, make us safer on the Internet. Other times, they open us to attacks that otherwise wouldn't be possible. On Friday, a researcher documented an example of the latter—a vulnerability he found in about a dozen name-brand AV programs that allows attackers who already have a toehold on a targeted computer to gain complete system cont
9h
Science | The Guardian
Let's draw blue skies research out of our universities and into the economy | Ruth McKernan The government’s new knowledge exchange framework can help universities commercialise their research – but we need to get the measures right Ruth McKernan is chief executive of Innovate UK A great idea often starts with a lightbulb moment, a flash of inspiration that feels like it could be something big – but for many ideas that’s as far as it gets. For successful innovators, getting to the point
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Trained hawks scare off smaller birds, draw stares in LAA hawk named Riley soars between high-rises in downtown Los Angeles. Smaller birds take notice. And take flight.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
News Corp reports profit jump to $87 mnUS media group News Corp said Thursday it returned to profit in the past quarter, as it saw improvements in digital subscriptions at the Wall Street Journal and other newspapers.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Huge solar plant aims for brighter Brazil energy outputBrazil has lagged far behind in the shift to solar power, but the continent's biggest facility now being built in the south-east aims to give the country its place in the sun.
10h
Science | The Guardian
‘Pretty gruesome’: giant coconut crab seen hunting birds Researcher in remote Chagos Islands says he saw crabs, previously thought to be scavengers, hunting and killing seabird A large, land-dwelling crustacean known as a coconut or robber crab has been seen hunting and killing a seabird, the first time such behaviour has been observed in the species. The phenomenon was witnessed by a researcher, Mark Laidre of Dartmouth College, while he was studying
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Developing world says rich nations shirking on climateThe failure of wealthy nations to deliver on short-term climate commitments could hinder the rollout of a landmark treaty, a bloc of 134 developing countries, including India and China, warned Thursday at UN negotiations in Bonn.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nature's nastiest beasts on show in LondonFrom a hairy-legged Goliath spider to a 2.5-foot (0.7-metre) Komodo dragon, a fear-inducing exhibition opens Friday at London's Natural History Museum showcasing the world's most venomous creatures.
10h
Viden
Snyd med store muskler koster livBivirkningerne ved anabole steroider fortsætter hele livet. Det overrasker muskelbundterne.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sheriff: Wildfires point to usefulness of old technologyWildfires that killed nine people in a remote Northern California county last month also crippled land lines, cell phones and internet service, the local sheriff said Thursday, saying the disaster shows old-fashioned sirens and ham radios have a place in emergencies.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research shows ice sheets as large as Greenland's melted fast in a warming climateNew research published in Science shows that climate warming reduced the mass of the Cordilleran Ice Sheet by half in as little as 500 years, indicating the Greenland Ice Sheet could have a similar fate.
10h
Science | The Guardian
Sir Richard Branson labelled a hypocrite over support for Saudi tourism scheme Campaigners say tycoon’s plan to invest in luxury Red Sea project jars with previous criticism of Saudi Arabia’s questionable human rights record Sir Richard Branson has been accused of hypocrisy after investing in a luxury tourism project in Saudi Arabia despite his track record of speaking out against human rights abuses in the country. The Virgin Group founder has backed a project to develop 5
11h
Ingeniøren
Leder: Nye krumspring tager glansen af Europas klima-glorie Klima
12h
Science | The Guardian
Country diary: millions of birds arrive on their autumn migration Many birds migrate at night, using the stars to orient themselves. For some, Britain is the last stop – for others, a staging post Waking in the small hours, I find my bedroom bisected by a ribbon of light. The waxing gibbous moon hangs like a beaten silver pendant, backlighting wisps of cloud that cling to the inky sky like cobwebs. As I raise my binoculars to view the moon’s craters, I notice a
12h
Science | The Guardian
Are you the hero frogs need right now? This app will tell you! | First Dog on the Moon This exciting new frog identification app will help you work out if anything around you is an actual frog and which one it is. It’s not all frog fun though Sign up here to get an email whenever First Dog cartoons are published Get all your needs met at the First Dog shop if what you need is First Dog merchandise and prints Continue reading...
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nitric oxide: Experimental analysis of its role in brain tissue in simulated ischemiaA joint study conducted by scientists at the National Academy of Sciences in Belarus and Kazan Federal University in Russia, looks at the role of nitric oxide (NO) in brain tissue in simulated ischemia in rats. The study seeks to cast light on NO as a signalling molecule in a modeled ischemic and hemorrhagic insult.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Common genetic fusion event may be associated with low-risk prostate cancerEstablishing the way in which a genetic alteration called a TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion forms in a prostate cancer, rather than the presence of the gene fusion itself, could help identify patients with prostate cancer with a low risk of spreading, which might determine the best course of treatment for the patient.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sleep apnea may increase risk of developing Alzheimer's diseaseObstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may put elderly people at greater risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.
13h
Ingeniøren
Analyse: Krigen om mobilbetaling er kun lige startet ANALYSE: Kampen om mobilbetalinger understreger den magt, der ligger i at kontrollere den platform, hvor brugerne er. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/apple-pay-mobilbetaling-blot-slag-krigen-fremtidens-bank-1082572 Version2
14h
Ingeniøren
Virtual reality sender e-learning på pension Nyt læringskoncept med virtuel klasseundervisning slår e-læring af pinden. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/artikel/virtual-reality-sender-e-learning-pa-pension-11025 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ice sheets as large as Greenland's melted fast in a warming climateNew research shows that climate warming reduced the mass of the Cordilleran Ice Sheet by half in as little as 500 years, indicating the Greenland Ice Sheet could have a similar fate.
14h
Gizmodo
CFO Brought On To Get Faraday Future On Track Apparently Headed For The Door After Eight Months Photo: AP Just eight months after joining the company to help it “secure a sustainable path forward,” Faraday Future’s chief financial officer, Stefan Krause, appears to be likely headed for the exit door in the coming days, multiple people familiar with the matter told Jalopnik. A decision could come as early as Friday. Krause leaving the company would be a significant blow to the three-year-old
14h
Science | The Guardian
Ribbiting stuff: museum app gives people chance to help in frog research Australian Museum teams up with IBM to monitor the country’s native frog population by having their calls recorded The Australian Museum has teamed up with IBM to count the country’s native frog population via a world-first app that records their calls and sends them to experts for identification. App FrogID will give the public the chance to carry out Australia’s first such national count, which
14h
Science : NPR
Researcher Says Aaron Hernandez's Brain Showed Signs Of Severe CTE Hernandez enjoyed a brilliant career on the football field and displayed a remarkable self-destructive streak off the field. (Image credit: Stephan Savoia/AP)
15h
Popular Science
More evidence that the dinosaurs were super unlucky with regards to that whole asteroid thing Science Location matters. Especially to extinction-causing asteroids. It’s an extraordinary, planet-changing event. An asteroid hit the Earth at the wrong time for dinosaurs, but the right time for us.
17h
Ars Technica
New study links natural disaster with revolutions Enlarge / This Nilometer at Cairo is an ancient device that Egyptians used to measure Nile flooding, to predict the harvest, and set tax levels. Scientists used historical data from Nilometers to see how volcanic eruptions affected Nile floods (and by extension, the health of the harvest). (credit: Berthold Werner / Wikimedia Commons ) From 305 BCE to 30 BCE, ancient Egypt was ruled by the Ptolem
17h
Gizmodo
Preorder and Save On Luminoodle's New Flexible (and Also Bendable) Task Lights Luminoodle Task Luminoodle’s big, bright string lights are getting bigger and brighter, and you can save on your favorite size by preordering today . For starters, the $44 Luminoodle Task USB is 2' long, flexible, magnetic, weatherproof, and puts out 1000 lumens, which is shocking for a USB-powered device. Advertisement For $119, you can upgrade to the full-sized Luminoodle Task , which is ov
17h
Futurity.org
‘Fireworks’ fly when cold bosons collide Researchers have discovered a new kind of quantum behavior—and saw some fireworks in the process. “This is a very fundamental behavior that we have never seen before; it was a great surprise to us,” says Cheng Chin, study author and professor of physics at the University of Chicago. The research details a curious phenomenon—seen in what was thought to be a well-understood system—that may someday
17h
New Scientist - News
Tracking the first interstellar asteroid back to its home starLast month, astronomers saw the first asteroid from outside our solar system speed by. Now, they're tracing its orbit back to find out where it came from
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
HPV jab means women only need 3 cervical screens in a lifetimeWomen may only need three cervical screens in their lifetime if they have been given the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, according to a new study published in the International Journal of Cancer today.
18h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: The Shock of the New What We’re Following Disturbing Allegations: The Washington Post reported that Roy Moore, the Republican candidate for Senate in Alabama, had sexual contact with a 14-year-old girl and pursued three other teenagers in the 1970s, when he was in his 30s and serving as an assistant district attorney. Many GOP senators are calling for him to drop out of the race if the accusations are true . Meanwhil
18h
Futurity.org
Algorithm cuts 3D printing time in half Researchers have created a new algorithm that can speed up the process of 3D printing, tackling one of the biggest drawbacks to using the technology—the slow pace of work. The algorithm allows printers to deliver high-quality results at speeds up to two times faster than those in common use, with no added hardware costs. One of the challenges for today’s 3D printers lies in vibrations caused as t
18h
Futurity.org
How HIV ‘hacks’ cells to spread itself Using a computer model, researchers have uncovered previously unknown details about how HIV “hacks” cells to make them spread the virus to other cells. Their findings may offer a new avenue for drugs to combat the virus. A key part of HIV’s success is a nasty little trick to propagate itself inside the body. Once HIV has infected a cell, it forces the cell to make a little capsule out of its own
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bad break: Osteoporosis-related bone fractures linked to air pollutionExposure to air pollution is associated with osteoporosis-related loss of bone mineral density and risk of bone fractures, according to a new study by researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. Their findings are published in The Lancet Planetary Health.
18h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Trump emissions threat to US car industryUS car makers will suffer if President Trump eases emissions standards, California's governor says.
18h


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