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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Diabetes-related mortality in Germany higher than expected
IMAGE: Age-specific excess deaths of men and women diagnosed with diabetes in persons over 40 years of age in Germany (2010). Source: DDZ view more Credit: DDZ In the October 2017 issue of the journal Diabetes Care , DDZ scientists published their study on the number of deaths in Germany due to diabetes and its complications. The number of diabetes-related deaths worldwide has doubled between
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
RNG105/caprin1 is essential for long-term memory formation
IMAGE: Protein synthesis regulatory factor RNG105/caprin1 is essential for long-term memory formation. view more Credit: NIBB The research group of Associate Professor Nobuyuki Shiina of the National Institute for Basic Biology have revealed that the function of RNG105 (aka Caprin1) is essential for the formation of long-term memory. RNG105 is a factor involved in protein synthesis in the v
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
An international group of scientists reveals the mystery about the origin of gold
IMAGE: Peridotite from the deep mantle (green) enclosed in lava (black) from a Patagonian volcano, which was found by the researchers. view more Credit: UGR An international group of scientists, with the participation of the University of Granada (UGR), has shed new light on the origin of gold, one of the most intriguing mysteries for Mankind since ancient times and which even today doesn't h
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Arctic shorebird decline noted by study
A new study addresses concerns over the many Arctic shorebird populations in precipitous decline. Evident from the study is that monitoring and protection of habitat where the birds breed, winter, and stopover is critical to their survival and to that of a global migration spectacle.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New catalyst controls activation of a carbon-hydrogen bond
Chemists have developed another catalyst that can selectively activate a carbon-hydrogen bond, part of an ongoing strategy to revolutionize the field of organic synthesis and open up new chemical space.
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Ingeniøren
Kunstig intelligens skriver forskningsartikler
Et program til at håndtere forskningsresultater kan nu på få sekunder producere et udkast til en videnskabelig artikel netop på baggrund af dine resultater. Som udgangspunkt er programmet gratis at anvende og hele projektet er skudt i gang på finansieringsportalen Kickstarter tilbage i 2015. Ud over, at programmet er gratis at anvende, er det også muligt at udvikle egne programmer og tilføre dem
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Gizmodo
Get a Robotic Vacuum That's Also a Mop For Just $170
ECOVACS DEEBOT M80 | $170 | Promo code QPEI4S75 If you think it’s cool that you can buy a robot to vacuum your floors for $170, how would you feel if I told you this one mopped too ? The ECOVACS DEEBOT M80 Pro has all the accoutrements you’d expect from a mid-tier robotic vacuum, including a motorized brush roll, scheduling, and even Wi-Fi, plus one you wouldn’t: an optional mopping system. If yo
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Ars Technica
Skype is the latest messaging app to disappear from Chinese app stores
Aurich Lawson reader comments 69 Yet another popular communications app has disappeared from app stores in China. According to a report from The New York Times , Microsoft's messaging service Skype is no longer available from app stores, including Apple's App Store. Google's Play Store doesn't operate in China, but Skype hasn't appeared on the various third-party Android app stores in the country
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EU frees up cross-border online shopping
Credit: CC0 Public Domain The European Union have agreed to lift barriers to consumers shopping online for cheaper goods and services in other EU countries, with the rules to take effect late next year. The European Parliament, the European Council and the European Commission agreed late Monday to end the practice known as "geoblocking," which often limits customers to websites in their home coun
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Scientific American Content: Global
Even Unpalatable Foods Taste Good to the Brain
When we experience something painful, our brain produces natural painkillers that are chemically similar to potent drugs such as morphine. Now research suggests these endogenous opioids also play another role: helping regulate the body's energy balance. Lauri Nummenmaa, a brain-imaging scientist at the University of Turku in Finland, and his colleagues measured endogenous opioid release in th
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Dagens Medicin
Syv ting, vi holder øje med på valgaftenen
Syv ting, vi holder øje med på valgaftenen Regions- og kommunalvalget er over os. Men hvad holder Dagens Medicins redaktion øje med, mens vi spiser valgflæsk og drikker aftenkaffe? Lasse Lange Close: Biografi Journalist , Dagens Medicin Flere artikler af Lasse Lange Desværre, kun abonnenter har adgang til at læse denne artikel. Allerede abonnent – log ind 1. Hvem stemmer
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Gizmodo
We Tested iPhone Fast-Charging and You Should Definitely Upgrade Your Charger
Your iPhone can charge a lot faster than you thought. When Apple announced the new iPhone 8 and iPhone X, the company glossed over the fact that all three of its new handsets were capable of fast charging—similar to what Android phones have been doing for years. Even now, if you go the spec page for Apple’s latest phones, all you get is a single line saying fast charging can add up to a 50 percen
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Imaging technique unlocks the secrets of 17th century artists
Georgia Tech professor David Citrin is shown with images produced by a terahertz imaging technique. Researchers studied a 17th century painting using a terahertz reflectometry technique to analyze individual paint layers. Credit: John Toon, Georgia Tech The secrets of 17th century artists can now be revealed, thanks to 21st century signal processing. Using modern high-speed scanners and the advan
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Imaging technique unlocks the secrets of 17th century artists
The secrets of 17th century artists can now be revealed, thanks to 21st century signal processing. Using modern high-speed scanners and the advanced signal processing techniques, researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology are peering through layers of pigment to see how painters prepared their canvasses, applied undercoats, and built up layer upon layer of paint to produce their masterpiec
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pneumonia: Treatment with vaccines instead of antibiotics
Mycoplasma bacteria are one of the most common causes of bacterial pneumonia in children. It is still unclear how the disease develops. Researchers from the University Children's Hospital Zurich and UZH have now demonstrated that there are specific immune cells, so-called B cells, which are crucial for recovery from the infection. The antibodies produced by these cells eliminate mycoplasma in the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New breast cell types discovered by multidisciplinary research team
IMAGE: Breast researchers Dr François Vaillant and Dr Bhupinder Pal collaborated with bioinformatician Dr Yunshun Chen to reveal new details about how the breast develops. view more Credit: Walter and Eliza Hall Institute Australia A joint effort by breast cancer researchers and bioinformaticians has provided new insights into the molecular changes that drive breast development. The res
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tempting your taste buds: Food cues entice consumers to overeat
ANN ARBOR--The mouth-watering aroma of juicy burgers and crispy fries, and the eye-catching menu signs with delicious food pictures can tempt many hungry patrons to stop at fast-food restaurants. But these food cues, which stimulate brain activity, can nudge some customers to overeat due to increased cravings and hunger, a new University of Michigan study suggests. "Food-related cues can make peo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cinnamon turns up the heat on fat cells
New research from the University of Michigan Life Sciences Institute has determined how a common holiday spice -- cinnamon -- might be enlisted in the fight against obesity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Kaiser Permanente researchers reduce antibiotic prescriptions through physician education
Physicians at Kaiser Permanente in Southern California reduced the odds of prescribing an antibiotic for sinusitis by 22 percent using computer alerts to inform doctors when antibiotics may not be the best course of treatment. The research was published today in the American Journal of Managed Care . The work is a continuation of research to better understand what drives over-prescription of anti
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Infectious diseases: CTRL + ALT + Delete
Sandia National Laboratories’ Safe Genes project team members, Kyle Seamon, left, Oscar Negrete, second from left, principal investigator Joe Schoeniger, seated, and Edwin Saada, are working on gene editing. Credit: Dino Vournas Gene editing is revolutionizing the bioscience research landscape and holds great promise for "deleting" diseases from human bodies. Sandia National Laboratories is worki
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
After US pushback, AT&T prepares to fight for Time Warner
In this Wednesday, Dec. 7, 2016, file photo, AT&T Chairman and CEO Randall Stephenson, left, testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, before a Senate Judiciary subcommittee hearing on the proposed merger between AT&T and Time Warner, as Time Warner Chairman and CEO Jeffrey Bewkes listens at right. The Justice Department intends to sue AT&T to stop its $85 billion purchase of Time Warner, accordin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ancient barley took high road to China
The study confirms that ancient barley from central China contains mutations at the Ppd-H1 gene locus that switch off the photoperiod response. It also shows that extant barley landraces planted in China carry the genetic haplotype A, which infers that Chinese barley has a different genetic origin than the haplotype B barley that made its way to northern Europe. Credit: PLOS One First domesticate
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers conduct chemical study of an old, metal-rich globular cluster
A 10′ × 10′ digitized sky survey image centered on NGC 5927. North is up and east to the left. The green symbols show the location of the spatial distribution of the 7 stars analyzed. Credit: Mura-Guzman et al., 2017. (Phys.org)—Chilean researchers have presented a chemical study of the old, metal-rich globular cluster NGC 5927. The new research determines abundances of 22 elements in seven giant
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chemo brain starts during cancer's progression, not just after chemotherapy
IMAGE: This is a Dr. Gordon Winocur headshot. view more Credit: Provided by Baycrest Health Sciences The memory and thinking problems experienced by cancer survivors, known as "chemo brain" or "chemo fog," are not just the result of chemotherapy treatment, they may start as tumors form and develop, suggests a Baycrest-led study. Researchers found that female mice with a form of breast cance
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ancient barley took high road to China
IMAGE: Map of Eurasia shows the oldest radiocarbon-measured dates (B.C.) for individual grains of barley recovered from each region. Wheat and barley arrived in South Asia about a millennium before they... view more Credit: Image: Courtesy of PLOS One First domesticated 10,000 years ago in the Fertile Crescent of the Middle East, wheat and barley took vastly different routes to China,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Oncotarget: Researchers identify a potential molecular trigger for invasiveness in prostate cancer cells
ORCHARD PARK, New York - (Nov. 20, 2017) - A small protein modification can trigger the aggressive migratory and invasive properties of prostate cancer cells, according to new research published on the cover of Oncotarget . The findings give greater insight into how cancers can move from one location in the body to another, and could help develop more effective therapies in the future. When
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Autoimmune disease discovery could spark new treatments
University of Colorado Boulder researchers have discovered a potent, drug-like compound that could someday revolutionize treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases by inhibiting a protein instrumental in prompting the body to start attacking its own tissue. "We have discovered a key to lock this protein in a resting state," said Hang Hubert Yin, a biochemistry professor in th
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Ars Technica
A new law gives Air Force some wiggle room in picking its new rockets
Enlarge / Blue Origin's BE-4 engine hot fire test could have major implications for the next round of Air Force contract awards. Blue Origin reader comments 0 On Monday, US aerospace companies submitted their final bids to capture some of the $1.2 billion on offer from the Air Force over the next five years to develop new launch systems for military purposes. The “Launch Services Agreement” compe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wall carvings in Saudi Arabia appear to offer earliest depiction of dogs
Rock art at Shuwaymis appears to show two dogs leashed to a hunter. Credit: M. Guagnin et al., Journal Of Anthropological Archaeology , 5, 2017 (Phys.org)—A combined team of researchers from Max Planck University and the Saudi Commission for Tourism & National Heritage has documented what might be the oldest depictions of dogs by human beings. In their paper published in the Journal of Anthropolo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
We built a robot care assistant for people with dementia – here's how it works
Credit: Trinity College Dublin, Author provided Not all robots will take over human jobs. My colleagues and I have just unveiled a prototype care robot that we hope could take on some of the more mundane work of looking after elderly and disabled people and those with conditions such as dementia. This would leave human carers free to focus on the more personal parts of the job. The robot could al
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Brazil nut effect' helps explain how rivers resist erosion, team finds
An experimental 'stream' -- a circular channel with varying sizes of particles and fluid embedded with fluorescent dye -- enabled the Penn team to examine the forces influencing the sorting of rocks in a riverbed. Credit: University of Pennsylvania Pop the top off a can of mixed nuts and, chances are, Brazil nuts will be at the top. This phenomenon, of large particles tending to rise to the top o
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Blog » Languages » English
Turkey vs. Bald Eagle
Turkeys vs Eagles starts at 11 AM EST on 11/23 and goes for 24 hours! This week, a lot of folks here in the US will be visiting family for Thanksgiving. If you find yourself craving some Eyewire time amid the hustle and bustle, or you live somewhere that doesn’t do the whole “eat a big pile of food on the fourth Thursday in November” routine, we’ve still got a big bird battle happening here. The
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Flower in a Mushroom Suit
Scientists discover the real pollinators of a popular houseplant flower.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Science Lights the Way
In 1998 British researcher Andrew Wakefield and his colleagues published a paper showing a link between the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine and the incidence of autism in children. During the following years the paper was exposed as an elaborate fraud and was retracted by the Lancet , the journal that published it. Dozens of follow-up studies have since shown zero connection between vaccines and au
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Feeding by humans alters behavior and physiology of green turtles in the Canary Islands
The green turtle is included in the red list of endangered species according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature. Credit: Lluís Cardona, UB-IRBio Feeding animals is altering the behaviour and eating habits of the green turtle in the Canary Islands (Spain). This is the conclusion of a study published in the journal Science of the Total Environment carried out by a team from the B
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Ingeniøren
Magnetfeltmålende fly og sonarer leder efter forsvundet argentinsk ubåd
Der er sat store ressourcer ind i at finde den ubåd, som i sidste uge forsvandt på en 3.000 kilometer lang rejse langs Argentinas kyst. Der har indtil nu ikke været andet end ‘kolde’ spor i eftersøgningen. Og det er på trods af, at der er sat et enormt antal forskellige fartøjer ind i forsøget på at opstøve den 66 meter lange ubåd. Nasas magnetregistrerende fly Den amerikanske flåde har søsat to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China's Tencent becomes more valuable than Facebook
China's Tencent, which owns the WeChat brand, has leapfrogged Facebook to become one of the world's top five most valuable companies Chinese social media and video game giant Tencent became more valuable than Facebook on Tuesday as investors sent the company soaring into the top five of the world's biggest firms. Tencent's Hong Kong-listed shares have doubled in value this year, and on Monday it
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Russia denies nuclear accident after radioactive pollution
Russia denied its nuclear facilities experienced any incidents after reports of contamination by the ruthenium 106 radioactive isotope in parts of the country Russia on Tuesday denied its nuclear facilities experienced any incidents after reports of contamination by the ruthenium 106 radioactive isotope in parts of the country, and said the concentration detected posed little threat. On Monday, R
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bali volcano spews smoke and ash, raising eruption fears
This handout from Indonesia's Disaster Mitigation Agency shows Mount Agung volcano spewing smoke A rumbling volcano on Indonesia's holiday island of Bali spewed ash and towering clouds of smoke Tuesday, heightening fears it may erupt for the first time in more than 50 years. Mount Agung belched smoke as high as 700 metres (2,300 feet) above its summit, as it stirred to life again after more than
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Device to accelerate drug discovery for kidney diseases
Credit: CNX OpenStax Researchers from the Department of Engineering are collaborating with industry and academia to develop a device to improve the testing of kidney disease drugs. State-of-the-art microfluidics technology developed by Dr Shery Huang, Lecturer in Bioengineering, and her team, will be merged with world-class expertise in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology and kidney d
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using magnets to control chemical reactions that target release of medicines inside the body
Nature Catalysis E- and S-type superparamagnetic nanoparticles carrying the enzyme and the substrate. a,b, Cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) image (a) and schematic (b) explaining the concept of the magnetic-field-triggered biocatalysis. The particle superparamagnetic core is made of Fe3O4 nanoparticles enveloped by silica. The silica envelope is labelled with covalently bound fluo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Brazil nut effect' helps explain how rivers resist erosion, Penn team finds
IMAGE: An experimental 'stream' -- a circular channel with varying sizes of particles and fluid embedded with fluorescent dye -- enabled the Penn team to examine the forces influencing the sorting of... view more Credit: University of Pennsylvania Pop the top off a can of mixed nuts and, chances are, Brazil nuts will be at the top. This phenomenon, of large particles tending to rise to th
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Futurity.org
Reducing ‘stress granules’ may slow Alzheimer’s
Reducing “stress granules,” gritty blobs of RNA that form when things like heat, viruses, or toxins stress a cell, may be a new way to fight Alzheimer’s disease. A slice of brain riddled with Alzheimer’s disease holds two unmistakable hallmarks: balled-up beta-amyloid plaques, clustered outside damaged nerve cells, and spaghetti-like tangles of tau protein sprawling inside. For decades, researche
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nano-watch has steady hands
An international team of researches from the Universities of Vienna, Duisburg-Essen and Tel Aviv use tiny silicon nano-cylinders as the ultra-stable hands of a clock. Using a laser to levitate the tiny rod, they make the nano-hands tick with pulses of polarized light. Credit: James Millen/University of Vienna An international team from the Universities of Vienna, Duisburg-Essen and Tel Aviv have
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers study importance of nongame entertainment in minor league baseball
Recent research by a Pennsylvania College of Technology faculty member shows the importance of nongame entertainment in drawing fans to minor league baseball games. The findings, published in Volume 23, No. 2 of the Pennsylvania Economic Review, were the result of six years of research by Chip D. Baumgardner, associate professor of business administration/management at Penn College, and Michael J
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study suggests some population shifts during early and late Holocene were due to climate changes
Bronze bead necklace Stage: Holocene Bronze age 1800-1500 BC . Credit: Didier Descouens/Wikipedia/CC BY-SA 4.0 (Phys.org)—A team of researchers from University College London and the University of Plymouth, both in the U.K., has found evidence that suggests at least some of the population shifts that have occurred over the past several thousand years in Britain and Ireland were likely due to clim
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using math to study a masterpiece
Credit: Duke University Combining the mathematics of digital image processing with the history, craftsmanship and science of art conservation, the Bass Connections Image Processing Algorithms for Art Conservation team spent last year working with the NC Museum of Art to study, restore and exhibit a 14th-century altarpiece that hadn't been displayed in its entirety for over a century. Crucial to t
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Science | The Guardian
Russian radiation leak: everything you need to know
What is the nuclear material that has leaked? Russia’s meteorological service has confirmed that “extremely high” concentrations of a radioactive isotope, ruthenium-106, were found in several parts of the country in late September. Ru-106 is a decay product from nuclear reactions: the initial fuel is typically uranium or plutonium, and this splits into smaller nucleii, which decay through a serie
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Futurity.org
Wheat genome comes together like jigsaw puzzle
Researchers have sequenced the genome of the species of wheat most commonly grown for making bread, Triticum aestivum . “After many years of trying, we’ve finally been able to produce a high-quality assembly of this very challenging genome,” says Steven Salzberg, professor of biomedical engineering and genetic medicine at Johns Hopkins University and author of the paper in the journal GigaScience
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Live Science
Buzz Off: Genetic Edit Could 'Defuse' Mosquitoes
Gene disruption turned Aedes aegypti mosquitoes from black to yellow and changed their eye color from black to white. Credit: University of California, Riverside Mosquitoes' stinging bites are irritating and itchy, but they can also be dangerous. From malaria, to dengue, to yellow fever, to Zika, mosquito-borne illnesses affect billions of people worldwide each year, sometimes causing debilitat
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researcher shows how racially based tools to separate science students persist
The recent U.S. Next Generation Science Standards seek to address long-standing problems of some populations of students being underserved and not receiving the same quality education as their peers. The standards refute deficit-oriented views about the capabilities of students from historically underserved groups. However, the standards also divide students in ways that threaten to exacerbate un
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Popular Science
How to eat less this Thanksgiving
Eating less is not generally a goal on Thanksgiving . It’s a day of stuffing both turkey butts and our own stomachs. If you want to test the limits of your digestive system, go for it. We at Popular Science will never judge you for wanting a second helping of mashed potatoes. Heck, we even wrote a guide to eating as much as humanly possible . But eating less at Thanksgiving is a noble endeavor. P
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Jet fuel from sugarcane a realistic prospect
Airlines are under pressure to reduce their carbon emissions, and are highly vulnerable to global oil price fluctuations. These challenges have spurred strong interest in biomass-derived jet fuels. Bio-jet fuel can be produced from various plant materials, including oil crops, sugar crops, starchy plants and lignocellulosic biomass, through various chemical and biological routes. However, the tec
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How to save the rainforest—build a health centre
The roosters were still asleep when Sri Wayunisih woke her daughter, Puteri. They could not afford to sleep till dawn. Wayunisih had taken a day off from working on the oil palm estates and Puteri had skipped school for this trip. They had to reach their destination before everyone else. Wayunisih pushed her motorcycle onto the road and her daughter climbed on behind her. The Mickey Mouse keychai
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New book shows existence of transgender people isn't a recent phenomenon
True Sex: The Lives of Trans Men at the Turn of the Twentieth Century Thanks to recent highly politicized, highly publicized pushes to ban transgender people from serving in the military and using the public restroom that matches their gender identity, it may seem like transgender issues have suddenly sprung up out of nowhere. But they didn't, and that's important to know, says Emily Skidmore, an
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Myth of the genius solitary scientist is dangerous
Scientist and inventor Rick Sanchez of the animated series Rick and Morty embodies the erroneous popular archetype of the scientist as eccentric lone genius. Picture a scientist. Seriously, right now. I'm not going to discuss the nature of the person that you have in your mind (although I am going to guess: White? Male? Crazy hair? That's not surprising, but another topic entirely). I'm more curi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What is the impact of 'impact investing'?
The financial returns from "impact investing" are on par with mainstream investments, according to a recent report . Impact investing aims to generate a social or environmental return (such as affordable housing or a reduction in greenhouse emissions) as well as a financial one. Our research shows that impact investors have already funded many significant social and environmental programs in Aust
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Evacuating a nuclear disaster areas is often a waste of time and money, says study
Over 110,000 people were moved from their homes following the Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan in March 2011. Another 50,000 left of their own will, and 85,000 had still not returned four-and-a-half years later. While this might seem like an obvious way of keeping people safe, my colleagues and I have just completed research that shows this kind of mass evacuation is unnecessary, and can even
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How a Native American tribe came to own one of the world's most valuable patents
Credit: Tashatuvango/Shutterstock Allergan , the drugmaker behind Botox, is using an unprecedented tactic to protect its valuable patents – angering lawyers and politicians, and keeping the price of its medicines high. There has long been a debate about patents and traditional knowledge in developing countries. Pharmaceutical companies in the West, like Allergan, are often accused of "bio-prospec
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How disposable diapers can improve measurements of tumor growth
Credit: National Institute of Standards and Technology Catching cancer early can make all the difference for successful treatment. A common screening practice measures tumor growth with X-ray computed tomography (CT), which takes a series of cross-section images of the body. Before they are used in clinics, researchers test multiple CT imaging techniques with standard objects called "phantoms," d
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Feed: All Latest
12 Logical Star Trek Gifts for the Trekkie in Your Life
Star Trek has been with us for over 50 years, and with the latest incarnation, Star Trek: Discovery , hitting the internet, it’s a great time to be a Trekkie (or, Trekker, if you prefer). Whether they love the classic trifecta of Kirk, Spock, and McCoy, Picard and his gang, or they’re more partial to Burnham, Saru, and Lorca, there’s a gift in this guide just for them. Make the holidays with your
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Gizmodo
Put Some Power Tools Under the Tree With These Massive Porter-Cable Discounts
Porter Cable 20V 2-Tool Combo Kit | $99 | Amazon Porter Cable 20V Drill/Driver Kit | $85 | Amazon Porter Cable Angle Grinder | $22 | Amazon Power tools make great holiday gifts, and Amazon’s marking down a trio of Porter-Cables down to all-time low prices as part of their Black Friday Week promotions. I suspect the biggest seller will be this $99 drill/driver and impact driver combo kit , which i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Do speed cameras really save lives?
Credit: Gary Perkin/Shutterstock.com Speed cameras have been the focus of motorists' anger and frustration for years, although we are told repeatedly that they are an effective means of reducing death and injury on the roads. But is this really the case? Whether speed cameras actually do save lives seems an easy assertion to test: measure the numbers of casualties at a site over a period, say two
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Topological insulators—one glimpse is enough
The band structure of a topological insulator measured using photoemission. The dark areas indicate which energies [on the y-axis] go together with which (here inverse) wavelengths [on the x-axis] for the electron waves in the solid. After 20 seconds exposure to the UV light involved in doing a photoemission experiment (right-hand image) the band structure is very different to that after only 1 s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
6,000-year-old monument offers a tantalising glimpse of Britain's neolithic civilisation
Cat’s Brain long barrow is near the more famous Stonehenge (pictured) but predates it by hundreds of years. Credit: Shutterstock This summer, the University of Reading Archaeology Field School excavated one of the most extraordinary sites we have ever had the pleasure of investigating. The site is an Early Neolithic long barrow known as "Cat's Brain" and is likely to date to around 3,800BC. It li
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The microscopic origin of efficiency droop in LEDs
Credit: Caltech Light-emitting diodes—or LEDs, as they are commonly known—have been slowly replacing incandescent light bulbs in applications ranging from car taillights to indicators on electronics since their invention in the 1960s. Eschewing the filament of an incandescent bulb and the mercury vapor of a fluorescent bulb, LEDs instead generate light by applying a voltage across a semiconductor
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Male dolphins offer gifts to attract females
Credit: CC0 Public Domain Researchers from The University of Western Australia have captured a rare sexual display: evidence of male humpback dolphins presenting females with large marine sponges in an apparent effort to mate. Scientists from UWA's School of Biological Sciences, the University of Zurich and Murdoch University conducted a decade of boat-based research on coastal dolphins across no
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists dispute missing dryland forests
Credit: Oregon State University Scientists are disputing the possibility that a significant portion of the world's forests have been missed in an earlier accounting of ecological diversity. Writing in the journal Science , a team led by Daniel Griffith, a postdoctoral scientist in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University, argues that dryland forests should not be confused with savannahs
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Ingeniøren
Forskere indsætter menneskelige hjerneceller i rotter og mus - men må man så stadig eksperimentere på dyrene?
Det er ikke altid, at det etiske kodeks kan følge med det videnskabelige fremskridt. Som det er nu, har vi sjældent problemer med at eksperimentere på mus, aber og grise. Men hvad nu, hvis bevistheden i de dyr, man eksperimenterer på, pludselig nærmer sig et menneskelignende sind? Det er en problematik, som adskillige forskere i neurovidenskab ifølge Stat News i disse dage er nødt til at forholde
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Improving the femtosecond ultrashort pulse laser
Researchers conducting experiments at the KIST Sensor System Research Center. Credit: ResearchSEA MXenes, conductive materials widely used in many industries, now have one more promising application: helping lasers fire extremely short femtosecond pulses, which last just millionths of a billionth of a second. The finding, made by an international team of researchers, opens up avenues for developi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research becomes reality in study of fire impact on sonoma water resources
Berkeley Lab researchers, including Michelle Newcomer (right), are collaborating with USGS and the Sonoma County Water Agency to study how the water resources respond to extreme events such as fire. Credit: Michelle Newcomer Scientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) spent a decade developing world-class modeling and monitoring capabilities to pi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Uncovering the origins of galaxies' halos
Figure 1: Eleven dwarf galaxies and two star-containing halos were identified in the outer region of the nearby Whale Galaxy. Credit: Tohoku University/NAOJ Using the Subaru Telescope atop Maunakea, researchers have identified 11 dwarf galaxies and two star-containing halos in the outer region of a large spiral galaxy 25 million light-years away from Earth. The findings, published in The Astrophy
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Arthritis, autoimmune disease discovery could lead to new treatments
Hubert Yin in his lab at the BioFrontiers Institute. Credit: Glenn Asakawa/CU Boulder More than 23.5 million Americans suffer from autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma and lupus, in which an overzealous immune response leads to pain, inflammation, skin disorders and other chronic health problems. The conditions are so common that three of the top five selling drugs in the Un
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Live Science
Wow! 1st Interstellar Asteroid Is a Spinning Space Cigar
When astronomers using the Pan-STARRS1 telescope in Hawaii spotted a mysterious object dashing through our solar system on Oct. 19, they immediately knew it was something special. Traveling at high speed and originating from interstellar space , this object was originally thought to be an ancient comet, but observations revealed it was, in fact, an asteroid from another star system.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Online software spots genetic errors in cancer papers
Two scientists have rolled out a program that spots incorrect gene sequences reported in experiments — and have used it to identify flaws in more than 60 papers, almost all of them studies of cancer. Jennifer Byrne, a cancer researcher at the Kids Research Institute of the Children’s Hospital at Westmead in Sydney, Australia, and Cyril Labbé, a computer scientist at the University of Grenoble Alp
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research details genetic resistance to sudden death syndrome in soybeans
A transgenic soybean line (left) carrying PSS1 confers SDS resistance while the line on the right without the PSS1 gene is SDS susceptible. Credit: Madan Bhattacharyya An Iowa State University agronomist is charting mechanisms – gene by gene – that could lead to soybean varieties resistant to sudden death syndrome. A paper published recently in the peer-reviewed academic journal Plant Physiology
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: SDO spies broad coronal hole
A broad hole in the corona was the sun's dominant feature November 7-9, 2017, as shown in this image from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory. The hole is easily recognizable as the dark expanse across the top of the sun and extending down in each side.
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Science | The Guardian
Robert Winston wins fourth Royal Society young people's book prize
TV professor Robert Winston has proved he has the winning formula as a science writer for children by scooping the prestigious Royal Society young people’s book prize for the fourth time with Home Lab, a collection of scientific experiments that can be done at home. Voted for by young readers, the book was described as “really cool” by six-year-old judge Mohammed, and “brilliant” by eight-year-ol
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Black Friday 2017: Camera Deals, from Lumix to Nikon
Whether you're shopping for yourself or a loved one, there are tons of great year-end photography deals going on right now. From kits perfect for a beginner, to video-capable mirrorless and DSLR cameras, and even high-end, high-performance bundles. we've scoured the internet looking for the best Black Friday and Cyber Monday discounts and you'll find them all below. (Be sure to also check out our
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Not Everyone Is Giving Thanks for Antibiotic-Free Turkeys
David Pitman is a third-generation poultry grower, raising chickens and turkeys with his brother and parents on a property east of Fresno that his grandfather founded in 1954 . They’re independent farmers—instead of raising birds for a corporation, they sell directly to wholesalers and stores—and their farming style reflects that freedom. They buy turkeys from a variety of breeds, feed them organ
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Aston Martin Unveils Its New, $150,000 Vantage Sports Car
The phrase “ Aston Martin ” may conjure images of 1960s cool, of Sean Connery in a fine suit, of the iconic DB5. That’s why the job of every new Aston car over the past five decades has been to deliver that heritage—but also to build on it, to pull it into the modern day. The latest vehicle to take on the task is Aston’s entry level sports car. And based on first impressions, this new Vantage, wi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Migration pays off for songbirds
Some of the blackbirds living in Central Europe journey southwards in the autumn. New research shows that migrating bird species that winter in the south they are more likely to survive the cold season than than their conspecifics that remain in central Europe. Credit: Florian Zauner It is estimated that there are over one-and-a-half billion songbirds living in Europe alone. Around half of them e
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists explain metallic conductivity of thin carbon nanotube films
Credit: MIPT An international team of researchers has examined the optical and dielectric properties of thin macroscopic films based on single-walled carbon nanotubes and obtained an explanation for the metallic nature of their conductivity using infrared and terahertz spectroscopy. The research findings were published in the journals Carbon and Nanotechnology . A single-walled carbon nanotube ,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Manufacture of high performance soft magnetic materials by melt spinning
The methodology is to design a master alloy with different starting compositions, to which Fe is added to get the desired atomic ratio of components. With this starting alloy, using the method of melt spinning, are achieved amorphous ribbons (FeSiB) with desired soft magnetic behavior. Then these ribbons are thermally treated for achieve nanocrystalline structures to improve the performance in the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Toyota unveils third-generation humanoid robot T-HR3
Master Maneuvering System and T-HR3. Credit: Toyota Toyota Motor Corporation today revealed T-HR3, the company's third generation humanoid robot. Toyota's latest robotics platform, designed and developed by Toyota's Partner Robot Division, will explore new technologies for safely managing physical interactions between robots and their surroundings, as well as a new remote maneuvering system that
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Carbon's economic damage costlier than thought based on current science
Ball-and-stick model of carbon dioxide. Credit: Wikipedia The data used to calculate the damage that an additional ton of carbon dioxide has on the global economy has long relied on outdated science. Recent updates modeled by the University of California, Davis and Purdue University raise the calculations of those costs significantly and change the outlook on climate change from a positive for ag
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Ars Technica
Aston Martin reveals its all-new Vantage, a 503hp V8 sports car
reader comments 0 This is the all-new Aston Martin Vantage. Aston Martin Yes, it is available in colors that won't scorch your retinas. The entry-level Aston Martin might still cost $150,000, but the interior alone might justify that price after you've sat in it for a few minutes. Aston Martin Aerodynamics were an important concern in the Vantage's styling; that rear diffuser underneath the car l
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change models of bird impacts pass the test
Credit: University of Adelaide A major study looking at changes in where UK birds have been found over the past 40 years has validated the latest climate change models being used to forecast impacts on birds and other animals. Led by the University of Adelaide, in collaboration with an international team of researchers, the scientists compared forecasts from ecological models with observed change
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Novel hybrid material may inspire highly efficient next-gen displays
Credit: Basu et al. Researchers at the Indian Institute of Science (IISc) have created a novel hybrid of graphene and quantum dots, a breakthrough that may inspire highly efficient and controllable next-generation displays and LEDs. Quantum dots are semiconductor nanocrystals with the potential to revolutionize diverse technologies,including photovoltaics, medical imaging and quantum computing. T
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Science | The Guardian
Trade in Dead Sea Scrolls awash with suspected forgeries, experts warn
A multimillion-dollar trade in fragments of the Dead Sea Scrolls fuelled by a surge in interest from wealthy evangelicals in the US includes a significant number of suspected forgeries, two prominent experts have said. On scholar said the problem was so serious that up to 90% of the 75 fragments sold since 2002 could be fakes. Six of 13 fragments bought by Steve Green, owner of the US arts and cr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Utrecht chemists prove Nobel Prize-winner Olah correct
The ‘green’ route for producing raw materials for polystyrene from biomass and bioethanol using a zeolite as catalyst. The spotlighted reaction intermediate is the Wehland complex. Credit: Utrecht University Faculty of Science In 1877, Charles Friedel and James Craft discovered a chemical reaction for quickly producing raw materials for plastics, fine chemicals and detergents. More than 100 years
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Smiling human faces are attractive to dogs—thanks to oxytocin
The hormone oxytocin is probably a key factor in the interaction between dogs and humans. Credit: Sanni Somppi Researchers in the University of Helsinki's Canine Mind research project found that oxytocin made dogs interested in smiling human faces. It also made them see angry faces as less threatening. Correlated with affection and trust, the hormone oxytocin is probably a key factor in the inter
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
High-latitude volcanic eruptions have global impact
Photo of early stages of the eruption of the Sarychev on June 12, 2009. Image from the International Space Station of. Image courtesy of Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center. NASA Photo ID: ISS020-E-9048. Credit: NASA Volcanic eruptions emit sulfate aerosols via volcanic plumes, which may stay in the stratosphere f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Poorer communities need empowering in order to become more resilient to natural disasters
Credit: University of Nottingham People in poor urban areas are the least likely to be able to rebuild their lives after a natural disaster, and need support in order to become more sustainable, according to research from the University of Nottingham. 'Poverty Alleviation in the Wake of Typhoon Yolanda' is a three-year collaborative research project with the University of the Philippines, looking
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Scientific American Content: Global
Meet the Spiders That Completely Defy What We Know as Jet Lag
Darrell Moore is typically a honeybee guy. He’s been studying them for 40 years. But a few years ago, his colleague Thomas Jones asked for his opinion about some weird spider behavior. Jones studies social behavior in the orb weaver spiders that his undergraduate students collect near their East Tennessee State University campus. Spiders are both predators and prey. Their aggression and passi
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Ingeniøren
Minister: Der er intet reelt alternativ til nye togsignaler
Transportminister Ole Birk Olesen (LA) ser intet alternativ til at poste nye milliarder i at erstatte de nuværende signaler langs de danske skinner med ny ERTMS-teknologi. Det fremgår af en håndfuld skriftlige udtalelser oven på Ingeniørens seneste afdækning af, at det kan blive yderligere 1,2 milliarder kroner dyrere at skifte togsignalerne ud. Det sker, hvis det mislykkes at indbygge de nødvend
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Artificial Intelligence Can Hunt Down Missile Sites in China Hundreds of Times Faster Than Humans
Intelligence agencies have a limited number of trained human analysts looking for undeclared nuclear facilities, or secret military sites, hidden among terabytes of satellite images. But the same sort of deep learning artificial intelligence that enables Google and Facebook to automatically filter images of human faces and cats could also prove invaluable in the world of spy versus spy. An early
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Behind the Scenes as NASA Tests the Most Powerful Rocket Ever
Behind the Scenes as NASA Tests the Most Powerful Rocket Ever NASA wants to send a human to Mars in the next two decades. And that means making the most powerful rocket ever. by Chelsea Leu 11.21.17 Photographs by Vincent Fournier In 2019, NASA will send a capsule called Orion on an elaborate 25-day trajectory. First, the Space Launch System, the most powerful rocket ever built, will blast it int
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Dagens Medicin
Søgaard: Et centerland løb endnu engang af med et agentur
EU's udkantslande, som Danmark, har alene på grund af sin geografiske placering ringere odds for at vinde værtsskaber for europæiske agenturer som EMA, vurderer professor i sundhedsøkonomi Jes Søgaard.
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Ingeniøren
Politisk flertal: Kystsikring bør ikke være op til kommunerne
I slutningen af oktober blæste stormen Ingolf endnu engang kystsikring ind på den politiske dagsorden, og koret af grundejere og borg­mestre, der er utilfredse med indsatsen, synes at vokse i takt med vandstanden og nedbørsmængden. Mens regeringen forsøger at sætte gang i indsatsen ved at løsne bureaukratiet med et nyt lovforslag i denne måned, så blev et andet tilbagevendende spørgsmål igen heve
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Ingeniøren
KMD har problemer med elektroniske valglister
Der er problemer med de digitale valglister på otte valgsteder, fordelt på tre kommuner. Det oplyser KMD, der står bag de berørte systemer. »KMD er bekendt med, at der har været opstartsvanskeligheder på en række valgsteder i Kolding, Ringsted og et enkelt sted på Nørrebro i København. I alt har vi kendskab til, at der har været tekniske udfordringer på otte valgsteder. Ellers ser det fint ud run
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Ingeniøren
Neurale netværk skal forudse næste uges luftforurening
Igen i år samledes virksomheder, ngo’er og byer til Smart City Expo i Barcelona for at sætte fokus på, hvordan data, borgerinddragelse og automatisering kan tackle de dilemmaer, som den moderne storby står over for i den evige kamp for bæredygtig vækst. Luftforurening er et af de centrale dilemmaer. Forurenet luft kræver årligt millioner af liv , og mange storbyer har svært ved at leve op til kra
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New Scientist - News
We got a good look at the interstellar asteroid and it’s weird
An artist’s impression of what the first interstellar asteroid may look like ESO/M. Kornmesser By Shannon Hall and Press Association Scientists now know what that interstellar visitor — the asteroid that recently zipped through our solar system from outer space — might look like. And it’s an oddity. Immediately after ‘Oumuamua’s discovery early this November, telescopes around the world were
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Revolutionary imaging technique uses CRISPR to map DNA mutations
IMAGE: Jason Reed, Ph.D., member of the Cancer Molecular Genetics research program at VCU Massey Cancer Center and an associate professor in the Department of Physics at the VCU College of... view more Credit: John Wallace at VCU Massey Cancer Center A team of scientists led by Virginia Commonwealth University physicist Jason Reed, Ph.D., have developed new nanomapping technology that could
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Penn study identifies new malaria parasites in wild bonobos
IMAGE: A female bonobo of the Hali-Hali community in the Kokolopori Bonobo Reserve (Democratic Republic of the Congo) relaxes on a branch (members of the Hali-Hali community contributed fecal samples for... view more Credit: Alexander Georgiev PHILADELPHIA -- Malaria parasites, although widespread among wild chimpanzees and gorillas, have not been detected in bonobos, a chimp cousin. Re
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New human mobility prediction model offers scalability, requires less data
IMAGE: Real-world examples of individual trajectories and collective movements. (a) Four examples of an individual trajectory from an empirical data set from mainland China and the corresponding collective movements. (b-d) Collective... view more Credit: Arizona State University A new method to predict human mobility - which can be used to chart the potential spread of disease or determine ru
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Male triathletes may be putting their heart health at risk
IMAGE: Short-axis and long-axis LGE images depicting a non-ischemic fibrosis pattern in all 10 LGE+ triathletes. LGE size, indicated by arrows, varied from small, point-shaped (triathlete 53) to larger and more... view more Credit: Radiological Society of North America CHICAGO - Competitive male triathletes face a higher risk of a potentially harmful heart condition called myocardial fibros
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Women prefer getting mammograms every year
CHICAGO - Women prefer to get their mammograms every year, instead of every two years, according to a new study being presented next week at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). "Women understand that yearly mammograms have been shown to save lives and do not consider previously reported 'harms' to be as important as getting screened," said study author Ghizlane
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Ingeniøren
Er den batterifri mobiltelefon inden for rækkevidde?
Forskere ved University of Washington har præsenteret en prototype på en mobiltelefon uden batteri. I stedet for at køre på et batteri, som oplades via elnettet, henter den nemlig strøm fra energi, der er høstet fra de ‘radiobølger’, der er overalt omkring os. Eller i hvert fald findes de, der hvor mennesker færdes. Bølger fra radio- og tv-signaler, mobilnet på flere frekvenser, nødnet og en rækk
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Revolutionary imaging technique uses CRISPR to map DNA mutations
Jason Reed, Ph.D., member of the Cancer Molecular Genetics research program at VCU Massey Cancer Center and an associate professor in the Department of Physics at the VCU College of Humanities and Sciences. Credit: John Wallace at VCU Massey Cancer Center A team of scientists led by Virginia Commonwealth University physicist Jason Reed, Ph.D., have developed new nanomapping technology that could
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New human mobility prediction model offers scalability, requires less data
Real-world examples of individual trajectories and collective movements. (a) Four examples of an individual trajectory from an empirical data set from mainland China and the corresponding collective movements. (b-d) Collective movements embedded in the data sets from the continental United States, Cote d'Ivoire and Belgium. Here the color bar represents the amount of mobility flux among locations
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study identifies new malaria parasites in wild bonobos
A female bonobo of the Hali-Hali community in the Kokolopori Bonobo Reserve (Democratic Republic of the Congo) relaxes on a branch (members of the Hali-Hali community contributed fecal samples for this study). Credit: Alexander Georgiev Malaria parasites, although widespread among wild chimpanzees and gorillas, have not been detected in bonobos, a chimp cousin. Reasoning that previous studies may
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Dagens Medicin
Danmarks bedste til hjertesvigt 2017
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The Atlantic
An Interstellar Tourist Barrels Through the Solar System
Nobody saw it coming. The rocky object showed up in telescope images the night of October 19. The Pan-STARRS1 telescope, from its perch atop a Hawaiian volcano, photographed it during its nightly search for near-Earth objects, like comets and asteroids. Rob Weryk, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Hawaii Institute for Astronomy, was the first to lay eyes on it, as he sorted through t
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Dagens Medicin
Avanceret CT-scanning forbedrer udredningen af hjertepatienter
Brug af avanceret CT-scanning af hjertet er en effektiv metode til at nedbringe antallet af falsk negative svar, som er højt med den gængse metode, myokardioscintigrafi, viser ny undersøgelse.
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Science | The Guardian
The vinyl frontier: why do we keep sending music to outer space?
W hat item would you choose to sum up humanity if you were, like Captain James T Kirk of the Starship Enterprise, seeking out new life and new civilisations? A “five items or less” sign from a supermarket, with a note explaining why it should be “ fewer ”? Maybe a selection of press cuttings about the Greggs sausage roll Jesus controversy , summing up both humanity’s silliness and its capacity fo
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NYT > Science
ScienceTake: Tricky Cockatoos Match Shapes Better Than Primates
Some primates can do similar tasks, although they need a lot of basic training to get up to speed before they can use the experimental apparatus, called a key box. The birds jumped right in without any training and excelled. “Compared to primates, the cockatoos performed very well,” Ms. Habl said. Why are they so good? In the wild, they haven’t been observed using tools. But they are generalists,
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NYT > Science
Cockatoos Rival Children in Shape Recognition
See how monkeys teach manners, elephants show empathy and ants imitate water in ScienceTake, combining cutting-edge research from the world of science with stunning footage of the natural world in action.
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Ingeniøren
Valgdag: Kampen om vindmøller rykker ind i stemmeboksen
Når danskerne i dag skal afgøre, hvem der skal have magten i landets kommuner og regioner de næste fire år, vil vindmøller være et af de emner, der har stor betydning for vælgerne i visse kommuner. Det vurderer netmediet Energiwatch , som peger på, at stemningen omkring vindmøller i mange kommuner har forandret sig mærkbart. Hvor der før var stor politisk velvilje over for møllerne, har større vi
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Dagens Medicin
Forbrugerrådet: Svagheder i godkendelsessystemet af generika vil blive udnyttet
Underleverandørers svindel med generika vil finde sted så længe loven tillader det, advarer Forbrugerrådet Tænk.
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Science-Based Medicine
The Death of Expertise
In Tom Nichols' new book, The Death of Expertise, he explains how a misguided intellectual egalitarianism is harming our ability to assess the truth and solve problems, and discusses some of the responsible factors and possible long-term consequences.
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Science | The Guardian
Megafauna mega-find: the extraordinary discoveries at Diamond Valley Lake
I n the early 1990s, the Eastside Reservoir project – eventually simply referred to as Diamond Valley Lake – was announced. Planners intended to create an enormous reservoir to act as Southern California’s emergency water supply. It would require a huge excavation, and accordingly, an Environmental Impact Report (EIR), a requisite before construction could commence, was commissioned. When complet
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Science | The Guardian
The consensus is clear: there is no upside to a nuclear Brexit | Clare Moody
C abinet resignations, a government with no majority in the Commons, a make-or break-budget for the chancellor and a fast-approaching Brexit negotiating deadline means it is easy for issues to slip out of the public consciousness. Against this backdrop, Euratom and the UK’s future nuclear safeguarding regime risk being forgotten. As the nuclear safeguards bill - one of the “Brexit bills” announce
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Free wheelin' in New York: the Big Apple bike boom
Cyclists use the dedicated bike lanes from the Brooklyn Bridge in New York Expanding bike lanes, handing out free helmets and making lessons free: New York is making great strides in encouraging pedal power at the expense of exhaust fumes, even if some cyclists are still nervous about navigating bottleneck traffic. For years, the city of 8.5 million—which has the most extensive public transport n
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spain, Portugal struggle with extreme drought
Drought has caused river levels to drop in many areas of Spain and Portugal Spain and Portugal are grappling with a devastating drought which has left rivers nearly dry, sparked deadly wildfires and devastated crops—and experts warn that prolonged dry spells will become more frequent. Nearly all of Portugal has suffered extreme drought conditions during the last six months, which has not happened
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Advanced' cyber attack targets Saudi Arabia
Saudi authorities said Monday they had detected an "advanced" cyber attack targeting the kingdom, in a fresh attempt by hackers to disrupt government computers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Thanksgiving tribe reclaims language lost to colonization
In this Thursday, Oct. 19, 2017, photo Massachusetts Institute of Technology archivist Nora Murphy places a second edition of the Eliot Indian Bible on a table at the MIT rare book collection, in Cambridge, Mass. The second edition of the Eliot Indian Bible, translated into Wampanoag, is dated 1685. Experts have relied on extensive written records in Wampanoag to reclaim the language, including 1
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A chicken-flavored electrolyte drink could help sniffer dogs stay hydrated
The first comparison of three common hydration methods for sniffer dogs shows that while all are effective, dogs drink more and are more hydrated when given a chicken-flavored electrolyte drink compared to plain water or when injected with electrolytes under the skin. The study, published in open-access journal Frontiers in Veterinary Science , also shows that the dogs did not suffer from a build
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study pinpoints arctic shorebird decline
Red-necked phalarope. Credit: Zak Pohlen A new study co-authored by WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) addresses concerns over the many Arctic shorebird populations in precipitous decline. Evident from the study is that monitoring and protection of habitat where the birds breed, winter, and stopover is critical to their survival and to that of a global migration spectacle. To understand why arct
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Ingeniøren
ITU-forsker: Østdansk mobilpendlerkort-app kan forfalskes
Der er tilsyneladende plads til forbedring af den sikkerhed, der er forbundet med app'en DOT Mobilpendlerkort, som kan anvendes på Sjælland, Lolland, Falster og Møn. Det har postdoc på IT-Universitetet i København Rosario Giustolisi fundet frem til. Mobilpendlerkort er en digital udgave af et periodekort, der kan bruges som billet i den offentlige transport i førnævnte områder. I forbindelse med
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers reveal new details on aged brain, Alzheimer's and dementia
IMAGE: This is a Thioflavin-S staining of a brain tissue sample from the Aging, Dementia and TBI study. Staining reveals amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles associated with Alzheimer's disease.... view more Credit: Allen Institute for Brain Science In a comprehensive analysis of samples from 107 aged human brains, researchers at the Allen Institute for Brain Science, UW Medicine
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A chicken-flavored electrolyte drink could help sniffer dogs stay hydrated
The first comparison of three common hydration methods for sniffer dogs shows that while all are effective, dogs drink more and are more hydrated when given a chicken-flavored electrolyte drink compared to plain water or when injected with electrolytes under the skin. The study, published in open-access journal Frontiers in Veterinary Science , also shows that the dogs did not suffer from a build
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Science | The Guardian
Illegal building 'played central role' in floods that killed 20 in Athens
Chaotic urban planning and illegal construction in Athens played a central role in the deadly flash floods that killed 20 people last week, experts in Greece have claimed as authorities pledged emergency funding for victimsmade homeless by the disaster. About 1,000 owners of homes and businesses are eligible for the assistance, according to government engineers dispatched to inspect the buildings
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New on MIT Technology Review
This AI Can Spot Art Forgeries by Looking at One Brushstroke
Detecting art forgeries is hard and expensive. Art historians might bring a suspect work into a lab for infrared spectroscopy, radiometric dating, gas chromatography, or a combination of such tests. AI, it turns out, doesn’t need all that: it can spot a fake just by looking at the strokes used to compose a piece. In a new paper , researchers from Rutgers University and the Atelier for Restoration
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Gizmodo
Initial Coin Offering-Backed Startup Confido Goes Dark After Getting $374,000 From Investors
Image: Screengrab via The Next Web A few weeks ago, Jordan Belfort—the notorious “Wolf of Wall Street” and convicted financial scam artist— warned the entire internet not to get into sketchy cryptocurrency-backed startups. Specifically, he warned that initial coin offerings, a form of almost completely unregulated investment vehicle where crypto-backed startups offer blockchain-based “tokens” in
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Intel Management Engine Flaws Leave Millions of PCs Exposed
Security researchers have raised the alarm for years about the Intel remote administration feature known as the Management Engine . The platform has a lot of useful features for IT managers, but it requires deep system access that offers a tempting target for attackers; compromising the Management Engine could lead to full control of a given computer. Now, after several research groups have uncov
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Ingeniøren
5 måder at frastøde dine kolleger – uden at du ved det
Det vrimler heldigvis ikke med folk, som gør deres bedste for at være nedladende. Alligevel kan de fleste lave en smutter, hvor de træder en medansat over fødderne. Fumler du, når du skal give komplimenter eller er du så optaget af dig selv, at du glemmer andre? Nye jobtilbud hver uge. Tjek Jobfinder. Det kan være nogle af de karaktertræk, som kan afgøre, hvad din arbejdsplads mener om dig. Kompl
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Ingeniøren
Knald eller fald: Fejler IC3-ombygningen, bliver de nye togsignaler endnu en milliard dyrere
Der kan meget vel blive lagt en ekstra milliard kroner og yderligere forsinkelser oven i projektet med at erstatte togsignalerne langs de danske skinner. Afsporede signaler? Ingeniøren sætter i en serie artikler fokus på den største investering i den danske jernbane i nyere tid, det 20 milliarder kroner dyre projekt med at installere nye signaler ved alle skinner og i samtlige tog. Følg sagen om
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Live Science
What Is Garcinia Cambogia?
The Malabar tamarind was once just the less popular cousin of a trendy fruit, the mangosteen. But now, nutritional supplements containing extracts of the fruit with the scientific name Garcinia cambogia have become the rage, touted for their purported ability to curb appetite and stop weight gain. The Malabar tamarind, also known as the gambooge fruit, grows across southwest India, Myanmar
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Gizmodo
Someone Forgot to Give Stan Lee a Hat
Image: Still via YouTube This is not even the most bizarre snapshot from a new behind-the-scenes video for Will.i.am’s collaboration with Marvel, the graphic novel Masters of the Sun , which is also being turned into an AR experience. But it is the only one where Stan Lee looks wildly envious of the hat game on display all around him, and that’s delightful. But yes, Masters of the Sun: The Zombie
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Live Science
Facts About Alpacas
Adorable, docile and soft, alpacas are prized as pets and cattle around the world. There are no wild alpacas. Alpacas are domesticated versions of vicuñas, South American ruminants that live high in the Andes. Alpacas are related to llamas, which are domesticated versions of another wild Andean ruminant, the guanaco. While llamas are used as pack animals, alpacas are raised mainly for their sof
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Live Science
Facts About Bismuth
Bismuth is a brittle, crystalline, white metal with a slight pink tinge. It has a variety of uses, including cosmetics, alloys, fire extinguishers and ammunition. It is probably best known as the main ingredient in stomach ache remedies such as Pepto-Bismol. Bismuth, element 83 on the periodic table of elements, is a post-transition metal , according to Los Alamos National Laboratory. (Diff
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Gizmodo
Uh, This Flat Earther's Homemade Manned Rocket Launch Does Not Sound Totally Advisable
An Orbital ATK Antares rocket launches from a NASA facility in 2017. Photo: AP 61-year-old DIY enthusiast and stuntman “Mad” Mike Hughes is planning his first manned launch of a homemade, $20,000 steam-powered rocket with “RESEARCH FLAT EARTH” written on the side on Saturday, the Associated Press reported . According to the AP, Hughes says he expects his new rocket to hurl him through the skies a
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Gizmodo
These Printers You Won't Hate Are the Real Holiday Miracles
Refurb Brother Printer EHLL2360DW Compact Laser Printer | $54 | Amazon Brother HL2340DW Compact Laser Printer | $80 | Amazon Brother HL3170CDW Color Laser Printer | $160 | Amazon Brother is o ur readers’ favorite printer brand and it’s easy to see why : they basically never jam, the toner is relatively cheap, and it prints fast (up to 32 pages per minute). The one trade off is that they don’t pri
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Gizmodo
Want To See a Guardians of the Galaxy-Themed Marching Band Performance? Of Course You Do
Image: Disney The idea of a marching band doing a Guardians of the Galaxy- themed performance is kind of hard to get your head around. That is, until you see how USC’s marching band, the Spirit of Troy, pulled it off. This past weekend, the band did a halftime show of pop hits from both of James Gunn’s Guardians of the Galaxy movies, and transformed themselves into a cassette tape, the Milano spa
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Popular Science
Will the world shake with more large earthquakes in 2018? Time will tell.
Amidst panic over planets that don’t exist and conspiracy theories about the moon landing on Google News this morning, one headline announced a more down-to-Earth sort of doom. “Deadly earthquakes could hit a BILLION people next year because of Earth's slowing rotation,” warned The Daily Mail . While Nibiru still doesn’t exist (and the Moon landing definitely happened) the last example was based
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Non-fearful social withdrawal linked positively to creativity
Spending too much time alone can be unhealthy and there is growing evidence that the psychosocial effects of too much solitude can last a lifetime. But newly published research suggests that not all forms of social withdrawal are detrimental. In fact, the research findings suggest that one form of social withdrawal, referred to as unsociability, is not only unrelated to negative outcomes, but link
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Physicists design $100 handheld cosmic ray muon detector
Physicists have designed a pocket-sized cosmic ray muon detector to track these ghostly particles. The detector can be made with common electrical parts, and when turned on, it lights up and counts each time a muon passes through. The relatively simple device costs just $100 to build, making it the most affordable muon detector available today.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Quantum dots amplify light with electrical pumping
In a breakthrough development, scientists have shown that they can successfully amplify light using electrically excited films of the chemically synthesized semiconductor nanocrystals known as quantum dots.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The evolution of climate change activism studied by researcher
Climate change is a topic that is debated, doubted and covered by news outlets across the world. Now an academic is researching the evolution of climate change activism and how advocacy groups use digital platforms to mobilize.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Slight climate shifts can affect optimum water use in plant communities
A new discovery is providing scientists a better understanding of how rainfall is shared beneficially by the plant community and the human population, in addition to the effects of climate change.
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Science : NPR
Popular Surgery To Ease Chronic Shoulder Pain Called Into Question
Doctors think the chronic pain of "shoulder impingement" may arise from age-related tendon and muscle degeneration, or from a bone spur that can rub against a tendon. Michele Constantini/Getty Images/PhotoAlto hide caption toggle caption Michele Constantini/Getty Images/PhotoAlto Doctors think the chronic pain of "shoulder impingement" may arise from age-related tendon and muscle degeneration, or
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Futurity.org
Method demystifies the center of our chromosomes
A new technique could give scientists access to the “final frontier” of our DNA—the centromere. It’s in nearly every one of our cells, at the center of every X-shaped chromosome, and it plays a crucial role in the everyday cell division that keeps us healthy. Which also makes it a key suspect in birth defects, cancers, and other diseases that arise from cell division problems. “With this techniqu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Twisted sex allows mirror-image snails to mate face-to-face, research finds
A study led by the University of Nottingham has found that differently-coiled types of Japanese land snails should in fact be considered a single species, because - against all odds - they are sometimes able to mate, a result which has implications for the classification of other snails. Although most snails have a right-handed spiralling shell, rare 'mirror-image' individuals have a shell that c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dementia study sheds light on how damage spreads through brain
Insights into how a key chemical disrupts brain cells in a common type of dementia have been revealed by scientists. Brain tissue from people with Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB) showed that the protein builds up in vital parts of neurons that connect cells and may jump from one cell to another through these connections. Scientists say the findings shed light on the causes of DLB and will help to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Maintaining sufficient vitamin D levels may help to prevent rheumatoid arthritis
IMAGE: This is vitamin D. view more Credit: University of Birmingham Maintaining sufficient vitamin D levels may help to prevent the onset of inflammatory diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, research led by the University of Birmingham has discovered. The research also found that while Vitamin D can be effective at preventing the onset of inflammation, it is less effective once inflammatory
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Science | The Guardian
Vitamin D may help prevent rheumatoid arthritis, suggests study
Maintaining sufficient vitamin D levels may help to prevent rheumatoid arthritis, according to researchers. A study led by the University of Birmingham compared the ability of immune cells in blood from inflamed joints in people with rheumatoid arthritis to respond to the so-called sunshine vitamin. The experts found tissue that was not diseased responded well to vitamin D, suggesting it could be
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Ars Technica
If you liked the Cambrian Explosion, you’ll love the Ordovician Radiation
Enlarge / During the Ordovician, life was literally great. Multicellular plants and animals diversified and moved into ecological niches throughout the globe. This is probably what it was like on a typical Ordovician day, hanging out with cephalopods, crinoids, and coral at the edge of a supercontinent that covered the South Pole. I think a colony of graptolites is floating in the distance. reade
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Twisted sex allows mirror-image snails to mate face-to-face, research finds
Euhadra senckenbergiana aomoriensis. Credit: Wikipedia A study led by the University of Nottingham has found that differently-coiled types of Japanese land snails should in fact be considered a single species, because - against all odds - they are sometimes able to mate, a result which has implications for the classification of other snails. Although most snails have a right-handed spiralling she
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Scientific American Content: Global
Salmon Sex Changes Entire Landscape
Sex. It drives people to do crazy things. Animals, too. They’ll make unsettling sounds, perform complex dances or show off giant plumes of colorful feathers . And, famously, salmon will swim hundreds of kilometers upstream to get down to business. They also inadvertently rework the landscape. “Adult salmon spend most of their life out in the ocean and then they come in to freshwater to mate.”
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Live Science
Tiny Slowdown in Earth's Rotation Could Unleash Major Earthquakes
A tiny slowdown in Earth's rotation next year could trigger more earthquakes than usual, new research suggests. Past periods of slow rotation over the last 100 years have coincided with more earthquakes than average, according to research presented last month at the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America. "The numbers of earthquakes that have occurred each year in the past
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Gizmodo
The Feds Cannot Stop You From Tossing Live Turkeys Out Of An Airplane But Consider Not Doing It Anyway
The annual, reasonably disgraceful tradition of an “ anonymous ” pilot dropping live turkeys from hundreds of feet in the air in Yellville, Arkansas, continued this fall, with several birds dropped on Oct. 14. The FAA said then they were looking into it, but it conceded to HuffPost on Saturday that there was nothing they could do to stop it. Officials say the event, which is known locally as the
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Dagens Medicin
Danmarks bedste til KAG
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Dagens Medicin
Danmarks bedste til isoleret aortaklapoperation 2017
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Science : NPR
Dog Owners Have Lower Risk Of Cardiovascular Disease, Swedish Data Suggest
Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images Dogs shower their owners with affection and demand walks on a regular basis. And according to medical researchers, a corresponding link between dog ownership and heart health — previously called "probable" by experts — is supported by Swedish data. An examination of Sweden's national records — spanning more than 3.4 million people and 12 yea
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Futurity.org
This kind of alone time is linked with creativity
New research links one form of social withdrawal, called “unsociability,” with creativity. Although everyone needs an occasional break from the social ramble, spending too much time alone can be unhealthy and there is growing evidence that the psychosocial effects of too much solitude can last a lifetime. But the new research suggests that not all forms of social withdrawal are detrimental. Under
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Futurity.org
Ancient bacteria shed light on turning water to energy
Researchers have traced the paths of three water channels in an ancient photosynthetic organism—a strain of cyanobacteria—to provide the first comprehensive, experimental study of how that organism uses and regulates water to create energy. The finding advances photosynthesis research but also presents an advance in green fuels research. Photosynthesis is the chemical conversion of sunlight into
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Popular Science
A Black Friday cheat sheet for buying the right TV
Picking a TV is hard, especially when the Black Friday advertisements are plastered with a seemingly infinite checkerboard of displays that promise crazy prices, and sport cryptic, jargon-filled names that are almost possible to decipher. Consider this your decoder ring. We’ll help you cut through the jargon that’s standing between you and the best television for you this Black Friday. Each subhe
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Gizmodo
Build Some of Europe's Iconic Sights With These $32 LEGO Architecture Sets
Commerce Content is independent of Editorial and Advertising, and if you buy something through our posts, we may get a small share of the sale. Click here for more. Build these LEGO Architecture sets of Arc De Triomphe and the London Skyline brick by brick, both selling for their historic-low price of $32 today. They would make gifts for any architecture or travel enthusiast in your life. $32 Fro
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Live Science
Surprising Find: Marijuana Linked with Benefits for Heart Failure Patients
Smoking marijuana has been linked with heart problems, but in a surprising new finding, researchers now say the drug may have benefits for people with heart failure. However, the researchers stress that they do not currently recommended that heart failure patients use marijuana. The researchers found that, among patients with heart failure — when the heart muscle can't pump enough blood
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Gizmodo
The Beginner's Guide to VPNs
Photo Illustration by Elena Scotti/Lifehacker/GMG, photos via Shutterstock In our new series Getting It , we’ll give you all you need to know to get started with and excel at a wide range of technology, both on and offline. Here, we’re arming you with everything you need to know to understand and use virtual private networks. In trying to puzzle out just what, exactly a virtual private network (V
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The Scientist RSS
A Newly Identified Species Represents Its Own Eukaryotic Lineage
The 10-micrometer-long flagellate cell might have a big story to tell about the evolution of eukaryotes.
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Gizmodo
Eager to Host More Classified Data, Amazon Launches New 'Secret' Cloud Region for US Intelligence
Jeff Bezos, CEO of Amazon and founder of Blue Origin, speaks during the Access Intelligence’s SATELLITE 2017 conference at the Washington Convention center on March 7, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo: Getty) Amid the unparalleled classified leaks, global acts of cyberwarfare, and colossal data breaches dominating the daily news cycle, Amazon Web Services (AWS) has debuted an entirely new cloud reg
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NYT > Science
Global Health: Nearly 21 Million Now Receiving AIDS Drugs, U.N. Agency Says
But that means that only 44 percent of the world’s H.I.V.-infected people are virally suppressed — that is, that they are taking medication consistently enough to provide a nearly normal life span. By that measure, the countries doing best are Botswana, Britain, Cambodia, Denmark, Iceland, Singapore and Sweden. The report also notes a few cities doing especially well: Amsterdam, Melbourne, New Yo
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New Scientist - News
How a tiny fly can ‘scuba dive’ in a salty and toxic lake
An alkali fly (Ephydra hians) CalTech By Chris Baraniuk A strange fly can “scuba dive” within a perfectly-formed bubble of air, and we may now know how it does it. It has long been known that alkali flies ( Ephydra hians ) can pop below the surface of the super salty and alkaline Mono Lake in California, to feed on underwater algae. Each fly’s air bubble is well fitted to the skin on its body
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New Scientist - News
The message we’re sending to nearby aliens is no threat to Earth
Is anybody there? blickwinkel/Alamy When a 32-metre radio dish north of the Arctic Circle in Norway began a series of transmissions last month, it marked the first attempt to directly signal our existence to aliens on a known Earth-like exoplanet. The target was GJ 273b , the closest known potentially habitable planet visible from that site. It orbits Luyten’s star, a red dwarf 12.4 light yea
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New Scientist - News
Nothing you can do stops this code from watching you online
Just stop using the internet Kathleen Finlay/plainpicture By Abigail Beall Have you ever typed something into a search box on a website and then thought better of it? New research shows that 482 sites may be passing on that information anyway. We have long known that information we provide online can be tracked. A website you visit might have hundreds of scripts running in the background; some de
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New Scientist - News
Whales switch from right to left-handed when diving for food
Whales lunge left when going for shallow food PA By News Scientist staff and Press Association Ambidextrous behaviour by “right-handed” blue whales has surprised scientists studying the huge creatures’ feeding habits. Like many other animals, blue whales display laterality, or “handedness” – generally a bias towards the right. But a study using video cameras attached to the backs of whales ha
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study pinpoints arctic shorebird decline
IMAGE: This is a red-necked phalarope. view more Credit: Zak Pohlen A new study co-authored by WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) addresses concerns over the many Arctic shorebird populations in precipitous decline. Evident from the study is that monitoring and protection of habitat where the birds breed, winter, and stopover is critical to their survival and to that of a global migration
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Science : NPR
Scientists Glimpse Houston's Flooded Future In Updated Rainfall Data
A family evacuated their apartment complex in west Houston, where high water coming from the Addicks Reservoir flooded the area after Hurricane Harvey on Aug. 30th. Erich Schlegel/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Erich Schlegel/Getty Images A family evacuated their apartment complex in west Houston, where high water coming from the Addicks Reservoir flooded the area after Hurricane Harvey
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Justice Dept. sues to stop AT&T's $85B Time Warner deal (Update)
In this Wednesday, Dec. 7, 2016, file photo, AT&T Chairman and CEO Randall Stephenson, left, testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, before a Senate Judiciary subcommittee hearing on the proposed merger between AT&T and Time Warner, as Time Warner Chairman and CEO Jeffrey Bewkes listens at right. The Justice Department intends to sue AT&T to stop its $85 billion purchase of Time Warner, accordin
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Gizmodo
A/S/L? Oregon Wants to Celebrate a 'Day of Cyber' With You
Screenshot: Twitter Oregon Governor Kate Brown, having apparently never used a chatroom in the ‘90s, declared November 20th to be a statewide “Day of Cyber.” While I would infer this to mean she wants everyone to wank to steamy AIM messages, the day is really meant to herald the launch of the Cyber Oregon Cybersecurity Awareness Initiative and encourage people to be more mindful online and better
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UCLA engineers use deep learning to reconstruct holograms and improve optical microscopy
The technique developed at UCLA uses deep learning to produce high-resolution pictures from lower-resolution microscopic images. Credit: UCLA Ozcan Research Group A form of machine learning called deep learning is one of the key technologies behind recent advances in applications like real-time speech recognition and automated image and video labeling. The approach, which uses multi-layered artif
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Viden
'Hul' i isen afslører: Vulkan i Island viser øget aktivitet
De sidste 300 år har en af Islands største vulkaner Öræfajökull ligget stille hen. Men i de sidste par dage er den begyndt at røre på sig. Det skriver det svenske medie SVT . Læs også: Kraftigt vulkanudbrud i Island Gletsjeren over vulkanen er begyndt at bevæge sig på grund af stigende temperaturer, og det får isen til at smelte. Derfor er der nu opstået en næsten perfekt cirkelform på gletsjeren
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Slight climate shifts can affect optimum water use in plant communities
COLLEGE STATION - A new discovery is providing scientists a better understanding of how rainfall is shared beneficially by the plant community and the human population, in addition to the effects of climate change. "It's going to be a wet gets wetter, dry gets drier world," said Dr. Georgianne Moore, Texas A&M department of ecosystem science and management associate professor, College Station. "T
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Resident physician is shaped by a difficult patient's life and death
When a patient dies in the early years of a resident's training, the resident gains insights into the complicated relationships that can mark patients' lives and deaths. Although she had a conflicted relationship with her insensitive patient, the resident finds that the experience taught her to reach toward rather than away from the people she treats. Hatpins Irene Koplinka-Loehr, MD University o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New framework for multimorbidity care identifies changes and gaps
Researchers have developed a new framework for reporting and designing models of care for multimorbidity. The framework describes each model in terms of its theoretical basis and target population (the foundations of the model), and elements of care implemented to deliver the model. Elements of care, including clinical focus, organization of care, and support for model delivery, have changed over
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UVA researchers discover a new target for 'triple-negative' breast cancer
So-called "triple-negative" breast cancer is a particularly aggressive and difficult-to-treat form. It accounts for only about 10 percent of breast cancer cases, but is responsible for about 25 percent of breast cancer fatalities. Triple-negative breast cancer earns its name because, unlike other breast cancer subtypes, its cells test negative for estrogen and progesterone receptors, as well as f
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Anticholinergic cognitive burden scale helps identify risk of adverse outcomes
Anticholinergic burden assessed with the Anticholinergic Cognitive Burden Scale consistently shows dose-response relationships with a variety of adverse outcomes. In a study of long-term associations between adverse clinical outcomes in older adults and three scales for anticholinergic burden (the cumulative effect of using multiple medications that block the effects of acetylcholine in the body)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Family physician calls for a return to human connection
How can medical practices create and sustain healthy cultures at a time of rapid and often stressful change? The answer, according to family physician David Loxterkamp, MD, lies in human connection. Based on the book "Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging," by Sebastian Junger, Loxterkamp suggests that both medical professionals and their patients need to feel useful and connected. For physicians, h
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
For adults younger than 78, risk for heart disease linked to risk for problems walking
Problems with balance , walking speed, and muscle strength become more common as we age, and can lead to disability. In fact, studies show that for older adults, having a slower walking speed can help predict chronic illness , hospitalization, and even death. A team of researchers from Sweden's Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm examined the factors that put older adults at higher risk for deve
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Magnitude 6 earthquake strikes off Samoa, American Samoa
NASA satellites have been providing data on Tropical Cyclone Winston in the Southwestern Pacific, and watched the storm over the past couple of days as it weakened to a tropical storm. Today, Feb. 16, Winston regained hurricane-force ...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EU court threatens Poland with heavy fines over ancient forest logging
Bialowieza Forest, in Poland, is one of Europe's last primeval forests The EU's top court on Monday warned Poland's rightwing government to "immediately" stop logging in one of Europe's last primeval forests or face fines of up to 100,000 euros ($118,000) a day. The case is the latest in a string of issues causing tension between Warsaw and Brussels, which has watched the Polish administration's
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Ars Technica
No, you’re not being paranoid. Sites really are watching your every move
reader comments 164 If you have the uncomfortable sense someone is looking over your shoulder as you surf the Web, you're not being paranoid. A new study finds hundreds of sites—including microsoft.com, adobe.com, and godaddy.com—employ scripts that record visitors' keystrokes, mouse movements, and scrolling behavior in real time, even before the input is submitted or is later deleted. Session re
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team studies evolution of climate change activism
Credit: University of Texas at San Antonio Climate change is a topic that is debated, doubted and covered by news outlets across the world. Luis Hestres, in the Department of Communication at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), is researching the evolution of climate change activism and how advocacy groups use digital platforms to mobilize. Hestres and Jill Hopke, assistant professor a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team achieves light amplification with electrically stimulated quantum dots
A collage showing contains a transmission electron microscopy image of the improved quantum dot and its representation (left), the schematic of the device which nicely illustrates 'current-focusing' idea (middle), and the device under operation (right). Credit: LANL In a breakthrough development, Los Alamos scientists have shown that they can successfully amplify light using electrically excited
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Feed: All Latest
Stopping Robocalls Will Soon Be Easier Than Ever
You probably get robocalls all the time. Some pretend to be from the IRS, others come from a phone number very similar to yours. And then there's the rash of free airline tickets/problem with your credit card/complete this short survey intrusions. If it feels like they're cropping up more than ever, you're right. The blocking service YouMail estimates that 2.49 billion robocalls were placed to US
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Six-month-old babies know words for common things, but struggle with similar nouns
Around the six-month mark, babies start to get really fun. They’re not walking or talking, but they are probably babbling, grabbing and gumming, and teaching us about their likes and dislikes. I remember this as the time when my girls’ personalities really started making themselves known, which, really, is one of the best parts of raising a kid. After months of staring at those beautiful, bald he
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: Rock Carvings of Ancient Dogs Getting Taught New Tricks
“This is the first imagery of a dog with a leash,” said Michael Petraglia , an archaeologist from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, in Germany, and an author of the study which appeared in the Journal of Anthropological Archaeology . He said that because of where the lines were on the dog and human’s anatomy, they most likely represented actual leashes and were not mere s
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Feed: All Latest
Frequent Flier Miles Don't Matter Anymore—Get Some New Credit Cards
Oh, Thanksgiving: A time for turkey, a time for uncomfortable political discussions, a time for the most nightmarish airplane trips imaginable . Roughly 24 million Americans will fly with US airlines this week, and a lot of them will be thinking: Hey, at least I'll come out of this misery with some frequent flier miles for that solo kayaking trip to New Zealand. Except, not so much. For the first
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Most older adults prefer to participate in medical decisions
Although most older Americans prefer to actively participate in making health care decisions, those with four or more chronic conditions are less likely to prefer active decision making. Researchers analyzed a random sample of 2,017 older adults who, with sample weights, represented approximately 33 million Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 and older. They found that 85 percent of older Americans in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reports of shared decision making increase in the united states, but disparities exist
Between 2002 and 2014, reports of shared decision making increased significantly among adult Americans. Analyses of data from a nationally representative survey found that the mean shared decision making composite increased from 4.4 to 5. In multivariable modeling, blacks reported more shared decision making, while Asians, those without insurance, and those in poor health reported less. When a re
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UTSA researcher studies evolution of climate change activism
Climate change is a topic that is debated, doubted and covered by news outlets across the world. Luis Hestres, in the Department of Communication at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), is researching the evolution of climate change activism and how advocacy groups use digital platforms to mobilize. Hestres and Jill Hopke, assistant professor at DePaul University, co-authored "Internet-
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quantum dots amplify light with electrical pumping
IMAGE: This is a collage showing contains a transmission electron microscopy image of the improved quantum dot and its representation (left), the schematic of the device which nicely illustrates 'current-focusing'... view more Credit: LANL LOS ALAMOS, N.M., November 20, 2017-- In a breakthrough development, Los Alamos scientists have shown that they can successfully amplify light using elec
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A physician explores her own experience with postpartum depression
"I thought I knew what it meant for patients to hear a diagnosis of postpartum depression," writes family physician Tara Frankhouser, DO. After the birth of her first child, however, she found that the reality of the condition was much different than she anticipated. In a qualitative study using autoethnography -- a method of self-reflection and analysis of personal and cultural experiences -- Dr
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Live Science
Why Human Head Transplants Will Never Work
Italian surgeon Dr. Sergio Canavero at a press conference in 2016 in Scotland. Credit: Jeff J Mitchell/Getty An Italian neurosurgeon is claiming that his team has performed the world's first "successful" human head transplant , using two human cadavers in China, according to news reports. The procedure, which took 18 hours to complete, has led the controversial surgeon — Dr. Sergio Canavero, of
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Live Science
No, Cotton Swabs Aren't the Most Common Cause of Eardrum Rupture
Every day, countless people perform a task so dangerous that many doctors urge them to reconsider: They clean out the wax out of their ears with a cotton swab. This simple act is responsible for 40 percent of cases of ruptured eardrums, a new study from Israel finds. But cotton swabs aren't actually the most common cause of eardrum rupture , according to the study. Instead, blunt trauma is
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Optimal gout treatment requires ongoing monitoring for urate lowering therapy
Optimal Gout Treatment Requires Ongoing Monitoring for Urate Lowering Therapy Managing gout as a chronic, rather than an acute, condition could help prevent recurrences. A new study of more than 8,000 medical records found a positive association between starting treatment with allopurinol, a medication that helps prevent gout by lowering production of uric acid, and recurring doctor visits for th
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Popular Science
Your guide to a Thanksgiving dinner without food waste
Even if you’ve spent the entire year cutting down on plastic , eating less red meat , and conserving water , you’re probably poised to have a wasteful Thanksgiving . It’s the nature of the holiday. We eat a lot, and that means we create a lot of garbage— and throw away a lot of food . This year can be different. Here’s a step-by-step guide to minimizing your turkey day trash. Step one: The planni
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Russia confirms 'extremely high' readings of radioactive pollution
The highest concentration of radioactive pollution was registered in the village of Argayash, whose "extremely high pollution" of Ru-106 exceeds natural background pollution by 986 times Russia's meteorological service confirmed on Monday "extremely high" concentrations of the radioactive isotope ruthenium-106 in parts of the country in late September, following European reports about the contami
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Dagens Medicin
Midtjylland kan vise blodpropper i hjerter før de kommer
Midtjylland kan vise blodpropper i hjerter før de kommer Med en ny metode kan personalet i ambulancerne undersøge, om patienten er ved at få en blodprop i hjertet. Rikke Gundersen Close: Region Midtjylland har som de første i verden har taget en ny metode i brug, som sikrer langt større muligheder for at hjælpe patienter med blodpropper i hjertet. Det skriver TV2. Metoden indebærer, at patienter
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why rural coal families are less likely to divorce
Rural coal-mining families show resilience against divorce when faced with the economic downturns common in the industry, a new study suggests. Researchers found that rural counties with higher levels of coal jobs had lower divorce rates compared with similar counties with fewer coal jobs during the 1990s, when the coal industry was losing jobs. The results suggest that rural coal families may do
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Another danger sign for coral reefs: Substitute symbiont falls short
Credit: Oregon State University For reef-building corals, not just any symbiotic algae will do, new research shows. The findings are important because they amount to another danger sign for the world's coral reefs, which rely on a partnership with the millions of phototrophic algae they host to obtain food. Global climate change is threatening the reefs in part because the symbionts, dinoflagella
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study reveals new mechanism used by cancer cells to disarm attacking immune cells
Columbus, Ohio - A new study by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC - James) identifies a substance released by pancreatic cancer cells that protects them from attack by immune cells called macrophages. The study found that the substance, called Gdf-15, might be required for the development of early pan
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Ars Technica
“You feel really stupid and you hope the CGI team makes you look good”
reader comments 24 Video shot and edited by Justin Wolfson. Click here for transcript . These days, your typical science-fiction or fantasy movie is performed by casts of human actors—and even bigger casts of programmers. VFX (visual effects) are so crucial that there's now an entire genre of acting devoted to dealing with creatures and environments the actors never see. In some cases, the actors
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Science : NPR
Greece Was Hit By Storm Some Called A 'Medicane.' What's That?
Flash floods killed at least 20 people in Greece, in a storm some were calling a "medicane." A woman cleans mud in front of a house in the town of Mandra, northwest of Athens, on Friday. Angelos Tzortzinis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Angelos Tzortzinis/AFP/Getty Images Flash floods killed at least 20 people in Greece, in a storm some were calling a "medicane." A woman cleans mud
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Science : NPR
How Much Hotter Is It In The Slums?
The metal roofs of Kibera, a one-square-mlle slum community in Nairobi. Herbert Misiani hide caption toggle caption Herbert Misiani When Nairobi gets hot, its slums get even hotter. That's what a new study published in PLOS ONE has found. In 2015, researchers put dozens of thermometers in poor communities and monitored them during Nairobi's warmest months of December, January and February — durin
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Scientific American Content: Global
New Keys to Help Extraterrestrials Unlock Our Messages
When the esteemed German mathematician Carl Friedrich Gauss contemplated communication with extraterrestrials at the beginning of the 19th century, targeting the moon seemed obvious. Our planet’s natural satellite provided the nearest plausible home for life beyond Earth. The form and content of the message we could send was equally clear to Gauss. He is credited with the idea of communicatin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chimp females who leave home postpone parenthood
Imani the chimpanzee, a newcomer to her group, lounges with her son at Gombe National Park in Tanzania. Credit: Ian Gilby, Arizona State University New moms need social support, and mother chimpanzees are no exception. So much so that female chimps that lack supportive friends and family wait longer to start having babies, according to researchers who have combed through the records of Jane Gooda
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Genome sequencing reveals extensive inbreeding in Scandinavian wolves
Credit: CC0 Public Domain Researchers from Uppsala University and others have for the first time determined the full genetic consequences of intense inbreeding in a threatened species. The large-scale genomic study of the Scandinavian wolf population is reported in Nature Ecology & Evolution . The Scandinavian wolf population was founded in the 1980s by only two individuals. This has subsequently
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New catalyst controls activation of a carbon-hydrogen bond
The dirhodium (shown in blue) drives the reaction, while the shape of the scaffold around it controls which C-H bond the catalyst works on. Credit: Kuangbiao Liao, Emory University. Chemists have developed another catalyst that can selectively activate a carbon-hydrogen bond, part of an ongoing strategy to revolutionize the field of organic synthesis and open up new chemical space. The journal Na
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers design survey to tap students' motivation in STEM
Researchers at Portland State University are learning more about undergraduates' experience in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) classes and sharing a set of survey questions that will help researchers and educators at other universities do the same. This survey was developed by a team of researchers in PSU's STEM Equity and Education Institute with the help of instructors in chemi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astronomers reveal nearby stars that are among the oldest in our galaxy
Dr. Wei-Chun Jao, research scientist in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Georgia State University. Credit: Dr. Wei-Chun Jao Astronomers have discovered some of the oldest stars in our Milky Way galaxy by determining their locations and velocities, according to a study led by scientists at Georgia State University. Just like humans, stars have a life span: birth, youth, adulthood, senior
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists design $100 handheld muon detector
At any given moment, the Earth's atmosphere is showered with high-energy cosmic rays that have been blasted from supernovae and other astrophysical phenomena far beyond the Solar System. When cosmic rays collide with the Earth's atmosphere, they decay into muons—charged particles that are slightly heavier than an electron. Muons last only fractions of a second, and during their fleeting lifespan
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Robotic device tracks plant growth at the cellular level
Researcher Sarah Robinson setting up ACME in the lab. Credit: Cris Kuhlemeier, University of Bern Determining how various treatments and conditions affect the mechanical properties of plant cells could allow scientists to understand plant growth at the cellular level and devise ways to enhance it. In a breakthrough report published in The Plant Cell , a team of researchers introduces an innovativ
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cognitive science
What Do China’s Police Collect on Citizens in Order to Predict Crime? Everything
Interesting that they have halved the crime rate in only three months in the test area.
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The Scientist RSS
European Medicines Agency to Move to Amsterdam
A coin toss decides the agency's post-Brexit home once it departs from London.
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Dagens Medicin
Hjertestoppatienter har markant højere dødelighed i Region Sjælland
Der er store geografiske forskelle i dødelighed blandt patienter med hjertestop, viser ny undersøgelse.
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The Atlantic
For the Lucas Brothers, Comedy Is Therapy
Growing up in Newark, New Jersey, the Lucas brothers were surrounded by violence and drugs. Amidst the chaos of public housing and abject poverty, television was a constant and laughter an escape. In a recent interview with The Atlantic , animated above, the twins said that at an early age, they learned the power of comedy. Now, the successful comedians see their work as more than simply a vocati
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The Atlantic
The Education of Mark Zuckerberg
There’s a story that Mark Zuckerberg has told dozens of times over the years. Shortly after he’d launched Facebook in February 2004, he went to get pizza with Kang-Xing Jin, a coder friend who would become a Facebook executive, at a place around the corner from his dorm. In one telling , Zuckerberg says he was thinking, “this is great that we have this community that now people can connect within
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sensors could identify biomarkers, improve early-stage detection, treatment of diseases
WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - Purdue University researchers have found a method of identifying biological markers in small amounts of blood that they believe could be used to detect a myriad of diseases, infections and different medical conditions at early stages. Jeffrey Rhoads, a professor in Purdue's School of Mechanical Engineering; George Chiu, a professor in Purdue's School of Mechanical Engineeri
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MIT physicists design $100 handheld muon detector
At any given moment, the Earth's atmosphere is showered with high-energy cosmic rays that have been blasted from supernovae and other astrophysical phenomena far beyond the Solar System. When cosmic rays collide with the Earth's atmosphere, they decay into muons -- charged particles that are slightly heavier than an electron. Muons last only fractions of a second, and during their fleeting lifesp
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Another danger sign for coral reefs: Substitute symbiont falls short
CORVALLIS, Ore. - For reef-building corals, not just any symbiotic algae will do, new research shows. The findings are important because they amount to another danger sign for the world's coral reefs, which rely on a partnership with the millions of phototrophic algae they host to obtain food. Global climate change is threatening the reefs in part because the symbionts, dinoflagellates of the gen
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Albatross populations in decline from fishing and environmental change
The populations of wandering, black-browed and grey-headed albatrosses have halved over the last 35 years on sub-antarctic Bird Island according to a new study published today (20 November) in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences . The research, led by scientists at British Antarctic Study (BAS), attributes this decline to environmental change, and to deaths in longli
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cholesterol helps flu virus escape through host cell's membrane
CAMBRIDGE, MA -- After a flu virus infects a host cell and hijacks its inner workings to create copies of itself, these copies gather into viral buds that break free from the host cell to infect again. A new study from MIT now provides the clearest picture yet of how the buds are pinched off from the host cell membrane. Using a technique called solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectro
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ancient fish scales and vertebrate teeth share an embryonic origin
IMAGE: A high-magnification image of the skin of a shark, showing a broad covering of dermal denticles. view more Credit: Andrew Gillis, Gillis Lab In biology, one long-running debate has teeth: whether ancient fish scales moved into the mouth with the origin of jaws, or if the tooth had its own evolutionary inception. Recent studies on species such as zebrafish showed scales an
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The strange case of the scuba-diving fly
More than a century ago, American writer Mark Twain observed a curious phenomenon at Mono Lake, just to the east of Yosemite National Park: enormous numbers of small flies would crawl underwater to forage and lay eggs, but each time they resurfaced, they would appear completely dry. In his travel memoir Roughing It, Twain wrote: "You can hold them under water as long as you please--they do not mi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Car, stroller, juice: Babies understand when words are related
DURHAM, N.C. -- The meaning behind infants' screeches, squeals and wails may frustrate and confound sleep-deprived new parents. But at an age when babies cannot yet speak to us in words, they are already avid students of language. "Even though there aren't many overt signals of language knowledge in babies, language is definitely developing furiously under the surface," said Elika Bergelson, assi
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Dagens Medicin
Syv sygehuse kan ikke undersøge hjertepatienter om natten
Syv sygehuse kan ikke undersøge hjertepatienter om natten På syv sygehuse, som modtager akutte hjertepatienter, har man ikke læger på arbejde døgnet rundt til at lave de nødvendige scanninger, viser en ny undersøgelse. Lasse Lange Close: Biografi Journalist , Dagens Medicin Flere artikler af Lasse Lange Desværre, kun abonnenter har adgang til at læse denne artikel. Allerede abonnent – l
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Bench to Bedside: Genetics of Circadian Rhythms, Part 1 - Louis Ptáček
http://www.ibiology.org/ibioeducation/taking-courses/bench-to-bedside/genetics-human-circadian-rhythms-sleep.html Overview Dr. Ptáček introduces the circadian clock and its relationship to sleep. He describes different sleep-wake behaviors including people who go to sleep and awaken exceptionally early or late. By studying families with an advanced sleep phase (ASP) phenotype, he and his colleagu
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Bench to Bedside: Ciliopathies and Retinal Degeneration, Part 2 - Jacque Duncan
http://www.ibiology.org/ibioeducation/taking-courses/bench-to-bedside/ciliopathies-retinal-degeneration.html In Part 1, Dr. Marshall began with an overview of the complex internal structure of cilia and flagella and the machinery, called intraflagellar transport (IFT), required to build and maintain these structures. Mutations in motile cilia were known to cause several human diseases but it wasn
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Bench to Bedside: Ciliopathies and Retinal Degeneration, Part 1 - Wallace Marshall
http://www.ibiology.org/ibioeducation/taking-courses/bench-to-bedside/ciliopathies-retinal-degeneration.html Dr. Marshall begins with an overview of the complex internal structure of cilia and flagella and the machinery, called intraflagellar transport (IFT), required to build and maintain these structures. Mutations in motile cilia were known to cause several human diseases but it wasn't until s
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Patient-centered medical home model improves chronic disease management
Data from more than 800 Veterans Health Administration (VHA) primary care clinics revealed that national implementation of a patient-centered medical home model was effective at improving several chronic disease outcomes over time.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Disposable optical test substrate for detecting harmful microbes
Harmful microbes and toxic micromolecules in food and drinking water can cause serious health problems around the world. Now a researcher has developed a disposable optical test substrate for use in microbial detection. The aim is to enable cost-effective detection of harmful microbes and toxins.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Photocrosslinkable, thermoreversible, type-I collagen bioink for photolithographic printing
Biomedical engineers have leveraged a unique combination of properties of methacrylated collagen to demonstrate its potential as a bioink capable of simple, photolithographic printing of 3D scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Type-I collagen is the most ubiquitous protein in the human body. Chief among the fibril forming collagens, type-I collagen gives many soft tissues st
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Jellyfish: Stinging cells pack a powerful pressure
The stinging cells of jellyfish, called nematocytes, have evolved to be one of the world's most efficient predation tools. The nematocysts consist of a capsule and folded tubule, and use high pressure and acceleration for defense and locomotion and, more importantly, to capture prey. Inconsistencies in a previous conceptual explanation of the stinging cell mechanism were identified using a microfl
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
One Second In Your Brain - Jeremy Nathans (Johns Hopkins/HHMI)
What happens inside your head when you are asked "What is the sum of three plus two?" Nathans gives us a fascinating description of all of the events that must occur when you answer this question, from detecting the sounds and decoding their meaning, to calculating the answer, to directing the muscles that control speech. It is an account sure to leave you in awe of the complexity and power of hu
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
White Nose Syndrome - Winifred Frick (University of California, Santa Cruz)
A horrific fungal disease called White Nose Syndrome began to cause massive mortality of small brown bats in the Northeastern United States in 2006. Dr. Frick explains that she and her colleagues used historical data from bat censuses and recent mortality data to model possible outcomes for bat populations in this region. Sadly, their data indicate almost certain regional extinction for the bats
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Tiny Conspiracies - Bonnie Bassler (Princeton/HHMI)
Did you know that bacteria can "speak" to each other and make decisions as a group? Dr. Bassler explains how bacteria use chemicals to communicate in a process called quorum sensing. By identifying these chemicals, scientists may be able to hamper, or improve, quorum sensing and generate new antibiotic or probiotic therapies. http://www.ibiology.org/ibioeducation/exploring-biology/microbiology-ed
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Alejandro Sanchez Alvarado (Stowers Institute/HHMI): Staying Young
In one year, each of us will lose and replace a mass of cells equal to our own body weight. It is only because these processes are closely regulated that we can recognize ourselves as the "same" person after that year. Sánchez Alvarado explains that tissue homeostasis and regeneration are regulated in part by stem cells and he argues that studying model systems such as planaria will allow us to u
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Ron Vale (UCSF/HHMI), Lasker Foundation, Stuyvesant High School - Molecular Motors
Lasker Award winner Vale visits a high school class and explains how he became fascinated with molecular motors and how they work. He also describes the experiments that led to his discovery of the motor protein kinesin. http://www.ibiology.org/ibioeducation/exploring-biology/cell-bio/cytoskeleton/molecular-motors-lasker.html From: iBiology
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Regeneration - Peter Reddien (MIT/HHMI)
Many animals are able to regenerate following injury, some better than others. Dr. Reddien uses Planaria as a model system to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms that drive regeneration. RNAi makes it possible to inhibit specific genes in Planaria and follow the effects on protein expression and regeneration. Using this methodology, Reddien's lab identified the notum gene as a regul
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Richard Losick (Harvard): Are We More Microbial than Human?
Losick poses the question “Are we more microbial than human?” There are 10 times more bacterial cells on and in us, the human microbiome, than human cells and 100 times more types of bacterial genes than human genes. These bacteria certainly influence our health, and Losick wonders if they also might influence our behavior. From: iBiology
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Coral Reefs and Climate Change - Nancy Knowlton (National Museum of Natural History)
Dr. Knowlton has spent over 30 years studying coral reefs. In her talk, she describes the devastating effects of increasing ocean temperature and acidification, both due to increased atmospheric CO2 levels, on coral reefs around the world. She explains that short term, local action and long term, global efforts are needed to halt the coral reef crisis. http://www.ibiology.org/ibioeducation/explor
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Mitochondria - Jodi Nunnari (UC Davis)
Dr. Nunnari explains that mitochondria are derived from prokaryotes and played a pivotal role in the evolution of eukaryotes. In an aerobic environment, mitochondria produce energy, in the form of ATP. This energy allowed eukaryotes to develop into complex cells and organisms. Mitochondria are also fascinating because they have retained their own genome and are dynamic organelles that communicate
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Baldomero “Toto” Olivera (U. Utah, HHMI): Venomous Cone Snails
http://www.ibiology.org/ibioeducation/exploring-biology/toto-olivera-venomous-cone-snails.html Marine cone snails are predators that use a purely chemical mechanism for catching their prey. There are over 700 types of cone snails, each of which has a unique venom that can help the cone snail capture fish, worms, and even other cone snails. In this talk, Dr. Baldomero “Toto” Olivera describes diff
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Wallace Marshall (UCSF): Ten Craziest Things Cells Do
http://www.ibiology.org/ibioeducation/exploring-biology/cell-bio/signaling/ten-craziest-things-cells-do.html Dr. Marshall refutes the commonly held idea that cells are just bags of watery enzymes. He runs through his “Top 10 List” of unexpected and amazing things that individual cells can do. These including growing to be huge, navigating mazes, and performing feats that seem to belong in science
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Susan Lindquist (Whitehead Institute, MIT, HHMI): Protein Folding and Disease
http://www.ibiology.org/ibioeducation/susan-lindquist-protein-folding-and-disease.html Talk Overview: Proteins are complex structures folded from a linear strand of amino acids. These structures are involved in almost every process in the cell. In this iBiology talk, Susan Lindquist talks about the incredible diversity of protein structures, the importance of proper protein folding, and the probl
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Cheese as a model microbial ecosystem - Rachel Dutton (Harvard)
http://www.ibiology.org/ibioeducation/rachel-dutton-food-for-thought-cheese-as-a-model-microbial-ecosystem.html Most microbes in nature exist within a microbial community. However, little is known about how different microbial species interact with each other and their environment to form these communities. Rachel Dutton uses cheese as a model system for studying microbial ecosystems. By studying
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Genome Sequencing for Pathogen Discovery - Joseph DeRisi (UCSF, HHMI)
http://www.ibiology.org/ibioeducation/joseph-derisi-genome-sequencing-for-pathogen-discovery.html For decades, a strange neurological disease has plagued snakes around the world. The snakes tie themselves into knots, exhibit strange behaviors, and eventually die. In this talk, Dr. Joseph DeRisi describes how his lab uncovered the mysterious agent responsible for this disease, which turned out to
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Bench to Bedside: Mesenchymal Stem Cells and ARDS, Part 2 - Michael Matthay
http://www.ibiology.org/ibioeducation/taking-courses/bench-to-bedside/mesenchymal-stem-cells-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome.html In Part 1, Dr. Calfee began by explaining that acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is pulmonary edema, or fluid in the lungs, not due to heart failure. It is a condition that affects 200,000 people/year in the USA with a 30-40% mortality rate. During ARDS, t
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Bench to Bedside: Mesenchymal Stem Cells and ARDS, Part 1 - Carolyn Calfee
http://www.ibiology.org/ibioeducation/taking-courses/bench-to-bedside/mesenchymal-stem-cells-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome.html In Part 1, Dr. Calfee begins by explaining that acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is pulmonary edema, or fluid in the lungs, not due to heart failure. It is a condition that affects 200,000 people/year in the USA with a 30-40% mortality rate. During ARDS,
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Bench to Bedside: Ocular Drug Delivery - Robert Bhisitkul and Tejal Desai (UCSF)
http://www.ibiology.org/ibioeducation/taking-courses/bench-to-bedside/advancing-treatment-retinal-diseases.html Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of several retinal diseases that can lead to vision loss and, ultimately, blindness. Dr. Bhisitkul explains that the class of anti-VEGF biologic drugs (Lucentis, Avastin, Eylea) can treat AMD, however, ongoing, monthly injections into the ey
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Bench to Bedside: Multiple Sclerosis and Tysabri, Part 2 - Ted Yednock
http://www.ibiology.org/ibioeducation/taking-courses/bench-to-bedside/tysabri-natalizumab-treatment-multiple-sclerosis.html Overview In the first of his two talks, Ted Yednock begins with an overview of multiple sclerosis. He describes how, in MS, immune cells are able to transverse the wall of blood vessels and infiltrate the brain and central nervous system resulting in damage to the myelin sur
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Bench to Bedside: Multiple Sclerosis and Tysabri, Part 1 - Ted Yednock
http://www.ibiology.org/ibioeducation/taking-courses/bench-to-bedside/tysabri-natalizumab-treatment-multiple-sclerosis.html Overview In the first of his two talks, Ted Yednock begins with an overview of multiple sclerosis. He describes how, in MS, immune cells are able to transverse the wall of blood vessels and infiltrate the brain and central nervous system resulting in damage to the myelin sur
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Bench to Bedside: Genetics of Circadian Rhythms, Part 2 - Ying-Hui Fu
http://www.ibiology.org/ibioeducation/taking-courses/bench-to-bedside/genetics-human-circadian-rhythms-sleep.html Overview In Part 1, Dr. Ptáček introduced the circadian clock and its relationship to sleep. He describes different sleep-wake behaviors including people who go to sleep and awaken exceptionally early or late. By studying families with an advanced sleep phase (ASP) phenotype, he and h
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Ars Technica
First-known interstellar visitor is a bizarre, cigar-shaped asteroid
Enlarge / An artist’s impression of the oddly shaped interstellar asteroid `Oumuamua. reader comments 179 Since mid-October, the astronomy community has been buzzing about what might be our Solar System’s first confirmed interstellar visitor. An automated telescope spotted an object that appeared as if it had been dropped on the Solar System from above, an angle that suggests it arrived from else
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Science | The Guardian
Babies may be able to link certain words and concepts, research suggests
Babies as young as six months old may have an inkling that certain words and concepts are related to each other, say scientists in research that sheds new light on how infants learn. The study also found that babies who were more often exposed to adults talking to them about items in their vicinity did better at identifying a picture of an object when the item was said out loud. Newborn babies ma
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Science | The Guardian
Mysterious object confirmed to be from another solar system
Astronomers are now certain that the mysterious object detected hurtling past our sun last month is indeed from another solar system. They have named it 1I/2017 U1(’Oumuamua) and believe it could be one of 10,000 others lurking undetected in our cosmic neighbourhood. The certainty of its extraterrestrial origin comes from an analysis that shows its orbit is almost impossible to achieve from withi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Non-fearful social withdrawal linked positively to creativity
BUFFALO, N.Y. - Everyone needs an occasional break from the social ramble, though spending too much time alone can be unhealthy and there is growing evidence that the psychosocial effects of too much solitude can last a lifetime. But newly published research by a University at Buffalo psychologist suggests that not all forms of social withdrawal are detrimental. In fact, the research findings pub
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why rural coal families are less likely to divorce
COLUMBUS, Ohio - Rural coal-mining families show resilience against divorce when faced with the economic downturns common in the industry, a new study suggests. Researchers found that rural counties with higher levels of coal jobs had lower divorce rates compared with similar counties with fewer coal jobs during the 1990s, when the coal industry was losing jobs. The results suggest that rural coa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Patients and families aren't comfortable with 'overlapping surgeries,' survey finds
November 20, 2017 - Patients and family members are either neutral or uncomfortable with the idea of "overlapping" or "concurrent" surgery, where the attending surgeon isn't present in the operating room for part of the procedure, according to survey results published in the November 15, 2017 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery . The journal is published in partnership with Wolters Kluwe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Simple EKG can determine whether patient has depression or bipolar disorder
MAYWOOD, IL - A groundbreaking Loyola Medicine study suggests that a simple 15-minute electrocardiogram could help a physician determine whether a patient has major depression or bipolar disorder. Bipolar disorder often is misdiagnosed as major depression. But while the symptoms of the depressive phase of bipolar disorder are similar to that of major depression, the treatments are different and o
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Survey taps students' motivation in STEM
Researchers are learning more about undergraduates' experience in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) classes and sharing a set of survey questions that will help researchers and educators at other universities do the same.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New way to write magnetic info could pave the way for hardware neural networks
Researchers have shown how to write any magnetic pattern desired onto nanowires, which could help computers mimic how the brain processes information.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genome sequencing reveals extensive inbreeding in Scandinavian wolves
Researchers have for the first time determined the full genetic consequences of intense inbreeding in a threatened species.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sleeve gastrectomy, common weight-loss surgery, lowers women's tolerance to alcohol
Women who have had gastric sleeve surgery to lose weight may want to consider limiting the number of alcoholic drinks they consume post-surgery. A new study found that after undergoing sleeve gastrectomy, women could be legally intoxicated after drinking half the number of drinks than women who did not have this surgery.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Seafloor sediments appear to enhance Earthquake and Tsunami danger in Pacific Northwest
The Cascadia Subduction Zone off the coast of the Pacific Northwest has all the ingredients for making powerful earthquakes -- and according to the geological record, the region is due for its next 'big one.' A new study has found that the occurrence of these big, destructive quakes and associated devastating tsunamis may be linked to compact sediments along large portions of the subduction zone.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain stimulation can change how much we enjoy and value music
Researchers have proven it is possible to increase or decrease our enjoyment of music, and our craving for more of it, by enhancement or disruption of certain brain circuits.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cell cycle proteins help immune cells trap microbes with nets made of DNA
In your bloodstream, there are immune cells called neutrophils that, when faced with a pathogenic threat, will expel their DNA like a net to contain it. These DNA snares are called neutrophil extracellular traps or NETs. Researchers describe an important step in how these NETs are released and how they stop a fungus from establishing an infection in mice and human cells.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Achilles is more than just one tendon
The Achilles tendon is the strongest tendon in the human body. It can bear loads exceeding over 900 kilograms during running. Despite its strength, it is prone to injuries and it is not yet well known what factors predict good or bad recovery from injuries.
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The Atlantic
The Connected Vocabularies of Six-Month-Olds
No matter how many words you can define, your vocabulary isn’t like a dictionary. Your mind stores language not as a list of words, but as a network of categories, properties, and meanings, with stronger connections between related words, like newspaper and magazine , than unrelated ones, like wallet and avalanche . At six months old, a baby probably doesn’t know what wallet or avalanche means—bu
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Science : NPR
Can Science Explain The Human Mind?
monsitj/Getty Images/iStockphoto monsitj/Getty Images/iStockphoto In The Devil's Dictionary , Ambrose Bierce describes the mind as "a mysterious form of matter secreted by the brain," engaged in a futile attempt to understand itself "with nothing but itself to know itself with." Questions about the limits of self-understanding have persisted long after Bierce's 1911 publication. One user on Quora
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Gizmodo
Ridiculously Waterproof Fly Survives Dives Into Toxic Lakes
An alkali fly creates a protective bubble in order to dive in Mono Lake. (Image: Floris van Breugel / Caltech) If you’ve ever seen an outdoor swimming pool between cleanings, then you’re well aware of the death trap that standing water can be for flying insects. Bees, grasshoppers, and flies all easily tumble into the chlorinated sea, only to find themselves drenched and unable to fly away. But o
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Gizmodo
Amazon's Co-Branded 4K TVs Are Back On Sale For Black Friday
Element 50" 4K TV - Fire TV Edition | $300 | Amazon Element 55" 4K TV - Fire TV Edition | $400 | Amazon Amazon partnered with Element this year to create affordable 4K TVs with Amazon’s Fire TV software and Alexa built in, and they just got a whole lot cheaper for Black Friday. You can get a 50" for just $300 , or a 55" for $400 (the same price as Prime Day). These were availa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Albatross populations in decline from fishing and environmental change
Pair of Wandering Albatrosses on the sub-Antarctic island of Bird Island (South Georgia). Credit: Stacey Adlard @ British Antarctic Survey The populations of wandering, black-browed and grey-headed albatrosses have halved over the last 35 years on sub-antarctic Bird Island according to a new study published today (20 November) in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences . The r
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The strange case of the scuba-diving fly
An alkali fly creates a protective bubble in order to dive in Mono Lake. Credit: Floris van Breugel / Caltech More than a century ago, American writer Mark Twain observed a curious phenomenon at Mono Lake, just to the east of Yosemite National Park: enormous numbers of small flies would crawl underwater to forage and lay eggs, but each time they resurfaced, they would appear completely dry. In hi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ancient fish scales and vertebrate teeth share an embryonic origin
A high-magnification image of the skin of a shark, showing a broad covering of dermal denticles. Credit: Andrew Gillis, Gillis Lab In biology, one long-running debate has teeth: whether ancient fish scales moved into the mouth with the origin of jaws, or if the tooth had its own evolutionary inception. Recent studies on species such as zebrafish showed scales and teeth developing from distinctly
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cholesterol helps flu virus escape through host cell's membrane
Space-filling model of the Cholesterol molecule. Credit: RedAndr/Wikipedia After a flu virus infects a host cell and hijacks its inner workings to create copies of itself, these copies gather into viral buds that break free from the host cell to infect again. A new study from MIT now provides the clearest picture yet of how the buds are pinched off from the host cell membrane. Using a technique c
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Scientific American Content: Global
Sex Matters in Experiments on Party Drug--in Mice
Mouse experiments with the popular club drug ketamine may be skewed by the sex of the researcher performing them, a study suggests. The findings, presented on November 14 at the Society for Neuroscience (SfN) meeting in Washington DC, only deepen the mystery of how ketamine, which has powerful mood-lifting properties, interacts with the brain. They also raise questions about the reproducibility o
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chimp females who leave home postpone parenthood
Female chimps that lack supportive friends and family wait longer to start having babies, researchers find. An analysis of more than 50 years' worth of daily records for female chimpanzees in Gombe National Park in Tanzania indicates that would-be moms who leave home or are orphaned take roughly three years longer to start a family.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Preclinical study demonstrates promising treatment for rare bone disease
Researchers have led a preclinical study demonstrating that the drug palovarotene suppresses the formation of bony tumors (osteochondromas) in models of multiple hereditary exostoses (MHE). The research is an important step toward an effective pharmacological treatment for MHE, a rare genetic condition that affects about 1 in 50,000 people worldwide.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Astronomers reveal nearby stars that are among the oldest in our galaxy
Astronomers have discovered some of the oldest stars in our Milky Way galaxy by determining their locations and velocities.
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The Atlantic
Winners of the 2017 Epson International Pano Awards
The top-scoring panoramic photos entered in the eighth annual Epson International Pano Awards have just been announced. The contest is meant to showcase the best work of panoramic photographers around the world. Organizers reported that they received 5,377 entries from 1,322 photographers in 71 countries this year, competing for the top spots in five categories, for several special awards, and fo
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The Atlantic
Egypt's Cartoonists Are Drawing a Lost Revolution
This article is edited from a story shared exclusively with members of The Masthead , the membership program from The Atlantic ( find out more ). “It's a hard time to tell the truth in Egypt,” says Magdy El Shafee, cartoonist and co-founder of the annual Cairo Comix Festival. “And it's getting harder.” For four days in September, in a courtyard on the old campus of American University in Cairo, E
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The Scientist RSS
European Research Council Founder, Molecular Biologist Dies
Fotis Kafatos, a Greek researcher famous for his work on malaria, has died at age 77.
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Gizmodo
The First Known Interstellar Asteroid Looks Incredibly Weird
Artist’s impression (Image: ESO) Scientists know of 750,000 or so asteroids and comets—and all of them are part of this fine solar system. That is, all of them but one. And as new research shows, it’s weird as hell. Today, scientists are reporting their analysis of ‘Oumuamua, an interstellar object spotted last month. The oddly-shaped, fast-moving rock immediately surprised astronomers with its c
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Viden
Andreas Mogensen løfter sløret for Danmarks største rumprojekt
Den danske astronaut Andreas Mogensen har i dag løftet sløret for Danmarks største rumprojekt, ASIM, der efter flere års udvikling står færdigt i Det Europæiske Rumagentur (ESA) i morgen. Projektet er et avanceret observatorium på 314 kilo, der skal monteres på Den Internationale Rumstation (ISS), og det er med til at placere Danmark på rumforskningens verdenskort. - Det er altid spændende, når v
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Gizmodo
This Outdated Law Makes CRISPR Illegal in Canada—and That’s Hurting Science
Image: AP Images Canada is among the few countries in the world where genetically engineering human embryos isn’t just illegal, doing so could land you behind bars. In the United States, using genetic engineering techniques such as CRISPR to make genetic alterations that can be passed on to future generations is illegal, but scientists are still allowed to conduct experiments that include genetic
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Robotic device tracks plant growth at the cellular level
IMAGE: This is researcher Sarah Robinson setting up ACME in the lab. view more Credit: Cris Kuhlemeier, University of Bern Plant scientists have a new tool in their toolkit. The automated confocal micro-extensometer (ACME)--developed by a team of researchers in Europe and the US--allows scientists to measure spatial variation in the mechanical properties of plant cells with unprecedented ac
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Preclinical study demonstrates promising treatment for rare bone disease
IMAGE: Yu Yamaguchi, M.D., Ph.D., is a professor in the Human Genetics Program at SBP. view more Credit: SBP La Jolla, Calif., November 20, 2017 - Researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) have led a preclinical study demonstrating that the drug palovarotene suppresses the formation of bony tumors (osteochondromas) in models of multiple hereditary exostoses (MHE)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
PSU researchers design survey to tap students' motivation in STEM
IMAGE: Ellen Skinner, Ph.D., Professor of Human Development & Psychology Chair, Department of Psychology, Portland State University. Skinner led the study. view more Credit: Portland State University Researchers at Portland State University are learning more about undergraduates' experience in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) classes and sharing a set of survey questions th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Simplified method allows CGM users to leverage trend arrow data
WASHINGTON -- Endocrine Society experts have developed a streamlined method for using the Dexcom G5 Mobile Continuous Glucose Monitor (CGM) to help individuals with diabetes maintain better control of their glucose levels, according to two perspectives published in the Journal of the Endocrine Society . More than 30 million Americans have diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New oral anticoagulant drugs associated with lower kidney risks
ROCHESTER, Minn. -- Mayo Clinic researchers have shown a link between which type of oral anticoagulant (blood-thinning medication) a patient takes to prevent a stroke and increased risks of kidney function decline or failure. MULTIMEDIA ALERT: Video and audio are available for download on the Mayo Clinic News Network. Their study, published online today in the Journal of the American College of C
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
State of CPR education in US high schools
Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is known to improve survival of cardiac arrest; however, there is a disparate geographic variation in cardiac arrest survival and only a small number of the US population is trained in CPR annually. A review published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology found that over half of US states require some form of CPR training in high school,
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Gizmodo
Apple Criticized for Not Investigating App Developer Who Faked Her Cancer
A screenshot of Belle Gibson’s now defunct app, The Whole Pantry (left) and Gibson trying a prototype of the Apple Watch before it was released (right) When the Apple Watch launched in 2015, Belle Gibson was touted by Apple as a star. Not only had Gibson supposedly cured her own cancer through healthy eating, she now had an app for both the iPhone and Apple Watch that could help others do the sam
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Diabetes drug helps repair UV-damaged DNA in cells of 'Moon children'
The severe and debilitating genetic disease Xeroderma pigmentosum impedes cells to repair UV-induced DNA damage. Scientists found a drug approved for diabetes treatment to alleviate the impact of the gene defect in cell culture, which led to the discovery of a previously unknown DNA repair mechanism.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Benzodiazepines increase mortality in persons with Alzheimer's disease
Benzodiazepine and related drug use is associated with a 40 percent increase in mortality among persons with Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Underwater Sniffing of Star-Nosed Moles Is Mimicked for Chemical-Detecting ‘Electronic Nose’
The star-nosed mole has several unusual abilities. One of them is “sniffing” underwater by blowing bubbles and quickly re-inhaling them, detecting odors of its prey through the water. The moles’ “star” nose features a ring of tiny, pink tentacles and is the most sensitive known touch organ of any mammal.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Plesiosaur flippers inspire a steering mechanism for swimming robotic vehicle
Plesiosaurs, who thrived during the early to middle Jurassic Period, used four paddlelike flippers of nearly equal size and musculature to swim. Despite the seemingly subpar engineering, the fossil record reveals that plesiosaurs were widespread and prolific. This inspired a team to explore how swimming with four flippers might be advantageous compared to two.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bubbles clustering while pouring stout beers?
If you’ve poured a stout beer into a pint glass, you may have wondered about the or physics behind the rapid rise of bubbles and three-color shift when dark, medium and light shades are all clearly visible, before it transitions to simply beer and foam.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The physics behind dandelion seed plume dispersal revealed
The fluffy dandelion seed head infuriates gardeners, but delights physicists. That’s because those seeds may lend key insights into the physics of parachutes, useful for designing small drones, or micro air vehicles. Investigators reveal why, at low Reynolds numbers, the rules for big parachutes don’t apply to small dandelions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Magic' sinus paths could mean new instructions for nasal sprays
Sinus infections, inflammation and nasal congestion constantly plague Americans, often leading to unpleasant symptoms and even missed days of work. Traditional nasal spray anti-inflammatory medications attempt to treat the symptoms noninvasively, but are not very efficient in transmitting the active drug ingredients directly into the sinus cavities.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Raindrops splash pathogens onto crops
Pathogens, such as bacteria, viruses or fungi, cause harmful plant disease and often lead to the destruction of agricultural fields. With many possible dispersal methods, it can often be difficult to assess the damage of a pathogen’s impact before it’s too late.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Explosive' hot oil droplets could hurt your skin -- and air quality
Cooking in a frying pan with oil can quickly become dangerous if “explosive” hot oil droplets jump out of the pan, leading to painful burns. But these droplets may be doing something even more damaging: contributing to indoor air pollution.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Albatrosses hit by fishing and climate
Image copyright BAS Image caption There are about 700 breeding pairs of wandering albatrosses on Bird Island The spectacular wandering albatrosses in Sunday's Blue Planet programme on the BBC have suffered a major decline in numbers over the past three decades. New research suggests breeding pairs of this species are now little more than half what they were in the 1980s. Scientists say the losses
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Viden
De fleste blåhvaler er højrehåndede
Blåhvaler er det største dyr, der nogensinde har levet på Jorden med en længde og vægt op til henholdsvis 33 meter og 200 ton. Alligevel lever disse giganter af helt små rejelignende dyr kaldet lyskrebs eller krill. Når de store hvaler sætter jagten ind disse små dyr, har forskere nu fundet ud af, at hvalerne for meste laver et rul til højre inden de gaber over sværmen af lyskrebs. Lidt ligesom d
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genome sequencing reveals extensive inbreeding in Scandinavian wolves
Researchers from Uppsala University and others have for the first time determined the full genetic consequences of intense inbreeding in a threatened species. The large-scale genomic study of the Scandinavian wolf population is reported in Nature Ecology & Evolution . The Scandinavian wolf population was founded in the 1980s by only two individuals. This has subsequently led to intense inbreeding
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
BGRF scientists co-publish research paper on blockchain & AI for biomedical applications
IMAGE: Biogerontology Research Foundation Chief Science Officer (CSO) co-authored the landmark paper in the journal Oncotarget on the convergence of blockchain and AI to decentralize and galvanize healthcare and biomedical research.... view more Credit: Insilico Medicine Inc. Monday, November 20, 2017, London, UK: Biogerontology Research Foundation Chief Science Officer (CSO) co-authored th
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Bizarre shape of interstellar asteroid
Image copyright ESO/M. Kornmesser Image caption Artwork: 'Oumuamua is now fading from the view of telescopes An asteroid that visited us from interstellar space is one of the most elongated cosmic objects known to science, a study has shown. Discovered on 19 October, the unique object's speed and trajectory strongly suggested it originated in a planetary system around another star. Astronomers ha
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Previous evidence of water on Mars now identified as grainflows
Dark features previously proposed as evidence for significant liquid water flowing on Mars have now been identified as granular flows, where sand and dust move rather than liquid water, according to a new article. These findings indicate that present-day Mars may not have a significant volume of liquid water. The water-restricted conditions that exist on Mars would make it difficult for Earth-like
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Materialists collect Facebook friends and spend more time on social media
If you're materialistic, you're likely to use Facebook more frequently and intensely. A new article reveals that materialistic people see and treat their Facebook friends as 'digital objects,' and have significantly more friends than people who are less interested in possessions. It also shows that materialists have a greater need to compare themselves with others on Facebook.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Key signaling protein for muscle growth
Researchers have discovered the importance of a well-known protein, myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88), in the development and regeneration of muscles. Researchers have described the protein's critical role in the growth and repair of skeletal muscles, both in post-natal development and in the regeneration of injured adult muscles.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Improved method of engineering T-cells to attack cancer
Researchers have found a way to boost the cancer-destroying ability of the immune system's T-cells, offering new hope in the fight against a wide range of cancers.
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Ars Technica
The dream of the ’90s is alive in this Windows 95 screensaver indie game
reader comments 43 Twenty-two years ago, Microsoft Windows took a big leap forward with Windows 95. Most would say that Windows 95 was significant for its addition of the Start button, or the merging of MS-DOS and Windows, or plug and play. Maybe they were wrong; maybe it was the screensavers that mattered the most. That's what Screensaver Subterfuge , an indie game made by Cahoots Malone , posit
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Ars Technica
US Navy sends underwater robots to assist in search for Argentine sub [Updated]
reader comments 28 An Iver Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV), here being used as part of Exercise Eager Lion with the Royal Jordanian Navy in 2015 in a mine countermeasures role. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Arthurgwain L. Marquez A US Navy Bluefin AUV is deployed from a ship in 2014 in support of the search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. US Navy photo by Mass C
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
UK government announces research-spending hike ahead of budget
The UK government seems to be making good on its promises to increase research spending significantly over the next decade. In an announcement on 20 November, the government said that it would boost public spending on research and development (R&D) to £12.5 billion (US$16.5 billion) in 2021–22, an increase of £500 million on what is planned for the year before. The hike builds on a surprise annou
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Gizmodo
This Guy Is Living My Fantasy of Flying Like a Bird
GIF Even with the hours of preamble as I shuffle through the airport to my gate, flying is still an amazing experience for me. But taking off in a commercial airliner isn’t anywhere near as magical as the way Jean-Baptiste Chandelier takes flight in this stylishly-edited new video , which makes paragliding look as close to being a bird as any human can hope to be. Dangling beneath a parachute pow
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Astronomers reveal nearby stars that are among the oldest in our galaxy
IMAGE: This is Dr. Wei-Chun Jao, research scientist in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Georgia State University. view more Credit: Dr. Wei-Chun Jao ATLANTA--Astronomers have discovered some of the oldest stars in our Milky Way galaxy by determining their locations and velocities, according to a study led by scientists at Georgia State University. Just like humans, stars have a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Smoking study personalizes treatment
A simple blood test is allowing researchers to determine which patients should be prescribed varenicline (Chantix) to stop smoking and which patients could do just as well, and avoid side effects, by using a nicotine patch.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hydrological implications of rapid global warming
Researchers studying a rapid global warming event, around 56 million years ago, have shown evidence of major changes in the intensity of rainfall and flood events. The findings indicate some of the likely implications should current trends of rising carbon dioxide and global warming continue.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What makes soil, soil? Researchers find hidden clues in DNA
Ever wondered what makes a soil, soil? And could soil from the Amazon rainforest really be the same as soil from your garden?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Zika-related nerve damage caused by immune response to the virus
The immune system's response to the Zika virus, rather than the virus itself, may be responsible for nerve-related complications of infection, according to a Yale study. This insight could lead to new ways of treating patients with Zika-related complications, such as Guillain-Barré syndrome, the researchers said.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Molecules in spit may be able to diagnose, predict length of concussions
Diagnosing a concussion can sometimes be a guessing game, but clues taken from small molecules in saliva may be able to help diagnose and predict the duration of concussions in children, according to researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Spin current from heat: New material increases efficiency
Electronic devices such as computers generate heat that mostly goes to waste. Physicists have found a way to use this energy: They apply the heat to generate magnetic signals known as 'spin currents'. In future, these signals could replace some of the electrical current in electronic components.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Protein 'intentionally' terminates own synthesis by destabilizing synthesis machinery -- the ribosome
Cell biologists have discovered that a protein, during its synthesis, may destabilize the structure of the ribosome and end its own synthesis prematurely, and found that this phenomenon is used for adapting the cell to its environment.
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Popular Science
There's a 'quiet crisis' happening in the U.S. Air Force
This article originally appeared in Flying Magazine . In July 2016, United States Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David Goldfein and then-Secretary Deborah Lee James revealed their plan to fix what they referred to as a “quiet crisis.” The Air Force, they wrote for Defense One faced a shortage of 500 fighter pilots that would grow to 700 by the end of the year. In all, the USAF was short 1,500 avia
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Big Think
Mentally Challenging Yourself Curbs Anxiety and Depression, New Research Shows
I recall the different methods I used to employ to fight off panic attacks. Cleaning was a popular choice. When the attacks became more regular during college my dorm room was spotless. Then there were cardiovascular hacks: running, either around the block or on a treadmill, often alleviated the physiological surge, as well as sex, which not only increased my heart and breathing rates but also
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Borophene shines alone as 2-D plasmonic material
IMAGE: Rice University scientists calculate that the atom-thick film of boron known as borophene could be the first pure two-dimensional material naturally able to emit visible and near-infrared light by activating... view more Credit: Sharmila Shirodkar/Rice University An atom-thick film of boron could be the first pure two-dimensional material able to emit visible and near-infrared li
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chimp females who leave home postpone parenthood
DURHAM, N.C. -- New moms need social support, and mother chimpanzees are no exception. So much so that female chimps that lack supportive friends and family wait longer to start having babies, according to researchers who have combed through the records of Jane Goodall's famous Gombe chimpanzees. Wild chimpanzee females in western Tanzania who leave home or are orphaned take roughly three years l
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Realistic rodent model of drug addiction
IMAGE: The drug-seeking phase requires the completion of 2 distinct response sequences. If either the 1st or 2nd response sequence during the drug-seeking period is performed incorrectly (indicated by dashed lines),... view more Credit: Singer et al., JNeurosci (2017) Drug addiction may not require a habitual relationship with a substance, suggests findings from a new model of cocaine adminis
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NeuroExpresso: Web app enables exploration of brain cell types
IMAGE: Mouse brain cell type specific expression database compiled from publicly available datasets. view more Credit: Mancarci et al., eNeuro (2017) An online database of gene expression profiles for 36 major types of brain cells from 12 brain regions, based on mouse data from multiple laboratories, is reported in a new paper published in eNeuro . The tool is provided as a resource for neuro
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Gizmodo
Flashlight Apps Snuck Malware Into Google's Play Store, Targeting Bank Accounts
Photo: Getty Active on Google Play Store as recently as last Friday, a mobile banking trojan infected thousands of users who thought they downloading games or innocent-looking apps, according to research published by a trio of cybersecurity firms. The malware, known as BankBot, was concealed inside various flashlight and Solitaire apps, and was first detected by researchers on October 13th. After
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Gizmodo
A Pair of Dyson Uprights Are Already On Sale For Black Friday
Dyson Ball Multifloor 2 | $250 | Amazon Dyson Cinetic Big Ball Animal Plus Allergy | $450 | Amazon Dyson dominates the list of our readers’ favorite vacuums , and two of their most popular uprights are on sale on Amazon. First up, the Ball Multi Floor 2 features a smart cleaning head that automatically raises and lowers itself based on the kind of floor you’re on, ensuring that the vacuum always
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Antarctic landscape insights keep ice loss forecasts on the radar
New maps of a mountainous landscape under a key glacier in West Antarctica will be a valuable aid in forecasting sea level changes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Righty blue whales sometimes act like lefties, study finds
To support their hulking bodies, blue whales use various acrobatic maneuvers to scoop up many individually tiny prey, filtering the water back out through massive baleen plates. In most cases, the whales roll to the right as they capture their prey, just as most people are right-handed. But, researchers now show that the whales shift directions and roll left when performing 360° barrel rolls in sh
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nanoparticles could allow for faster, better medicine
Gold nanoparticles could help make drugs act more quickly and effectively, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Light green plants save nitrogen without sacrificing photosynthetic efficiency
Scientists designed plants with light green leaves with hopes of allowing more light to penetrate the crop canopy and increase overall light use efficiency and yield. This strategy was tested in a recent modeling study that found leaves with reduced chlorophyll content do not actually improve canopy-level photosynthesis, but instead, conserve a significant amount of nitrogen that the plant could r
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
One source of potent greenhouse gas pinned down
Researchers have discovered the first known methane-producing microbe that is active in an oxygen-rich environment -- a finding that suggests today's global climate models may be misjudging the amount of methane being released into the atmosphere.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Clay mineral waters Earth's mantle from the inside
The first observation of a super-hydrated phase of the clay mineral kaolinite could improve our understanding of processes leading to volcanism and affecting earthquakes. In the lab, scientists created conditions similar to those in subduction zones where an oceanic plate dives under the continental crust. Transport of water with subducting plates causes volcanic activity, according to new researc
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientific research on disasters represents 0.22 percent of global scholarly output
Despite loss of life and economic devastation worldwide due to increasingly frequent natural and human-made disasters, scientific research on disasters represents a small percentage of scholarly output.
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Dagens Medicin
København taber kampen om EMA
København taber kampen om EMA Det Europæiske Lægemiddelagentur flytter fra London til Amsterdam. Steffen Bang Nielsen Close: Biografi Webredaktør , Dagens Medicin Født i 1968, uddannet fra Danmarks Medie- og Journalisthøjskole i 1995. Journalist på Dagens Medicin, Dagens Pharma og Kommunal Sundhed siden 1999. Har tidligere arbejdet hos IDG Danmark og JydskeVestkysten. Flere artikler af Ste
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Science | The Guardian
London loses European Medicines Agency in Brexit relocation
London is losing the European Medicines Agency to Amsterdam, European ministers have decided, in one of the first concrete signs of Brexit as the UK prepares to leave the bloc in 18 months. Amsterdam was chosen by the EU to host the agency, after a tie with Milan in the final. The Dutch capital beat its Italian rival, only after lots were drawn, after a dead heat resulted from three rounds of Eur
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New on MIT Technology Review
This Inquisitive AI Will Kick Your Butt at Battleship
A remarkably inquisitive artificial-intelligence system developed by a team of researchers at NYU has learned to play a game similar to Battleship with mind-blowing skill. In the simple game the researchers created, players seek to find their opponent’s ships hidden on a small grid of squares by asking a series of questions that can be answered with a single number or word. Their program figures
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Mental health mobile apps are effective self-help tools
IMAGE: This is a student using an app for mental health. view more Credit: BYU Photo When it comes to strengthening your mental or emotional health, would you trust an app? A trio of Brigham Young University health science researchers has published new research that says the answer is yes. The group was looking to identify what it is about health apps that influences users' behavior. Over
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New catalyst controls activation of a carbon-hydrogen bond
IMAGE: The dirhodium (shown in blue) drives the reaction, while the shape of the scaffold around it controls which C-H bond the catalyst works on. view more Credit: Graphic images by Kuangbiao Liao, Emory University. Chemists have developed another catalyst that can selectively activate a carbon-hydrogen bond, part of an ongoing strategy to revolutionize the field of organic synthesis and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Materialists collect Facebook friends and spend more time on social media
London, November 20, 2017 - If you're materialistic, you're likely to use Facebook more frequently and intensely. A new paper in Heliyon reveals that materialistic people see and treat their Facebook friends as "digital objects," and have significantly more friends than people who are less interested in possessions. It also shows that materialists have a greater need to compare themselves with ot
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Live Science
Diving Scientists Report 'Big Changes' Beneath Antarctic Ice Shelf
Climate change may be leading to shifts in the communities of sea life beneath an Antarctic ice shelf, researchers say. Scientists diving beneath Antarctica's Ross Ice Shelf have discovered unexpected changes in the seafloor ecosystem compared to previous studies of the same area, and they think the thinning of the ice shelf caused by climate change may be to blame. "Surprisingly big ch
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NYT > Science
Wake Up and Smell the Traffic? London Tries Coffee to Power Buses
The first batch of 6,000 liters, or about 1,580 gallons, would power one bus for a year, Bio-bean said in a news release. According to official figures in 2015, London’s buses used 240 million liters of diesel fuel a year. Given the tiny proportion of coffee-based oil in the bus fuel, there was no immediate, empirical indication that the noisome whiff of central London’s air would turn into the a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Materialists collect Facebook friends and spend more time on social media
Credit: CC0 Public Domain If you're materialistic, you're likely to use Facebook more frequently and intensely. A new paper in Heliyon reveals that materialistic people see and treat their Facebook friends as "digital objects," and have significantly more friends than people who are less interested in possessions. It also shows that materialists have a greater need to compare themselves with othe
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Popular Science
Dandelion fluff makes a surprisingly effective parachute
Dandelions and their relatives are pretty seasoned voyagers. Their seeds can sometimes travel 100 miles on the wind, and even drift over the sea to repopulate islands decimated by volcanoes . “They can achieve such incredible distances with no energy consumption,” says Cathal Cummins, an applied mathematician at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. He’s investigating how dandelions manage the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New way to write magnetic info could pave the way for hardware neural networks
'Hexagonal artificial spin ice ground state' -- a pattern never demonstrated before. Colored arrows show north or south polarization. Credit: Gartside et al/Imperial College London Researchers have shown how to write any magnetic pattern desired onto nanowires, which could help computers mimic how the brain processes information. Much current computer hardware, such as hard drives, use magnetic m
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Can social media users prevent use of online information to characterize and target them?
A new study examines how organizations use information people disclose on social network sites (SNS) to predict their personal characteristics and whether SNS users can successfully block certain information (and how much) to better protect their privacy. A novel analytical tool called a "cloaking device" to prevent the use of specific information and how effective it may be are discussed in an ar
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Gizmodo
Apple Received a Warrant for the Sutherland Springs Shooter's iPhone Data
Photo: Getty Law enforcement officials investigating the Nov. 5 mass shooting in Sutherland Springs, Texas, have served Apple with a warrant for the data held on an iPhone SE used by the shooter. The warrant was served two days after a special agent with the Federal Bureau of Investigation said during a press conference that the agency was unable to decrypt the phone and criticized technology com
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Feed: All Latest
The Best Black Friday and Cyber Monday 2017 TV and Home Theater Deals
Sometimes the term "Black Friday" seems like a misnomer. A possible replacement might include "Televisions-On-Sale Friday." Yes, this is one of the most popular times of the year to score a big-ticket electronics item for comparatively little dinero, but sorting through the white noise can be a little difficult. If you're in the mood to update your home entertainment system before Aunt Gertude an
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Live Science
Earth 'Breathes' in Amazing Time-Lapse Video from Space
For 20 years, NASA satellites have monitored Earth from space, tracking the pulse of life in seasonal patterns as heat moves around the planet, sea ice grows and shrinks, and vegetation blooms and recedes on the continents. And now, data gathered by a fleet of satellites circling Earth since 1997 have been visualized as a breathtaking time-lapse video of our dynamic planet, capturing the mo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New way to write magnetic info could pave the way for hardware neural networks
IMAGE: Illustration of the atomic force microscope tip writing a nanowire. view more Credit: Gartside et al/Imperial College London Researchers have shown how to write any magnetic pattern desired onto nanowires, which could help computers mimic how the brain processes information. Much current computer hardware, such as hard drives, use magnetic memory devices. These rely on magnetic s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can social media users prevent use of online information to characterize and target them?
IMAGE: Big Data , published quarterly online with open access options and in print, facilitates and supports the efforts of researchers, analysts, statisticians, business leaders, and policymakers to improve operations, profitability, and... view more Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers New Rochelle, November 20, 2017--A new study examines how organizations use information people discl
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Previous evidence of water on Mars now identified as grainflows
IMAGE: This HiRISE image cutout shows Recurring Slope Lineae in Tivat crater on Mars in enhanced color. The narrow, dark flows descend downhill (towards the upper left). Analysis shows that the... view more Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona/USGS Dark features previously proposed as evidence for significant liquid water flowing on Mars have now been identified as granular flows, where san
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sleeve gastrectomy, common weight-loss surgery, lowers women's tolerance to alcohol
URBANA, Ill. - Women who have had gastric sleeve surgery to lose weight may want to consider limiting the number of alcoholic drinks they consume post-surgery. A new study from a team of researchers at the University of Illinois and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that after undergoing sleeve gastrectomy, women could be legally intoxicated after drinking half the numbe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cell cycle proteins help immune cells trap microbes with nets made of DNA
IMAGE: This photograph shows bacteria (Shigella flexneri) trapped in a NET. The mesh-like structure of the NET is visible between two still-intact neutrophils. view more Credit: Volker Brinkmann In your bloodstream, there are immune cells called neutrophils that, when faced with a pathogenic threat, will expel their DNA like a net to contain it. These DNA snares are called neutrophil extracel
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Swiss nuclear plant finds defective tubes from France's Areva
"The nuclear power plant in Leibstadt informed the Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (IFSN) a few days ago that some of its fuel production components did not meet specifications", the agency said in a statement Tubes supplied by French nuclear energy giant Areva to a plant in northern Switzerland are defective and will be replaced, Swiss nuclear safety inspectors and the company said Monday. "
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Live Science
8,000-Year-Old Rock Art Includes the World's Oldest Images of Dogs
Etched into the rock walls of dried-out valleys and slopes in the Arabian Peninsula, the 8,000-year-old hunting scenes even feature some dogs on leashes. Those images —the oldest archaeological evidence of dog leashes —suggest humans were controlling and training dogs even before they settled down into farming communities. The dog carvings come from the rock-art sites of Shuwaymis and Jubba
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Seafloor sediments appear to enhance earthquake and tsunami danger in Pacific Northwest
The Cascadia Subduction Zone is capable of generating powerful earthquakes. The study found compact sediments along the coast of Washington and northern Oregon, a result that suggests that the area could be more prone to producing larger quakes than subduction zone areas farther south with less compact sediments. Adapted from FEMA graphic. Credit: FEMA/Jackson School of Geosciences/UT Austin The
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Gizmodo
Ancient Cave Art Depicts Oldest Evidence of Dogs Wearing Leashes
Panel with highlight color added. (Image: Guagnin et al., 2017) A new analysis of ancient rock art demonstrates that humans hunted with dogs on the Arabian Peninsula over 8,000 years ago—and it looks like those dogs wore leashes. There are lots of questions around the origin of dog domestication, such as when, where, and how it happened. But a newly analyzed set of panels depicts scenes of leashe
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Ars Technica
Verizon may sign new deal with NFL to expand game streaming rights
Enlarge (credit: Daniel Spiess ) Verizon and the National Football League are in talks to sign another streaming rights deal. According to a Bloomberg report , the wireless provider and the NFL are close to finalizing a new deal that would let Verizon stream games to Internet-connected TVs, tablets, and phones. Verizon's previous deal only allowed it to stream games to devices with screens that a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Patient-centered medical home model improves chronic disease management
IMAGE: Bar graph showing statistically significant changes in percentage of PACT clinic populations meeting clinical guidelines. view more Credit: University of Pittsburgh PITTSBURGH, Nov. 20, 2017 - Data from more than 800 Veterans Health Administration (VHA) primary care clinics revealed that national implementation of a patient-centered medical home model was effective at improving several
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Now you like it, now you don't
Enjoyment of music is considered a subjective experience; what one person finds gratifying, another may find irritating. Music theorists have long emphasized that although musical taste is relative, our enjoyment of music, be it classical or heavy metal, arises, among other aspects, from structural features of music, such as chord or rhythm patterns that generate anticipation and expectancy. Now,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Seafloor sediments appear to enhance Earthquake and Tsunami danger in Pacific Northwest
IMAGE: Lead researcher Shoushou Han in front of an array of air guns, the source of the soundwaves used to image the seafloor. view more Credit: Shoushou Han/UT Austin. The Cascadia Subduction Zone off the coast of the Pacific Northwest has all the ingredients for making powerful earthquakes--and according to the geological record, the region is due for its next "big one." A new stu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First known interstellar visitor is an 'oddball'
In October astronomers were surprised by a visitor that came racing into our Solar System from interstellar space. Now, researchers using the Gemini Observatory have determined that the first known object to graze our Solar System from beyond is similar to, but definitely not, your average asteroid or comet. "This thing is an oddball," said Karen Meech of the University of Hawaii's Instit
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Do women receive appropriate counseling when they freeze their eggs?
IMAGE: Journal of Women's Health , published monthly, is a core multidisciplinary journal dedicated to the diseases and conditions that hold greater risk for or are more prevalent among women, as well... view more Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers New Rochelle, NY, November 20, 2017--Oocyte cryopreservation is on the rise, and whether a woman freezes her eggs before undergoing medica
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists discover most blue whales are 'right-handed' -- except when they swim upward
IMAGE: A blue whale dives into the water off the California coast. view more Credit: Craig Hayslip, Oregon State University Marine Mammal Institute CORVALLIS, Ore. - A team of scientists that used motion-sensing tags to track the movements of more than five dozen blue whales off the California coast discovered that most have a lateralization bias - in other words, they essentially are "right-
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Video tags reveal surprising details of blue whale feeding behavior
The lunge feeding of blue whales is an extraordinary biomechanical event in which the largest animal on Earth accelerates and opens its mouth under water, expanding its enormous throat pouch to engulf a huge volume of water, then filtering out its prey (small crustaceans called krill) by forcing the water through sieve-like baleen plates. "It's very costly energetically, but it's also very effici
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Righty blue whales sometimes act like lefties, study finds
Blue whales are the largest animals in the world, with bodies that can weigh as much as 25 elephants and extend over the length of a basketball court. To support their hulking bodies, the whale use various acrobatic maneuvers to scoop up many individually tiny prey, filtering the water back out through massive baleen plates. In most cases, the whales roll to the right as they captur
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First interstellar asteroid is like nothing seen before
For the first time ever astronomers have studied an asteroid that has entered the Solar System from interstellar space. Observations from ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile and other observatories around the world show that this unique object was traveling through space for millions of years before its chance encounter with our star system. It appears to be a dark, reddish, highly-elongated rocky
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Artificial photosynthesis gets big boost from new catalyst
A new catalyst brings researchers one step closer to artificial photosynthesis -- a system that, just like plants, would use renewable energy to convert carbon dioxide (CO2) into stored chemical energy. By both capturing carbon emissions and storing energy from solar or wind power, the invention provides a one-two punch in the fight against climate change.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New biology of Alzheimer's disease described by researchers
A unique model for the biology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is now being described by researchers, which may lead to an entirely novel approach for treating the disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New cell therapy for relapsed leukemia patients, suggested by clinical trial
A significant proportion of children and young adults with treatment-resistant B-cell leukemia who participated in a small study achieved remission with the help of a new form of gene therapy, according to researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Blueprint to reduce wasteful blood transfusions
By analyzing data from randomized clinical trials comparing blood transfusion approaches, experts endorse recommendations for blood transfusions that reduce blood use to improve patient safety and outcomes. The report also provides a how-to guide for launching a patient blood management program.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain cell advance brings fresh hope for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease therapies
Scientists have developed a new system to study Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in the laboratory, paving the way for research to find treatments for the fatal brain disorder.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Smiling human faces are attractive to dogs, thanks to oxytocin
Researchers found that oxytocin made dogs interested in smiling human faces. It also made them see angry faces as less threatening. Associated with affection and trust, the hormone oxytocin is probably a key factor in the interaction between dogs and humans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New approach to studying chromosomes' centers may reveal link to Down syndrome and more
A new technique may force the centromere -- the mysterious stretch of DNA in the center of every chromosome -- to give up its secrets at last. The first test of the approach has yielded clues about the role of centromeres in Down syndrome, and further use may accelerate research on other conditions that may have roots in centromere-related problems.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Digital pills successfully monitor opioid use after injury
Investigators report on the results from a pilot study of 15 individuals who received a prescription to take oxycodone digital pills as needed following treatment for acute fractures. The team found that the opioid-naïve patients self-administered opioids to manage pain for only a brief period and only took a fraction of the number of pills they were given.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What's in your wheat? Scientists piece together genome of most common bread wheat
Scientists have successfully used two separate gene technologies to assemble the most complete genome sequence to date of Triticum aestivum, the most common cultivated species of wheat used to make bread.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon goes into the holidays with magnified store presence
This Tuesday, Sept. 26, 2017, photo shows Pikmi Pops from Moose Toys on display at the 2017 TTPM Holiday Showcase in New York. Some of the hottest toys this year are LOL Surprise and Pikmi Pops. These and similar toys hide small stuffed animals or dolls inside plastic balls that are wrapped in several layers of packaging. Kids peel each layer, revealing tiny bags filled with trinkets, stickers, m
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New Scientist - News
Spongy clay might create huge water deposits deep inside Earth
Land containing kaolinite covered with rain water in Tanjung Pandan TodiArtz / Alamy By Andy Coghlan We might finally know how ocean-sized deposits of water hundreds of kilometres below Earth’s surface are getting there. A form of clay, called kaolinite, might be soaking up water like a sponge and bringing it deep underground. Depending on the location, kaolinite accounts for between 5 and 60
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New Scientist - News
Your music tastes can be changed by using magnets on your brain
Matt Sayles/Invision/AP/REX/Shutterstock By Sam Wong Can’t stand the new Taylor Swift track? A quick jolt to the brain might change your mind. Just a few minutes of magnetic stimulation to the front of the brain was all it took for researchers to increase or decrease people’s love of music. They even managed to influence how much of their hard-earned cash they’re willing to spend on it. Rober
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Viden
Apples julemusik forsinket for andet år i træk
For andet år i træk har Apple måtte udskyde en planlagt lancering af et nyt lydprodukt. Sidste år var det de trådløse høretelefoner AirPods. I år er det så den såkaldte smarte højttaler HomePod, som ikke bliver klar til den planlagte lanceringsdato. Læs også: Nyt fra Apple: Smart højttaler, virtual reality og opdateringer galore Apple lovede ellers i forbindelse med præsentationen af højttaleren
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Science | The Guardian
Joseph Banks: botanical work on Cook's voyage finally makes it to print
T he publishing deadline was missed by more than 200 years, but finally the work of one of the great men of the Enlightenment has been printed and distributed, sharing with the world the detailed botanical work of Joseph Banks on his journey aboard James Cook’s Endeavour. Cook’s mission when he left England in 1768 was ostensibly to chart the transit of Venus – a measurement that would allow the
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Science | The Guardian
Did you solve it? This apple teaser is hard core!
On my puzzle blog earlier today I set you the following puzzle: You and your two friends Pip and Blossom are captured by an evil gang of logicians. In order to gain your freedom, the gang’s chief, Kurt, sets you this fearsome challenge. The three of you are put in adjacent cells. In each cell is a quantity of apples. Each of you can count the number of apples in your own cell, but not in anyone e
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Science | The Guardian
On a roll: blue whales switch 'handedness' when rolling to scoop food
They are the largest animals on Earth, can live to around 90 years old and have a tongue that weighs as much as an elephant. Now scientists have revealed another insight into blue whales: how they roll. A study has found that blue whales have a tendency to roll to one side or the other when lunging for prey, with the preference apparently down to the depth of the water and the type of roll they e
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cognitive science
Theory linking cognition, genes and income refuted
A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanoparticles could allow for faster, better medicine
A new study, co-conducted by Binghamton University Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering Amber Doiron, is one of the first of its kind to look deeper into these nanoparticles in regards to health. Credit: Binghamton University, State University of New York Gold nanoparticles could help make drugs act more quickly and effectively, according to new research conducted at Binghamton Universit
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
James Webb Space Telescope completes final cryogenic testing
NASA's James Webb Space Telescope sits inside Chamber A at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston after having completed its cryogenic testing on Nov. 18, 2017. This marked the telescope's final cryogenic testing, and it ensured the observatory is ready for the frigid, airless environment of space. Credit: NASA/Chris Gunn The vault-like, 40-foot diameter, 40-ton door of Chamber A at NASA's Johnso
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
ESO observations show first interstellar asteroid is like nothing seen before
This artist's impression shows the first interstellar asteroid: `Oumuamua. This unique object was discovered on Oct. 19, 2017 by the Pan-STARRS 1 telescope in Hawai`i. Subsequent observations from ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile and other observatories around the world show that it was travelling through space for millions of years before its chance encounter with our star system. `Oumuamua s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers pin down one source of a potent greenhouse gas
At a Lake Erie wetland [Old Woman Creek National Estuarine Research Reserve], researchers at The Ohio State University and their colleagues have discovered first known methane-producing microbe that is active in an oxygen-rich environment. Credit: Jordan Angle, The Ohio State University. A study of a Lake Erie wetland suggests that scientists have vastly underestimated the number of places methan
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists discover most blue whales are 'right-handed'—except when they swim upward
A blue whale dives into the water off the California coast. Credit: Craig Hayslip, Oregon State University Marine Mammal Institute A team of scientists that used motion-sensing tags to track the movements of more than five dozen blue whales off the California coast discovered that most have a lateralization bias - in other words, they essentially are "right-handed" or "left-handed." That didn't n
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Recurring martian streaks: flowing sand, not water?
This inner slope of a Martian crater has several of the seasonal dark streaks called "recurrent slope lineae," or RSL, that a November 2017 report interprets as granular flows, rather than darkening due to flowing water. The image is from the HiRISE camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UA/USGS Dark features on Mars previously considered evidence for subsurface fl
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Gizmodo
DJI Rewarded Bug Bounty Discovery With Legal Threats, Developer Claims
Photo: Getty Bug bounty programs are indispensable tools for finding security vulnerabilities and are used by major tech companies like Google and Microsoft. Following an order from the US Army for personnel to stop using DJI drones due to security issues, the company launched its own bug bounty program. Now, one researcher says he found an incredible screw-up, worth $30,000, but then received ex
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nanoparticles could allow for faster, better medicine
IMAGE: A new study, co-conducted by Binghamton University Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering Amber Doiron, is one of the first of its kind to look deeper into these nanoparticles in regards... view more Credit: Binghamton University, State University of New York BINGHAMTON, NY- Gold nanoparticles could help make drugs act more quickly and effectively, according to new research cond
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ESO observations show first interstellar asteroid is like nothing seen before
On Oct. 19, 2017, the Pan-STARRS 1 telescope in Hawai`i picked up a faint point of light moving across the sky. It initially looked like a typical fast-moving small asteroid, but additional observations over the next couple of days allowed its orbit to be computed fairly accurately. The orbit calculations revealed beyond any doubt that this body did not originate from inside the Solar System,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA's James Webb Space Telescope completes final cryogenic testing
The vault-like, 40-foot diameter, 40-ton door of Chamber A at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston was unsealed on November 18, signaling the end of cryogenic testing for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope. The historic chamber's massive door opening brings to a close about 100 days of testing for Webb, a significant milestone in the telescope's journey to the launch pad. The cryogenic vacuum te
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Added Arctic data shows global warming didn't pause
Missing Arctic temperature data, not Mother Nature, created the seeming slowdown of global warming from 1998 to 2012, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Rise in oxygen levels links to ancient explosion of life, researchers find
Scientists have found that oxygen levels appear to increase by roughly 80 percent at about the same time as a three-fold increase in biodiversity during the Ordovician Period, between 445 and 485 million years ago.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Space dust may transport life between worlds, research suggests
Life on Earth might have originated from tiny organisms brought to our planet in streams of fast-moving space dust, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
MRI uncovers brain abnormalities in people with depression, anxiety
Researchers using MRI have discovered a common pattern of structural abnormalities in the brains of people with depression and social anxiety, according to a new study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A curious quirk brings organic diode lasers one step closer
A red laser beam shines on a card bearing a replica of Penn State's academic logo. Credit: Yufei Jia/Penn State Since their invention in 1962, semiconductor diode lasers have revolutionized communications and made possible information storage and retrieval in CDs, DVDs and Blu-ray devices. These diode lasers use inorganic semiconductors grown in elaborate high vacuum systems. Now, a team of resea
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Gizmodo
This Is America's Most Embarrassing Automotive Engineering Failure
America has had an incredible, dynamic, and often quite innovative automotive industry for well over a century, but that rich automotive history also includes many missteps and some outright failures. There’s one engineering failure, though, that makes the Pinto gas tank placement and the Vega’s engine woes seem like mere blips: the persistent and depressing problem of terminal headliner sag. I r
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Science : NPR
Spit Test May Help Reveal Concussion Severity
Many children require quickly from a concussion, but some have much more severe symptoms. Competitive sports are a major source of injury. Getty Images/Hero Images hide caption toggle caption Getty Images/Hero Images A little spit may help predict whether a child's concussion symptoms will subside in days or persist for weeks. A test that measures fragments of genetic material in saliva was nearl
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Clay mineral waters Earth's mantle from the inside
Ordinary kaolinite under an electron microscope. Credit: Yonsei University, Yongjae Lee The first observation of a super-hydrated phase of the clay mineral kaolinite could improve our understanding of processes that lead to volcanism and affect earthquakes. In high-pressure and high-temperature X-ray measurements that were partly conducted at DESY, scientists created conditions similar to those i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA spots Tropical Depression Kirogi dissipating
Tropical Depression Kirogi made landfall in southeastern Vietnam on Nov. 19 and NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the storm as it was dissipating over land.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Light green plants save nitrogen without sacrificing photosynthetic efficiency
Scientists have designed plants with light green leaves to allow more light to penetrate the crop canopy to increase photosynthesis and yield; however, models show these plants likely require less nitrogen and photosynthesis is hardly affected. Credit: Claire Benjamin/University of Illinois The top leaves of crops absorb far more light than they can use, starving lower leaves of light. Scientists
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Futurity.org
Colliding and fusing nanoparticles caught on tape
Researchers have captured organic nanoparticles colliding and fusing on video for the first time. This unprecedented view of “chemistry in motion” will aid nanoscientists developing new drug delivery methods, as well as demonstrate how an emerging imaging technique opens a new window on a very tiny world. “I had an image in my mind, but the first time I saw these fusing nanoparticles in black and
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The Atlantic
The Real Cult of Charles Manson
“All of us are excited by what we most deplore,” Martin Amis wrote in the London Review of Books in 1980, reviewing Joan Didion’s The White Album . In the title piece in that collection, Didion’s second, the essayist recalls sitting in her sister-in-law’s swimming pool in Beverly Hills on August 9, 1969, when the phone rang. The friend on the line had heard that across town there had been a spate
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UofL researchers discover key signaling protein for muscle growth
IMAGE: This is Ashok Kumar, Ph.D. view more Credit: University of Louisville LOUISVILLE, Ky. - Researchers at the University of Louisville have discovered the importance of a well-known protein, myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88), in the development and regeneration of muscles. Ashok Kumar, Ph.D., professor and distinguished university scholar in UofL's Departm
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Smoking study personalizes treatment
A simple blood test is allowing Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) researchers to determine which patients should be prescribed varenicline (Chantix) to stop smoking and which patients could do just as well, and avoid side effects, by using a nicotine patch. The first-of-its-kind clinical study combines smoking cessation with personalized medicine by learning whether the patient is a "no
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Light green plants save nitrogen without sacrificing photosynthetic efficiency
The top leaves of crops absorb far more light than they can use, starving lower leaves of light. Scientists designed plants with light green leaves with hopes of allowing more light to penetrate the crop canopy and increase overall light use efficiency and yield. This strategy was tested in a recent modeling study that found leaves with reduced chlorophyll content do not actually improve
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A curious quirk brings organic diode lasers one step closer
Since their invention in 1962, semiconductor diode lasers have revolutionized communications and made possible information storage and retrieval in CDs, DVDs and Blu-ray devices. These diode lasers use inorganic semiconductors grown in elaborate high vacuum systems. Now, a team of researchers has taken a big step toward creating a diode laser from a hybrid organic-inorganic material that can be de
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Gizmodo
Watch This Perfectly-Timed Bus Block a Livestream of the Georgia Dome, Right as it Implodes
GIF GIF: Facebook A building implosion is a one-time thing; once a structure has been razed, there’s no resetting for a take two. That’s why The Weather Channel set up its livestream camera of the Georgia Dome’s demolition over half an hour before the first scheduled kaboom—except it forgot to double-check the local bus schedule. Mere seconds after the first explosive charges are fired, one of At
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NYT > Science
New Gene Treatment Effective for Some Leukemia Patients
In some cases, those two treatments have brought long and seemingly miraculous remissions to people who were expected to die. Kymriah and Yescarta require removing millions of each patient’s T-cells — disease-fighting white blood cells — and genetically engineering them to seek and destroy cancer cells. The T-cells are then dripped back into the patient, where they home in on protein molecules ca
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NYT > Science
Skin Cancers Rise, Along With Questionable Treatments
Dermatology — a specialty built not on flashy, leading edge medicine but on thousands of small, often banal procedures — has become increasingly lucrative in recent years. The annual dermatology services market in the United States, excluding cosmetic procedures, is nearly $11 billion and growing, according to IBISWorld, a market research firm. The business potential has attracted private equity
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Inside Science
How Do Lady Turkeys Pick Their Guys?
How Do Lady Turkeys Pick Their Guys? Female turkeys pick males based on dangly facial ornaments called snoods -- the more dangly, the better. Turkey.jpg Image credits: Alexandra Giese/ Shutterstock Creature Monday, November 20, 2017 - 11:15 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- When you pick a turkey, you're probably looking for things like plumpness and price. But when a female turkey ma
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Science | The Guardian
Blue Planet II: what have we learned so far?
I t is testament to the number of spectacles packed into Blue Planet II that the strategic change of gender a giant wrasse is – scientifically speaking, at least – one of the least remarkable. Changing gender, or sequential hermaphroditism, is a fact of life for more than 400 species of fish, and has already been widely studied . But many of the programme’s marvels are new not just to television
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Thinking big by burning small
Creative fire management can increase habitat for wildebeest and other grazing animals in national parks, research indicates. The work shows that small, repeated fires can have a concentrating effect on animals, and create 'grazing-lawn ecosystems' where food quality is higher and herbivores can see predators from further away.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Proteins in breastmilk protect offspring against food allergy
The breastmilk of mothers exposed to egg during pregnancy and breastfeeding has been found to protect nursing newborns against egg allergy symptoms. This research in mice reinforces recent guidance that women should not avoid allergenic foods while they are pregnant or breastfeeding.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hydrogen cars for the masses one step closer to reality, thanks to invention
A new device that can inexpensively and efficiently create and store energy and create hydrogen fuel, and that needs only sunlight to operate, has now been developed by researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Homes should not be abandoned after a big nuclear accident, study suggests
Few people, if any, should be asked to leave their homes after a big nuclear accident, which is what happened in March 2011 following the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, new research recommends.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA spots Tropical Depression Kirogi dissipating
Tropical Depression Kirogi made landfall in southeastern Vietnam on Nov. 19 and NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the storm as it was dissipating over land. Kirogi made landfall at 1 a.m. EST (0600 UTC) on Sunday, Nov. 19 approximately 30 nautical miles south-southwest of Cam Ranh Bay, which reported maximum sustained surface winds of 20 knots with minimum sea level pressure near 1006 millibars.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Clay mineral waters Earth's mantle from the inside
The first observation of a super-hydrated phase of the clay mineral kaolinite could improve our understanding of processes that lead to volcanism and affect earthquakes. In high-pressure and high-temperature X-ray measurements that were partly conducted at DESY, scientists created conditions similar to those in so-called subduction zones where an oceanic plate dives under the continental crust. T
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers pin down one source of a potent greenhouse gas
IMAGE: At a Lake Erie wetland [Old Woman Creek National Estuarine Research Reserve], researchers at The Ohio State University and their colleagues have discovered first known methane-producing microbe that is active... view more Credit: Photo by Jordan Angle, courtesy of The Ohio State University. COLUMBUS, Ohio--A study of a Lake Erie wetland suggests that scientists have vastly underestimat
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Antarctic landscape insights keep ice loss forecasts on the radar
New high-resolution maps of the complex landscape beneath a major West Antarctic glacier will be valuable for forecasting global sea level rise, researchers say. Radar surveys of the land beneath Pine Island Glacier, obtained by snowmobile, have revealed a surprisingly diverse, mountainous landscape under the ice. The findings are significant as Pine Island Glacier is the fastest melting glacier
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A curious quirk brings organic diode lasers one step closer
IMAGE: A red laser beam shines on a card bearing a replica of Penn State's academic logo. view more Credit: Yufei Jia/Penn State Since their invention in 1962, semiconductor diode lasers have revolutionized communications and made possible information storage and retrieval in CDs, DVDs and Blu-ray devices. These diode lasers use inorganic semiconductors grown in elaborate high vacuum systems.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rise in oxygen levels links to ancient explosion of life, researchers find
Oxygen has provided a breath of fresh air to the study of the Earth's evolution some 400-plus million years ago. A team of researchers, including a faculty member and postdoctoral fellow from Washington University in St. Louis, found that oxygen levels appear to increase at about the same time as a three-fold increase in biodiversity during the Ordovician Period, between 445 and 485 million years
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Added Arctic data shows global warming didn't pause
IMAGE: A research team deploys an ice beacon on sea ice north of Utqiagvik (formerly known as Barrow), Alaska's northernmost community. view more Credit: Ignatius Rigor of the Polar Science Center, Applied Physics Laboratory University of Washington NOTE TO MEDIA: This news release was updated as of November 20, 2017 with new content from the previous version posted on November 17, 2017. Gaps in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What makes soil, soil? Researchers find hidden clues in DNA
IMAGE: This is Botswana soil crust found on trip to the country. view more Credit: Dr Kelly Ramirez - Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW) Ever wondered what makes a soil, soil? And could soil from the Amazon rainforest really be the same as soil from your garden? Researchers at the Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW) and The University of Manchester, UK, are using DN
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can MicroRNA levels identify concussion symptom duration in children?
Bottom Line: MicroRNAs in the saliva of children and young adults with mild traumatic brain injury appeared to better identify people with prolonged concussion symptoms than a standard survey of reported symptoms. Why The Research Is Interesting: Concussion symptoms typically go away within 2 weeks but some children can have prolonged symptoms. An objective test to identify children at risk of pr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Artificial photosynthesis gets big boost from new catalyst
IMAGE: Phil De Luna is one of the lead authors of a new paper published in Nature Chemistry that reports a low-cost, highly efficient catalyst for chemical conversion of water into... view more Credit: Tyler Irving A new catalyst created by U of T Engineering researchers brings them one step closer to artificial photosynthesis -- a system that, just like plants, would use renewable ener
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers describe new biology of Alzheimer's disease
(Boston)--In a new study, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) describe a unique model for the biology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) which may lead to an entirely novel approach for treating the disease. The findings appear in the journal Nature Neuroscience . AD is a major cause of disease in the elderly and places a huge financial cost on the health care system. Scientists
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Zika-related nerve damage caused by immune response to the virus
New Haven, Conn. -- The immune system's response to the Zika virus, rather than the virus itself, may be responsible for nerve-related complications of infection, according to a Yale study. This insight could lead to new ways of treating patients with Zika-related complications, such as Guillain-Barré syndrome, the researchers said. In mice models lacking a key antiviral response, infection wit
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Clinical trial suggests new cell therapy for relapsed leukemia patients
A significant proportion of children and young adults with treatment-resistant B-cell leukemia who participated in a small study achieved remission with the help of a new form of gene therapy, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and the National Cancer Institute. The therapy is similar to but distinct from CD19-targeted chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Molecules in spit may be able to diagnose and predict length of concussions
Diagnosing a concussion can sometimes be a guessing game, but clues taken from small molecules in saliva may be able to help diagnose and predict the duration of concussions in children, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. Researchers measured the levels of microRNAs -- tiny snippets of noncoding RNA -- in the saliva of concussion patients. They found that the presence of cer
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Popular Science
Most of us have never eaten a turkey tail, and that shows just how messed up our food system is
I ntensive livestock farming is a huge global industry that serves up millions of tons of beef, pork and poultry every year. When I asked one producer recently to name something his industry thinks about that consumers don’t, he replied, “Beaks and butts.” This was his shorthand for animal parts that consumers – especially in wealthy nations – don’t choose to eat. On Thanksgiving, turkeys will ad
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Warming to make thunderstorms larger and more frequent (Update)
In this Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2017 file photo, a neighborhood near Houston's Addicks Reservoir is flooded after heavy rains from Tropical Storm Harvey. A study released Monday, Nov. 20, 2017 predicts that summer thunderstorms in North America will likely be larger, wetter and more frequent in a warmer world, dumping 80 percent more rain in some areas and worsening flooding. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip
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Gizmodo
The Last of the Iron Lungs
Martha Lillard spends half of every day with her body encapsulated in a half-century old machine that forces her to breathe. Only her head sticks out of the end of the antique iron lung. On the other end, a motorized lever pulls the leather bellows, creating negative pressure that induces her lungs to suck in air. In 2013, the Post-Polio Health International (PPHI) organizations estimated that th
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
The hidden opportunities of the informal economy | Niti Bhan
Niti Bhan studies business strategy for Africa's informal markets: the small shops and stands, skilled craftspeople and laborers who are the invisible engine that keeps the continent's economy running. It's tempting to think of these workers as tax-dodgers, even criminals -- but Bhan makes the case that this booming segment of the economy is legitimate and worthy of investment. "These are the fert
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google signs lease for office space near downtown Detroit
Technology giant Google is opening an office in a planned office, retail and residential development just north of downtown Detroit.
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Futurity.org
How do brains drain? Not how textbooks say
Scientists have disproved a decades-old orthodoxy: Cerebrospinal fluid does not leave the cranial cavity via blood vessels, but instead through the lymphatic system. This finding has far-reaching implications in new treatments for dementia. The brain sits fully immersed in an aqueous liquid called cerebrospinal fluid. Every day, the human body produces about half a liter of new cerebrospinal flui
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How antibiotic use in animals is contributing to antibiotic resistance
The overuse of veterinary antibiotics in animal production and the subsequent land applications of manure contribute to increased antibiotic resistance in soil. A new review published in the European Journal of Soil Science examines the results of recent studies on veterinary antibiotic use, the concentrations of antibiotics, and the abundance and diversity of antibiotic resistance genes in animal
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research indicates likely hydrological implications of rapid global warming
Sediments in northern Spain showing the change from fine-grained sandstones to thick pebble conglomerates characteristic of massive and repeated flood events. Credit: Dr Rob Duller, University of Liverpool Researchers studying a rapid global warming event, around 56 million years ago, have shown evidence of major changes in the intensity of rainfall and flood events. The findings indicate some of
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Gizmodo
Access PlayStation Now's Extensive Game Library For Just $60 For a Full Year
Commerce Content is independent of Editorial and Advertising, and if you buy something through our posts, we may get a small share of the sale. Click here for more. With over 500 PS4 and PS3 games (playable on both the PS4 and Windows PCs) in its library, PlayStation Now is basically the Netflix of video games, and you can get (or gift) a full year of the service for just $60 for a limited time .
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Space dust may transport life between worlds, research suggests
Life on our planet might have originated from biological particles brought to Earth in streams of space dust, a study suggests. Fast-moving flows of interplanetary dust that continually bombard our planet's atmosphere could deliver tiny organisms from far-off worlds, or send Earth-based organisms to other planets, according to the research. The dust streams could collide with biological particles
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How emancipation contributes to trust in strangers
In many countries, human empowerment - including freedom of expression and action - tends to increase people's generalised trust in other people, particularly strangers. However, such an increase is usually gradual, reaching its peak in affluent, modernised democracies. In contrast, in countries with below-average levels of development, people, especially educated ones, often demonstrate a lack o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Blueprint to reduce wasteful blood transfusions
By analyzing data from randomized clinical trials comparing blood transfusion approaches, Johns Hopkins experts, along with colleagues at Cleveland Clinic and NYU Langone Medical Center, endorse recommendations for blood transfusions that reduce blood use to improve patient safety and outcomes. Publishing this week in JAMA Internal Medicine , the report also provides a how-to guide for launching
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New research indicates likely hydrological implications of rapid global warming
IMAGE: These are sediments in northern Spain showing the change from fine-grained sandstones to thick pebble conglomerates characteristic of massive and repeated flood events. view more Credit: Dr Rob Duller, University of Liverpool Researchers studying a rapid global warming event, around 56 million years ago, have shown evidence of major changes in the intensity of rainfall and flood events
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain cell advance brings fresh hope for CJD therapies
Scientists have developed a new system to study Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in the laboratory, paving the way for research to find treatments for the fatal brain disorder. The team have devised a method of studying the abnormal proteins responsible for the disease - called prions - in specialised brain cells grown from stem cells. The advance marks the first time scientists have been able to infect
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientific research on disasters represents 0.22 percent of global scholarly output, shows Elsevier report
Amsterdam, November 20, 2017 - Despite loss of life and economic devastation worldwide due to increasingly frequent natural and man-made disasters, scientific research on disasters represents a small percentage of scholarly output, a study by Elsevier, the global information analytics business specializing in science and health, shows. Furthermore, countries with the highest death tolls from disa
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Quanta Magazine
A Mathematician Who Dances to the Joys and Sorrows of Discovery
“Nadie te quita lo bailado.” (No one can take from you what you’ve danced.) For Federico Ardila, this Latin American expression epitomizes his approach to life and mathematics. It’s the driving force behind the parties he DJs in venues across the San Francisco Bay Area, where people dance till morning to the beats of his native Colombia. The dance floor is a place “where you have your freedom and
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Science : NPR
Amos Winter: How Do You Build An All-Terrain Wheelchair For The Developing World?
Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode Simple Solutions About Amos Winter's TED Talk In many countries, uneven and unpaved roads make it hard to get around in a standard wheelchair. MIT engineer Amos Winter describes his design for an affordable, lever-powered, all-terrain wheelchair. GUY RAZ, HOST: But the thing with simplicity is that sometimes it requires a lot of complexity to get there. AMOS W
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Ingeniøren
Volkswagen vil bruge milliarder på at bygge elbiler
10 milliarder euro, eller knap 75 milliarder kroner – så store summer vil bilgiganten Volkswagen over de næste otte år bruge på udvikling og produktion af elbiler og genopladelige hybrider. Og allerede i løbet af to-tre år vil firmaet lancere 15 genopladelige biler under Volkswagen- og Audi-mærkerne. Derefter skal yderligere 25 sådanne biler lanceres frem mod 2025, skriver Reuters, som har interv
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Gizmodo
The Best Bluetooth Speaker Now Works With Alexa and It's Amazing
All photos: Adam Clark Estes When you’re a gadget blogger, your friends typically have a classic, back-pocket question around the holiday season: What should I get So-and-So as a gift? My most-used answer used to be the Boom, a Bluetooth speaker made by Ultimate Ears. This year is different. This year it’s the Blast, an Alexa-powered speaker made by angels from heaven. Alright fine, the UE Blast
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Added Arctic data shows global warming didn't pause
These figures show the global warming rates with the incorporated Arctic data. Credit: Xiangdong Zhang. Missing Arctic temperature data, not Mother Nature, created the seeming slowdown of global warming from 1998 to 2012, according to a new study in the journal Nature Climate Change . A University of Alaska Fairbanks professor and his colleagues in China constructed the first data set of surface
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rise in oxygen levels links to ancient explosion of life, researchers find
Credit: CC0 Public Domain Oxygen has provided a breath of fresh air to the study of the Earth's evolution some 400-plus million years ago. A team of researchers, including a faculty member and postdoctoral fellow from Washington University in St. Louis, found that oxygen levels appear to increase at about the same time as a three-fold increase in biodiversity during the Ordovician Period, between
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What makes soil, soil? Researchers find hidden clues in DNA
Botswana soil crust found on trip to the country. Credit: Dr Kelly Ramirez - Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW) Ever wondered what makes a soil, soil? And could soil from the Amazon rainforest really be the same as soil from your garden? Researchers at the Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW) and The University of Manchester, UK, are using DNA sequencing to unlock the secrets of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Artificial photosynthesis gets big boost from new catalyst
Phil De Luna is one of the lead authors of a new paper published in Nature Chemistry that reports a low-cost, highly efficient catalyst for chemical conversion of water into oxygen. The catalyst is part of an artificial photosynthesis system being developed at U of T Engineering. Credit: Tyler Irving A new catalyst created by U of T Engineering researchers brings them one step closer to artificia
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Live Science
Chemistry of 'Wine Legs' Inspires Surface-Skimming Minibots
VIDEO Miniature robots hold great promise — tiny bots could help with tasks such as environmental cleanups in the future. But finding a way to power these tiny robotic helpers is a challenge because clean, lightweight and compact fuel sources are hard to develop. Now, a team of engineers from the East China Normal University in Shanghai may have found a solution: They've developed a che
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Gizmodo
This Mind-Bending Archer Fires Arrows That Change Direction in Mid-Air
GIF Archer Lars Andersen doesn’t post a lot of videos to his YouTube channel. But when he does, it’s to show off a mind-melting new trick he’s mastered, like getting arrows to change direction mid-flight so that he can hit targets hidden behind obstacles that he can’t actually see. This would have undoubtedly been a useful skill back in the Middle Ages, allowing archers to remain safe and out of
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Futurity.org
To predict population booms, borrow from economics
A new “landscape portfolio” theory uses insights from economics to predict animal population growth and the spread of disease. The work melds Harry Markowitz’s “portfolio theory” in economics with ecological landscape theory to predict population growth of living things. Population demography of plants, animals, and microbes that cause diseases is central to understanding many problems in ecology
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Ars Technica
Come February, Amex users won’t be able to pay with a Jawbone Up4
Valentina Palladino reader comments 6 Jawbone may have switched gears to medical devices, but there are some Up fitness trackers still out there. Those who use the Up4 , Jawbone's most advanced tracker and one of the last it debuted before pulling out of the consumer-wearable market, won't be able to use its NFC payment feature for much longer. American Express customers who paired a card with th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How antibiotic use in animals is contributing to antibiotic resistance
IMAGE: This is a sampling mature compost for ARG. view more Credit: European Journal of Soil Science The overuse of veterinary antibiotics in animal production and the subsequent land applications of manure contribute to increased antibiotic resistance in soil. A new review published in the European Journal of Soil Science examines the results of recent studies on veterinary antibiotic use, t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New approach to studying chromosomes' centers may reveal link to Down syndrome and more
IMAGE: The centromere is the structure at the center of every X-shaped chromosome, where cells attached the long, thin spindles that pull the two copies of DNA apart during cell division.... view more Credit: University of Michigan ANN ARBOR, Mich. -- Some scientists call it the "final frontier" of our DNA -- even though it lies at the center of every X-shaped chromosome in nearly every one o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Digital pills successfully monitor opioid use after injury
Digital pills - gelatin capsules that contain an ingestible sensor along with medication - can help track patterns of drug use, and Brigham and Women's Hospital clinicians are among the first to explore the application of this new technology among patients being prescribed opioids. In a paper published in the December issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia , BWH investigators report on the results from
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Use of Prostate Health Index test reduces unnecessary biopsies
The Prostate Health Index (phi) is a cost-effective tool used by urologists to detect prostate cancer. It reduces the risk of over diagnosis, and cuts down on the need to send men for unnecessary and often uncomfortable biopsies. So says Jay White of Carolina Urology Partners in the US, lead author of a study in the journal Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases , published by Springer Nature. Th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Smiling human faces are attractive to dogs -- thanks to oxytocin
IMAGE: The hormone oxytocin is probably a key factor in the interaction between dogs and humans. view more Credit: Sanni Somppi "It seems that the hormone oxytocin influences what the dog sees and how it experiences the thing it sees," says doctoral student Sanni Somppi. Researchers in the Canine Mind group showed 43 dogs images of smiling and angry faces on a computer screen. Each dog was
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Spin current from heat: New material increases efficiency
IMAGE: In experiments, including those at the University of Greifswald, researchers are testing which material can generate spin current most effectively. view more Credit: Photo: University of Greifswald Electronic devices such as computers generate heat that mostly goes to waste. Physicists at Bielefeld University have found a way to use this energy: They apply the heat to generate ma
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Ingeniøren
Vindkraft bliver billigere end kulbaseret el i løbet af næste årti
I løbet af det næste årti bliver det billigere at producere el på en ny landvindmølle end at fortsætte strømproduktionen på et eksisterende kulværk. Det viser en ny analyse lavet af Dansk Energi, der blandt andet bygger på Energistyrelsens Teknologikatalog. Havvind og solceller forventes ligeledes at overhale kul, mens naturgas allerede halter efter landvindmøllerne. Stigende priser på kul, natur
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Uncovering essential enzymes for plant growth during nitrogen starvation
A study has found that two key enzymes in plants called PAH1 and PAH2 are critical for survival and growth under nitrogen-depleted conditions. The study sheds new light on how plants could be modified in future to boost tolerance to nutrient-poor environments.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pre-diabetes discovery marks step towards precision medicine
Identification of three molecules that can be used to accurately assess pre-diabetes -- a key predictor of conditions such as diabetes and high blood pressure -- has brought precision medicine for humans a step closer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Osimertinib improves progression-free survival in Asian EGFR-mutated lung cancer patients
Osimertinib improves progression-free survival compared to standard first line therapy in Asian patients with EGFR-mutated non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to the Asian subset analysis of the FLAURA trial.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Theory linking cognition, genes and income refuted
Researchers have cast doubt on a widely-held belief that connects family income with cognitive development. The popular theory holds that genes play a larger role in brain development for children from advantaged environments than in those from poorer backgrounds, especially in the United States.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cultural values can be a strong predictor of alcohol consumption
New research shows that countries with populations that value autonomy and harmony tend to have higher average levels of alcohol consumption than countries with more traditional values, such as hierarchy and being part of a collective.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Some cancer therapies may provide a new way to treat high blood pressure
Drugs designed to halt cancer growth may offer a new way to control high blood pressure (hypertension), say investigators. The finding could offer a real advance in hypertension treatment because although a number of high blood pressure drugs are now available, they work by different mechanisms that are not suited for all patients.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Recovery of West Coast marine mammals boosts consumption of chinook salmon
The researchers estimate that from 1975 to 2015, the yearly biomass of chinook salmon consumed by pinnipeds (sea lions and harbor seals) and killer whales increased from 6,100 to 15,200 metric tons, and from five to 31.5 million individual salmon.
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The Atlantic
Swati Sharma Named Deputy Editor of TheAtlantic.com
Washington, D.C. (November 20, 2017)—The Atlantic is expanding its editorial leadership team with the hire of Swati Sharma as deputy editor of TheAtlantic.com, announced today by Editor in Chief Jeffrey Goldberg and TheAtlantic.com Editor Adrienne LaFrance . Sharma will begin with The Atlantic on January 2; she is currently The Washington Post ’s deputy general assignment editor. “For months we’v
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Big Think
10 Indian Thinkers and Why You Should Know Them.
10 Indian Thinkers and Why You Should Know Them. India is a vast land, rich in history, beauty, and great ideas. Here, we want to introduce you to ten great minds in Indian thought. These ten thinkers span thousands of years, include several religions, and more than a few fields of expertise. Parshvanatha (7 th or 8 th century BCE ) The flag of Jainism, each stripe represents a divinity as
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Special Focus Issue of Future Oncology highlights advances in image guided therapy
The issue was guest edited by Ron Allison (The Brody School of Medicine, USA) who stated: "Imagine a tumor lighting up for the surgeon to see. Imagine the oncologist able to precisely track and treat a cancer while it moves during an actual radiation therapy session. Imagine what the future of Oncologic intervention will mean to patients and caregivers when these types of imaging techniques becom
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Improved method of engineering T-cells to attack cancer
Researchers at Cardiff University have found a way to boost the cancer-destroying ability of the immune system's T-cells, offering new hope in the fight against a wide range of cancers. Using CRISPR genome editing, the team took the genetic engineering of killer T-cells one step further by removing their non-cancer specific receptors and replacing them with ones that would recognise specific ca
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Glass microparticles enhance solar cells efficiency
IMAGE: Layers of the new coating and advances in their functions. view more Credit: ITMO University Scientists from ITMO University suggested a new solar cell coating that combines features of an electrode and those of a light-trapping structure. The coating enabled researchers to cut down on reflected light and avoid solar cell overheating, thus increasing its overall efficiency by 20%. More
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Gizmodo
Antioxidants Will Not Stop You From Dying
When you hear something is chock-full of antioxidants, the mental conclusion is often: That’s it—that’s the elixir of life, I have to eat a lot of that. But why do we all assume that loading up on anti-oxidants will somehow be the key to infinite youth? This week, news outlets reported on a new study claiming that mushrooms can help fight aging. As you may be aware, the only true way to stop agin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Marvell Technology buying chip maker Cavium in $6B deal
Marvell Technology has bid about $6 billion for Cavium in a cash-and-stock deal that would create a chip maker to compete with Intel and other giants in the industry. The potential deal extends a long-running consolidation for computer chip producers which are trying to grow so that they can better supply tech leaders like Apple, Google and Samsung. Last week, Qualcomm rejected an unsolicited,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Protein intentionally terminates own synthesis by destabilizing synthesis machinery—the ribosome
The ribosome becomes destabilized by the protein (nascent chain) it itself synthesized (IRD) and splits apart into the large and small subunits. As a result, the protein synthesis ends mid-cycle without reaching the end point. Credit: Hidekii Taguchi A joint research group of Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Kyoto Sangyo University has discovered that a protein, during its synthesis
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Diabetes drug helps repair UV-damaged DNA in cells of 'Moon children'
Visualization of the DNA repair proteins XPC (in green) and MUTYH (in red) to sites of UV-induced DNA damage within the nucleus (in blue), within a human cell. Credit: CeMM/ Abdelghani Mazouzi The severe and debilitating genetic disease Xeroderma pigmentosum impedes cells to repair UV-induced DNA damage. Scientists from CeMM found a drug approved for diabetes treatment to alleviate the impact of
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Gizmodo
The Walking Dead Just Delivered Its Best Episode in Ages
If there’s a reason we’ve all kept watching The Walking Dead after its last two lackluster seasons, I’d hazard a guess that last night’s episode is why. “The Big Scary U” was a reminder that the show can be legitimately excellent TV thanks to its first truly thoughtful and compelling look at Negan—and the reason why he calls his people the Saviors. The episode begins with what can only be called
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Photocrosslinkable, thermoreversible, type-I collagen bioink for photolithographic printing
Bioprinting of collagen methacrylamide (CMA) scaffolds. Credit: Dr. David Shreiber A group of biomedical engineers from Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey have leveraged a unique combination of properties of methacrylated collagen to demonstrate its potential as a bioink capable of simple, photolithographic printing of 3D scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Type-I
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Creative management of grazing through the use small fires
Credit: Wits University Creative management of grazing through the use small fires can draw back herbivores to grazing areas that are avoided by animals. A recent paper by scientists from Wits University in South Africa shows how creative fire management can increase habitat for wildebeest and other grazing animals in national parks . The work, published in the Journal of Applied Ecology , show
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Uncovering essential enzymes for plant growth during nitrogen starvation
Left: In nitrogen-depleted (-N, dark gray) conditions, plants overexpressing PAH1 and PAH2 (PAH1OE and PAH2OE) showed greater chlorophyll content than wild-type (WT) plants.Right: PAH1OE and PAH2OE showed greater photosynthetic activity than WT plants under nitrogen-depleted (-N, dark gray) conditions. Lower: Plants growth under normal growth (+N) and nitrogen depleted (-N) coniditions. Scale bar
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Feed: All Latest
Stephen Shore's Instagram Posts on Display at MoMa
Stephen Shore was an Instagram artist way before there was Insta­gram. He shot to prominence in the ’70s with carefully composed snapshots of parking lots, pancake breakfasts, and camping trips, beautiful banalities that future Instagrammers would try to emulate. Now that Shore is actually on the platform, he averages a post a day—and a retrospective of his work, opening at New York’s Museum of M
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The future of plastics—reusing the bad and encouraging the good
Plastic pollution: discarded plastic bags are a hazard to marine life. Credit: Richard Whitcombe/Shutterstock, CC BY-ND Plastics have got themselves a bad name, mainly for two reasons: most are made from petroleum and they end up as litter in the environment. However, both of these are quite avoidable. An increased focus on bio-derived and degradable composites as well as recycling could lessen p
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New on MIT Technology Review
U.S. Election Officials Are Getting Cybersecurity 101
A hardware safeguard in Amazon’s recently launched while-you’re-out delivery service turns out to have a big hole. And, well—let’s just say you probably should have seen this coming. Amazon Key uses a smart lock and cloud-based security camera in order to allow delivery staff to drop parcels inside a home while a customer is out. The driver requests access via Amazon, but the customer can watch
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Ars Technica
Exoskeletons won’t turn assembly line workers into Iron Man
reader comments 7 Ford's EksoVest won't give users superstrength, but it does help take some of the strain out of the day. Ford Marty Linn, General Motors manager of advanced technology and principal engineer for robotics, shakes hands with Robonaut 2 (R2), a humanoid robot developed by GM and NASA during a nine-year collaboration that also led to development of the RoboGlove. This high-tech carb
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Thinking big by burning small
IMAGE: The Working on Fire team manages a controlled burn near the Satara Rest Camp in the Kruger National Park in south Africa. Working on Fire managed the controlled burn events... view more Credit: Jason Donaldson A recent paper by scientists from Wits University in South Africa shows how creative fire management can increase habitat for wildebeest and other grazing animals in na
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Filling the gap: High-latitude volcanic eruptions also have global impact
IMAGE: Photo of early stages of the eruption of the Sarychev on June 12, 2009. Image from the International Space Station of. Image courtesy of Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory,... view more Credit: NASA Volcanic eruptions always seize the attention of climate scientists, because the sulfate aerosols formed in the volcanic plumes may stay months to years in the stratosphere--the s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Photocrosslinkable, thermoreversible, type-I collagen bioink for photolithographic printing
IMAGE: This is bioprinting of collagen methacrylamide (CMA) scaffolds. view more Credit: Dr. David Shreiber A group of biomedical engineers from Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey have leveraged a unique combination of properties of methacrylated collagen to demonstrate its potential as a bioink capable of simple, photolithographic printing of 3D scaffolds for tissue engineering and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Benzodiazepines increase mortality in persons with Alzheimer's disease
Benzodiazepine and related drug use is associated with a 40 per cent increase in mortality among persons with Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. The findings were published in the International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry . The study found that the risk of death was increased right from the initiation of benzodiazepine and related drug use. T
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Diabetes drug helps repair UV-damaged DNA in cells of 'Moon children'
IMAGE: Visualization of the DNA repair proteins XPC (in green) and MUTYH (in red) to sites of UV-induced DNA damage within the nucleus (in blue), within a human cell. view more Credit: CeMM/ Abdelghani Mazouzi (Vienna, Nov. 17, 2017) The destructive force of UV radiation on DNA molecules is only fully visible, when repair mechanisms fail: patients with the rare genetic disease Xeroderma pigme
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reusing waste energy with 2-D electron gas
IMAGE: (a) In conventional semiconductors, electrons flow from the hot to the cold side with low mobility caused by ionized impurity. (b) In the newly developed semiconductor without the impurity, 2DEG... view more Credit: Ohta H. et al., Advanced Science , November 20, 2017 Novel approach utilizes high mobility two-dimensional electron gas, boosting thermoelectric conversion efficiency.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Enterovirus vaccine prevents virus-induced diabetes in a T1D experimental model
Scientists at the University of Tampere (Finland) and the Karolinska Institutet (Sweden) have demonstrated that an enterovirus vaccine can protect against virus-induced diabetes in a mouse model for Type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is increasing worldwide and to date, the exact causes of the disease are not known. Enteroviruses (the most common virus affecting humans) are one of the environment
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Diagnosing the impacts of health policy
IMAGE: KAUST biostatistician Hernando Ombao (right), developed the method with colleagues Maricela Cruz (left on skype) and Miriam Bender from the University of California. view more Credit: © 2017 KAUST A new statistical technique offers a better way to gauge the effectiveness of complex healthcare interventions. The method, developed by KAUST biostatistician Hernando Ombao and his colle
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Theory: Flexibility is at the heart of human intelligence
Centuries of study have yielded many theories about how the brain gives rise to human intelligence. Some think it arises from a single region or neural network. Others argue that metabolism is key. A new article makes the case that the brain's dynamic properties -- how it is wired but also how that wiring shifts in response to changing intellectual demands -- are the best predictors of intelligenc
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Two out of 3 parents struggle finding childcare that meets their health, safety standards
The search for the best preschool or childcare option is often a challenging experience -- and many parents aren't sure if the one they pick is safe and healthy for their child.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Many cancer survivors are living with PTSD
A recent study showed approximately one-fifth of patients with cancer experienced post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) several months after diagnosis, and many of these patients continued to live with PTSD years later.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cell-weighing method could help doctors choose cancer drugs
Researchers can use a new type of measurement to predict how drugs will affect cancer cells taken from multiple myeloma patients. Their predictions correlated with how those patients actually fared when treated with those drugs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Overweight women may need more frequent mammograms
Women with higher body mass index (BMI) face an increased risk of not detecting their breast tumor until it has become large, according to a new study. Researchers said the findings suggest that women with higher BMI may need shorter intervals between mammography screening exams.
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Ingeniøren
Nyt studie: Økologisk landbrug kan brødføde verdens befolkning
Det kan lade sig gøre, at omlægge verdens landbrugsarealer til økologi, og stadig mætte hele verdens befolkning. Det er konklusionen af et nyt studie, som forskere fra Østrig, Skotland og Schweiz har udgivet i Nature Communications . Et af de største argumenter imod økologi som produktionsform er, at denne form for landbrug kræver mere areal end ved konventionel dyrkning af jorden. Samtidig disku
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Storms hit poorer people harder, from Superstorm Sandy to Hurricane Maria
Superstorm Sandy caused more damage in lower-income parts of Long Island, which are more vulnerable to storms. Credit: Stony Brook University’s Center for the Study of Inequality, Social Justice and Policy, CC BY The ferocious "frankenstorm" known as Sandy that ripped through greater New York City five years ago remains one for the record books. Like this year's hurricane season , it racked up te
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Gizmodo
Hunker Down For the Holidays With This One-Day Board Game and Puzzle Sale
Ravensburger Puzzle and Board Game Sale | Amazon You’re going to have a lot of quality family time to fill over the next few months, so it’s a great time to pick up some board games and puzzles . A whole bunch from Ravensburger are on sale, today only on Amazon, with options available for every age group.
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Futurity.org
These Black Friday deals can trick you into spending more
Promotions that involve spending a certain amount at a store to get a gift card may make you spend more than you normally, report researchers. This is thanks to a phenomenon called “mental discounting.” “…consumers should carefully consider these offers before taking advantage of them…” “Price promotions that feel too good to be true are always an opportunity for consumers to take an extra moment
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New on MIT Technology Review
Election Officials are Getting Cybersecurity 101
A hardware safeguard in Amazon’s recently launched while-you’re-out delivery service turns out to have a big hole. And, well—let’s just say you probably should have seen this coming. Amazon Key uses a smart lock and cloud-based security camera in order to allow delivery staff to drop parcels inside a home while a customer is out. The driver requests access via Amazon, but the customer can watch
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Farvestoffernes sammensætning i 2000 år gamle egyptiske papyri afdækket
20. november 2017 Farvestoffernes sammensætning i 2000 år gamle egyptiske papyri afdækket EGYPTOLOGI: Beamline ID21 ved European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) i Grenoble har revolutioneret vores muligheder for at studere sammensætningen af blækket på antikke egyptiske papyri. Opdagelsen af papyri og blæk for 5000 år siden er et af de vigtigste fremskridt i menneskehedens historie. Opdagel
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Protein intentionally terminates own synthesis by destabilizing synthesis machinery -- the ribosome
IMAGE: The ribosome becomes destabilized by the protein (nascent chain) it itself synthesized (IRD) and splits apart into the large and small subunits. As a result, the protein synthesis ends mid-cycle... view more Credit: Hidekii Taguchi Background Proteins are functional molecules, which support life and are three-dimensional structures of polypeptide chains, chains of linked amino ac
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Uncovering essential enzymes for plant growth during nitrogen starvation
IMAGE: Left: In nitrogen-depleted (-N, dark gray) conditions, plants overexpressing PAH1 and PAH2 (PAH1OE and PAH2OE) showed greater chlorophyll content than wild-type (WT) plants. Right: PAH1OE and PAH2OE showed greater photosynthetic activity... view more Credit: Mie Shimojima, Tokyo Institute of Technology How plants tolerate nitrogen starvation is a longstanding mystery. Nitrogen is vita
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pre-diabetes discovery marks step towards precision medicine
Researchers from the University of Sydney's Charles Perkins Centre have identified three specific molecules that accurately indicate insulin resistance, or pre-diabetes - a major predictor of metabolic syndrome, the collection of medical conditions that include abdominal obesity, high blood pressure and high blood sugar levels. The finding, from a study undertaken in mice, could make earlier de
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Osimertinib improves progression-free survival in Asian EGFR-mutated lung cancer patients
LUGANO, 20 November 2017 - Osimertinib improves progression-free survival compared to standard first line therapy in Asian patients with EGFR-mutated non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to the Asian subset analysis of the FLAURA trial presented at the ESMO Asia 2017 Congress (1), sumultaneously published in The New England Journal of Medicine . (2) EGFR mutations occur in 30-40% of NS
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Motorcycle crashes cause 5 times as many deaths as car accidents, 6 times the health costs
Motorcycle accidents are costly in terms of lives and health care costs. Compared with car accidents, motorcycle accidents cause three times the injuries, six times the medical costs and 5 times the deaths, found new research. Despite better motor vehicle safety, injuries from motorcycle crashes have not improved.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fixated on food?
African Clawed Frog (Xenopus laevis). Credit: AG Straka Contrast has an impact on the optokinetic reflex, which enables us to clearly perceive the landscape from a moving train. Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have now shown that visual features that modulate this ability are encoded in the retina. When we gaze out the window of a moving train, our eye muscles are
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Growing cannabis with modern science and technology
In Canada and around the world, legal cannabis producers face many challenges: varying government regulations, high security requirements and a lack of reliable information on how to grow their crops. Growing cannabis has been illegal for so many years that scientific research on how to best produce this crop is limited. Much of the knowledge on how to grow cannabis lacks validation, is clouded i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What's in your wheat? Scientists piece together genome of most common bread wheat
Credit: CC0 Public Domain Johns Hopkins scientists report they have successfully used two separate gene technologies to assemble the most complete genome sequence to date of Triticum aestivum , the most common cultivated species of wheat used to make bread. A report on the achievement was published in the Oct. 23 issue of GigaScience just a few weeks before their related report on the sequencing
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Dagens Medicin
Kühnau: Regionerne bør have ens regler for efteruddannelse
Næstformanden i Region Midtjyllands regionsråd opfordrer til en fælles linje mellem regionerne omkring efteruddannelse.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hydrogen cars for the masses one step closer to reality, thanks to UCLA invention
Richard Kaner and Maher El-Kady in Kaner's office. Kaner is holding a replica of a new energy storage and conversion device they developed. Credit: Reed Hutchinson/UCLA UCLA researchers have designed a device that can use solar energy to inexpensively and efficiently create and store energy, which could be used to power electronic devices, and to create hydrogen fuel for eco-friendly cars. The de
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists unify quantum coherence with nonclassicality of light
Credit: Asim Alnamat (Phys.org)—Physicists have demonstrated that two independently developed concepts—quantum coherence and the nonclassicality of light—both arise from the same underlying resources. The ability to explain seemingly distinct phenomena within a single framework has long been a fulfilling aspiration in physics, and here it may also have potential applications for quantum informati
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Ars Technica
America’s oldest rocket just made its penultimate flight
reader comments 0 The Delta II rocket made its 99th flight on Saturday morning. ULA The first stage of the rocket is derived from a Thor ballistic missile, first launched in the 1950s. ULA However, NASA soon realized the potential of the Thor as a launch vehicle. ULA The Thor-Delta launched the country's first communications satellite in 1960. ULA Beginning in 1989, the Delta II rocket became a w
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Ars Technica
Marvell Technology to buy chipmaker Cavium for about $6 billion
Google reader comments 24 In another consolidation move in the semiconductor industry, chipmaker Marvell Technology announced it will acquire competitor Cavium Inc. for approximately $6 billion. It's estimated that the combined company will generate about $3.4 billion in annual revenue. Bermuda-based Marvell makes semiconductors for data-storage devices while California-based Cavium produces comm
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Solution-processed OLEDs pave the way to future lighting applications
Credit: Shutterstock Before it can take over our streets and homes, OLED lighting needs to be made more accessible. The SOLEDLIGHT project has developed novel multilayer OLEDs thanks to a new process that promises to increase production efficiency by 20 percent, thereby reducing its cost. Benefitting directly from the PI-SCALE project , which involves the creation of pilot lines for the productio
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Space dust may transport life between worlds
Credit: CC0 Public Domain Life on our planet might have originated from biological particles brought to Earth in streams of space dust, a study suggests. Fast-moving flows of interplanetary dust that continually bombard our planet's atmosphere could deliver tiny organisms from far-off worlds, or send Earth-based organisms to other planets, according to the research. The dust streams could colli
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Antarctic landscape insights keep ice loss forecasts on the radar
The research team used snow vehicles equipped with radar sensors to carry out a detailed survey of around 1500 sq km of ice. Credit: University of Aberdeen Scientists from the University of Aberdeen have helped carry out a detailed survey of the landscape beneath thick Antarctic ice that researchers say will be a valuable resource in understanding how ice draining into the ocean contributes to gl
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Borophene shines alone as 2-D plasmonic material
Rice University scientists calculate that the atom-thick film of boron known as borophene could be the first pure two-dimensional material naturally able to emit visible and near-infrared light by activating its plasmons. The Rice team tested models of three polymorphs and found that triangular borophene, at left, was capable of emitting visible light, while the other two reached near-infrared. C
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientific research on disasters represents only 0.22 percent of global scholarly output
Despite loss of life and economic devastation worldwide due to increasingly frequent natural and man-made disasters, scientific research on disasters represents a small percentage of scholarly output, a study by Elsevier, the global information analytics business specializing in science and health, shows.. Furthermore, countries with the highest death tolls from disasters tend to be low-income co
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Scientific American Content: Global
How to Fight Format Rot
I'm not the first techno writer to raise the alarm about data rot, which can be described as “the tendency of computer files to become inaccessible as their storage media go to the great CompUSA in the sky.” Over the years we've entrusted our writing, business documents, music and art to such now defunct formats as punch cards, magnetic tape, floppy disks and Zip disks. And if you think CD-ROM an
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Exoplanet hunters rethink search for alien life
M. Kornmesser/ESO The exoplanet Ross 128b orbits a cool dwarf star at a distance that could allow the world to have liquid water. Steve Desch can see the future of exoplanet research, and it’s not pretty. Imagine, he says, that astronomers use NASA’s upcoming James Webb Space Telescope to scour the atmosphere of an Earth-mass world for signs of life . Then imagine that they chase hints of atmosph
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Dagens Medicin
Regionsrådsformand: Fejl i Svendborg-sag skal føre til læring
OUH’s ledelse skal lære af sine fejl. Sådan lyder det fra regionsrådsformanden i Syddanmark, der afviser øget kontrol med hospitalsledelserne som følge af Svendborg-sagen.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Reusing waste energy with 2-D electron gas
(a) In conventional semiconductors, electrons flow from the hot to the cold side with low mobility caused by ionized impurity. (b) In the newly developed semiconductor without the impurity, 2DEG can flow with high mobility. Credit: Ohta H. et al., Advanced Science, November 20, 2017 More than 60 percent of the energy produced by fossil fuels is lost as heat. Thermoelectric energy conversion has a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spin current from heat—new material increases efficiency
In experiments, including those at the University of Greifswald, researchers are testing which material can generate spin current most effectively. Credit: University of Greifswald Electronic devices such as computers generate heat that mostly goes to waste. Physicists at Bielefeld University have found a way to use this energy: They apply the heat to generate magnetic signals known as 'spin curr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows new second line therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer is effective and safe
LUGANO, 20 November 2017 - A randomised trial in 650 patients has confirmed the safety and efficacy of a new second line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer, researchers report at the ESMO Asia 2017 Congress. (1) Oral fluorinated pyrimidines have been investigated to replace intravenous 5FU in colorectal cancer (CRC). Capecitabine combined with oxaliplatin (XELOX) has demonstrated comparab
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Neurobiology: Fixated on food?
Contrast has an impact on the optokinetic reflex, which enables us to clearly perceive the landscape from a moving train. Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have now shown that visual features that modulate this ability are encoded in the retina. When we gaze out the window of a moving train, our eye muscles are constantly at work, stabilizing the gaze in order to ke
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hydrogen cars for the masses one step closer to reality, thanks to UCLA invention
IMAGE: Richard Kaner and Maher El-Kady in Kaner's office. Kaner is holding a replica of a new energy storage and conversion device they developed. view more Credit: Reed Hutchinson/UCLA UCLA researchers have designed a device that can use solar energy to inexpensively and efficiently create and store energy, which could be used to power electronic devices, and to create hydrogen fuel for eco-
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Proteins in breastmilk protect offspring against food allergy
Research published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine today indicates that a mother's diet can protect nursing newborns against food allergies. Conducted by researchers at Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, the study offers an explanation for how breastfeeding can promote tolerance to the foods that most often cause allergies. The study received support from Food Allergy
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pairing cancer genomics with cognitive computing highlights potential therapeutic options
IMAGE: William Kim, MD, and colleagues have demonstrated the ability of cognitive computing to scour large volumes of data from scientific studies and databases to identify potentially relevant clinical trials or... view more Credit: UNC Lineberger CHAPEL HILL - A University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center-led study has demonstrated the ability of cognitive computin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Breast milk found to protect against food allergy
IMAGE: As this schematic shows, mothers exposed to food allergens transfer antibodies to their offspring via breastmilk. Their immune systems make a complex of the antibody and allergen (IgG-IC complex), which... view more Credit: Michiko Oyoshi /Nancy Fliesler, Boston Children's Hospital Eating allergenic foods during pregnancy can protect your child from food allergies, especially if you br
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mainstreaming genetic counselling for ovarian cancer
LUGANO, 17 November 2017 - A study that looked at mainstreaming genetic counselling for ovarian cancer to support screening programmes in Malaysia was presented at the ESMO Asia 2017 Congress. (1) The preliminary results of the MaGiC study show that most patients counselled by a well-trained but not necessarily an expert in genetics were satisfied or just as satisfied with their experience as com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds all Myanmar mouth cancer patients chew betel quid
LUGANO, 17 November 2017 - A study in Myanmar has found that all mouth cancer patients use smokeless tobacco, researchers report at the ESMO Asia 2017 Congress. (1) Betel quid chewing often starts in adolescence and is associated with smoking and drinking alcohol, which are also risk factors for oral cancer. (2,3) According to GLOBOCAN 2012, more than half of oral cancers in the world occur in As
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Only one in five Indonesian women are aware of cervical cancer screening
LUGANO, 17 November 2017 - Just one in five Indonesian women are aware of cervical cancer screening, according to a study presented at the ESMO Asia 2017 Congress. (1) The research in nearly 5,400 women also found that only 5% knew about mammography for early detection of breast cancer. "Early detection of cervical and breast cancers leads to better treatment, with improved survival and quality o
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Futurity.org
How boosting cognition could prevent anxiety
People at-risk for anxiety are less likely to develop the disorder if they have higher activity in a region of the brain responsible for complex mental operations, according to a new study. “We are looking for variables that actually confer resiliency and protect individuals from developing problems.” The findings may be a step toward tailoring psychological therapies to the specific brain functi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What genes and genomes reveal about our health
Credit: CC0 Public Domain But unlike magic crystal balls, our genome can reveal some actual facts about our inner workings. Our amazing genome Quick flashback to 2001. The world was awed when the very first sequence of the human genome was officially revealed. The feat took an international group of scientists over a decade to complete and had a hefty price tag of about US$2.7 billion. Today,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physics forecasts for fracking and fuels
To generate sand slurry requires a low-pressure manifold to mix water and polymers with sand. Credit: Tadeusz Patzek Society's demand for energy relies mainly on oil and gas, which are finite resources. Future technologies could reduce the consumption of energy, but until then, existing resources must be carefully managed. Director of the Ali I. Al-Naimi Petroleum Engineering Research Center at K
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Gizmodo
YouTube's Craziest Inventor Built a Giant Sword-Launching Slingshot
GIF Amateur life-risker Joerg Sprave has successfully built custom slingshots capable of firing everything from bowling balls , to Christmas trees , to lethal Lego bricks . His latest creation, a slingshot that can launch full-size swords , is as ludicrous-sounding as it is awesome to see in action. Sprave’s slingshots are mostly built from wood, but the giant elastics needed to propel a sword th
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Latest Headlines | Science News
This material does weird things under pressure
View the video A newly fabricated material does more than just hold up under pressure. Unlike many ordinary objects that shrink when squeezed, the metamaterial — a synthetic structure designed to exhibit properties not typically found in natural materials — expands at higher pressures. This counterintuitive material is made up of a grid of hollow 3-D crosses — shaped like six-way pipe fittings —
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cognitive science
A paper in PSPB suggests that mindfulness can increase criminogenic thinking in inmates.
Interesting but limited since it is only looking at the relationship between scores of mindfulness on a psychometric scale and crimogenic thinking. It isn't too surprising that the aspect of the mindfulness scale that tries to quantify 'nonjudgment of self' is related to crimogenic thinking. Maybe this says more about how people quantify mindfulness? It would be cool to see this replicated in lon
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Feed: All Latest
Mythbuster Adam Savage Has Made a Tool Bag, and It’s Beautiful
Adam Savage is clearly overjoyed about his new bag. I met up with the gear-obsessed designer, former Mythbusters host, and Tested.com editor in chief at his workshop in San Francisco to see his latest creation. He's designed his first carryall utility bag and launched a new brand, Savage Industries, to market it. With the same childlike glee he exudes on camera , Savage flipped the thing around o
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Feed: All Latest
Star Wars News: 'The Last Jedi' Will Put Rey to the Test
With less than four weeks to go before the opening of Star Wars: The Last Jedi , everyone is getting very, very excited about the prospect of returning to the Resistance, the First Order, and the never-ending conflict between good and evil. But do you know just how never-ending that conflict is going to be? Perhaps you should have a seat before reading on. Rey Will Be Put to the Test in The Last
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Feed: All Latest
Iron Ox Brings Robotics to Hydroponic Greenhouse Farming
When you think of automation, you probably think of the assembly line, a dramatic dance of robot arms with nary a human laborer in sight. But that’s child’s play. The grandest, most disruptive automation revolution has played out in agriculture. First with horses and plows, and eventually with burly combines—technologies that have made farming exponentially cheaper and more productive. Just consi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How emotional and economic abuse go hand-in-hand
Financial control is a form of abuse and includes controlling access to household money, such as not having access to bank accounts. Credit: Stephanie Flack/AAP People who have been in an abusive relationship often don't realise it until they've left it, so looking at the data on past relationships is the best way of getting a picture of how bad it can be. We find that emotional and economic abus
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Coming soon to a highway near you—truck platooning
Truck platooning involves a lead truck with a driver guiding other trucks through vehicle to vehicle communication. Credit: cheskyw / 123rf.com, Author provided Should Australian truckies feel a little nervous about the rise of platooning? Truck platooning has burst into both the international and Australian scene - with recent announcements including Elon Musk's new Semi , and approval for Pelot
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Super-Earth' planet with very short orbital period discovered
K2 light curve of C12_3474. Stellar activity is seen as the quasi-periodic, long period modulation. Transits are visible as shallow dips. The 5.3-day-long data gap, during which the telescope entered in safe mode, is clearly visible at ∼2/3 of the time series. Credit: Barragán et al., 2017. (Phys.org)—NASA's prolonged Kepler exoplanet-hunting mission, known as K2, has revealed the presence of ano
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Dagens Medicin
Overblik: Her står kampen om regionerne
Der er stor spænding om udfaldet ved tirsdagens valg i både de fem regioner og Danske Regioners hovedkvarter på Dampfærgevej i København. Få et overblik herunder. Sjælland: Uforudsigeligt trekantsdrama Mest spænding blandt de enkelte regioner samler der sig om Region Sjælland, hvor det eneste sikre er, at regionsrådsformanden efter valget ikke er den samme som før. Ved det seneste valg i 2013 sik
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More care is needed for cancer supportive care
LUGANO, Switzerland - The relentless efforts devoted to improving prevention, early detection, and treatment have resulted in more and more cancer survivors worldwide. In fact, there is a decrease in overall cancer mortality rate of about 1% per year. (1) However, a cure or control of cancer does not necessarily mean a full restoration of health. Cancer-related effects and the treatment itself ca
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ESMO Consortium study reveals inequality in access to treatment in Asia
IMAGE: Cover of the infographic showing the results of the Asian subset in the ESMO International Consortium Study on the availability, out-of-pocket costs and accessibility of antineoplastic medicines in countries outside... view more Credit: © European Society for Medical Oncology LUGANO, Switzerland - The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) opened its 3rd ESMO Asia Congress today,
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Gizmodo
The OnePlus 5T Is a Very Damn Good Phone for a Reasonable Price
All images: Sam Rutherford/Gizmodo The price of high-end smartphones has gotten out of control. The iPhone X starts at $1000, while Samsung’s Galaxy Note 8 retails at $950, and as much as I like nice things, ponying up that much for a phone is kind of ridiculous. Do we really need a notch that lets you turn your face into an animated pile of poop, or a stylus that won’t make your shitty stick fig
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Gizmodo
These Anova Sous-Vide Discounts Are Better Than We Expect on Black Friday
Anova 800W Bluetooth Precision Cooker | $95 | Amazon Anova 800W Wifi Precision Cooker | $112 | Amazon If you’ve ever eaten at a nice steakhouse, you were probably eating sous-vide meat. Here’s a secret though: It’s really easy to get those kinds of results yourself, and Amazon’s here to help with a $95 deal on the Anova Bluetooth sous-vide circulator . Or, if you’ve been waiting for the Wi-Fi-ena
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Metal constraints for a low-carbon economy
Credit: Leiden University It is often thought that a transition to a low-carbon economy requires an enormous increase of the use of metals like steel and copper and smaller amounts of critical raw materials. For power generation and mobility systems, this is true. An electric car needs a battery. Wind turbines need strong magnets. Replacing a normal car for an electric car can easily require doze
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists make first observations of how a meteor-like shock turns silica into glass
Meteor Crater in Arizona, formed by a meteor impact 50,000 years ago, contains bitsof a hard, compressed form of silica called stishovite. Credit: Nikolas_jkd/iStock Studies at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have made the first real-time observations of how silica – an abundant material in the Earth's crust – easily transforms into a dense glass when hit with a ma
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Separation a sweet success
The cyclodextrins (blue cones, inset image) linked together to form a wrinkled selectively porous membrane (main image). Reproduced with permission from reference 1. Credit: WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. Sugars can make excellent gatekeepers for separating mixtures of molecules. A KAUST team has discovered a way to make a selectively porous membrane by linking large numbers of sugar structures, kno
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Ars Technica
OnePlus 5T review—An outstanding combination of specs, design, and price
reader comments 83 The OnePlus 5T. Check out those slim bezels. Ron Amadeo The fingerprint reader moves to the back. Ron Amadeo Here's the 5T (left) compared to the OnePlus 5 (right). It's a big improvement, packing more screen into the same size body. Ron Amadeo Other than the fingerprint reader, the back looks just like the OnePlus 5. Ron Amadeo In the top bezel, you can see a few sensors hidde
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Scientific American Content: Global
Amazing Animals
Introduction The Secret Lives of Animals by Andrea Gawrylewski Section 1: The Wild Things They Do 1.1 The Spider’s Charade by Ximena Nelson 1.2 The Evolution of Architecture by Rob Dunn 1.3 The Prolific Afterlife of Whales by Crispin T.S. Little 1.4 Good with Faces by Elizabeth A. Tibbetts & Adrian G. Dyer 1.5 Bisexual Species by Emily V. Driscoll 1.6 Zom
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Evolution of a Scientific American Graphic: Beetle Resurrection
My initial assignment for illustrating Hannah Nordhaus’ December 2017 article about the endangered American Burying Beetle, Nicrophorus americanus , was to represent the beetle’s life cycle. Life cycles are staples of biology illustration, typically using small, separate pieces of art connected by arrows to represent the life stages of a particular organism. The more I learned about N. americanus
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A guide to meteor showers – what to look out for and when
Blink and you’ll miss it – until the next one. Credit: Channone Arif/Flickr, CC BY It has happened to most of us: walking home late at night under clear skies you catch a glimpse of something bright moving, often from the corner of your eye. You turn to see what it is but it's gone without a trace. And chances are you will have seen a meteor ending its multi-billion year journey in a burst of lig
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Separate experiments show no evidence of violation of Lorentz invariance
Credit: C. Carreau/ESA, via Physics (Phys.org)—Two teams of researchers working independently of one another have conducted experiments designed to test Lorentz invariance; both report no violations. One of the teams used decades of data from lunar lasing experiments, the other data from experiments conducted over several years using superconducting gravimeters. Both teams have published papers i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Five reasons India, China and other nations plan to travel to the Moon
A view from the Apollo 11 spacecraft, showing the Earth rising above the moon’s horizon (July 1969). Credit: NASA No human has been to the Moon since 1972 and only 12 people have ever done it – all of them American men. But that list could soon be getting a lot longer. Why the Moon? Haven't we already been there, done that? Well, yes. But now there are new reasons motivating countries to reach
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Ingeniøren
Sådan bliver Kina uafhængig af kul på 35 år
Kina er på alle måder et fascinerende land. Verdens største CO2 udleder men samtidig det land, som investerer mest i vedvarende energi. Et land, dybt afhængig af kul, men samtidig med en drøm om en “ecological civilisation”. Og et land som alle lytter til, fordi det har så stor betydning for hvordan hele verden udvikler sig. Men det kan være svært at finde ud af hvad der egentligt er op og ned, n
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Dagens Medicin
Dupont: Sanktionér generiske svindelfirmaer
»Ikke betryggende.« Sådan lyder reaktionen fra formand for Lægeforeningens Lægemiddel- og Medikoudvalg Michael Dupont til Dagens Medicins nylige historier om, at det europæiske lægemiddelagentur EMA i stigende grad trækker generisk medicin tilbage . Tilbagetrækningerne sker efter fund af fusk hos de typisk asiatiske underleverandører, som fremstiller eller teser de generiske produkter for vestlig
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Live Science
In Photos: Treasures From 800-Year-Old Tombs in China
Crystal disc Credit: Photo courtesy Chinese Cultural Relics Gold pendant Credit: Photo courtesy Chinese Cultural Relics Coffin chamber Credit: Photo courtesy Chinese Cultural Relics Elephant knob and jar Credit: Photo courtesy Chinese Cultural Relics The life of Hong Credit: Courtesy Chinese Cultural Relics Hairpins Credit: Photo courtesy Chinese Cultural Relics Combs Credit: Photo courtesy Chine
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Live Science
800-Year-Old Tombs Tell the Story of an Ancient Chinese Couple
Two 800-year-old tombs belonging to a man named Lord Hu Hong and his wife née Wu, who carried the title Lady of Virtue, have been discovered at a construction site in Qingyuan County, in China's Zhejiang province. An inscription says that Hu Hong is the "Grand Master for Thorough Counsel." He and née Wu lived at a time when China was divided between two dynasties, with Hu Hong serving the s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Transparent coatings for everyday applications
Fluoropor coating on a copper thin film. Credit: Bastian E. Rapp, KIT Water- and dirt-repellent sportswear and outdoor clothing, or anti-fog windshields – there are many everyday products that can profit from highly hydrophobic coatings. For such coatings, researchers led by Dr. Bastian E. Rapp at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have created Fluoropor, a material that is both transparent
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Deletion of a stem cell factor promotes TBI recovery in mice
IMAGE: This is (l-r) Dr. Xiaoling Zhong and Dr. Chun-Li Zhang. view more Credit: UT Southwestern Medical Center DALLAS - Nov. 17, 2017 - UT Southwestern molecular biologists today report the unexpected finding that selectively deleting a stem cell transcription factor in adult mice promotes recovery after traumatic brain injury (TBI). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention defines T
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Ars Technica
Delhi smog levels drop from severe to very poor—you know, half-marathon weather
Enlarge / A man wears a face mask as he takes part in the Airtel Delhi Half Marathon 2017 in New Delhi on November 19, 2017. reader comments 20 Despite extremely dangerous levels of air pollution smothering Delhi and creating “gas chamber” conditions, thousands took to the streets to run a half marathon Sunday. Most ran without masks that would filter out harmful pollution. In recent weeks, air p
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Scientific American Content: Global
Strict Targets for Cholesterol, Blood Pressure, and More Don't Always Make Sense
In an era when everyone seems to be tracking their daily 10,000 steps with a Fitbit, measuring calories with MyFitnessPal and monitoring fertility with apps like Glow, it's easy to get hung up on numbers. Is my body mass index sitting nicely below 25? Is my blood pressure normal for my age? Is my blood level of that nasty LDL cholesterol in check—say, below 100 mg/dL? But this health-by-the-numbe
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Popular Science
Why do we go Black Friday shopping?
There are two kinds of people on Black Friday : the ones who stand in line, and the ones who think those other people are whacky. If you’re the latter, you may even spend your Friday morning watching news footage of the mayhem and rolling your eyes. But don't be so quick to look down on the line-standers of the world. “The thing about Black Friday that people misunderstand is that people shop for
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Futurity.org
Smaller, quieter wind turbines could boost public support
Vertical axis wind turbines, which may have fewer effects on birds and nearby people, could increase public support for new wind energy installations, new research suggests. With global carbon emissions on the rise, wind power continues to be an attractive option for states and countries looking to limit fossil fuel use and increase renewable energy. Wind already accounts for over 5 percent of el
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Gizmodo
How Do Animals Recognize Each Other?
To be a giraffe among giraffes, or a pigeon among pigeons, is to live at all times in that scene from Being John Malkovich —a world in which everyone you know looks pretty much exactly like you. However wondrously varied the animal kingdom might be, on a species-level its residents tend to look more similar than not—at least, from a human perspective. I’m not saying that all squirrels look identi
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Blood Factory
In Drosophila larvae, the formation of blood cells takes place in a specialized organ, the lymph gland.
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Futurity.org
These ER tests don’t actually spot heart attacks
People who go to the ER with chest pain often receive unnecessary tests to evaluate whether they are having a heart attack, a practice that provides no clinical benefit and adds to health-care costs, according to a new study. Specifically, computed tomography (CT) scans and cardiac stress tests are overused in the ER for patients with chest pain and provide no information to determine whether a p
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What's in your wheat? Johns Hopkins scientists piece together genome of most common bread wheat
Johns Hopkins scientists report they have successfully used two separate gene technologies to assemble the most complete genome sequence to date of Triticum aestivum , the most common cultivated species of wheat used to make bread. A report on the achievement was published in the Oct. 23 issue of GigaScience just a few weeks before their related report on the sequencing of the bread wheat's "ance
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What makes tissue soft and yet so tough
The mechanical behaviour of soft biological tissue in the human body is determined by the interactions between collagen fibres (green), proteoglycans (blue) and water (transparent). Credit: ETH Zurich Engineers at ETH Zurich have discovered that soft biological tissue deforms very differently under tension than previously assumed. Their findings are already being put to use in medical research pr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
ELaNa XIV CubeSats launch on JPSS-1 mission
Photo of Microwave Radiometer Technology Acceleration (MiRaTa) CubeSat. Credit: Massachusetts Institute of Technology NASA has launched four small research satellites, or CubeSats, developed by four universities as part of a broader mission launching the next generation polar-orbiting satellite to space. These CubeSat missions were selected through the CubeSat Launch Initiative (CSLI) as part of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New NASA insights into the secret lives of plants
New NASA missions will study forested ecosystems, such as these trees along the Kuskokwim River near McGrath, Alaska. Credit: NASA/Peter Griffith From rainforests to croplands, boreal forests to mangroves, NASA will take a new look at terrestrial vegetation across our living planet over the next two years with several unique instruments in space. The missions will help scientists investigate the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Hubble's cosmic search for a missing arm
This new picture of the week, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows the dwarf galaxy NGC 4625, located about 30 million light-years away in the constellation of Canes Venatici (The Hunting Dogs). The image, acquired with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), reveals the single major spiral arm of the galaxy, which gives it an asymmetric appearance. But why is there only one such spi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Slight climate shifts can affect optimum water use in plant communities
Dr. Georgianne Moore shows a graduate student how to install a sap flow sensor. Credit: Texas A&M AgriLife photo A new discovery is providing scientists a better understanding of how rainfall is shared beneficially by the plant community and the human population, in addition to the effects of climate change. "It's going to be a wet gets wetter, dry gets drier world," said Dr. Georgianne Moore, Te
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study shows plant growth regulators can benefit onion establishment, production
A recently completed study by researchers at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center in Uvalde showed how exogenous plant growth regulators can improve germination and enhance early root development in onions. Credit: Texas A&M AgriLife Research photo by Paul Schattenberg A study by researchers at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center in Uvalde shows the use of externa
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14 Star Wars Gifts for Your Favorite Jedi or Sith
Podcasts Channel Zero Is Smarter and More Subversive than Stranger Things echo esc_html( wired_get_the_byline_name( $related_video ) ); ?>
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Ingeniøren
Ny blogger på ing.dk: Sådan bliver Kina uafhængig af kul på 35 år
I denne uge sætter vi i vores blogunivers spot på Riget i Midten. Kina er en kæmpe spiller i international sammenhæng og har ingen intentioner om at få baghjul af andre, mere fremsynede nationer. Chefekspert ved China National Renewable Energy Centre Kaare Sandholt, som er uddannet civilingeniør vil med bloggen 'Kinesisk energi' sætte fokus på energi i Kina, og han skriver i sit første blogindlæg
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hundreds of fossil tree specimens belong to a single species
Credit: Leiden University Paleobotanist Menno Booi discovered that 250 previously described fossil tree species are objectively not distinguishable and belong to only one single species. Towering clubmosses, primitive conifers and the first appearance of seed fern groups characterize the so-called Jambi flora. A collection of plant fossils that once grew in the Indonesian province of Jambi. Booi
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BBC News - Science & Environment
European memory champion reveals winning trick
Simon Reinhard mastered the Method of Loci to become a European memory champion.
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