Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Exercise increases brain size, new research finds ::::: Aerobic exercise can improve memory function and maintain brain health as we age, a new study has found.
16h
Viden :::::
15.000 forskere sender dyster advarsel til menneskeheden ::::: Én ting er lykkes os: At stabilisere ozonlaget. Derudover har vi brugt de sidste 25 år på at skade miljøet i større hast end nogensinde før. Læs også: Varm luft skrumpede ozon-hullet i 2017 Nogenlunde sådan lyder beskeden fra 15.000 forskere fra 184 lande, der netop har udgivet artiklen “World Scientists’ Warning to Humanity: A Second Notice” (Dansk: “Alverdens forskeres advarsel til menneskehede
3h
Ingeniøren :::::
PVC skaber læssevis af farligt affald – nu forsvinder afgiften ::::: Hvert kg blød PVC-plast, som ny aftale afskaffer afgiften på, skaber to kg farligt affald. Til gengæld mener industrien ikke længere, at PVC er et sundhedsproblem.
8h

LATEST

The Atlantic :::::
The Future of Kenya's Democracy Is Hanging in the Balance ::::: NAIROBI, Kenya—The police officers, dressed in their military greens, were so well-armed they could have been preparing for a war. On the morning of October 26 , they secured a perimeter around a polling station at Olympic Primary School in Kibera, Nairobi’s largest slum, to safeguard what would be Kenya’s second presidential election in three months. In September , the Supreme Court had thrown o
3min
The Atlantic :::::
Did Donald Trump Jr. Cross the Line With WikiLeaks? ::::: Donald Trump Jr.’s private exchanges with WikiLeaks on Twitter during the 2016 campaign raise a host of new questions about the Trump team’s communications with foreign entities before the election. But the messages alone don’t appear to cross any clear-cut legal lines. “I certainly didn’t see anything that looks like a smoking gun in the descriptions that we were given,” Rick Hasen, a University
2min
Gizmodo :::::
The Most Essential Episodes of Justice League and Justice League Unlimited ::::: Image: Warner Bros. Animation In a week, the Justice League will finally unite on the big screen. It’s far from the first time DC’s finest have gathered outside of the comics, and if the live-action has anything to live up to, it’s the beloved animated series and its continuation, Unlimited . Want to binge-watch to get in the justice mood? Here’s the best of both series. A quick note before we he
2min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
The brain auditions different cells when learning a task, some don't make the cut ::::: For decades, neuroscientists have wondered how the brain can continue to learn new skills without needing to grow in size or volume over a person's lifetime. Evidence suggests that the number of brain cells -- neurons, synapses, and glial cells -- does initially increase as we're learning, but many are eventually pruned away or assigned to other roles.
5min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
New insights into why sleep is good for our memory ::::: Researchers have shed new light on sleep's vital role in helping us make the most of our memory.
5min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Sun's role in mitigating fungal disease of mango fruit ::::: The occurrence of stem end rot (SER) during storage means major losses for mango fruit growers and suppliers. Promising new research explores sunlight's role in cultivating a beneficial mix of microorganisms that help mitigate SER.
5min
Ars Technica :::::
Bugcrowd unmasks (sort of) hackers to cast vulnerability hunters in better light ::::: Enlarge / This is not what a hacker looks like. Except on hacker cosplay night. reader comments 0 Asking the crowd for help in fixing security problems is going mainstream. Microsoft , Facebook, and other tech giants have offered "bug bounties"—cash rewards or other prizes and recognition—to individuals discovering vulnerabilities in their products for years. (Ars even made it onto Google's secur
6min
Latest Headlines | Science News :::::
Simulating the universe using Einstein’s theory of gravity may solve cosmic puzzles ::::: If the universe were a soup, it would be more of a chunky minestrone than a silky-smooth tomato bisque. Sprinkled with matter that clumps together due to the insatiable pull of gravity, the universe is a network of dense galaxy clusters and filaments — the hearty beans and vegetables of the cosmic stew. Meanwhile, relatively desolate pockets of the cosmos, known as voids, make up a thin, watery b
7min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
If sitting is the new smoking, should employers be held liable? ::::: Researchers have linked sitting for long periods of time to a number of health issues, including increased high blood pressure, high blood sugar, excess body fat and cholesterol. They also warn that prolonged sitting increases the risk of cardiovascular problems and cancer. What does this mean for organizations whose employees end up sitting for at least eight hours a day? Should they be held liab
19min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Legal implications of neuroscience research - Harvard Review of Psychiatry presents update ::::: Nov. 14, 2017 - New research on the biological basis of psychiatric disorders has important implications for legal proceedings as well as mental health treatment, according to a special issue on "Psychiatry, Neuroscience, and the Law," presented in the Harvard Review of Psychiatry . The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer . The special issue seeks "to educate and inform mental health researc
19min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Multifunctional fluorescent nanoparticles for cancer surgery show promise ::::: Even with pre-operative imaging techniques, surgeons still rely on visual inspection to locate malignant tissues during surgery. New research released today at the 2017 American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) Annual Meeting and Exposition may help surgeons better view and treat these tumor cells with engineered naphthalocyanine-based nanoparticles (SiNc-PNP) injected 24 hours befo
19min
Scientific American Content: Global :::::
The Caveman and The Bomb: Does Trump Grasp the Horror of His Threat to "Totally Destroy" North Korea? ::::: “I am deeply moved if I see one man suffering and would risk my life for him. Then I talk impersonally about the possible pulverization of our big cities, with a hundred million dead. I am unable to multiply one man’s suffering by a hundred million.” ­—Albert Szent-Györgyi The Senate Committee on Foreign Relations just concluded a historic hearing on the executive’s authority to use nuclear w
19min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Cygnus cargo ship arrives at space station ::::: Orbital ATK's unmanned Cygnus cargo ship arrived Tuesday at the International Space Station carrying more than 7,400 pounds (3,400 kilograms) of food, supplies and experiments, the US space agency said.
23min
Live Science :::::
Stress from Negative Life Events Linked to Obesity in Women ::::: More stress in a woman's life may widen her waistline, a new study reveals. Researchers found that middle-age and older women who experienced more stress from major life events were more likely to develop obesity than women who did not report any stressful events, according to the study, which was presented today (Nov. 13) at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions meeting in A
24min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Scientists create yellow, three-eyed, wingless mosquitoes by using gene editing tool ::::: Researchers have developed transgenic mosquitoes that stably express the Cas9 enzyme in their germline. The addition of Cas9 will enable the use of the CRISPR gene editing tool to make efficient, targeted changes to the mosquitoes' DNA. As proof of concept, the researchers used the system to disrupt cuticle, wing, and eye development, producing completely yellow, three-eyed and wingless mosquitoes
34min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Punctuation in text messages helps replace cues found in face-to-face conversations ::::: Emoticons, irregular spellings and exclamation points in text messages aren't sloppy or a sign that written language is going down the tubes -- these 'textisms' help convey meaning and intent in the absence of spoken conversation, according to newly published research.
34min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Electron backscatter diffraction yields microstructure insights ::::: Soft magnetic core engineering plays a key role in high-efficiency electric motors, but for higher-frequency applications, soft magnetic composites are also promising. Each stage of motor construction affects the material's microstructure, and understanding the details of the microstructure is paramount to reaching higher efficiency for electrical motors. Researchers have now created an advanced c
34min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Psoriasis severity linked to increased risk of type 2 diabetes ::::: People with psoriasis are at a higher risk to develop type 2 diabetes than those without psoriasis, and the risk increases dramatically based on the severity of the disease. Researchers found people with psoriasis that covers 10 percent of their body or more are 64 percent more likely to develop diabetes than those without psoriasis, independent of traditional risk factors such as body weight.
34min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Voice impersonators can fool speaker recognition systems ::::: Skilful voice impersonators are able to fool state-of-the-art speaker recognition systems, as these systems generally aren't efficient yet in recognising voice modifications, according to new research. The vulnerability of speaker recognition systems poses significant security concerns.
34min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Essential quantum computer component downsized by two orders of magnitude ::::: Qubits, the key building blocks at the heart of every quantum computer, are extremely sensitive to interference and need to be shielded from unwanted signals, for example by using so-called nonreciprocal devices. But until now these devices were huge and produced unwanted magnetic fields themselves. Now, scientists have developed a new nonreciprocal device that is only a tenth of a millimeter wide
34min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Why hot water freezes faster than cold water ::::: A team of researchers has defined a theoretical framework that could explain the Mpemba effect, a counterintuitive physical phenomenon revealed when hot water freezes faster than cold water.
34min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Critical Care Recovery Center concept could benefit adult ICU survivors of all ages ::::: IMAGE: Babar Khan, MD of the Indiana University Center for Aging Research, Regenstrief Institute, IU School of Medicine and Center for Health Innovation and Implementation Science Sophia Wang, MD of Indiana... view more Credit: Indiana University Center for Aging Research INDIANAPOLIS -- A growing number of individuals of all ages are surviving intensive care unit hospitalization, however
40min
Ars Technica :::::
Black worker says Tesla factory was a “hotbed for racist behavior” ::::: Tesla Factory in Fremont, California. reader comments 4 Tesla’s factory in Fremont is a “hotbed for racist behavior,” according to a a legal complaint filed in California's Alameda County Superior Court on Monday and reported by Bloomberg . Marcus Vaughn is an African-American who worked on Tesla’s factory floor from April to October of this year. Vaughn charges that workers and managers on the f
41min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Businesses need better approach to compliance programs, research finds ::::: Recent reports of sexual harassment committed by powerful men also highlight the failures of corporate compliance programs designed to protect employees. This is because few companies understand how their employees reach unethical and illegal decisions or have compliance strategies aimed at curbing them, according to research by a professor in the Indiana University Kelley School of Business. "De
41min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Disease-resistant apples perform better than old favorites ::::: New disease-resistant apples appear to perform better than some old favorites. Credit: David Riecks, University of Illinois You may not find them in the produce aisle yet, but it's only a matter of time before new disease-resistant apple cultivars overtake favorites like Honeycrisp in popularity, according to a University of Illinois apple expert. "I know everyone wants Honeycrisp, but they're no
41min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Punctuation in text messages helps replace cues found in face-to-face conversations ::::: Credit: CC0 Public Domain Emoticons, irregular spellings and exclamation points in text messages aren't sloppy or a sign that written language is going down the tubes—these "textisms" help convey meaning and intent in the absence of spoken conversation, according to newly published research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. "In contrast with face-to-face conversation, text
41min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Making mosquitoes self-destruct ::::: CRISPR/Cas9-mediated disruption of genes associated with eye pigment caused eye color to change from Black to white. Credit: Michelle Bui, UC Riverside. Researchers at the University of California, Riverside have developed transgenic mosquitoes that stably express the Cas9 enzyme in their germline. The addition of Cas9 will enable the use of the CRISPR gene editing tool to make efficient, targete
41min
The Atlantic :::::
A Photo Trip to Antarctica ::::: Antarctica is approaching its peak summertime, when the people living and working at coastal stations will experience a few weeks of 24-hour daylight around Christmas time. Collected here are images from the past few years of the Antarctic landscape, wildlife, research facilities, and some of the scientific work taking place there.
42min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
With launch of new night sky survey, UW researchers ready for era of 'big data' astronomy ::::: The ZTF took this "first light" image on Nov. 1, 2017, after being installed at the 48-inch Samuel Oschin Telescope at Palomar Observatory. The Horsehead nebula is near center and the Orion nebula is at lower right. The full-resolution version is more than 24,000 pixels by 24,000 pixels. Each ZTF image covers a sky area equal to 247 full moons. Credit: Caltech Optical Observatories The first astr
47min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Researchers examine social identity threat and religion in the US ::::: When people feel targeted because of their religious identity, they can experience a psychological threat that may undermine psychological well-being and increase prejudice toward other groups, according to a new study by Penn State psychologists. The findings, which appear online in the journal of Social Psychological and Personality Science , suggest that in the United States, highly religious
47min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Microbiome transplants provide disease resistance in critically-endangered Hawaiian plant ::::: Native Hawaiian plant, P. kaalaensis in flower, with infection (white spots on leaves) beginning to spread. Credit: Geoff Zahn Transplanting wild microbes from healthy related plants can make a native Hawaiian plant healthier and likelier to survive in wild according to new research from The Amend Laboratory in the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa (UHM) Botany Department and the O'ahu Army Natural
47min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Labor induction at 40 weeks associated with lower risk of perinatal mortality ::::: Induction of labor at 40 weeks in nulliparous women aged 35 and older is associated with reduced risk of in-hospital perinatal death, according to a recent analysis.
48min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Disease-resistant apples perform better than old favorites ::::: You may not find them in the produce aisle yet, but it's only a matter of time before new disease-resistant apple cultivars overtake favorites like Honeycrisp in popularity.
48min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Speedy collision detector could make robots better human assistants ::::: A faster collision detection algorithm could enable robots to work more fluidly in the operating room or at home for assisted living. The algorithm, dubbed 'Fastron,' runs up to eight times faster than existing collision detection algorithms. It uses machine learning to help robots avoid moving objects and weave through complex, rapidly changing environments in real time.
48min
Popular Science :::::
Elgato Eve Degree Review: A smart-but-spendy way to track your home's climate ::::: The Eve Degree lets you track temperature, humidity, and barometric pressure inside your home or out. And if you have other Apple HomeKit-compatible devices, you can use those readings to trigger specific smart home actions, like turning off the heat or turning on a humidifier. Testing As with most HomeKit devices, the Degree takes less than a minute to set up. The palm-sized sensor comes with it
59min
Big Think :::::
There’s No Moral Difference between a Wall and a Migrant Visa ::::: A large portion of the world’s population lives in conditions that are hard to fathom for people in developed countries. Many of those living in extreme poverty would gladly move to the United States, the European Union or Australia if given a chance. In light of this, how should rich countries design and enforce their immigration policies? The figures for world poverty are staggering. Accordin
59min
The Atlantic :::::
Is It Too Late for Boris Johnson to Say Sorry? ::::: Sorry seems to be the hardest word—especially if your name is Boris Johnson. On Monday, the British foreign secretary made a second attempt at apologizing for comments he made about Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, a dual British-Iranian national currently serving a five-year sentence as a political prisoner in Tehran. Johnson had claimed Zaghari-Ratcliffe was “simply teaching journalism” when she was
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Engineering tomorrow's responsive, adaptable neuroprosthetics and robots ::::: Advanced prosthetic limbs and eyes as well as brain-machine interfaces are harnessing existing neural circuitry to improve the quality of life for people with sensory impairment, according to studies presented today at Neuroscience 2017, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health.
1h
Gizmodo :::::
Super Slo-Mo Footage of Swords Slicing Water Bottles Will Satisfy Your Ninja Fantasies ::::: GIF When people fantasize about being ninjas, they’re not day-dreaming about sneaking up on their enemies; it’s all about the sword play. The Slow Mo Guys are no exception, and realized that playing around with a katana sword would result in some spectacular slo-mo footage . It takes a few harrowing practice swings to get the sword to cleanly slice through a line of ten plastic bottles, but once
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Artificially cooling planet 'risky strategy' ::::: Proposals to reduce the effects of global warming by imitating volcanic eruptions could have a devastating effect on global regions prone to either tumultuous storms or prolonged drought, new research has shown.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Pesticides may cause bumblebees to lose their buzz, study finds ::::: Pesticides significantly reduce the number of pollen grains a bumblebee is able to collect, a new study has found.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Low dose, constant drip: Pharmaceutical, personal care pollution impacts aquatic life ::::: Traditional toxicity testing underestimates the risk that pharmaceutical and personal care product pollution poses to freshwater ecosystems. Criteria that account for ecological disruption -- not just organism death -- are needed to protect surface waters, which are under pressure from a growing population and escalating synthetic chemical use.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Why testicular cancer is so responsive to chemo ::::: A major step has been taken toward answering a key question in cancer research: Why is testicular cancer so responsive to chemotherapy, even after it metastasizes?
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Quick! What's that smell? Mammal brains identify type of scent faster than once thought ::::: It takes less than one-tenth of a second -- a fraction of the time previously thought -- for the sense of smell to distinguish between one odor and another, new experiments in mice show.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Texas' odds of Harvey-scale rainfall to increase by end of century ::::: Texas' risk of Harvey-scale rainfall will increase by the end of this century, new research concludes. By 2100, the annual probability of Hurricane Harvey's record rainfall returning to Texas will rise to 18 percent, if the growth of greenhouse gas emissions continues unmitigated.
1h
Science | The Guardian :::::
Satellites could be launched from Shetland Islands' most northern isle ::::: For the 600 residents of the most northern island in the Shetlands, it could be the most exciting thing since Unstfest – the annual shindig which this year offered, among its attractions, a scything demonstration that over-16s could join. The proposals are at an early stage, but if the Shetland Space Centre Ltd gets its way, Unst could become the UK’s premier spaceport with a local economy revita
1h
Ars Technica :::::
Dealmaster: Get a Lenovo laptop with a Core i7 and 256GB SSD for $570 ::::: Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our friends at TechBargains , we have another round of deals to share. Though the madness of Black Friday doesn't start in earnest for another week, today's list brings a few early gadget discounts, including Lenovo's 14-inch IdeaPad 510S marked down to $570. This notebook has been slashed a few times before, but in the notoriously fussy realm of budget laptops, yo
1h
Gizmodo :::::
Jeffrey Richelson, FOIA Legend and National Security Expert, Dies at 67 ::::: Screenshot from C-SPAN2 Jeffrey T. Richelson wrote over a dozen books about national security, nuclear weapons, and agencies like the CIA and KGB—books that were often the product of incredible new revelations obtained through Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests. Richelson, a legend to FOIA advocates and anyone else with an interest in national security, died this past weekend at the age o
1h
Dana Foundation :::::
Brain Awareness Week Reception at SfN ::::: On Saturday, the Society for Neuroscience (SfN) kicked off its annual meeting with 30,000 people registered to attend the five-day program at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in downtown Washington, DC. The meeting provides one of the world’s largest forums for neuroscientists to debut research and to network with colleagues from around the world. The Brain Awareness Week (BAW) receptio
1h
Gizmodo :::::
1 Crazy Way My Mom Can Share Photos With Me, Her Daughter ::::: No really, that is as big as the photo can get. (Image: Gizmodo) The email arrived in my personal inbox, mysteriously and poorly titled: “Heidi ‘s christening.” I was not sure who Heidi was, but after noting it came from my mother’s rarely used email address, I assumed it was a relation I’d heard mentioned in weekly phone calls. I clicked and there was a single image about the size of a stamp wit
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
With launch of new night sky survey, UW researchers ready for era of 'big data' astronomy ::::: The first astronomers had a limited toolkit: their eyes. They could only observe those stars, planets and celestial events bright enough to pick up unassisted. But today's astronomers use increasingly sensitive and sophisticated instruments to view and track a bevy of cosmic wonders, including objects and events that were too dim or distant for their sky-gazing forebears. On Nov. 14, scientists w
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Businesses need better approach to compliance programs, IU research finds ::::: Recent reports of sexual harassment committed by powerful men also highlight the failures of corporate compliance programs designed to protect employees. This is because few companies understand how their employees reach unethical and illegal decisions or have compliance strategies aimed at curbing them.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Study: Process used to select lung transplant patients may need to be changed ::::: IMAGE: This is Robert M. Reed, MD, associate professor of medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine and pulmonary and critical care specialist at the University of Maryland Medical Center. view more Credit: University of Maryland School of Medicine Baltimore, Md., Nov. 14, 2017 - With a limited number of lungs available, deciding who gets a transplant can be a matter of life or deat
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Inducing first-time mums aged 35 and over earlier may reduce stillbirths and neonatal deaths ::::: The cohort study of nearly 80,000 UK women giving birth in the NHS in England, led by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine with the University of Cambridge, showed that inducing first-time mothers aged 35 or over 1-2 weeks earlier was linked to the risk of perinatal death - the stillbirth or death of a baby within seven days of birth - falling from 26 per 10,000 pregnancies to 8 per 1
1h
Live Science :::::
Genetically Modified Beetles Grow Working Third Eye ::::: When a gene that regulates head development was negated, some beetles grew a functional extra eye. Credit: Eduardo Zattara When scientists deactivated the gene responsible in part for developing and shaping the heads of scarab beetles, the insects hatched with an extra set of compound eyes in the middle of their heads, sometimes forming together into one big third eye. And now, the scientists h
1h
New Scientist - News :::::
How long should you let a pregnancy run before being induced? ::::: Safer to be born at 40 weeks Kohei Hara/Getty By Clare Wilson If your pregnancy runs past its due date, how long should you wait before being induced? Evidence is building that, at least for older women, it’s safer to get the baby out on time, at 40 weeks. This seems to be the case for first-time mums, according to a review of 80,000 women in England. Gordon Smith of the University of Cambrid
1h
New Scientist - News :::::
NHS reforms have failed to boost community-based care in England ::::: By Andy Coghlan Reorganising the National Health Service in England has failed to increase the amount of care taking place in the community. The health service changed radically in England in 2013, when two-thirds of the NHS budget was transferred to family doctors. The hope was that more people could be treated relatively cheaply locally, rather going for assessment or treatment at hospitals
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
'Black box' methods used by biologists probably overestimate number of new species ::::: New research demonstrates the misuse and abuse of methods scientists commonly use to place boundaries between different species.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
How emotions influence our internal clock ::::: Just how it works is not known, but human beings have an internal clock which enables us to perceive and estimate periods of time subconsciously. A research team has demonstrated that this mental time-processing system is able to adapt quickly and flexibly to predictive time patterns.
1h
New on MIT Technology Review :::::
Bitcoin Cash Had a Big Day, Hinting at a Deep Conflict in the Cryptocurrency Community ::::: Why This New Quantum Computing Startup Has a Real Shot at Beating Its Competition A startup called Quantum Circuits plans to compete with the likes of IBM, Google, Microsoft, and Intel to bring quantum computing out of the lab and into the wider world. There’s one good reason to think it might be able to beat them all. That’s because… Read more A startup called Quantum Circuits plans to compete
1h
The Atlantic :::::
How Will the Oscars Reflect This Moment in Hollywood? ::::: For all the hullaballoo about misplaced envelopes and mistaken winners , it’s sometimes hard to remember that the Best Picture Oscar went to Moonlight earlier this year. It was a shockingly relevant choice for an awards body that’s usually anything but: An artful exploration of identity and sexuality with a gay black protagonist, made by an indie studio for $4 million, defeated the expected victo
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue :::::
Better choices than optical angular momentum multiplexing for communications [Physical Sciences ::::: ] Better choices than optical angular momentum multiplexing for communications Using optical angular momentum (OAM) beams, Shi et al. ( 1 ) demonstrate multiple acoustic channels between arrays of sources and detection points. Even better channels with fewer resources are, however, possible. OAM is not an additional degree of freedom beyond normal spatial multiplexing; using only the OAM “topologic
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue :::::
Reply to Miller: Misunderstanding and mix-up of acoustic and optical communications [Physical Sciences ::::: ] Reply to Miller: Misunderstanding and mix-up of acoustic and optical communications Chengzhi Shi a , 1 and Xiang Zhang a , b , 1 a Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center, University of California, Berkeley , CA 94720; b Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory , Berkeley, CA 94720 In a Letter in PNAS, Miller ( 1 ) comments on our work on high-speed acoustic communicatio
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue :::::
Theory, simulations, and experiments show that proteins fold by multiple pathways [Biological Sciences ::::: ] Theory, simulations, and experiments show that proteins fold by multiple pathways William A. Eaton a , 1 and Peter G. Wolynes b , c , 1 a Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892; b Department of Chemistry, Rice University , Houston, TX 77005; c Center for Theoretical Biological Physics, Ric
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue :::::
Reply to Eaton and Wolynes: How do proteins fold? [Biological Sciences ::::: ] Reply to Eaton and Wolynes: How do proteins fold? S. Walter Englander a , 1 and Leland Mayne a a The Johnson Research Foundation, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania , Philadelphia, PA 19104 Eaton and Wolynes ( 1 ) take issue with our recent paper on protein folding ( 2 ) in which we compare the defined-pathway model ( 3 , 4 ) and the
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue :::::
Harmful algal blooms in the Eastern North Atlantic Ocean [Biological Sciences ::::: ] Harmful algal blooms in the Eastern North Atlantic Ocean Paul Dees a , 1 , Eileen Bresnan b , Andrew C. Dale a , Martin Edwards c , David Johns c , Beth Mouat d , Callum Whyte a , and Keith Davidson a a Scottish Association for Marine Science, Scottish Marine Institute , Oban PA37 1QA, United Kingdom; b Marine Scotland Science, Marine Laboratory , Aberdeen AB11 9DB, United Kingdom; c Sir Alister
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue :::::
Reply to Dees et al.: Ocean warming promotes species-specific increases in the cellular growth rates of harmful algal blooms [Biological Sciences ::::: ] Reply to Dees et al.: Ocean warming promotes species-specific increases in the cellular growth rates of harmful algal blooms Christopher J. Gobler a , 1 , Theresa K. Hattenrath-Lehmann a , Owen M. Doherty b , Andrew W. Griffith a , Yoonja Kang a , and R. Wayne Litaker c a School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook University , Southampton, NY 11968; b Eagle Rock Analytics , Sacramento
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue :::::
Continuum limit of the vibrational properties of amorphous solids [Applied Physical Sciences ::::: ] Continuum limit of the vibrational properties of amorphous solids Hideyuki Mizuno a , 1 , Hayato Shiba b , and Atsushi Ikeda a a Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo , Tokyo 153-8902, Japan; b Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University , Sendai 980-8577, Japan Edited by Andrea J. Liu, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, and approved September 25, 2017 (
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue :::::
Interplay of hemilability and redox activity in models of hydrogenase active sites [Chemistry ::::: ] Interplay of hemilability and redox activity in models of hydrogenase active sites Shengda Ding a , Pokhraj Ghosh a , Marcetta Y. Darensbourg a , and Michael B. Hall a , 1 a Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University , College Station, TX 77843 Edited by Brian M. Hoffman, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, and approved October 6, 2017 (received for review June 12, 2017) Significance Segmen
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue :::::
Combining disparate data sources for improved poverty prediction and mapping [Computer Sciences ::::: ] Combining disparate data sources for improved poverty prediction and mapping Neeti Pokhriyal a , 1 , 2 and Damien Christophe Jacques b , 1 a Computer Science and Engineering, State University of New York , Buffalo, NY 14221; b Earth and Life Institute–Environment, Université Catholique de Louvain , 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium Edited by Anthony J. Bebbington, Clark University, Worcester, MA, an
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue :::::
Enhanced antibacterial activity through the controlled alignment of graphene oxide nanosheets [Environmental Sciences ::::: ] Enhanced antibacterial activity through the controlled alignment of graphene oxide nanosheets Xinglin Lu a , 1 , Xunda Feng a , 1 , Jay R. Werber a , Chiheng Chu a , Ines Zucker a , Jae-Hong Kim a , Chinedum O. Osuji a , and Menachem Elimelech a , 2 a Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Yale University , New Haven, CT 06520-8286 Edited by Pedro J. J. Alvarez, Rice University, Ho
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue :::::
Reverse chemical ecology: Olfactory proteins from the giant panda and their interactions with putative pheromones and bamboo volatiles [Biochemistry ::::: ] Reverse chemical ecology: Olfactory proteins from the giant panda and their interactions with putative pheromones and bamboo volatiles Jiao Zhu a , 1 , Simona Arena b , 1 , Silvia Spinelli c , d , Dingzhen Liu e , Guiquan Zhang f , Rongping Wei f , Christian Cambillau c , d , Andrea Scaloni b , Guirong Wang a , 2 , and Paolo Pelosi a , 2 a State Key Laboratory for Biology of Plant Diseases and In
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue :::::
Molecular basis of the 14-3-3 protein-dependent activation of yeast neutral trehalase Nth1 [Biochemistry ::::: ] Molecular basis of the 14-3-3 protein-dependent activation of yeast neutral trehalase Nth1 Miroslava Alblova a , Aneta Smidova a , b , Vojtech Docekal c , Jan Vesely c , Petr Herman d , Veronika Obsilova a , 1 , and Tomas Obsil a , b , 1 a Department of Structural Biology of Signaling Proteins, Division Biotechnology and Biomedicine Center of the Academy of Sciences and Charles University in Vest
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue :::::
Role of the nucleotidyl cyclase helical domain in catalytically active dimer formation [Biochemistry ::::: ] Role of the nucleotidyl cyclase helical domain in catalytically active dimer formation Irene Vercellino a , Lenka Rezabkova a , Vincent Olieric b , Yevhen Polyhach c , Tobias Weinert a , Richard A. Kammerer a , Gunnar Jeschke c , and Volodymyr M. Korkhov a , d , 1 a Laboratory of Biomolecular Research, Division of Biology and Chemistry, Paul Scherrer Institute , 5232 Villigen, Switzerland; b Macr
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Protocadherin cis-dimer architecture and recognition unit diversity [Biochemistry ::::: ] Protocadherin cis -dimer architecture and recognition unit diversity Kerry M. Goodman a , b , 1 , Rotem Rubinstein c , 1 , Hanbin Dan c , Fabiana Bahna b , d , Seetha Mannepalli a , b , Göran Ahlsén b , c , d , Chan Aye Thu a , Rosemary V. Sampogna e , Tom Maniatis a , b , 2 , Barry Honig a , b , c , d , e , 2 , and Lawrence Shapiro a , b , 2 a Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics,
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Parsing the roles of neck-linker docking and tethered head diffusion in the stepping dynamics of kinesin [Biophysics and Computational Biology ::::: ] Parsing the roles of neck-linker docking and tethered head diffusion in the stepping dynamics of kinesin Zhechun Zhang a , Yonathan Goldtzvik a , b , and D. Thirumalai b , 1 a Biophysics Program, Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland , College Park, MD 20742; b Department of Chemistry, University of Texas at Austin , Austin, TX 78712 Edited by José N. Onuchic, Rice
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Probing the cooperativity of Thermoplasma acidophilum proteasome core particle gating by NMR spectroscopy [Biophysics and Computational Biology ::::: ] Probing the cooperativity of Thermoplasma acidophilum proteasome core particle gating by NMR spectroscopy Rui Huang a , b , c , Felipe Pérez a , b , c , and Lewis E. Kay a , b , c , d , 1 a Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto , Toronto, ON M5S 1A8, Canada; b Department of Biochemistry, University of Toronto , Toronto, ON M5S 1A8, Canada; c Department of Chemistry, University o
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Binding kinetics and substrate selectivity in HIV-1 protease-Gag interactions probed at atomic resolution by chemical exchange NMR [Biophysics and Computational Biology ::::: ] Binding kinetics and substrate selectivity in HIV-1 protease−Gag interactions probed at atomic resolution by chemical exchange NMR Lalit Deshmukh a , Vitali Tugarinov a , John M. Louis a , and G. Marius Clore a , 1 a Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health , Bethesda, MD 20892-0520 Contributed by G. Marius Clo
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Sequences flanking the transmembrane segments facilitate mitochondrial localization and membrane fusion by mitofusin [Cell Biology ::::: ] Sequences flanking the transmembrane segments facilitate mitochondrial localization and membrane fusion by mitofusin Xiaofang Huang a , b , Xin Zhou a , b , Xiaoyu Hu a , b , 1 , Amit S. Joshi c , Xiangyang Guo a , b , Yushan Zhu a , b , Quan Chen a , b , d , William A. Prinz c , and Junjie Hu a , b , e , f , 2 a Department of Genetics and Cell Biology, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University
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Intercellular mRNA trafficking via membrane nanotube-like extensions in mammalian cells [Cell Biology ::::: ] Intercellular mRNA trafficking via membrane nanotube-like extensions in mammalian cells Gal Haimovich a , b , Christopher M. Ecker c , Margaret C. Dunagin c , Elliott Eggan c , Arjun Raj c , Jeffrey E. Gerst a , 1 , and Robert H. Singer b , d , 1 a Department of Molecular Genetics, Weizmann Institute of Science , Rehovot 7610001, Israel; b Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Albert Eins
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Probing and manipulating intracellular membrane traffic by microinjection of artificial vesicles [Cell Biology ::::: ] Probing and manipulating intracellular membrane traffic by microinjection of artificial vesicles Seiichi Koike a and Reinhard Jahn a , 1 a Department of Neurobiology, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry , 37077 Göttingen, Germany Contributed by Reinhard Jahn, September 27, 2017 (sent for review August 1, 2017; reviewed by Pietro De Camilli, Tom A. Rapoport, and Jose Rizo-Rey) Significa
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Patterns of conserved gp120 epitope presentation on attached HIV-1 virions [Cell Biology ::::: ] Patterns of conserved gp120 epitope presentation on attached HIV-1 virions Meron Mengistu a , Ai-hui Tang b , James S. Foulke, Jr. a , Thomas A. Blanpied b , Mileidy W. Gonzalez c , John L. Spouge c , Robert C. Gallo a , 1 , George K. Lewis a , and Anthony L. DeVico a , 1 a Institute of Human Virology, University of Maryland School of Medicine , Baltimore, MD 21201; b Department of Physiology, Un
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A vimentin binding small molecule leads to mitotic disruption in mesenchymal cancers [Cell Biology ::::: ] A vimentin binding small molecule leads to mitotic disruption in mesenchymal cancers Michael J. Bollong a , Mika Pietilä b , Aaron D. Pearson a , Tapasree Roy Sarkar b , Insha Ahmad a , Rama Soundararajan b , Costas A. Lyssiotis a , 1 , Sendurai A. Mani b , 2 , Peter G. Schultz a , 2 , and Luke L. Lairson a , 2 a Department of Chemistry, The Scripps Research Institute , La Jolla, CA 92037; b Depa
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Relevance of iPSC-derived human PGC-like cells at the surface of embryoid bodies to prechemotaxis migrating PGCs [Developmental Biology ::::: ] Relevance of iPSC-derived human PGC-like cells at the surface of embryoid bodies to prechemotaxis migrating PGCs Shino Mitsunaga a , Junko Odajima a , Shiomi Yawata a , Keiko Shioda a , Chie Owa a , Kurt J. Isselbacher a , 1 , Jacob H. Hanna b , and Toshi Shioda a , 1 a Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Cancer Research and Harvard Medical School , Charlestown, MA 02129; b Department of Mo
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Contaminants of emerging concern affect Trichoplusia ni growth and development on artificial diets and a key host plant [Environmental Sciences ::::: ] Contaminants of emerging concern affect Trichoplusia ni growth and development on artificial diets and a key host plant Marcus J. Pennington a , b , Jason A. Rothman a , c , Stacia L. Dudley b , d , Michael B. Jones a , Quinn S. McFrederick a , c , Jay Gan b , d , and John T. Trumble a , b , 1 a Department of Entomology, University of California, Riverside , CA 92521; b Graduate Program in Enviro
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Seasonally fluctuating selection can maintain polymorphism at many loci via segregation lift [Evolution ::::: ] Seasonally fluctuating selection can maintain polymorphism at many loci via segregation lift Meike J. Wittmann a , b , c , 1 , Alan O. Bergland a , d , Marcus W. Feldman a , Paul S. Schmidt e , and Dmitri A. Petrov a , 1 a Department of Biology, Stanford University , Stanford, CA 94305; b Fakultät für Mathematik, Universität Wien , 1090 Wien, Austria; c Fakultät für Biologie, Universität Bielefel
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The immunopeptidomic landscape of ovarian carcinomas [Immunology and Inflammation ::::: ]Immunotherapies, particularly checkpoint inhibitors, have set off a revolution in cancer therapy by releasing the power of the immune system. However, only little is known about the antigens that are essentially presented on cancer cells, capable of exposing them to immune cells. Large-scale HLA ligandome analysis has enabled us to...
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Visual experience sculpts whole-cortex spontaneous infraslow activity patterns through an Arc-dependent mechanism [Neuroscience ::::: ] Visual experience sculpts whole-cortex spontaneous infraslow activity patterns through an Arc-dependent mechanism Andrew W. Kraft a , Anish Mitra b , Adam Q. Bauer b , Abraham Z. Snyder a , b , Marcus E. Raichle a , b , Joseph P. Culver b , c , d , and Jin-Moo Lee a , b , c , 1 a Department of Neurology, Washington University in St. Louis , St. Louis, MO 63130; b Department of Radiology, Washingt
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Electrical synapses mediate synergism between pheromone and food odors in Drosophila melanogaster [Neuroscience ::::: ] Electrical synapses mediate synergism between pheromone and food odors in Drosophila melanogaster Sudeshna Das a , 1 , Federica Trona a , 1 , Mohammed A. Khallaf a , Elisa Schuh a , Markus Knaden a , Bill S. Hansson a , and Silke Sachse a , 2 a Department of Evolutionary Neuroethology, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology , 07745 Jena, Germany Edited by John G. Hildebrand, University of Ariz
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Silent memory engrams as the basis for retrograde amnesia [Neuroscience ::::: ] Silent memory engrams as the basis for retrograde amnesia Dheeraj S. Roy a , 1 , Shruti Muralidhar a , Lillian M. Smith a , and Susumu Tonegawa a , b , c , 2 a RIKEN-Massachusetts Institute of Technology Center for Neural Circuit Genetics at the Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, Department of Biology and Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology ,
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Active site voltage clamp fluorometry of the sodium glucose cotransporter hSGLT1 [Physiology ::::: ] Active site voltage clamp fluorometry of the sodium glucose cotransporter hSGLT1 Edurne Gorraitz a , Bruce A. Hirayama a , Aviv Paz a , Ernest M. Wright a , 1 , and Donald D. F. Loo a , 1 a Department of Physiology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles , CA 90095-1751 Contributed by Ernest M. Wright, September 25, 2017 (sent for review August 7, 2017; reviewed by
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Transcriptomes of major renal collecting duct cell types in mouse identified by single-cell RNA-seq [Physiology ::::: ] Transcriptomes of major renal collecting duct cell types in mouse identified by single-cell RNA-seq Lihe Chen a , Jae Wook Lee b , Chung-Lin Chou a , Anil V. Nair c , Maria A. Battistone c , Teodor G. Păunescu c , Maria Merkulova c , Sylvie Breton c , Jill W. Verlander d , Susan M. Wall e , f , Dennis Brown c , Maurice B. Burg a , 1 , and Mark A. Knepper a , 1 a Systems Biology Center, National H
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Genome diversity of tuber-bearing Solanum uncovers complex evolutionary history and targets of domestication in the cultivated potato [Plant Biology ::::: ] Genome diversity of tuber-bearing Solanum uncovers complex evolutionary history and targets of domestication in the cultivated potato Michael A. Hardigan a , F. Parker E. Laimbeer b , Linsey Newton a , Emily Crisovan a , John P. Hamilton a , Brieanne Vaillancourt a , Krystle Wiegert-Rininger a , Joshua C. Wood a , David S. Douches c , Eva M. Farré a , Richard E. Veilleux b , and C. Robin Buell a
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MPSR1 is a cytoplasmic PQC E3 ligase for eliminating emergent misfolded proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana [Plant Biology ::::: ] MPSR1 is a cytoplasmic PQC E3 ligase for eliminating emergent misfolded proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana Jong Hum Kim a , 1 , Seok Keun Cho a , 1 , Tae Rin Oh a , Moon Young Ryu a , Seong Wook Yang a , b , 2 , and Woo Taek Kim a , 2 a Department of Systems Biology, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University , Seoul 03722, Republic of Korea; b Section of Plant Biochemistry, Depar
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Global analysis of ribosome-associated noncoding RNAs unveils new modes of translational regulation [Plant Biology ::::: ] Global analysis of ribosome-associated noncoding RNAs unveils new modes of translational regulation Jérémie Bazin a , b , c , Katja Baerenfaller d , Sager J. Gosai e , Brian D. Gregory e , Martin Crespi c , and Julia Bailey-Serres a , b , 1 a Center for Plant Cell Biology, University of California, Riverside , CA 92521; b Department of Botany and Plant Sciences, University of California, Riversid
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High-throughput characterization of protein-protein interactions by reprogramming yeast mating [Applied Biological Sciences ::::: ] High-throughput characterization of protein–protein interactions by reprogramming yeast mating David Younger a , b , Stephanie Berger a , b , David Baker b , c , d , 1 , and Eric Klavins e , 1 a Bioengineering Department, University of Washington , Seattle, WA 98105; b Institute for Protein Design, University of Washington , Seattle, WA 98195; c Biochemistry Department, University of Washington ,
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White blood cell population dynamics for risk stratification of acute coronary syndrome [Applied Mathematics ::::: ] White blood cell population dynamics for risk stratification of acute coronary syndrome Anwesha Chaudhury a , b , c , Lorette Noiret a , b , c , and John M. Higgins a , b , c , 1 a Center for Systems Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital , Boston, MA 02114; b Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital , Boston, MA 02114; c Department of Systems Biology, Harvard Medical School , Bos
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Mechanism of RNA polymerase II stalling by DNA alkylation [Biochemistry ::::: ] Mechanism of RNA polymerase II stalling by DNA alkylation Stefano Malvezzi a , 1 , Lucas Farnung b , 1 , Claudia M. N. Aloisi a , Todor Angelov a , Patrick Cramer b , 2 , and Shana J. Sturla a , 2 a Department of Health Sciences and Technology, ETH Zurich , 8092 Zurich, Switzerland; b Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry , 37077 Göttingen, Germany Edited by Graham C. Walker, Massachuset
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Large domain movements upon UvrD dimerization and helicase activation [Biochemistry ::::: ] Large domain movements upon UvrD dimerization and helicase activation Binh Nguyen a , Yerdos Ordabayev a , Joshua E. Sokoloski a , Elizabeth Weiland a , and Timothy M. Lohman a , 1 a Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Washington University School of Medicine , St. Louis, MO 63110 Edited by Smita S. Patel, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ, and accepted b
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Inhibition of curli assembly and Escherichia coli biofilm formation by the human systemic amyloid precursor transthyretin [Biochemistry ::::: ] Inhibition of curli assembly and Escherichia coli biofilm formation by the human systemic amyloid precursor transthyretin Neha Jain a , Jörgen Ådén b , Kanna Nagamatsu a , Margery L. Evans a , Xinyi Li c , Brennan McMichael a , Magdalena I. Ivanova d , e , Fredrik Almqvist b , Joel N. Buxbaum c , 1 , and Matthew R. Chapman a , 1 a Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, Univ
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DsbA-L prevents obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance by suppressing the mtDNA release-activated cGAS-cGAMP-STING pathway [Cell Biology ::::: ] DsbA-L prevents obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance by suppressing the mtDNA release-activated cGAS-cGAMP-STING pathway Juli Bai a , b , Christopher Cervantes b , Juan Liu b , Sijia He b , Haiyan Zhou a , Bilin Zhang b , Huan Cai b , Dongqing Yin b , Derong Hu b , Zhi Li a , b , Hongzhi Chen a , Xiaoli Gao c , Fang Wang d , Jason C. O’Connor b , e , Yong Xu f , g , Meilian Liu a ,
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Early T cell receptor signals globally modulate ligand:receptor affinities during antigen discrimination [Chemistry ::::: ] Early T cell receptor signals globally modulate ligand:receptor affinities during antigen discrimination Rafal M. Pielak a , 1 , 2 , Geoff P. O’Donoghue a , 1 , 3 , Jenny J. Lin a , 1 , Katherine N. Alfieri a , 4 , Nicole C. Fay a , b , 5 , Shalini T. Low-Nam a , and Jay T. Groves a , 6 a Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley , CA 94720; b Department of Molecular and Cellula
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Climate-driven changes in functional biogeography of Arctic marine fish communities [Ecology ::::: ] Climate-driven changes in functional biogeography of Arctic marine fish communities André Frainer a , 1 , Raul Primicerio a , Susanne Kortsch a , Magnus Aune b , Andrey V. Dolgov c , Maria Fossheim d , and Michaela M. Aschan a a Norwegian College of Fishery Science, UiT The Arctic University of Norway , 9037 Tromsø, Norway; b Akvaplan-Niva, Framsenteret , 9296 Tromsø, Norway; c Knipovich Polar Re
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Pathogen-mediated selection in free-ranging elk populations infected by chronic wasting disease [Ecology ::::: ] Pathogen-mediated selection in free-ranging elk populations infected by chronic wasting disease Ryan J. Monello a , 1 , Nathan L. Galloway a , Jenny G. Powers a , Sally A. Madsen-Bouterse b , William H. Edwards c , Mary E. Wood c , Katherine I. O’Rourke d , and Margaret A. Wild a a Biological Resources Division, National Park Service , Fort Collins, CO 80525; b Department of Veterinary Microbiolo
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Handgun waiting periods reduce gun deaths [Economic Sciences ::::: ] Handgun waiting periods reduce gun deaths Michael Luca a , 1 , Deepak Malhotra a , and Christopher Poliquin a a Harvard Business School , Boston, MA 02163 Edited by Philip J. Cook, Duke University, Durham, NC, and accepted by Editorial Board Member Kenneth W. Wachter September 21, 2017 (received for review December 3, 2016) Significance Waiting period laws that delay the purchase of firearms by a
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Impact of population growth and population ethics on climate change mitigation policy [Economic Sciences ::::: ] Impact of population growth and population ethics on climate change mitigation policy Noah Scovronick a , 1 , 2 , Mark B. Budolfson b , 1 , Francis Dennig c , Marc Fleurbaey a , d , Asher Siebert e , Robert H. Socolow f , Dean Spears g , h , 1 , and Fabian Wagner a , i , j a Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University , Princeton, NJ 08544; b Department of Philosophy, University of Vermont , Burl
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Estimating mobility using sparse data: Application to human genetic variation [Evolution ::::: ] Estimating mobility using sparse data: Application to human genetic variation Liisa Loog a , b , c , d , 1 , Marta Mirazón Lahr e , Mirna Kovacevic a , f , Andrea Manica c , Anders Eriksson g , and Mark G. Thomas a , 1 a Research Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment, University College London , London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom; b Research Laboratory for Archaeology & the History of Ar
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Testing the neutral hypothesis of phenotypic evolution [Evolution ::::: ] Testing the neutral hypothesis of phenotypic evolution Wei-Chin Ho a , Yoshikazu Ohya b , and Jianzhi Zhang a , 1 a Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan , Ann Arbor, MI 48109; b Department of Integrated Biosciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo , Kashiwa, Chiba Prefecture 277-8562, Japan Edited by Wen-Hsiung Li, Academia Sinica, Taipe
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DNA-RNA interactions are critical for chromosome condensation in Escherichia coli [Genetics ::::: ] DNA–RNA interactions are critical for chromosome condensation in Escherichia coli Zhong Qian a , 1 , Victor B. Zhurkin b , and Sankar Adhya a , 1 a Laboratory of Molecular Biology, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health , Bethesda, MD 20892; b Laboratory of Cell Biology, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health , Bethesda, MD 20892 Contributed by Sankar Adhya, Se
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Genomic features shaping the landscape of meiotic double-strand-break hotspots in maize [Genetics ::::: ] Genomic features shaping the landscape of meiotic double-strand-break hotspots in maize Yan He a , b , 1 , Minghui Wang a , c , 1 , Stefanie Dukowic-Schulze d , 1 , Adele Zhou a , Choon-Lin Tiang a , Shay Shilo e , Gaganpreet K. Sidhu a , 2 , Steven Eichten f , Peter Bradbury g , Nathan M. Springer f , Edward S. Buckler a , g , Avraham A. Levy e , Qi Sun c , Jaroslaw Pillardy c , Penny M. A. Kian
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Dynamics of cell transformation in culture and its significance for tumor development in animals [Medical Sciences ::::: ] Dynamics of cell transformation in culture and its significance for tumor development in animals Harry Rubin a , 1 a Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley , CA 94720-3200 Contributed by Harry Rubin, September 20, 2017 (sent for review July 10, 2016; reviewed by Allen Mayer and Wallace L. McKeehan) Significance Growth of NIH 3T3 cells in an optimized medium p
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Requirement of zinc transporter ZIP10 for epidermal development: Implication of the ZIP10-p63 axis in epithelial homeostasis [Medical Sciences ::::: ]Skin tissues, in particular the epidermis, are severely affected by zinc deficiency. However, the zinc-mediated mechanisms that maintain the cells that form the epidermis have not been established. Here, we report that the zinc transporter ZIP10 is highly expressed in the outer root sheath of hair follicles and plays critical...
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PRC2-mediated repression of SMARCA2 predicts EZH2 inhibitor activity in SWI/SNF mutant tumors [Medical Sciences ::::: ] PRC2-mediated repression of SMARCA2 predicts EZH2 inhibitor activity in SWI/SNF mutant tumors Thomas Januario a , 1 , Xiaofen Ye a , 1 , Russell Bainer b , Bruno Alicke c , Tunde Smith a , Benjamin Haley d , Zora Modrusan d , Stephen Gould c , and Robert L. Yauch a , 2 a Department of Discovery Oncology, Genentech, Inc. , South San Francisco, CA 94080; b Department of Bioinformatics, Genentech, I
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Rewriting nature’s assembly manual for a ssRNA virus [Microbiology ::::: ] Rewriting nature’s assembly manual for a ssRNA virus Nikesh Patel a , Emma Wroblewski a , German Leonov b , c , d , Simon E. V. Phillips e , f , Roman Tuma a , Reidun Twarock b , c , d , and Peter G. Stockley a , 1 a Astbury Centre for Structural Molecular Biology, University of Leeds , Leeds LS2 9JT, United Kingdom; b York Centre for Complex Systems Analysis, University of York , Heslington, Yor
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O2 availability impacts iron homeostasis in Escherichia coli [Microbiology ::::: ] O 2 availability impacts iron homeostasis in Escherichia coli Nicole A. Beauchene a , Erin L. Mettert a , Laura J. Moore b , Sündüz Keleş c , d , Emily R. Willey a , and Patricia J. Kiley a , 1 a Department of Biomolecular Chemistry, University of Wisconsin–Madison , Madison, WI 53706; b Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Monmouth College , Monmouth, IL 61462; c Department of Statistics, U
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Phytopathogenic fungus hosts a plant virus: A naturally occurring cross-kingdom viral infection [Microbiology ::::: ] Phytopathogenic fungus hosts a plant virus: A naturally occurring cross-kingdom viral infection Ida Bagus Andika a , b , Shuang Wei a , Chunmei Cao c , Lakha Salaipeth a , d , Hideki Kondo b , and Liying Sun a , 1 a State Key Laboratory of Crop Stress Biology for Arid Areas and College of Plant Protection, Northwest A&F University , Yangling, 712100, China; b Institute of Plant Science and Resour
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Replication of early and recent Zika virus isolates throughout mouse brain development [Microbiology ::::: ] Replication of early and recent Zika virus isolates throughout mouse brain development Amy B. Rosenfeld a , 1 , 2 , David J. Doobin b , 1 , Audrey L. Warren a , Vincent R. Racaniello a , and Richard B. Vallee b a Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons , New York, NY 10032; b Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Columbia University Co
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Facephenes and rainbows: Causal evidence for functional and anatomical specificity of face and color processing in the human brain [Neuroscience ::::: ] Facephenes and rainbows: Causal evidence for functional and anatomical specificity of face and color processing in the human brain Gerwin Schalk a , Christoph Kapeller b , c , Christoph Guger b , Hiroshi Ogawa d , Satoru Hiroshima d , Rosa Lafer-Sousa e , f , Zeynep M. Saygin e , f , 1 , Kyousuke Kamada d , and Nancy Kanwisher e , f , 2 a National Center for Adaptive Neurotechnologies, New York S
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The human visual cortex response to melanopsin-directed stimulation is accompanied by a distinct perceptual experience [Neuroscience ::::: ] The human visual cortex response to melanopsin-directed stimulation is accompanied by a distinct perceptual experience Manuel Spitschan a , Andrew S. Bock b , Jack Ryan b , Giulia Frazzetta b , David H. Brainard a , and Geoffrey K. Aguirre b , 1 a Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania , Philadelphia, PA 19104; b Department of Neurology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pe
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Human hippocampal theta power indicates movement onset and distance travelled [Neuroscience ::::: ] Human hippocampal theta power indicates movement onset and distance travelled Daniel Bush a , b , 1 , 2 , James A. Bisby a , b , 1 , Chris M. Bird c , 1 , Stephanie Gollwitzer b , d , Roman Rodionov b , Beate Diehl b , e , Andrew W. McEvoy b , Matthew C. Walker b , and Neil Burgess a , b , 2 a Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London , London WC1N 3AZ, United Kingdom; b Inst
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Cooperative cortical network for categorical processing of Chinese lexical tone [Neuroscience ::::: ] Cooperative cortical network for categorical processing of Chinese lexical tone Xiaopeng Si a , Wenjing Zhou b , and Bo Hong a , c , 1 a Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University , Beijing 100084, China; b Epilepsy Center, Yuquan Hospital, Tsinghua University , Beijing 100084, China; c McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Tsinghua University , Beijing 100084,
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Endosomal signaling of the receptor for calcitonin gene-related peptide mediates pain transmission [Pharmacology ::::: ] Endosomal signaling of the receptor for calcitonin gene-related peptide mediates pain transmission Rebecca E. Yarwood a , b , 1 , Wendy L. Imlach c , d , 1 , TinaMarie Lieu a , b , Nicholas A. Veldhuis a , b , Dane D. Jensen a , b , Carmen Klein Herenbrink a , b , Luigi Aurelio a , b , Zhijian Cai c , d , MacDonald J. Christie e , Daniel P. Poole a , b , f , Christopher J. H. Porter a , b , Peter
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NOX4-dependent neuronal autotoxicity and BBB breakdown explain the superior sensitivity of the brain to ischemic damage [Pharmacology ::::: ] NOX4-dependent neuronal autotoxicity and BBB breakdown explain the superior sensitivity of the brain to ischemic damage Ana I. Casas a , 1 , Eva Geuss b , 1 , Pamela W. M. Kleikers a , Stine Mencl c , Alexander M. Herrmann d , Izaskun Buendia e , Javier Egea f , Sven G. Meuth d , Manuela G. Lopez e , Christoph Kleinschnitz b , c , 2 , 3 , and Harald H. H. W. Schmidt a , 2 , 3 a Department of Phar
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Catalysis of heat-to-work conversion in quantum machines [Physics ::::: ] Catalysis of heat-to-work conversion in quantum machines A. Ghosh a , b , 1 , C. L. Latune c , 1 , L. Davidovich d , 2 , and G. Kurizki b a Department of Physics, Shanghai University , Baoshan District, Shanghai 200444, People’s Republic of China; b Department of Chemical Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science , 76100 Rehovot, Israel; c School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal
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COP1 mediates dark-specific degradation of microtubule-associated protein WDL3 in regulating Arabidopsis hypocotyl elongation [Plant Biology ::::: ] COP1 mediates dark-specific degradation of microtubule-associated protein WDL3 in regulating Arabidopsis hypocotyl elongation Na Lian a , 1 , Xiaomin Liu a , 1 , Xiaohong Wang a , 1 , Yangyang Zhou a , Hong Li a , Jigang Li a , 2 , and Tonglin Mao a , 2 a State Key Laboratory of Plant Physiology and Biochemistry, Department of Plant Sciences, College of Biological Sciences, China Agricultural Uni
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Two rice receptor-like kinases maintain male fertility under changing temperatures [Plant Biology ::::: ] Two rice receptor-like kinases maintain male fertility under changing temperatures Junping Yu a , Jiaojiao Han a , Yu-Jin Kim a , Ming Song a , Zhen Yang a , Yi He a , Ruifeng Fu a , Zhijing Luo a , Jianping Hu b , c , Wanqi Liang a , and Dabing Zhang a , d , e , 1 a Joint International Research Laboratory of Metabolic and Developmental Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Hybrid Rice, School of Lif
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue :::::
Using neurostimulation to understand the impact of pre-morbid individual differences on post-lesion outcomes [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences ::::: ] Using neurostimulation to understand the impact of pre-morbid individual differences on post-lesion outcomes Anna M. Woollams a , 1 , Gaston Madrid a , and Matthew A. Lambon Ralph a a Neuroscience and Aphasia Research Unit, Division of Neuroscience and Experimental Psychology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Manchester , Manchester, M13 9PL, England Edited by Robert D. Rafal, Univers
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue :::::
Supply and demand drive a critical transition to dysfunctional fisheries [Sustainability Science ::::: ] Supply and demand drive a critical transition to dysfunctional fisheries John M. Fryxell a , 1 , Ray Hilborn b , Carling Bieg a , Katrine Turgeon a , c , Amanda Caskenette a , d , and Kevin S. McCann a a Department of Integrative Biology, University of Guelph , Guelph, ON, Canada, N1G 2W1; b School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences, University of Washington , Seattle, WA 98195-5020; c Department
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue :::::
In This Issue [This Week in PNAS ::::: ] In This Issue Amnesic mice retain silent memory engrams Hippocampal dentate gyrus engram cells (red) store fear memories. Memory engrams refer to long-lasting, learning-induced physical or chemical changes that occur in brain networks. Researchers have shown that the reactivation of these engram cells, which are located in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, triggers the recollection of specifi
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue :::::
Reverse chemical ecology at the service of conservation biology [Biochemistry ::::: ] Reverse chemical ecology at the service of conservation biology Walter S. Leal a , 1 a Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of California, Davis , CA 95616 Chemical ecology is the study of the chemical languages, cues, and mechanisms controlling interactions among living beings, including communication among individuals of the same species and between organisms and their envir
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue :::::
Reducing gun violence in America [Economic Sciences ::::: ] Reducing gun violence in America Jens Ludwig a , b , 1 a Harris School of Public Policy, University of Chicago , Chicago, IL 60637; b National Bureau of Economic Research , Cambridge, MA 02138 The rate of gun violence in the United States substantially exceeds that of most other developed nations ( 1 ). Within the United States, gun deaths—particularly homicides—contribute to disparities in life
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue :::::
Climate warming drives large-scale changes in ecosystem function [Ecology ::::: ] Climate warming drives large-scale changes in ecosystem function Leif Christian Stige a , 1 and Kristina Øie Kvile b a Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis, Department of Biosciences, University of Oslo , N-0316 Oslo, Norway; b Department of Biology, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution , Woods Hole, MA 02543 The Barents Sea is the continental shelf sea to the north of Scandinavia and
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue :::::
How population growth relates to climate change [Sustainability Science ::::: ] How population growth relates to climate change Wolfgang Lutz a , 1 a Wittgenstein Centre for Demography and Global Human Capital (International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Vienna Institute of Demography/Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna University of Economics and Business Administration), International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis , Laxenburg, Lower Austria 2361, Austri
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue :::::
Sensing fluctuating airflow with spider silk [Applied Physical Sciences ::::: ] Sensing fluctuating airflow with spider silk Jian Zhou a , 1 and Ronald N. Miles a , 1 , 2 a Department of Mechanical Engineering, Binghamton University , Binghamton, NY 13902 Edited by John G. Hildebrand, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, and approved September 18, 2017 (received for review June 15, 2017) Significance We find nanodimensional spider silk captures airflow with maximum physical ef
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue :::::
De novo prediction of human chromosome structures: Epigenetic marking patterns encode genome architecture [Biophysics and Computational Biology ::::: ] De novo prediction of human chromosome structures: Epigenetic marking patterns encode genome architecture Michele Di Pierro a , 1 , 2 , Ryan R. Cheng a , 1 , Erez Lieberman Aiden a , b , Peter G. Wolynes a , c , d , and José N. Onuchic a , d , 2 a Center for Theoretical Biological Physics, Rice University , Houston, TX 77005; b Center for Genome Architecture, Baylor College of Medicine , Houston,
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue :::::
Assembly of silver Trigons into a buckyball-like Ag180 nanocage [Chemistry ::::: ] Assembly of silver Trigons into a buckyball-like Ag 180 nanocage Zhi Wang a , 1 , Hai-Feng Su b , 1 , Yuan-Zhi Tan b , Stan Schein c , d , 2 , Shui-Chao Lin b , Wei Liu e , Shu-Ao Wang e , Wen-Guang Wang a , Chen-Ho Tung a , Di Sun a , 2 , and Lan-Sun Zheng b a Key Lab of Colloid and Interface Chemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University , Ji
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue :::::
Strong texturing of lithium metal in batteries [Chemistry ::::: ] Strong texturing of lithium metal in batteries Feifei Shi a , Allen Pei a , Arturas Vailionis b , Jin Xie a , Bofei Liu a , Jie Zhao a , Yongji Gong a , and Yi Cui a , c , 1 a Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University , Stanford, CA 94305; b Stanford Nano Shared Facilities, Stanford University , Stanford, CA 94305; c Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences,
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue :::::
Inner Workings: Special relationship between fungi and plants may have spurred changes to ancient climate [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences ::::: ] Inner Workings: Special relationship between fungi and plants may have spurred changes to ancient climate Look at a plant, and you’re probably also looking at a fungus. More than 80% of land plants partner with fungi to help those plants extract nutrients—nitrogen and phosphorus—from the ground ( 1 , 2 ). The plants return the favor with carbon from their photosynthesis. Biologists suspect that t
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue :::::
Giant boulders and Last Interglacial storm intensity in the North Atlantic [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences ::::: ] Giant boulders and Last Interglacial storm intensity in the North Atlantic Alessio Rovere a , b , c , 1 , Elisa Casella b , Daniel L. Harris a , b , d , Thomas Lorscheid a , b , Napayalage A. K. Nandasena e , Blake Dyer c , Michael R. Sandstrom c , Paolo Stocchi f , g , William J. D’Andrea c , and Maureen E. Raymo c , 1 a Center for Marine Environmental Sciences (MARUM), University of Bremen , D-
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue :::::
Direct observation of impact propagation and absorption in dense colloidal monolayers [Engineering ::::: ] Direct observation of impact propagation and absorption in dense colloidal monolayers Ivo Buttinoni a , 1 , 2 , Jinwoong Cha b , c , 2 , Wei-Hsun Lin b , 2 , Stéphane Job d , 2 , Chiara Daraio c , 3 , and Lucio Isa a , 3 a Laboratory for Interfaces, Soft Matter and Assembly, Department of Materials, ETH Zurich , 8093 Zurich, Switzerland; b Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, ETH Zur
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue :::::
Core Concept: Tissue resident memory cells emerging as key player in health and disease [Immunology and Inflammation ::::: ] Core Concept: Tissue resident memory cells emerging as key player in health and disease Much of our understanding of the immune system has come from studying immune cells drawn from blood. Such samples are minimally invasive and relatively easy to collect, but they provide an incomplete and often misleading picture. Put simply, the biology of the immune system in blood doesn’t match the biology i
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue :::::
STAT5-mediated chromatin interactions in superenhancers activate IL-2 highly inducible genes: Functional dissection of the Il2ra gene locus [Immunology and Inflammation ::::: ] STAT5-mediated chromatin interactions in superenhancers activate IL-2 highly inducible genes: Functional dissection of the Il2ra gene locus Peng Li a , 1 , 2 , Suman Mitra a , 1 , 3 , Rosanne Spolski a , 1 , Jangsuk Oh a , 1 , Wei Liao a , Zhonghui Tang b , c , Fei Mo a , Xingwang Li b , c , Erin E. West a , Daniel Gromer a , d , 4 , Jian-Xin Lin a , Chengyu Liu e , Yijun Ruan b , c , and Warren
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Punctuation in text messages helps replace cues found in face-to-face conversations ::::: Emoticons, irregular spellings and exclamation points in text messages aren't sloppy or a sign that written language is going down the tubes -- these 'textisms' help convey meaning and intent in the absence of spoken conversation, according to newly published research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Making mosquitoes self-destruct ::::: Researchers at the University of California, Riverside have developed transgenic mosquitoes that stably express the Cas9 enzyme in their germline. The addition of Cas9 will enable the use of the CRISPR gene editing tool to make efficient, targeted changes to the mosquitoes' DNA.As proof of concept, the researchers used the system to disrupt cuticle, wing, and eye development, producing completely
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Ibuprofen may block damage from fetal-alcohol exposure ::::: An anti-inflammatory drug may have the potential to stall the damaging effects of alcohol on the fetal brain, a new study suggests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Allergy amplifier implicated in asthma also intensifies food allergy ::::: Almost 8 percent of children under three years old and four percent of adults suffer food allergies, which trigger not only discomfiting symptoms like dermatitis and diarrhea but can cause deadly anaphylactic shock. Allergic responses emerge when food components, like egg, shellfish, or peanut proteins, stimulate white blood cells called mast cells to dump excessive quantities of histamine or cyto
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Heart failure reversed in Marfan mice ::::: In experiments with mice that have a rodent form of Marfan syndrome, researchers report that even modestly increasing stress on the animals' hearts -- at levels well-tolerated in normal mice -- can initiate heart failure. The findings revealed a novel cellular pathway in heart tissue that leads to heart failure and may serve as a model for a new standard of treatment for children with this aggress
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Gizmodo :::::
Arianna Huffington Ignored Sexual Misconduct at The Huffington Post ::::: Photo: Getty When Susan Fowler rocked Uber’s world with a meticulous account of the company’s sexual harassment and gender discrimination issues, the ride-sharing service turned to its only female board member to help clean up its culture (and its image). Arianna Huffington was perfectly poised to position herself as the feminist savior who would advocate for Uber’s women—she oversaw the subseque
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Gizmodo :::::
Oh Hell Yeah, Amazon's Running a BOGO 50% Off Sale on Nerf Guns ::::: BOGO 50% off Nerf Guns and Accessories For a limited time, Amazon’s offering BOGO 50% off 80 different Nerf guns and accessories , as long as they’re both shipped and sold by Amazon.com directly. So what are you still doing here?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Additive manufacturing and sustainability: The environmental implications of 3-D printing ::::: For many in the general public and the engineering community alike, the potential implications of additive manufacturing (AM) have excited the imagination. Popularly known as 3D printing, the emerging class of technologies has been heralded as both a revolution in production and an opportunity for dramatic environmental advance Yet while the technological capabilities of additive manufacturing pr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Disease-resistant apples perform better than old favorites ::::: IMAGE: New disease-resistant apples appear to perform better than some old favorites. view more Credit: David Riecks, University of Illinois URBANA, Ill. - You may not find them in the produce aisle yet, but it's only a matter of time before new disease-resistant apple cultivars overtake favorites like Honeycrisp in popularity, according to a University of Illinois apple expert. "I know eve
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Australian workers who smoke hit national pocketbook ::::: ANAHEIM, California, Nov. 14, 2017 -- Smoking among the working population is predicted to cost Australia an estimated $340 billion in lost productivity, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians. The health costs of smoking are
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Heart failure in methamphetamine users: Could this be the next epidemic among vets? ::::: ANAHEIM, California, Nov. 14, 2017 -- Heart failure associated with methamphetamine (meth) use has risen dramatically in recent years among U.S. veterans, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians. Meth abuse is a serious problem
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New on MIT Technology Review :::::
Why This New Quantum Computing Startup Has a Real Shot at Beating Its Competition ::::: Why This New Quantum Computing Startup Has a Real Shot at Beating Its Competition A startup called Quantum Circuits plans to compete with the likes of IBM, Google, Microsoft, and Intel to bring quantum computing out of the lab and into the wider world. There’s one good reason to think it might be able to beat them all. That’s because… Read more A startup called Quantum Circuits plans to compete
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The Atlantic :::::
The Most Dangerous Form of American Extremism Yet ::::: While it may be tempting to dismiss members of the alt-right as disturbed or fringe, The Atlantic writer Luke O’Brien cautions that the group may be the most dangerous form of American extremism yet. That’s because the alt-right has capitalized on the anonymity of the internet to recruit members and proliferate its ideology. O’Brien argues that unless America wakes up to this insidious threat, th
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Big Think :::::
It’s Fructan, Not Gluten, That’s Causing Stomach Problems, Says New Research ::::: The gluten protein may not be the real reason for why many people experience bloating after eating wheat-containing food. Instead, a new study proposes fructan as the potential culprit for the sensitivity some are exhibiting. As much as 13% of the population have bloating after eating gluten-containing foods and seek out alternatives. But perhaps, they should be looking for fructan-free produ
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Brain structure, cognitive function in treated HIV-positive individuals ::::: Adults with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and good viral suppression on combination antiretroviral therapy had poorer cognition and reduced brain thickness and volume on magnetic resonance imaging than adults without HIV, but changes over time in cognitive performance and brain structure were similar between the two groups over two years.
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Gizmodo :::::
This Three-Wheeled Log Cabin Of A Car Was Supposed To Be Everywhere ::::: The Martin Stationette was pitched as the American economy car of the future. It was supposed to make our lives better, our roads clearer, but only one prototype was ever built. That’s probably for the best. On this week’s episode of Jason Drives (I am writing the post for it because Jason is off doing stupid shit in Mexico ) we found out that there’s a lot wrong with the Stationette—and that’s l
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Popular Science :::::
Here’s how scientists are tricking you into eating your veggies ::::: There are people in this world who genuinely love vegetables . Some snack on frozen broccoli straight from the bag. Others crave carrots, adore asparagus, and even finish their kale without being bribed, begged, or threatened. Then there are the rest of us. Sure, a vegetable-rich diet lowers your risk for high blood pressure, heart disease, certain cancers, and more. But why do they have to taste
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Ars Technica :::::
Apple plans to add a 3D sensor to the back of the iPhone, too ::::: Samuel Axon reader comments 0 The iPhone X's front-facing TrueDepth sensor array could be used for more than just Face ID authentication , and it fits neatly into Apple's broader march into augmented reality on the iPhone, but the iPhone X's rear camera still uses a combination of motion sensors and two rear cameras for AR. That could change in next year's iPhone; sources cited by Bloomberg claim
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Live Science :::::
Disney Legionnaires' Outbreak: Why Cooling Towers Spread the Disease ::::: A scanning electron micrograph (SEM) image of Legionella bacteria. Credit: Janice Haney Carr. Provided by CDC, Margaret Williams, Claressa Lucas and Tatiana Travis. The happiest place on Earth has been plagued with a most unhappy situation: A handful of visitors to the park have come down with a deadly respiratory infection called Legionnaires' disease. It turns out that the source may be t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Technological advances in brain stimulation expand uses for research and treatment ::::: WASHINGTON, DC -- Advances in brain stimulation are transforming how neuroscientists study the brain and guiding novel approaches to the treatment of disease. New strategies revealed today offer safer, targeted means by which to study brain function, improve memory, and treat neurological and psychiatric disorders. The findings were presented at Neuroscience 2017, the annual meeting of the Societ
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Gizmodo :::::
How Black Market Criminals Are Duping Apple Users Into Surrendering Their iPhones ::::: Photo: Getty A security report out Tuesdays sheds new light on the lucrative business of unlocking and reselling stolen iPhones, a multi-million dollar criminal enterprise spanning the globe. The tools used by shadowy hackers involved in this black market trade were detailed in TrendMicro’s latest research . Today, stolen or lost iPhones are typically locked down by theirs owners using the Find M
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
US attorney general slams 'epidemic' of leaks to media ::::: Leaks of classified information under Donald Trump's presidency have reached "epidemic proportions," US Attorney General Jeff Sessions said Tuesday.
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Ars Technica :::::
Why Google should be afraid of a Missouri Republican’s Google probe ::::: reader comments 9 The Republican attorney general of Missouri has launched an investigation into Google's business practices. Josh Hawley wants to know how Google handles user data. And he plans to look into whether Google is using its dominance in the search business to harm companies in other markets where Google competes. "There is strong reason to believe that Google has not been acting with
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BBC News - Science & Environment :::::
Stranded orca refloated in New Zealand ::::: Volunteers and military personnel worked together to help return the killer whale to the ocean.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
CRISPR-carrying nanoparticles edit the genome ::::: Nanoparticles that allow for CRISPR genome-editing in adult animals have now been developed by researchers. Using a new nanoparticle-based, nonviral delivery technique, the researchers were able to cut out a disease-causing gene in about 80 percent of liver cells, and permanently lower cholesterol in mice.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
New spin on how 'beige' fat cells burn calories ::::: It has been known for decades that low temperatures can trigger specialized fat cells to burn energy to produce heat, but in a new study, researchers have discovered a new heat-producing pathway in fat cells that works by burning excess blood glucose, suggesting a potential new approach to treating metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes.
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Gizmodo :::::
Two Ways to Make Trump's Tweets a Little Less Awful ::::: The president’s Twitter account is unprecedented as a communications strategy, a stream-of-consciousness series of communiqués that strike fear into the heart of any American who wants to, I dunno, avoid war or keep on having a Constitution. But his Twitter rants, as bizarre and as unhinged as they frequently are (“covfefe”) are at least a sort-of window into his thought processes. I mean, I’d ra
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BBC News - Science & Environment :::::
Into the woods: The Japanese way to beat stress ::::: One army veteran suffering from PTSD says Forest Bathing is helping him sleep.
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Live Science :::::
Cremated Remains of the 'Buddha' Discovered in Chinese Village ::::: Cremated human remains were found inside this ceramic box. An inscription found nearby says that they were buried Jun. 22, 1013 and belong to the Buddha. It is not certain if the statues were buried along with the remains. Credit: Photo courtesy Chinese Cultural Relics The cremated remains of what an inscription says is the Buddha, also called Siddhārtha Gautama, have been discovered in a box i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
High speed video recording precisely measures blood cell velocity ::::: IMAGE: This is a picture of nailfold capillary network obtained by new system. view more Credit: Provided by leading author IgorGurov Scientists from ITMO University created a high-speed video capillaroscopy system that enables direct measurement of red blood cell velocity. Coupled with sophisticated software, the system can raise the bar on the accuracy of vascular condition assessment. Su
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Russian chemists developed a way to synthesize drugs from renewable precursors ::::: IMAGE: This is the novel simple synthetic pathway to obtain benzofurans from salicyl alcohols and N-tosylfurfurylamine. view more Credit: Igor Trushkov The scientists of RUDN University together with their Russian colleagues have developed a new approach to the synthesis of benzofurans from cheap raw materials. Original furans can be produced from wastes of agriculture and wooworking indust
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Researchers examine social identity threat and religion in the US ::::: When people feel targeted because of their religious identity, they can experience a psychological threat that may undermine psychological well-being and increase prejudice toward other groups, according to a new study by Penn State psychologists.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Special Focus Issue of Immunotherapy explores the use of allergen-specific immunotherapy ::::: Immunotherapy, a leading MEDLINE-indexed journal, published by Future Science Group, has released a special focus issue providing insights into the latest advances in allergen immunotherapy covering both environmental and food allergies, with the aim of directing the improvement and optimization of immunotherapy for allergy specific treatments.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Microbiome transplants provide disease resistance in critically-endangered Hawaiian plant ::::: IMAGE: Native Hawaiian plant, P. kaalaensis in flower, with infection (white spots on leaves) beginning to spread. view more Credit: Geoff Zahn Transplanting wild microbes from healthy related plants can make a native Hawaiian plant healthier and likelier to survive in wild according to new research from The Amend Laboratory in the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa (UHM) Botany Departmen
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Confusion, different priorities may cause EMTALA violations ::::: Legislation requires Medicare-participating emergency departments to give emergency care to everyone even if they don't have insurance, but violations of the law may be underreported, according to researchers. The researchers interviewed hospitals, hospital associations and patient safety organizations to gain insight on why violations of the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA) hap
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
RUDN scientists synthesized analogues of substances actively used in pharmaceutics ::::: IMAGE: This is an X-ray diffraction analysis of one of the compounds described in the article. view more Credit: Tatiana Borisova RUDN University chemists synthesized new isoquinoline derivatives. Due to their biological activity, these compounds may be applicable in new drugs, from antispasmodics to bactericidal agents. In addition, in the future they may show effectiveness in the treatmen
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Many hospitalized heart patients not getting protective statin medications upon discharge ::::: IMAGE: While patients who are discharged from the hospital after treatment for heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, or peripheral artery disease, should be on statin medications to reduce their risk of reoccurrence,... view more Credit: Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute. While patients who are discharged from the hospital after treatment for heart disease, cerebrovascular dise
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Pregnant Asian women who develop high blood pressure at highest risk for heart failure hospitalization ::::: ANAHEIM, California, Nov.14, 2017 -- Women who develop high blood pressure during pregnancy are more likely to experience heart problems within a few years of giving birth, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians. Researchers f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Prague zoo fetes health of rare Malayan tiger cubs ::::: Two six-weeks-old Malayan tiger cubs were born on October 3, 2017 at the Prague zoo The Prague zoo on Tuesday celebrated the health of two rare Malayan tiger cubs—a male and a female—born there six weeks ago. Zoo officials said that the small size of the female—belonging to the critically endangered subspecies—had been a cause for concern after two underweight cubs born this spring died. "We ar
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
New study shows disadvantage for firms possessing celebrity and status ::::: Businesses that have attracted lots of positive media coverage and are also affiliated with high-status venture capitalists or underwriters may seem like poster children for corporate success. But new research from the University of Notre Dame shows this kind of attention may be too much of a good thing.
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The Atlantic :::::
How Breitbart Destroyed Andrew Breitbart's Legacy ::::: On the populist right, the late Andrew Breitbart, a man regarded as an influential hero, is best remembered for these words: “Politics is downstream from culture.” Byron York wrote in the Washington Examiner that teaching that lesson was “by far the most important thing he did.” He quoted Breitbart: The people who have money, every four years at the last possible second, are told, “You need to gi
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The Atlantic :::::
The Atlantic’s December Issue: “The Making of an American Nazi” Profiles the Disturbing Evolution of Daily Stormer Publisher Andrew Anglin ::::: Washington, D.C. (November 14, 2017)—Andrew Anglin’s website, The Daily Stormer, has been called the leading hate site on the internet—and Anglin himself is the alt-right’s most effective propagandist and most vicious troll. But who is Anglin, and how did he develop such a following? The cover story of The Atlantic’s December issue, “ The Making of an American Nazi ,” takes a riveting and deeply
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Study suggests the body is central to identity manipulation in call center work ::::: New research highlights the politics of 'identity work' where Indian call centre workers manipulate their cultural identities to sell a global service. The study, by sociologist and social worker Dr Sweta Rajan-Rankin of the University of Kent, examines the way workers in call centres are required to take on new identities but also make assumptions about the identity of the people they are callin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Sunny future for renewables thanks to China: IEA ::::: China along with India are to help make solar the leading new source of power generation over the coming decades, says the International Energy Agency in a new report. Solar energy is to lead the race to new power generation over the coming decades, thanks in large part to China and India, the International Energy Agency said Tuesday. The IEA's annual World Energy Outlook report said that, over t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Study settles prehistoric puzzle, confirms modern link of carbon dioxide, global warming ::::: Fossil leaves from prehistoric plants collected from the Ethiopian Highlands of Chilga and Mush River Valley tell scientists how much carbon dioxide was present in the atmosphere millions of years ago. Credit: SMU Fossil leaves from Africa have resolved a prehistoric climate puzzle—and also confirm the link between carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and global warming. Research until now has produc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
New internet TV service has $16 monthly tab and no sports ::::: The hook of the latest internet TV service is a low price and no sports channels. Analysts estimate that internet TV packages such as Sling TV, YouTube TV and DirecTV Now have so far signed up a few million customers. These services are meant to replace cable TV with a cheaper price and a smaller bundle of channels. Unlike the existing services, though, Philo doesn't offer many of the networks
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
New study shows disadvantage for firms possessing celebrity and status ::::: IMAGE: This is Tim Hubbard, assistant professor of management in Notre Dame's Mendoza College of Business. view more Credit: University of Notre Dame Businesses that have attracted lots of positive media coverage and are also affiliated with high-status venture capitalists or underwriters may seem like poster children for corporate success. But new research from the University of Notre Dame s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Three decades of responding to infectious disease outbreaks ::::: IMAGE: Maps showing global examples of emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases. view more Credit: NIAID WHAT: Soon after his appointment in 1984 as director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., testified before Congress showing a world map annotated with a single emerging infectious dise
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Greater oversight of precursor chemicals at retail level needed to reduce threat from IEDs ::::: Policymakers' efforts to reduce threats from improvised explosive devices (IEDs) should include greater oversight of precursor chemicals sold at the retail level -- especially over the Internet -- that terrorists, violent extremists, or criminals use to make homemade explosives, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Shape-shifting agent targets harmful bacteria in the stomach ::::: IMAGE: At normal tissue pH (left), the polymer is inactive and does not kill bacteria. But in an acidic environment (right), it disrupts bacterial membranes to kill H. pylori in the... view more Credit: Images courtesy of Jianjun Cheng, University of Illinois CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- A new shape-shifting polymer can target and kill Helicobacter pylori bacteria in the stomach without killing helpful
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Gizmodo :::::
Google's Pixel Buds Aren't Even Close to Being Good ::::: All photos: Adam Clark Estes There was always something off about the Pixel Buds . Google released the smart, wireless headphones a full year after Apple released the AirPods. But the Pixel Buds aren’t exactly wireless, and they’re not exactly smart, either. In fact, after spending a few days with the product, I’m prepared to say it: the Pixel Buds suck. The Pixel Buds suck, but they shouldn’t. G
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Feed: All Latest :::::
Netflix Knows Some Very Strange Things About Public Viewing Habits ::::: "Netflixing in Public"—the act of watching Netflix out in the world, not to be confused with "Netflix and chill"—is officially a thing. Ever since smartphones got fast enough to stream on-the-go, folks have gotten more and more used to watching TV and movies almost anywhere. Don’t believe us? Go watch the line at Whole Foods for an hour, or ride the New York City subway. Or check out the latest d
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Live Science :::::
In Photos: Cremated Buddha Remains and Buddha Statues ::::: Spiritual discovery Credit: Photo courtesy Chinese Cultural Relics Buddha Credit: Photo courtesy Chinese Cultural Relics Cremated remains Credit: Photo courtesy Chinese Cultural Relics A sneak peek Credit: Photo courtesy Chinese Cultural Relics A life's work Credit: Photo courtesy Chinese Cultural Relics Another Buddha Credit: Photo courtesy Chinese Cultural Relics A king Credit: Photo courtesy C
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Pesticides may cause bumblebees to lose their buzz, study finds ::::: Bees. Credit: University of Stirling Pesticides significantly reduce the number of pollen grains a bumblebee is able to collect, a new University of Stirling study has found. The research, conducted by a team in the Faculty of Natural Sciences, found that field-realistic doses of a neonicotinoid pesticide affects the behaviour of bees - ultimately interfering with the type of vibrations they prod
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Study provides insights for combating devastating amphibian disease ::::: Amphibian chytridiomycosis, caused by infection with the Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis fungus, is the most devastating vertebrate disease on record. The fungus infects more than 600 species of amphibian and has been implicated as the primary cause of decline in more than 200 species.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Development of new protein may lead to novel treatment options for cancer, birth defects ::::: Researchers have engineered an artificial protein that may block malignant properties of cancer cells as well as correct certain birth defects. The findings, which appear in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , may lead to identifying new molecular targets suitable for therapeutic intervention. Cells in the human body need to communicate with each other to function prop
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Proposed NASA mission would investigate where space weather begins ::::: Deputy Principal Investigator Albert Shih (left) and Principal Investigator Steven Christe are baselining a next-generation detector array pictured here to measure X-rays for the hard X-ray spectroscopic imager on the proposed FOXSI mission. Credit: NASA/W. Hrybyk A NASA team is advancing a mission to reveal unprecedented details about solar flares, powerful eruptions that explode with enough ene
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
New NASA mission concept aimed at studying why planets lose their atmospheres ::::: This artist's rendition shows MEME-X's dual spacecraft as they observe the aurora from an altitude like that of the International Space Station. Credit: NASA A team of NASA scientists want to use Earth as a laboratory to understand how planets lose their atmospheres and has proposed a mission that the agency recently selected as one of five for further consideration as a possible NASA Explorer mi
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The Atlantic :::::
How the Zombie Fungus Takes Over Ants’ Bodies to Control Their Minds ::::: To find the world’s most sinister examples of mind control, don’t look to science fiction. Instead, go to a tropical country like Brazil, and venture deep into the jungle. Find a leaf that’s hanging almost exactly 25 centimeters above the forest floor, no more and no less. Now look underneath it. If you’re in luck, you might find an ant clinging to the leaf’s central vein, jaws clamped tight for
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Cellphone data reveals Hurricane Maria's impact on travel in Puerto Rico ::::: A U.S. Naval Aircrewman leads residents of Puerto Rico to a helicopter for evacuation following the landfall of Hurricane Maria. Credit: Sean Galbreath/Wiki Commons Nearly two months after Hurricane Maria swept through Puerto Rico, the infrastructural damage remains evident—today, FEMA estimates that only 41 percent of the island has had power restored. But the impact on human behavior is just be
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Ars Technica :::::
Report suggests Nintendo close to deal for a new Mario movie ::::: Leguizamo and Hoskins wait to see if they'll be picked for the vocal cast. reader comments 8 Nearly 25 years after a live-action version of the Mario Bros. first graced the silver screen, the studio behind Despicable Me and Minions is close to a deal to bring an animated Mario movie to theaters, according to a Wall Street Journal report . Illumination Entertainment, a subsidiary of Comcast-owned
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Gizmodo :::::
Court Rules Yelp Must Identify Anonymous User in Defamation Case ::::: Photo: Getty On Monday, a California state appeals court handed down its decision in a pivotal lawsuit that could have significant effects on Yelp’s business and anonymous speech online in general. The court determined that Yelp will have to turn over documents that could identify an anonymous user who is accused of defaming an accountant in a review posted on its website. The case goes back to 2
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
More stress and lower survival rates for birds in young, managed forests ::::: Birds experience less stress during the winter months when they shelter in old forests rather than in younger, managed plantations suggests new research. The study in Springer's journal The Science of Nature was led by Indrikis Krams of the University of Latvia and the University of Tartu in Estonia. Forestry activities are increasingly causing the fragmentation and deterioration of old growth fo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Pesticides may cause bumblebees to lose their buzz, study finds ::::: Pesticides significantly reduce the number of pollen grains a bumblebee is able to collect, a new University of Stirling study has found. The research, conducted by a team in the Faculty of Natural Sciences, found that field-realistic doses of a neonicotinoid pesticide affects the behaviour of bees - ultimately interfering with the type of vibrations they produce while collecting pollen. Dr Penel
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Study settles prehistoric puzzle, confirms modern link of carbon dioxide & global warming ::::: IMAGE: Researchers measured and counted the leaf pores and epidermal cells on well-preserved fossil leaves from the Highlands of Ethiopia to determine the concentration of carbon dioxide present in the Earth's... view more Credit: SMU Fossil leaves from Africa have resolved a prehistoric climate puzzle -- and also confirm the link between carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and global
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Global birth season study links environment with disease risk ::::: New York, NY (November 14, 2017)--Studies have shown that babies born in winter tend to have a greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes at some point, while fall babies have a greater lifetime risk of depression. What might explain these curious connections? In a new analysis of health information from more than 10 million patients living in three countries and five different climates, data sci
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Aspirin can prevent heart attacks after noncardiac surgery in patients with prior PCI ::::: IMAGE: Graham found that aspirin can help prevent heart attacks in non-cardiac surgery patients who previously had a coronary procedure such as an angioplasty or stent view more Credit: Melissa Fabrizio A Canadian-led study has found that perioperative aspirin can prevent heart-related complications after major noncardiac surgery in patients with previous percutaneous coronary intervention
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Study suggests the body is central to identity manipulation in call center work ::::: New research highlights the politics of 'identity work' where Indian call centre workers manipulate their cultural identities to sell a global service. The study, by sociologist and social worker Dr Sweta Rajan-Rankin of the University of Kent, examines the way workers in call centres are required to take on new identities but also make assumptions about the identity of the people they are cal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Cornell study reveals why testicular cancer is so responsive to chemo ::::: Cornell researchers have taken a major step toward answering a key question in cancer research: Why is testicular cancer so responsive to chemotherapy, even after it metastasizes?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Zwicky Transient Facility sees 'first light' ::::: IMAGE: ZTF took this 'first-light' image on Nov. 1, 2017, after being installed at the 48-inch Samuel Oschin Telescope at Palomar Observatory. The full-resolution version is more than 24,000 pixels by... view more Credit: Caltech Optical Observatories A new robotic camera with the ability to capture hundreds of thousands of stars and galaxies in a single shot has taken its first image of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
A new strategy for prevention of liver cancer development ::::: IMAGE: Cells treated with a chemical carcinogen show severe liver cancer development. In cells treated with the same dosage of a chemical carcinogen and given synthetic dsRNA treatment at the pre-cancer... view more Credit: UC San Diego Health Primary liver cancer is now the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and its incidences and mortality are increasing rapidly in the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Stem cells express genes differently in the lab dish than in the body, study finds ::::: Stem cells in the body have a significantly different gene-expression profile than do the same cells when they're isolated in a lab dish, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. The research suggests that any conclusions about stem cell function based on studies of isolated stem cells may now need to be reconsidered in light of the fact that the cells' biology chan
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
The brain auditions different cells when learning a task, some don't make the cut ::::: For decades, neuroscientists have wondered how the brain can continue to learn new skills without needing to grow in size or volume over a person's lifetime. Evidence suggests that the number of brain cells -- neurons, synapses, and glial cells -- does initially increase as we're learning, but many are eventually pruned away or assigned to other roles. Researchers in Germany and Sweden present thi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Study finds 'black box' methods used by biologists probably overestimate number of new species ::::: Photo illustration of the Malaysian torrent frog. Credit: University of Kansas Do researchers need to "hit the brakes a little" before declaring a species is new to science? A recent University of Kansas study published in the peer-reviewed journal Molecular Ecology demonstrates the misuse and abuse of methods scientists commonly use to place boundaries between different species, especially so-ca
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
New study 'sheds light' on sun's role in mitigating fungal disease of mango fruit ::::: Mango fruits play host to some economically damaging fungal diseases, especially during ripening and storage; but mango growers and suppliers have a new ray of hope...in the form of sunlight.
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Gizmodo :::::
Urban Trees Grow Differently Than Rural Trees ::::: Image: Matthias Ripp / Flickr If you’re familiar with the urban heat island effect, chances are you’re not a fan. It’s that oppressive quality to the air in the Target parking lot that can only be combatted by a trip to the nearest park. But the trees growing in that park may actually be benefitting from the heat. Sometimes. A major analysis of urban and rural trees in ten metropolitan areas arou
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The Atlantic :::::
The Muslim Overpopulation Myth That Just Won’t Die ::::: The sheer number of Rohingya Muslims fleeing genocide in Burma—over 10,000 per day since late August—has become too huge to ignore. It’s the reason why U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson will visit Burma on Wednesday . In his briefings on the crisis, Tillerson will likely encounter another question of numbers: the claim, voiced often by Burmese officials and hardline Buddhist monks, that Rohin
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Ars Technica :::::
Amazon Music app for Android quietly gets Chromecast support ::::: Sam Machkovech reader comments 1 The Amazon Music app has been around for years and has supported connecting to a number of external devices for music playback. But Google's Chromecast wasn't one of them until now. Amazon has quietly updated the Amazon Music app for Android to include Chromecast support, allowing Android users to shoot music from their device to a nearby Chromecast. The feature w
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Gizmodo :::::
Deadspin Tennessee State Player Expelled From School For Punching Out Coach During Game | Jezebel Lo ::::: Deadspin Tennessee State Player Expelled From School For Punching Out Coach During Game | Jezebel Louis C.K.’s Former Manager Apologizes For Silencing Victims | The Root Today in White Nonsense: Fla. Woman Claims She’s ‘Transracial,’ Identifies as Filipino | Earther The US Event at the International Climate Talks Was a Total Train Wreck | Splinter BAN THE NFL |
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Ars Technica :::::
Even 8,000 years ago, a meal without wine was like a day without sunshine ::::: Enlarge / The first vineyards probably weren't this orderly and certainly lacked the barn. reader comments 0 PIiny the Elder knew that truth comes out in it. Aeschylus called it the mirror of the mind. Robert Louis Stevenson said it was bottled poetry. Mark Twain compared the books of great geniuses to it. It is no wonder that wine—which perfectly complements food, inhibits inhibitions, and alter
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Quanta Magazine :::::
Galactic Glow, Thought to Be Dark Matter, Now Hints at Hidden Pulsars ::::: In 2009, Dan Hooper and his colleagues found a glow coming from the center of our galaxy that no one had ever noticed before. After analyzing publicly available data from the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope, a satellite launched a year earlier, the team concluded that the center of the Milky Way was radiating more gamma rays than astrophysicists could account for. The finding was so unexpected th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
'Muscles and money': What photos of men taken on the Tube say about modern day attraction ::::: People still desire the traditional masculine values of muscles and money in the men they find attractive and have not moved on from long-established gender roles, according to new research. The study by academics at Coventry and Aberystwyth universities challenges current thinking about feminism and how masculinity is portrayed, and instead suggests that white, male privilege is still an attract
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Paper: 'No money down' bankruptcies prevalent among the poor, minorities ::::: IMAGE: Bankruptcy attorneys are increasingly encouraging clients to file for the more expensive 'no money down' option of Chapter 13 bankruptcy -- a tactic that's used more often with blacks than... view more Credit: Photo by L. Brian Stauffer CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- A new paper from a University of Illinois law professor who studies consumer credit issues examines the breakdown in access to jus
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Yerba mate's beneficial effects on cellular energy and lipid metabolism linked to weight ::::: IMAGE: Journal of Medicinal Food publishes original scientific research on the bioactive substances of functional and medicinal foods, nutraceuticals, herbal substances, and other natural products. view more Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers New Rochelle, NY, November 14, 2017--Researchers have shown that use of the dietary supplement yerba mate over an extended period had signific
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Development of new protein may lead to novel treatment options for cancer, birth defects ::::: (Boston)--Researchers have engineered an artificial protein that may block malignant properties of cancer cells as well as correct certain birth defects. The findings, which appear in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , may lead to identifying new molecular targets suitable for therapeutic intervention. Cells in the human body need to communicate with each other to funct
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Study provides insights for combating devastating amphibian disease ::::: Amphibian chytridiomycosis, caused by infection with the Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis fungus, is the most devastating vertebrate disease on record. The fungus infects more than 600 species of amphibian and has been implicated as the primary cause of decline in more than 200 species. A new Animal Conservation study indicates that the common eastern froglet, Crinia signifera, can carry infections
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
How emotions influence our internal clock ::::: A research team headed by Freiburg psychologist finds previously unknown effects.
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Science | The Guardian :::::
Powerful new robotic camera captures stunning new image of Orion nebula ::::: The turbulent cosmic cloud known as the Orion nebula has been captured by astronomers with a powerful robotic camera freshly installed at the Palomar Observatory near San Diego in California. Astronomers discover a giant world – but is it a planet? The nebula is a stellar nursery 1,500 light years from Earth where more than 1,000 young stars are thought to reside. It forms the brightest spot in t
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Gizmodo :::::
Nintendo Is Finally Making Another Super Mario Bros. Movie ::::: Image: Nintendo The day many thought would never come has arrived. The Wall Street Journa l reports that Nintendo has made a deal with Illumination Entertainment, the animation studio that makes the Despicable Me movies (as well as recent hits Sing and The Secret Life of Pets ) to do an animated Mario movie. According to the report, the companies have been in negotiations for a year and the fact
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Ethnic and gender differences in youths' developing gender identity ::::: The extent to which youths feel typical of their gender and the pressure they feel to conform to traditional gender roles are related to adolescents' well-being. Because many gender-related expectations are culturally based, a new longitudinal study examined how French middle school adolescents' feelings about the development of gender identity differed across groups of teens from different ethnic
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Innovative, ideal liquid-repellent surfaces developed by scientists ::::: Scientists have developed a robust liquid-repellent structure and the fabrication of porous surfaces by an innovative microfluidic-droplet-based technique. Materials such as textiles, metals, and glasses covered by a layer of this robust porous surface can then become liquid-repellent.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Oral bacteria in the gut could drive immune cell induction and inflammatory bowel disease ::::: Investigators have investigated the relationship between salivary microbes and IBD, and they found that when the bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae colonizes in an intestine out of microbial balance, immune cells called T helper 1 (TH1) become overactive in the gut, resulting in intestinal inflammation leading to the onset of IBD.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Grow, differentiate and freeze stem cells in a transparent bag ::::: Human stem cells are considered a major new hope in the field of medicine. In the future, it is expected that they will make it possible to treat a wide range of ailments such as neurodegenerative diseases. With LabBag®, researchers have developed an all-in-one system in the form of a transparent bag that provides a cheap, fast and sterile way for scientists to grow, differentiate and freeze stem
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Tapeworm drug fights prostate cancer ::::: Medicine against parasites like Tapeworms and Giardia, contains a substance that kills Prostate- and colon cancer, scientists have discovered.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Insurance linked to black-white survival disparities in colorectal cancer ::::: Health insurance coverage differences account for nearly one-half of the black-white survival disparity in colorectal cancer patients, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Eating regular variety of nuts associated with lower risk of heart disease ::::: People who regularly eat nuts, including peanuts, walnuts and tree nuts, have a lower risk of developing cardiovascular disease or coronary heart disease compared to people who never or almost never eat nuts, according to a new study. The study is the largest to date looking at frequency of nut consumption in relation to incident cardiovascular disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Using a mathematical lens to look at disease as a whole body problem ::::: A novel computational method allows researchers to parse how multiple organs contribute to a disease over time, giving a more holistic view of disease and potentially revealing new avenues for intervention.
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Latest Headlines | Science News :::::
New camera on Palomar telescope will seek out supernovas, asteroids and more ::::: Nov. 11 SN : Hybrids tell tales, defining “species,” neutron star collision makes waves, AlphaGo's latest feat, Haumea's ring, the next bird flu to watch, inbreeding's downsides and more.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Low dose, constant drip: Pharmaceutical and personal care pollution impacts aquatic life ::::: Pharmaceutical and personal care product pollution is common in freshwaters throughout the US. Credit: AJ Reisinger Traditional toxicity testing underestimates the risk that pharmaceutical and personal care product pollution poses to freshwater ecosystems. Criteria that account for ecological disruption - not just organism death - are needed to protect surface waters, which are under pressure fro
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Zwicky Transient Facility sees 'first light' ::::: ZTF took this 'first-light' image on Nov. 1, 2017, after being installed at the 48-inch Samuel Oschin Telescope at Palomar Observatory. The full-resolution version is more than 24,000 pixels by 24,000 pixels. Each ZTF image covers a sky area equal to 247 full moons. The Orion nebula is at lower right. Computers searching these images for transient, or variable, events are trained to automatically
3h
Ars Technica :::::
Experts raise eyebrows at digital pill to monitor patients with schizophrenia ::::: reader comments 0 The Food and Drug Administration announced its approval Monday for the first digital medicine —a melding of a long-standing drug for schizophrenia—Abilify (aripiprazole tablets)—with an edible sensor that reports when it’s ingested. Together, they make Abilify MyCite. Though the approval is a long time coming, the choice of an antipsychotic medicine for this advance is raising t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Video: The only detox you'll ever need ::::: People talk all the time about how they need to "detox."
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Team develops innovative, ideal liquid-repellent surfaces ::::: Professor Wang Liqui (left) and Dr Zhu Pingan from HKU Mechanical Engineering Department showcase the liquid repellent material they innovated. Credit: The University of Hong Kong On liquid-repellent surfaces, liquid droplets bounce away instead of being stuck. These surfaces are important in many fields, such as water-repellent clothes and anti-fouling kitchenware. Used as drag-reduction coating
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Sensor for the most important human cancer gene ::::: The molecular smoke detector works like a TP53 sensor, which monitors the correct function of the gene. A non-functional TP53 gene is going to activate the sensor, which initiates cell death.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Cognitive behavioral therapy for children and adolescents with OCD works in the long run ::::: The vast majority of children and adolescents who receive cognitive behavioral therapy treatment for OCD thrive and live without symptoms a year after the end of treatment, shows new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Stress faced by emergency call handlers damaging to long term health ::::: The stress experienced by emergency call handlers negatively impacts on their long term psychological well being, a new report shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Bioengineered robotic hand with its own nervous system will sense touch ::::: Researchers are developing a first-of-its-kind bioengineered robotic hand that will actually feel and adapt to its environment. This “living” robot will have its own peripheral nervous system directly linking robotic sensors and actuators.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Butterfly wing inspires photovoltaics: Light absorption can be enhanced by up to 200 percent ::::: Sunlight reflected by solar cells is lost as unused energy. The wings of the butterfly Pachliopta aristolochiae are drilled by nanostructures (nanoholes) that help absorbing light over a wide spectrum far better than smooth surfaces. Researchers have now succeeded in transferring these nanostructures to solar cells and, thus, enhancing their light absorption rate by up to 200 percent.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Annoyed by floating specks in your vision? You may soon be able to zap them away ::::: Millions of people who put up with seeing annoying specks drift through their field of vision may now have a safe, high-tech solution to their problem. A study of patients who had laser treatment to vaporize these flecks and spots known as floaters, showed a very low complication rate.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Wouldn’t it be great if eyedrops didn’t spill out of your eyes? ::::: A new kind of eyedropper can deliver tiny droplets of medication, treating the eye more precisely than traditional eyedroppers, while reducing waste and avoiding dangerous side effects.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Butterfly wing inspires photovoltaics: Light absorption can be enhanced by up to 200 percent ::::: Nanostructures of the wing of Pachliopta aristolochiae can be transferred to solar cells and enhance their absorption rates by up to 200 percent. Credit: Radwanul H. Siddique, KIT/Caltech Sunlight reflected by solar cells is lost as unused energy. The wings of the butterfly Pachliopta aristolochiae are drilled by nanostructures (nanoholes) that help absorbing light over a wide spectrum far better
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Bioengineered robotic hand with its own nervous system will sense touch ::::: A first-of-its-kind bioengineered robotic hand will grow and adapt to its environment. This "living" robot will have its own peripheral nervous system directly linking robotic sensors and actuators. The research team is creating a living pathway from the robot's touch sensation to the user's brain to help amputees control the robotic hand. Credit: Florida Atlantic University The sense of touch is
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Gizmodo :::::
The Apple Watch Can Accurately Detect Hypertension and Sleep Apnea ::::: Image: Alex Cranz/ Gizmodo The data that fitness trackers collect about your body goes far beyond just how many steps you’ve taken, and researchers are just beginning to understand how to harness all that valuable data-collecting power. A new study from the health startup Cardiogram and UCSF suggests that off-the-shelf wearables like the Apple Watch and Fitbit could be used to accurately detect c
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Gizmodo :::::
Tuesday's Best Deals: Bias Lighting, Amazon Music Unlimited, Plasma Lighter Flashlight, and More ::::: HDTV bias lighting sets , an Amazon Music Unlimited discount , a tricked-out flashlight with a plasma lighter , and more are all part of today’s best deals. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Luminoodle $15-$22 with code M89UHFGT HDTV bias lights are nothing new to our readers, but with three length options, 15 color modes, a color-changing fade set
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
New study 'sheds light' on sun's role in mitigating fungal disease of mango fruit ::::: IMAGE: Phytobiomes is a multidisciplinary journal that publishes original research about organisms and communities and their interaction with plants in any ecosystem. Its objective is to offer a new vision for... view more Credit: The American Phytopathological Society St. Paul, Minn. (November 2017)--Mango fruits play host to some economically damaging fungal diseases, especially during ri
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Study finds 'black box' methods used by biologists probably overestimate number of new species ::::: IMAGE: This is a photo illustration of the Malaysian torrent frog. view more Credit: KU News Service LAWRENCE -- Do researchers need to "hit the brakes a little" before declaring a species is new to science? A recent University of Kansas study published in the peer-reviewed journal Molecular Ecology demonstrates the misuse and abuse of methods scientists commonly use to place boun
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Ibuprofen may block damage from fetal-alcohol exposure ::::: COLUMBUS, Ohio - An anti-inflammatory drug may have the potential to stall the damaging effects of alcohol on the fetal brain, a new study suggests. Ibuprofen reduced neuroinflammation and behavioral signs of alcohol exposure in a rat model of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). The study was the first to directly link alcohol-induced inflammation in the hippocampus to cognitive impairment l
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Queen's researchers make killer superbug breakthrough ::::: IMAGE: This is Professor Jose Bengoechea, Director of the Wellcome-Wolfson Institute for Experimental Medicine, Queen's University Belfast. view more Credit: Queen's University Belfast Researchers at Queen's University Belfast together with the University of Vienna have discovered that treatment for the antibiotic resistant bacteria Klebsiella pneumoniae could lie within our bodies' natural d
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Stem cell therapy shows promise for common cause of blindness ::::: Results from two early clinical trials show that it may be possible to use human embryonic stem cells as treatment for the dry form of macular degeneration, according to presentations given today at AAO 2017, the 121st Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology.
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The Atlantic :::::
Reflections of an Affirmative-Action Baby ::::: In 1991, the African American Yale Law School professor Stephen Carter wrote a book called Reflections of an Affirmative Action Baby . I remember reading part of it at the time. Little did I realize that the book’s title applied to me. Two years after Carter published his book, I joined the New Republic as a summer intern. I was thrilled. I had been reading the magazine since high school, and ido
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Scientific American Content: Global :::::
U.S. Promotes Fossil Fuels at Global Climate Meeting ::::: BONN, Germany—A White House roundtable on fossil fuels and nuclear energy became an outlet for international rage at President Trump, who has disdained the world's work to contain climate change. Yesterday's event, hosted by White House energy adviser George David Banks, didn't offer the same level of defiance shown by Trump in June when he accused the world of "laughing at us as a country" f
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Expanded networks, faculty mentorship bolster female undergrads' pursuit of geoscience ::::: To retain more undergraduate women in geoscience majors, a supportive network that includes faculty mentorship seems to be a key driver, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
New player in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis identified ::::: Scientists have shown that a protein called membralin is critical for keeping Alzheimer's disease pathology in check. The study shows that membralin regulates the cell's machinery for producing beta-amyloid (or amyloid beta), the protein that causes neurons to die in Alzheimer's disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Cognitive training enhanced innovative thinking and brain networks in older adults ::::: Researchers have demonstrated in a pilot study that cognitive training improves innovative thinking, along with corresponding positive brain changes, in healthy adults over the age of 55. The study reveals that a specific strategic cognitive training program enhanced innovation in healthy adults.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Manganese dioxide shows potential in micromotors ::::: Manganese dioxide could make the preparation of micromotors increasingly cost-effective, opening up new avenues for their use.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Parasitic plants rely on unusual method to spread their seeds ::::: Three species of non-photosynthetic plants rely mainly on camel crickets to disperse their seeds.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Left-brained: Study suggests conservative Democrats don't compute for liberal voters ::::: Magnetic resonance imaging research finds self-identified liberals more likely to notice when candidates deviate from the party line. Liberals also tend to take longer to react to inconsistent positions from Democrats. In the majority of instances, they evaluated those inconsistent positions as 'bad.'
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Artificial intelligence tool quantifies power imbalance between female and male characters in Hollywood movies ::::: Researchers who used machine learning tools to analyze language in 800 Hollywood movie scripts found subtle but widespread gender bias in the amount of power and agency given to male and female characters.
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Science : NPR :::::
On The Alien Question: Where Are They? ::::: Nuclear physicist Enrico Fermi, as seen on a 2001 USA postage stamp. Ken Brown/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Ken Brown/Getty Images Nuclear physicist Enrico Fermi, as seen on a 2001 USA postage stamp. Ken Brown/Getty Images Since my last post was on Earth's hosting of life, it's natural to follow with a discussion of life elsewhere. From the outset, we must state two essential facts: f
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Ars Technica :::::
OnePlus includes Qualcomm engineering app in phones, exposes root backdoor ::::: Ron Amadeo reader comments 2 A Twitter user by the name " Elliot Alderson "‏ has discovered a root backdoor in OnePlus devices—one that has apparently been shipping for years. OnePlus has been shipping a Qualcomm engineering APK (an Android app file) in its devices, which with a few commands, can root a device. The app—called "EngineerMode"—is partially exposed to users through a secret " *#808#
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New Scientist - News :::::
If we only ate organic it would be an environmental disaster ::::: Cropland is in demand NASA/GSFC/METI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan Should the world’s farms go 100 per cent organic to protect the environment? Absolutely not. One huge problem is that organic farming requires far more land than conventional farming to produce the same amount of food. According to a study out today , going all-organic would require up to a third more land to feed the world by
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New Scientist - News :::::
Prairie vole partners split up if one drinks more than the other ::::: That feeling when you’ve had one too many Yva Momatiuk and John Eastcott/Minden Pictures By Jessica Hamzelou Heavy drinkers and abstainers don’t make the best couples. In humans, one partner that drinks more than the other is thought to be a recipe for a breakup. The same appears to be true for prairie voles, one of the only other mammals known to form long-term monogamous relationships. The
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New Scientist - News :::::
Camera spots hidden oil spills and may find missing planes ::::: Any oil here? Mlenny/Getty By David Hambling There are thousands of oil spills each year in US waters alone. One major source is illegal dumping of oil in harbours when ships empty their bilges, typically at night to avoid detection. However, a new kind of polarising camera can now spot offenders immediately. Its ability to detect otherwise invisible oil sheens could even lead investigators t
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New Scientist - News :::::
Ancient skull from China may rewrite the origins of our species ::::: What can the Dali skull tell us? Sheela Athreya By Colin Barras The origins of our species might need a rethink. An analysis of an ancient skull from China suggests it is eerily similar to the earliest known fossils of our species –found in Morocco, some 10,000 kilometres to the west. The skull hints that modern humans aren’t solely descended from African ancestors, as is generally thought. M
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Gizmodo :::::
It's Hard as Hell to Raise Venture Capital as a Woman ::::: The venture capital world is dominated by men —and for companies led by women, especially companies creating products FOR women, pitching to these male investors can be a demoralizing experience. Women sitting on billion-dollar ideas aren’t taken seriously simply because the people writing the checks don’t understand their experience. Gizmodo spoke with three of these women about their products a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Psoriasis severity linked to increased risk of type 2 diabetes ::::: IMAGE: This is an image of severe Psoriasis. view more Credit: Penn Medicine PHILADELPHIA - People with psoriasis are at a higher risk to develop type 2 diabetes than those without psoriasis, and the risk increases dramatically based on the severity of the disease. Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found people with psoriasis that covers 10 per
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Researchers reveal new insights into why sleep is good for our memory ::::: Researchers at the University of York have shed new light on sleep's vital role in helping us make the most of our memory. Sleep, they show, helps us to use our memory in the most flexible and adaptable manner possible by strengthening new and old versions of the same memory to similar extents. The researchers also demonstrate that when a memory is retrieved - when we remember something - it is u
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Low dose, constant drip: Pharmaceutical & personal care pollution impacts aquatic life ::::: IMAGE: Pharmaceutical and personal care product pollution is common in freshwaters throughout the US. view more Credit: AJ Reisinger (Millbrook, NY) Traditional toxicity testing underestimates the risk that pharmaceutical and personal care product pollution poses to freshwater ecosystems. Criteria that account for ecological disruption - not just organism death - are needed to prote
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Study: Parents help shape how much pain preschoolers feel after vaccination ::::: TORONTO, Tuesday, November 14, 2017 While vaccinations protect children against various illnesses, the pain can sometimes be too much to bear. It's no wonder most children and parents dread their vaccination appointments. Now new research from York University's OUCH Cohort at the Faculty of Health found that the amount of distress and pain felt by a preschooler during a vaccination is strongly re
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Speedy collision detector could make robots better human assistants ::::: A faster collision detection algorithm could enable robots to work more fluidly in the operating room or at home for assisted living. The algorithm, dubbed 'Fastron,' runs up to 8 times faster than existing collision detection algorithms. It uses machine learning to help robots avoid moving objects and weave through complex, rapidly changing environments in real time.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Study in mice finds dietary levels of genistein may adversely affect female fertility ::::: A new study of mice by scientists at the University of Illinois raises concerns about the potential impact that long-term exposure to genistein prior to conception may have on fertility and pregnancy. The study was conducted by food science and human nutrition professor William G. Helferich, comparative biosciences professor Jodi A. Flaws, Illinois alumna Shreya Patel and animal sciences research
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
The only detox you'll ever need (video) ::::: IMAGE: People talk all the time about how they need to 'detox.' And there's a line of companies a mile long waiting to sell you juices and smoothies that claim to... view more Credit: The American Chemical Society WASHINGTON, Nov. 14, 2017 -- People talk all the time about how they need to "detox." And there's a line of companies a mile long waiting to sell you juices and smoothies that cla
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Are multiple H-coils needed to accurately measure magnetic field strengths? ::::: WASHINGTON, D.C., November 14, 2017 -- Is more always better? Researchers from Doshisha University in Kyoto, Japan, sought to find out if that was the case for measuring magnetic field strengths. Their paper, appearing this week in AIP Advances , from AIP Publishing, examines whether a double H-coil method or a single H-coil method is a more accurate way to measure magnetic field strength. Single
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Soft magnetic material characterizations get a harder look ::::: IMAGE: This is an image of an electrical machine, sliced open to show the rotor and stator iron lamination, which consists of soft magnetic material. view more Credit: Image courtesy of Silas Elfgen WASHINGTON, D.C., November 14, 2017 -- In motors, generators and similar electric machines, the electrical current that powers them generates magnetic fields that magnetize some of the metallic
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Artificially cooling planet 'risky strategy,' new research shows ::::: Proposals to reduce the effects of global warming by imitating volcanic eruptions could have a devastating effect on global regions prone to either tumultuous storms or prolonged drought, new research has shown.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Electron backscatter diffraction yields microstructure insights ::::: IMAGE: Comparison of the influence of different cutting methods on the deformation of the edge of electrical steel sheets: a) rough cutting using a blunt object, b) industrial punching tool and... view more Credit: Image courtesy of the authors WASHINGTON, D.C., Nov. 14, 2017 -- High-efficiency electric motors with tailored speed-torques, determined by their magnetic components, are essential
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Improvement in glycemic control among patients with diabetes may have plateaued ::::: Bottom Line: The improvement in glycemic control observed between 1998 and 2010 among patients with diabetes appears to have plateaued during 2007-2014. More participants reported having a test for HbA1c in the prior year and were aware of their HbA1c result and target. Why The Research Is Interesting: In 2014, an estimated 30.3 million people (9.4 percent) in the United States had diabetes. Impr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Early trial of peanut patch for peanut allergy shows promise ::::: Bottom Line: A skin patch that delivered a high dose of peanut protein reduced peanut sensitivity in children and adults with peanut allergy, findings that warrant a phase 3 trial. Why The Research Is Interesting: Allergy immunotherapy exposes people to a controlled dose of the proteins that trigger allergies so they become less sensitive or no longer sensitive. Peanut immunotherapy with a pill
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Does unhealthy weight before pregnancy increase the risk for severe illness or death for the mother? ::::: Bottom Line: Being over- or underweight before pregnancy was associated with a small increased risk of severe maternal illness or death. Why The Research Is Interesting: Unhealthy weight during pregnancy is associated with adverse birth outcomes. Less is known about the association between unhealthy weight before pregnancy and maternal complications. Who and When: 743,630 women who gave birth in
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Evidence-based approach to treating post-delivery pain in new moms during opioid crisis ::::: Women who undergo vaginal delivery often do not require opioids to manage pain after hospital discharge, concludes a study. In addition, the quantity of opioids prescribed to women after cesarean delivery can be less than currently prescribed, say the authors.
4h
Popular Science :::::
Yes, the frilled shark is really freaky. But there are other 'living fossils' that are just as weird. ::::: We’ve been here before: someone pulled something freaky looking out of the bottom of the ocean , and now Google News is flooded with headlines about “dinosaur-era” or “prehistoric” sharks and “ living fossils .” Indeed, the frilled shark ( Chlamydoselachus anguineus ) looks like something from another (much scarier) time. But no, scientists didn’t just trawl up some time-traveling dinosaur fish .
4h
Scientific American Content: Global :::::
Explaining the Global Rise of "Dominance" Leadership ::::: Political pundits, commentators and average citizens continue to have trouble accounting for the rise of populist authoritarian leaders across the globe. The common question batted around continues to be how leaders such as Donald Trump, Viktor Orban, Rodrigo Duterte, Nicolás Maduro, Recep Erdogan could become the standard-bearers of democracy for countries like the US, Hungary, Philippines, Vene
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Feed: All Latest :::::
So You Want to Geoengineer the Planet? Beware the Hurricanes ::::: Every country on Earth, save for cough one , has banded together to cut emissions and stop the runaway heating of our only home. That’s nearly 200 countries working to keep the global average temperature from climbing 2 degrees Celsius above pre-Industrial Revolution levels. Phenomenal. But what if cooperation and emissions reduction aren’t enough? Projections show that even if all those countrie
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Gizmodo :::::
NASA Captures Stunning Close-Up Photos of Antarctica's Massive Iceberg ::::: The edge of A-68, the iceberg the calved from the Larsen C ice shelf in July 2017. (Image: NASA/Nathan Kurtz) Back in July, satellite images showed an iceberg bigger than the state of Delaware calving and drifting away from Antarctica’s Larsen C ice shelf. Well, it’s summertime now in Antarctica, which means scientists are finally able to view this behemoth from up close—and the pictures are just
4h
Ingeniøren :::::
VIDEO: Kina testflyver enorm fragtdrone ::::: Kinas tungeste fragtdrone blev testfløjet i slutningen af oktober. AT200 kan bære 1,5 ton, og skal blandt andet bruges til sikre militærforsyninger til øer i det Sydkinesiske Hav.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Are multiple H-coils needed to accurately measure magnetic field strengths? ::::: Is more always better? Researchers from Doshisha University in Kyoto, Japan, sought to find out if that was the case for measuring magnetic field strengths. Their paper, appearing this week in AIP Advances , examines whether a double H-coil method or a single H-coil method is a more accurate way to measure magnetic field strength. Single sheet testers (SSTs) measure the magnetic properties of ele
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Artificially cooling planet 'risky strategy,' new research shows ::::: Credit: public domain Proposals to reduce the effects of global warming by imitating volcanic eruptions could have a devastating effect on global regions prone to either tumultuous storms or prolonged drought, new research has shown. Geoengineering - the intentional manipulation of the climate to counter the effect of global warming by injecting aerosols artificially into the atmosphere - has bee
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Soft magnetic material characterizations get a harder look ::::: An electrical machine, sliced open to show the rotor and stator iron lamination, which consists of soft magnetic material. Credit: Silas Elfgen In motors, generators and similar electric machines, the electrical current that powers them generates magnetic fields that magnetize some of the metallic components. Choosing the right magnetic material is crucial for designing efficient machines, so res
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Electron backscatter diffraction yields microstructure insights ::::: Comparison of the influence of different cutting methods on the deformation of the edge of electrical steel sheets: a) rough cutting using a blunt object, b) industrial punching tool and c) laser cutting. Credit: the authors High-efficiency electric motors with tailored speed-torques, determined by their magnetic components, are essential for sustainable, successful electric automobile drive conc
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Evidence-based approach to treating post-delivery pain in new moms during opioid crisis ::::: Women who undergo vaginal delivery often do not require opioids to manage pain after hospital discharge, concludes a study published in Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA). In addition, the quantity of opioids prescribed to women after cesarean delivery can be less than currently prescribed.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Butterfly wing inspires photovoltaics: Light absorption can be enhanced by up to 200 percent ::::: IMAGE: Nanostructures of the wing of Pachliopta aristolochiae can be transferred to solar cells and enhance their absorption rates by up to 200 percent. view more Credit: Graphics: Radwanul H. Siddique, KIT/Caltech) Sunlight reflected by solar cells is lost as unused energy. The wings of the butterfly Pachliopta aristolochiae are drilled by nanostructures (nanoholes) that help absorbing lig
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
More stress and lower survival rates for birds in young, managed forests ::::: Birds experience less stress during the winter months when they shelter in old forests rather than in younger, managed plantations suggests new research. The study in Springer's journal The Science of Nature was led by Indrikis Krams of the University of Latvia and the University of Tartu in Estonia. Forestry activities are increasingly causing the fragmentation and deterioration of old growth fo
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Why can hot water freeze faster than cold water? ::::: IMAGE: A team of researchers from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, the Universidad de Extremadura and the Universidad de Sevilla have defined a theoretical framework that could explain the Mpemba effect,... view more Credit: UC3M The researchers, who have recently published the findings in Physical Review Letters , have confirmed how this phenomenon occurs in granular fluids, that is, thos
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Essential quantum computer component downsized by two orders of magnitude ::::: Qubits, the key building blocks at the heart of every quantum computer, are extremely sensitive to interference and need to be shielded from unwanted signals, for example by using so-called nonreciprocal devices. But until now these devices were huge and produced unwanted magnetic fields themselves. Now, scientists at IST Austria have developed a new nonreciprocal device that is only a tenth of a
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The Atlantic :::::
The Intolerant Left ::::: The writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie has firsthand experience with the swift and intense outrage that can flow toward an individual in the age of democratized publishing. Say something potentially objectionable these days, and you will hear about it from every direction. Adichie’s characterization of women and transgender women as being fundamentally different ignited a firestorm of controversy la
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Gizmodo :::::
Apple Reportedly Wants a 3D Sensor on the Back of iPhones by 2019 ::::: Image: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo After the relative success of Apple’s front-mounted 3D sensor on the iPhone X, which is the component that enables Face ID and the company’s playful Animojis, Apple is reportedly aiming to complement 2019 iPhones with similar tech on their backsides, too. However, according to Bloomberg , the rear-facing 3D sensors would function a bit differently than the 3D tech found
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
How food poisoning bacteria Campylobacter uses other organisms as Trojan horse to infect new hosts ::::: New research has shown how the food poisoning bacteria Campylobacter can multiply and spread inside micro-organisms called amoebae- which could lead to a better understanding of how bacteria survive and help efforts to prevent the spread of infection.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
A fast reactor system to shorten the lifetime of long-lived fission products ::::: Researchers have proposed a more efficient method to reduce radioactive waste. The study involves converting radioactive material into short-lived nuclides by absorbing surplus neutrons in the core peripheral portion of a small fast reactor faster than they are generated in the core, thus providing an effective way to lessen the burden of nuclear waste on future generations.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Potential new autism drug shows promise in mice ::::: NitroSynapsin is intended to restore an electrical signaling imbalance in the brain found in virtually all forms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Female mongooses help their pups by driving out rivals ::::: Mongoose mothers boost their pups' survival chances by evicting rival females from their social groups, new research shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Blood test spots paracetamol overdose patients at risk of liver damage ::::: People who overdose on paracetamol could be helped by a blood test that shows immediately if they are going to suffer liver damage, research has found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Hair cortisol levels predict which mothers are more likely to suffer postpartum depression ::::: Hair cortisol levels, which is a steroid hormone secreted as a response to stress, are higher in the first and third trimesters of pregnancy for those women that will later suffer postpartum depression, new research indicates.
4h
TED Talks Daily (SD video) :::::
How to talk (and listen) to transgender people | Jackson Bird ::::: Gender should be the least remarkable thing about someone, but transgender people are still too often misunderstood. To help those who are scared to ask questions or nervous about saying the wrong thing, Jackson Bird shares a few ways to think about trans issues. And in this funny, frank talk, he clears up a few misconceptions about pronouns, transitioning, bathrooms and more.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Voice impersonators can fool speaker recognition systems ::::: Skilful voice impersonators are able to fool state-of-the-art speaker recognition systems, as these systems generally aren't efficient yet in recognising voice modifications, according to new research from the University of Eastern Finland. The vulnerability of speaker recognition systems poses significant security concerns. Nowadays, mobile devices are increasingly equipped with applications t
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
'Muscles and money': What photos of men taken on the Tube say about modern day attraction ::::: People still desire the traditional masculine values of muscles and money in the men they find attractive and have not moved on from long-established gender roles, according to new research. The study by academics at Coventry and Aberystwyth universities challenges current thinking about feminism and how masculinity is portrayed, and instead suggests that white, male privilege is still an attract
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Innovative and ideal liquid-repellent surfaces developed by HKU scientists ::::: On liquid-repellent surfaces, liquid droplets bounce away instead of being stuck. These surfaces are important in many fields, such as water-repellent clothes and anti-fouling kitchenware. Used as drag-reduction coatings for water vehicles, these surfaces can even help with speeding up cargo ships and military equipment so as to save energy. The dream of research and development on liquid-repelle
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
World's longest sauropod dinosaur trackway brought to light ::::: In 2009, the world's largest dinosaur tracks were discovered in the French village of Plagne, in the Jura Mountains. Since then, a series of excavations at the site has uncovered other tracks, sprawling over more than 150 meters. French scientists conclude these tracks were left 150 million years ago by a dinosaur at least 35 meters long and weighing no less than 35 tons.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Comprehensive health study in India finds rise of non-communicable diseases ::::: DELHI - A new state-by-state health analysis in India finds that over two decades heart- and lung-related conditions, as well as other non-communicable diseases (NCDs), have surpassed infectious diseases, such as diarrhea and tuberculosis, as the nation's leading killers. The extent of this difference, however, varies significantly among the nation's 29 states and seven union territories. The stu
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New on MIT Technology Review :::::
Boston Dynamics’s Newest Four-Legged Robot Is a Smooth Operator ::::: On its first day on the job yesterday, a self-driving shuttle in Las Vegas got into a crash. The vehicle is one of several made by French startup Navya that are part of a trial sponsored by AAA Northern California, Nevada, and Utah. Each shuttle carries… Read more On its first day on the job yesterday, a self-driving shuttle in Las Vegas got into a crash. The vehicle is one of several made by
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Dagens Medicin :::::
Kritisk læge til samtale med ledelsen i Svendborg-sag ::::: Overlæge Kristian Rørbæk Madsen, Odense Universitetshospital, var i to debatindlæg kritisk over for sygehusledelsens udmeldinger i den såkaldte Svendborg-sag. I sidste uge var han til samtale med afdelingsledelsen.
5h
New on MIT Technology Review :::::
Boston Dynamics’ Newest Four-Legged Robot Is a Smooth Operator ::::: On its first day on the job yesterday, a self-driving shuttle in Las Vegas got into a crash. The vehicle is one of several made by French startup Navya that are part of a trial sponsored by AAA Northern California, Nevada, and Utah. Each shuttle carries… Read more On its first day on the job yesterday, a self-driving shuttle in Las Vegas got into a crash. The vehicle is one of several made by
5h
Viden :::::
Forskere advarer igen om hovedskader i sport ::::: Kontaktsport kan skade hjernen, selv hvis skaderne i hovedet ikke i første omgang fører til hjernerystelser. Det fremgår af ny forskning, som netop er præsenteret ved verdens største konference for hjerneforskere, Neuroscience 2017 i Washington, USA. Andre resultater fra konferencen følger samme spor og advarer om, at kvindelige fodboldspillere er mere udsatte for påvirkning efter hovedstød end m
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
To find new biofuel enzymes, it can take a microbial village ::::: In search of new plant enzymes? Try looking in compost. Researchers have demonstrated the importance of microbial communities as a source of stable enzymes that could be used to convert plants to biofuels. This approach yields robust enzymes that researchers can't easily obtain from isolates.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Early-life behavior of grey seal pups at sea ::::: Male and female grey seal pups show distinct behavioral differences as they learn to forage effectively in the early stages of their independence.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Molecular magnetism packs power with 'messenger electron' ::::: A UW-Madison lab has made a molecule that gains magnetic strength through an unusual way of controlling those spins, which could lead to a breakthrough in quantam computing.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
High cognitive ability not a safeguard from conspiracies, paranormal beliefs ::::: A social psychologist reports on two studies that examined why some people are inclined to believe in various conspiracies and paranormal phenomena.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Biocatalysts are a bridge to greener, more powerful chemistry ::::: New research is building a bridge from nature's chemistry to greener, more efficient synthetic chemistry.
5h
New on MIT Technology Review :::::
The FDA Has Approved Smart Pills That Track When Patients Take Their Meds ::::: On its first day on the job yesterday, a self-driving shuttle in Las Vegas got into a crash. The vehicle is one of several made by French startup Navya that are part of a trial sponsored by AAA Northern California, Nevada, and Utah. Each shuttle carries… Read more On its first day on the job yesterday, a self-driving shuttle in Las Vegas got into a crash. The vehicle is one of several made by
5h
Futurity.org :::::
Extreme galaxy merger makes stars in a ‘frenzy’ ::::: Astronomers have observed a pair of giant, hyper-luminous galaxies merging into one, helping them understand more about the history of the universe. “…this discovery is helping astronomers to understand the timeline of the cosmos.” “Discovering a hyper-luminous starburst galaxy is an extraordinary feat, but discovering two—this close to each other—is amazing,” says Dominik Riechers, assistant pro
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Stress faced by emergency call handlers damaging to long term health ::::: During this innovative study, researchers from the University of Surrey, University of Dundee, Anglia Ruskin University and Kingston University/St George's, University of London investigated areas that impacted on the psychological health of call handlers. Previous research on how stress affects healthcare workers is largely focused on frontline staff i.e. paramedics and firefighters, however lit
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Risk perception of genome editing: Reservations and a great demand for information ::::: For decades now, humans have been altering the genetic information of plants and animals in order to produce new varieties or strains. Some more recent molecular biological methods known under the generic term 'genome editing' enable targeted intervention into the genetic material. The CRISPR/Cas9 method, which could be used in agriculture and medicine, for example, promises to be particularly suc
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Vegan diet as lifestyle choice and the need for risk communication ::::: Tofu sausages on the barbecue, followed by cake made with bananas instead of eggs? There is no doubt that the vegan diet is in vogue. Alongside the proven positive effects on health, however, there are also risks.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Physicists mix waves on superconducting qubits ::::: IMAGE: Artificial atoms are a staple of quantum optics experiments. Physicists closely investigate these systems recently: they turned a single artificial atom into a laser, learned to control single photon. This... view more Credit: MIPT Press Office Physicists from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) and Royal Holloway, University of London, have demonstrated an
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Food supplements ::::: In addition to Aloe barbadensis, however, other Aloe species are used for many different purposes. Inter alia, the sap of the pressed, whole, unpeeled leaves of Aloe arborescens (krantz aloe, candelabra aloe) is marketed in the form of food supplements. The German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) has assessed the possible health risks of such food supplements. The outer layers of the l
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Cognitive behavioral therapy for children and adolescents with OCD works in the long run ::::: The vast majority of children and adolescents who receive cognitive behavioral therapy treatment for OCD thrive and live without symptoms a year after the end of treatment. This is shown by new research from Aarhus University's Centre for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Risskov.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Later-borns choose less prestigious programs at university ::::: First-borns are more likely to study more prestigious subjects at university such as medicine and engineering and can thus expect greater earnings than later-borns, who turn to arts, journalism and teaching.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Cognitive training enhanced innovative thinking and brain networks in older adults ::::: IMAGE: These are regions that showed significant cerebral blood flow increases at rest in the cognitive training group. view more Credit: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience Researchers at the Center for BrainHealth at UT Dallas have demonstrated in a pilot study that cognitive training improves innovative thinking, along with corresponding positive brain changes, in healthy adults over the age
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Research finds injury from contact sport has harmful, though temporary effect on memory ::::: IMAGE: This is Melissa McCradden, a neuroscience postdoctoral fellow at McMaster University. view more Credit: McMaster University McMaster University neuroscientists studying sports-related head injuries have found that it takes less than a full concussion to cause memory loss, possibly because even mild trauma can interrupt the production of new neurons in a region of the brain responsible
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Caregivers of child support beneficiaries at risk for depression ::::: IMAGE: Prof Leila Patel, South African Research Chair for Welfare and Social Development and Director of the Centre for Social Development in Africa at the University of Johannesburg led the study... view more Credit: Supplied by the University of Johannesburg In South Africa, the Child Support Grant (CSG), a cash transfer for poor children, reaches a third of children under eight yea
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Studies uncover the hard-hitting consequences of sports-related head injuries ::::: Playing contact sports can injure the brain even if head impacts don't result in concussions, according to new research presented today at Neuroscience 2017, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health. The studies also suggest that relatively simple changes in equipment and athlete education could improve safety
5h
Gizmodo :::::
A New Type of Gravitational Wave Could Be Spotted Soon, Claims New Paper ::::: The Sombrero Galaxy (NASA/ESA and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)) It can’t be stressed enough how crazy gravitational waves are. These supremely violent events take place many light years in the distance, and because they literally alter the shape of space and time, the ripples they produce can be detected on Earth. But gravitational wave astronomy is only in its infancy, and there’s even
5h
The Atlantic :::::
'Human Rights Are Largely Irrelevant to the Emerging Trump Doctrine' ::::: Donald Trump is the first president in modern history who barely pays lip service to the promotion of universal human rights. On his grand tour of Asia, he stopped in Vietnam, where he failed to press the regime on what Human Rights Watch calls a “dire” lack of individual freedoms. Senator John McCain tweeted : “@POTUS in #Danang & no mention of human rights - Sad.” Instead, Trump prioritized tra
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
New strategies to increase 'good' cholesterol? ::::: After decades of individual attempts to identify the structure of the main building block of HDL (high-density lipoproteins), the so-called 'good' cholesterol that associates with protection from cardiovascular disease, a research team representing eight academic institutions across the US and Australia has come to agreement on a predictive model.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Exposure to thin-ideal media affect most, but not all, women: Results from the perceived ::::: New research measuring women's perceptions of how media impacts their body image. Results showed that many women reported feeling worse about their bodies when shown media images of bikini or fashion models, compared to those shown images of paintings or products.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Poison-ivy an unlikely hero in warding off exotic invaders? ::::: The invasive Japanese knotweed causes much more severe damage to floodplain forests along the Susquehanna River, Pennsylvania, USA, than previously thought. Furthermore, the researchers point to a key role for the often-maligned poison-ivy as a native species that can not only compete with knotweed but also help sustain the growth of new trees.
5h
New on MIT Technology Review :::::
Boston Dynamics’ New Four-Legged Robot Is a Smooth Operator ::::: On its first day on the job yesterday, a self-driving shuttle in Las Vegas got into a crash. The vehicle is one of several made by French startup Navya that are part of a trial sponsored by AAA Northern California, Nevada, and Utah. Each shuttle carries… Read more On its first day on the job yesterday, a self-driving shuttle in Las Vegas got into a crash. The vehicle is one of several made by
5h
Ingeniøren :::::
Nu bruger verden flere penge på el end på olie ::::: For første gang har forbrugere på globalt plan anvendt flere penge til køb af el end til køb af olieprodukter. Det er ét af de fakta, som får IEA til at konkludere, at elektrificeringen er igang i mange sektorer verden over, og at el kan gå hen og blive 'det nye olie'. Det fremgik af en web-præsentation af World Energy Outlook 2017 mandag. I World Energy Outlook-udgivelserne beskriver Det interna
5h
Science | The Guardian :::::
When it comes to claims about screen time we need more sense and less hype ::::: Screen time is one of the more divisive contemporary issues in psychological science. In a sense, this is no surprise – smartphone use, particularly among children and adolescents, has consistently increased in recent years . And as with any new form of disruptive technology, there are questions around what constitutes healthy and maladaptive use, both at an individual and societal level. The pro
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Gizmodo :::::
Keep Prying Eyes Out of Your Online Activity For About $.09 Per Day ::::: 1 Year NordVPN , $48 with code VIP70 2 Year Plan , $72 with code 2YSpecial2017 3 Year Plan , $99 with code 3ydeal VPNs are in the news these days , and with good reason. So if you’re curious to sign up and start protecting your browsing history and personal data (or, you know, getting around websites’ geoblocks), NordVPN charges less per month than a typical trip to Starbucks. NordVPN has long be
5h
Futurity.org :::::
After 3-year plateau, fossil fuel emissions rise again ::::: After remaining steady for three years, global fossil fuel emissions are rising again and may increase again next year. But improved energy efficiency and a booming renewables market may offer a bit of a silver lining. “This year’s result is discouraging, but I remain hopeful,” says Rob Jackson, professor at the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences at Stanford University and chair of
5h
Viden :::::
Nordens papegøjer er på vej mod Danmark ::::: Den ligner en papegøje. Næbet er kroget, og den har lang hale. Den bevæger sig også på samme måde som en papegøje. For eksempel når den holder fast i grenene med sine fødder og går på jagt efter bær eller frø. Men i modsætning til papegøjen, så lever den i det nordligste Skandinavien. Fuglen, der blot hedder krognæb, er dog en sjælden gæst i Danmark. Men nu får du måske mulighed for at se den. Læ
5h
Gizmodo :::::
HTC Kills Its Google VR Headset ::::: The HTC Vive Focus (Image: HTC) Today HTC announced a cool new completely standalone VR headset for China, and then promptly dashed hopes in America by confirming the cancellation of the standalone headset intended for US audiences. If you’re US-based and want the next wave of VR headsets, then it seems you’re going to need to look elsewhere. The US-focused headset was a Google Daydream standalon
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Quantum computing with molecules for a quicker search of unsorted databases ::::: IMAGE: Upon execution of Grover's quantum algorithm, the terbium single-molecule transistor reads out unsorted databases. view more Credit: Graphics: KIT/Institut Néel Scrapbooks or social networks are collections of mostly unsorted data. The search for single elements in very large data volumes, i.e. for the needle in the data haystack, is extremely complex for classical computers. Scienti
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
New study compares sexual practices among older and younger HIV-infected women ::::: A new study that compared HIV-positive women over 50 years of age with their younger HIV-infected cohorts found that while the older women were less likely to be sexually active and to report condomless sex with a male partner, those who were sexually active were not as likely to undergo screening for gonorrhea, chlamydia, or syphilis than their younger counterparts.
5h
Popular Science :::::
Your last-minute training guide to dominating this year's Turkey Trot ::::: Indulging in a delicious, home-cooked meal is arguably the best part of Thanksgiving. Arguably. In my opinion, a day of relaxation, merriment, and delicious grub isn't complete without some amount of strenuous physical activity. Luckily for me, there's many others who share my sentiments. Over the past decade or so, Thanksgiving Day road races—colloquially known as Turkey Trots—have become increa
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
High energy costs make vulnerable households reluctant to use air conditioning: study ::::: With a hot summer forecast, keeping cool will put a strain on financially vulnerable households. Credit: Shutterstock The trifecta of rising electricity prices, soaring temperatures and concerns over possible blackouts risks increasing heat-related deaths and illness this summer, as households struggle to afford to run cooling appliances. Over the past year, our Heatwaves, Homes & Health research
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Pregnancy-related conditions taken together leave moms -- and dads -- at risk ::::: Scientists show that the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure or heart disease post pregnancy is drastically higher if the women had both diabetes and high blood pressure while being pregnant. The study doesn't end with the mother's risks. The father's risks also rise if the mother has one gestational condition and rises even higher if she has both.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
HPV testing is better than the Pap test at detecting cervical cancer ::::: Testing for cervical cancer using HPV testing in addition to the Pap smear is unlikely to detect cancer cases that wouldn't be found using HPV testing alone.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Screen time might boost depression, suicide behaviors in teens ::::: Increased time spent in front of a screen -- in the form of computers, cell phones and tablets -- might have contributed to a recent uptick in symptoms of depression and suicide-related behaviors and thoughts in American young people, especially girls.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Sugary beverage consumption in US declining but remains high among certain groups ::::: Consumption of sodas and other sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) fell for both children and adults between 2003 and 2014, according to a new study. But despite this positive trend, the researchers found, consumption remains high among adolescents and young adults, and is particularly high among black, Mexican American, and non-Mexican Hispanic populations.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Simple water test could prevent crippling bone disease ::::: A simple colour-changing test to detect fluoride in drinking water could in the future prevent the crippling bone disease, skeletal fluorosis, in developing countries such as India and Tanzania.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
When water met iron deep inside the Earth, did it create conditions for life? ::::: Reservoirs of oxygen-rich iron between the Earth's core and mantle could have played a major role in Earth's history, including the breakup of supercontinents, drastic changes in Earth's atmospheric makeup, and the creation of life, according to recent research.
5h
Gizmodo :::::
This Photographer Turned a Grade School Science Experiment Into a Phenomenal Short Film ::::: GIF Using iron powder to teach kids about the magic of magnets has been a staple of grade school science for decades. The tiny iron particles are seemingly brought to life in the presence of a powerful magnet; an effect that filmmaker Roman De Giuli manages to turn into a moving masterpiece with closeup photography and moody lighting. Everything you see in De Giuli’s short film, Matereality , was
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Science in the home boosts children's academic success ::::: Science at home doesn’t need to be daunting. It can be as simple as planting seeds with a child, or helping them collect leaves and bugs. Credit: Shutterstock Did you know that children spend just 14 per cent of their waking time between Kindergarten and the end of Grade 12 in school? Given this startling statistic, it comes as no surprise that much of children's learning happens "out there"—in t
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Defects in cell's 'waste disposal system' linked to Parkinson's ::::: Research points at a group of lysosomal storage disorder genes as potential major contributors to the onset and progression of Parkinson's disease.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Dresden scientists develop a sensor for the most important human cancer gene ::::: The molecular smoke detector works like a TP53 sensor, which monitors the correct function of the gene. A non-functional TP53 gene is going to activate the sensor, which initiates cell death. Results from this study from the research team of Professor Frank Buchholz are now published in the journal Nature Communications.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
New player in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis identified ::::: IMAGE: This is Huaxi Xu, Ph.D., professor, Neuroscience and Aging Research Center. view more Credit: Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) La Jolla, Calif., November 14, 2017 -- Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) have shown that a protein called membralin is critical for keeping Alzheimer's disease pathology in check. The study, published
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
An atlas of the heart: Proteome of the human heart mapped for the first time ::::: IMAGE: Front: drawing of a cardiac muscle, background: excerpt from a so-called 'heatmap', an overview of the proteins analyzed for the proteomic map. view more Credit: Doll, Kraue, Menzfeld / MPIB A healthy heart beats about two billion times during a lifetime - thanks to the interplay of more than 10,000 proteins. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (MPIB) and the Ge
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Parasitic plants rely on unusual method to spread their seeds ::::: IMAGE: Figure 2: (a) flowers of Yoania amagiensis, (b) flowers of Monopastrum humile, (c) flowers of Phacellanthus tubiflorus, (d) fruit of Y. amagiensis, (e) fruit of M. humile, (f) fruit of... view more Credit: Kobe University Three species of non-photosynthetic plants rely mainly on camel crickets to disperse their seeds, according to new research from Project Associate Professor
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Cellphone data reveals Hurricane Maria's impact on travel in Puerto Rico ::::: Nearly two months after Hurricane Maria swept through Puerto Rico, the infrastructural damage remains evident -- today, FEMA estimates that only 41 percent of the island has had power restored. But the impact on human behavior is just beginning to be understood. Research collaborators from the Boston Children's Hospital Computational Epidemiology Group, MIT Media Lab and Google, Inc., have shed l
6h
New on MIT Technology Review :::::
This Startup Developed a Promising New Battery Material—and a Novel Survival Strategy ::::: As Kenan Sahin walks through the labs at Tiax, an energy technology development firm located along Boston’s tech beltway, he points to a row of little muffle furnaces in a small beige room. The company’s researchers use the ovens to heat mixtures of metals, producing slight variations of a nickel-rich cathode recipe that Sahin believes will improve the energy density, cycle life, and price of lit
6h
Gizmodo :::::
New Study Shows What Would Happen If the US Went Vegan ::::: Hello, ladies (Image: Gizmodo) If you were to ask all of your friends what an ideal society looks like, I’m sure you’d receive vastly different answers. Maybe someone will suggest a society without war where everyone works together to solve problems. Your friend who just finished an Ayn Rand book will say something stupid. And maybe your vegan friend will pipe up and suggest a society without ani
6h
Gizmodo :::::
4 Updates to Mozilla's Overhauled Quantum Firefox ::::: Image: Mozilla In the nine years that it’s been around, Google Chrome’s speed and simplicity convinced most of us to make the switch from whatever browser we were using before (though not everyone is a Chrome fan). With a new overhaul and some streamlining, Firefox is hoping to claw back some of that market share. A newly updated version of Mozilla’s browser, with the fancy name Quantum —or Firef
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Selenium might hold key to mystery of crib-biting in horses ::::: Crib-biting may share similar characteristics with some human neurological or psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia and autism. Credit: University of Portsmouth Crib-biting in horses – a distressing compulsive disorder – might be related to a lack of trace element selenium in their diets, according to new research. The researchers, led by Dr Arash Omidi at Shiraz University in Iran, and in
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
New mirror reflects light differently than conventional mirrors ::::: When a regular mirror reflects circularly polarized light, it reverses the spin state of the light. In contrast, the chiral meta-mirror preserves one of the two spin states when reflecting circularly polarized light, while absorbing the other spin state. Credit: Kang et al. ©2017 American Chemical Society (Phys.org)—Researchers have designed a new type of mirror that reflects light in a completel
6h
Ars Technica :::::
Apple clarifies what Control Center Wi-Fi, Bluetooth toggles do in iOS 11.2 beta ::::: Enlarge / The control center has a new interface for adjusting brightness. Unbeknownst to many, the Bluetooth and Wi-Fi toggles in the Control Center in iOS 11 don't do what you expect. Rather than completely disabling those features, they only partially disable Bluetooth and Wi-Fi. To clear up any confusion, Apple appears to have added explainer pop-up messages when either Bluetooth or Wi-Fi is
6h
Scientific American Content: Global :::::
Let's Science That: A Tool for Solving Humanity's Greatest Challenges ::::: As an editor, I've never been a big fan of turning nouns into verbs when perfectly good options already exist. But I'd be happy to see us use “science” that way. It's a powerful, evidence-based process of conducting experiments, gathering data and performing analysis on the results. It's at once a methodical set of practices and a tool that inspires hope for a brighter future by advancing discove
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Manganese dioxide shows potential in micromotors ::::: Manganese dioxide could make the preparation of micromotors increasingly cost-effective, opening up new avenues for their use, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. Synthetic micromotors are tiny particles with dimensions less than the diameter of a human hair. Micromotors can undergo an autonomous motion in liquid environments, which can be driven by various means su
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Oral bacteria in the gut could drive immune cell induction and inflammatory bowel disease ::::: IMAGE: 'When the bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae colonizes in an intestine out of microbial balance, immune cells called T helper 1 (TH1) become overactive in the gut, resulting in intestinal inflammation leading... view more Credit: Waseda University On average, we humans ingest 1.5 liters of saliva containing bacteria every day. Could this possibly have harmful effects on our health? Accordin
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Researchers reverse heart failure in Marfan mice ::::: In experiments with mice that have a rodent form of Marfan syndrome, Johns Hopkins researchers report that even modestly increasing stress on the animals' hearts -- at levels well-tolerated in normal mice -- can initiate heart failure. The findings, described Aug. 4 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation Insight, revealed a novel cellular pathway in heart tissue that leads to heart failure and m
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
HPV testing is better than the Pap test at detecting cervical cancer ::::: A new paper in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute finds that testing for cervical cancer using HPV testing in addition to the Pap smear is unlikely to detect cancer cases that wouldn't be found using HPV testing alone. The main goal of cervical screening programs is to detect and treat precancer before cancer develops. Cytology-based screening, known as the Pap test or Pap smear, is use
6h
Inside Science :::::
Flow Like an Oil, Stick Like a Mussel ::::: Flow Like an Oil, Stick Like a Mussel Scientists look to nature to make a glue that can bind wet surfaces together. Blue_mussel_clump.jpg Image credits: Inductiveload /Public Domain Technology Tuesday, November 14, 2017 - 09:00 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- Researchers have created a new underwater glue using materials inspired by mussels -- and a dash of soybean. Marine organisms ca
6h
Ars Technica :::::
Can EA fix what’s broken with Star Wars: Battlefront II’s economy? ::::: Enlarge / Much like this space-defense mission, EA's launch plans for the Star Wars: Battlefront II economy seem to be blowing up. EA/DICE reader comments 2 Before we deliver a proper verdict for Star Wars: Battlefront II , we want to take a moment to talk about the game's troubling, multilayered economy. The online multiplayer shooter is now officially available for paying EA Access subscribers,
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Parasitic plants rely on unusual method to spread their seeds ::::: Figure 1: (a) flowers of Yoania amagiensis, (b) flowers of Monopastrum humile, (c) flowers of Phacellanthus tubiflorus, (d) fruit of Y. amagiensis, (e) fruit of M. humile, (f) fruit of P. tubiflorus. Credit: Kobe University Three species of non-photosynthetic plants rely mainly on camel crickets to disperse their seeds, according to new research from Project Associate Professor Suetsugu Kenji (Ko
6h
Dagens Medicin :::::
Satspuljepartierne afsætter 65 mio. kr. til ny national diabeteshandlingsplan ::::: 65 mio. kr. fra satspuljemidlerne skal over en fireårig periode bruges til at gennemføre en ny national diabeteshandlingsplan. Danske Regioner savner fokus på tidlig indsats.
6h
Ingeniøren :::::
Aktindsigt: Dårligt håndværk plager installering af signalsystem i togene ::::: Det svært forsinkede arbejde med at installere udstyr til det nye landsdækkende signalsystem i DSB’s tog har i flere omgange været præget af gnidninger mellem DSB og leverandøren Alstom. Det viser en række dokumenter, som Ingeniøren i dag kan offentliggøre forud for, at en konsulentrapport onsdag ventes at afsløre nye forsinkelser og fordyrelser i det allerede 19,6 milliarder kroner dyre projekt.
6h
Scientific American Content: Global :::::
Top 10 Emerging Technologies of 2017 ::::: Top 10 Emerging Technologies of 2017 Disruptive solutions that are poised to change the world What if drinking water could be drawn from desert air easily, without requiring enormous amounts of electricity from a grid? What if a doctor could do a biopsy for a suspected cancer without a blade of any sort? What if we didn't have to wait too long for the result? Technologies that make these visions
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
California launch of new US weather satellite postponed ::::: Before its brief mission ended unexpectedly in March 2016, Japan's Hitomi X-ray observatory captured exceptional information about the motions of hot gas in the Perseus galaxy cluster. Now, thanks to unprecedented detail ...
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
As China flexes its muscles in Antarctica, science is the best diplomatic tool on the frozen continent ::::: Australia’s new icebreaker will be called RSV Nuyina. Credit: Australian Antarctic Division/Damen/DMS Maritime/Knud E Hansen Science has always drawn people and nations to Antarctica. But territorial claims and political tensions are also part of the history of that continent. China is investing heavily in infrastructure and capability in Antarctica with research stations, airfields, field camps
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Can cities get smarter about extreme weather? ::::: Municipalities invest heavily in infrastructure, such as this spillway in Sacramento, to guard against flooding and other extreme weather events, but their design models are lagging as the climate changes. Credit: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, CC BY Remember the movie "Moneyball" ? The Oakland A's are struggling, financially and on the baseball field. Then they introduce an innovative system for
6h
Gizmodo :::::
Don't Expect Man of Steel 2 Any Time Soon ::::: But Wonder Woman 2 is coming a little sooner than you’d expected. The writer behind the It movie is bringing Are You Afraid of the Dark? back to life. Paul Bettany teases his Solo: A Star Wars Story character. Plus, gorgeous Justice League posters, and Nazi Oliver Queen strikes in new footage from the big CW/DC crossover. Spoilers now! Man of Steel 2 Speaking with the Washington Times , producer
6h
Feed: All Latest :::::
How to Lock Down Your Facebook Privacy Settings ::::: Facebook deserves a lot of the flack it gets, be it for providing Russian propaganda with a platform or gradually eroding privacy norms. Still, it has some genuine usefulness. And while the single best way to keep your privacy safe on Facebook is to delete your account, taking these simple steps in the settings is the next best thing. Remember, it's not just friends of friends you need to think a
6h
Futurity.org :::::
How very low-calorie diets reverse diabetes ::::: New research clarifies the mechanisms by which caloric restriction rapidly reverses type 2 diabetes. If researchers confirm the findings in people, they could provide potential new drug targets for treating this common chronic disease, the researchers say. One in three Americans will develop type 2 diabetes by 2050, according to recent projections by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Quantum computing with molecules for a quicker search of unsorted databases ::::: Upon execution of Grover’s quantum algorithm, the terbium single-molecule transistor reads out unsorted databases. Credit: KIT/Institut Néel Scrapbooks or social networks are collections of mostly unsorted data. The search for single elements in very large data volumes, i.e. for the needle in the data haystack, is extremely complex for classical computers. Scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Tec
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Contracting white dwarf observed for the first time ::::: White dwarf from HD49798/RX J0648.0-4418. Credit: Francesco Mereghetti Astrophysicists from MSU (Russia) and colleagues from Italy and Russian Academy of Sciences have found the first observational evidence for a contracting white dwarf. Constant high spin-up rate of a star of this type, located in an enigmatic binary system, can be easily explained if the white dwarf is contracting, the research
6h
New on MIT Technology Review :::::
Smart Pills Are Headed to American Patients ::::: Congressman Lamar Smith, who has relentlessly disputed the science behind climate change, now argues there may be ways to avoid the dangers of rising temperatures without overhauling America’s energy system. “As the climate continues to change, geoengineering… Read more Congressman Lamar Smith, who has relentlessly disputed the science behind climate change, now argues there may be ways to avoi
6h
Feed: All Latest :::::
The Real Problem with 'Games as Service' Isn't the Microtransactions ::::: One of my most vital videogame memories is actually a travel story. In the early days of the wildly popular Final Fantasy XI , I was a highly active player. I wasn't a very good player—I never levelled up very high, I never quite got into the party dynamics, and I had a bad habit of jumping around accounts and classes before ever really mastering anything. I didn't play the game "correctly." But
6h
Feed: All Latest :::::
Review: Razer Wolverine Ultimate (Xbox/PC) ::::: It isn’t too often that I think back on a game controller fondly. I think the only exception is the Nintendo WaveBird , arguably the first great wireless controller, which was frickin’ life-changing. Nowadays, most folks probably stick to the bundled controller that comes with whatever console they buy. That’s why I was surprised when I picked up Razer’s Wolverine Ultimate to play for the first t
6h
Ars Technica :::::
Firefox’s faster, slicker, slimmer Quantum edition now out ::::: Firefox is fast now. (credit: Mozilla) Mozilla is working on a major overhaul of its Firefox browser, and, with the general release of Firefox 57 today, has reached a major milestone. The version of the browser coming out today has a sleek new interface and, under the hood, major performance enhancements, with Mozilla claiming that it's as much as twice as fast as it was a year ago. Not only shou
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Earth's heartbeat ::::: Molten rock pulses deep inside Earth, and WA scientists are studying it to help us to understand volcanic activity around the world. Hidden very deep underground is a hot flowing river of melted rock or magma. Like all rivers, it doesn't stay still. This movement can do two things. It can cause an earthquake or it can create rock—two different types of rock, in fact. The river of hot magma ca
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
'No money down' bankruptcies prevalent among the poor, minorities ::::: A new paper from a University of Illinois law professor who studies consumer credit issues examines the breakdown in access to justice among the poor and minorities in the bankruptcy system, from which about 1 million Americans will seek help this year. A crucial decision for those filing for bankruptcy is whether to choose a traditional Chapter 7 bankruptcy, in which attorney 's fees are paid up
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Giant ionized gas nebula found by astronomers ::::: HST WFC3 FR716N image of the “Teacup” containing the Hα+[NII] lines. Credit: Martin et al., 2017. (Phys.org)—A group of astronomers has discovered a giant nebula of ionized gas extending over 300,000 light years. This nebula turns out to be associated with the quasar dubbed the "Teacup." The finding was presented November 7 in a paper published online on the arXiv pre-print server. "Teacup" (offi
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Demand for people skills is growing faster than demand for STEM skills ::::: High-level interpersonal and problem solving skills are what will make you employable in a digital world. Credit: Shutterstock Advances in digital technology are changing the world of work. It has been estimated that more than 40% of human workers will be replaced by robots. This probably overstates the scale of displacement , but developments in the fields of artificial intelligence and machine
6h
Scientific American Content: Global :::::
Nature-Inspired Antifreeze Molecules Could Keep Organs Fresh Longer ::::: Exposing living tissue to subfreezing temperatures for long can cause irreparable damage. Microscopic ice crystals shred cells and seize moisture, making donor organs unsuitable for transplantation. Thus, organs can be chilled for only a few hours ahead of a procedure. But a set of durable new antifreeze compounds—similar to those found in particularly hardy animals—could lengthen organs’ shelf l
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Twisting molecule wrings more power from solar cells ::::: Inside a solar cell, sunlight excites electrons. But these electrons often don't last long enough to go on to power cell phones or warm homes. In a promising new type of solar cell, the solar-excited electrons have better odds going on to work. Why? Scientists revealed the dominant force behind the higher efficiency of these promising hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite solar cells. They found tha
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Robots can help us better understand how infants learn ::::: Credit: Radboud University Robots are a hot item and Radboud University is right on trend by using them to replicate babies' brain and behaviour. Johan Kwisthout, coordinator of the Master's programme in Artificial Intelligence, explains how this works and what else we can expect from robots. According to Kwisthout, previous research into the learning behaviour of babies focused primarily on 'whe
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
How social media fires people's passions – and builds extremist divisions ::::: Passionate feelings can lead to extreme divisions. Credit: pathdoc/Shutterstock.com The people of the United States continue to learn how polarized and divided the nation has become. In one study released in late October by the Pew Research Center, Americans were found to have become increasingly partisan in their views. On issues as diverse as health care, immigration, race and sexuality, Americ
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
LHC achieves record luminosity ::::: View of the LHC tunnel. Credit: Maximilien Brice/CERN It's the end of the road for the protons this year after a magnificent performance from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). On Friday, the final beams of the 2017 proton run circulated in the LHC. The run ended, as it does every year, with a round up of the luminosity performance, the indicator by which the effectiveness of a collider is measured
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Where does bad air come from? ::::: Credit: PlanetEarth Online Auchencorth Moss is one of Scotland's distinctive moorlands, which for generations have provided people with a lifesaving source of peat to burn to keep warm. While modern alternative fuels have dramatically reduced communities' need for fires and peats, this precious habitat is now providing valuable information for scientists working to combat air pollution in cities
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Measuring impact of 'likes' by users on Facebook being targeted by sellers ::::: Credit: CC0 Public Domain (Phys.org)—A small team of researchers from Columbia Business School, Stanford University and the Wharton School of Business all in the U.S. and the University of Cambridge in the U.K. has found a way to show that sellers targeting ads at users based on their profiles on Facebook can have a dramatic impact on sales. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
New super-resolution probe captures cells in unprecedented detail ::::: An image of a cell nucleus captured using the new probe. Credit: University of Sheffield Scientists have developed a new technique to capture images of the nucleus of a cell in unprecedented detail, paving the way for new insights into human disease and ageing. By using a new luminescent probe to light up cell components, researchers in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Sheffield h
6h
Science | The Guardian :::::
Untried and unethical: why Nevada's new lethal injection crosses a line ::::: Today, Scott Raymond Dozier was scheduled to be executed by lethal injection in Nevada’s Ely State Prison. However, the execution has been postponed over concerns around the untested drug combination proposed as the method of death. The postponement is the latest incident in a series of controversial state executions carried out in the United States this year, and brings to the foreground many co
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Did they mean to do that? Accident and intent in an octopuses' garden ::::: A gloomy octopus perched above a bed of discarded scallop shells. Credit: Peter Godfrey-Smith , Author provided We recently published a scientific report of octopuses living together in unusual numbers at a site on the south coast of New South Wales. Then things got a little out of hand. Gloomy octopus The gloomy octopus, named for large eyes that can give the animal a doleful appearance, is
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Driving a Tesla may not trip your defibrillator ::::: Sitting in, or standing close to the charging port of a Tesla electric vehicle didn't trigger a shock or interfere with implantable defibrillator performance, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.
6h
Ars Technica :::::
Flying car maker Terrafugia bought by Geely ::::: Terrafugia / Barcroft Cars / Barcroft Media via Getty Images reader comments 10 One of the most remarkable transformations in the auto industry has been the flourishing of Volvo Cars under the ownership of Chinese parent company Geely. It could be a poster child for the right way to acquire and manage a brand—one simply needs to look at Volvo's tenure under previous owner Ford, or perhaps the fat
6h
The Scientist RSS :::::
Image of the Day: Starved Worm ::::: A heat map of gene expression provides insights on the genes that help C. elegans survive severe caloric restriction.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Shape-shifting agent targets harmful bacteria in the stomach ::::: Credit: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign A new shape-shifting polymer can target and kill Helicobacter pylori bacteria in the stomach without killing helpful bacteria in the gut. Such a treatment could improve the digestive health of billions of people worldwide who contract H. pylori infections. The antimicrobial agent morphs into a bacterial hole-puncher in the stomach's acidic enviro
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Digitally mediated domestic violence ::::: Domestic violence survivors can be abused, monitored and controlled through a host of techniques and digital technologies, says QUT Associate Professor Molly Dragiewicz. "Surveillance, identity theft and intrusion are increasingly emerging as challenges for victims, advocates and support services," she said. Professor Molly Dragiewicz and Dr Bridget Harris, criminologists in QUT's School of Jus
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Exploring evolution acceptance for better science education ::::: Understanding the nature of science is the greatest predictor of evolution acceptance in college students, a new study finds. With a minority of American adults fully accepting evolution, the fundamental principle of biological science, this research provides guidance for educators to improve science literacy. "Asking why it is critical that students accept evolution is almost like asking why it
7h
Futurity.org :::::
Will Parkinson’s disease be the next pandemic? ::::: The number of people with Parkinson’s disease will soon grow to pandemic proportions—and the medical community needs to mobilize to respond to the impending public health threat—experts say. “Pandemics are usually equated with infectious diseases like Zika, influenza, and HIV,” says Ray Dorsey, a neurologist at the University of Rochester Medical Center. “But neurological disorders are now the le
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Campylobacter uses other organisms as Trojan horse to infect new hosts ::::: A computer-generated image of a Campylobacter bacteria. Researchers at Kingston University have been exploring how the leading cause of food poisoning spreads by invading the cells of micro-organisms called ameobae. Credit: Phanie/Rex/Shutterstock. Kingston University researchers have shown how a leading cause of bacterial food poisoning can multiply and spread – by using another organism's cells
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
The forgotten scientist who paved the way for the discovery of DNA's structure ::::: J. Michael Creeth. Credit: University of Nottingham When James Michael Creeth finished adding acid to the sample of DNA taken from a calf's thymus gland, he wasn't just completing the experiments that would earn him his PhD. He was paving the way for a discovery that would change the world. Scientists James Watson and Francis Crick were famously the first to work out the structure of DNA, and Ros
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Taiwan's Hon Hai quarter profit falls on iPhone X costs ::::: Taiwanese tech giant Foxconn said Tuesday its third-quarter profit dropped by more than a third, dragged by costs associated with producing the latest iPhone model. Also known as Hon Hai, the firm is the world's biggest contract electronics maker and assembles Apple's iPhones. Its net income in July-September fell 39.3 percent from a year earlier to Tw$21 billion ($696 million), lower than the
7h
New on MIT Technology Review :::::
This Startup Developed a Promising New Battery Material—and a Novel Survival Strategy ::::: As Kenan Sahin walks through the labs at Tiax, an energy technology development firm located along Boston’s tech beltway, he points to a row of little muffle furnaces in a small beige room. The company’s researchers use the ovens to heat mixtures of metals, producing slight variations of a nickel-rich cathode recipe that Sahin believes will improve the energy density, cycle life and price of lith
7h
New on MIT Technology Review :::::
Alibaba’s AI Fashion Consultant Helps Achieve Record-Setting Sales ::::: On the third floor of a shopping mall in the heart of Shanghai last week, Xiaolan He, a woman in her 50s, took an olive-green down jacket to a fitting room. To her surprise, she found a screen about the size of a large poster on the wall. It recognized the item of clothing in her hands through a tiny sensor embedded in the garment, and showed several options for matching items that she could flip
7h
Scientific American Content: Global :::::
Capturing Floodwaters in Wet Years Could Help California Survive Drought Years ::::: “Seventeen is closed, Skyline is closed, nine is closed, 152 is closed,” my mom tells me at a restaurant in San Jose, Calif., rattling off highways between the San Francisco Bay Area and the Pacific coast, where I'm scheduled to drive the next morning. Last winter's torrential storms turned California's hillsides so sodden that they slid down over roads, cutting off communities. Between October 2
7h
Dagens Medicin :::::
Danskerne betaler for meget for medicin ::::: Priserne på kopi-medicin er alt for dyr, lyder det i en opsigsvækkende advarsel fra Konkurrence- og Forbrugerstyrelsen.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Simulating a meat-free America ::::: (Phys.org)—A pair of researchers affiliated with both Virginia Polytechnic Institute and the U.S. Department of Agriculture has conducted an intriguing exercise—simulating the impact on the American diet and changes in greenhouse gas emissions if animal food products were completely eliminated from production, consumption and sale in the US. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National
7h
Popular Science :::::
Why does my arm hurt the day after I get my flu shot? ::::: Needles usually hurt. That bit makes sense. Flu shots are painful because someone is jabbing a pointed bit of metal into your arm and forcing fluid into your body. But why does it sometimes hurt more the next day? And while we’re at it, why does the shot even go in the arm? Didn’t doctors and nurses use to jab those needles into our buttcheeks?? You’re having an immunologic response inside your a
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Dagens Medicin :::::
PLO taler mod ‘kvotekonger’ i Folketinget ::::: PLO har foretræde for Folketingets Sundheds- og Ældreudvalg og vil tale mod ny lovgivning, der kan skabe ‘kvotekonger’ i almen praksis.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Insurance linked to black-white survival disparities in colorectal cancer ::::: Health insurance coverage differences account for nearly one-half of the black-white survival disparity in colorectal cancer patients, according to a new study. The study, published in Gastroenterology , reinforces the importance of equitable health insurance coverage to mitigate the black-white survival disparity in colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed
7h
Ingeniøren :::::
Spørg Læserne: Hvorfor stopper brændeovnens blæsere altid i samme position? ::::: Søren Hetland Basse har skrevet: Jeg har 2 stk. canadiske Ecofan-blæsere placeret på min brændeovn. Brændeovnen er stor, og der er et skorstensrør i midten. De to blæsere står forrest på ovnen og er orienteret i vinkel til hinanden. Der er 39 cm mellem navene på blæserne. Den venstre starter først, når ovnen tændes, fordi luftindtaget og døråbningen er i den side; den højre kører længst tid, når
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Futurity.org :::::
Why head and face pain cause more suffering ::::: Sensory neurons that serve the head and face are wired directly into one of the brain’s principal emotional signaling hubs, research finds. This accounts for why people consistently rate pain of the head, face, eyeballs, ears, and teeth as more disruptive, and more emotionally draining, than pain elsewhere in the body. “Usually doctors focus on treating the sensation of pain, but this shows the w
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Temperature change in Sichuan ::::: The Sichuan basin is one of the most densely populated regions of China. Along with insufficient arable land and economic underdevelopments, this region is particularly vulnerable to climate-related stresses.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Where is all that carbon dioxide going? ::::: In the Peruvian Amazon, a researcher studies a fire set by farmers in order to clear land. Credit: Kevin Krajick/Earth Institute An international team of scientists announced today at the Bonn climate talks that human emissions of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide are again rising this year, after three years of remaining basically flat. They project that emissions will reach a record 41 billion
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
'Criticality' experiments enhance nuclear safety, security and effectiveness ::::: Plutonium plates are hand-stacked onto an aluminum tray during the first LLNL-designed criticality experiment in 40 years. The "vintage plutonium" plates were produced in the 1960s, steel plated to prevent oxidation and used through the '80s to mock up nuclear reactor cores. Credit: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Gathered in a control room deep in the Nevada desert, a team of researchers
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Dagens Medicin :::::
Diabetesbørn dør syv gange oftere af hjertesygdom ::::: Ny dansk forskning viser, at børn og unge har markant højere sandsynlighed for at dø af pludselig hjertesygdom. Diabetesforeningen kræver øget opmærksomhed på området.
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Feed: All Latest :::::
Inside the Decades-Long Fight for Better Emergency Alerts ::::: More than 20 years later, Tom Wheeler can still remember the sound that several thousand tons of aluminum train make when they crash into an abandoned vehicle. Wheeler, who would eventually serve as chairman of the Federal Communications Commission under President Obama, was at the time working on the opposite end of the regulatory spectrum, as CEO of the cell phone lobbying group, CTIA. He was s
7h
Feed: All Latest :::::
How to Set Up Twitter Lists and Regain Some Sanity ::::: Twitter can be exhausting. As you follow more and more people, your feed becomes more and more cluttered, until it's just one long stream of bad jokes, shameless self-promotion, political doom, and the occasional subtweet. It doesn't help that Twitter’s algorithm seems hard-wired to bring the worst of tweets right to the top. Sure, you could go on a mass unfollow spree, but muting offenders of yo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
The changing colors of our living planet ::::: From space, satellites can see Earth breathe. A new NASA visualization shows 20 years of continuous observations of plant life on land and at the ocean’s surface, from September 1997 to September 2017. On land, vegetation appears on a scale from brown (low vegetation) to dark green (lots of vegetation); at the ocean surface, phytoplankton are indicated on a scale from purple (low) to yellow (high
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Graphene water filter turns whisky clear ::::: Credit: University of Manchester Previously graphene-oxide membranes were shown to be completely impermeable to all solvents except for water. However, a study published in Nature Materials , now shows that we can tailor the molecules that pass through these membranes by simply making them ultrathin. The research team led by Professor Rahul Nair at the National Graphene Institute and School of Ch
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Researchers release evaluation of solar pumps for irrigation and salt mining in India ::::: In 2014, the government of India made an ambitious goal to replace 26 million groundwater pumps run on costly diesel, for more efficient and environmentally-friendly options such as solar pumps.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Later-borns choose less prestigious programmes at university ::::: Realistic scenario: it is actually quite likely that the older sister will go on to study medicine in the future, while the younger one is more likely to become a journalist or teacher. Credit: istockphoto / imagepointphoto First-born children tend to choose more prestigious university programmes such as medicine or engineering than their later-born siblings. These are the findings of a new study
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Information filter for immune defence ::::: Structure of the MHC-I peptide-loading complex in the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum. Credit: S. Trowitzsch, A. Möller, R. Tampé Nowadays, social media help us to keep abreast of current events. As we are unable to process the entire flood of information at once, neural networks extract only the information we need to know. The cells in our body act in a similar manner: In the fight agains
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Astronaut meets volcano ::::: ESA astronaut Matthias Maurer communicates with planetary scientists to discuss interesting geological sampling sites during the first ESA Pangaea training course in 2016. Credit: European Space Agency An expedition of astronauts, planetary scientists and engineers is off to Spain's Canary Island of Lanzarote to learn best how to explore uncharted planets. The training will equip space travellers
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Millions of city trees at risk from rising temperatures ::::: Credit: University of Melbourne A new study has found that almost one quarter of trees in Australian cities are at risk from increasing temperatures in urban environments due to climate change and urban heat islands, posing a threat to some tree species in our cities. Researchers from the University of Melbourne and the University of Queensland from the Clean Air and Urban Landscapes Hub (CAUL) h
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Black holes, curved spacetime and quantum computing ::::: Credit: Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic license. Rotating black holes and computers that use quantum-mechanical phenomena to process information are topics that have fascinated science lovers for decades, but even the most innovative thinkers rarely put them together. Now, however, theoretical physicist Ovidiu Racorean from the General Direction of Information Technology, Buc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
How robots could solve the antibiotics production crisis ::::: A WHO report in February listed a worrying number of pathogens that threaten our health because there are fewer and fewer drugs that can treat the infections they cause. Indeed, since their 1960s heyday, the production of novel antibiotics has declined markedly and it's been 30 years since a major new class of antibiotics for clinical use has been discovered. There are even cases of resistance to
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Dagens Medicin :::::
425 millioner voksne har diabetes på verdensplan ::::: Den internationale diabetesorganisation opjusterer, hvor mange personer, der verden over lever med diabetes. Tallet er steget med 10 millioner personer på bare to år.
8h
Gizmodo :::::
Three Months of Amazon Music Unlimited For Just $1 Is the Best Deal In Streaming ::::: Commerce Content is independent of Editorial and Advertising, and if you buy something through our posts, we may get a small share of the sale. Click here for more. At $8 per month for Prime members, Amazon Music Unlimited was already more affordable than Spotify Premium or Apple Music , but Amazon’s sweetening the pot for new members by offering three months for just $1 , for a limited time. Ama
8h
Live Science :::::
7 Ways That Air Pollution Can Harm Your Health ::::: A recent study of U.S. veterans suggested that air pollution exposure could be connected to declining kidney function, the emergence of kidney disease and even kidney failure. In the study, which was published online on Sept. 21 , 2017, in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology , researchers reported that even low levels of air pollution could affect the kidneys, and its impact would
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Live Science :::::
Early Medieval Farming Village Unearthed Near Famed Viking Site ::::: Archaeologists in Denmark have unearthed the remains of a 1,500-year-old farming village near the famed Viking site of Jelling in central Jutland. The excavated village contains traces of up to 400 farm buildings, including several longhouses that would have each formed the center of a family farm. Based on the distinctive shapes of the buildings, researchers have dated the remains to b
8h
Live Science :::::
In Photos: Early Medieval Village Discovered in Denmark ::::: Jelling became a center of Viking power under King Harald Bluetooth in the 10 th Century. Bluetooth placed these runestones, known as the Jelling Stones, at the sire, to mark his introduction of the Christian religion to Denmark. But the early medieval village excavated by archaeologists on the outskirts of the town predates the Viking era by many centuries, and is not thought to be directly conn
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Pregnancy-related conditions taken together leave moms -- and dads -- at risk ::::: Scientists at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre in Montreal show that the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure or heart disease post pregnancy is drastically higher if the women had both diabetes and high blood pressure while being pregnant. The study doesn't end with the mother's risks. The father's risks also rise if the mother has one gestational c
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Feed: All Latest :::::
A New Study of Economics as a Science Says It's Still Dismal ::::: When Hristos Doucouliagos was a young economist in the mid-1990s, he got interested in all the ways economics was wrong about itself—bias, underpowered research, statistical shenanigans. Nobody wanted to hear it. “I’d go to seminars and people would say, ‘You’ll never get this published,’” Doucouliagos , now at Deakin University in Australia, says. “They’d say, ‘this is bordering on libel.’” Now,
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Feed: All Latest :::::
State Attorneys General Are Google's Next Headache ::::: European regulators have come down hard on Google for squelching competition . The US Federal Trade Commission let the company off relatively easy in 2013. Antitrust advocates have predicted that the next threat would come from state attorneys general. Monday, that forecast came true, when Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley said he is investigating whether Google violated Missouri’s consumer-p
8h
Feed: All Latest :::::
Brogan BamBrogan's Arrivo Takes the Hyperloop to Colorado ::::: The good people of Denver, Colorado, have seen the self-driving trucks that deliver beer and those designed to get smashed . They have wooed Silicon Valley and welcomed big pot. Now they are getting a hyperloop . Well, not exactly a hyperloop. A hyperloop-inspired system . “It’s a meaningful distinction,” says Brogan BamBrogan (yup, his legal name), founder and CEO of Arrivo, which today announce
8h
Feed: All Latest :::::
Watch a 10-Year-Old Beat Apple's Face ID on His Mom's iPhone X ::::: Hacking Face ID, the facial recognition system built into Apple's iPhone X, isn't easy . Unless, it turns out, you're a very specific hacker—say, a rare 10-year-old kid, trying to break into the phone of whichever of your parents looks the most like you. Attaullah Malik and Sana Sherwani made that discovery earlier this month, when their fifth-grade son, Ammar Malik, walked into the bedroom of th
8h
Ars Technica :::::
Guidemaster: Finding good wireless headphones in a sea of compromises ::::: Jeff Dunn reader comments 0 Even as Bluetooth headphones continue to skyrocket in popularity, the state of wireless exercise headphones remains a bit hairy. Though the benefits of Bluetooth seem perfectly suited for the gym, and while there’s no shortage of demand for an uncompromised set of wireless workout headphones, the ideal pair always appears to be just out of reach. I say this because I’v
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Latest Headlines | Science News :::::
Ancient spiral galaxy is 11 billion years old ::::: Nov. 11 SN : Hybrids tell tales, defining “species,” neutron star collision makes waves, AlphaGo's latest feat, Haumea's ring, the next bird flu to watch, inbreeding's downsides and more.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global :::::
A Saudi Heroine, a Big Score and the First City on the Moon ::::: The Martian author Andy Weir’s new book, Artemis , drops today. Rather than focusing on one man’s survival on an inhospitable planet hundreds of millions of kilometers away, the novel keeps readers a bit closer to home—a city called Artemis on the moon, where a few thousand people live and work in a network of domes built not far from the Apollo 11 landing site.Roughly 60 years from now the moon
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Scanner for paintings turns out to be promising new CSI tool ::::: A research collaborative has introduced a new method for detecting hard-to-find and concealed forensic traces. This work was officially published today in Scientific Reports and is based on scanning macro x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (MA-XRF), a technique originally developed for the elemental imaging of paintings and other works of art.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
World's longest sauropod dinosaur trackway brought to light ::::: The sauropod trackway. Credit: P. Dumas In 2009, the world's largest dinosaur tracks were discovered in the French village of Plagne, in the Jura Mountains. Since then, a series of excavations at the site has uncovered other tracks, sprawling over more than 150 meters. They form the longest sauropod trackway ever to be found. Having compiled and analyzed the collected data, which is published in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Tourism and travel make Paris targets unachievable ::::: Credit: CC0 Public Domain In the year 2100, tourists will be flying nine times as many kilometres as in 2015, and the average travel distance for all tourist journeys is set to double over the same period. Aviation, 90 percent of which is tourism, must be severely restricted if we are to meet the climate targets. This conclusion was drawn by Paul Peeters, who will be awarded his PhD for his thesi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Current-carrying holes confined to one dimension show unique spin ::::: Credit: Australian Research Council Half of all the transistors in your iPhone use positively-charged 'holes', rather than negatively-charged electrons to operate. At university, we teach undergraduates that holes are quasiparticles, basically 'missing electrons' – a bit like the bubble in a spirit level, or the missing chair in a game of musical chairs. But that isn't the whole story: holes al
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cognitive science :::::
Do animals dream of electric humans? ::::: submitted by /u/OestlundMartin [link] [comments]
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Science : NPR :::::
Researchers Explore The Effects Of Section 8 Grants In Houston ::::: A study looks at the effect of housing vouchers on criminal activity. People who receive Section 8 vouchers are more likely to be arrested for violent crimes, but this effect only shows up for men.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global :::::
NASA's Next Mars Lander Zooms toward Launch ::::: LITTLETON, Colo.—After expensive delays, NASA’s next mission to Mars is on track to embark next year. As spacecraft names go, this one is a mouthful: Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport. At NASA, and here at Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, which built the craft, it’s just called InSight. Designed to probe the planet’s deep interior and to eaves
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Manganese dioxide shows potential in micromotors ::::: Manganese dioxide could make the preparation of micromotors increasingly cost-effective, opening up new avenues for their use, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. Synthetic micromotors are tiny particles with dimensions less than the diameter of a human hair. Micromotors can undergo an autonomous motion in liquid environments, which can be driven by various means such
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Ingeniøren :::::
Region i Sverige undersøges for ulovlig overførsel af patientdata til USA ::::: Den svenske ombudsmand indleder en undersøgelse af et forskningssamarbejde mellem Region Halland og et amerikansk hospital. Ifølge en anmeldelse til ombudsmanden er hundredvis af patientjournaler blevet sendt til USA – uden at en aftale om beskyttelse af data er indgået. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/region-sverige-undersoeges-ulovlig-overfoersel-patientdata-usa-1082743 Version2
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
A fast reactor system to shorten the lifetime of long-lived fission products ::::: Representation of the dramatically reduced half-lives of LLFPs. Credit: Satoshi ChibaTokyo Institute of Technology A team of scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) working in collaboration with Tohoku University, Tokyo City University and the Japan Atomic Energy Agency has proposed a novel approach to tackle the problem of radioactive waste disposal. The new method, published in
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Viden :::::
VIDEO Ny robot er mere skøde- end vagthund ::::: Sidste år blev verden præsenteret for robotten SpotMini, der er lavet af firmaet Boston Dynamics. SpotMini er en firbenet robot. Og på samme tid er den både tiltalende og uendeligt skræmmende. Den er tiltalende på grund af sin lighed med en hund. Og den virker skræmmende på grund af sin hårde overflade af metal og elektronkkomponenter. Nu er Boston Dynamics klar med en ny version af SpotMini, der
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Urban trees are growing faster worldwide ::::: Trees in metropolitan areas have been growing faster than trees in rural areas worldwide since the 1960s. This has been confirmed for the first time by a study on the impact of the urban heat island effect on tree growth headed by the Technical University of Munich (TUM). The analysis conducted by the international research team also shows that the growth of urban trees has already been exposed to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Solution enables compact devices for telecommunications, security camera applications at even higher frequencies ::::: VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has developed a new manufacturing technology for the integration of very high-frequency terahertz systems. This enables the cost-effective development of telecommunications and imaging solutions and space instruments that are even smaller and have higher frequencies. VTT's technology was awarded at the European Microwave Conference.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Monoclonal antibody prevents graft-vs-host disease in bone marrow transplantation model ::::: VANCOUVER, WASHINGTON (November 14, 2017) - Newly published research provides preclinical proof-of-concept for the ability of PRO 140, a humanized anti-CCR5 monoclonal antibody under development by CytoDyn Inc. (OTC.QB: CYDY), to effectively block the development of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), a potentially lethal complication of bone marrow stem cell (BMSC) transplantation. CytoDyn is curr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Physicists mix waves on superconducting qubits ::::: Credit: MIPT Physicists from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) and Royal Holloway, University of London, have demonstrated an effect known as quantum wave mixing on an artificial atom. Their results, published in the journal Nature Communications , could help develop quantum electronics of an entirely new kind. Researchers from MIPT's Laboratory of Artificial Quantum Systems l
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Four sperm whales die in Indonesia beach rescue ::::: Four sperm whales stranded on a beach in Indonesia have died, a local official said Tuesday, despite frantic efforts to save the massive mammals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Austrian activist can sue Facebook: EU court adviser ::::: Max Schrems is suing Facebook's Irish division for various alleged rights violations Austrian activist Max Schrems can sue Facebook over alleged privacy breaches, but cannot bring a class action lawsuit against the US social media giant, the adviser to the EU's top court said Tuesday. Schrems is suing Facebook's Irish division in an Austrian court for various alleged rights violations including t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Sad farewell as Malaysia-born panda heads to China ::::: Two-year-old giant panda cub Nuan Nuan, the first to be born in Malaysia, is seen inside her enclosure before departing for Chengdu Malaysia's first locally-born giant panda headed to its homeland China on Tuesday, with officials bidding a sad goodbye to the female cub. Two-year-old Nuan Nuan, whose name means "warmth", was born in Malaysia's national zoo in August 2015 a year after her parents F
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
'Super invader' tree hits South, but flea beetle may be hero ::::: The tallow tree, a "super invader" with toxic leaves and no natural enemies in North America, is conquering the South. Overtaking forests from Texas to Florida, tallows grow three times faster than most native hardwoods, and each one casts off 100,000 seeds a year. Controlled burns haven't stopped their spread, nor have herbicide sprays from helicopters. Cutting them down works only when each stu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
China maintains reign over world supercomputer rankings: survey ::::: China has not only overtaken the US in sheer numbers, but also in aggregate performance of supercomputers China now has more high-performance supercomputers than ever before, again besting the United States in global rankings, a supercomputer tracking organisation said. The standing corresponds with China's growing reputation as the global leader in supercomputers, as the Asian power prepares to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Rare flying foxes shot in 'horrific' Australia attack ::::: The flying fox, Australia's largest bat, is listed as a "vulnerable" species Dozens of rare grey-headed flying foxes have been shot in remote bushland near Australia's eastern coast, authorities said Tuesday as locals told of a "horrific scene" when the carcasses were discovered. The alleged killings followed a spate of animal mutilations in Victoria state involving native species including the k
9h
The Atlantic :::::
The Conversation ::::: The First White President In October, Ta-Nehisi Coates argued that Donald Trump’s presidency is predicated nearly entirely on white supremacy and the negation of a black president. I read Ta-Nehisi Coates’s fascinating article. I found it convincing. I am white. Now what? I already am angry with police treatment of people who are less white than me. I can vote for Democrats, I guess, but will tha
9h
The Atlantic :::::
The Odyssey and the Other ::::: Who could have guessed that the time would be so ripe for an Odyssey that shrinks the vast distance between the ancient text and contemporary sensibilities? During the age when The Odyssey took form, near the end of the eighth century b . c ., the Greeks were voyaging into the world once again after a period of dark decline. They were setting up colonies and resuming the trade that had been inter
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Ingeniøren :::::
Regeringen mere end fordobler årets bredbåndspulje – men pengene kan stadig ende i København ::::: En aftale mellem regeringen og Dansk Folkeparti betyder, at bredbåndspuljen mere end fordobles fra 40 mio. kr. til 100 mio. kr. i år. Men den øgede investering sker på trods af, at det endnu ikke er lykkedes at revidere kriterierne for puljen, så den primært kan komme landdistrikterne til gode, som Christiansborg-politikerne har ønsket sig. Københavnerne har også søgt I august kunne Ingeniøren sk
9h
Science | The Guardian :::::
Lunching ranger discovers species lost for 40 years ::::: The last time anyone saw Jackson’s climbing salamander – I didn’t yet exist. It was 1975: Margaret Thatcher took over leadership of the Tories, Saigon fell to Communist forces, the USSR was still a thing, and everyone was listening to Queen’s Bohemian Rhapsody. And in Guatemala , reeling from over a decade of civil war, two American conservationists found a little treasure of black and gold: they
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Feed: All Latest :::::
How One Woman's Digital Life Was Weaponized Against Her ::::: The first time the police arrived on her doorstep, in March of 2015, Courtney Allen was elated. She rushed to the door alongside her dogs, a pair of eager Norwegian elkhounds, to greet them. “Is this about our case?” she asked. The police looked at her in confusion. They didn’t know what case she was talking about. Courtney felt her hope give way to a familiar dread. Three days earlier, Courtney
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Microsoft pledges to curb carbon emissions despite growth ::::: At first glance, the movie "Frozen" might seem to have two strong female protagonists—Elsa, the elder princess with unruly powers over snow and ice, and her sister, Anna, who spends much of the film on a quest to save their ...
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Space Delivery: Astronauts get ice cream, make-own pizzas ::::: The International Space Station's robotic arm captures the Cygnus cargo spacecraft, Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017, 260 miles (418 kms.) above the earth. The commercial supply ship arrived at the International Space Station on Tuesday, two days after launching from Virginia. (NASA TV via AP) Astronauts got a mouth-watering haul with Tuesday's Earth-to-space delivery—pizza and ice cream. A commercial supp
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Study offers detailed insight into early-life behavior of grey seal pups at sea ::::: Grey seal pup. Credit: Kimberley Bennett Male and female grey seal pups show distinct behavioural differences as they learn to forage in the early stages of their independence, according to new research which scientists believe could be crucial to the future protection of their habitat. The pups are abandoned by their mothers when they are just three weeks old, with many of them never having vent
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Mammal brains identify type of scent faster than once thought ::::: Credit: CC0 Public Domain It takes less than one-tenth of a second—a fraction of the time previously thought—for the sense of smell to distinguish between one odor and another, new experiments in mice show. In a study to be published in the journal Nature Communications online Nov. 14, researchers at NYU School of Medicine found that odorants—chemical particles that trigger the sense of smell —ne
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Tree rings used to counter smugglers' rings ::::: DNA analysis and near-infrared scanners could help customs officers identify illegally traded wood. Credit: Pixabay/ Kytalpa Analysing regional differences in the DNA of wood and has allowed scientists to determine the location of the original tree within 15km, and the work could help crack down on the billion-euro trade in illegal timber. Illegal logging is a serious problem, with Interpol estim
9h
New Scientist - News :::::
Get closer to death to make the most of life ::::: Talking about death… Jupiterimages/Getty FEW people like to contemplate their own death, but knowledge of its inevitability has some surprising upsides. According to a school of thought called terror management theory, the desire to transcend death is the driving force of human civilisation. The “worm at the core of life” inspires people to create symphonies, build cathedrals, nurture their c
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Scientists create a prototype neural network based on memristors ::::: The memristive chip in its casing, housed in a standard contacting device (for testing the parameters of memristive nanostructures). Credit: Elena Emel'janova Lobachevsky University scientists under the supervision of Alexey Mikhailov, head of the UNN PTRI Laboratory of Thin Film Physics and Technology, are working to develop an adaptive neural interface that combines a living culture and a neura
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
New molecules for OLEDs and pharmaceuticals ::::: Photograph of solutions of synthesized thiophene derivatives in dioxane in daylight and irradiation with a UV lamp with an excitation wavelength of 380 nm. Credit: Nataliya Belskaya, Professor, UrFU Institute of Chemical Engineering Chemists from Ural Federal University (UrFU, Ekaterinburg) have suggested a new technique for synthesizing thiophene derivatives and studied their fluorescent propert
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
The anatomy of a 'cosmic snake' reveals the structure of distant galaxies ::::: The Cosmic Snake is the image of a distant galaxy, deflected by a strong gravitational lens. Credit: ESA/Hubble, NASA, A.Cava We have a fair understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that regulate star formation in galaxies, from the interstellar matter to the diffuse clouds distributed in space whose gravitational contraction leads to the birth of stars within large stellar clusters. But obser
10h
The Atlantic :::::
The Lost Boys ::::: The sudden emergence of the so-called alt-right from the dark recesses of the internet into the American mainstream was at first more baffling than shocking. The young people sharing strange, coded frog memes and declaring their commitment to white identity politics on obscure websites remained in the realm of the unserious—or at least the unknowable and weird. Then, last November, The Atlantic p
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The Atlantic :::::
The Making of an American Nazi ::::: O n December 16, 2016, Tanya Gersh answered her phone and heard gunshots. Startled, she hung up. Gersh, a real-estate agent who lives in Whitefish, Montana, assumed it was a prank call. But the phone rang again. More gunshots. Again, she hung up. Another call. This time, she heard a man’s voice: “This is how we can keep the Holocaust alive,” he said. “We can bury you without touching you.” To hea
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Contracting white dwarf observed for the first time ::::: Astrophysicists from MSU (Russia) and his colleagues from Italy and Russian Academy of Sciences have found the first observational evidence for a contracting white dwarf. Constant high spin-up rate of a star of this type, located in an enigmatic binary system, can be easily explained if the white dwarf is contracting, the researchers argue. The discovery is reported in the Monthly Notices of the R
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Study offers detailed insight into early-life behavior of grey seal pups at sea ::::: Male and female grey seal pups show distinct behavioural differences as they learn to forage effectively in the early stages of their independence, according to new research led by the University of Plymouth in conjunction with the Sea Mammal Research Unit at the University of St Andrews and Abertay University.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Potential new autism drug shows promise in mice ::::: LA JOLLA, Calif. -- Nov. 14, 2017 -- Scientists have performed a successful test of a possible new drug in a mouse model of an autism disorder. The candidate drug, called NitroSynapsin, largely corrected electrical, behavioral and brain abnormalities in the mice. NitroSynapsin is intended to restore an electrical signaling imbalance in the brain found in virtually all forms of autism spectrum dis
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Quick! What's that smell? Mammal brains identify type of scent faster than once thought ::::: It takes less than one-tenth of a second -- a fraction of the time previously thought -- for the sense of smell to distinguish between one odor and another, new experiments in mice show. In a study to be published in the journal Nature Communications online Nov. 14, researchers at NYU School of Medicine found that odorants -- chemical particles that trigger the sense of smell -- need only reach a
10h
Ingeniøren :::::
Kystbanetog påkører Banedanmark-gravemaskine ::::: I morges ramte et kystbanetog en gravemaskine mellem Skodsborg og Klampenborg. Det vides endnu ikke, hvad der førte til ulykken. Passagerer er kørt på hospitalet, men ingen er kommet alvorligt til skade.
10h
Ingeniøren :::::
Et spørgsmål alle ledere skal stille sig selv ::::: amerikansk-ledelse.amerikansk-ledelse Et ægte lederskab engagerer, bevæger og begejstrer medarbejdere og omgivelser. Det indeholder en kerne af personlig autenticitet med alle de menneskelige facetter, det indebærer, samtidig med at lederen tilpasser sin ageren til omskiftelige omstændigheder og medarbejdernes behov, siger Gareth Jones, medforfatter til ny-klassikeren ‘Why should anyone be led by
10h
Dagens Medicin :::::
Sundhedsministere: Fremtidens læge er ikke i solopraksis ::::: De praktiserende læger skal tage flere opgaver på sig i fremtiden, som også den seneste overenskomst mellem PLO og regionerne lægger op til. Det var en af hovedpointerne fra sundhedsminister Ellen Trane Nørby (V) til Lægedage, hvor hun holdt en tale til lægerne og deltog i en åbningsdebat mandag eftermiddag. »Der er ingen tvivl om, at overenskomstaftalen ikke var en revolution, men det var et skr
11h
Ingeniøren :::::
DSB fik nej til selv at installere signalcomputere ::::: Nogle gange, når en sag er økonomisk og politisk betændt, og alle parter vogter over deres mindste skridt i offentligheden, kan valget af et enkelt ord være meget sigende. Derfor starter dette interview med Anders Egehus, driftsdirektør i DSB, med et tilsyneladende uskyldigt spørgsmål: Nemlig hvordan samarbejdet med Alstom er. Det fransk-tyske kæmpefirma har kontrakt med Banedanmark om at bygge d
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Samsung worker scores victory at South Korea's Supreme Court ::::: In this Oct. 31, 2017, file photo, employees walk past logos of the Samsung Electronics Co. at its office in Seoul, South Korea. Overturning an appeals court's decision, South Korea's Supreme Court says on Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017, a family of a Samsung worker who died of brain tumor should be eligible for state compensation for occupational disease. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon, File) Overturning an a
11h
Science-Based Medicine :::::
Turpentine, the Fountain of Youth According to Dr. Jennifer Daniels ::::: Jennifer Daniels says turpentine is the Fountain of Youth, able to cure many ailments, both real and imaginary. It isn't; it's a poison with no recognized benefits for human health.
12h
Big Think :::::
A Utopian Map of Southeast Asian Railways ::::: What unites the many, varied countries of Southeast Asia? Their railways suck. For reasons historical, geographical and accidental, the region is underserved by rail. Not that there haven't been plans aplenty to fix the problem. Here's a map of what a Southeast Asian integrated regional rail network would look like, if all those plans were to be realised. In black: lines currently in use. In
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Toshiba sells TV, visual solutions unit to Hisense of China ::::: Troubled Toshiba Corp. is selling 95 percent of its TV and other visual products subsidiary to Chinese electronics maker Hisense Group as part of its effort to stay afloat.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
'Don't panic' says Indian minister as smog crisis deepens ::::: Indian schoolgirls covered in a sheet in an effort to protect themselves from heavy smog India's environment minister has said the country's filthy air is no cause for alarm, claiming only "routine precautions" were needed to cope with what doctors have called a public health emergency. Harsh Vardhan contrasted the pollution choking large swathes of north India, including the capital, with the 19
12h
Science | The Guardian :::::
The empathy gap: why don’t you meet people who think differently to you? | Douglas Alexander ::::: P eople often ask me, “Do you miss being an MP?” My answer is always a bit of a curate’s egg . I certainly miss being in government – where you can make change happen. But I don’t miss Westminster – even before the latest depressing revelations – it often felt to me like Hogwarts gone wrong. But what I miss most of all is working in the constituency. For almost two decades my weekly routine invol
12h
Dagens Medicin :::::
Stor variation i brug af POCT af langtidsblodsukker på landsplan ::::: Point of care test (POCT) af langtidsblodsukker bliver kun brugt i almen praksis i en ud af fem regioner. Der er behov for at finde ud af, om POCT på diabetesområdet giver mening økonomisk og for patienterne, mener forskere.
12h
Ingeniøren :::::
Rift om batterierne: Datacentre må køre med en blanding af bly og lithium-jern ::::: NNIT er i gang med at udvide datacenterkapaciteten i form af et nyt site, der er klar til kunder fra omkring årsskiftet. Mens batteribankerne i det nye center udelukkende består af blybatterier, så kører det 'gamle' center på en blanding af lithium-ion-batterier og bly. Associate Vice President Lennart Bøgedal Jørgensen oplyser via mail, at det i forhold til vedligehold er nemmere at have den sam
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
In Morocco, a blue tourist town is turning green ::::: A woman walks in the medina of the northwestern Moroccan city of Chefchaouen Huddling against a hillside in northern Morocco is a tourist town famed for the striking blue of its buildings, and now the mayor is mixing in another colour—green. Chefchaouen—known locally as Chaouen—wants to become a model for sustainable development at a time when the northwest African kingdom has shone a spotlight o
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Environmentalists take Norway to court over Arctic drilling ::::: Greenpeace has staged several protests against drilling licences awarded in the Arctic Representatives for Norway, western Europe's biggest oil producer, face an Oslo court on Tuesday in a lawsuit brought by Greenpeace and another group opposed to drilling in the Arctic. Greenpeace, along with Natur og Ungdom (Nature and Youth), an environmental group targeting youths, has sued the Norwegian stat
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Heat on 'climate chancellor' Merkel over coal and cars ::::: Germany's Angela Merkel has been dubbed "climate chancellor" but critics say she tends to cave in when it matters Angela Merkel has been dubbed the "climate chancellor" but she now faces the real risk of Germany, a green energy pioneer, missing its emissions reduction target on her watch. Battles over dirty coal plants and the combustion engine have dogged her efforts to forge an unlikely three-w
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Qualcomm spurns $130 bn Broadcom bid for big tech tie-up ::::: Broadcom CEO Hock Tan announced at the White House on November 2, 2017 that the tech company would be moving back to the United States from Singapore Qualcomm on Monday rejected a $130 billion bid from fellow computer chip maker Broadcom, setting the stage for a potentially bitter fight for control of a key player in the world of mobile technology. The proposal "significantly undervalues Qualcomm
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Scientists warn of 'giant leap backward' at climate talks ::::: Sea ice as viewed from NASA's research aircraft in the Antarctic Peninsula region this month.Scientists warn that Earth is heading towards a dangerous 'tipping point' which could result in the disintegration of Antarctic ice sheets Carbon dioxide emissions are set to rise this year after a three-year pause, scientists said at UN climate talks Monday, warning that "time is running out", even as Wh
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
More governments manipulate media with 'bots,' trolls: study ::::: A study of internet freedom in 65 countries found 30 governments are deploying some form of manipulation to distort online information, up from 23 the previous year More governments are following the lead of Russia and China by manipulating social media and suppressing dissent online in a grave threat to democracy, a human rights watchdog said on Tuesday. A study of internet freedom in 65 countri
12h
Dagens Medicin :::::
Anders Beich: »Vi er bedst til populationsomsorg« ::::: LÆGEDAGE. Det vigtigste lige nu er at bevare den tætte relation til patienterne ovenpå de mange nye opgaver i OK18, mener formand for DSAM, Anders Beich.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Amazon or Walmart? Some retailers are choosing alliances ::::: This Thursday, June 1, 2017, file photo, shows a Walmart sign at a store in Hialeah Gardens, Fla. Walmart announced Monday, Nov. 13, 2017, that it will devote a section on its website to upscale Lord & Taylor, the latest strategic partnership as retailers make alliances. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz, File) Store chains feeling the upheaval in retail are making strategic alliances—and that can mean picking
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Uber comes of age with SoftBank tieup ::::: Uber's tieup with Japan's SoftBank is aimed at putting the ridesharing giant on a smoother road to a public share offering Uber's tieup with Japanese tech giant SoftBank suggests the ridesharing giant is set to come of age in the business world, but it still faces a long road ahead. The deal is giving the world's most valuable startup an additional $1 billion in capital and could allow SoftBank t
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
To find new biofuel enzymes, it can take a microbial village ::::: This 50-milliliter flask contains a symbiotic mix of bacteria derived from compost that was maintained for three years. Credit: Steve Singer/JBEI A new study led by researchers at the Department of Energy's Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI), based at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), demonstrates the importance of microbial communities as a source of stable enzymes that could b
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Female mongooses help their pups by driving out rivals ::::: Two mongooses fight during an attempted eviction. Credit: Dave Seager Mongoose mothers boost their pups' survival chances by evicting rival females from their social groups, new research shows. Banded mongooses live in highly cooperative societies, but violence between and within groups - including battles to evict some members - is common. Dominant females often spark fights to force out other f
13h
Dagens Medicin :::::
Brug jeres faglighed mod presset om at henvise færre patienter ::::: LÆGEDAGE. Vi skal stå fast på vores faglighed, når vi for eksempel møder et pres om at henvise færre patienter med potentiel kræft, mener Peter Vedsted, professor i Almen Medicin.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Expanded networks, faculty mentorship bolster female undergrads' pursuit of geoscience ::::: A recent PROGRESS networking event at a Colorado State University solar field. Credit: Ilana Pollack/Colorado State University To retain more undergraduate women in geoscience majors, a supportive network that includes faculty mentorship seems to be a key driver, according to a new study led by Colorado State University. The study, published earlier this month in the journal PLOS ONE , is the fir
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
When water met iron deep inside the Earth, did it create conditions for life? ::::: An illustration from the paper showing oxygen and hydrogen cycling in the deep Earth. Credit: Carnegie Institution for Science Reservoirs of oxygen-rich iron between the Earth's core and mantle could have played a major role in Earth's history, including the breakup of supercontinents, drastic changes in Earth's atmospheric makeup, and the creation of life, according to recent work from an intern
13h
Science | The Guardian :::::
Dork or duder: which kids do best in later life? Personality quiz | Ben Ambridge ::::: Is it really true that the geeks, as they say, will inherit the earth? Or that the nerdy kids in school will go on to find fame and fortune (think Bill Gates, and most musicians and artists), while the good-looking, popular kids end up in their home towns, and quickly start large families? Or is that just a stereotype? Take the test to find out. Q1 At school, were you (a) a jock or jockette: good
14h
Viden :::::
Google: Stjålne internet-konti skyldes oftest phishing ::::: Du har formentlig oplevet at modtage en email fra nogen, der udgiver sig for at være Google, Facebook, Skat eller din bank - og som vil have dig til at klikke på et link i mailen og logge ind på din konto. Konceptet kaldes phishing og går ud på at lokke dig til at give dine login-oplysninger fra dig. Falder du i fælden, kan du få overtaget din konto. Herfra kan du få lænset din profil for personl
14h
Gizmodo :::::
Remember Scarif's Better Days With This Action-Packed Rogue One Poster ::::: All Images: Bottleneck At one time Scarif was a beautiful place that served as a well-protected base for the Galactic Empire. Well, the rebels on a ship code-named “Rogue One” screwed that up, coupled with a little thing called “the Death Star.” But now, this new poster lets you remember Scarif in its better days Bottleneck Gallery has teamed with Lucasfilm and Kilian Eng to create this awesome p
14h
Gizmodo :::::
The FDA Just Approved a Pill With Sensors in It For the First Time Ever ::::: Photo: Styroks/Wikipedia The era of digital pills is here. This week, for the first time ever, the Food and Drug Administration approved a pill with sensors inside to inform doctors how often the drug was taken. In a press release to Gizmodo, the FDA said atypical anti-psychotic drug Abilify MyCite was the first medication it had approved with a “digital ingestion tracking system” to record wheth
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
To find new biofuel enzymes, it can take a microbial village ::::: IMAGE: This 50-milliliter flask contains a symbiotic mix of bacteria derived from compost that was maintained for three years. view more Credit: Steve Singer/JBEI A new study led by researchers at the Department of Energy's Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI), based at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), demonstrates the importance of microbial communities as a source
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Clinicians need a clear definition of severe asthma for precise management ::::: ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, IL (Nov. 14, 2017) - Those who treat patients suffering with severe asthma know how frustrating it can be to try to get the disease under control - despite the introduction in recent years of both biologics and bronchial thermoplasty. These treatments have proven effective, but require an understanding of all that is involved before being prescribed or recommended. An article i
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Female mongooses help their pups by driving out rivals ::::: Mongoose mothers boost their pups' survival chances by evicting rival females from their social groups, new research shows. Banded mongooses live in highly cooperative societies, but violence between and within groups - including battles to evict some members - is common. Dominant females often spark fights to force out other females, and University of Exeter scientists have now proved a long-hel
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
A fast reactor system to shorten the lifetime of long-lived fission products ::::: IMAGE: This is a representation of the dramatically reduced half-lives of LLFPs. view more Credit: Satoshi Chiba Tokyo Institute of Technology A team of scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) working in collaboration with Tohoku University, Tokyo City University and the Japan Atomic Energy Agency has proposed a novel approach to tackle the problem of radioactive waste dis
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Expanding geographic sharing of donor kidneys would increase transplants, study finds ::::: IMAGE: The US Department of Health and Human Services oversees 11 regions as part of the nation's organ donation system. view more Credit: University of Kansas News Service LAWRENCE -- Broadening the geographic range that a number of deceased-donor kidneys would be available would increase the number of transplants and improve the lives of patients unlikely to receive one based on where t
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
New technology makes artificial intelligence more private and portable ::::: Technology developed at the University of Waterloo is paving the way for artificial intelligence (AI) to break free of the internet and cloud computing. New deep-learning AI software produced with that technology is compact enough to fit on mobile computer chips for use in everything from smartphones to industrial robots. That would allow devices to operate independent of the internet while using
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Sugary beverage consumption in US declining but remains high among certain groups ::::: Consumption of sodas and other sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) fell for both children and adults between 2003 and 2014, according to a new study led by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. But despite this positive trend, the researchers found, consumption remains high among adolescents and young adults, and is particularly high among black, Mexican American, and non-Mexica
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Screen time might boost depression, suicide behaviors in teens ::::: Increased time spent in front of a screen -- in the form of computers, cell phones and tablets -- might have contributed to an uptick in symptoms of depression and suicide-related behaviors and thoughts in American young people, especially girls, according to a new study by San Diego State University professor of psychology Jean Twenge. The findings point to the need for parents to monitor how mu
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Study documents ethnic and gender differences in youths' developing gender identity ::::: The extent to which youths feel typical of their gender and the pressure they feel to conform to traditional gender roles are related to adolescents' well-being. Because many gender-related expectations are culturally based, a new longitudinal study examined how French middle school adolescents' feelings about the development of gender identity differed across groups of teens from different ethni
15h
NYT > Science :::::
Take a Number: Americans Are Putting Down the Soda Pop ::::: Photo Soda pop at a store in New Jersey. Sugary drink consumption has declined in the United States, according to a new study. Credit Karsten Moran for The New York Times Sugar-sweetened drinks are not as popular as they once were. According to a new study based on a continuing national health survey, 60.7 percent of children and 50 percent of adults drank a sugary beverage on any given day in 20
15h
The Atlantic :::::
Assange Claims WikiLeaks Was Trying to ‘Beguile’ Donald Trump Jr. Into Leaking ::::: Julian Assange, the founder of WikiLeaks, responded to The Atlantic ’s disclosure of private communications between his group and Donald Trump Jr. by praising his organization for its “chutzpah” in attempting to take advantage of the president’s son. On Monday afternoon, my colleague Julia Ioffe reported on the direct messages exchanged on Twitter between WikiLeaks and Trump Jr. WikiLeaks attempt
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Study documents ethnic and gender differences in youths' developing gender identity ::::: The extent to which youths feel typical of their gender and the pressure they feel to conform to traditional gender roles are related to adolescents' well-being. Because many gender-related expectations are culturally based, a new longitudinal study examined how French middle school adolescents' feelings about the development of gender identity differed across groups of teens from different ethni
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Study of impact of climate change on temperatures suggests more deaths unless action taken ::::: The largest study to date of the potential temperature-related health impacts of climate change has shown that as global temperatures rise, the surge in death rates during hot weather outweighs any decrease in deaths in cold weather, with many regions facing sharp net increases in mortality rates.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Some Latinos believe science may negatively impact their kids' faith ::::: More than one-third of Latinos interviewed in a recent study believe science education may have a negative impact on the religious faith of their children.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
Neutrons probe oxygen-generating enzyme for a greener approach to clean water ::::: A new study sheds light on a unique enzyme that could provide an eco-friendly treatment for chlorite-contaminated water supplies and improve water quality worldwide. An international team of researchers used neutron analysis, X-ray crystallography and other techniques to study chlorite dismutase, an enzyme that breaks down the environmental pollutant chlorite into harmless byproducts. Their result
16h
Feed: All Latest :::::
Donald Trump Jr. and WikiLeaks Talking Privately on Twitter Makes Perfect Sense ::::: WikiLeaks has been sliding into Donald Trump Jr.’s DMs. The mostly one-sided conversation, surfaced by The Atlantic , lasted at least from September 2016 to July 2017. Throughout that stretch, WikiLeaks sent Donald Trump Jr. direct messages through Twitter, asking him for his father's tax returns, suggesting Trump Senior reject election results if Hillary Clinton won, and even oh-so-casually floa
16h
Ingeniøren :::::
Rigsrevision kigger på Sundhedsplatformen: Region H kører hospitaler på upålidelige data ::::: Det er fortsat ubelyst, i hvor høj grad indførelsen af Sundhedsplatformen i Region Hovedstaden forsinker og hæmmer sygehusenes fremmeste opgave, nemlig at undersøge og behandle patienter. Det skyldes, at data fra Sundhedsplatformen om udviklingen i aktiviteten på hovedstadens hospitaler ikke er pålidelige. Det fastslår Rigsrevisionen i en såkaldt åbningsskrivelse til Region H, som Version2 har få
16h
NYT > Science :::::
First Digital Pill Approved to Worries About Biomedical ‘Big Brother’ ::::: But, he added, “if used improperly, it could foster more mistrust instead of trust.” Patients who agree to take the digital medication, a version of the antipsychotic Abilify, can sign consent forms allowing their doctors and up to four other people, including family members, to receive electronic data showing the date and time pills are ingested. A smartphone app will let them block recipients a
16h
BBC News - Science & Environment :::::
Why do people still think the Earth is flat? ::::: This social media community has come together for the first time in North Carolina to discuss their shared belief.
16h
Gizmodo :::::
Apple Is Testing a Beta Fix to the iOS 11 Control Center's Wi-Fi and Bluetooth Switches ::::: Photo: AP iOS 11, the fancy new version of Apple’s OS that shipped just about two months before the launch of its latest line of expensive phones, introduced some changes to Control Center, its app which streamlines the annoying process of changing settings by putting the most commonly tweaked ones on a single swipe-up menu. One issue? The changes included buttons that appeared to be convenient w
16h
Ingeniøren :::::
Rapport: Salget af fossilbiler halveres globalt inden 2030 ::::: Elbiler bliver den vigtigste teknologi i Europa og Kina og diesel går mod solnedgangen.
16h
The Scientist RSS :::::
Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration ::::: Rodent studies presented at the Society for Neuroscience meeting this week tie pathologies in the gastrointestinal tract or microbiome composition with Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases.
17h
Live Science :::::
What Is Stevia? ::::: Stevia is perhaps unique among food ingredients because it's most valued for what it doesn't do. It doesn't add calories. Unlike other sugar substitutes, stevia is derived from a plant. The stevia plant is part of the Asteraceae family, related to the daisy and ragweed. Several stevia species called candyleaf are native to New Mexico, Arizona and Texas. But the prized species, Stevia re
17h
Gizmodo :::::
Suspicious Account Behind Viral Roy Moore Conspiracy Theory Deletes All of Its Tweets ::::: Photo: AP Republican Roy Moore, the homophobic bigot and former state Supreme Court justice running for Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ vacated Alabama Senate seat, has seen his campaign begin to crash and burn after the Washington Post produced well-evidenced allegations that decades ago, Moore molested teenagers. Moore has refused to end his campaign despite numerous calls from fellow Republica
18h
Gizmodo :::::
Elon Musk's Alleged Response To Tesla Racism Complaints: 'Be Thick-Skinned And Accept Apology': Report ::::: Photo via AP Images Another former Tesla employee is seeking permission from a judge to sue Tesla for racial harassment on behalf of over 100 affected African-American workers, according to a report from Bloomberg Technology . The complaint, Vaughn v. Tesla Inc . in the Superior Court of California, alleges that Tesla workers, including supervisors, regularly used derogatory and discriminatory la
18h
BBC News - Science & Environment :::::
Singing protest at pro-coal UN event ::::: US officials were arguing for the continued use of coal at a UN meeting in Bonn, Germany.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily :::::
World’s longest sauropod dinosaur trackway brought to light ::::: In 2009, the world's largest dinosaur tracks were discovered in the French village of Plagne, in the Jura Mountains. Since then, a series of excavations at the site has uncovered other tracks, sprawling over more than 150 meters. They form the longest sauropod trackway ever to be found. Scientists have concluded these tracks were left 150 million years ago by a dinosaur at least 35 m long and weig
19h
Popular Science :::::
After a brief pause, carbon emissions are back on the rise ::::: The road to a very hot place is paved with good intentions. No, not hell—just the future. Right now in Bonn, Germany, the UN Climate Change Conference is hosting representatives from all over the world, meeting to discuss how to keep the world from warming beyond 1.5 degrees Celsius, and how to reduce the emissions of greenhouse gasses like carbon dioxide to a net zero by 2050. That means that we
19h
Gizmodo :::::
The Versatile Logitech Harmony Hub Basically Comes With a Free Echo Dot Right Now ::::: Echo Dot + Harmony Hub , $90 The Logitech Harmony Hub is one of the best Alexa-compatible accessories out there, and it basically comes with a free Echo Dot right now . If you aren’t familiar, the Harmony Hub is a little puck that blasts out RF signals like a TV remote to control all of your devices (Logitech’s database has nearly 300,000; it’s pretty comprehensive). Normally, this would work wit
19h
Futurity.org :::::
Ancient ice sheet melted quicker than we thought ::::: A warming climate reduced the mass of the Cordilleran Ice Sheet by about half in as few as 500 years, new research suggests. The finding could indicate what’s coming for the Greenland Ice Sheet in the face of climate change. The Cordilleran Ice Sheet covered large parts of North America during the Pleistocene—or last ice age—and was similar in mass to the Greenland Ice Sheet. Previous research es
19h
New Scientist - News :::::
The ‘space nation’ Asgardia just launched its first satellite ::::: The birth of a space nation? NASA By Leah Crane The Space Kingdom of Asgardia has launched its first satellite. This so-called ‘virtual nation’ is the pet project of Russian scientist and billionaire Igor Ashurbeyli. Last year, he proposed a new nation which would be based in space in order to be outside of the control of nations on Earth. The Asgardia-1 satellite, which is about the size of
20h
New Scientist - News :::::
Coffee and plant-based diets linked to lower heart failure risk ::::: Salad with a side of coffee d3sign/Getty By Alice Klein Less meat, more coffee. That’s the secret to reducing your risk of heart failure, according to two studies. Heart failure is a progressive condition in which the heart cannot pump as much blood as the body needs. This results in less oxygen and nutrients being delivered to the rest of the body, and can lead to death. Kyla Lara at Mount S
20h
New Scientist - News :::::
Big aftershocks could well hit Iran and Iraq in next 48 hours ::::: Xinhua/Ahmad Halabisaz/PA Images By Andy Coghlan An earthquake on the Iran-Iraq frontier has killed at least 400 and injured more than 4000 in the region. It was felt as far away as the Mediterranean. Seismologists say the magnitude-7.3 quake could well be followed by at least one more large shock. “The general rule of thumb is that the final aftershock will be one magnitude less,” says seism
20h
New Scientist - News :::::
In a Spotify world, why does anyone want to listen to cassettes? ::::: Bring back mixtapes! Ollie Millington/Redferns/Getty Images One morning in 1965, Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards surfaced to find that the night before, inspired by a dream, he’d half-woken and in a stupor created the memorable riff to one of the band’s biggest hits. “I had no idea I’d written it, it’s only thank God for the little Philips cassette player,” he writes in his autobiogra
20h
New Scientist - News :::::
Should we seed life through the cosmos using laser-driven ships? ::::: Light sails can later use space-dust braking Richard Bizley/Science Photo Library By James Romero Our galaxy may contain billions of habitable worlds that don’t host any life. Should we attempt to change that? Claudius Gros at the Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany, thinks we should. He believes in directed panspermia: deliberately seeding life throughout the cosmos. And to do that, he prop
20h
New Scientist - News :::::
Climate change blamed for Arabian Sea’s unexpected hurricanes ::::: Cyclone Megh over the Arabian Sea in 2015 NASA By Aylin Woodward In the last four years the Arabian Sea has experienced unprecedented storms, and a new study reveals that climate change has made such events more likely to strike. The Arabian Sea sits between Yemen, Oman and India. Cyclones are rare there – yet in 2014, cyclone Nilofar caused flash-floods in north-east Oman, killing four peopl
20h
New Scientist - News :::::
Monkeys learn to play ‘chicken’ in a virtual driving game ::::: On a collision course Bloomberg/Getty By Clare Wilson in Washington, DC Monkeys have something in common with daredevil teenagers: an aptitude for the potentially deadly car driving contest, “chicken”. In the human version of the game, two people drive their cars towards each other down a long, straight road. Whoever turns aside first is the chicken; if neither does, there’s a head-on crash.
20h
Futurity.org :::::
Tiny bees make huge treks as tree ‘matchmakers’ ::::: When it comes to sex between plants, tiny bees the size of ladybugs play a critical role in promoting long-distance pairings, according to one of the most detailed wild tree paternity tests ever conducted. The findings clarify how pollinating animals promote genetic diversity that is essential for plants’ adaptation in the face of disease, climate change, and other threats relevant for agricultur
20h
Gizmodo :::::
A Brief History of Ben Affleck Not Being Sure If He'll Continue Being Batman ::::: Image: Warner Bros. Up until July, everyone just assumed Ben Affleck would be playing Batman for a long time. Then a story came out that he was contemplating leaving the role; since then, Affleck has been weaving a beautiful web of uncertainty and nothingness. His latest quote might be the best yet. Speaking to USA Today , the actor said that appearing in Matt Reeves’ solo Batman film—one he was
20h
Gizmodo :::::
Adequate Man How Not To Make Coffee | Jezebel Megyn Kelly Today, Today: Things Get Unexpectedly Tens ::::: Adequate Man How Not To Make Coffee | Jezebel Megyn Kelly Today , Today: Things Get Unexpectedly Tense Between Megyn Kelly and Joe Biden | The Root The Curious Case of the Black Male Prostitute Found Dead Inside a Wealthy Democratic Donor’s Home | Splinter Don’t Let Female Creators Be Collateral Damage When Male Abusers Go Down | Earther Scientists: Maybe We Should Stop Ruining the Earth |
20h
Big Think :::::
314 Action Is on the Forefront in The “War Against Science” ::::: Scientists, science-minded citizens, and others have been appalled by what some claim is the Trump Administration’s “War on Science.” Besides stepping away from the Paris climate accords, officials appointed to important positions such as head of the EPA Scott Pruitt and Dept. of Energy Secretary Rick Perry, are a testament to the administration’s attitude towards science. Pruitt challenged the E
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Simple water test could prevent crippling bone disease ::::: A simple colour-changing test to detect fluoride in drinking water, devised by researchers at the University of Bath, could in the future prevent the crippling bone disease, skeletal fluorosis, in developing countries such as India and Tanzania. Whilst low amounts of fluoride are beneficial for healthy teeth, high levels of fluoride can weaken bones, leading to skeletal fluorosis.
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Futurity.org :::::
How immune system ‘scars’ make flu more deadly ::::: New research sheds light on why patients who survive a severe infection or physical inflammation, such as pneumonia from the flu, may be more vulnerable to secondary infections in recovery. “This new knowledge is changing our thinking about how best to manage patients after their infections.” Researchers discovered that the initial infection paralyzes our immune system, inhibiting its ability to
20h
Science | The Guardian :::::
Most UK supermarkets falling short in fight against antibiotics crisis ::::: Most of the UK’s biggest supermarket chains are falling short on measures to reduce the use of antibiotics in the production of the meat and animal products they sell, campaigners have warned, with potentially harmful impacts on human health. Lidl performed worst of the nine supermarket chains examined by the Alliance to Save Our Antibiotics , a pressure group made up of several NGOs. Lidl had no
20h
Live Science :::::
Hypertension: Symptoms and Treatment ::::: High blood pressure, or hypertension, is a serious disease that can, over time, damage the blood vessel walls and increase a person's risk of heart attack, stroke and other conditions. Blood pressure is recorded as two numbers and written as a ratio: the top number, called the systolic pressure, is the pressure as the heart beats. The bottom number, called the diastolic pressure, is the mea
20h
Ars Technica :::::
Star Trek: Discovery just broke our brains ::::: Enlarge / Do not mess with Burnham, you Klingon supremacist scum. reader comments 80 A white-knuckle cliffhanger ended the first half of Star Trek: Discovery 's first season. Frenetic, fascinating, and sometimes shocking, "Into the Forest I Go" raised more questions than it answered. There are conspiracies wrapped in conspiracies, and we've got the entire mid-season break to mull them over. Spoil
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Latest Headlines | Science News :::::
New blood pressure guidelines put half of U.S. adults in unhealthy range ::::: ANAHEIM, Calif. — Nearly half of U.S. adults now have high blood pressure, thanks to a new definition of what constitutes high: 130/80 is the new 140/90. That means that 103 million people — about 14 percent more than under the old definition — need to make diet and exercise changes and, in some cases, take medication to lower their risk of heart attack or stroke. These new blood pressure guideli
20h
The Atlantic :::::
The Atlantic Daily: A Moral Failing, a Choice ::::: What We’re Following Roy Moore: A fifth woman, Beverly Young Nelson, has come forward with an accusation against Roy Moore, stating that the Republican Senate candidate sexually assaulted her in 1977 , when she was 16. “He told me … ‘You’re just a child … I am the district attorney of Etowah County and if you tell anyone about this no one will ever believe you,’” Nelson said. Earlier in the day,
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Air quality and health in US will improve from other nations' actions to slow climate change ::::: Credit: CC0 Public Domain The USA will benefit from improved air quality in the future, through actions to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions both domestically and globally. That is the primary finding of new research led by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), published today in the journal Environmental Research Letters . It comes following the decision by President Donald
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories :::::
Simple water test could prevent crippling bone disease ::::: The simple test changes color from purple to blue when fluoride levels are too high. Credit: University of Bath A simple colour-changing test to detect fluoride in drinking water, devised by researchers at the University of Bath, could in the future prevent the crippling bone disease, skeletal fluorosis, in developing countries such as India and Tanzania. Whilst low amounts of fluoride are benefi
20h
Ars Technica :::::
For nearly a year, WikiLeaks was DMing with Donald Trump Jr. ::::: Enlarge / Julian Assange, the founder of WikiLeaks, gestures from the balcony of Ecuador's embassy in London. reader comments 34 As part of its investigation into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia, Congress received a cache of Twitter direct messages between Donald Trump Jr. and WikiLeaks—at least some of those messages have now been leaked to The Atlantic . When Ars asked
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Blood test spots overdose patients at risk of liver damage ::::: People who overdose on paracetamol could be helped by a blood test that shows immediately if they are going to suffer liver damage. Researchers say the test - which detects levels of specific molecules in blood - will help doctors identify which patients arriving in hospital need more intense treatment. It will also help speed the development of new therapies for liver damage by targeting patient
21h
Live Science :::::
Blood Pressure: Highs, Lows & What's Normal ::::: Blood pressure is one of the vital signs that doctors measure to assess general health. Having a high blood pressure, also called hypertension, that is not under control can result in heart problems, stroke, and other medical conditions. Almost half of U.S. adults — 46 percent — have high blood pressure, according to the American Heart Association. High blood pressure is sometimes referred
21h
Gizmodo :::::
Let's Talk About Bill Gates' Plans to Build A 'Smart Town' ::::: Photo: Getty Bill Gates doesn’t seem to be all that interested in maintaining his title as richest man in the world these days. He mostly focuses on philanthropy , but don’t think for a second that he’s lost his capacity for initiating a new benchmark for his rich competitors. Brace yourself: A new era may be approaching in which tech gazillionaires own the town you live in. Somewhere near the Wh
21h
The Atlantic :::::
Why Amazon Just Spent a Fortune to Turn Lord of the Rings Into TV ::::: Amazon has acquired the television rights to J.R.R. Tolkien’s fantasy series The Lord of the Rings . With this deal, which industry publications estimate at being worth $250 million, Amazon can use the classic Middle-earth mythology as a canvas for several different TV shows, including backstories of beloved characters like Aragorn. The gargantuan deal is perhaps the most important event in the h
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease increases risk of liver, colorectal, and breast cancers ::::: IMAGE: NAFLD is associated with the development of HCC, colorectal cancer in males, and breast cancer in females. view more Credit: Journal of Hepatology Amsterdam, November 14, 2017 - Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the more common chronic liver diseases worldwide. It is associated with metabolic syndrome (i.e. insulin resistance and diabetes) and predisposes to cardiova
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Novel gene therapy approach to treating methamphetamine abuse ::::: SAN DIEGO, Nov. 13, 2017 -- While there are no FDA-approved medicines to treat methamphetamine (meth) use disorders, researchers are reporting early findings of a second-generation gene therapy in animal models for meth abuse. Results being presented today at the 2017 American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) Annual Meeting and Exposition demonstrate that the therapy lasts for over
21h
Gizmodo :::::
Julian Assange's Secret DMs to Donald Trump Jr. Are Somehow Dumber, Sadder Than You'd Think ::::: Photo: Getty Throughout the 2016 election and for the better part of this year, WikiLeaks sent private messages via Twitter to the president’s deadlifting adult son Donald Trump Jr., according to newly leaked correspondence first reported by The Atlantic . Trump Jr. only occasionally responded and apparently ceased all communication less than a month before the election. The chats, which were als
21h
Science : NPR :::::
Global Carbon Emissions Rising Again After Brief Plateau, Researchers Say ::::: Smoke stacks in New Brunswick, Canada, were photographed in 2015. Global carbon emissions are on the rise after holding steady for several years, researchers say. Tony Webster/Flickr hide caption toggle caption Tony Webster/Flickr Smoke stacks in New Brunswick, Canada, were photographed in 2015. Global carbon emissions are on the rise after holding steady for several years, researchers say. Tony
21h
Feed: All Latest :::::
AI Can Help Apple Watch Predict High Blood Pressure, Sleep Apnea ::::: The world’s most valuable company crammed a lot into the tablespoon-sized volume of an Apple Watch . There’s GPS, a heart-rate sensor, cellular connectivity, and computing resources that not long ago would have filled a desk-dwelling beige box. The wonder gadget doesn’t have a sphygmomanometer for measuring blood pressure or polysomnographic equipment found in a sleep lab—but thanks to machine le
21h
Live Science :::::
Electric Cars Don't Interfere with Heart Implants ::::: Fans of Tesla electric cars who also have implanted heart devices can rest easy: A new study finds that these patients won't run the risk of shock or interference to their devices when they sit in or stand close to a Tesla while it's charging. The findings come on the heels of another recent study, which examined how electromagnetic interference (EMI) from electrical cars could possibly affect pa
21h
The Atlantic :::::
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: It Goes Down in the DM ::::: Today in 5 Lines President Trump nominated former pharmaceutical executive Alex Azar to lead the Department of Health and Human Services. Lawmakers continued to withdraw their endorsements of Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore in light of allegations that Moore pursued teenage girls when he was in his 30s. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell called on Moore to drop out of the race. And later i
21h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube :::::
Tony Beets's Dredge #1 Gets An Upgrade | Gold Rush ::::: #GoldRush | Friday 9p The Beets family is finally upgrading Dredge 1 by replacing the winch pack with brand new hydraulic units. The custom units were designed to fit exactly onto the dredge with no room for error. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Disco
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Hormone replacement therapy may protect against eye disease ::::: New Orleans - Nov. 13, 2017 -- Women who took estrogen-only hormone replacement therapy after ovary removal had a lower risk of developing glaucoma, according to research presented today at AAO 2017, the 121st Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. This research, which was conducted at Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins University, Stanford University, and the University of C
21h
Ars Technica :::::
Harvey-scale rains could hit Texas 18x more often by the end of the century ::::: Enlarge / Members of the Texas Army National Guard move through flooded Houston streets as floodwaters from Hurricane Harvey continue to rise on August 28, 2017. More than 12,000 members of the Texas National Guard have been called out to support local authorities in response to the storm. reader comments 0 Hurricanes strike the US with regularity, but there's nothing on record that is at all lik
21h
BBC News - Science & Environment :::::
'World's oldest wine' found in 8,000-year-old jars in Georgia ::::: Image copyright AFP Image caption Some of the Neolithic jars bore decorations of grapes Scientists say 8,000-year-old pottery fragments have revealed the earliest evidence of grape wine-making. The earthenware jars containing residual wine compounds were found in two sites south of the Georgian capital, Tbilisi, researchers said. Some of the jars bore images of grape clusters and a man dancing. P
21h
Gizmodo :::::
The Best Use For Microsoft's HoloLens Is Playing a Star Trek: TNG Game That Nearly Killed the Crew ::::: GIF When you think about the early days of virtual reality, you either think of the movie The Lawnmower Man , or that episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation where the crew gets addicted to an augmented reality game that almost kills everyone. Which, by the way, you can now play on Microsoft’s HoloLens AR headset. Lovingly recreated by Robert Burke , his version of “The Game” is also controlled
21h
Popular Science :::::
Last week in tech: the calm before next week's Black Friday storm ::::: Black Friday has gotten weird in recent years. It veered into Thanksgiving day and retailers have started offering their sale prices way before the actual day. As a result, those deals tend to overshadow most of the actual tech news. But, all is not lost to the fog of consumerism. There is some cool stuff to talk about, so here’s a handy recap to get you all caught up while we prepare to gather u
21h
NYT > Science :::::
Trilobites: Dream Chaser Space Plane Aces Glide Test ::::: Photo The crewless Dream Chaser lands at Edwards Air Force Base in California on Saturday after a successful test flight. Credit NASA/Sierra Nevada Corporation If you miss NASA’s space shuttles, you might like the Dream Chaser. The compact space plane carries no crew, but will transport cargo to the International Space Station in the years ahead and conduct other missions in orbit around the Eart
21h
NYT > Science :::::
Protesters Jeer as Trump Team Promotes Coal at U.N. Climate Talks ::::: The American presentation — the only scheduled public appearance by top Trump administration officials at the two-week meeting — came the same day that a new study showed that emissions were rising worldwide after three years on a plateau. Researchers said the emissions growth was driven largely by increased burning of coal in China and India. “The question is not if we will continue to use coal,
21h
NYT > Science :::::
A Race to Save 10 Stranded Whales ::::: “The team seems to be determined to work during night time to release the remaining whales,” Whale Stranding Indonesia reported. Two more whales were released just before sunrise, the group said, according to an official from the Center for Coastal and Marine Resources Management, the regional marine and fisheries authority in Indonesia. Photo Indonesian officials and environmental activists work
21h
NYT > Science :::::
Yale Professors Race Google and IBM to the First Quantum Computer ::::: Quantum computing systems are difficult to understand because they do not behave like the everyday world we live in. But this counterintuitive behavior is what allows them to perform calculations at rate that would not be possible on a typical computer. Today’s computers store information as “bits,” with each transistor holding either a 1 or a 0. But thanks to something called the superposition p
21h
NYT > Science :::::
Under New Guidelines, Millions More Americans Will Need to Lower Blood Pressure ::::: The number of Americans with high blood pressure, or hypertension, will rise to 103 million from 72 million under the previous standard, according to Dr. Robert M. Carey, professor of medicine at the University of Virginia and co-chair of the committee writing the new guidelines. The number of men under age 45 with a diagnosis of high blood pressure will triple. The prevalence of high blood press
21h
Gizmodo :::::
FBI: Man 'Thought It Would Be Funny' to Shine Laser in Pilot's Eyes, Crashed Car in Chase ::::: Photo: Gizmodo Authorities say a California man who was arrested after crashing during a high-speed chase allegedly “thought it would be funny” to flash a laser at a police helicopter, Ars Technica reports . Such laser strikes are dangerous because they can disorient pilots and endanger their passengers and people on the ground. The FAA reports roughly 5,000 laser strikes per year around the coun
22h
Gizmodo :::::
The 10 Best Deals of November 13, 2017 ::::: Before you head out for the day, check out the 10 best deals we found today from around the web. Head over to our main post for more deals, and follow us on Twitter and Facebook to never miss a chance to save. You can also join our Kinja Deals Community Facebook group to connect with your fellow deal hunters. #1: A Bunch of Anker Charging Gear Anker makes basically all of our readers’ favorite ch
22h
Ars Technica :::::
Tesla, SpaceX board member takes leave after sexual harassment claims ::::: Enlarge / DFJ Partner Steve Jurvetson speaks onstage during TechCrunch Disrupt SF 2017 at Pier 48 on September 18, 2017 in San Francisco, California. reader comments 0 Steve Jurvetson, a partner at a major Silicon Valley venture capital firm that bears his name—Draper Fisher Jurvetson—has left the company amid accusations of sexual harassment. However, he is still listed as a " partner " on the D
22h
Scientific American Content: Global :::::
Polluted Water Whale Invents New Feeding Strategy ::::: Baleen whales feed by opening their gigantic maws , lunging forward in the water and engulfing gallons of seawater in their mouths. They strain the seawater back through their baleen plates, trapping vast numbers of tiny critters—fish, krill and others—that then get swallowed all at once. The species that share this method include what are called the rorqual whales, which include fin whales, sei
22h
Live Science :::::
New Blood Pressure Numbers: 130 Is Now High, Doctors Say ::::: ANAHEIM, Calif. — The bar for what's considered "high blood pressure" just got lowered, meaning millions more Americans will now be classified as having the condition, according to new guidelines from several leading groups of heart doctors. The guidelines, from the American Heart Association (AHA) and the American College of Cardiology (ACC), now define high blood pressure as 130 mm Hg or
22h
Live Science :::::
8,000-Year-Old Jars Are the Earliest Evidence of Winemaking ::::: An 8,000-year-old Neolithic jaw, known as a qvevri — a vessel used for fermentation — found in the Republic of Georgia. Credit: Judyta Olszewski This remarkable find deserves a toast: People were fermenting grapes into wine about 8,000 years ago in what is now the Republic of Georgia, say scientists who found what's now considered the oldest known winemaking site on record. Archaeologists f
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News :::::
Doctors and patients make more decisions together ::::: CHICAGO --- In a shift away from the more patriarchal/matriarchal relationship between doctor and patient, patients report an increased partnership with their physicians in making medical decisions, reports a new study from Northwestern Medicine and Harvard University. Shared decision-making between patients and their clinicians increased 14 percent from 2002 to 2014, the study reports. Accordi
22h
Gizmodo :::::
Next Generation Telescope Selects First Proposals From Scientific Community ::::: Image: STSci There’ve been some incredible images of the James Webb Space Telescope, the next generation telescope and successor to the Hubble. But we’re not really here to look at images of telescopes. We’re here to learn some dope space stuff. The JWST’s operators at the Space Telescope Science Institute have selected 13 missions as part of their Director’s Discretionary Early Release Science P
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