NYT > Science
Keystone Pipeline Leaks 210,000 Gallons of Oil in South Dakota More than 5,000 barrels of oil spilled from the Keystone pipeline on Thursday in South Dakota, sending cleanup crews and emergency workers to the remote northeast portion of the state. The spill, near Amherst, S.D., comes just days before regulators in neighboring Nebraska decide whether to grant the final permit needed for construction to begin on the proposed Keystone XL pipeline, which would b
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Gizmodo
U.S. Navy Is Very Sorry That Their Pilot Drew A Dong In The Sky If you have been wandering around Washington state’s Okanogan County lately and thinking, wait, do I see a giant dick drawn in the sky ? your eyes have not deceived you. And the United States Navy, specifically the naval air station at Whidbey Island, is very sorry about that. Spokane’s KREM Channel 2 News has a collection of viewer-submitted pictures that you can peruse at leisure, but here’s a
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Science | The Guardian
Owning a dog cuts risk of heart attacks and other fatal diseases, study shows Never mind the chewed slippers, the hair on the sofa, and the inexplicable barking at 3am. Having a dog in the home substantially reduces the risk of heart attacks and other fatal conditions, a major study has shown. Researchers found that dog ownership had a dramatic effect on people who live alone, cutting the risk of death from cardiovascular disease by 36%. In households with more people unde
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Gizmodo
Surprise: There's A New Tesla Roadster With 620 Miles Of Range The Tesla Roadster, unexpectedly, is back. The specs that Tesla are claiming verge on the unbelievable. Top speed of 250+ MPH. 0-60 in 1.9 seconds. Range of 620 miles. To give you an idea of how nuts that is, no production car (not that the new Roadster is a production car, yet) has gone faster to highway speed. Ever. No Ferrari, no Porsche, not even a Koenigsegg. Advertisement And that top speed
18h
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Elon Musk Reveals Tesla's Electric Semitruck Elon Musk has always dreamed big, and tonight he showed off his biggest reverie yet: the fully electric Tesla Semi. Powered by a massive battery, it's capable of hauling 80,000 pounds. It’ll even drive itself —on the highway, at least. The big rig, which Musk unveiled at Tesla's design center in Hawthorne, California Thursday night, is just the latest step in his mission to make humanity forget a
18h
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What Does Tesla's Automated Truck Mean for Truckers? On Thursday night, Elon Musk rolled out Tesla 's biggest gizmo yet: a fully electric semitruck . The Semi can go a whopping 500 miles between charges, hauling 80,000 pounds along the way. And it can sorta, kinda drive itself—on highways, anyway. The truck comes with Enhanced Autopilot, the second generation of Tesla's semiautonomous technology, equipped with automatic braking, lane keeping, and l
11h
The Atlantic
Trump's Risky, Unearned Sanctimony About Al Franken President Trump jabbed at Senator Al Franken in a pair of late-night tweets Thursday, poking at a Democrat whose career is in danger over past sexual harassment , but calling attention to his silence about Alabama U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore—and, moreover, to his own history, including his boasts about sexual assault. On Thursday, radio host Leeann Tweeden wrote about two incidents during a 2
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The Atlantic
What Hillary Knew If the ground beneath your feet feels cold, it’s because hell froze over the other day. It happened at 8:02 p.m. on Monday, when The New York Times published an op-ed called “ I Believe Juanita. ” Written by Michelle Goldberg, it was a piece that, 20 years ago, likely would have inflamed the readership of the paper and scandalized its editors. Reviewing the credibility of Broaddrick’s claim, Gold
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Everything We Know About Tesla's New Roadster Tesla is making a new version of the Roadster sports car, Elon Musk announced Thursday night, and it looks spectacular. After the Tesla CEO spent half an hour onstage extolling the virtues of his new electric 18-wheeler , he stepped away and the lights went out. Beastie Boys’ “Sabotage” came on the loudspeakers, and then the new Roadster rolled out of the very Semi he had just introduced, ripping
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The Atlantic
Christian Support for Roy Moore ‘Looks Like Hypocrisy to the Outside World’ Before this month, Roy Moore was best known nationally for refusing to remove a Ten Commandments monument from the Alabama state supreme-court building. Now, the aspiring senator is accused of hitting on teens at an Alabama mall and inappropriately touching a 14-year-old girl. These allegations may be the end of Moore. Congressional Republicans have started disowning him, and he’s tentatively dro
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Gizmodo
This Dragon Ball Z Fan Film Is Probably the Best Live-Action Adaptation the Series Is Ever Going to Get GIF Image: RobotUnderdog Many live-action anime adaptations are objectively terrible, but Robot Underdog’s Dragon Ball Z: Light of Hope manages to set itself apart. Not with incredibly high production values or brilliant fight sequences, but with an earnest love and respect for the series that it’s based on. Light of Hope is a 35-minute short film based on the Android Saga, which focuses specific
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Gizmodo
Head Transplant Doctor Claims First Successful Human Head Transplant...on a Corpse Sergio Canavero, who actually looks like the kind of guy who’d be really excited about head transplants (image: AP) One nice thing about teddy bears is that if your dog tears the head off of your child’s favorite one, you can just sew it back on. But you don’t proclaim your achievement a “wild success”—rather, you say, “here, I have fixed your lifeless play-thing.” Yet here comes Sergio Canavero,
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The Atlantic
Al Franken, That Photo, and Trusting the Women The picture was striking . The military airplane. The sleeping woman. The outstretched hands. The mischievous smile. The look what I’m getting away with impishness directed at the camera. On Thursday, Leeann Tweeden, a radio host and former model, came forward with the accusation that Senator Al Franken, of Minnesota, had kissed her against her will during a 2006 USO trip to Kuwait, Iraq, and Afg
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Science | The Guardian
No, there hasn’t been a human 'head transplant', and there may never be In February 2015, Sergio Canavero appeared in this very publication claiming a live human head will be successfully transplanted onto a donor human body within two years . He’s popped up in the media a lot since then, but two years and nine months later, how are things looking? Well, he’s only gone and done it! As we can see in this Telegraph story from today, the world’s first human head transpl
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BBC News - Science & Environment
First gene-editing in human body attempt Image copyright Children's Hospital Oakland Image caption Brian Madeux and his fiancé Marcie Humphrey Gene-editing has been attempted on cells inside a patient, in a world first by doctors in California. Brian Madeux, 44 from Arizona, was given the experimental treatment to try to correct a defect in his DNA that causes Hunter's syndrome. Mr Madeux says he was prepared to take part in the trial a
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Science : NPR
Clues In That Mysterious Radioactive Cloud Point Toward Russia The core of the 'RBT-3' reactor at the Dimitrovgrad Scientific Research Institute of Reactors. Sovfoto/UIG via Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Sovfoto/UIG via Getty Images The core of the 'RBT-3' reactor at the Dimitrovgrad Scientific Research Institute of Reactors. Sovfoto/UIG via Getty Images The tiny nation of Denmark has just three stations for monitoring atmospheric radiation. Each
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New on MIT Technology Review
Boston Dynamics’ Backflipping Robot Is an Astounding Advance A hardware safeguard in Amazon’s recently launched while-you’re-out delivery service turns out to have a big hole. And, well—let’s just say you probably should have seen this coming. Amazon Key uses a smart lock and cloud-based security camera in order to allow delivery staff to drop parcels inside a home while a customer is out. The driver requests access via Amazon, but the customer can watch
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Gizmodo
iOS 11 Is Killing Me All images: Adam Clark Estes / Gizmodo Okay, look. I’m not the first person to say this, and I certainly won’t be the last. But iOS 11 is bad. The new operating system has turned my phone into a bug-infested carcass of its former self, and the frustration of trying to use it sometimes makes me want to die, too. Plenty of people have qualms with the design. A couple months ago, my former co-worker
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New on MIT Technology Review
VIDEO: Boston Dynamics’ Backflipping Robot Is an Astounding Advance A hardware safeguard in Amazon’s recently launched while-you’re-out delivery service turns out to have a big hole. And, well—let’s just say you probably should have seen this coming. Amazon Key uses a smart lock and cloud-based security camera in order to allow delivery staff to drop parcels inside a home while a customer is out. The driver requests access via Amazon, but the customer can watch
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Gizmodo
Everything You Need to Know About Tesla's New Electric Semi Truck All Images: Tesla Elon Musk rolled up to a Tesla press event tonight in an electric semi truck, unveiling his latest project to the world. The semi has been hotly anticipated since Musk first hinted at it last summer, and he’s been hyping it up on Twitter this week, promising that the reveal would “blow your mind clear out of your skull and into an alternate dimension.” The semi truck is the late
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Science : NPR
The Largest Digital Camera In The World Takes Shape A technician examines the mirror on the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. Scientists at two national laboratories are currently building the components for an enormous digital camera that will capture images from the telescope. Joe McNally/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Joe McNally/Getty Images A technician examines the mirror on the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. Scientists at two nat
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NYT > Science
Science Is Dry, Obscure, Complex? Well, It Makes for Great Comedy “ You’re the Expert ” is among a new crop of comedy podcasts and live shows that are mining science for laughs. The podcast-live show “ The Scientists ,” as well as the New York-based event series “ Monotony ,” “ Drunk Science ,” and “ Drunk Education ,” treat subjects like astronomy, human evolution and even the physics behind urinal cakes as source material; and the more obscure, bizarre and co
12h
The Atlantic
The Deepening Partisan Split Over Sexual Misconduct Earlier this week, New York magazine’s Jonathan Chait asked his fellow liberals to imagine that Roy Moore were a Democrat. “It’s easy to feel superior about this when opposition to grotesque treatment of teenage girls lines up neatly with your own party’s well-being,” he wrote. “If you’re a liberal, ask yourself what you would do if the circumstances were reversed.” Thanks to Al Franken, we can n
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The Atlantic
Conservatives Reap the Whirlwind of Their War on the Media All news is “fake news”—at least if you’re a diehard Roy Moore supporter. With sexual misconduct allegations continuing to mount against the Republican Senate candidate in Alabama, Moore has defied calls to drop out of the race by advancing an audacious conspiracy theory—that partisan fabulists in the mainstream media are working with his enemies in the political establishment to wage a nefarious
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New Scientist - News
Watch humanoid Boston Dynamics robot do box jumps and back flips VIDEO By Sally Adee Boston Dynamics has released footage of a humanoid robot that can do box jumps and back flips. This is a significant improvement on robot capabilities – despite what years of sci fi movies have suggested, it’s actually really hard to make a bipedal robot walk, climb stairs and just generally keep its balance. That’s why some of the entrants in recent humanoid robot Grand C
6h
Popular Science
No, there has not been a successful human head transplant In a 2015 TEDx talk, Sergio Canavero made a bold and tantalizing claim : by 2017, he swore, he would conduct the first human head transplant. And if you’ve been paying attention to trending headlines today, you might think he’s followed through on that promise. He has not. Canavero has not completed a successful human head transplant, and it is very unlikely that he will ever do so. We repeat: No
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Ars Technica
Tesla promises a new wicked-fast $200,000 Roadster reader comments 86 A press image of the new Roadster. Tesla The black truck turned around to back onto the stage. Megan Geuss The new Roadster rolled out of the back of the Semi. Megan Geuss A first look at the new Roadster. Megan Geuss The new Roadster will apparently have a 620 mile range. Megan Geuss A first full look at the new Roadster. Megan Geuss Elon Musk pumps a fist at the new car's spe
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Big Think
Tesla Reveals a Slick Electric Semitruck Elon Musk-led Tesla Motors unveiled a new truck yesterday - it’s first fully electric Tesla Semi. The slick truck has a giant battery which lets it go for 500 miles on one charge and can haul 80,000 pounds. It also comes with Enhanced Autopilot, a next-generation semiautonomous driving tech which will add automation to the truck’s braking, lane keeping and lane departure warnings. Musk teased
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Ars Technica
Star Wars: Battlefront II review: Nope, nope, nope, nope, nope, nope, nope [Updated] Enlarge / The pull of the Force is strong with things like an impeccably rendered Millennium Falcon. (I mean, gosh, that's purty.) But Star Wars: Battlefront II can't paint over most of its failings. reader comments 144 Game details Developer: DICE/Criterion Publisher : EA Platform : Xbox One (reviewed), PS4, Windows Release Date: November 17, 2017 ESRB Rating: T for Teen Price : $60 Links: Offic
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New on MIT Technology Review
Tesla’s All-Electric Semi Sounds Amazing—But How Much Will It Cost, Exactly? A hardware safeguard in Amazon’s recently launched while-you’re-out delivery service turns out to have a big hole. And, well—let’s just say you probably should have seen this coming. Amazon Key uses a smart lock and cloud-based security camera in order to allow delivery staff to drop parcels inside a home while a customer is out. The driver requests access via Amazon, but the customer can watch
8h
Gizmodo
MoviePass Probably Won't Last, But It's Only Seven Bucks Now Image: MoviePass When MoviePass announced its Netflix-for-the-cinema service back in August, observers wondered how it could possibly maintain the low $10 monthly fee for unlimited movies. On Friday, the company announced that it will be making a change to the fee. For a limited time, it’s offering annual subscriptions at about $7 per month. According to a press release the company sent to Gizmod
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Everything Attorney General Jeff Sessions Has Forgotten Under Oath We get it. Presidential campaigns are a blur. One day you're kissing babies in an Iowa cornfield, the next you're working the spin room at a Las Vegas debate. Who among us can remember every hand shaken, every appointment kept, every 30-year-old underling plotting a backroom conversation with Vladimir Putin to acquire dirt on a political opponent? Certainly not Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Sin
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Scientific American Content: Global
Have Scientists Found a Secret Chord for Happy Songs? The following essay is reprinted with permission from The Conversation , an online publication covering the latest research. In the BBC radio comedy show I’m Sorry I Haven’t A Clue, panellists are sometimes asked to sing “one song to the tune of another”. Hilarious results ensue when the words of one song fit the rhythm and metre of the other but they have completely different sentiments: Jab
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Gizmodo
Uh, Is This Transformers Toy a Trump Supporter? [Update] Image: Hasbro. Donald Trump’s presidency has seen the words “Make America Great Again”—a.k.a. MAGA—plastered all over the U.S., from placards to stickers to the infamous red hats. One of the last places you’d expect to see it, however, is on the side of a toy Transformers car in an alien language. And yet, it seems here we are. Hasbro’s recently released “Power of the Primes” Jazz action figure h
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Surrey develops new 'supercatalyst' to recycle carbon dioxide and methane Ball-and-stick model of carbon dioxide. Credit: Wikipedia The University of Surrey has developed a new and cost-effective catalyst to recycle two of the main causes behind climate change - carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). In a study published by the Applied Catalysis B: Environmental , scientists have described how they created an advanced nickel-based catalyst strengthened with tin and ce
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The Fallout Over the Al Franken Allegations Underscore That Seeing Is Believing On Thursday, Los Angeles radio show host Leeann Tweeden accused Senator Al Franken of kissing and groping her during a 2006 USO tour through the Middle East. It’s the same icky, infuriating story of sexual assault Americans have heard countless times over the past few weeks. But the immediate response has been overwhelmingly different. Why? Because Tweeden has a photo. And people view photographs
22h
Live Science
What in the World? Flat-Earthers Gather at First Conference Many flat-Earthers believe the Earth is a disc surrounded by an ice wall. Credit: FastMotion/Shutterstock A conference aimed at disputing the idea that the world is round just wrapped up in North Carolina. The first-ever 2017 Flat Earth International Conference (FEIC) was held in Raleigh on Nov. 9 and 10, featuring some of the big names in round-Earth denial. Among the speakers were Darryle
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New Scientist - News
Blue tits divorce their partners if they turn up late to mate Blue tits are monogamous – unless one of them is late blickwinkel / Alamy Stock Photo By Alice Klein Blue tits divorce their partners if they turn up late to annual breeding season. About 85 per cent of birds are socially monogamous, meaning they form couples and share the workload of raising their young. Staying together long-term is thought to be beneficial because they can focus on breedin
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Live Science
Alien Hunters Send Message to Nearby Planet Artist’s illustration of the GJ 273 system, which consists of a red dwarf star and two known planets, one of which may be capable of supporting life. Credit: Danielle Futselaar/METI If there are any intelligent aliens in the GJ 273 system, they can expect to hear from us about a dozen years from now. Last month, scientists and artists beamed a message to GJ 273, a red dwarf also known as Lu
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The FCC's Latest Moves Could Worsen the Digital Divide When Ajit Pai became chair of the Federal Communications Commission earlier this year, he pledged to make bridging the digital divide a top priority. Thursday, the commission took several steps that could worsen the divide, by making it harder for poor and rural Americans to access telecom services. In particular, the agency said it is considering changes to its Lifeline program that helps low-in
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Gizmodo
Netflix Is Promoting The Punisher With What Looks Like an E-Mail Phishing Scam Image: Netflix This morning at 6:51 AM, I received an e-mail from Netflix with the subject line: “Suspicious activity █████ Marvel on Netflix █████” Though I was curious as to what was going on, I left the e-mail unopened because just last week, Netflix was in the news for being linked to a phishing scam . A number of Netflix subscribers recently reported receiving odd e-mails from organizations
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Popular Science
Tesla is crowdfunding its vehicles with big promises At a theatrical, hype-filled event Thursday night in an aircraft hanger in Hawthorne, California, Elon Musk finally revealed Tesla’s long-expected electric semi truck. He then surprised the audience by unveiling another product that emerged from one of those trucks—a bright red Roadster, an updated version of the company’s first vehicle. The Roadster, which he said will be available in 2020, will
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Scientific American Content: Global
Ancient One-Percenters Were Beast Based The square footage of a home tends to be a measure of wealth . Compare the sizes of dwellings in a city and you'll get begin to get a picture of rich and poor, and how wealth is distributed . Now researchers have used that modern metric on ancient settlements. They investigated housing-based wealth at 63 archaeological sites, from Old World places like Mesopotamia to New World sites like Mesa Ver
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Ars Technica
Weekend code warriors prepare to clash in Codewarz Enlarge / Obviously a Codewarz competitor. Alain Daussin/Getty Images reader comments 0 If you didn't have any weekend plans yet—or maybe even if you did—and you're interested in scratching your programming itch, there's something to add to your calendar. Codewarz , a programming competition that presents participants with 24 coding challenges, is running its first live event starting at 1pm East
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
20 years of changing seasons on Earth packed into two and half minutes From space, satellites can see Earth breathe. A new NASA visualization shows 20 years of continuous observations of plant life on land and at the ocean’s surface, from September 1997 to September 2017. On land, vegetation appears on a scale from brown (low vegetation) to dark green (lots of vegetation); at the ocean surface, phytoplankton are indicated on a scale from purple (low) to yellow (high
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
These ring-tailed lemurs raise a 'stink' when they flirt with potential mates Credit: Devin Sturgeon/University of Toronto A U of T Scarborough study finds that a unique ritual performed by male ring-tailed lemurs may come at a significant physical cost, but it could help their chances in securing a mate. "Stink-flirting displays are done more often by dominant males," says Amber Walker-Bolton, lead author and instructor in U of T Scarborough's Department of Anthropology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mathematician's study of 'swarmalators' could direct future science How does the Japanese tree frog figure into the latest work of noted mathematician Steven Strogatz? As it turns out, quite prominently. "We had read about these funny frogs that hop around and croak," said Strogatz, the Jacob Gould Schurman Professor of Applied Mathematics. "They form patterns in space and time. Usually it's about reproduction. And based on how the other guy or guys are croaking,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
When to fish: Timing matters for fish that migrate to reproduce Alaska sockeye salmon migrating. Credit: Dennis Wise/University of Washington It's no secret that human activities affect fish, particularly those that must migrate to reproduce. Years of building dams and polluting rivers in some regions have left fish such as salmon struggling to return to their home streams and give birth to the next generation. A new University of Washington study points to y
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Heavy nitrogen molecules reveal planetary-scale tug-of-war Researchers from Rice University and UCLA simulated high-energy chemistry in the upper atmosphere to reproduce enriched levels of 15N15N, molecules that contain only heavy isotopes of nitrogen. Credit: Laurence Yeung/Rice University Nature whispers its stories in a faint molecular language, and Rice University scientist Laurence Yeung and colleagues can finally tell one of those stories this week
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
It's A Showdown At The Hoffman Claim Over Whether To Shut Down The Plant #GoldRush | Friday 9p Hunter makes a tough decision to shut down Monster Red once he discovers that mining all day produced a 4 ounce cleanup. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Breakthrough could launch organic electronics beyond cell phone screens Researchers used ultraviolet light to excite molecules in a semiconductor, triggering reactions that split up and activated a dopant Credit: Jing Wang and Xin Lin A discovery by an international team of researchers from Princeton University, the Georgia Institute of Technology and Humboldt University in Berlin points the way to more widespread use of an advanced technology generally known as orga
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple pushes back release of HomePod speaker to 2018 Apple's HomePod connected speaker, unveiled in June, won't be available until early 2018, according to the company Apple said Friday it was delaying until early next year the release of its HomePod speaker set to compete with Amazon's Alexa-powered devices and Google Home as a smart home and music hub. The delay means Apple will miss the key holiday shopping season in the fast-growing segment of
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Gizmodo
Breath of the Wild Special Edition Is Back In Stock, If You Hurry Commerce Content is independent of Editorial and Advertising, and if you buy something through our posts, we may get a small share of the sale. Click here for more. This isn’t a deal per se, but if you’ve been trying to get your hands on Breath of the Wild Special Edition , Amazon has it back in stock right now for its $100 MSRP. $100 From amazon Gizmodo Media Group may get a commission About the
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Gizmodo
The 10 Best Deals of November 17, 2017 We see a lot of deals around the web over on Kinja Deals , but these were our ten favorites today. Head over to our main post for more deals, and follow us on Twitter and Facebook to never miss a chance to save. You can also join our Kinja Deals Community Facebook group to connect with your fellow deal hunters. #1: Ecobee4 Ecobee4 , $199 While not nearly as ubiquitous as Nest’s Learning Thermosta
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A new way to reduce surgery complications stemming from high blood sugarUsing a different marker to track a patient's glycemic levels could help improve outcomes after surgery for diabetic and non-diabetic patients alike.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gene drive technologies for ecosystem conservation: Use with care!Scientists working in the vanguard of new genetic technologies have issued a cautionary call to ensure that possible applications in conservation will only affect local populations. Experts have now examined the possible consequences of the accidental spread of existing self-propagating gene drive systems.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chance discovery of forgotten 1960s 'preprint' experimentResearchers in physics and mathematics have long used 'preprints' -- preliminary versions of their scientific findings published on internet servers for anyone to read. In 2013, similar services were launched for biology, but following a chance discovery, a scientist and historian has unearthed a long-forgotten experiment in biology preprints that took place in the 1960s.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Progression from infection to pulmonary tuberculosis follows distinct timelineResearchers have uncovered a sequence of biological processes that occur in humans infected with the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis as the infection progresses to pulmonary tuberculosis.
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Gizmodo
Y Combinator Quietly Ends Relationship With Peter Thiel Photo: Getty Amidst last year’s presidential election, Silicon Valley was publicly at odds with Peter Thiel’s support for Donald Trump. But that wasn’t enough to convince people like Y Combinator’s president Sam Altman to stop working with Thiel. Now, in what has to be one of the stealthiest announcements ever, the partnership between Y Combinator and Thiel has come to an end. Buzzfeed News confi
58min
Big Think
These $2 Million Floating Homes Can Withstand Category 4 Hurricanes Hurricanes and tropical storms ravaged the eastern coast of the U.S. and surrounding islands in 2017, leaving many to question the long-term habitability of the areas and those similar across the globe. But there will be soon one solution that would allow people to live safely and in style right off the coast of regions likely to be affected by the effects of climate change – at least for those w
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The Scientist RSS
Cheap, Safe Anti-Malaria Drug Reduces Zika Virus in MiceInfected animals given chloroquine while pregnant had fetuses with a far lighter viral load in their brains than untreated mice did.
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: 'He Will Not Step Down' Today in 5 Lines President Trump blasted Minnesota Senator Al Franken after the lawmaker was accused of forcibly kissing and groping a woman, but did not mention Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore, who has also been accused of sexual misconduct. During a rally in Alabama, Kayla Moore said her husband isn’t letting the allegations get to him: “He will not step down.” Reverend Jesse Jackson, the 76
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Sex matters in experiments on party drug — in mice unoL/Getty When it comes to lab mice and antidepressants, it's complicated. Mouse experiments with the popular club drug ketamine may be skewed by the sex of the researcher performing them, a study suggests. The findings, presented on 14 November at the Society for Neuroscience (SfN) meeting in Washington DC, only deepen the mystery of how ketamine, which has powerful mood-lifting properties, int
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Gadget Lab Podcast: Pixel Buds, AirPods, and the Future of Ear Computers Headphones aren’t really just headphones anymore. They’re ear computers. Sure, you can use them to listen to music, as always. But they’ve got touch controls now. They’re embedded with custom wireless chips to ease pairing. They also open a direct line to the voice assistant on your phone. Soon however, it’s likely you won’t even need the phone to talk to your AI-powered assistant in your headpho
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Professor publishes archaeological research on social inequality MISSOULA - The origins of social inequality might lie in the remnants of ancient Eurasia's agricultural societies, according to an article recently published in the major science journal Nature . The article, "Greater post-Neolithic wealth disparities in Eurasia than in North America and Mesopotamia," includes research from Anna Prentiss, a professor in the Department of Anthropology at the Unive
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A walk at the mall or the park? New study shows, for moms and daughters, a walk in the park is best URBANA, Ill. - Spending time together with family may help strengthen the family bond, but new research from the University of Illinois shows that specifically spending time outside in nature--even just a 20-minute walk--together can help family members get along even better. The research is based on the attention restoration theory which describes how interaction with natural environments can
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A mom's support helps a child learn to handle negative emotions, but what if mom is distressed?When children become upset, showing negative emotions or behaviors, some parents become distressed, while others are able to talk their child through the difficult situation. Studies have shown that a mothers' reaction -- positive or negative -- to her child's negative emotions can predict whether her child develops the ability to effectively regulate his emotions and behavior. A new University of
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New model estimates odds of events that trigger sudden cardiac deathA new computational model of heart tissue allows researchers to estimate the probability of rare heartbeat irregularities that can cause sudden cardiac death.
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Gizmodo
How to Host a Great Thanksgiving Without Ruining the Planet For many, the holidays are one of the more stressful times of year. Between cooking for a motley crew of relatives, having to deal with that one uncle who doesn’t believe in climate change, and figuring out how to stay sane through it all, Thanksgiving isn’t the laid-back day with friends and family that Nicole Westbrook’s seminal 2012 song “It’s Thanksgiving” would make you think it is. On top o
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Ars Technica
Dealmaster: The Black Friday tech deals that might actually be worth buying Enlarge / Get ready for lots of ads like this. Best Buy reader comments 0 Brace yourself for Walmart fights and snarky tweets about capitalism, because Black Friday is nearly here. Once again, the day after Thanksgiving—and in many cases the days before that—will see retailers across the country pushing an avalanche of sales to the gift-needy public. And once again, many of those “discounts” won’
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
European forests might not be realizing their full potentialEuropean forest managers can have their cake and eat it, because according to a new study maximizing timber production in a forest does not necessarily have to come at a cost of reduced species diversity or the capacity to regulate climate change by the same forest. However most European forests fall well below their possible maximum levels of these three capacities.
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Ars Technica
Microsoft abandons typical Patch Tuesday playbook to fix Equation Editor flaw reader comments 14 When a company like Microsoft needs to fix a security flaw in one of its products, the process is normally straightforward: determine where the bug lies, change the program's source code to fix the bug, and then recompile the program. But it looks like the company had to step outside this typical process for one of the flaws it patched this Tuesday. Instead of fixing the source
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Big Think
A Clear-Eyed Comparison of Alcohol vs Marijuana It seems that for as long as we’ve been around, we’ve enjoyed losing control of our faculties and behavior for fun, at least temporarily. The means of transport for these little mind vacations may vary, but the two most popular are obviously alcoholic beverages and marijuana. Though it’s well-known that booze goes way back — each builder of the pyramids at Giza had a one-gallon per day beer ratio
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hibernating ground squirrels provide clues to new stroke treatments IMAGE: A team of scientists identified a molecule that may reduce stroke-induced brain damage. view more Credit: Image courtesy of the NINDS. In the fight against brain damage caused by stroke, researchers have turned to an unlikely source of inspiration: hibernating ground squirrels. While the animals' brains experience dramatically reduced blood flow during hibernation, just like human pa
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
How to transform apocalypse fatigue into action on global warming | Per Espen StoknesThe biggest obstacle to dealing with climate disruptions lies between your ears, says psychologist and economist Per Espen Stokes. He's spent years studying the defenses we use to avoid thinking about the demise of our planet -- and figuring out a new way of talking about global warming that keeps us from shutting down. Step away from the doomsday narratives and learn how to make caring for the ea
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NYT > Science
A Close-Up on Mysteries Made of Stone in Saudi Arabia’s Desert A Close-Up on Mysteries Made of Stone in Saudi Arabia’s Desert Structures that may have been created by ancient tribes could only be studied using Google Earth. Saudi officials finally invited an archaeologist to observe them via helicopter. For nearly a decade, David Kennedy marveled from behind his computer screen at thousands of mysterious stone structures scattered across Saudi Arabia’s deser
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NYT > Science
Q&A: The Chemical Reaction That Cleans Everything Photo Credit Victoria Roberts Q. What exactly does bleach do? If I soak a cracked dish, the stains seem to be gone — but are they really? A. The active ingredient of bleach is sodium hypochlorite, which is made up of three common elements, sodium, oxygen and chlorine, said May Nyman, professor of chemistry at Oregon State University. The rest of what is in the bleach bottle is mostly water. “Of t
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Viden
Dansk Industri om Teslas nye ellastbil: Det er ikke bare en fremtidsdrøm Den ligner mere en blanding af et hurtigtog og batmobilen, end hvad den egentlig er – nemlig en lastbil. Den amerikanske elbilproducent Teslas nye lastbil, der har fået navnet ’Semi’, skal tage kampen op mod de konventionelle diesellastbiler, der kører på vejene i dag. Når de først er kommet på det almindelige vejnet, så begynder de hurtigt at vinde indpas på markedet Michael Svane, branchedirekt
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The Scientist RSS
Telomere Length and Childhood Stress Dont Always CorrelateShorter telomere length is widely considered a manifestation of stress in young children, but the results of a new study find it's more complicated than that.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Breakthrough could launch organic electronics beyond cell phone screens IMAGE: Researchers used ultraviolet light to excite molecules in a semiconductor, triggering reactions that split up and activated a dopant view more Credit: Jing Wang and Xin Lin A discovery by an international team of researchers from Princeton University, the Georgia Institute of Technology and Humboldt University in Berlin points the way to more widespread use of an advanced technology ge
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Taking a spin on plasma space tornadoes with NASA observationsTornado-like swirls of space plasma create tumultuous boundaries in the near-Earth environment, letting dangerous high-energy particles slip into near Earth space, new NASA mission results show.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New computational method provides optimized design of wind up toysA team of leading computer scientists has developed a novel computational system to aid the design and fabrication of wind-up toys, focusing on automating the intricate interior machinery responsible for the toys' wind-up motion.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Drones could help crop management take off, research showsInitial results of an ongoing study show that aerial imagery produced by multi-spectral sensors as well as less-expensive digital cameras may improve accuracy and efficiency of plant stand assessment in cotton.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Risk of distracted driving predicted by age, gender, personality and driving frequencyThe first study of how personal traits affect driver distraction finds that young men, extroverted or neurotic people, and people who drive more often are more likely to report being distracted during driving, while older women and those who feel they could control their distracted behavior are less likely to report distraction. The study also proposes future directions for interventions to reduce
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Solar flare pulses at sun and Earth detectedTwo recent studies show how solar flares exhibit pulses or oscillations in the amount of energy being sent out. Such research provides new insights on the origins of these massive solar flares and the space weather they produce. This is key information as humans and robotic missions venture out into the solar system, farther and farther from Earth.
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Ars Technica
Hairy situation: DC’s rail system may be taken down by human shedding Enlarge / The DC Metro, when it's not on fire. reader comments 6 For residents of our nation’s capital, news of a fire on the city’s rapid transit system—the Washington Metro—is not surprising. It catches fire and smokes quite regularly. At some points last year, there were reports of more than four fires per week (although there’s some dispute about that rate). There’s even the handy site— IsMet
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Gizmodo
Deadspin U.S. Deadspin U.S. Navy Is Very Sorry That Their Pilot Drew A Dong In The Sky | The Slot Trump Mocks Al Franken On Twitter, Blows It | Splinter The Scary Sex Trap That Is Nice-Guy Stealthing | The Root Idiot Gun Owner Shoots Himself and Wife in Church While Speaking About His Right to Have a Gun in Church | Earther That Spill You Keep Seeing Is Not the Keystone XL, But It Still Matters |
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Gizmodo
Two Teams Have Simultaneously Unearthed Evidence of an Exotic New Particle A tetraquark (Artwork: Fermilab) A few months ago, physicists observed a new subatomic particle—essentially an awkwardly-named, crazy cousin of the proton. Its mere existence has energized teams of particle physicists to dream up new ways about how matter forms, arranges itself, and exists. Now, a pair of new research papers using different theoretical methods have independently unearthed another
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Gizmodo
Get Our Readers' Favorite Travel Mugs at BOGO 50% Off Prices Commerce Content is independent of Editorial and Advertising, and if you buy something through our posts, we may get a small share of the sale. Click here for more. Normally priced at $15 per bottle, these 2-packs of Contigo travel mugs and water bottles are all just $22 today, which is basically like getting them BOGO 50% off. Our readers selected the vacuum insulated travel mugs as their favori
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Gizmodo
Could the Whole CRISPR Patent Kerfuffle Have Been Completely Avoided? Image: AP For the better part of the last three years, the introduction of the most powerful gene editing technology ever invented has been marred by a nasty patent battle . The two groups of scientists involved, each contributing significantly to the future of genetic engineering, are pitted against each other in a bitter contest for glory and fortune. In one corner: UC Berkeley, which argued th
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: Same Oceans, Similar Prey, Two Very Different Necks It was a question that dogged biologists, Agustina Gómez-Laich recalls: Why the neck? Imperial cormorants, lanky, long-necked creatures that live on the southern coasts of Argentina and Chile, spend much of their time immersed in the frigid waters of the ocean. They dive to chilly depths — in the colony Dr. Gómez-Laich studies, up to 80 meters, or 240 feet — to hunt fish. But the cormorants have
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Data Shows Nike’s Vaporfly 4% Marathon Shoe Increases Running Economy Eliud Kipchoge, the world's best marathon runner, runs in Nike shoes. But do his shoes help him run faster? You'll be shocked—shocked!—to learn that Nike claims they do. Kipchoge wears a special version of the Vaporfly 4%, which got its name from a study out of UC Boulder. Funded by Nike, and conducted in collaboration with Nike researchers, it found test subjects shod in a Vaporfly prototype ran
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New theory rewrites opening moments of Chernobyl disasterA brand-new theory of the opening moments during the Chernobyl disaster, the most severe nuclear accident in history, based on additional analysis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A new way to store thermal energyA new phase-change material provides a way to store heat in a stable chemical form, then release it later on demand using light as a trigger.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New test to measure the effectiveness of CF drugsA new laboratory model has been created to measure and compare the responses of CF and normal airway cells to CF-related infectious/inflammatory factors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Aquatic plant may help remove contaminants from lakesA tiny aquatic plant called duckweed might be a viable option for remove phosphorus, nitrates, nitrites and even heavy metals from lakes, ponds and slow-moving waterbodies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Small changes to organ procurement system could lead to more life-saving transplants Slight changes to the system for allocating deceased-donor kidneys could result in higher rates of organ procurement and lead to more kidney transplants across the country, according to new research co-authored by an Indiana University Kelley School of Business professor. "Any increase in supply will result in saved lives," said Rodney P. Parker, an associate professor of operations management at
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Not an illusion: Clever use of mirrors boosts performance of light-sheet microscope IMAGE: Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) Fellows Patrick La Riviere of University of Chicago, left, and Hari Shroff of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering with the diSPIM system (Dual-view... view more Credit: Diana Kenney WOODS HOLE, Mass.--Using a simple "mirror trick" and not-so-simple computational analysis, scientists affiliated with the Marine Biological Lab
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Like a baby: The vicious cycle of childhood obesity and snoring BOSTON - Poor nutrition and lack of exercise lead to the increasing prevalence of obesity which, in turn, is the major predictor of diabetes and future risk of cardiovascular disease in western societies. Excess weight is also closely associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), the increasingly common and potentially serious sleep disorder that is often marked by loud snoring. OSA affects abou
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Latest Headlines | Science News
The Arecibo Observatory will remain open, NSF says In the Nov. 25 SN : Charting lumpy space, Bronze Age movers and shakers, T. rex ’s slasher arms, gene editor corrects typos, the Great Pyramid hides a void, mosses chronicle Arctic warming, an itty-bitty insect-inspired robot and more.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Gene Therapy Could Help People Overcome Meth Addiction Gene therapy, which modifies a person’s DNA, has long been thought of as a way to treat genetic diseases —and more recently, cancer. But a team at the University of Arkansas for Medical Science thinks it can use this same idea to counteract the high that methamphetamine produces as a way to treat addiction. Eric Peterson, associate professor of pharmacology and toxicology, and his colleagues have
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Interstellar space probes: Where's the brakes?With a miniaturized space probe capable of being accelerated to a quarter of the speed of light, we could reach Alpha Centauri, our nearest star, in 20 to 50 years. However, without a mechanism to slow it down, the space probe could only collect data from the star and its planets as it zoomed past. A theoretical physicist has now examined whether interstellar spacecraft can be decelerated using 'm
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A sub-desert savanna spread across Madrid 14 million years agoThe current landscape of Madrid city and its vicinity was really different 14 million years ago. A semi-desert savanna has been inferred for the center of the Iberian Peninsula in the middle Miocene. This ecosystem was characterized by a very arid tropical climatic regime with up to ten months of drought per year, according to a recent paper. Scientists reached such conclusions after comparing mam
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Progesterone to fight preterm birthA new study provides additional support for treatment with vaginal progesterone to reduce the risk of preterm birth, neonatal complications and infant death in pregnant women with a short cervix. A shortened cervix is the most powerful predictor of preterm birth.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
To reduce risk of crashing, pick roads with wide shoulders and high speed limitsA solid median, wide shoulders, minimal hills -- and a high speed limit? Researchers explore freeway features that minimize crash risk.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Using eDNA to identify the breeding habitat of endangered speciesUsing wide-ranging eDNA analysis combined with traditional collection survey methods, researchers have identified the breeding site of critically endangered fish species Acheilognathus typus in the mainstream of Omono River in Akita Prefecture, Japan.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain astrocytes linked to Alzheimer's diseaseAstrocytes, the supporting cells of the brain, could play a significant role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to a new study. This is the first time researchers discovered a direct association between astrocytes and AD.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Employees want to sit down less and walk more during work daysDesk-based workers would like to spend less time sitting down and more time walking or doing physical activity as part of their working day, research suggests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
When male voles drink alcohol, but their partner doesn't, their relationship suffersResearchers find that the relationship between prairie vole couples suffers when the male has access to alcohol, but his female partner doesn't - similar to what has been observed in human couples. The researchers also found changes in a specific brain region in the male voles. The results could help researchers find strategies to overcome the negative effects of alcohol on human relationships.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel therapeutic target discovered for estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancerA new protein has been identified in a common subtype of breast cancer which can potentially offer more effective therapies for the future.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New therapy lessens impact of mistreatment at a young ageCertain drugs can prevent and reduce changes to the brain caused by mistreatment at an early age, suggests new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study raises possibility of naturally acquired immunity against Zika virusBirth defects in babies born infected with Zika virus remain a major health concern. Now, scientists suggest the possibility that some women in high-risk Zika regions may already be protected and not know it. New research performed in mice, shows women who develop symptom-free Zika infections may be able to acquire immunity that would protect them from future infections and their offspring in a fu
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Old World monkeys could be key to a new, powerful rheumatoid arthritis therapyA peptide only found in Old World monkeys has the potential to stop rheumatoid arthritis progression better than established treatments, new research indicates.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Finding MajoranasNano-'hashtags' could be the key to generating the highly sought Majorana quasiparticle, report scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A photosynthetic organism's 'Water World'Following the path of radicals and being able to identify many damaged residues because of incredibly accurate, expeditious and sensitive mass spectrometry, three scientists studied the great granddaddy of all photosynthetic organisms -- a strain of cyanobacteria -- to develop the first experimental map of that organism's water world.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Making it easier to recycle plasticsResearchers report new approaches could dramatically increase the amount of plastic waste that can be successfully recycled.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Plant respiration could become a bigger feedback on climate than expectedNew research suggests that plant respiration is a larger source of carbon emissions than previously thought, and warns that as the world warms, this may reduce the ability of Earth's land surface to absorb emissions due to fossil fuel burning.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Ion billiards' cue novel material synthesis methodA team of researchers has developed a novel material synthesis method called proton-driven ion introduction (PDII) which utilizes a phenomenon similar to 'ion billiards.' The new method could pave the way for creating numerous new materials, thus drastically advancing materials sciences.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Link between obesity and cancer is not widely recognizedA new study has shown that the majority of people in the United Kingdom do not understand the connection between weight issues and cancer. Obesity is associated with thirteen types of cancer, including those of the breast, kidney, bowel, and womb. However, after surveying 3293 adults, taken as representative of the UK population, researchers found that only a quarter of respondents were aware of t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hydrogen fuel from water by harnessing red and near-infrared regions of sunlightScientists have synthesized a compound that absorbs near-infrared light to produce hydrogen from water. The compound contains three ruthenium atoms connected by an organic molecule. The absorbed light stimulates electrons to 'jump' into orbitals that do not exist in other, similar compounds. This is the first successful use of infrared light to reduce water into hydrogen, which can be used for ene
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Noninvasive brain imaging shows readiness of trainees to perform operationsWhile simulation platforms have been used to train surgeons before they enter an actual operating room (OR), few studies have evaluated how well trainees transfer those skills from the simulator to the OR. Now, a study that used noninvasive brain imaging to evaluate brain activity has found that simulator-trained medical students successfully transferred those skills to operating on cadavers and w
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How Snapdragons keep their color: Signposting trick reveals evolutionary mechanismA study of the colour patterns among wild flowers in a mountain valley has yielded a clue about how nature controls fundamental evolutionary change in all species.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Separating side effects could hold key for safer opioidsOpioid pain relievers can be extremely effective in relieving pain, but can carry a high risk of addiction and ultimately overdose when breathing is suppressed and stops. Scientists have discovered a way to separate these two effects -- pain relief and breathing -- opening a window of opportunity to make effective pain medications without the risk of respiratory failure.
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Gizmodo
Was It a Good Idea to Beam Our Best Techno to an Alien World? Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech In the year 2030, a powerful radio transmission originating from Earth will arrive at a potentially habitable exoplanet located approximately 12.4 light years away. Should any alien intelligence be there to receive it, they’re in for quite a treat: This binary stream of data contains short musical clips from some of the world’s best electronic musicians. It’s part art, par
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Live Science
Did Marijuana Really Cause an Infant's Death? For an 11-month-old boy in Denver, ingesting marijuana may have triggered a heart problem that ultimately led to his death, according to a recent report of the case. If the report's hypothesis is true, the case would mark the first time a person has died from a marijuana overdose. But the findings are far from definitive — as a single case, the report cannot prove that marijuana exposure wa
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Big Think
Why Panpsychism Fails to Solve the Mystery of Consciousness Is consciousness everywhere? Is it a basic feature of the Universe, at the very heart of the tiniest subatomic particles? Such an idea – panpsychism as it is known – might sound like New Age mysticism, but some hard-nosed analytic philosophers have suggested it might be how things are, and it’s now a hot topic in philosophy of mind. Panpsychism’s popularity stems from the fact that it promises
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Big Think
The Death of Dinosaurs Allowed Mammals to Ditch Nocturnal Behavior, Study Suggests Why have so many modern-day mammals evolved adaptations suited for the night? The answer might very well be dinosaurs, according to new research. A study published in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution suggests that the threat of dinosaurs, who ruled the world during the daytime more than 65 million years ago, encouraged mammals to only come out under the dark of night. This idea – know
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Ars Technica
Argentine Navy diesel sub disappears, NASA plane joins in search reader comments 4 NASA's P-3 Orion, a former Navy patrol plane modified into a "flying lab." NASA The ARA San Juan (S-42) has been out of contact since Wednesday. The US Navy and NASA have joined the search for an Argentine Armada (navy) diesel-electric attack submarine—the ARA San Juan (S-42)—and its crew of 44 sailors missing in the Southern Argentine Sea. The last contact with the TR-1700 clas
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Ars Technica
Tax bill that passed the House would cripple training of scientists Enlarge / Whatever you made in that flask, it's going to cost you. reader comments 185 Yesterday, the US House of Representatives passed its version of a tax bill that would drop corporate tax rates and alter various deductions. While most of the arguments about the bill have focused on which tax brackets will end up paying more, an entire class of individuals appears to have been specifically ta
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Gizmodo
German Regulators Ban Smartwatches for Kids, Urge Parents to Destroy Them Photo: Getty Saying the technology more closely resembles a “spying device” than a toy, Germany regulators have banned the sale of smartwatches designed for kids, urging the parents who were dumb enough to buy them in the first place to destroy them. Last month, the European Consumer Organization (BEUC) warned that smartwatches marketed to kids were a serious threat to children’s privacy. A repor
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New on MIT Technology Review
If Unleashed in the Wild, Gene Drives Could Create a “Highly Invasive Species,” Researchers Say A hardware safeguard in Amazon’s recently launched while-you’re-out delivery service turns out to have a big hole. And, well—let’s just say you probably should have seen this coming. Amazon Key uses a smart lock and cloud-based security camera in order to allow delivery staff to drop parcels inside a home while a customer is out. The driver requests access via Amazon, but the customer can watch
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First-graders fitter than expectedChildhood obesity is often attributed to a lack of exercise. So what about sports among elementary school students? Scientists have pursued this question and collected the results of fitness tests for first-year students over a period of one decade. Their study shows that students did not lose their strength. Speed or balance even increased over the time of 10 years. One change was in the boys, wh
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'Justice League' Is a Beautiful Mess of a Franken-Movie If the internet made a movie, it might look like Justice League . That shouldn’t be read as a compliment or an insult. It’s both. The internet is a fantastic place full of smart people; anything it produced would have moments of brilliance and humor. It's also a cesspool of tribalism and in-fighting, and anything it produced would feel and look like it was made by a bunch of wildly different-mind
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Inside Science
Concussion: Its Diagnosis and Treatment Concussion: Its Diagnosis and Treatment Scientific advances in the way doctors diagnose and treat concussions. Concussion: Its Diagnosis and Treatment Video of Concussion: Its Diagnosis and Treatment Human Friday, November 17, 2017 - 14:15 Jason Socrates Bardi, Editor (Inside Science) -- When someone arrives at an emergency room in a coma, someone with a serious brain injury, there is a long and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Argonne to install Comanche system to explore ARM technology for HPC IMAGE: Argonne is collaborating with Hewlett Packard Enterprise to test and evaluate ARM processors for high-performance computing environments. view more Credit: Image courtesy of Hewlett Packard Enterprise. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory is collaborating with Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) to provide system software expertise and a development ecosystem
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Heavy nitrogen molecules reveal planetary-scale tug-of-war HOUSTON -- (Nov. 17, 2017) -- Nature whispers its stories in a faint molecular language, and Rice University scientist Laurence Yeung and colleagues can finally tell one of those stories this week, thanks to a one-of-a-kind instrument that allowed them to hear what the atmosphere is saying with rare nitrogen molecules. Yeung and colleagues at Rice, UCLA, Michigan State University and the Universi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How a poorly explored immune cell may impact cancer immunity and immunotherapy ANN ARBOR, Michigan -- The immune cells that are trained to fight off the body's invaders can become defective. It's what allows cancer to develop. So most research has targeted these co-called effector T-cells. But a new study takes a step back and considers: What if the problem isn't with the effector T-cells but starts higher up the cellular chain? And so researchers looked at naïve T-cell
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Water world IMAGE: The three-colored formations (red, purple, yellow) are the three groups of damaged amino acids in Photosystem II identified in this study. They are centered on the active site ( "Mn cluster, "... view more Credit: (Credit: Science Advances manuscript # aao3013, Figure 3B.) Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have traced the paths of three water channels in an ancient phot
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Flu vaccine prevents hospitalization in children Children vaccinated against influenza are significantly less likely to experience serious complications from the virus that could land them in hospital, new research from Public Health Ontario (PHO) and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) has found. Published in the Nov. 17 issue of PLOS ONE , the study found that young children who were fully vaccinated against influenza saw th
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Gizmodo
Apple's Diversity Chief Is Leaving After Six Months Photo: Getty Apple’s Vice President of Diversity and Inclusion, Denise Young Smith, is leaving the company at the end of the year, Bloomberg reports . Earlier this month, Cornell Tech announced Young Smith would be joining the faculty as an executive-in-residence in January. Young Smith is an Apple veteran who has been with the company since 1997, most recently serving as human resources chief be
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Fireball in Finland sky 'probably a meteorite'The suspected meteor shook buildings when it raced through the sky in Lapland.
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The Atlantic
Photos of the Week: 11/11–11/17 The Ministry of Fun Santa School in England opens for the season, a red fox meets a stegosaurus in Siberia, an earthquake causes destruction in Iran, judging Scotch Pies in Scotland, protesting a proposed total ban on abortions in Brazil, Australians vote to allow same-sex marriage, and much more.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Skeletons could provide clues to who wrote or protected the Dead Sea Scrolls BOSTON — A decades-long debate over who once occupied a settlement located near the caves where the Dead Sea Scrolls were found has taken a chaste turn. Analyses of 33 newly excavated skeletons of people buried at the West Bank site, Qumran, supports a view that the community consisted of a religious sect of celibate men. Anthropologist Yossi Nagar of the Israel Antiquities Authority in Jerusalem
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When to fish: Timing matters for fish that migrate to reproduce IMAGE: Alaska sockeye salmon migrating. view more Credit: Dennis Wise/University of Washington It's no secret that human activities affect fish, particularly those that must migrate to reproduce. Years of building dams and polluting rivers in some regions have left fish such as salmon struggling to return to their home streams and give birth to the next generation. A new University of
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Gizmodo
These Glass-Framed OLED TVs Are Basically Works of Art, and They've Never Been Cheaper LG 55" OLED 4K TV , $1800 | 65" , $2600 If you love inky blacks and vibrant colors —and who doesn’t?—this 55" 2017 OLED LG TV is down to $1800 today on MassDrop, or $2600 for 65" , both $200 less than you’ll find them on Amazon. As you’d expect from any high-end TV these days, that gets you a 4K panel and Dolby Vision HDR, but OLED technology means the blacks will be far riche
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mapping 'damage trails' lets researchers follow the water in Photosystem II The three-colored formations (red, purple, yellow) are the three groups of damaged amino acids in Photosystem II identified in this study. They are centered on the active site ("Mn cluster," shown in green), and trace three pathways connecting the Mn cluster to the surface of the complex, the watery bulk medium of the cell. Credit: Science Advances manuscript # aao3013, Figure 3B. Researchers at
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Live Science
US Lifts Ban on Import of African Elephant Hunting Trophies: What It Means Earlier this week, the Trump administration lifted a ban on importing hunting trophies from African elephants into the United States, claiming that this policy change would benefit elephants — but conservation officials are skeptical. Representatives of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) announced in a statement yesterday (Nov. 16) that the department would begin issuing permits allow
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Could this protein protect people against coronary artery disease?The buildup of plaque in the heart's arteries is an unfortunate part of aging. But by studying the genetic makeup of people who maintain clear arteries into old age, researchers have identified a possible genetic basis for coronary artery disease (CAD), as well as potential new opportunities to prevent it.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Secrets of Ebola unlocked in the heart of devastating outbreakIn a comprehensive and complex molecular study of blood samples from Ebola patients in Sierra Leone, a scientific team has identified signatures of Ebola virus disease that may aid in future treatment efforts.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Newly found immune defense could pave way to treat allergiesScientists have made a fundamental discovery about how our body's immune system clears harmful infections.
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The Atlantic
The Disappearing Right to Earn a Living In most states, a person who desires to install home-entertainment systems for a living, or as a part-time gig for extra cash, faces relatively few barriers to entry. This is work teenagers routinely do for grandparents after they make a technology purchase. But in Connecticut, a home-entertainment installer is required to obtain a license from the state before serving customers. It costs applica
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The Atlantic
Zimbabwe: How to Make and Break a Democracy On Wednesday, Robert Mugabe, the autocratic President of Zimbabwe, was ousted and placed under house arrest by the country’s military. While Mugabe’s fate remains uncertain, the apparent coup may bring about the end of a 37-year dictatorship masquerading as a democracy. But this wresting of power shouldn’t have been necessary—it was supposed to happen ten years ago. In 2008, international sanctio
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The Atlantic
How Much Attention Should Extremists Get? This article is edited from a story shared exclusively with members of The Masthead , the membership program from The Atlantic ( find out more ). In part one, we explore how fringe groups on the internet have assimilated into the mainstream. In part two, we dive deep into one particular online group often associated with the alt-right, tracking how it’s grown since its inception. Whitney Phillips
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Game review: 'Need For Speed: Payback,' wrong way Racing simulators are thriving within the genre these days, but arcade racers offer a brief respite from the tighter sim experiences and will always have a home with casual gamers. "Need For Speed" is a long-running series that has taken on many forms throughout its history, with its latest entry adopting the high-octane drama you'd find in summer blockbusters. "Does Need For Speed: Payback" get
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
These ring-tailed lemurs raise a 'stink' when they flirt with potential mates IMAGE: Male ring-tailed lemurs perform an elaborate mating ritual that may pay off in terms of finding a mate. view more Credit: Devin Sturgeon A U of T Scarborough study finds that a unique ritual performed by male ring-tailed lemurs may come at a significant physical cost, but it could help their chances in securing a mate. "Stink-flirting displays are done more often by dominant males,"
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mathematician's study of 'swarmalators' could direct future science ITHACA, N.Y. - How does the Japanese tree frog figure into the latest work of noted mathematician Steven Strogatz? As it turns out, quite prominently. "We had read about these funny frogs that hop around and croak," said Strogatz, the Jacob Gould Schurman Professor of Applied Mathematics. "They form patterns in space and time. Usually it's about reproduction. And based on how the other guy or guy
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Inside Science
Will the NFL's Blitz for Position-Specific Helmets Pay Off? Sports The goals of a major push for football helmet safety should bring improvements, but the overall results remain unpredictable. 11/17/2017 Chris Gorski, Editor https://www.insidescience.org/news/will-nfls-blitz-position-specific-helmets-pay
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Ars Technica
Man gets threats—not bug bounty—after finding DJI customer data in public view Enlarge / A security researcher says he was trying to play fair with DJI's bug bounty program. DJI calls him a hacker who exposed customer data. reader comments 4 DJI, the Chinese company that manufactures the popular Phantom brand of consumer quadcopter drones, was informed in September that developers had left the private keys for both the "wildcard" certificate for all the company's Web domain
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Live Science
Ever Seen a Shark Walk? Tiny Animals Amaze on PBS The epaulette shark can do what no other shark can: It can walk on its fins. Credit: copyright Minden Pictures/Alamy Stock Photo Great Whites may get all the headlines, but it's a miniature species of shark that can do what no other shark can: walk. The epaulette shark ( Hemiscyllium ocellatum ) grows to less than 3.3 feet (1 meter) in length and lives in shallow coral reefs off Australia,
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Protein key to cancer cells ability to spread identifiedScientists have made a discovery that could reduce the spread of cancer by hindering a protein that binds cancer cells together and allows them to invade tissues. The groundbreaking study identified a protein, known as cadherin-22, as a potential factor in cancer metastasis, or spread, and showed that hindering it decreased the adhesion and invasion rate of breast and brain cancer cells by up to 9
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The future of cell culture: A new continuous bioprocess developedA revolutionary technique to allow the continuous production and collection of cells has been developed by scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New imaging technique peers inside living cellsCalled Ultrasound Bioprobe, a non-invasive approach allows researchers to view sub-cellular structures and their mechanical behavior at nanoscale resolution.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Environmental factors may trigger lupus onset, progressionWhile genetics play a role in the development of Lupus, a systemic autoimmune disease, so do environmental triggers, such as particulates in air pollution and ultraviolet light, says a researcher.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Large decrease in age-related macular degeneration in baby boomers compared to previous generationsThe risk of developing age-related macular degeneration is much less in the Baby Boom (1946-1964) and later generations than in earlier generations, for unclear reasons.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Arecibo Telescope Wins Reprieve from U.S. Government Nearly two months after Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico, the people who operate one of the world’s pre-eminent radio telescopes—at the Arecibo Observatory, on the northwestern part of the island—are still without reliable water, electricity and phone service at their homes. But their jobs seem to be safe. The US National Science Foundation (NSF), which funds about two-thirds of the obs
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The Atlantic
A Heavy Blow to One of America's Most Controversial School Boards As is the case in districts across the country, the racial composition of a school board in the New York City suburb of Ramapo doesn’t look anything like that of the predominantly nonwhite student population it serves. The news Thursday of a lawsuit challenging the district’s school-board election proceedings in attempt to change that might just seem like another effort to challenge the status qu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cardiorespiratory fitness is essential to reduce risk of coronary heart disease IMAGE: Combinations of cardiorespiratory fitness and triglyceride/HDL ratio with coronary heart disease mortality in 40,269 men followed for 16.6 years, Cooper Center Longitudinal Study, 1978-2010. The higher the bar, the higher... view more Credit: The Cooper Institute Rochester, MN, November 17, 2017 - Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a leading cause of death for men in the U.S. Both car
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Ars Technica
The world of Skyrim is thrilling and flawed in VR Enlarge / The disembodied hand of fate falls on you, tree! reader comments 48 Since consumer-grade virtual reality became a thing last year , there has been some criticism over the lack of lengthy, meaty VR experiences that can draw players in an epic story for dozens of hours. As if to answer that criticism, Bethesda has released Skyrim VR , a PlayStation VR exclusive version of one of the meati
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Latest Headlines | Science News
The key to breaking down plastic may be in caterpillars’ guts In the Nov. 25 SN : Charting lumpy space, Bronze Age movers and shakers, T. rex ’s slasher arms, gene editor corrects typos, the Great Pyramid hides a void, mosses chronicle Arctic warming, an itty-bitty insect-inspired robot and more.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Midwifery care at hospitals is associated with fewer medical interventionsWomen who gave birth at hospitals with a larger percentage of midwife-attended births were less likely to have two specific medical interventions, cesarean delivery and episiotomy, a new, hospital-level analysis. These findings raise the possibility that greater access to midwifery care, which is low in the United States, might enhance perinatal care and lower costs for low-risk women.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New painkillers reduce overdose riskNew opioid pain relievers that reduce pain on par with morphine but do not slow or stop breathing -- the cause of opiate overdose -- outlines a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gene discovery may halt worldwide wheat epidemicA gene that enables resistance to a new devastating strain of stem rust, a fungal disease that is hampering wheat production throughout Africa and Asia and threatening food security worldwide, has been identified by scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Finding allows gene editing with surgical precisionA more precise and efficient technology has been created to edit the genomes of living organisms, an ability that is transforming medicine and biotechnology. The new method eliminates some of the drawbacks of genome editing technologies, which enables scientists to insert or eliminate genes within DNA.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Next-generation atomic clocks may support official timekeepingFor more than a decade, a research team has been unveiling experimental next-generation atomic clocks. New simulations suggest these clocks may now be reliable and practical enough to start contributing to calibrations that support official US civilian time.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Intervention becomes first to successfully reduce risk of dementiaA computerized brain training program reduces risk of dementia 29 percent, a 10-year study concludes.
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Gizmodo
Wet, Warm, Glorious: I Tried The Atomizing Shower That Wooed Tim Cook Instead of a normal shower, imagine standing up every morning inside of a storm cloud: The shower curtain bucking and bellowing in the wind; the air, hot and humid as a heavy mist envelopes you, washing away soapy suds. That’s what it’s like to use a Nebia, the shower system that’s won over the biggest names in tech without a single “smart” feature. No sensors, no Bluetooth, no Wi-Fi, but it feel
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Latest Headlines | Science News
What caterpillars’ gut bacteria can tell us about breaking down plastic In the Nov. 25 SN : Charting lumpy space, Bronze Age movers and shakers, T. rex ’s slasher arms, gene editor corrects typos, the Great Pyramid hides a void, mosses chronicle Arctic warming, an itty-bitty insect-inspired robot and more.
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The Atlantic
The Photoshoppers Behind Dreamy Jupiter Photos In the early 1880s, the French astronomer Étienne Léopold Trouvelot published a dreamy illustration of Jupiter based on his telescope observations. Back then, the gas giant looked, through telescopes, like a fuzzy, gray marble, a dust particle hanging in the night sky. Trouvelot, who in his life created 7,000 astronomical drawings, sought to add a little more detail to the picture to enhance the
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The Scientist RSS
Drug Development Could Suffer from Proposed NIH Budget CutsAn analysis of President Trump's proposed $7.2 billion slash to the National Institutes of Health budget points to dire consequences for the development of novel drugs.
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: How Snapdragons Beckon Bees With More Than One Color But how did the snapdragon cousins create accented patterns that appeared to be equally effective in the same environment? To find out how color differences in these snapdragons arose, scientists compared the genomes of the subspecies in a study published Thursday in Science. You’re a Bee. This Is What It Feels Like. We’re taking you on a journey to help you understand how bees, while hunting for
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Decrease in sunshine, increase in rickets A University of Toronto student and professor have teamed up to discover that Britain's increasing cloudiness during the summer could be an important reason for the mysterious increase in Rickets among British children over the past few decades. Hospitalizations of children due to the disabling bone disease, caused by lack of vitamin D, began dramatically increasing starting in the mid-1990s, puz
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Carbon emissions by plant respiration will have large impact on climate New findings by researchers from the University of Minnesota College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences (CFANS), who partnered with scientists from across the world, suggest plant respiration is a larger source of carbon emissions than previously thought, and warn that as the world warms, this may reduce the ability of Earth's land surface to absorb emissions due to fossil fuel b
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Ars Technica
New Tesla Roadster sounds impressive, but it’s not the only game in town Aurich Lawson reader comments 46 On Thursday night, Elon Musk upstaged his own semi truck launch with the news that Tesla is going to build a new performance car, the Roadster . The specs certainly have the Internet ablaze this morning: a 200kWh battery and 620-mile (1,000km) range, 0-60mph in 1.9 seconds, the standing quarter-mile in 8.9 seconds, and a top speed of 250mph. That's truly impressiv
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Naturally occurring molecule may help prevent, treat atherosclerosis and gum diseaseResolvin E1, a molecule produced naturally in the body from an omega -3 fish oil, topically applied on gum tissues not only prevents and treats gum disease, but also decreases the likelihood for advanced arterial atherosclerotic plaques to rupture and form a dangerous thrombus or blood clot, report investigators.
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Ars Technica
Apple’s HomePod speaker isn’t coming out this year Enlarge / Look at this happy couple enjoying voice commands and high quality audio in their home! Apple reader comments 7 In a statement to CNBC this morning, Apple said its HomePod smart speaker will be released in 2018, not by the end of this year as originally announced. Here is the company's statement: We can't wait for people to experience HomePod, Apple's breakthrough wireless speaker for t
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Ars Technica
Bitcoin is hitting new highs—here’s why it might not be a bubble reader comments 2 In early September, one Bitcoin was worth almost $5,000. Then the Chinese government cracked down on cryptocurrency investments, and Bitcoin's value plunged 40 percent in a matter of days, reaching a low below $3,000. But Bitcoin bounced back. By early November, one Bitcoin was worth almost $8,000. Then last week, a controversial effort to expand the Bitcoin network's capacity f
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NYT > Science
Island Nations, With No Time to Lose, Take Climate Response Into Their Own Hands From rising seas to the loss of fresh water, islands are among the most vulnerable nations to global warming. Hurricanes, expected to become more ferocious with climate change, pummeled Caribbean island nations into crisis this summer. Irma destroyed nearly every car and building on the island of Barbuda and swelled the population of Antigua overnight as thousands of Barbudans sought shelter. Mar
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The Best Laptop/Phone Black Friday 2017 Deals Black Friday isn’t always the best time to buy a computer or phone. It’s easy to get ripped off by a deal that seems too good to be true (it usually is). To save you a few headaches, and a lot of dollars, we’ve compiled some WIRED picks for the best PCs and mobile device deals going on Black Friday weekend, some of which are already available. All of these deals are purchasable online, not in-sto
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple's smart speaker HomePod may get Face ID: report Apple's new Face ID technology may be coming to a living room near you. The Taiwanese supplier for Apple's smart speaker HomePod hinted it expects smart speakers in general to have 3-D facial-recognition technology, the Japan-based Nikkei Asian Review reported. While the supplier, Inventec Appliances, did not say HomePod will one day include Face ID, market analysts believed it was an inevitabili
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tesla's all-electric semi truck aims to disrupt transport Tesla Chairman and CEO Elon Musk unveils the new electric "Semi" Truck on November 16, 2017 in Hawthorne, California After shaking up the auto world with its electric cars, Tesla is tackling a new frontier in "green" transportation with the unveiling of a futuristic all-electric semi truck. Elon Musk, the South African-born inventor and entrepreneur, showcased the new vehicle Thursday in Hawthorn
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Experts: Idaho hatchery built to save salmon is killing themFisheries biologists in Idaho say they think they know why a relatively new $13.5 million hatchery intended to save Snake River sockeye salmon from extinction is instead killing thousands of fish before they ever get to the ocean.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research shows drones could help crop management take off Shawn Butler, a graduate student at the University of Tennessee College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources, analyzes cotton research plots from his laptop thanks to images obtained with an unmanned areial system (UAS), also called a drone. This research could help farmers improve crop monitoring. Credit: Ginger Rowsey Unmanned aerial systems (UAS), commonly referred to as drones, coul
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientific advances can make it easier to recycle plastics Credit: CC0 Public Domain Most of the 150 million tons of plastics produced around the world every year end up in landfills, the oceans and elsewhere. Less than 9 percent of plastics are recycled in the United States, rising to about 30 percent in Europe. That's a $176 billion problem, the potential energy savings scientists say could be achieved from recycling all global plastic solid waste. But
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Live Science
New Video Shows a Creepily Human-Like Robot Doing a Backflip A new version of a humanoid disaster robot, called Atlas, can do half-turns in the air and even a backflip. Credit: Boston Dynamics A new video shows a robot performing amazing acrobatic feats, from backflips to half-turn jumps. The eerily humanoid robot, called Atlas, is 4.9 feet (1.5 meters) tall and weighs 165 pounds (75 kilograms), and uses Lidar and stereovision to navigate in its surr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research shows drones could help crop management take off IMAGE: Shawn Butler, a graduate student at the University of Tennessee College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources, analyzes cotton research plots from his laptop thanks to images obtained with an... view more Credit: Ginger Rowsey JACKSON, Tenn. - Unmanned aerial systems (UAS), commonly referred to as drones, could help farmers determine if their crop is growing satisfactorily,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientific advances can make it easier to recycle plastics IMAGE: Megan Robertson, associate professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at the University of Houston, develops biorenewable components for plastics, replacing hydrocarbon-based polymers with those made from vegetable oils or other... view more Credit: University of Houston Most of the 150 million tons of plastics produced around the world every year end up in landfills, the oce
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New computational method provides optimized design of wind up toys A team of leading computer scientists has developed a novel computational system to aid the design and fabrication of wind-up toys, focusing on automating the intricate interior machinery responsible for the toys' wind-up motion. The new computational system includes analytic modeling of a wide variety of elemental mechanisms found in common wide-up toys, including their geometry and kinematics,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
eDNA tool detects invasive clams before they become a nuisance University of Illinois aquatic ecologist Eric Larson holds a handful of invasive Corbicula clams. Credit: University of Illinois When seeking a cure for a disease, early detection is often the key. The same is true for eliminating invasive species. Identifying their presence in a lake before they are abundant is vital. A recent University of Illinois study successfully used environmental DNA to d
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Carefully crafted light pulses control neuron activity Illinois researchers used ultrafast pulses of tailored light to make neurons fire in different patterns, the first example of coherent control in a living cell. Credit: Stephen Boppart, University of Illinois Specially tailored, ultrafast pulses of light can trigger neurons to fire and could one day help patients with light-sensitive circadian or mood problems, according to a new study in mice at
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Taking a spin on plasma space tornadoes with NASA observations This simulation of the boundary shows how areas of low density plasma, shown by blue, mix with areas of higher density plasma, red, forming turbulent tornadoes of plasma. Credit: NASA/Takuma Nakamura Interplanetary space is hardly tranquil. High-energy charged particles from the Sun, as well as from beyond our solar system, constantly whizz by. These can damage satellites and endanger astronaut h
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Infrared NASA imagery shows development of Tropical Depression 31W A series of synthetic chemicals widely used in household products, food packaging and clothing have a significant effect on the development of frogs, even at low doses, according to a Purdue University study.
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Viden
VIDEO "Menneske"-robot laver saltomortale I 2013 fik den menneskelignende robot Atlas sin debut i offentligheden. Den er udviklet af Boston Dynamics på bestilling af den teknologiske udviklingsgren af det amerikanske militær, DARPA, til deres robotkonkurrence. Dengang bestod udfordringen hovedsageligt i at få robotten til at gå og holde balancen. Og nu kan Atlas altså hoppe og lave en baglæns saltomortale (se video ovenover). En akrobati
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The Atlantic
A Week Around the World With The Atlantic What We’re Writing Trump Abroad: President Trump’s visit to Asia provided an opportunity for outsiders to evaluate his behavior with foreign leaders. He contradicted the American intelligence community by claiming to believe Vladimir Putin’s assertions that there was no Russian meddling in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. He spoke of his “great relationship” with Philippine President Rodrigo
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Gizmodo
Apple Delays HomePod Speaker Release to ‘Early 2018’ Image: Apple Originally slated for a December release, it seems we’re going to be waiting a little longer for Apple’s $350 HomePod smart speaker now that its debut has been delayed until sometime in “early 2018.” In a statement Apple made to The Verge , the company said “We can’t wait for people to experience HomePod, Apple’s breakthrough wireless speaker for the home, but we need a little more t
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Popular Science
Five rad and random things I found this week My job is to find cool stuff. Throughout the week I spend hours scouring the web for things that are useful or fun or ridiculously cheap. Often times, these choices coalesce into a guide of like items—for example, laptop accessories that will upgrade your entire life , items to elevate your binge watching , or the best new phone cases for your smartphone . But I often stumble across some pretty a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New computational method provides optimized design of wind up toys A team of leading computer scientists has developed a novel computational system to aid the design and fabrication of wind-up toys, focusing on automating the intricate interior machinery responsible for the toys' wind-up motion. The new computational system includes analytic modeling of a wide variety of elemental mechanisms found in common wide-up toys, including their geometry and kinematics,
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New on MIT Technology Review
Gene Drives Aren’t Safe Enough to Trial Right Now A hardware safeguard in Amazon’s recently launched while-you’re-out delivery service turns out to have a big hole. And, well—let’s just say you probably should have seen this coming. Amazon Key uses a smart lock and cloud-based security camera in order to allow delivery staff to drop parcels inside a home while a customer is out. The driver requests access via Amazon, but the customer can watch
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Gizmodo
'Accidental Billionaire': How The Outlandish Ambition Of Faraday Future's Financier Brought The Startup To Its Knees In Rancho Palos Verdes, an affluent suburb of Los Angeles, there’s a 7,800 square foot mansion that sits atop a picturesque bluff, offering sweeping views of the Pacific Ocean. Across two stories, the home contains six bedrooms, seven bathrooms, a three-car garage, and privacy. Google Maps doesn’t offer a streetview of the site. For the city it’s in, the property isn’t unusual. What’s unusual is
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Ars Technica
Robocalls from spoofed Caller IDs may soon be blocked by phone companies Getty Images | vladru reader comments 10 Phone companies are now authorized to be more aggressive in blocking robocalls before they reach customers' landlines or mobile phones, but you might have to pay for the new blocking capabilities. The Federal Communications Commission yesterday issued an order to "expressly authorize voice service providers to block robocalls that appear to be from telepho
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What grosses out a chimpanzee? The origins of disgustChimps show increased latencies to feed, and tendencies to maintain greater distances from possible contaminants and/or outright refusals to consume food in test conditions, hinting at the origins of disgust in humans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Asthma attacks reduced in tree-lined urban neighborhoodsPeople living in polluted urban areas are far less likely to be admitted to hospital with asthma when there are lots of trees in their neighborhood, a new study has found.
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Science | The Guardian
'Robots are not taking over,' says head of UN body on autonomous weapons “Robots are not taking over the world”, the diplomat leading the first official talks on autonomous weapons assured on Friday, seeking to head off criticism over slow progress towards restricting the use of so-called “killer robots” . The United Nations was wrapping up an initial five days of discussions on weapons systems that can identify and destroy targets without human control, which experts
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Investigating patterns of degeneration in Alzheimer's disease Alzheimer's disease (AD) is known to cause memory loss and cognitive decline, but other functions of the brain can remain intact. The reasons cells in some brain regions degenerate while others are protected is largely unknown. In a paper to be published in Stem Cell Reports , researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital have found that factors encoded in the DNA of brain cells contribute to the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Infrared NASA imagery shows development of Tropical Depression 31W IMAGE: The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Depression 31W on Nov. 17 at 12:17 a.m. EST (0517 UTC). Coldest cloud tops and strongest storms... view more Credit: Credits: NASA JPL/Ed Olsen NASA's Aqua satellite provided infrared imagery of the latest tropical cyclone in the South China Sea. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder aboard NASA's Aqua sat
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study out of WSU further supports use of progesterone to fight preterm birth DETROIT - A new study published today - World Prematurity Day - in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology provides additional support for treatment with vaginal progesterone to reduce the risk of preterm birth, neonatal complications and infant death in pregnant women with a short cervix. A shortened cervix is the most powerful predictor of preterm birth. A meta-analysis of individual pa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
eDNA tool detects invasive clams before they become a nuisance URBANA, Ill. - When seeking a cure for a disease, early detection is often the key. The same is true for eliminating invasive species. Identifying their presence in a lake before they are abundant is vital. A recent University of Illinois study successfully used environmental DNA to detect invasive clams in California and Nevada lakes. Researchers believe this tool can help identify pests before
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Inner clock: Biologists research the mechanism of an auxiliary clock IMAGE: Professor Dr. Dorothee Staiger is an expert on the inner clock of plants. view more Credit: Photo: Bielefeld University In December, the Nobel Prize for Medicine and Physiology will be awarded for the identification of genes that control the inner clock. The honoured academics examined fruit flies to determine the biorhythm. Biochemist Professor Dr. Dorothee Staiger of Bielefeld
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Inconvenient Truth about Smart Cities This week, we learned that tech guru and mega philanthropist Bill Gates purchased 25,000 acres of land in Arizona with the intent to build a smart city from the ground up. The community, called Belmont, will “create a forward-thinking community with a communication and infrastructure spine that embraces cutting-edge technology, designed around high-speed digital networks, data centers, new manufa
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New Scientist - News
Why setting ‘safe’ limits for environmental damage won’t work Did the dodo’s extinction affect ecosystems elsewhere? Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images By Stuart Pimm It is such a seductive idea at a time when environmental worries seem to be multiplying rapidly. So long as we keep the impacts of human activity within set limits we can carry on as we are without jeopardising the ability of Earth’s ecosystems to recover. Breaching these “planetary boundaries”
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New Scientist - News
Common condition endometriosis reprograms brain for depression Women with endometriosis can experience anxiety as well as pain Michele Constantini/Getty By Jessica Hamzelou Endometriosis can reprogram the brain, causing anxiety and depression – according to research in mice. The findings suggest the common disorder may put the one in ten women who have it at risk of mental health problems. Endometriosis is caused by uterus lining (endometrium) cells movi
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New Scientist - News
Tesla’s electric trucks are great but they won’t save the planet Will Tesla’s trucks be environmental saviours? Tesla By Michael Le Page Electric cars used to be a joke – the ugly, expensive option for wealthy tree-huggers. But thanks to companies like Tesla, they are now sleek, desirable and increasingly affordable. With the car revolution already under way, Tesla and other manufacturers are turning their attention to heavier vehicles. Yesterday, Tesla CE
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Gizmodo
Friday's Best Deals: OLED TVs, Dyson Vacuums, Smart Thermostats, and More Black Friday is one week away, but some of the deals have already started. Find discounts on OLED 4k TVs , Dyson vacuums , a smart thermostat , and more. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Jump To: Tech | Home | Lifestyle | Media | Gaming | More Deals Jump To: Home | Lifestyle | Media | Gaming | More Deals LG 55" OLED 4K TV , $1800 | 65" , $2600 If you l
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Inside Science
Will the NFL's Blitz for Position-Specific Helmets Pay Off? Will the NFL's Blitz for Position-Specific Helmets Pay Off? The goals of a major push for football helmet safety should bring improvements, but the overall results remain unpredictable. footballhelmets_final2.jpg Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Rights information: Copyright American Institute of Physics ( reprinting information ) Sports Friday, November 17, 2017 - 11:30 Chris Gor
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Taking a spin on plasma space tornadoes with NASA observationsNew NASA mission results show that tornado-like swirls of space plasma create tumultuous boundaries in the near-Earth environment, letting dangerous high-energy particles slip into near Earth space.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Age and gut bacteria contribute to MS disease progression, according to Rutgers Researchers at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School published a study suggesting that gut bacteria at young age can contribute to Multiple sclerosis (MS) disease onset and progression. In this study, published in the October 31 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , Sudhir Yadav PhD, a neuroimmunology post-doctoral fellow in the laboratories of Drs. Kouichi Ito, asso
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Carefully crafted light pulses control neuron activity IMAGE: Illinois researchers used ultrafast pulses of tailored light to make neurons fire in different patterns, the first example of coherent control in a living cell. view more Credit: Image courtesy of Stephen Boppart, University of Illinois CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- Specially tailored, ultrafast pulses of light can trigger neurons to fire and could one day help patients with light-sensitive circadian
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Walmart gives Amazon run for its money in third quarter Unseating Amazon as the biggest player in e-commerce is a tall, maybe even impossible task. But Walmart is giving the online titan a run for its money. "It won't become Amazon, but it doesn't have to," Clement Thibault, an analyst with Investing.com, wrote in a note on Thursday after Walmart reported its latest earnings. "It has to make sure it remains a viable alternative to Amazon," he added. "
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Gizmodo
New FCC Regulation Raises Concerns Over Spying TVs and Obsolescence Photo: AP Do you remember the big changeover to digital TV a few years ago that made traditional antennas obsolete? Well, the FCC approved a new technology on Thursday that could lead to a fresh round of obsolete devices and turn broadcast television into a data-collecting advertising machine. Among the many decisions made by the FCC commission on Thursday, one item passed that will allow broadca
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The Humor and Beauty in Capturing Graffiti Cleanup Designer Vincent Wittenberg was at a seedy train station in the Dutch city of Eindhoven a few years ago when he noticed a man using a knife to scrape graffiti off a wall. Once finished, the guy pulled out his cellphone and snapped a pic. Wittenberg asked what he was up to, and the man explained he was a contractor tasked with cleaning up the station. Before-and-after images proved he did the job.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Snap, Crackle, Whop--How to Win the Wishbone Snap, Crackle, Whop--How to Win the Wishbone Don’t crack under pressure! Explore the scientific—and sometimes sleazy—secrets to win a wish at this year’s Thanksgiving wishbone pull. Tags: Advertisement Related Video Every Issue. Every Year. 1845 - Present Neuroscience. Evolution. Health. Chemistry. Physics. Technology. Subscribe Now! Snap, Crackle, Whop--How to Win the Wishbone Don’t crack under
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Richard Spencer, other white supremacists lose Twitter verification A week after the ruckus over blue checks on Twitter, the company has updated its policy on verifications and revoked the verifications of some white supremacists. Richard Spencer, Jason Kessler and others have lost the blue check marks next to their names on Twitter. "We are conducting an initial review of verified accounts and will remove verification from accounts whose behavior does not fall
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The Atlantic
Roman J. Israel, Esq. Wastes a Denzel Washington Performance The hero of Roman J. Israel, Esq. looks like he emerged out of a time tunnel straight from 1979. He wears baggy three-piece suits, sports an afro, and never goes anywhere without his Walkman or its fuzzy orange headphones. A lawyer and an activist, Roman is a man who’s frozen in the past, the personification of a guilty conscience for a more corporate, less moral world. He’s also the star of Dan
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study analyzes mutations in cerebrospinal fluid in lung cancer with brain metastases LUGANO, 17 November 2017 - Researchers have explored the analysis of mutations in cerebrospinal fluid of lung cancer patients with brain metastases in a study presented at the ESMO Asia 2017 Congress. (1) Tumour tissue from brain metastasis is difficult to obtain and therefore less invasive methods are needed to identify and monitor the presence of known actionable mutations. Brain metastases are
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ALEX study shows alectinib 600 mg more effective than crizotinib in Asian cancer patients A subanalysis of the phase III ALEX study has shown that alectinib (1) 600 mg twice daily is more effective than standard of care crizotinib in Asian patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), researchers report at the ESMO Asia 2017 Congress. (2) The J-ALEX study demonstrated that alectinib 300 mg twice daily improved progression-free survival co
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Strain-free epitaxy of germanium film on mica Flexible semiconductor Ge thin film grown on mica by van der Waals epitaxy. The film experiences no degradation in its electrical properties even after repeated bending. Credit: Aaron Littlejohn, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Germanium, an elemental semiconductor, was the material of choice in the early history of electronic devices, before it was largely replaced by silicon. But due to its hi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Inventor Brian Krohn combats snoring, creates wizard tools Brian Krohn has developed brain surgery tools, pioneered biodiesel innovations and briefed members of Congress on how to turn waste oils into energy. But the young serial entrepreneur with some impressive academic credentials also does lots of not-so-serious stuff, like an analysis of the safest place to survive a zombie apocalypse (answer: Borneo). Or writing a 10,000-word essay on "the perfec
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Gizmodo
US Government to Continue Funding Hurricane-Stricken Puerto Rican Telescope Image: AP Yesterday, the National Science Foundation announced that they’ll keep the storied Arecibo telescope running in the wake of the Hurricane Maria damage. The NSF concluded that the best way forward was to collaborate with “new stakeholders” who will both use and maintain the facility, according to the Record of Decision. There could be some potential demolitions of buildings on the site,
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Popular Science
How to become an asteroid prospector This article originally appeared on FlyingMag.com . With the first mission to bring material from the asteroid belt back to Earth underway, the longtime science-fiction staple of commercial asteroid prospecting and mining has put its “now hiring” sign out for tomorrow’s industry professionals, including those with “a solid background in orbital mechanics, asteroid astronomy, chemical engineering
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
Why do I make art? To build time capsules for my heritage | Kayla BriëtKayla Briët creates art that explores identity and self-discovery -- and the fear that her culture may someday be forgotten. She shares how she found her creative voice and reclaimed the stories of her Dutch-Indonesian, Chinese and Native American heritage by infusing them into film and music time capsules.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Seagrass is a key fishing ground globallyNew research demonstrates that seagrass meadows are important fishing grounds all around the globe. The work highlights that there is an urgent need to start appreciating and understanding this role to be able to build more sustainable fisheries. A study examines the global extent to which these underwater meadows support fishing activity.
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Ingeniøren
Ny algoritme sikrer bedre diagnose af prostatakræft Prostatakræft rammer ca. 4.500 danske mænd om året. En del af disse tilfælde er harmløse og noget, som mændene hverken bliver generet eller dør af. Men en lille del er aggressive tumorer, som kræver behandling, inden kræften spreder sig. Den såkaldte PSA-test (Prostata Specific Antigen), der benyttes ved diagnosticeringen, er imidlertid ikke god nok til at skelne de to typer, og derfor behandles
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Gizmodo
The 7 Settings to Change as Soon as You've Set Up Your New Phone Head to the Settings app. (Image: Gizmodo) Congratulations! You’ve got yourself a shiny new smartphone , you’ve worked your way through the initial setup and login process, and you’re ready to start using it in earnest. Before you start Snapchatting and WhatsApping though, check out some of the default settings Android and iOS apply for you—because they might not be exactly what you want. 1) Put
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Ars Technica
Swiss lab develops genetic tool kit to turn any cell into a tumor killer Enlarge / T cells latch on to a cancer cell before killing it. reader comments 19 We've made some impressive advances toward inducing the immune system to attack cancers. One of these techniques, using CAR-T cells , is amazing. CAR-T cells are made by inserting receptors that recognize cancerous cells into a leukemia patient’s own T cells. This induces those T cells to recognize the patient’s tum
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Science : NPR
The Big Idea Behind Big Data Matjaz Slanic/Getty Images/iStockphoto In the Spring of 2009, the H1N1/09 virus — dubbed "swine flu" — made the jump from pigs to people and began claiming its first victims. Fearing the beginning of a global swine flu pandemic, terrified health officials began planning for the worst. Shutting down the world's major airports became the nuclear option of their arsenal — the last hope for halting t
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Scientific American Content: Global
How Dirt Can Clean the Air Soil management doesn't sound snazzy, but scientists say it offers huge potential for keeping carbon emissions in the ground—and out of the atmosphere. A paper published this week in the journal Scientific Reports estimates that improved land-use practices could increase the amount of carbon stored in the top layer of soils worldwide by between 0.9 and 1.85 billion metric tons each year.
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Live Science
When You Learn, Your Brain Swells with New Cells — Then It Kills Them Every time you learn a skill, new cells burst to life in your brain. Then, one after another, those cells die off as your brain figures out which ones it really needs. In a new opinion paper, published online Nov. 14 in the journal Trends in Cognitive Sciences , researchers proposed that this swelling and shrinking of the brain is a Darwinian process. An initial burst of new cells helps the brain
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Ars Technica
First-ever marijuana overdose death? Let’s review what “potential link” means Enlarge / Even this baby is annoyed. reader comments 65 The US Drug Enforcement Administration plainly reports that no death from an overdose of marijuana has ever been reported—a tidbit often repeated by cannabis enthusiasts when discussing the potential harms of the popular drug. But this week, many news outlets coughed up headlines saying that the famous fact had gone up in smoke. Those media
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Strain-free epitaxy of germanium film on mica IMAGE: This is a flexible semiconductor Ge thin film grown on mica by van der Waals epitaxy. The film experiences no degradation in its electrical properties even after repeated bending. view more Credit: Aaron Littlejohn, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute WASHINGTON, D.C., November 17, 2017 -- Germanium, an elemental semiconductor, was the material of choice in the early history of electron
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A sub-desert savanna spread across Madrid 14 million years ago IMAGE: This is an image of an arid savanna during the middle Miocene in Madrid. view more Credit: Marco Ansón The Central Iberian Peninsula was characterised by a very arid savanna during the middle Miocene, according to a study led by the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM) that compares the mammal assemblages from different localities in Africa and South Asia with those that inhabited
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Interstellar space probes: Where's the brakes?!With a miniaturized space probe capable of being accelerated to a quarter of the speed of light, we could reach Alpha Centauri, our nearest star, in 20 to 50 years. However, without a mechanism to slow it down, the space probe could only collect data from the star and its planets as it zoomed past. A theoretical physicist at Goethe University Frankfurt has now examined whether interstellar spacecr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook launches video app for content creators in challenge to YouTube Facebook has launched a video app called Creators aimed at building a community of closely followed producers like YouTube's, the company announced Thursday. The company opened a new office in Playa Vista last year in part to strengthen its relationship with the entertainment industry and video creators who have flocked to YouTube. Video - particularly the kind generated by social media stars -
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Gizmodo
All The Questions Tesla Has To Answer Now Tesla introduced a new show-stopper on Thursday in the form of a colossal big-rig electric semi. It’s carrying hugely impressive specs, too. But what Tesla CEO Elon Musk offered up on Thursday was nothing short of a high-flying reveal party for a couple of concepts. Here’s why. With the Tesla Model 3 production months behind, Musk emerged from an apparently lonely cave of despair on Thursday to t
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Quanta Magazine
Deathblow Dealt to Dark Matter Disks Eighty years after the discovery of dark matter, physicists remain totally stumped about the nature of this nonreflective stuff that, judging by its gravitational effects, pervades the cosmos in far greater abundance than all the matter we can see. From axions to WIMPs (or “weakly interacting massive particles”), many candidates have been proposed as dark matter’s identity — and sought to no avai
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Diffusion plays unusual signaling role in drosophila embryos, researchers findDiffusion plays an unexpected role in cell differentiation during the early stages of development in the embryos of Drosophila, or fruit flies, researchers have found. Instead of spreading a molecular signal out, it was found that diffusion, facilitated through a carrier molecule, actually concentrates the signal in one place.
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Futurity.org
Swabbing dolphin mouths reveals bacterial ‘dark matter’ Researchers have found two previously unknown phyla of bacteria inside the mouths of dolphins. A phylum is a broad taxonomic rank that groups together organisms that share a set of common characteristics due to common ancestry. The discovery of two bacterial phyla, as well as additional novel genes and predicted products, provides new insights into bacterial diversity, dolphin health, and the uni
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Futurity.org
Here’s when to buy LED light bulbs A new study recommends replacing all incandescent and halogen light bulbs in your home now with compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) or LEDs. But immediate replacement is not advised for existing CFLs and LEDs, unless your main concern is helping to reduce power-plant emissions, according to the study in Environmental Research Letters . “Estimating the right time to switch over to LEDs is not a strai
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Fishing 'best argument for seagrass conservation' Image copyright Chris Smart Image caption An indigenous child fisher in Indonesia collecting urchins and porcupine fish in seagrass The importance of seagrasses is further emphasised in a new report that looks at how they underpin fishing worldwide. These flowering plants, which grow in near-shore waters, are under intense pressure - some estimates suggest global losses are running at 7% a year.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New iPhone X teardown study estimates cost to build Apple's deluxe phone As the iPhone X has made the biggest technological leap for Apple smartphones in several years, a new study has done the math to figure out just how much it costs to build. The United Kingdom-based analytics company IHS Markit tore apart the iPhone X to examine how much each part costs. It concluded the overall cost to construct an iPhone X at 64 gigabytes was $370.25, the most expensive in iPhon
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain activity buffers against worsening anxiety DURHAM, N.C. - Boosting activity in brain areas related to thinking and problem-solving may also buffer against worsening anxiety, suggests a new study by Duke University researchers. Using non-invasive brain imaging, the researchers found that people at-risk for anxiety were less likely to develop the disorder if they had higher activity in a region of the brain responsible for complex mental op
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Futurity.org
Ancient North Americans played high-stakes games From games of chance to tests of physical skill, ancient North America Indians took their sport and recreation seriously, research shows. “Games are ubiquitous. Every society seems to have them,” says Barbara Voorhies, a research professor of anthropology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Gambling was especially prevalent—because with nothing at stake the games would simply be incre
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Viden
Forsker efter p-pillestudie: Læger skal spørge mere ind til depression Har du tidligere haft tendens til eller ligefrem haft en depression? Inden læger ordinerer hormonel prævention såsom p-piller, bør de spørge mere ind til kvinders tidligere psykiske tilstande, mener en af verdens førende forskere i p-pillesikkerhed professor Øjvind Lidegaard. Han er seniorforfatter til ny, dansk forskning fra Rigshospitalet, som netop er blevet offentliggjort i det videnskabelige
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Science | The Guardian
Chester Zoo successfully breeds rare Catalan newt Conservationists at Chester Zoo have successfully bred one of the world’s rarest amphibians – the Catalan newt – in a bid to save it from extinction. The zoo is the first organisation outside Catalonia to become involved in the breeding project for the newt, the rarest amphibian in Europe. The critically endangered species, also known as the wild Montseny newt, is from the Montseny mountain range
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Science | The Guardian
Are our dreams trying to tell us something – or should we sleep on it? | Oliver Burkeman W hat are dreams for? It’s one of those bottomless questions where the answer tells you mainly about the person doing the answering. Those who pride themselves on being hard-headed and scientific will say they’re meaningless nonsense or, at best, some kind of boring but essential process for consolidating the memories of the day . Those who think of themselves as spiritual, meanwhile, will insist
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The Atlantic
The Dismal Future of Trump's Least Favorite Agency The strangest thing about the man who's expected to be named the next leader of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is that he has long opposed the agency's work. This is the agency established in the wake of the 2008 market crash, whose regulatory reach touches countless financial products that Americans use every day—student loans, payday loans, credit cards, mortgages, and so on. Earlier
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What is the Paris Agreement? The Paris Agreement is the first truly universal climate treaty. The United States is now the only country to opt out On December 12, 2015, 195 countries gathered in the French capital to conclude the first truly universal climate treaty, the Paris Agreement, aimed at preventing worst-case-scenario global warming. The Palestinian Authority has since joined the UN's climate convention and the Pari
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Science update on climate change: from bad to worse Credit: CC0 Public Domain Scientists monitoring the Earth's climate and environment have delivered a cascade of grim news this year, adding a sense of urgency to UN talks on how best to draw down the greenhouse gases that drive global warming. Here is a summary of recent findings: 1.1 degrees Earth's average surface temperature last year was a record 1.1 degree Celsius (1.98 Fahrenheit) above
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Transforming greenhouse gases: New 'supercatalyst' to recycle carbon dioxide and methaneEngineers have developed a new and cost-effective catalyst to recycle two of the main causes behind climate change -- carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dog ownership linked to lower mortality rateA team of scientists have used national registries of more than 3.4 million Swedes aged 40 to 80 to study the association between dog ownership and cardiovascular health. Their study shows that dog owners had a lower risk of death due to cardiovascular disease or to other causes during the 12-year follow-up.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Anti-malaria drug shows promise as Zika virus treatmentA medication used to prevent and treat malaria may also be effective for Zika virus, scientists have discovered. The drug, called chloroquine, has a long history of safe use during pregnancy, and is relatively inexpensive.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Performance appraisal success depends on frequent feedback and good standard setting Appraisal of employees often gets a bad press, but recent research suggests if it involves frequent feedback between the formal appraisal and good prior planning and communication of standards then it can be successful and appreciated by employees. The research, conducted by Stephen Wood at the University of Leicester and Shaun Pichler and Gerard Beenen, both at the California State University, F
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NIR-driven H2 evolution from water: Expanding wavelength range for solar energy conversion Near-infrared-light-driven hydrogen evolution from water photo-driven by triruthenium photosensitizer. Credit: Kyushu University Hydrogen gas is a promising "green" fuel. The lightest chemical element, hydrogen is an efficient energy store and could potentially replace gasoline in vehicles. However, the element does not exist in large amounts in nature, and must be produced artificially. Hydrogen
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
No more deer in the headlight: Study finds large mammals do use road crossing structures Large mammals crossing US Highway 93 are more likely to use wildlife crossing structures than move past a random location in the surrounding habitat, new research shows. The research team also found that animal movement varied between crossing structures in different locations, suggesting that location might be more important than design. The findings, published in open-access journal Frontiers i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Seagrass is a key fishing ground globally In many places in the world fishers still, utilize spearfishing as a subsistence means of catching food. The Bajo of SE Asia is an indigenous group who still commonly practice such activity in Wakatobi, Indonesia. Credit: Richard Unsworth New research demonstrates that seagrass meadows are important fishing grounds all around the globe. The work highlights that there is an urgent need to start ap
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Gizmodo
This Gigantic Version of Nintendo's Original Handheld Games Needs Two People to Play It GIF Before the Switch, before the 3DS, and even before the Game Boy, Nintendo had the Game & Watch: a series of handheld video games that were primitive by today’s standards, but mind-blowing to ‘80s kids. And they made such an impression on computer scientist Thomas Tilley that he recently created a gigantic version of the toy built around a 46-inch LCD display. Aside from the flatscreen and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Link between obesity and cancer is not widely recognized A new study published in the Journal of Public Health has shown that the majority of people in the United Kingdom do not understand the connection between weight issues and cancer. Obesity is associated with thirteen types of cancer, including those of the breast, kidney, bowel, and womb. However, after surveying 3293 adults, taken as representative of the UK population, researchers found that on
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Electrochemistry opens up novel access to important classes of substances IMAGE: This is a young researcher in Professor Waldvogel's team using a screening apparatus for parallel electrolysis optimization view more Credit: photo/©: Alexander Sell Electrochemistry has undergone a renaissance in recent years and numerous research groups are currently working on the environmentally friendly production or conversion of molecules. However, despite the superiority
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Anti-tumor and immune-potentiating Enterococcus faecalis-2001 β-glucans IMAGE: Macrophages were activated by β-1,3D-glucan and β-1,4D-glucan of EF-2001. Macrophages activate NK, LAK cells. It is thought that TNFα directly causes tumor to necrosis.... view more Credit: Dr. Yeun-Hwa Gu et al, Bentham Science Publishers Background: Enterococcus faecalis 2001 is a probiotic lactic acid bacterium and has been used as a biological response modifier (BRM). From physio
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain astrocytes linked to Alzheimer's disease Astrocytes, the supporting cells of the brain, could play a significant role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. This is the first time researchers discovered a direct association between astrocytes and AD. Published in Stem Cell Reports , the study investigated the brain cell function of familial AD patients by using s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Warmer water signals change for Scotland's shags An increasingly catholic diet among European Shags at one of Scotland's best-studied breeding colonies has been linked to long-term climate change and may have important implications for Scotland's seabirds, according to research led by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology on November 16 2017. Three decades of data from the Isle of May, off Scotland's east coast, found that the proportion of sandee
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Performance appraisal success depends on frequent feedback and good standard setting IMAGE: Professor Stephen Wood from the School of Business. view more Credit: University of Leicester Appraisal of employees often gets a bad press, but recent research suggests if it involves frequent feedback between the formal appraisal and good prior planning and communication of standards then it can be successful and appreciated by employees. The research, conducted by Stephen Wood at the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
BfR supports EFSA and ECHA with the development of European guidelines for the health assessment of endocrine disruptors The basis of the discussion was formed by literature research and a survey conducted by the BfR among competent laboratories on the applicability and feasibility of methods in the identification of endocrine disruptors. The recommendations prepared as a result of the hearing are intended to be included as an annex to the guidelines for the health assessment of endocrine disruptors in line with th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
University of Guelph professor identifies protein key to cancer cells ability to spread U of G scientists have made a discovery that could reduce the spread of cancer by hindering a protein that binds cancer cells together and allows them to invade tissues. The groundbreaking study identified a protein, known as cadherin-22, as a potential factor in cancer metastasis, or spread, and showed that hindering it decreased the adhesion and invasion rate of breast and brain cancer cells by
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Ion billiards' cue novel material synthesis methodA team of Hokkaido University researchers has developed a novel material synthesis method called proton-driven ion introduction (PDII) which utilizes a phenomenon similar to 'ion billiards.' The new method could pave the way for creating numerous new materials, thus drastically advancing materials sciences.
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Futurity.org
To prevent eczema, promote breastfeeding? Babies whose mothers had received support to breastfeed exclusively for a sustained period from birth have a 54 percent lower risk of eczema at the age of 16, a new study shows. Eczema causes the skin to become itchy, dry, cracked, sore, and red. It affects around 1 in 5 children and 1 in 10 adults in the developed world. Eczema affects around 1 in 5 children and 1 in 10 adults in the developed w
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What grosses out a chimpanzee? Chimpanzee feeding on an orange. Credit: Cecile Sarabian, HELP Congo, Kyoto University Chimpanzees do some pretty disgusting things. In their natural habitats, chimpanzees are known to pick up seeds from feces and re-ingest them. In captivity, some practice coprophagy: the deliberate ingestion of feces. These behaviors usually involve their own fecal matter, or that of their closest family member
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Want safe travels? Find freeways with these features I-15 in Utah. Credit: Nate Edwards/BYU New BYU research commissioned by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) shows a number of highway features that make accidents less likely. Among them are some that are intuitive: minimal hills and curves, paved right shoulders and concrete-barrier medians. But one finding was less expected: lower speed limits were associated with higher rates of accident
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Gizmodo
Upgrade To a Sound Bar, Or Even Surround Sound, With These Early Black Friday Deals Vizio 2.0 Channel Sound Bar , $50 AmazonBasics 2.0 Channel Sound Bar , $50 AmazonBasics 2.1 Channel Sound Bar , $80 Samsung 2.1 Channel Sound Bar , $158 Samsung 3.1 Channel Sound Bar , $218 Samsung Wireless Surround Sound Expansion Kit , $94 If you’re still listening to your TV through its built-in speakers, it’s time to drop what you’re doing and grab a sound bar on sale. On the low end, we’ve s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Warmer water signals change for Scotland's shags European shag on the Isle of May. Credit: Gary Howells An increasingly catholic diet among European Shags at one of Scotland's best-studied breeding colonies has been linked to long-term climate change and may have important implications for Scotland's seabirds, according to research led by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology on November 16 2017. Three decades of data from the Isle of May, off Sco
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Evaluation of novel hybrid membranes for carbon captureHybrid materials known as mixed matrix membranes are considered a promising approach to capture carbon dioxide and mitigate against global warming. These materials are derived from a polymer combined with porous nanoparticles. We show that materials prepared using porous organic polymers are resilient to the acidic impurities present in industrial gas streams, whereas other hybrid materials fail.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
For older women, every movement mattersWomen who engaged in 30 minutes per day of light physical activity had a 12 percent lower risk of death. Women who did a half-hour each day of moderate to vigorous activity had a 39 percent lower mortality risk.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How bacteria in the gut influence neurodegenerative disordersHumans have roughly as many bacterial cells in their bodies as human cells, and most of those bacteria live in the gut. New research released today reveals links between the gut microbiome -- the population of microorganisms living in the gastrointestinal tract -- and brain diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's, including potential new ways to track and treat these diseases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Climate change impacts already locked in, but the worst can still be avoidedSome impacts of global warming -- such as sea level rise and coastal flooding -- are already locked in and unavoidable, according to a major research project.
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Ingeniøren
Efter valgkampen venter vandkampen Mens Danmark er på vej mod stemmeurnerne, er diplomater og politikere fra hele verden samlet i Bonn for at diskutere og stemme om, hvordan vi minimerer de menneskeskabte klimaforandringer og tilpasser os de ændringer, som vi ikke kan forhindre. Hvad man kommer frem til i Sydtyskland kan få stor betydning nord for grænsen – og for de opgaver, som kommunalpolitikerne står over for. I disse år blive
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Feed: All Latest
Netflix's 'Mudbound': Harsh and Beautiful, It's the Streamer's Greatest Cinematic Triumph Yet Under the cloak of a Mississippi night, Florence Jackson makes an admission to her eldest son. “I dreamt about you, too,” she says during a serene midpoint in Mudbound . Ronsel (Jason Mitchell) has safely returned from the Second World War, serving in George S. Patton’s 761st “Black Panthers” tank battalion. While he was gone, Florence—played by Mary J. Blige, with the singer delivering a perform
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Feed: All Latest
The Moon Express MX-1E Lander Is Heading for the Moon or Bust Google can’t resist a moon shot, but this one is literal: A decade ago, the company announced the Google Lunar X Prize —$20 million for the first private firm to build a robot that can soft-land on the surface of the moon, travel 500 meters, and beam hi-def video back to Earth. Now, after multiple extensions and a couple of flameouts, five teams are racing toward the March 2018 launch deadline, a
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Popular Science
Seven apps that can actually help you through a breakup DIY Glue those shattered feelings back together. If your relationship just ended, or you're still in the midst of a breakup, these apps can help you stay sane until you emerge safely on the other side.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Semiconducting carbon nanotubes can reduce noise in carbon nanotube interconnects IMAGE: CNT bundle surrounded by semiconducting CNTs. view more Credit: Dr. Uma Sathyakam P., Dr. Partha S. Mallick, Bentham Science Publishers Crosstalk and noise can become a major source of reliability problems of CNT based VLSI interconnects in the near future. Downscaling of component size in integrated circuits (ICs) to nanometer scale coupled with high density integration makes it challengi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First-graders fitter than expectedChildhood obesity is often attributed to a lack of exercise. So what about sports among elementary school students? A team from the Technical University of Munich pursued this question and collected the results of fitness tests for first-year students over a period of one decade. Their study shows that students did not lose their strength. Speed or balance even increased over the time of 10 years.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NIR-driven H2 evolution from water: Expanding wavelength range for solar energy conversion IMAGE: This is an image of near-infrared-light-driven hydrogen evolution from water photo-driven by triruthenium photosensitizer. view more Credit: Kyushu University Fukuoka, Japan - Hydrogen gas is a promising "green" fuel. The lightest chemical element, hydrogen is an efficient energy store and could potentially replace gasoline in vehicles. However, the element does not exist in large am
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
No more deer in the headlight: Study finds large mammals do use road crossing structuresA pilot study finds that large mammals are more likely to use wildlife crossing structures than move past a random location in the surrounding habitat. Animal movement also varied between crossing structures in different locations, suggesting that location might be more important than design. These findings are a first step towards a better understanding of the effectiveness of wildlife crossing s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Asthma attacks reduced in tree-lined urban neighborhoods People living in polluted urban areas are far less likely to be admitted to hospital with asthma when there are lots of trees in their neighbourhood, a study by the University of Exeter's medical school has found. The study into the impact of urban greenery on asthma suggests that respiratory health can be improved by the expansion of tree cover in very polluted urban neighbourhoods. The stud
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Using eDNA to identify the breeding habitat of endangered speciesUsing wide-ranging eDNA analysis combined with traditional collection survey methods, Japanese researchers have identified the breeding site of critically endangered fish species Acheilognathus typus in the mainstream of Omono River in Akita Prefecture, Japan. The findings were published on November 14 in the online edition of The Science of Nature - Naturwissenschaften.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A popular tool to trace Earth's oxygen history can give false positivesIf someone cries 'Eureka!' because it looks like oxygen appeared in Earth's ancient atmosphere long before the body of evidence indicated, be careful. If it was a chromium isotope system reading that caused the enthusiasm, it might need to be curbed.
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Dagens Medicin
Mette Marklund bliver ny ledende overlæge på Nordsjællands Hospital Billeddiagnostisk Afdeling på Nordsjællands Hospital får ny ledende overlæge til februar.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
RUDN chemists synthesized a new catalyst for oil and gas processing A team of scientists from the Research Institute of Chemistry (RIC) of RUDN University together with colleagues from major scientific centers created a new catalyst - a substance that activates oxidation processes in low-reactive components of oil and gas. The new method of hydrocarbon processing will help efficiently produce valuable organic substances such as acids and alcohols, using a reactio
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Plant respiration could become a bigger feedback on climate than expected New research, led by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, suggests that plant respiration is a larger source of carbon emissions than previously thought, and warn that as the world warms, this may reduce the ability of Earth's land surface to absorb emissions due to fossil fuel burning. The new findings, published in the journal Nature Communications today [November 17th] are based on the comprehe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The tragedy of the seagrass commonsUrgent action is required to stem the loss of the world's seagrass meadows to protect their associated fisheries.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What grosses out a chimpanzee? Kyoto, Japan - Chimpanzees do some pretty disgusting things. In their natural habitats, chimpanzees are known to pick up seeds from feces and re-ingest them. In captivity, some practice coprophagy: the deliberate ingestion of feces. These behaviors usually involve their own fecal matter, or that of their closest family members. If presented with feces and other bodily fluids from others, howeve
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Seagrass is a key fishing ground globallyNew research demonstrates that seagrass meadows are important fishing grounds all around the globe. The work highlights that there is an urgent need to start appreciating and understanding this role to be able to build more sustainable fisheries. A study led by Dr. Lina Mtwana Nordlund at Stockholm University, published in the scientific journal Fish & Fisheries, examines the global extent to whic
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Want safe travels? Find freeways with these features IMAGE: This is I-15 in Utah. view more Credit: Nate Edwards/BYU Photo New BYU research commissioned by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) shows a number of highway features that make accidents less likely. Among them are some that are intuitive: minimal hills and curves, paved right shoulders and concrete-barrier medians. But one finding was less expected: lower speed limits were
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Ars Technica
Apple reportedly working with Intel to put 5G modem in future iPhones Samuel Axon reader comments 0 While it will be some time before 5G LTE becomes standard, Apple is thinking ahead about how to best incorporate 5G technology into its iPhones. According to a Fast Company report , Apple has been working with Intel to incorporate the chipmaker's 5G modems in future iPhones while talks with Qualcomm, the world's biggest modem supplier, have been "limited." Qualcomm c
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New paper answers causation conundrum Red Tree #1, #3 by Piet Mondrian. The compression of information from one version to the next illustrates the concept of coarse-graining. Credit: Santa Fe Institute In a new paper published in a special issue of the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A , SFI Professor Jessica Flack offers a practical answer to one of the most significant, and most confused questions in evolutionary b
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Six missing after deadly Greek floods as stricken towns face shortages Areas stricken by the floods are to request EU solidarity funds. Six people were still missing in Greece Friday after a flash flood killed 16 others near the capital, with local communities facing food and medicine shortages and the full scope of the damage still unclear. "We need rapid solutions... mainly on food distribution for those who have lost their homes, their documents, their medicine,"
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate talks wrap up with progress on Paris rulebook A coal-burning power plant steams in Gelsenkirchen, Germany while the 23rd UN Conference of the Parties (COP) climate talks end in Bonn, Germany, Friday, Nov. 17, 2017. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner) Global talks on curbing climate change wrapped up Friday, with delegates and observers claiming progress on several key details of the 2015 Paris accord. The two-week negotiations focused on a range of i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
VW to spend $40B on electric cars, technology through 2022Volkswagen says it plans to spend more than 34 billion euros ($40 billion) over the next five years on developing electric cars, autonomous driving and other new technologies.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New theory rewrites opening moments of Chernobyl disaster A picture of the HDR technology of the Sarcophagus in the Chernobyl Zone. Credit: Piotr Andryszczak A brand-new theory of the opening moments during the Chernobyl disaster, the most severe nuclear accident in history, based on additional analysis is presented for the first time in the journal Nuclear Technology , an official journal of the American Nuclear Society. The new theory suggests the fir
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Science : NPR
Amos Winter: How Do You Build An All-Terrain Wheelchair For Under $200? Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode Simple Solutions About Amos Winter's TED Talk In many countries, uneven and unpaved roads make it hard to get around in a standard wheelchair. MIT engineer Amos Winter describes his design for a lever-powered all-terrain wheelchair under $200. About Amos Winter Amos Winter is an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering at MIT. He is the Director of the Gl
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Science : NPR
Mileha Soneji: Can Simple Innovations Improve The Lives of Parkinson's Patients? Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Simple Solutions About Mileha Soneji's TED Talk When designer Mileha Soneji's uncle got Parkinson's, his quality of life deteriorated rapidly. Mileha couldn't cure her uncle's disease, so she designed simple ways to improve his everyday life. About Mileha Soneji Mileha Soneji is a strategic product designer from Pune, India. She studied design at MIT and earne
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Ars Technica
Converting natural gas to hydrogen without any carbon emissions Enlarge / Hard to believe that this stuff could cut carbon emissions. reader comments 51 The boom in natural gas production has been essential to the drop in carbon emissions in the US, as methane, the primary component of natural gas, releases more energy for each carbon atom when burned than other fossil fuels. But there's still a carbon atom in each molecule of methane, so switching to natural
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Salar de Atacama from orbit Credit: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2017), processed by ESA, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO From the Salar de Atacama salt flat in the east to the Cordillera Domeyko mountains in the west, Sentinel-2 takes us over part of the Atacama Desert in northern Chile. The desert runs along part of South America's central west coast. It is considered one of the driest places on Earth. Being a 'coastal de
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Breakthrough discovery in diagnostic tools that can replace commonly used and fragile antibodies Experts from the Biotechnology Group at the University of Leicester led by Professor Sergey Piletsky in collaboration with the spin-off company MIP Diagnostics Ltd have announced the development of polymeric materials with molecular recognition capabilities which hold the potential to outperform natural antibodies in various diagnostic applications In a newly released article "A comparison of the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Plant respiration could become a bigger feedback on climate than expected New research, led by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, suggests that plant respiration is a larger source of carbon emissions than previously thought, and warns that as the world warms, this may reduce the ability of Earth's land surface to absorb emissions due to fossil fuel burning. The new findings, published in the journal Nature Communications today (November 17 2017) are based on the comp
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Gizmodo
Alaska Natives Are Using Modern Technology to Save Traditional Ice Cellars Photo: USAF The frozen soils on the North Slope have served Alaska Natives as natural freezer for centuries. Beneath the monotonous surface of the tundra, they’ve dug out chambers known as ice cellars that stay cold enough to keep whale and caribou meat frozen year round. “Its a cultural way of life for time immemorial,” Arnold Brower, head of the Alaska Eskimo Whaling Commission, told Earther. “
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Dagens Medicin
Overlæge frygter kaos med indførslen af Sundhedsplatformen Medicinsk afdeling på Holbæk Sygehus har længe været underdrejet på grund af mangel på sygeplejersker og et opbrugt vikarbudget. Overlæge frygter, at implementering af det det nye IT-system Sundhedsplatformen vil køre afdelingen helt i sænk.
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Dagens Medicin
Lukning af fertilitetsklinik VAR en dårlig beslutningBent Hansens svar på kritik er klar tale, men det gør ikke beslutningen om at lukke fertilitetsklinikken på Aarhus Universitetshospital til en bedre beslutning.
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Viden
Hackernes metoder bliver mere kreative: Her er 8 af de mest udbredte Man siger, at det var simplere i gamle dage - og sådan er det også inden for hacking-verdenen. Da computeren blot var noget universiteter og supernørder havde stående, var der ikke så mange forskellige måder at hacke på. Men sådan er det bestemt ikke længere. Hackerne bruger i dag mange forskellige metoder for at trænge ind i vores telefoner eller computere og få fat i koder, kreditkortoplysninge
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Gizmodo
More Details About a Cameo-Studded Star Wars: The Last Jedi Scene Detective Pikachu has found its non-Pikachu star. Edward James Olmos teases the surprising humor of The Predator . Gotham is setting up another major arc for Jerome’s return. Plus, new pictures from The Flash ’s new encounter with its big bad of the season, and Reign makes her debut on Supergirl . Spoilers get! Star Wars: The Last Jedi Rumors have been swirling about a series of major cameos in t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA develops tool that shows how much sea level rise coastal cities can expect based on location and degree of ice melt(Phys.org)—A trio of researchers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has developed a new tool to map sea level rise for major cities depending on which parts of the Earth's ice sheets melt and by how much. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, Eric Larour, Erik Ivins and Surendra Adhikari describe the tool and the ways it can be used.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Grade inflation adds thousands to the cost of a family homeGrade inflation at English primary schools can increase the price of surrounding houses by up to £7,000, according to early research from economists at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Companies should monitor egos of employees to prevent unethical behaviour Credit: CC0 Public Domain Monitoring the egos of employees could prevent bad behaviour because people who feel entitled are more likely to behave unethically at work, research suggests. People who think they should receive special treatment, even if it is not deserved, are likely to break the rules because they are driven by self-interest and the need to look good in the eyes of others. Experts
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers reveal jamming in cellular motor protein trafficTo keep a cell alive, molecular motor proteins constantly transport building blocks and waste across the cell, along its biopolymer network. Because of the high density of these proteins, jamming effects are believed to affect this transport, just like traffic jams affect street traffic. However, not much is known about such crowding effects in cellular traffic. Researchers in the groups of Erwin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using eDNA to identify the breeding habitat of endangered speciesUsing wide-ranging eDNA analysis combined with traditional collection survey methods, Japanese researchers have identified the breeding site of critically endangered fish species Acheilognathus typus in the mainstream of Omono River in Akita Prefecture, Japan. The findings were published on November 14 in the online edition of The Science of Nature – Naturwissenschaften.
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Ingeniøren
Ekspert: Der er ingen permanent løsning på radioaktivt affald fra MærskMærsk har 450 ton radioaktivt affald uforsvarligt opbevaret på Esbjerg Havn. Det genrejser et gammelt ømtåeligt emne: Permanent eller midlertidigt?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The astonishing efficiency of life Neon cells. Credit: Zighuo.he, via Wikimedia Commons All life on earth performs computations – and all computations require energy. From single-celled amoeba to multicellular organisms like humans, one of the most basic biological computations common across life is translation: processing information from a genome and writing that into proteins. Translation, it turns out, is highly efficient. I
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers put probiotics in food and supplements to the test Sandra Buerger and her student Alexander Smith study the bacterial makeup of probiotics. Credit: Boston University It's a great time to be a bacterium. For more than a century, bacteria have been typecast as villainous bodily invaders in the stomach-churning, fever-inducing drama of infectious disease. Now, researchers are realizing that bacteria can play the good guys, too. Beneficial gut bacter
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
CRISPR patent wars highlight problem of granting broad intellectual property rights for tech that offers public benefits CRISPR-associated protein Cas9 (white) from Staphylococcus aureus based on Protein Database ID 5AXW. Credit: Thomas Splettstoesser (Wikipedia, CC BY-SA 4.0) (Phys.org)—Duke University Law professor Arti Rai and bio-technology professor Robert Cook-Deegan with Arizona State University have stepped into the gene editing patent war with an Intellectual Property Policy Forum paper they have had publi
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The Scientist RSS
Optogenetic Therapies Move Closer to Clinical UseWith a clinical trial underway to restore vision optogenetically, researchers also see promise in using the technique to treat deafness, pain, and other conditions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Widespread chemical contaminants stunt growth of amphibians Research led by Purdue University professor Maria Sepúlveda revealed certain chemicals are stunting the growth of amphibians, including the northern leopard frog (shown here). Credit: Purdue University A series of synthetic chemicals widely used in household products, food packaging and clothing have a significant effect on the development of frogs, even at low doses, according to a Purdue Univer
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers knit energy-storing clothing fibresEver wished you could recharge your mobile phone just by putting it in your pants pocket? That could soon be a reality thanks to energy-storing clothing fibres developed by scientists at Deakin's Institute for Frontier Materials (IFM).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Unexpected finding solves 40-year old cytoskeleton mystery Six melanoma cells. Their DNA (blue) is found in the nucleus of the cells, their microtubules (red) in the cytoplasm, surrounding the nucleus. Credit: Netherlands Cancer Institute Scientists have been searching for it for decades: the enzyme that cuts the amino acid tyrosine off an important part of the cell's skeleton. Researchers of the Netherlands Cancer Institute have now identified this myst
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers compute unprecedented values for spin lifetime anisotropy in graphene Credit: ICN2 Researchers of the ICN2 Theoretical and Computational Nanoscience Group, led by ICREA Prof. Stephan Roche, have published another paper on spin, this time reporting numerical simulations for spin relaxation in graphene/TMDC heterostructures. Published in Physical Review Letters , their calculations indicate a spin lifetime anisotropy that is orders of magnitude larger than anything o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemists synthesize a new catalyst for oil and gas processing The structure of pentanuclear prismatic metallasilsesquioxanes (copper and cobalt-containing) Credit: Alexey Bilyachenko A team of scientists from the Research Institute of Chemistry (RIC) of RUDN University and colleagues from major scientific centers have created a new catalyst, a substance that activates oxidation processes in low-reactive components of oil and gas. The new method of hydrocarb
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists discover method to convert food waste into biofuels Credit: Skoltech Scientists from Skoltech and the Russian Academy of Sciences Joint Institute for High Temperatures have proposed converting food waste into biofuel via hydrothermal liquefaction – a thermal depolymerization process used to turn wet biomass into oil. Recent studies conducted by the United Nations have revealed that about one-third of all food products produced for human consumptio
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New theory rewrites opening moments of Chernobyl disaster IMAGE: This is a picture of the HDR technology of the Sarcophagus in the Chernobyl Zone. view more Credit: Piotr Andryszczak A brand-new theory of the opening moments during the Chernobyl disaster, the most severe nuclear accident in history, based on additional analysis is presented for the first time in the journal Nuclear Technology , an official journal of the American Nuclear Society.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How do atmospheric shifts affect soil-dwelling microbes?Rising levels of carbon dioxide, ozone and other gases can affect crop growth. Microorganisms inside crops, on their roots or within nearby soil also influence crops by contributing nutrients, curbing disease and combating stresses such as drought. But little is known about how microorganisms respond as atmospheric conditions change.
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These Stunning 3-D Models Are Helping Unravel the Mysteries of Coral Coral isn’t what you think it is. It isn’t a plant, but an animal. It doesn’t just grow in shallow, tropical waters, but also hundreds of feet deep in the darkness . And it is far tougher than doom-and-gloom stories about coral bleaching would have you believe. For all that science knows about coral reefs, these complex ecosystems are still maddeningly, well, complex. But a new photographic techn
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'Justice League' Reading List: 5 Comics to Check Out Now After much fanfare, Justice League is finally in theaters, complete with Wonder Woman, Batman, The Flash, Aquaman, and Cyborg. It’s a jam-packed two hours, but it can still leave people wanting more. For those looking to go—in the parlance of the tagline—"all in" with the film’s heroes, the DC Comics back catalogue is filled with stories that build out the mythology and ideas introduced in the mo
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Scientific American Content: Global
Maryn McKenna's Book Big Chicken Looks at Poultry's Effect on Antibiotic Resistance Summer of '45. The war is winding down. Now the call to arms is about to be replaced by a call to wings. The time has come for the Chicken of Tomorrow contest. As Maryn McKenna details in her fun, fascinating and sometimes frightening new book Big Chicken , the aim of this nationwide breeding challenge was to create, you guessed it, a big chicken. A very big chicken. When the U.S. Department
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Futurity.org
3D-printed ‘schwarzites’ could build all kinds of stuff Engineers are using 3D printers to turn largely theoretical structures into strong, light and durable materials with complex, repeating patterns. The porous structures called schwarzites are designed with computer algorithms, but Rice University researchers found they could send data from the programs to printers and make macroscale, polymer models for testing. Their samples strive to use as litt
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Ion billiards' cue novel material synthesis method A schematic illustration of the newly developed Proton-Driven Ion Introduction (PDII) method. Protons generated by electric disassociation of hydrogen are shot into the supply source of the desired ions. The ions are then forced out of the source to be introduced into the host material. Credit: Fujioka M. et al., Journal of the American Chemical Society, November 16, 2017 A team of Hokkaido Unive
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Electrochemistry opens up novel access to important classes of substances A young researcher in Professor Waldvogel's team using a screening apparatus for parallel electrolysis optimization. Credit: Alexander Sell Electrochemistry has undergone a renaissance in recent years and numerous research groups are currently working on the environmentally friendly production or conversion of molecules. However, despite the superiority of electrochemistry, its application to var
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Expert discusses drones, warfare and the media Professor Lisa Parks is the co-editor of “Life in the Age of Drone Warefare,” published by Duke University Press. Professor Lisa Parks is the co-editor of “Life in the Age of Drone Warefare,” published by Duke University Press. Credit: Erin Valkner Drones have become a common part of warfare—but their use remains a subject of public contention. Lisa Parks, a professor in MIT's program in Comparat
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The Atlantic
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri Is an Absolute Marvel A teenage girl is brutally raped and murdered. After months pass without any progress on the case, her mother takes matters into her own hands. She rents three billboards outside of her small town, indicting the local police chief: “Raped While Dying”; “And Still No Arrests?”; “How Come, Chief Willoughby?” It is easy to imagine the movie that might have emerged from this premise in the hands of a
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The Atlantic
Radio Atlantic: How an American Neo-Nazi Was Made Andrew Anglin spent his formative years flirting with hippie progressivism, then tried his hand at becoming a tribal hunter-gatherer. But he only achieved notoriety after he founded the Daily Stormer, the world's biggest website for neo-Nazis. Anglin and his mob of followers have terrorized people around the world, and their influence has been cited by the perpetrators of fatal violence. What les
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Conservation call on sawfish nursery Murdoch University researchers have identified an important nursery for a critically endangered species of sawfish and are calling for conservation efforts to be focused there. Associate Professor David Morgan and a team from the Centre for Fish and Fisheries Research used acoustic telemetry to record the movements of a number of juvenile Green Sawfish (Pristis zijsron) near the mouth of the Ashb
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Nyt tværfagligt forskningsprogram i biomedicinsk innovationsret 17. november 2017 Nyt tværfagligt forskningsprogram i biomedicinsk innovationsret Bevilling Novo Nordisk Fonden har tildelt DKK 35 mio. til forskningsprogrammet Collaborative Research Programme in Biomedical Innovation Law (CeBIL), ledet af bevillingsmodtager professor Timo Minssen. CeBIL, som vil ligge på Det Juridiske Fakultet på Københavns Universitet, vil undersøge de væsentligste juridiske u
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Science | The Guardian
Lab notes: Bottoms up! Cheers to a vintage week in science This week’s biggest stories Shetland: famous for its irascible ponies, snuggly jumpers and now, perhaps, space exploration. UK Space Agency research has identified Unst, the Shetland Islands’ most northern isle as the best site in UK for spaceport to launch satellites into orbit . Which, teamed with the news that a potentially habitable world, Ross 128b , has been found just 11 light years away m
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Ingeniøren
Amazon Key kan lukke ubudne gæster ind i dit hjem Den amerikanske nethandelsgigant Amazon lancerede sidste måned deres nye leveringsservice Amazon Key i USA, der gør det muligt at aflevere pakker indenfor i kundernes hjem. Men nu har sikkerhedseksperter fra Rhino Security Labs fundet ud af, at der er et sikkerhedshul i systemet, der kan lukke ubudne gæster ind. Det skriver Wired . Amazon Key fungerer gennem en app, der har forbindelse til et kam
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Popular Science
Whatever your weather’s been like this week, you can probably expect the opposite for the rest of winter If you live in the eastern U.S. and love having those four distinct seasons, you’re probably hoping this past week was a harbinger of a truly wintery winter, unlike last year. Sorry, but you should enjoy your current weather while it lasts. It won’t be chilly for long. Right now, it’s colder than average in the eastern United States and bits of the Midwest, and warmer than average in most of the
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The Atlantic
Where Do Songbirds Go to Die? One afternoon in May 2008, a graduate student named Pat Kramer was in northwestern Pennsylvania catching purple martins. The bird, a large swallow that nests in artificial birdhouses across North America, is a well-studied species. But one particular purple martin Kramer and some fellow researchers from York University caught was about to revolutionize ornithology. Kramer let an exclamation mark
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Science-Based Medicine
Hopelessly Devoted to Woo: TLC and Forbes Bring Us Yet Another Celebrity HealerEndorsed by journalists and studied by academic medicine, bogus celebrity energy healer Charlie Goldsmith now has his own television program. In other words, it's just another day at Science-Based Medicine.
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Membrane FeverScientists have discovered a mechanism by which the Rift Valley fever virus infects the cells of its hosts.
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Ars Technica
Justice League review: Who will avenge these shortchanged heroes? Enlarge / Someone is (thankfully) missing here, and his name rhymes with "hot-mud-sand." Warner Bros. reader comments 0 This week's feature-length Justice League film benefits as much as it suffers from a "can't get any worse" reputation. Between the diminishing returns of Zack Snyder as a filmmaker, a crowded cast of new-to-film DC characters, and the incredibly stinky shadow of Batman V Superma
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'Star Wars Battlefront II' Review: A Fun Game That Loses Itself Trying to Find You The planet Kamino always been one of my favorite Star Wars settings: moody, original, and striking. Now, as rain lashes down, the droids try to tear it apart. A perennially overcast ocean world pockmarked with high-tech research platforms, Kamino is the home of the Clone Troopers serving the Galactic Republic during the war. I'm one of the Republic's clones, holding the line at a landing pad, fir
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What Climate-Conscious Cities Can Learn From Each Other This story originally appeared on CityLab and is part of the Climate Desk collaboration. In many ways, Essen is the envy of cities trying to move past their industrial days. Once the steel and coal center of Germany, Essen’s economic success in the early 20th century was evident in the dust blanketing the city and sulfur filling the air with the constant stench of rotten eggs. By one resident’s a
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Gift Guide: 12 Things for the Neat Freak All of these things are perfectly beautiful. All of these things have designs that exhibit an understated elegance. All of these things will help your loved one keep everything tidy, organized, and just so . All of these things are items they can display proudly on their office desk or in their home. All of these things are things you should get for the neat freak in your life, even if that neat
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Leslie Berlin Tackles Silicon Valley's Past in 'Troublemakers' Silicon Valley job perks are mythic. Self-replenishing snacks. Unlimited vacation. A pile of stock options. But as much as these professional entrapments might seem like dotcom-era phenomena, the practice of sweetening the deal for tech employees dates back to the ’70s as a way to ward off labor unions. Happy workers, explains Stanford historian Leslie Berlin, are less likely to agitate for bette
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
When did Australia's human history begin? A mural in Redfern, Sydney, based on the lyrics of the Joe Geia song "40,000 Years." Credit: Billy Griffiths In July, a new date was published that pushed the opening chapters of Australian history back to 65,000 years ago. It is the latest development in a time revolution that has gripped the nation over the past half century. In the 1950s, it was widely believed that the first Australians had a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Australia is a global top-ten deforester – and Queensland is leading the way Forest cleared by bulldozers towing massive chains. Credit: Noel Preece When you think of devastating deforestation and extinction you usually think of the Amazon, Borneo and the Congo. But eastern Australia ranks alongside these in the top 10 of the world's major deforestation fronts – the only one in a developed nation . Most of the clearing is happening in Queensland, and it is accelerating. O
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Gizmodo
Black Friday Is Now For the Ecobee4 Smart Thermostat - Get It For $50 Off Ecobee4 , $199 While not nearly as ubiquitous as Nest’s Learning Thermostats, Ecobee’s smart thermostats one-up the competition by pairing with wireless remote sensors that you can place elsewhere in your house, giving the thermostat a more accurate picture of your home’s overall temperature. The new Ecobee4 is especially notable in that it doesn’t just work with Google Assistant and Alexa...it a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Millions, billions, trillions—how to make sense of numbers in the news Breaking down the big numbers. Credit: helen_g/Shutterstock.com National discussions of crucial importance to ordinary citizens – such as funding for scientific and medical research, bailouts of financial institutions and the current Republican tax proposals – inevitably involve dollar figures in the millions, billions and trillions. Unfortunately, math anxiety is widespread even among intelligen
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Dagens Medicin
Syddanmark sætter begrænsninger for ansattes sponsorkurserNye retningslinier i Region Syddanmark fastslår, at ansatte fremover ikke må deltage i sponsorkurser, der skader habiliteten. Dog er det ikke alle aktiviteter hos private virksomheder, som forbydes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Data modelling is key to managing fisheries sustainably Rock flathead is one of Australia’s favourite fish. Credit: Alpha/Flickr Have you ever questioned the environmental or economic sustainability of the flathead you order from your local fish and chips shop? Do you know where it's from? Not all fish are caught in an ecologically sustainable way, but scientists are working with fisheries managers to address this. "To sustainably manage a fishery w
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New technique to detect oil in water during LNG processing Credit: University of Western Australia Collaborative efforts between the University of Western Australia, Chevron and Woodside have produced promising results using patented technology in a recent field trial. Researchers at The University of Western Australia have developed a new prototype instrument, based on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), to detect trace quantities of oil in water , and th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New 'artificial selection' research findings signal threat for marine environments Scanning electron microscopy of a single-celled green microalga Dunaliella tertiolecta. Credit: Martino E. Malerba & Simon Crawford A new study by Monash biologists has provided fresh insights into the long-standing questions of why animals are of the size they are and what happens when we artificially induce a change in their size. Using a technique called 'artificial selection' the research tea
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Scientific American Content: Global
Improved Diagnostics Fail to Halt the Rise of Tuberculosis Seven years ago, the global community of researchers, health-care workers and activists battling tuberculosis was euphoric. A landmark 2010 trial showed that a new genetic test was highly effective at diagnosing TB, prompting hopes that countries could soon finally control the disease, which killed 1.45 million that year. The World Health Organization (WHO), promptly endorsed the test, called Gen
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ocean warming signals diet change for European shags Credit: University of Liverpool The diet of European shags has diversified as a result of warming North Sea temperatures according to a new long-term study led by the University of Liverpool and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. The team of researchers, including those from the University's School of Environmental Sciences, studied the types of fish fed to shag chicks on the Isle of May Nationa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Objectively measuring how clean our cities are Credit: EPFL EPFL researchers have come up with a fact-based system to measure urban cleanliness. Municipal authorities will now be able to draw on objective assessments when planning their street cleaning – a sector with multi-million-franc budgets. The concept is straightforward: on one hand, vehicles equipped with video cameras to record the city streets, and on the other, a computer able to s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate nemesis, carbon, could become valuable resource In this Jan. 9, 2009 file photo smoke rises from the steel company ThyssenKrupp in Duisburg , western Germany. Levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere have steadily increased since the days of the industrial revolution, contributing to the greenhouse effect that is spurring global warming. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein, file) On a dreary November morning, a small party of visitors from around the w
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Calls mount for action on 'killer robots' after UN talks Activist group the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots insists human beings must be responsible for the final decision to kill The United Nations on Friday closed the first-ever talks on fully autonomous weapons, with experts warning that time was running out to set rules for the use of the machines dubbed "killer robots". The UN is facing mounting pressure to act against weapons systems—likely to be
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5 Essentials for The Perfect Cup of Coffee, From the Grinder to the Mug Java fanatics know that absolute control is key to crafting the perfect cup of coffee. 1 Baratza Virtuoso Pro baristas will tell you that burr grind-ers are the way to go for a uniform grind. Baratza’s ­conical crusher excels at ­producing a wide range of grind sizes, and it cuts down on “fines,” the powdery bits that can make your brew bitter. $249 2 Acaia Pearl Scale Keep close tabs on the weig
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The Movement to Protect Dreamers Is Still Divided on the Details Wednesday morning, Todd Schulte stood before a podium, dressed in a grey suit and orange tie, to talk about the urgent need for legislation that protects undocumented people who came to the United States as children, also known as Dreamers. Since Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced the Trump administration's intention to rescind an Obama-era protection for Dreamers called Deferred Action for
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study refutes theory linking cognition, genes and income Credit: Northwestern University Researchers have cast doubt on a widely-held belief that connects family income with cognitive development, according to a new study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences . A popular theory holds that genes play a larger role in brain development for children from advantaged environments than in those from poorer backgrounds, especially in th
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Fluorescence could help diagnose sick corals Sickness makes some corals lose their glow. Disease reduces a coral’s overall fluorescence even before any sign of the infection is visible to the naked eye, a new study finds. An imaging technique that illuminates the change could help with efforts to better monitor coral health, researchers report November 6 in Scientific Reports . Many corals naturally produce fluorescent proteins that glow in
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Viden
Er det farligt, når hjertet er på internettet? kl. 13.03 I gamle dage var pacemakere store og tunge. Lægerne skulle endda justere dem med skruetrækkere, som blev stukket ind under huden. Der er også et eksempel fra begyndelsen af 1980erne, hvor en amerikansk patient selv valgte at gøre det. Ingen grund til at besøge lægen, mente han åbenbart. Hvad er en pacemaker og ICD? En pacemaker er en lille computer, der kan overtage den elektriske impul
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mapping biological functions of NUDIX enzymes In a large multidisciplinary project, researchers at Karolinska Institutet have explored different properties of an enzyme family called NUDIX hydrolases. The study, published in Nature Communications , reveals novel insights into their biological functions in human cells. The NUDIX enzymes are involved in several important cellular processes such as cellular metabolism, homeostasis and mRNA proc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Sunrise flight to the space stationOrbital ATK's Cygnus resupply ship with its cymbal-ike UltraFlex solar arrays approaches the International Space Station's robotic arm Canadarm2 as both spacecraft fly into an orbital sunrise on Nov. 14, 2017.
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Ingeniøren
Russiske Twitter-bots påvirkede Brexit Putin er glad for at have en finger med i spillet i andre landes afstemninger. Nye tal viser, at russiske Twitter-bots med forbindelse til Kreml skrev løs på internettet i dagene op til Brexit. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/russiske-twitter-bots-paavirkede-brexit-1082894 Version2
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Ingeniøren
Forskere finder mikroplast på bunden af Stillehavet Forskere har fundet mikroplast i krebsdyr på bunden af Stillehavet, viser et nyt engelsk studie , der er ledet af Newcastle Universitet. “Resultaterne var både øjeblikkelige og alarmerende. Denne type af opgave kræver omhyggelig kontrol med kontaminering undervejs, men der var tidspunkter, hvor vi faktisk kunne se fibrene i maveindholdet, når det blev fjernet,” siger Alan Jamieson, der er marineb
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Ingeniøren
Fredagspodcast: Teslas lastbil, klimatilpasning og signalproblemer I denne uges udgave af Transformator kan du høre om verdens eskalerende energiforbrug og CO2-udledning, en ny og mere præcis test til at diagnosticere prostatakræft og en opfølgning på den fortsatte saga om signalproblemerne på de danske jernbaner. I temaet ser vi på klimatilpasning og kystsikring. I ugens trykte udgave af Ingeniøren er der en hel håndfuld af artikler, der på forskellig måde afdæ
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Live Science
6 Tips for Buying a Laptop Whether you're writing a term paper, teaching a class, organizing a research project or just surfing the web, you need the right laptop to suit your needs and budget. At first glance, the laptop shopping process may seem confusing. There are hundreds of different models available in several sizes, with at least three different operating systems and prices ranging from $150 to $5,000. Fortun
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers expect new fish passage to restore migratory fish populations Looking upstream from the York Haven hydroelectric plant, with the concrete dam running through the Susquehanna River. Credit: Cube Hydro Partners, LLC The addition of a nature-like fish passage to a Susquehanna River dam in Pennsylvania should allow migrating fish to more easily reach spawning grounds, according to Penn State researchers. "The basic idea is to open up part of the dam and then le
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA survey technique estimates Congo forest's carbon Sabinyo volcano and thick forest in Virunga National Park, Democratic Republic of Congo, habitat of the endangered mountain gorilla. Credit: Martin Harvey/WWF The equivalent of 85 billion tons of carbon dioxide—a huge amount equal to three-quarters of the carbon stored in forests across the contiguous United States—is locked in the living vegetation of one African country that holds much of the s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research suggests vertical axis turbines could increase public support for new wind energy installations Stanford researchers surveyed Californians on how they felt about traditional versus vertical axis wind turbines in a rural setting. Credit: Iris Hui With global carbon emissions on the rise, wind power continues to be an attractive option for states and countries looking to limit fossil fuel use and increase renewable energy. Wind already accounts for over 5 percent of electricity generation in
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The importance of biodiversity in forests could increase due to climate change Biodiverse forest with Norway spruce, beech and birch trees. Picture was taken in autumn in middle Germany. Credit: Christian Hueller Forests fulfill numerous important functions, and do so particularly well if they have a diversity of trees, according to a new study. As a second study demonstrates, forest managers do not have to decide on the provision of solely one function, such as wood produc
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The spliceosome—now available in high definition UCLA researchers have solved the high-resolution structure of a massive cellular machine, the spliceosome, filling the last major gap in our understanding of the RNA splicing process that was previously unclear. The cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM) atomic structure of the spliceosome P complex at 3.3 Å resolution has been published in an online article by the journal Science . DNA contains the
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New treasures from Tutankhamun's tomb Embossed gold application with motif of animal combat of Levantine origin. Credit: Christian Eckmann; RGZM, DAI Cairo and University of Tübingen As part of a German-Egyptian project, archaeologists from Tübingen for the first time examine embossed gold applications from the sensational find of 1922. The motifs indicate surprising links between the Levant and the Egypt of the pharaohs. Researchers
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Ingeniøren
Minister: Fem måneder uden tog på ny bane er det bedste alternativ Hvordan kan det være fornuftigt at lade en ny jernbane til ni milliarder kroner, der bliver bygget til prisen og bliver færdig til tiden, så tom hen? Det spørgsmål trænger sig på, efter at kaosset om at indføre nye signaler har ført til, at den nye jernbane mellem København og Ringsted ikke åbner til december næste år, når den er færdig, men først i maj 2019. Afsporede signaler? Ingeniøren sætter
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers tunnel to a new light source With concerns over moving to a clean energy platform worldwide with electric vehicles and renewables, wasted energy is a factor as important as the amount of green energy produced. Thus, solid-state lighting based upon light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is touted as a solution. However, LEDs struggle to deliver high brightness for the shorter-wavelength end of lighting needs. And emitted short waveleng
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
Amazon Gold Rush Continues to Decimate Peru's Rain Forest For decades gold miners have pillaged the lush Peruvian Amazon forest of Madre de Dios in search of the precious metal. Now a study reports that illicit mining is sharply on the rise despite local government efforts to curb it—and this is taking a heavy toll on the ecosystem. In 2012 the Peruvian government announced a slew of legal decrees to defend Madre de Dios—considered the country’s bio
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Solar minimum surprisingly constant Solar microwave observation telescopes in 1957 (top left) and today (bottom left). Fluctuations observed during 60 years of solar microwave monitoring (top right) and the solar microwave spectrum at each solar minimum (bottom right). The background is full solar disk images taken by the X-ray telescope aboard the Hinode satellite. Credit: NAOJ/Nagoya University/JAXA Using more than a half-century
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team discovers new mechanisms for DNA stability The researcher Andres Aguilera. Credit: University of Seville Researchers from the University of Seville at the Andalusian Centre for Molecular Biology and Regenerative Medicine have discovered that in eukaryotic cells, the proximity of the genes to the pores in the nuclear membrane contributes to maintaining the integrity of the genome. This is due to the fact that the anchoring of DNA to the po
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Renaissance of the iron-air battery Gravimetric and volumetric energy densities of various metal-air battery systems in comparison with Li-ion batteries and conventional gasoline. Credit: Forschungszentrum Jülich / H. Weinrich Iron-air batteries promise a higher energy density than present-day lithium-ion batteries. Their main constituent, iron, is an abundant and cheap material. Scientists from Forschungszentrum Jülich are pursuin
11h
Live Science
Puppy Love: Owning a Dog Linked to Better Heart Health Good news for dog owners: Man's best friend may help lower a person's risk of heart disease, a new study from Sweden finds. In the study, the researchers looked at the relationship between dog ownership and cardiovascular health. The results suggest that dog owners have a lower risk of heart disease because the four-legged friends provide social support and boost their owners' physical acti
11h
Live Science
110 Giant Steps: Long-Necked Dinosaur Breaks Record for Longest Trackway An illustration of the Plagne sauropod superimposed on its tracks. Credit: Drawing: A. Bénéteau; photo: Dinojura Imagine a dinosaur footprint as long as a young child. Now, imagine 110 of them. Amazingly, that's what paleontologists have discovered in eastern France — 110 fossilized footprints belonging to a long-necked sauropod that lived during the Jurassic period. The more than 500-foot-
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers discover poorly understood bacterial lineages in the mouths of dolphins Studying the bacteria found in the mouths of dolphins is giving researchers insight into dolphin health and the unique nature of marine mammals in general. Credit: National Marine Mammal Foundation Researchers have identified two deep lineages of bacteria that have never been characterized before—and they found them in a dolphin's toothy grin. These deep lineages are known as phyla. A phylum is a
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Giant telescope’s mobile-phone ‘dead zones’ rile South African residents Mujahid Safodien/AFP/Getty South Africa has already built prototype dishes that will form part of the Square Kilometre Array, which will be the world’s largest radio telescope. A map showing how mobile-phone use might be restricted because of a giant radio telescope in South Africa has angered people who will live near the instrument — deepening a rift between the local farming community and thos
12h
The Atlantic
Has the Mueller Probe Hamstrung Trump's Foreign Policy? President Trump returned from his 12-day trip to Asia Tuesday night, with few major gaffes to answer for but few accomplishments to show for it, either—a fact he underscored with a strange “what I did on my fall vacation” speech Wednesday that failed to produce the “major” announcement he’d promised. Trump headed out on his trip shortly after Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s first indictments and
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Viden
Hackergenerator: Her er dit hackernavn
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Viden
Mærsks radioaktive affald hober sig op Mærsk Oil har i dag 450 ton lavradioaktivt affald liggende på en industrigrund i Esbjerg. Det er en rekordstor mængde, men i fremtiden bliver der sejlet endnu mere radioaktivt affald fra Nordsøen til landjorden i Danmark. Læs også: Olieindustri ønsker hjælp til radioaktivt affald Det afslører et notat, som olieindustriens brancheorganisation, Olie Gas Danmark, har sendt til de danske myndigheder.
12h
Ingeniøren
Tesla truck: 32 ton med 100 km/t på 20 sekunder Tesla præsenterede torsdag sit første tunge køretøj - Tesla Semi. Og i lastrummet gemte sig en overraskelse - den nye Tesla Roadster. Lastbilen - en såkaldt klasse 8-lastbil - er tiltænkt det amerikanske marked. »Vi vil have et køretøj, der accelererer som intet andet,« sagde Elon Musk og præsenterede så en 0-100-tid på blot fem sekunder. Højeste vægt på køretøjet er 32,2 ton, og fuldt lastet er
12h
Ingeniøren
Ugens it-job: Rigspolitiet og PET jagter sikkerhedsspecialister med humor På dagens liste er der job for både konsulenter, ledere, specialister, arkitekter og udviklere. Find det rette job for dig. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/ugens-it-job-rigspolitiet-pet-jagter-sikkerhedsspecialister-med-humor-11202 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
12h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Tesla shows off new truck and surprise RoadsterTesla shows off a long awaited truck, but surprises with its new Roadster sports car.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Anti-malaria drug shows promise as Zika virus treatment La Jolla, Calif., November 17, 2017 -- A new collaborative study led by researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) and UC San Diego School of Medicine has found that a medication used to prevent and treat malaria may also be effective for Zika virus. The drug, called chloroquine, has a long history of safe use during pregnancy, and is relatively inexpensive. The resea
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dog ownership linked to lower mortality A team of Swedish scientists have used national registries of more than 3.4 million Swedes aged 40 to 80 to study the association between dog ownership and cardiovascular health. Their study shows that dog owners had a lower risk of death due to cardiovascular disease or to other causes during the 12-year follow-up. A total of more than 3.4 million individuals without any prior cardiovascular dis
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A popular tool to trace Earth's oxygen history can give false positives IMAGE: It's relatively simple to take a chromium isotope reading on a rock sample. First, crush the sample. Second, dissolve the pulverized rock in acid. Then place the solution in a... view more Credit: Georgia Tech / Christopher Moore For researchers pursuing the primordial history of oxygen in Earth's atmosphere, a new study might sour some "Eureka!" moments. A contemporary tool us
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel therapeutic target discovered for estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer Researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have identified a protein that can be targeted to suppress growth of a common type of breast cancer known as "estrogen receptor positive" (ER+), including ER+ cancers that are resistant to standard treatments. The protein, tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6), is an enzyme molecule that is highly expressed in multiple tumor types, including prostate,
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When male voles drink alcohol, but their partner doesn't, their relationship suffers A study of the effect of alcohol on long-term relationships finds that when a male prairie vole has access to alcohol, but his female partner doesn't, the relationship suffers - similar to what has been observed in human couples. The study, published today in open-access journal Frontiers in Psychiatry , also identifies changes in a specific brain region in the male voles. The findings could help
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Risk of distracted driving predicted by age, gender, personality and driving frequency New research identifies age, gender, personality and how often people drive as potential risk factors for becoming distracted while driving. Young men, extroverted or neurotic people, and people who drive more often were more likely to report being distracted, while older women and those who felt that they could control their distracted behavior were less likely to report distraction. Published t
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Ingeniøren
VIDEO: Murer-robotten Hadrian skal lægge 1000 mursten i timen Hadrian fik stor opmærksomhed i 2015, da en australsk maskiningeniør lancerede robotten, der skal kunne arbejde dag og nat 365 dage om året - og lægge mursten dobbelt så hurtigt som en almindelig murer . Ideen opstod, da teknologichefen i Fastbrick Robotics Mark Pivac, oplevede stor mangel på murere i 2005 - og han besluttede sig for at gøre noget ved problemet. Se, hvordan det er tanken, at Hadr
13h
The Atlantic
What It Takes To Make Saudi Islam ‘Moderate’ Saudi Arabia is going to great lengths to present itself as “moderate”—or at least, as trying to embody “a moderate Islam open to the world and all religions,” as the crown prince recently put it . Early signs suggest that the state’s rebranding efforts are working. In May, U.S. President Trump praised the Saudis as they jointly inaugurated a counterterrorism center in Riyadh, and just this week
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Science : NPR
Canadians Root For An Underdog Health Policy Idea From The U.S. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services — and its controversial center for innovation — is part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and has its headquarters outside D.C., in Woodlawn, Md. Jay Mallin/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Jay Mallin/Bloomberg via Getty Images The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services — and its controversial center for i
13h
Ars Technica
If NYPD cops want to snoop on your phone, they need a warrant, judge rules Sergi Reboredo/VW PICS/UIG via Getty Images reader comments 23 A New York state judge has concluded that a powerful police surveillance tool known as a stingray, a device that spoofs legitimate mobile phone towers, performs a "search" and therefore requires a warrant under most circumstances. As a New York State Supreme Court judge in Brooklyn ruled earlier this month in an attempted murder case,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A popular tool to trace Earth's oxygen history can give false positives Sedimentary rock layers chronicling Earth's geological history. Credit: Georgia Tech / Yale / Reinhard / Planavsky For researchers pursuing the primordial history of oxygen in Earth's atmosphere, a new study might sour some "Eureka!" moments. A contemporary tool used to trace oxygen by examining ancient rock strata can produce false positives, according to the study, and the wayward results can m
13h
New Scientist - News
We may know why Jupiter’s Great Red Spot is red instead of white Where does the red come from? By Jeff Hecht The recipe for the distinctive colour of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot has long been a mystery, but now researchers have an idea of how it got so red . Start with an ammonia-rich cloud deck and add intense solar radiation for eons. Ammonia forms the top layer of Jupiter’s atmosphere. Below that are clouds of ammonium hydrosulphide, a compound that breaks
14h
Viden
Morfar forklarer: Ikke alle hackere er nogle “fuckhoveder” I 2011 blev der ifølge Danmarks statistik anmeldt 647 tilfælde af databedrageri, mens tallet i 2016 var 22.339. Det er en stigning på mere end 3.000 procent på blot fem år. Læs også: GUIDE Sådan sikrer du dine internet-konti på 2 minutter Flere og flere danskere bliver altså ofre for hackere, der forsøger at tjene penge på cyberkriminalitet, og det har givet begrebet hacking en negativ betydning.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
India's heritage city races to save icons from polluted ruin Conservation experts warn Ahmedabad, one of the world's most polluted cities, faces a mammoth task defending its newly won UNESCO status as its fragile cultural icons decay under neglect, traffic and trash Traffic chokes the centuries-old stone archway into Ahmedabad's historic quarter, the snarl of honking rickshaws and sputtering buses coats the monuments of India's only heritage city in a grea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Delhi half-marathon to go ahead despite smog, court rules A 2014 World Health Organization survey found Delhi was the world's most polluted capital, with air quality even worse than Beijing The Delhi half marathon is to go ahead on Sunday despite dire health warnings from doctors after a court in the heavily polluted city refused to order a delay. The Indian Medical Association (IMA) had asked the Delhi High Court to postpone the event after a spike in
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Science : NPR
National Zoo Panda Tian Tian Gets Checkup For Weight Loss And Sore Shoulder Tian Tian receives laser therapy treatment during a full veterinary exam. Roshan Patel/Smithsonian's National Zoo hide caption toggle caption Roshan Patel/Smithsonian's National Zoo Tian Tian receives laser therapy treatment during a full veterinary exam. Roshan Patel/Smithsonian's National Zoo It's tough getting old, and that goes as much for giant pandas as people. Veterinarians at the National
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The importance of biodiversity in forests could increase due to climate change IMAGE: This is a biodiverse forest with Norway spruce, beech and birch trees. Picture was taken in autumn in middle Germany. view more Credit: Christian Hueller Leipzig. Forests fulfil numerous important functions, and do so particularly well if they are rich in different species of trees. This is the result of a new study. In addition, forest managers do not have to decide on the provision o
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UN climate talks wrap up as US stands firm on fossil fuels A smoking replica of the Statue of Liberty by Danish artist Jens Galschiot at a park in Bonn during UN climate talks, slowed down by the United States' defence of the use of fossil fuels UN negotiations on implementing the Paris climate change agreement wrap up Friday after two weeks of talks that were slowed down by the United States defending the use of fossil fuels. Envoys from nearly 200 coun
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Critics hit US over elephant trophy imports Elephants in South Africa photographed in September 2016 The administration of US President Donald Trump faced a barrage of criticism on Thursday from animal rights groups after it authorized the import of Zimbabwean elephant hunting trophies. The move reverses a prohibition imposed under Barack Obama and is the latest rollback of Obama-era controls on a number of fronts. It also came on the sa
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Getting more 'wolflike' is the key to the future for coyotes In this 2008 photo provided by Josh Harrison, a coyote stands in Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, Mass. Coyotes have lived in the East since the 1930s, and recent genetic tests have shown they are actually a mixture of coyote, wolf and dog. And scientists say they might be getting genetically closer to wolves, helping them become better predators and thrive in urban areas including New York Ci
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fossil that fills missing evolutionary link named after University of Chicago professors Jablonskipora kidwellae , the first known member of the modern bryozoans to grow up into a structure. Credit: Paul Taylor/London's Natural History Museum Lurking in oceans, rivers and lakes around the world are tiny, ancient animals known to few people. Bryozoans, tiny marine creatures that live in colonies, are "living fossils"—their lineage goes back to the time when multi-celled life was a new
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study says homeowners shouldn't count on property appreciation creating wealth Credit: CC0 Public Domain The American Dream of homeownership as the path to creating wealth may be due for a revision. A new study by faculty at Florida Atlantic University, Florida International University and the University of Wyoming finds that the property appreciation most homeowners expect when buying a home may be relatively meaningless in terms of building wealth. The study, published in
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Science | The Guardian
A moment that changed me: seeing my first moth fish | Fiona Gell L ike many of the most important occasions in my life, the moment that changed me involved fish. Holding the desiccated carcass of a sea moth while talking to my heroine, the fish biologist and conservationist Dr Amanda Vincent , altered the course of my life. I was 22, and had just finished my biology degree. For my dissertation research I had spent a couple of months following butterflyfish in
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Interstellar asteroid is given a name Image copyright NASA Image caption Artwork: Despite forming around another star, the object looks familiar in many respects The first known asteroid to visit our Solar System from interstellar space has been given a name. Scientists who have studied its speed and trajectory believe it originated in a planetary system around another star. The interstellar interloper will now be referred to as 'Oum
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SpaceX postpones launch of secretive Zuma mission This image obtained from SpaceX shows the company's Falcon 9 rocket carrying the US Air Force's unmanned X-37B drone lifting off from NASA's Kennedy Space Center on September 7, 2017 SpaceX on Thursday postponed the launch of a secretive US government payload known as Zuma, a mission whose nature—and the agency behind it—is a mystery. "We have decided to stand down and take a closer look at data
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Dagens Medicin
Manden du ikke ser i almen praksis LÆGEDAGE. Der er brug for et større hensyn til manden, som får alt for lidt ud af sundhedsvæsenets tilbud.
15h
Dagens Medicin
Kursus om behandlingen af spiseforstyrrelser er populært LÆGEDAGE. Det kan være en udfordring for den praktiserende læge at opdage problemet, skabe sygdomsbevidsthed hos patienten og ikke mindst sørge for, at forældrene kommer ordentligt på banen.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study on impact of climate change on manufacturing in China predict substantial losses by mid-21st century Credit: University of California - Santa Barbara To date, most empirical evidence on climate change impacts have focused on the agricultural sector. Little is known about the effects on, say, manufacturing in, say, China, which is in many ways "the factory of the world." In a new paper published in the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management , UC Santa Barbara researchers shows that cli
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Dagens Medicin
En god hjemmeside letter hverdagen betydeligtLÆGEDAGE.Lad være med at være så gammeldags, når det gælder digitale medier, lyder opfordringen fra to praktiserende læger, som underviser på Lægedage. Kaster man sig først ud i det, vil man både spare vigtig tid i hverdagen og få mere arbejdsglæde.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New method analyzes corn kernel characteristics Kernel maps of all maize ears. If no multi-counts occurred, the kernels are shown in black. In case of multi-counts, the kernels are shown in grey, and the multi-counted kernels in black. Credit: University of Illinois An ear of corn averages about 800 kernels. A traditional field method to estimate the number of kernels on the ear is to manually count the number of rows and multiply by the numbe
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Baby steps: Researcher's new book examines role of infants in modernizing American society Golden’s book examines the critical role that infants played in joining ordinary Americans to the modern revolutions of the 20th century. Credit: Rutgers University The 20th century saw revolutions in scientific medicine, consumer culture, and social welfare, and in the understanding of human development and potential, explains Janet Golden. And while many intellectual thinkers, scientists, and i
16h
Dagens Medicin
Gruppe 2-sikrede patienter fordeler sig geografisk skævtDe sidste 15 år har der været et markant fald i antallet af danskere, der ikke er tilknyttet en bestemt praktiserende læge. Langt de fleste patienter uden egen læge findes i Hovedstaden.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Oldest Australian human returned to 42,000-year-old grave In this image made from video, the oldest human remains in a coffin are unloaded and placed on the ground during a traditional ceremony in Lake Mungo, Australia, Friday, Nov. 17, 2017. The human remains found in Australia have been returned to the Outback desert that he roamed some 42,000 years ago in a ceremony celebrated by traditional owners. The ice age Aborigine was dubbed Mungo Man after th
16h
Ingeniøren
Chat dig til dit næste job Fra vores egen verden: Egentlig er du vældig godt tilfreds med dit arbejde og desuden er det umuligt at hive en dag ud af kalender for at gå på jobmesse. På den anden side kunne det være interessant at høre lidt om hvilke vilkår og opgaver, andre arbejdsgivere kan tilbyde dig. Hvis ovenstående signalementet passer på dig, så var det måske en idé at tage med på Mediehuset Ingeniørens (MI) online j
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Ingeniøren
Modeltog gør datalogi konkret: »Vi laver ikke traditionelle forelæsninger« Københavns Erhvervsakademi (KEA) har købt en stor togbane, så programmering bliver mere håndgribelig og lettere at forstå. Togbanen blev foreslået af en af akademiets egne undervisere, og har kostet akademiet et femcifret beløb. »Til at begynde med synes folk, at det lidt var noget mærkeligt noget – det synes jeg da også selv, da der kom en underviser og foreslog, at vi skulle købe en togbane. Så
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Vaginal progesterone reduces preterm birth and neonatal complications in women with a mid-trimester short cervix Philadelphia, November 17, 2017 - Prematurity is the main complication of pregnancy, and 15 million babies are born preterm worldwide each year. Progesterone is a natural hormone produced by the ovaries in early pregnancy, and then later by the placenta. A decline in progesterone action is implicated as one of the causes of spontaneous preterm labor and delivery. Physicians worldwide have investi
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Surrey develops new 'supercatalyst' to recycle carbon dioxide and methane The University of Surrey has developed a new and cost-effective catalyst to recycle two of the main causes behind climate change - carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). In a study published by the Applied Catalysis B: Environmental , scientists have described how they created an advanced nickel-based catalyst strengthened with tin and ceria, and used it to transform CO2 and CH4 into a synthesis
17h
Dagens Medicin
Firmaer fusker med kliniske data for generiske lægemidler Det europæiske lægemiddelagentur EMA trækker i stigende grad generisk medicin tilbage efter fund af fusk hos de underleverandører, der tester eller fremstiller medicinen for medicinalfirmaer. Svindlen sker nu ikke alene i fremstillingsfasen, men også i kliniske forsøg.
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Dagens Medicin
Vage krav til antallet af inspektioner frister til svindel Brodne kar har frit spil til at svindle, så længe EU-direktiverne ikke siger noget om, i hvor stort et omfang myndigheder og medicinalfirmaer skal tjekke underleverandørers laboratorier, mener konsulent, der arbejder med at afdække fusk med kliniske data.
17h
Ingeniøren
Leder: Vinderne på det ny frie betalingsmarked bliver ikke danske forbrugere Det er næppe gået op for mange danskere, at en 30-årig epoke med et billigt, politisk kontrolleret og meget gennemskueligt betalings­system er på vej til at blive afløst af et liberaliseret marked for betalingskort. Et marked, hvor gebyrer til internationale giganter som Visa og Mastercard bliver usynlige, og de samfundsøkonomiske konsekvenser tilsvarende uigennemskuelige. Dankortforliget har sid
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Dagens Medicin
Styrelse: Producenter skal sikre kvaliteten af de data Lægemiddelstyrelsens direktør Thomas Senderovitz svarer på spørgsmål om svindel med kliniske data, der ligger til grund for godkendelse af generiske lægemidler
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Dagens Medicin
Producenter: Vi holder øje med underleverandører Virksomhederne vil undgå at bruge kontraktklinikker, der har været involveret i fusk med data.
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Dagens Medicin
En lang rejse til akutlægens indre Læge Michael Boesen har prøvet kræfter med alt, fra almen praksis til Forsvaret, uden at finde sig helt til rette. Men 1.200 km på den japanske pilgrimsrute Shikoku 88 har rusket op i hans sind, forvandlet rastløshed til ro og har fået ham til at hvile i at være læge.
17h
Viden
Elektrisk lastbil og lynhurtig sportsvogn er Teslas fremtid Den amerikanske elbilproducent Tesla har torsdag aften lokal tid lanceret to store nyheder ved en begivenhed i Los Angeles. Først og fremmest præsenterede Tesla sin nye satsning: En lastbil, der kan køre 800 kilometer i høj fart og med fuld last på en enkelt opladning. Teslas karismatiske stifter, Elon Musk, gav ved begivenheden ikke en pris på den kommende lastbil, men han siger, at en normal di
17h
NYT > Science
Modern Love: 17 Million Frozen Sperm Await the Perfect Moment At a bachelorette dinner for a friend in late July, I met Sadie. She was loud, brash, a presence. From across the table, I overheard her describing plans to drive south for the coming eclipse, and a deep longing welled up inside me. “If you have space —— ” I said. “We may.” By the wedding on Aug. 6, I was two days late, my breasts sore and engorged. A pregnancy test came back negative, but I was
17h
Dagens Medicin
Ny forskning skal forbedre den ringe overlevelse for patienter med kræft i bugspytkirtlen Patienter med kræft i bugspytkirtlen har en af de dårligste prognoser, og sidste år var pancreascancer den femte hyppigste årsag til kræftdød i Danmark. På Herlev Hospital arbejder afdelingslæge Inna Chen og hendes kolleger med en række forskningsprojekter, som alle sigter mod at forbedre og forlænge overlevelsen for patientgruppen.
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Ingeniøren
Find den MBA, der passer bedst til dig EXECUTIVE MBA AVT Business School Uddannelsessted: Udbudt af AVT Business School i København, som udbyder en MBA, BBA og CBA. Målgruppe: Ledere og mellemledere med minimum fem års ledererfaring, typisk med en mellemlang forudgående specialistuddannelse. Varighed: 24-30+ måneder. Modul­opbygget bestående af tre moduler af 8 måneders varighed, der kan vælges uafhængigt af hinanden - strategic, sust
17h
Dagens Medicin
Klinisk test for tidlig pancreascancer rykker tættere på Muligheden for at gøre brug af en test, som kan identificere patienter med tidlige stadier af pancreascancer, rykker nærmere. Et længerevarende samarbejde mellem forskere fra Lund Universitet, forskere på Herlev Hospital og det svenske firma Immunovia ligger til grund for udviklingen af testen, som Immunovia håber at få CE-godkendt i løbet af 2018.
17h
Dagens Medicin
»Jeg ved ikke, om jeg bliver ramt af ‘tak for hjælpen’-abstinenser« Som nyt medlem af direktionen i Kræftens Bekæmpelse har Niels Kroman lagt skalpellen på hylden og sagt farvel til den daglige patientkontakt. Det har ikke været nemt at tage afsked med den ‘hvide kittel’, men arbejdet som cheflæge og den frihed og anerkendelse, der følger med stillingen, har indtil videre lagt en dæmper på afsavnet.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Evaluation of novel hybrid membranes for carbon capture IMAGE: Hybrid membranes composed of a polyimide combined with porous nanoparticles including carbons, metal organic frameworks and a porous organic polymer have been evaluated. view more Credit: Copyright 2017 'Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology' and 'The University of Melbourne' All rights reserved. Carbon dioxide (CO2) capture remains a priority in many countries as the world se
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers tunnel to a new light source With concerns over moving to a clean energy platform worldwide with electric vehicles and renewables, the energy we consume, or should we say do NOT consume, is as important as the green energy we produce. Thus, solid state lighting, more efficient than incandescent and fluorescent bulbs, based upon light emitting diodes (LED) is touted as the solution. However, LEDs struggle to deliver high brig
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists capture colliding organic nanoparticles on video for first timeA Northwestern University research team is the first to capture on video organic nanoparticles colliding and fusing together. This unprecedented view of 'chemistry in motion' will aid Northwestern nanoscientists developing new drug delivery methods as well as demonstrate to researchers around the globe how an emerging imaging technique opens a new window on a very tiny world.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The future of cell culture: A new continuous bioprocess developed IMAGE: This is Martina Miotto in the lab. view more Credit: Newcastle University, UK A technique which revolutionises cell culture by allowing the continuous production and collection of cells, has been developed by scientists at Newcastle University. The process removes the limit on the number of cells that can be grown in a culture dish, which until now has been strictly confined
18h
Gizmodo
Deadspin The NFL Can’t Stick To Sports And It’s All The NFL’s Fault | The Root Texas Sheriff Sparks Deadspin The NFL Can’t Stick To Sports And It’s All The NFL’s Fault | The Root Texas Sheriff Sparks Outrage After Warning Vehicle Owner About Profane Anti-Trump Sticker | The Slot Broadcaster Leeann Tweeden Accuses Sen. Al Franken of Assault [Updated] | Splinter BAN GUNS | Earther The Republican Tax Bill Is a Shit Sandwich That Includes Arctic Drilling and Rolling Back Obamacare |
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The future of cell culture: A new continuous bioprocess developed Comparing the new surface for cell production with the glass disc producing the same amount of cells as 14 traditional flasks. Credit: Newcastle University, UK A technique which revolutionises cell culture by allowing the continuous production and collection of cells, has been developed by scientists at Newcastle University. The process removes the limit on the number of cells that can be grown i
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists capture colliding organic nanoparticles on video for first time A Northwestern University research team is the first to capture on video organic nanoparticles colliding and fusing together. This unprecedented view of "chemistry in motion" will aid Northwestern nanoscientists developing new drug delivery methods as well as demonstrate to researchers around the globe how an emerging imaging technique opens a new window on a very tiny world. This is a rare examp
18h
Dagens Medicin
Den kammeratlige samtale Ledere i sundhedssvæsenet skal droppe den individuelle samtaler med kritiske - vis mod og mandshjerte og tag en åben diskussionen af problemerne i stedet.
18h
Dagens Medicin
Skæg for sig og …Hvis Højesteret stadfæster dommen i Svendborg-sagen, bliver der skabt præcedens for en efter min mening helt urimelig praksis.
18h
Ars Technica
A first look at Tesla’s promised electric semi reader comments 150 A first look at the Tesla Semi. Tesla An inner view of the cabin. Tesla There's full standing room in the Semi cabin. Tesla The steering wheel is flanked by touchscreens. Tesla A front view of the semi. Tesla The Tesla semi has Model 3 door handles. Tesla A side view of the truck. Tesla Tesla Musk greets guests with a Semi in the background. Megan Geuss Two trailers. Megan Geu
18h
Ingeniøren
I Danmarks fodspor: Signalproblemer breder sig til Norge og Sverige Mens norske og svenske politikere i denne uge har kunnet følge seneste kapitel i Danmarks problemer med det nye signalprogram til jernbanen, skaber projektet allerede nu vanskeligheder i begge lande. Norge og Sverige har ellers bevidst valgt at lægge sig i baghjulet på det danske projekt, men frygter nu at komme til at 'overhale' Danmark. I Sverige har Riksrevisionen meldt ud, at den vil granske
19h
The Scientist RSS
Genetic Mutation in Amish Linked to Longer LifeMutations in both copies of SERPINE1 can result in blood clotting disorders, but carriers might enjoy longer lifespan and health benefits.
20h
Ars Technica
After fan outcry, EA kicks real-money purchases out of Battlefront II Enlarge / Perhaps Star Wars: Battlefront II won't go down in flames after a major EA about-face. reader comments 40 Just hours before Star Wars Battlefront II 's retail launch Friday, Electronic Arts and developer DICE announced that they are "turning off all in-game purchases... and all progression will be earned through gameplay." The surprise announcement promises the ability to purchase in-ga
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Solar minimum surprisingly constant IMAGE: Solar microwave observation telescopes in 1957 (top left) and today (bottom left). Fluctuations observed during 60 years of solar microwave monitoring (top right) and the solar microwave spectrum at each... view more Credit: NAOJ/Nagoya University/JAXA Using more than half a century of observations, Japanese astronomers have discovered that the microwaves coming from the Sun at the min
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Employees want to sit down less and walk more during work days Desk-based workers would like to spend less time sitting down and more time walking or doing physical activity as part of their working day, research published in the open access journal BMC Research Notes suggests. To match these preferences, health promotion activities to reduce sitting time in the workplace should not only offer options for employees to stand up more, but also offer opportunit
22h
Live Science
Breast vs. Bottle: Weighing Infant-Feeding Options Deciding the best way to feed a new baby is a very personal choice for a woman. Whether she chooses to breast-feed or use formula, feeding time is an important opportunity for a mother and baby to form a close bond with one another. Health professionals consider breast-feeding to be the best choice for baby. But for first-time mothers, it can take a few weeks for a mother and her newborn to
22h
Popular Science
How to watch a meteor shower like a pro A fragment of rock, ice, and metal travels through space along with other small bits of dust and debris, all excess weight shed by a comet as it made an ardent pilgrimage to the Sun. Suddenly, the fragment gets a tug, pulled toward a new center. It rushes to its end, cruising through increasingly thick blankets of air until, overheated, it blazes brightly to life. Did you see it? The traces a com
22h
Ars Technica
Apple’s iOS 11.1.2 fixes the cold weather input bug on the iPhone X Samuel Axon reader comments 9 Apple released iOS 11.1.2 for iPhones and iPads this afternoon. It's a minor, bug-fix update that benefits iPhone X users who encountered issues after acquiring the new phone just under two weeks ago. iOS 11.1.2's patch notes are short and sweet. The update fixes just two problems. The first is "an issue where the iPhone X screen becomes temporarily unresponsive to t
22h
Gizmodo
Black Friday Has Already Started For These Bose Wireless Headphones There’s no need to wait for Black Friday to save on Bose headphones; their deals are already starting to go live, including all-time low prices on these wireless models. $199 From amazon 614 purchased by readers Gizmodo Media Group may get a commission $129 From amazon Gizmodo Media Group may get a commission If you’re not yet totally opposed to buying wired headphones, there’s are deals availabl
22h
NYT > Science
F.D.A. Speeds Review of Gene Therapies, Vowing to Target Rogue Clinics The F.D.A. said that those problematic clinics, many of which use products derived from patients’ own fat, are making treatments that must be approved before they can be marketed. For legitimate developers of the treatments, the guidelines were welcome news. “This is an incredibly significant development for the gene therapy, regenerative medicine sector,” said Michael J. Werner, a partner with H
22h
Futurity.org
Gene mutation extends life and health of some Amish Scientists have discovered the first genetic mutation that appears to protect against multiple aspects of biological aging in humans in an extended family of Old Order Amish living in the vicinity of Berne, Indiana. An experimental “longevity” drug that recreates the effect of the mutation is now being tested in human trials to see if it provides protection against some aging-related illnesses. “
22h
Gizmodo
That Spill You Keep Seeing Is Not the Keystone XL, But It Still Matters Photo: shannonpatrick17 / Flickr On Thursday morning, the Keystone Pipeline spilled about 5,000 barrels, or 210,000 gallons, of crude oil in Amherst, South Dakota. The pipeline has been shut down as operator TransCanada investigates the incident. So far, the company hasn’t reported oil entering any waterways or water systems, but Brian Walsh with the Department of Environment and Natural Resource
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hot spots of tick-borne diseases in MongoliaGiven the critical role livestock play in Mongolia, transmission of tick-borne diseases can have very real health and economic implications for livestock and herders. Researchers have explored the interaction between nomadic herders, the livestock they own, and the tick-borne diseases they are exposed to.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Biological mechanism of a leading cause of childhood blindness revealed in new researchScientists have revealed the pathology of cells and structures stricken by optic nerve hypoplasia, a leading cause of childhood blindness in developed nations.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Computer program finds new uses for old drugsResearchers have developed a computer program to find new indications for old drugs. The computer program, called DrugPredict, matches existing data about FDA-approved drugs to diseases, and predicts potential drug efficacy. In a recent study, the researchers successfully translated DrugPredict results into the laboratory, and showed common pain medications -- like aspirin -- can kill patient-deri
23h
Ars Technica
Comcast wants to get bigger, again, has begun talks with 21st Century Fox reader comments 2 Comcast and Verizon have each, separately, approached 21st Century Fox about buying part of the company, according to several news reports. Comcast already owns NBCUniversal and numerous regional sports networks. Adding part of 21st Century Fox would give Comcast even more programming to pair with the nation's largest cable broadband and TV network. 21st Century Fox owns Fox Bro
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