12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Expansion of tuna quotas 'step backward' for conservation
Country quotas for eastern bluefin tuna are to increase 50 percent, by increments, to 36,000 tonnes in 2020 The 51-nation tuna fisheries body for the Atlantic and Mediterranean boosted quotas for highly prized bluefin despite scientific findings that doing so could threaten the species' recovery, delegates and observers at a key meeting said Tuesday. Country quotas for eastern bluefin tuna are to
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
FCC chairman sets out to scrap open internet access rules
In this Feb. 26, 2015, file photo, Federal Communication Commission Commissioner Ajit Pai speaks during an open hearing and vote on "Net Neutrality" in Washington. Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai is following through on his pledge to repeal 2015 regulations designed to ensure that internet service providers treat all online content and apps equally. Pai distributed his alterna
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Species may appear deceptively resilient to climate change
Mussel beds at Bodega Marine Reserve. Credit: Laura Jurgens Nature itself can be the best defense against climate change for many species—at least in the short term­—according to a study published in the journal Ecology Letters from the University of California, Davis. The study found that natural habitats play a vital role in helping other plants and animals resist heat stresses ramping up with
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
More needs to be done to ensure 24-hour working is not the new norm
Employers should do more to ensure employees do not feel pressured into working outside of their contractual hours and offer more support regarding how they work flexibly, a new study in the International Journal of Management Reviews reports. During the comprehensive evidence-based review, led by the University of Surrey in collaboration with Birkbeck, University of London and the University of
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Species may appear deceptively resilient to climate change
IMAGE: These are mussel beds at low tide at Bodega Marine Reserve in California. view more Credit: Laura Jurgens Nature itself can be the best defense against climate change for many species -- at least in the short term­ -- according to a study published in the journal Ecology Letters from the University of California, Davis. The study found that natural habitats play a vital role
12h
Science | The Guardian
Horse-eating birds and Demon Ducks of Doom: untangling the fowl family tree
We don’t generally think of chickens and ducks as particularly awe-inspiring birds. Kept across the world as pets or as a food source, chickens (Galliformes) and ducks and geese (Anseriformes) are ubiquitous and seen as docile and unintimidating. The comparative anatomist Thomas Huxley noted in 1867 that Galliformes and Anseriformes shared a number of anatomical features, suggesting that the two
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Any physical activity in elderly better than none at all for reducing cardiovascular risk
Sophia Antipolis, Nov. 22, 2017: Any physical activity in the elderly is better than none at all for reducing cardiovascular risk, according to an 18-year study in more than 24 000 adults published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology .1 "We know that regular physical activity has major health benefits," said first author Dr Sangeeta Lachman, a cardiologist at the Academic Medic
13h
Science | The Guardian
Healthy body, healthy mind: a new approach for mental disorders - Science Weekly podcast
What role might the immune system play in mental illness? And how might this challenge long-held beliefs about the divide between body and brain? Subscribe & Review on iTunes , Soundcloud , Audioboom , Mixcloud & Acast , and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter Earlier this month, a clinical trial began to test a radical new approach for treating schizophrenia . The trial comes from a team
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Antibiotics resistance: Researchers succeed to block genes of resistance
A colorized scanning electron micrograph of MRSA. Credit: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Antibiotics are commonly used around the world to cure diseases caused by bacteria. But as the World Health Organization and other international bodies have pointed out, the global increase of antibiotic resistance is a rapidly worsening problem. And since antibiotics are also an essent
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How to cut your lawn for grasshoppers
Picture a grasshopper landing randomly on a lawn of fixed area. If it then jumps a certain distance in a random direction, what shape should the lawn be to maximise the chance that the grasshopper stays on the lawn after jumping? One could be forgiven for wondering what the point of such a question might be. But the solution, proposed by theoretical physicists in the UK and the US, has some intri
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Earplugs unavoidable for musicians in the orchestra and at home
Remy Wenmaekers performed measurements with mannequins on stage to determine the effect of the presence of an orchestra on the acoustics. His conclusion is that measurements on empty stages do not give a good picture of the stage acoustics. Credit: Bart van Overbeeke. Many musicians suffer ear damage. Professional orchestras have therefore taken measures in recent years to reduce the sound levels
14h
Science | The Guardian
Poor sperm quality linked to air pollution
High levels of air pollution are associated with poor sperm quality and could be partly responsible for the sharp drop in male fertility, according to a new study. A team of scientists, led by researchers from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, studied the sperm of nearly 6,500 men and found a “strong association” between high levels of fine particulate air pollution and “abnormal sperm shape.”
14h
Science | The Guardian
Pitch perfect: the experts' guide to selling an idea
A pitch is often all there is between an individual and their film getting made or their business receiving funding. Having a good idea can be the easy part – selling it to strangers requires nerves of steel and more than a working knowledge of the art of persuasion. Petrified of public speaking? Let your body do the talking Ad agency adam&eveDDB has pitched for and won some of the biggest ad acc
14h
Ingeniøren
Gode råd til at forhandle dig til en bedre løn
Lønforhandling kan være en svær disciplin at mestre, men der er heldigvis hjælp at hente. Jobfinder har fem tip til at blive en bedre forhandler. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/gode-raad-at-forhandle-dig-bedre-loen-11275 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
14h
Ingeniøren
Boozt har forberedt sig på Black Friday: »Vi ser peaks med en faktor ti trafik«
Den amerikanske shoppedag Black Friday rammer ikke længere kun butikker i USA, men vil på fredag skylle over danske butikker, centre og netbutikker. »Det er lidt sjovt. Black Friday er jo en ret ny ting her i Europa. For 2-3 år siden vidste man nærmest ikke, hvad det var, og sidste år var det en kæmpe dag. Det var større end vi troede, selvom vi forventede en rekorddag,« siger Jesper Brøndum, CTO
14h
The Guardian's Science Weekly
Healthy body, healthy mind: a new approach for mental disorders - Science Weekly podcast
What role might the immune system play in mental illness? And how might this challenge long-held beliefs about the divide between body and brain?
14h
Science | The Guardian
Type of alcohol determines whether you become merry or maudlin – study
While indulging in booze can inspire cheerful merrymaking in some, for others it can lead to a tearful journey to the bottom of the glass. Now researchers say the emotions people feel when drinking could be linked to their tipple of choice. An international survey has revealed that spirits are often associated with feelings of energy, confidence and sexiness – but on the flip-side anger and tearf
14h
Science | The Guardian
Why do left-handers excel at certain elite sports but not others?
From cricketer Wasim Akram to baseball pitcher Clayton Kershaw and table tennis star Ding Ning, the world of sport has no shortage of left-handed players. But now researchers say they’ve worked out why lefties are overrepresented in some elite sports but not others. The study suggests that being left-handed is a particular advantage in interactive sports where time pressures are particularly seve
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Earplugs unavoidable for musicians in the orchestra and at home
IMAGE: Remy Wenmaekers performed measurements with mannequins on stage to determine the effect of the presence of an orchestra on the acoustics. His conclusion is that measurements on empty stages do... view more Credit: Bart van Overbeeke. Many musicians suffer ear damage. Professional orchestras have therefore taken measures in recent years to reduce the sound levels. Studies now reveal t
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Antibiotics resistance: Researchers succeed to block genes of resistance
Antibiotics are commonly used around the world to cure diseases caused by bacteria. But as the World Health Organization and other international bodies have pointed out, the global increase of antibiotic resistance is a rapidly worsening problem. And since antibiotics are also an essential part of modern medicine, as prophylactic treatment during surgeries and cancer therapy, rising resistance of
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Leaving the house every day may help older adults live longer
In a Journal of the American Geriatrics Society study of community-dwelling individuals aged 70 to 90 years who were participating in the Jerusalem Longitudinal Study, leaving the house daily was linked with a lower risk of dying over an extended follow-up period, independent of social, functional, or medical factors. The study's investigators noted that getting outside of one's home provides num
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can sleep quality and burnout affect shift-work nurses' job performance?
In a Journal of Advanced Nursing study, female gender and personal burnout were linked with impaired sleep quality among nurses. Also, working in the psychiatric setting, working a long cycle shift pattern, and experiencing daytime dysfunction were associated with burnout. A significant negative association between patient-related burnout and job performance was also observed. ### Disclaimer: AAA
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Analysis reveals barriers to routine HIV testing in high-income countries
A new HIV Medicine study identified several barriers to routine HIV testing in emergency departments and acute medical units in the UK and US. For the study, investigators searched electronic databases for US and UK studies published between 2006 and 2015 that described the offer of HIV testing to adults. HIV testing coverage ranged from 10%-38% and 19%-26% while uptake levels were higher (70%-84
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study examines individuals' perceptions of childbirth's effects on sexuality
Media reports have depicted vaginal birth as harmful and cesarean delivery as protective of sexuality, but research does not support these depictions. In a recent survey published in Birth , 16%-48% of participants endorsed beliefs consistent with these media reports, and individuals who endorsed these beliefs tended to identify as heterosexual; hold negative attitudes toward female genitalia; an
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Risk for aging-related diseases elevated among thyroid cancer survivors
Bottom Line: Risk for aging-related diseases such as heart disease and diabetes was significantly higher among thyroid cancer survivors in Utah than it was among age-matched, cancer-free individuals, with those diagnosed before age 40 having the highest risk for some of the diseases. Journal in Which the Study was Published: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention , a journal of the American
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Adult survivors of childhood cancer are more likely to develop high blood pressure
Bottom Line: People who survived childhood cancer were more than twice as likely as the general population to have high blood pressure (hypertension) as adults. Journal in Which the Study was Published: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention , a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. Author: Todd M. Gibson, PhD, assistant faculty member in the Epidemiology/Cancer Control d
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mass media linked to childhood obesity
A task force from the European Academy of Paediatrics and the European Childhood Obesity Group has found evidence of a strong link between obesity levels across European countries and childhood media exposure. The experts' review is published in Acta Paediatrica . The findings indicate that parents and society need a better understanding of the influence of social media on dietary habits. In addi
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Diabetes foot care services may help avoid lower limb amputations
In a Diabetic Medicine study that compared different regions in England, areas that provided 10 key services for diabetes foot care had lower rates of major diabetes-related lower limb amputations. Services introduced included administrative support, standardized general practice foot screening, improved community podiatry staffing, hospital multidisciplinary foot clinics, effective care pathways
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Time between pregnancies may affect autism risk
Investigators have found a link between the amount of time between pregnancies and Autism Spectrum Disorder in children. The findings are published in Autism Research . Autism Spectrum Disorder was increased in second and later-born children who were conceived less than 18 months or 60 or more months after the mother's previous birth. Other developmental disabilities were not associated with birt
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study examines the effects of a marijuana alternative
Synthetic cannabinoids (often sold as Spice or K2) have become popular alternatives to cannabis due to easy access and portrayed safety. The first trial of its kind has looked at the neurocognitive and subjective experiences that occur after taking the synthetic cannabinoid JWH-018. The results are published in the British Journal of Pharmacology . JWH-018 dosing resulted in drug concentrations t
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Alcohol consumption and metabolic factors act together to increase the risk of severe liver disease
A new study provides insights into the interaction between alcohol consumption and metabolic factors in predicting severe liver disease in the general population. The findings, which are published in Hepatology , indicate that multiple components of the metabolic syndrome affect the risk of severe liver disease in conjunction with alcohol consumption at levels that are typically thought to not ca
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Analysis provides reassurance on the safety of biosimilars
Biosimilars have been available in the European Union since 2006. A new British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology analysis of publicly available regulatory documents found no substantial differences in the reporting of safety information for biosimilars and related originators. The analysis included 19 biosimilars and 6 originators. Overall, 55 general safety concerns (12 low, 21 medium, and 22 hi
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MRI shows brain differences among ADHD patients
IMAGE: This is diagram shows the workflow for extracting radiomics features from T1-weighted and diffusion-tensor images. FA = fractional anisotropy, MD = mean diffusivity, AD = axial diffusivity, and RD = radial diffusivity view more Credit: Radiological Society of North America OAK BROOK, Ill. - Information from brain MRIs can help identify people with attention deficit hyperactivity
15h
New on MIT Technology Review
Finally, a Useful Application for VR: Training Employees
If you’ve ever been inside a Walmart during the annual frenzy known as Black Friday, you know there’s no way to truly prepare yourself for the crushing crowds and panic-fueled shopping—you have to see it to believe it. But wearing a virtual-reality headset that lets you stand in the middle of this madness comes pretty close. I would know; I’ve never worked a Black Friday shift as a retail employe
16h
Gizmodo
Russia Allegedly Threatens Retaliation Against Google if It Lowers RT or Sputnik's Search Rankings
Photo: AP The ominous cloud of doom surrounding the ongoing U.S. investigations into alleged Russian interference in the 2016 federal elections got a little darker on Tuesday, with Russian state communications agency Roskomnadzor allegedly threatening retaliation against Google for suggesting it could lower government-funded outlets RT and Sputnik in search rankings. Per Reuters , Roskomnadzor ch
16h
NYT > Science
As Malaria Resists Treatment, Experts Warn of Global Crisis
But a new, drug-resistant strain of the disease, impervious to artemisinin and another popular drug with which it is frequently paired, piperaquine, threatens to upend years of worldwide eradication efforts — straining health care systems and raising the prospect that the death toll could increase again. In recent years, public health officials have tracked the spread of deadly falciparum malaria
16h
Big Think
You Know These Studies are Good Since They’ve Been Reviewed…by a Dog
The Global Journal of Addiction and Rehabilitation Medicine sounds like a solid, peer-reviewed academic publication. It’s not. It’s one of many “predatory” journals, alongside the Journal of Finance and Economics — as opposed to the legitimate and almost identically named Journal of Economics and Finance — and the GSTF Journal of Engineering Technology , a nefarious knockoff of the respected Jour
16h
Ingeniøren
Gasnettet kan være grønt i 2035 – men prisen står i vejen
Det danske gasnet kan i 2035 være fyldt med biogas i stedet for naturgas. Foto: Grøn Gas Danmark I dag udgør biogas kun sølle 5 procent af den samlede gasproduktion, men det er teknologisk muligt at opgradere sektoren til 100 procent biogas inden for de næste 18 år. Det viser et nyt notat, som interessefællesskabet Grøn Gas Danmark offentliggjorde i sidste uge. Grøn Gas Danmark Grøn Gas Danmark e
17h
Gizmodo
Watch Boba Fett Actor Daniel Logan Use a Real Life Boba Fett Flamethrower
GIF I mean, just look at that GIF. Bask in its glory. What you’re looking at is a moment from the web series Science and Star Wars . In the latest episode, the show explored just how close reality is to Boba Fett. Specifically, some of his technology. And while it concludes jetpacks aren’t quiet there yet, the flamethrower is. Check this out. We’ve covered this show before and, if you read that a
17h
Live Science
Sleep Apnea: Symptoms, Causes and Treatments
Sleep apnea is a condition in which people experience pauses in breathing or shallow breathing during sleep. According to the American Sleep Apnea Association , around 22 million Americans may suffer from sleep apnea and around 80 percent of moderate and severe obstructive sleep apnea goes undiagnosed. These pauses in breathing, called apneas, can occur as often as 30 or more times per hour
17h
Live Science
Christmas Trees: Real vs. Fake, and How to Keep Them Fresh
"O Christmas tree, O Christmas tree, how lovely are thy branches," goes the traditional German carol. But are those branches real or fake? Conscious consumers may wonder which type of Christmas tree — real or artificial — is better for the environment. And if the branches are real, how do you keep them fresh for the entire holiday season? The real vs. fake argument will likely not be settle
17h
Live Science
From Wild to Mild: How Different Types of Alcohol Affect Your Mood
The holidays are full of tasty treats and festive cocktails — but instead of Christmas cheer, some alcoholic beverages may cause other, less pleasant feelings, a new study from England suggests. In the study, researchers examined how consuming different types of alcohol, such as beer, spirits and wine, could affect a person's emotions when drinking at home or out in public. Their findings s
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers identify mutation that causes bad teeth in Samoyed dogs
A mutation in a gene called SCL24A4 that causes enamel hypoplasia, or poorly formed enamel of the teeth in Samoyed dogs has been identified by researchers at the Center for Companion Animal Health, University of California, Davis. The findings are published in the open access journal Canine Genetics and Epidemiology . Affected dogs have discoloured and malformed teeth and the condition can lead t
19h
Ars Technica
Before Peter Thiel invested, research on herpes vaccine began in US hotel rooms
reader comments 78 The researcher who conducted a controversial 2016 herpes vaccine trial on the island of St. Kitts without federal safety oversight had secretly begun the trial in the US three years earlier—in hotel rooms not far from his academic lab. That’s according to a new investigation by Kaiser Health News . That researcher, the late Dr. William Halford of Southern Illinois University, a
20h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Dialog med patienter kan give lavere antibiotikaforbrug
18. november 2017 Dialog med patienter kan give lavere antibiotikaforbrug antibiotika Når praktiserende læger taler med deres patienter om luftvejsinfektioner, antager de ofte, at patienterne forventer at få antibiotika. Men sådan forholder det sig langtfra altid: Hvis lægerne bruger tid på at involvere patienterne i behandlingen og informere dem om alternativer til antibiotika, vil de ofte accep
20h
Scientific American Content: Global
How Fit Is Bitcoin?
Computing 60-Second Science How Fit Is Bitcoin? A new analysis treats bitcoins and other cryptocurrencies as species in an evolutionary model—and finds bitcoin has no selective advantage. Christopher Intagliata reports. There are now more than 16 million bitcoins in circulation , with a total market cap of 130 billion dollars —more than the market value of Netflix, Priceline or Starbucks. Just go
20h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Seeds hold hidden treasures for future food
Image copyright Wolfgang Stuppy Image caption Seed vault at the Millennium Seed Bank More than 70,000 of the world's most precious seeds have been sent from the UK's Millennium Seed Bank to the Middle East, in its largest export to date. The consignment contains more than 50 wild relatives of cultivated crops, such as wheat, barley and lentils. The seeds will be used for food security research at
20h
Futurity.org
3 things to know about the ‘real’ Thanksgiving
For many Native Americans, Thanksgiving is not synonymous with blessings and praise. Rather, the day is a reminder of a dark history that is rarely told in its entirety. Year after year, elementary school children create paper turkeys and dress up as Pilgrims and Indians to re-create the original Thanksgiving feast. The portrayal suggests a great celebration between survivors of the Mayflower, wh
20h
Science : NPR
What The Industry Knew About Sugar's Health Effects, But Didn't Tell Us
A new report reveals how the industry influenced research in the 1960s to deflect concerns about the impact of sugar on health — including pulling the plug on a study it funded. Karen M. Romanko/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Karen M. Romanko/Getty Images A new report reveals how the industry influenced research in the 1960s to deflect concerns about the impact of sugar on health — incl
20h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: Do Lefties Have an Advantage in Sports? It Depends
Comparing all six sports against one another, he found the proportion of southpaws increased as the time available for players to act decreased. Nine percent of the top players were left-dominant in the slowest contest, squash, while 30 percent of the best pitchers were lefties in the fastest, baseball. Over all, left-handedness was 2.6 times more likely in the sports with higher time constraints
20h
NYT > Science
Lilli Hornig, 96, Dies; A-Bomb Researcher Lobbied for Women in Science
She couldn’t type at all. “She had a master’s degree in chemistry from Harvard,” Ruth H. Howes and Caroline L. Herzenberg wrote in “Their Day in the Sun: Women of the Manhattan Project” (1999), “but typing had not been one of the requirements.” Dr. Hornig talked her way into researching plutonium with another woman hired by the project. But when her supervisors realized that the isotope they were
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Health service complaints system risking patients' and doctors' health
The General Medical Council (GMC) regulates doctors in the UK and can stop or limit their rights to practice. Around 9000 doctors a year are reported to the GMC, and around 160 are suspended or erased from the medical register. Apart from those referred to the GMC, many other complaints are investigated formally or informally by hospitals and practices, meaning a doctor could be investigated a nu
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How to cut your lawn for grasshoppers
Picture a grasshopper landing randomly on a lawn of fixed area. If it then jumps a certain distance in a random direction, what shape should the lawn be to maximise the chance that the grasshopper stays on the lawn after jumping? One could be forgiven for wondering what the point of such a question might be. But the solution, proposed by theoretical physicists in the UK and the US, has some intri
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More needs to be done to ensure 24-hour working is not the new norm
Employers should do more to ensure employees do not feel pressured into working outside of their contractual hours and offer more support regarding how they work flexibly, a new study in the International Journal of Management Reviews reports. During the comprehensive evidence-based review, led by the University of Surrey in collaboration with Birkbeck, University of London and the University of
20h
Futurity.org
To eat, this beetle depends on organs full of bacteria
A leaf-eating tortoise beetle has a symbiotic relationship with bacteria living inside its body that allows the insect to digest pectin, part of a plant’s cell other animals can’t break down. The bacterium also has a surprisingly tiny genome—much smaller than previous reports on the minimum size required for an organism not subsisting within a host cell. “This insect is a leaf eater largely becau
20h
Futurity.org
How climate change will mess with water ‘recharge’ in Western U.S.
As the climate warms, the dry southern regions of the Western United States will have less groundwater recharge while the northern regions will have more, researchers report. “Our study asked what will be the effect of climate change on groundwater recharge in the Western US in the near future, 2021-2050, and the far future, 2070-2100,” says first author Rewati Niraula, who worked on the research
20h
Futurity.org
Babies connect similar words by listening to what we say
Babies recognize that the meanings of some words, like car and stroller, are more alike than others, like car and juice, researchers report. By analyzing home recordings, researchers found that babies’ word knowledge correlated with the proportion of time they heard people talking about objects in their immediate surroundings. “Even though there aren’t many overt signals of language knowledge in
21h
Gizmodo
Stan Against Evil's Finale Unleashes Alternate Realities, Bloodthirsty Witches, and Stripper Jokes
Image: IFC Stan Against Evil wraps up its second season tomorrow night with its last set of back-to-back episodes. We’ve got an exclusive look at the finale, and while there’s no Stan in the clip, it does feature a time-traveling Sheriff Evie (Janet Varney) meeting Deputy Leon (Nate Mooney) for what he thinks is the first time. Naturally, because Leon is a bit of a buffoon, it doesn’t go well...
21h
Futurity.org
Tiny ‘hashtags’ could catch Majorana quasiparticles
New research describes how to coax “hashtag”-shaped nanowires into generating Majorana quasiparticles. These quasiparticles are exotic states that if realized, can be used to encode information with very little risk of decoherence—one of quantum computing’s biggest challenges—and thus, little need for quantum error correction. “The ‘hashtag’ structures whose quantum properties are studied in this
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cases of heart failure continue to rise; poorest people worst affected
The number of people being diagnosed with heart failure in the UK continues to rise as a result of demographic changes common to many developed countries, new research by The George Institute for Global Health at the University of Oxford suggests. There are now as many new cases of heart failure each year as there are of the four most common cancers combined (lung, breast, bowel and prostate ca
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Air pollution linked to poorer quality sperm
Air pollution, particularly levels of fine particulate matter (PM2.5), is associated with poorer quality sperm, suggests research published online in Occupational & Environmental Medicine . Although the size of the effect is relatively small in clinical terms, given how widespread air pollution is, this might spell infertility for a "significant number of couples," say the researchers. Environmen
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Different types of alcohol elicit different emotional responses
Different types of alcohol elicit different emotional responses, but spirits are most frequently associated with feelings of aggression, suggests research published in the online journal BMJ Open . To explore the potential emotional factors underpinning alcohol preference the researchers drew on anonymised responses to the world's largest online survey of legal and illicit drug and alcohol use
21h
Popular Science
Burning questions for the top 'Hall of Fame' reviewer on Amazon
Since September, financial advisor Joanna Daneman has written Amazon reviews of a vertical chicken roaster, a toilet flush lever, a pan for making Japanese omelets, a Dear Drew by Drew Barrymore hair dryer, a foam roller, Tide laundry detergent smart pouches, a paperback about guitar music, squeaking dog toys, an electric kettle, and a leakproof bento-box lunch carrier. And that’s not the half of
21h
Gizmodo
Adequate Man Do Animals Have Accents?
Adequate Man Do Animals Have Accents? | The Root The Caucasian’s Guide to Black Thanksgiving, Part 1: The Guest List | Jezebel In the Fight for Boyle Heights, Is Artist Laura Owens the Real Enemy? | Splinter Teacher Suspended After Bragging About Flunking Kids Who Didn’t Stand for the Pledge of Allegiance | Earther Beneath Antarctica’s Sea Ice, Scientists Discover a Rapidly Changing World |
21h
Gizmodo
Sonos's Black Friday Deals Are Live, Including the Brand New Sonos One
Sonos One | $175 | Amazon Sonos Play:1 | $150 | Amazon Sonos Playbar | $600 | Amazon Sonos Playbase | $600 | Amazon It’s the most wonderful time of the year...to buy Sonos stuff. The deals we were expecting are live now on Amazon, including the first ever discount on the Alexa-equipped Sonos One , $50 off the still-great PLAY:1 , and $100 savings on the PLAYBAR and PLAYBASE .
21h
The Atlantic
Myths You Learned in Health Class
Remember learning about the food pyramid in health class? As it turns out, the pyramid was based on a lot of misinformation about nutrition. In this episode of School Myths , we explore the source of some of the pervasive myths about healthy foods and fitness—and the new science shaping health class today.
21h
New Scientist - News
Ocean-covered planets may not be the places to search for life
These may not be the worlds we should look for Micha Pawlitzki/Getty By Shannon Hall Although water worlds are awash with one of the key ingredients for life, surprisingly, they might not be the best places to find it. Tessa Fisher , a graduate student at Arizona State University in Tempe, and her colleagues presented this counter-intuitive idea last week at the Habitable Worlds conference in
22h
The Scientist RSS
US Research Integrity Head Temporarily Leaves Post
Kathy Partin, whose staff had expressed concerns about changes she instituted, was reportedly asked to leave.
22h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
A Failed Water Pump Puts Parker's Whole Operation At Risk | Gold Rush
#GoldRush | Friday 9p After running the de-watering pump all night, Parker and his crew find the flood water rising up to cover the pay and the pump… is no more. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_R
22h
Ars Technica
British water utilities admit they use divining rods to find leaks
Enlarge / A woman—but probably not a British water professional—uses a divining rod. reader comments 0 Ten out of 12 water utilities in the United Kingdom admitted that their technicians use divining rods to find underground leaks or water pipes, according to an investigation by science blogger Sally Le Page . Dowsing is a centuries-old technique for locating underground water. Someone searching
22h
Popular Science
The lake is basic. The slippery, scuba-diving fly that lives there is not.
There was a salty lake that swallowed a fly. I do know why it swallowed the fly, and rest assured, neither the lake nor the fly is going to die any sooner as a result. California’s Mono Lake is three times saltier than the Pacific ocean, and is incredibly basic. Chemically speaking, that is. It's on the opposite end of the pH scale from acids. The lake is filled with alkaline bases that give the
22h
Gizmodo
Vine's Co-Founder Is Very Concerned About Salad
Photo: Getty Vine was an app that offered something new and only lived long enough to leave people with mostly good feelings about it. Now, Vine’s co-creator Rus Yusupov has a new trivia app that people like a lot , and he seems to be doing his best to tank it by acting like a raving maniac. HQ Trivia is an app that lets people participate in live trivia events. The sessions occur twice a day and
22h
Feed: All Latest
WIRED's Product Reviews Have a New Look, and a New Mission
Here at WIRED, we approach product reviews a little differently than everyone else. There are literally dozens of places on the web where you can scan all the specs and read about every feature in a new phone or a new speaker. But we try to be more helpful than that. When we write a product review, we tell you what an object is trying to achieve, how it could potentially fit into your life, and w
22h
Popular Science
Cult leaders like Charles Manson exploit this basic psychological need
C harles Manson, who died November 19, famously attracted a coterie of men and women to do his bidding, which included committing a string of murders in the late-1960s. Manson is undoubtedly a fascinating figure with a complicated life story. But as someone who studies human cognition, I’m more interested in the members of the Manson “family” like Susan Atkins and Patricia Krenwinkel, and how the
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Ars Technica
DOJ names Iranian as hacker who stole unaired episodes from HBO
Enlarge / Acting US Attorney Joon H. Kim speaks during a press conference at the US Attorney's Office, Southern District of New York, on September 26, 2017. reader comments 21 On Tuesday, federal authorities in New York indicted Behzad Mesri, an Iranian citizen, accusing him of hacking HBO earlier this year. Seeing as Iran and the United States lack an extradition treaty, it is unlikely that Mesr
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Live Science
Radioactive Cloud Originated in Russia: What Might Have Caused It?
In early October, several European countries detected elevated levels of ruthenium-106 above the continent. Based on concentration levels, the likely source of contamination was located around the Ural Mountains. Credit: ISRN A mysterious cloud of radioactive material that hovered over Europe last month came from Russia, Russian weather monitoring data released today (Nov. 21) suggests. The
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Finding their inner bird: Using modern genomics to turn alligator scales into birdlike feathers
Upon first glance, most people wouldn't think alligators or birds were evolutionary cousins. But indeed, reptiles are the closest living relatives of birds, and all descended from the archosaurs, the "ruling reptiles" who once dominated the Earth 250 million years ago. Archosaurs gave rise to the age of the dinosaurs and, eventually, birds and reptiles as their only living descendants. Recently,
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Big Think
Physicists Find a Way Information Can Escape From Black Holes
Typically, one imagines a black hole as sort of a gigantic cosmic pit that sucks in everything around it. But physicists say a new kind of space structure is possible that allows some information to escape black holes. Previously, wormholes, theoretical structures predicted by the theory of general relativity (as Einstein-Rosen bridges ), have been considered as possible ways to escape black hole
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
People willing to trade treatment efficacy for reduced side effects in cancer therapies
(WASHINGTON, November 21, 2017) -- When choosing their preferred treatment, people with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) place the highest value on medicines that deliver the longest progression-free survival, but are willing to swap some drug efficacy for a reduced risk of serious adverse events according to a study published online in Blood Advances , a Journal of the American Society o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon Key delivery driver could knock out security camera, researchers show
A Seattle-based group of cybersecurity researchers has demonstrated a way to knock Amazon.com's new security camera offline, a capability that could enable malicious delivery drivers for the online retailer's new in-home delivery service to snoop around a house undetected. Amazon Key, which became available to customers this month, gives Amazon delivery drivers one-time access to a residence to d
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Ars Technica
Drugs that switch your brain into squirrel-mode may save you from a stroke
Enlarge / Aww. Well, if the 13-lined ground squirrel doesn’t save your brain, maybe it’ll warm your heart. reader comments 31 Stroke treatments have been a tough nut to crack. So, naturally, scientists have turned to squirrels for inspiration. In the latest cache of data, researchers dug up a drug that can essentially flip a hibernation switch in brain cells, mimicking conditions in the noggins o
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Live Science
Girl's Heart Beats Outside Her Chest: Rare Disorder Explained
A screengrab of a video showing a girl's rare condition that causes her heart to beat outside her chest. Credit: RM Videos/YouTube A girl's heart appears to beat literally outside of her chest in a recent video, but what causes this to happen? The video , which was uploaded to YouTube in September, shows a young girl laughing as her heart beats outside of her chest, with just a thin layer o
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Gizmodo
Turn Any Desk Into a Part-Time Standing Desk With These Early Black Friday Deals
Commerce Content is independent of Editorial and Advertising, and if you buy something through our posts, we may get a small share of the sale. Click here for more. So you want to try a standing desk , but you’re not ready to commit to it for eight hours a day...what do you do? You buy this Lorell monitor riser for as little as $136 , an all-time low. Over the past 12 months, standing desks went
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Comcast, Verizon and maybe Amazon want look at 21st Century Fox assets
First it was Disney and then along came Comcast, but now other industry heavyweights, Verizon and possibly Amazon, are eyeing some of 21st Century Fox's rich media empire. Comcast has approached Fox and expressed interest in some of Fox's assets, including U.K.-based TV and Internet provider Sky and Mumbai-headquartered studio Star India, a source familiar with the situation told USA TODAY. And
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Science : NPR
Sugar Industry Shifted Blame For Heart Disease Onto Fats In The '60s
A new report out today reveals documents showing how the sugar industry influenced scientific research in the 1960s in a way that deflected concerns about the impact of sugar on health.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple supplier used illegal teenage labor to assemble the iPhone X: report
If you own an iPhone X, there is a chance your prized smartphone was built from forced labor of Chinese high school students. Apple and its largest Chinese supplier, Foxconn, acknowledged that students did work in the latter's factories to assemble the iPhone X to keep up with the demand. Despite Apple and Foxconn saying the students volunteered to work at the factories, students told the Financi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New discovery: Common jellyfish is actually two species
Two different jellyfish. At left is US Atlantic sea nettle ( Chrysaora quinquecirrha ) and at right is the Atlantic bay nettle (Chrysaora chesapeakei). Credit: Photos by Shannon Howard, South Carolina Aquarium; Keith Bayha University of Delaware professor Patrick Gaffney and alumnus Keith Bayha, a research associate with the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, have determined that a
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Big Think
How Student Loan Debt May Be Affecting Your Sex Life
There’s been lots of talk about the meteoric rise in student loan debt and how it’s affecting borrowers. Millennials especially has been saddled with such debt and we’re now just starting to understand how it’s affecting them. One study out of the University of South Carolina, found that high levels of student debt can lead to greater anxiety and depression rates and poorer physical health. Wha
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Gizmodo
British Water Companies Are Searching for Leaks With Divining Rods and I'm So Angry I Could Cry
This is what they are doing (Image: National Library of Wales /Wikimedia Commons) Imagine if someone came to your house to fix your pipes, then stumbled around your yard blindly with a pair of sticks. Now imagine if you called the company they worked for whose rep said “yep, sometimes that’s how we look for pipes.” The Guardian reports that ten of twelve United Kingdom water companies admit to us
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New discovery: Common jellyfish is actually two species
IMAGE: This image shows two different jellyfish. At left is US Atlantic sea nettle ( Chrysaora quinquecirrha ) and at right is the Atlantic bay nettle (Chrysaora chesapeakei). view more Credit: Photos by Shannon Howard, South Carolina Aquarium; Keith Bayha University of Delaware professor Patrick Gaffney and alumnus Keith Bayha, a research associate with the Smithsonian's National Museum of
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Baby-boomers and millennials more afflicted by the opioid epidemic
Baby-boomers, those born between 1947 and 1964, experienced an excess risk of prescription opioid overdose death and heroin overdose death, according to latest research at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. Individuals born between 1979 and 1992 were also at significantly increased risk for death from heroin overdose. The study findings, which were consistent for both men and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Legal analysis finds Arkansas law that bars protection of LGBTQ people unconstitutional
An original legal analysis by NYU College of Global Public Health finds an Arkansas law that prohibits local governments from enacting civil rights protections for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer (LGBTQ) individuals to be unconstitutional. The article, published in the December issue of the American Journal of Public Health , provides information in support of evidence-based polic
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The Scientist RSS
New CAR T-Cell Therapy Shows Promise in Trial for Leukemia
The immunotherapy, which targets CD22 on cancer cells rather than CD19, might prove useful in patients for whom previous T-cell treatments were unsuccessful.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
Activism needs introverts | Sarah Corbett
For the introverts among us, traditional forms activism like marches, protests and door-to-door canvassing can be intimidating and stressful. Take it from Sarah Corbett, a former professional campaigner and self-proclaimed introvert. She introduces us to "craftivism," a quieter form of activism that uses handicrafts as a way to get people to slow down and think deeply about the issues they're faci
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Ars Technica
FCC will also order states to scrap plans for their own net neutrality laws
Enlarge / Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai arrives for his confirmation hearing with the Senate Commerce Committee on July 19, 2017 in Washington, DC. reader comments 98 In addition to ditching its own net neutrality rules , the Federal Communications Commission also plans to tell state and local governments that they cannot impose local laws regulating broadband service. This
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Popular Science
Tiny license plates could help us steer clear of our space junk
Before owning a car became typical, roads and highways (the few that existed) were never crowded. It was only after everyone started purchasing and driving their own vehicles—to work, school, even the grocery store around the block—that streets grew congested, rush hour became an everyday occurrence, and car accidents became an inevitability. Space, despite its vastness, could be on a similar tra
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Big Think
A Lack of Dreaming Might Cause Health Problems. Here's What You Can Do.
I often experience work-related dreams. Teaching yoga and fitness classes six days a week keeps my mind fixated on movement patterns. Sometimes new sequences are created while unconscious, which I translate the next day during class. Other nights are not so kind: I’m bombing in front of dozens of people or stuck in traffic rushing to make it to class on time—the classic work anxiety dream. mi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New findings to help HIV scientists establish 'template' for potent antibodies
New data further illuminate how some human beings generate powerful, HIV-blocking antibodies. These results offer important insight into a potential AIDS vaccine design.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cassini image mosaic: A farewell to Saturn
After more than 13 years at Saturn, and with its fate sealed, NASA's Cassini spacecraft bid farewell to the Saturnian system by firing the shutters of its wide-angle camera and capturing this last, full mosaic of Saturn and its rings two days before the spacecraft's dramatic plunge into the planet's atmosphere. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute In a fitting farewell to the planet t
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Which Sonos Speaker is Best For You?
Here at WIRED, we like Sonos speakers. Throughout the last five years, we’ve reviewed everything from its small Play:1 speaker to its soundbars and recommended every one of them. But it’s not cheap to turn your home into a Sonos-powered shrine to sound. Like Apple products, Sonos speakers are built to work with other Sonos speakers, and don’t come cheap, starting at $200 for the least expensive,
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The Atlantic
The Real-Life 'Mad Max'
If someone were to stumble upon the Race of Gentlemen in Wildwood, New Jersey, that person might think they had stepped into the Mad Max universe. The annual motorcycle and hot rod race attracts 15,000 bikers and spectators from across the country. Over the course of one exciting day, riders race at speeds up to 70 miles per hour in vehicles exclusively made before the year 1950. “These guys crea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Politics or policy? Behind the dispute over AT&T-Time Warner
In this Wednesday, Dec. 7, 2016, file photo, AT&T Chairman and CEO Randall Stephenson, left, testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, before a Senate Judiciary subcommittee hearing on the proposed merger between AT&T and Time Warner, as Time Warner Chairman and CEO Jeffrey Bewkes listens at right. The Justice Department intends to sue AT&T to stop its $85 billion purchase of Time Warner, accordin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lawsuit: 3M contamination led to more cancer, infertility
Minnesota's attorney general alleges that chemicals dumped by 3M Co. in the Twin Cities metro led to an increase in cancer, infertility and babies with low birth weights. The contamination caused $5 billion in health and environmental damage for which 3M should be liable, Attorney General Lori Swanson said Friday in a court filing . The filing alleges that 3M knew the groundwater was contaminat
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fiat Chrysler and Eni cooperating on emissions reductions
The CEOs of Italian-American carmaker Fiat Chrysler Automobiles SpA and Italian energy giant ENI have agreed to jointly develop technologies to reduce carbon emissions from vehicles.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hulu sued for not offering audio service for blind customers
Advocacy groups have sued Hulu in an effort to force the subscription streaming service to provide an audio track that helps people who are blind or visually impaired enjoy TV shows and movies. The federal lawsuit filed in Boston on Monday asks the court to declare that Hulu's failure to provide services for the blind violates the Americans with Disabilities Act. The groups say Hulu has refused t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Second HIV test helps prevent incorrect HIV diagnosis in infants
Confirmatory HIV testing can substantially reduce the number of infants in South Africa who may be falsely diagnosed as HIV-infected and started on unneeded treatment, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Specific tumor environment found that triggers cells to metastasize
The environment surrounding a tumor can trigger metastatic behavior in cancer cells, a team of bioengineers and bioinformaticians has discovered. Specifically, when tumor cells are confined in a dense environment, the researchers found that they turn on a specific set of genes and begin to form structures that resemble blood vessels.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Correctly used neonics do not adversely affect honeybee colonies, new research finds
Amid mounting controversy over use of neonicotinoids and declining bee population, a new analysis of previously unpublished studies and reports commissioned by agri-chemical companies Bayer and Syngenta -- as well as published papers from the scientific literature -- shows no significant ill effects on honeybee colonies from three common insecticides made by the companies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Topological insulators: One glimpse is enough
The Nobel Prize for physics in 2016 was awarded for the theory of topological matter. Topological insulators are new materials with special electronic properties and are of great fundamental and applications-oriented interest. Nevertheless, physicists have wrestled with a ten-year-old puzzle in which the results from the two best methods to probe their electronic states disagree. Researchers now k
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Function of an enigmatic synaptic protein defined
Communication is often mired in contradiction -- also in the brain. Neuroscientists have now resolved one such contradiction. The role of Synaptotagmin 7 has been controversial: There was a contradiction between the function it seemed to have, and the characteristics of signal transmission observed. Now, for the first time, scientists defined its functional contribution at an inhibitory GABAergic
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biomechanical model could reduce wobbling of pedestrian bridges
The dangerous wobbling of pedestrian bridges could be reduced by using biomechanically inspired models of pedestrian response to bridge motion and a mathematical formula to estimate the critical crowd size at which bridge wobbling begins, according to a study led by Georgia State University. Credit: Thomas Porostocky The dangerous wobbling of pedestrian bridges could be reduced by using biomechan
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biomechanical model could reduce wobbling of pedestrian bridges
IMAGE: The dangerous wobbling of pedestrian bridges could be reduced by using biomechanically inspired models of pedestrian response to bridge motion and a mathematical formula to estimate the critical crowd size... view more Credit: Illustration by Thomas Porostocky ATLANTA--The dangerous wobbling of pedestrian bridges could be reduced by using biomechanically inspired models of pedest
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Big Think
Experts Predict 20 Major Quakes Over the Next Year
The earth doesn’t spin at a constant speed. Various things can affect its rotation. Activities in its mantle and core affect it, as can atmospheric changes and ocean patterns. We’re not talking about big fluctuations in speed, but since 2011, the earth has been turning just a bit slower than usual, by a few-thousandths of a seconds. This has made our equator a bit smaller, like the best diet plan
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New on MIT Technology Review
How a Smart Watch Can Predict Your Happiness Levels
One of the more important challenges of 21st - century living is figuring out how to be happy. There is no shortage of advice. Aristotle wrote that “happiness is a state of activity.” And one team of researchers found that it is possible to increase happiness levels by surrounding yourself with people who are happy. Indeed, each happy individual in your life reportedly increases your happiness by
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The Scientist RSS
Editors Claim Censorship at a Public Health Journal
The editorial board at the International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health accuses its publisher of promoting corporate interests.
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Feed: All Latest
Feds Indict Iranian for HBO Hack—But Extradition Isn't Likely
Four months ago, HBO faced a punishing series of leaks of unreleased episodes, scripts, and even celebrities' contact information . On Tuesday, the Department of Justice named the alleged culprit behind that extortion campaign: An Iranian hacker named Behzad Mesri. By indicting Mesri, prosecutors have sent a message that even anonymous cybercriminals in countries as distant as Iran can be tracked
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Blog » Languages » English
Eyewire Secret Santa: signups are now open for the 5th annual gift exchange!
As I sit snuggled up by the warmth of the spawner server, thoughts of snow covered neuron branches dance through my head. The cold winter season is upon us and there’s only one cure for frozen mornings and 4 pm sunsets: celebrating science with Eyewire friends. We’re delighted to invite you to sign up for the 5th annual Eyewire Secret Santa gift exchange ! Deadline to sign up: Friday, Dec 1 at 2
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Proposed cuts to US Malaria Initiative could mean millions more malaria cases
Cutting the budget of the President's Malaria Initiative (PMI) by 44 percent, as the US Congress has proposed, would lead to an estimated 67 million additional cases of malaria over the next four years, according to a mathematical model.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Twisted sex allows mirror-image snails to mate face-to-face, research finds
A new study has found that differently-coiled types of Japanese land snails should in fact be considered a single species, because -- against all odds -- they are sometimes able to mate, a result which has implications for the classification of other snails.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Decongestant revealed as 'highly effective' in starving cancer cells
Cancer researchers seeking non-toxic alternatives to harmful chemotherapy are reporting a highly significant result for a humble cold remedy.
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The Atlantic
The Sichuan Giant Panda Bases and Sanctuaries
In the mountains of southwestern China’s Sichuan Province, a network of research centers, nature reserves, breeding facilities, and wildlife sanctuaries has been established to support native endangered species, especially the vulnerable giant panda. Researchers have been working for decades in the Wolong National Nature Reserve and Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding to boost the numbe
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Ars Technica
Chinese students claim they worked illegal overtime making the iPhone X
reader comments 63 A report in the Financial Times claims Foxconn has employed teenaged students to manufacture iPhone X components and that those students worked illegal overtime. Additionally, according to one of the students cited in the report, a school had students working at the factory as part of their educational programs. The report cited only six workers out of the thousands working at
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Live Science
Raw Milk Contaminated with Bacteria in Up To 4 States, CDC Warns
If you consumed raw milk in the past six months, you may need antibiotics: "People who bought and drank raw milk from a company called Udder Milk may have been infected with a rare but potentially serious germ called Brucella abortus RB51 " and should seek medical care, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said today (Nov. 21) in a statement. The warning applies to people in
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NYT > Science
Russia, in Reversal, Confirms Radiation Spike
A weather station in the town of Argayash recorded ruthenium 106 levels that were 986 times higher than a month earlier, the state weather agency said. A second station at Novogorny detected levels 440 times higher. Ruthenium 106, which does not occur naturally and has a half life of about a year, is used for medical purposes. For weeks, Russian officials had denied the French and German accusati
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Science | The Guardian
Sugar industry withheld research effects of sucrose 50 years ago, study claims
Sugar’s demise from childhood staple to public enemy can be seen everywhere. Chocolate bars are shrinking, sugary drinks are set to be taxed and our recommended daily sugar intake has been slashed in half . But the battle against sugar might have begun sooner if the industry hadn’t kept secrets to protect its commercial interests, according to new findings. In 1967, when scientists were arguing o
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New tool can help job searchers better position themselves in market
A novel method, developed by an economist has been created to evaluate a worker's skillset and determine its impact on wages.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How bacteria survive in oxygen-poor environments
Biologists have revealed a mechanism by which bacterial cells in crowded, oxygen-deprived environments access oxygen for energy production, ensuring survival of the cell. The finding could explain how some bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), are able to thrive in oxygen-poor environments like biofilms and resist antibiotics. P. aeruginosa biofilm infections are a leading caus
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Watching atoms move in hybrid perovskite crystals reveals clues to improving solar cells
The discovery of nanoscale changes deep inside hybrid perovskites could shed light on developing low-cost, high-efficiency solar cells. Using X-ray beams and lasers, a team of researchers discovered how the movement of ions in hybrid perovskites causes certain regions within the material to become better solar cells than other parts.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Children with Alagille Syndrome have malformed bile ducts
Serious liver and heart problems can affect children with Alagille Syndrome early in life. While there is as yet no cure, researchers have discovered that the liver disease part of the syndrome is caused by specific malformations of the bile ducts. The results were discovered with the aid of a new mouse model that can now be used to develop and test new therapies.
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Ars Technica
Dealmaster: Get a PlayStation 4 for $200 and other early Black Friday deals
Staff — Dealmaster: Get a PlayStation 4 for $200 and other early Black Friday deals Plus deals on Lenovo laptops, Kindles, Amazon Fire tablets, and more. Ars Staff - Nov 21, 2017 7:40 pm UTC reader comments 11 Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our friends at TechBargains , we have another round of deals to share. Though the Black Friday madness is still a couple of days away, various retailers have
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Big Think
Why Philosophy Is so Important in Science Education
Each semester, I teach courses on the philosophy of science to undergraduates at the University of New Hampshire. Most of the students take my courses to satisfy general education requirements, and most of them have never taken a philosophy class before. On the first day of the semester, I try to give them an impression of what the philosophy of science is about. I begin by explaining to them tha
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Health of people with cystic fibrosis shows positive trends in US and Canada
IMAGE: This is a model of the human lungs. view more Credit: Dr. Robb Glenny, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, UW Medicine New research comparing cystic fibrosis patients in the United States and Canada showed that, although the patients' nutritional status and lung function improved in both countries over the period from 1990 to 2013, the rate of improvement was faster in the Un
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How rogue immune cells cross the blood-brain barrier to cause multiple sclerosis
Drug designers working on therapeutics against multiple sclerosis should focus on blocking two distinct ways rogue immune cells attack healthy neurons, according to a new study in the journal Cell Reports . In multiple sclerosis, immune cells degrade the insulation that protects neurons and allows them to signal to one another, but little is known about how immune cells penetrate the blood-brain
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The Atlantic
Growing Up in Cartoon County
Cullen Murphy grew up in the funny pages. Almost literally: His father, John Cullen Murphy, was an artist who drew numerous comic strips, the best-known and longest-running of which was Prince Valiant . He somehow managed to support a family of eight children. This improbable feat was made possible partly by the times—the postwar prosperity and optimism that saw hundreds of thousands of returning
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New tool can help job searchers better position themselves in market
Credit: CC0 Public Domain With the decline of manufacturing, the U.S. economy has increasingly shifted toward knowledge-based production: industries focused on implementing new ideas surrounding technology, product design, machine learning, and other areas as their source of revenue. In this new economy, it can be challenging to evaluate the skillset of an individual, as combinations of various s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Correctly used neonics do not adversely affect honeybee colonies, new research finds
Credit: CC0 Public Domain The three most widely used neonicotinoid pesticides for flowering crops pose no risk to honeybee colonies when used correctly as seed treatments, according to new studies by University of Guelph researchers. Amid mounting controversy over use of neonicotinoids (neonics) and declining bee population, a new analysis by U of G scientists of previously unpublished studies an
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers identify how bacterium survives in oxygen-poor environments
Biofilms are multicellular communities formed by densely-packed microbes that are often associated with persistent infections. Steep gradients of nutrients and oxygen form in these crowded structures. The human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces molecules called phenazines that help it to cope with the oxygen-limited conditions within biofilms. Columbia researchers have uncovered new roles
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop potentially low-cost, low-emissions technology that can convert methane without forming CO2
Hydrogen Production with a Ni-Bi molten catalyst Credit: Brian Long As we work to toward more sustainable ways of powering our lifestyles, there is a quest to bridge the gap between the carbon dioxide-emitting fossil fuels we rely on for our most basic needs, and the cleaner, but not yet economically feasible alternative technologies. To that end, a group at UC Santa Barbara has explored methods
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New study points the way to therapy for rare cancer that targets the young
Scientists have engineered a mouse model to study a rare and often-fatal form of liver cancer. They've used it to clarify what drives these tumors at the molecular level, and discover new drug concepts.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bridging the gap: Potentially low-cost, low-emissions technology that can convert methane without forming carbon dioxide
A potentially low-cost, low-emissions technology has been designed that can convert methane without forming carbon dioxide.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Moon's crust underwent resurfacing after forming from magma ocean
A research team took to the lab to recreate the magmatic melt that once formed the lunar surface and uncovered new insights on how the modern moonscape came to be.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Deep learning used to reconstruct holograms, improve optical microscopy
New uses for deep learning have been developed, report researchers, specificially reconstructing a hologram to form a microscopic image of an object and improving optical microscopy. Their new holographic imaging technique produces better images than current methods that use multiple holograms, and it's easier to implement because it requires fewer measurements and performs computations faster.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Effects of feeding populations of the green turtle in the Canary Islands: High consumption of fat, pollutants and behaviour changes
Feeding the animals is altering the behavior and eating habits of the green turtle in the Canary Islands (Spain), concludes new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Disordered eating among young adults found to have long-term negative health effects
According to a recent study, disordered eating among young adults has long-term effects on their health. Disordered eating among 24-year-old women and men was an indicator of higher body weight, larger waist circumference and lower psychological well-being as well as a lower self-evaluation of general health both at age 24 and ten years later.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
For adults younger than 78, risk for heart disease linked to risk for problems walking
A team of researchers examined the factors that put older adults at higher risk for developing physical limitations as they age. Findings suggest that reducing heart disease risk factors with appropriate treatments might help 'younger' older adults maintain their physical function.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A chicken-flavored electrolyte drink could help sniffer dogs stay hydrated
The first comparison of plain water, electrolyte injections and a chicken-flavored electrolyte drink as techniques for keeping sniffer dogs hydrated when working in hot weather finds that while all are safe and effective, dogs drink more and are more hydrated when given a chicken-flavored electrolyte drink.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New human mobility prediction model offers scalability, requires less data
A new method to predict human mobility - which can be used to chart the potential spread of disease or determine rush hour bottlenecks -- has been developed.
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Ars Technica
With today’s launch of the OnePlus 5T, the OnePlus 5 is dead
Enlarge / Here’s the 5T (left) compared to the OnePlus 5 (right). It’s a big improvement, packing more screen into the same size body. Ron Amadeo reader comments 0 Today is OnePlus 5T launch day. The $500 phone with high-end specs and a slim bezel design is up for sale on the OnePlus website, where the current ship time is seven days. The release also makes it the end of the line for the OnePlus
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study shows how to get sprayed metal coatings to stick
Credit: Scripta Materialia (2017). DOI: 10.1016/j.scriptamat.2017.09.042 When bonding two pieces of metal, either the metals must melt a bit where they meet or some molten metal must be introduced between the pieces. A solid bond then forms when the metal solidifies again. But researchers at MIT have found that in some situations, melting can actually inhibit metal bonding rather than promote it.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Video game improves balance in youth with autism
IMAGE: Brittany Travers, an investigator at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Waisman Center and an assistant professor of kinesiology, works with a study participant while she plays a video game designed to... view more Credit: Andy Manis MADISON, Wis. -- Playing a video game that rewards participants for holding various "ninja" poses could help children and youth with autism spectru
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Taking proton pump inhibitors not linked to higher dementia risk
Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines commonly prescribed to treat acid-related digestive problems, including gastroesophageal reflux disease (or GERD). As of 2011, up to 1 in 5 older adults reported using a PPI. Although healthcare practitioners have long believed that PPIs are safe, recent studies have linked PPIs to potential risks, including fractures and kidney disease . Some studies a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gastric acid suppressant lansoprazole may target tuberculosis
A cheap and widely used drug, used to treat conditions such as heartburn, gastritis and ulcers, could work against the bacteria that cause tuberculosis (TB), according to new research from UCL and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. The study, published today in PLOS Medicine , found that people who used lansoprazole, as opposed to similar drugs omeprazole or pantoprazole, were a th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Schooling fish mainly react to one or two neighbors at a time
The study, published in PLOS Computational Biology , developed a new method combining behavioral analyses with a computer model to map the chain of direct interactions in a school of fish. The international research team, that includes the University of Bristol, found individual fish pay attention to its neighbours when the school moves together. Schooling fish exhibit remarkable group-level co-o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UQ dipstick technology could revolutionize disease diagnosis
New dipstick technology that enables pathogen detection and the rapid diagnosis of human, animal and plant disease in even the most remote locations has been developed by University of Queensland scientists. School of Agriculture and Food Sciences researcher Professor Jimmy Botella said the technology could extract DNA and RNA from living organisms in as little as 30 seconds without specialised e
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fish switch attention from neighbor to neighbor for seamless collective movement
IMAGE: A spontaneous change of swimming direction by a single fish triggers a collective u-turn in a group of rummy-nose tetras (Hemigrammus rhodostomus). view more Credit: Jiang et al. In a school of rummy-nose tetras, a common aquarium fish, group coordination appears to occur by each fish continuously changing which of its neighbors it pays attention to, according to new research published
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sunrise and sunset guide daily activities of city-dwellers
IMAGE: Daily rhythm of modern humans pan out under the simultaneous ticking of two different kind of clocks: an internal biological clock adapted to environmental cues, and a social clock, which... view more Credit: Daniel Monsivais Despite artificial lightning and social conventions, the dynamics of daylight still influence the daily activities of people living in modern, urban environments,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sugar industry withheld evidence of sucrose's health effects nearly 50 years ago
A U.S. sugar industry trade group appears to have pulled the plug on a study that was producing animal evidence linking sucrose to disease nearly 50 years ago, researchers argue in a paper publishing on November 21 in the open access journal PLOS Biology . Researchers Cristin Kearns, Dorie Apollonio and Stanton Glantz from the University of California at San Francisco reviewed internal sugar indu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A dipstick that could transform disease diagnosis
IMAGE: Scientists have developed a cellulose dipstick that can purify DNA and RNA from a wide range of plant, animal and microbe samples within less than 30 seconds. view more Credit: Michael Mason Scientists have developed a revolutionary dipstick technology that allows DNA and RNA to be extracted from living organisms in as little as 30 seconds. The extracted DNA or RNA can then be used f
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Proposed cuts to US Malaria Initiative could mean millions more malaria cases
Cutting the budget of the President's Malaria Initiative (PMI) by 44%, as the U.S. Congress has proposed, would lead to an estimated 67 million additional cases of malaria over the next four years, according to a mathematical model published this week in PLOS Medicine by Peter Winskill of Imperial College London, UK, and colleagues. The PMI, established in 2005 and funded by the US Agency for Int
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Second HIV test helps prevent incorrect HIV diagnosis in infants
Confirmatory HIV testing can substantially reduce the number of infants in South Africa who may be falsely diagnosed as HIV-infected and started on unneeded treatment, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Lorna Dunning of the University of Cape Town, South Africa, and colleagues. Confirmatory testing is recommended by the World Health Organization and South African gui
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Moon's crust underwent resurfacing after forming from magma ocean
Moon crust formation graphic. Credit: The University of Texas at Austin/Jackson School of Geosciences The Earth's Moon had a rough start in life. Formed from a chunk of the Earth that was lopped off during a planetary collision, it spent its early years covered by a roiling global ocean of molten magma before cooling and forming the serene surface we know today. A research team led by The Univers
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Live Science
Why Do People 'Twitch' When Falling Asleep?
Up to 70 percent of people experience a hypnic jerk while falling asleep. Credit: Hung Chung Chih/Shutterstock A hypnagogic jerk is an involuntary muscle spasm that occurs as a person is drifting off to sleep. The phenomenon is so named in reference to the hypnagogic state — the transitional period between wakefulness and sleep . Hypnagogic jerks, are also commonly known as hypnic jerks or
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Live Science
What Happens When You Drop a Turkey from a Plane?
Domestic turkeys can't fly — but that hasn't stopped people in a small town in Arkansas from dropping the birds from small planes at an annual festival event that has drawn opposition from animal-rights activists. While turkeys can't flap their wings and soar as many other birds can, they can slow their falls somewhat, Michael Habib, a professor of anatomy at the University of Southern Cali
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dipstick technology could revolutionise disease diagnosis
New dipstick technology that enables pathogen detection and the rapid diagnosis of human, animal and plant disease in even the most remote locations has been developed by University of Queensland scientists.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Schooling fish mainly react to one or two neighbors at a time
The study, published in PLOS Computational Biology, developed a new method combining behavioral analyses with a computer model to map the chain of direct interactions in a school of fish. The international research team, that includes the University of Bristol, found individual fish pay attention to its neighbours when the school moves together.
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The Best Black Friday and Cyber Monday Home and Lifestyle Deals We've Found
Shopping at a brick-and-mortar might get your heart rate up, but it's not technically a sport—at least, not yet. In addition to our favorite Black Friday deals, the gear team here at WIRED has scoured the web for topic-specific home and lifestyle bargains that you can order from the safety and comfort of your living room. (Be sure to also check out our main Black Friday Deals Guide for a lot more
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Inside Science
How to Win a Wishbone-Breaking Contest
How to Win a Wishbone-Breaking Contest Follow these three basic tips to increase your chances of ending up with the bigger side of the bone (infographic). wishbone_topnteaser.jpg Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Rights information: Copyright American Institute of Physics ( reprinting information ) Culture Tuesday, November 21, 2017 - 13:00 Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator (Inside
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Latest Headlines | Science News
When it comes to self-driving cars, what’s safe enough?
Self-driving vehicles passed a major milestone in November when Waymo’s minivans hit the streets of Phoenix without backup human drivers — reportedly making them the first fleet of fully autonomous cars on public roadways . Over the next few months, people will get a chance to take these streetwise vehicles for a free spin as the company tries to drum up excitement — and a customer base — for its
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Diabetes: Immune system can regulate insulin
Inflammation processes are responsible for the failure of insulin production in diabetes patients. The patients' own immune systems can contribute to treatment of this disease: researchers at the University of Basel and University Hospital Basel have found a feedback mechanism that could help maintain insulin production in overweight sufferers, as they report in the journal Immunity . In their st
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Argonne scientists capture several R&D 100 Awards
IMAGE: Argonne won several R&D 100 Awards for its reusable Oleo Sponge, which can cleaning up oil spills from water and absorb up to 90 times its own weight in oil.... view more Credit: Argonne National Laboratory Innovative technologies developed by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory recently earned multiple R&D 100 Awards. The presti
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers discover specific tumor environment that triggers cells to metastasize
IMAGE: This is a Breast cancer cell are grown in a highly dense 3-D collagen matrix. After 7 days the cells form networks that resemble the early stages of blood vessel... view more Credit: University of California San Diego A team of bioengineers and bioinformaticians at the University of California San Diego have discovered how the environment surrounding a tumor can trigger metastati
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New tool can help job searchers better position themselves in market
With the decline of manufacturing, the U.S. economy has increasingly shifted toward knowledge-based production: industries focused on implementing new ideas surrounding technology, product design, machine learning, and other areas as their source of revenue. In this new economy, it can be challenging to evaluate the skillset of an individual, as combinations of various skills are important. For e
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Correctly used neonics do not adversely affect honeybee colonies, new research finds
The three most widely used neonicotinoid pesticides for flowering crops pose no risk to honeybee colonies when used correctly as seed treatments, according to new studies by University of Guelph researchers. Amid mounting controversy over use of neonicotinoids (neonics) and declining bee population, a new analysis by U of G scientists of previously unpublished studies and reports commissioned by
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Gizmodo
Today's Cryptocurrency Gaffe: Hacker Makes Off With $30 Million in Tether
Image: AP While many cryptocoins seek to transcend conventional currency, the cryptocurrency Tether claims to back each of its issued tokens with an equal amount of redeemable cash held in a private reserve. That keeps its value predictable, but presents a problem if a token is stolen from one of the company’s “treasury” wallets. Today, Token’s development team has exactly 30,950,010 problems. A
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Phosphatidylserine save-me signals drive functional recovery of severed axons in Caenorhabditis elegans [Neuroscience]
Phosphatidylserine save-me signals drive functional recovery of severed axons in Caenorhabditis elegans Zehra C. Abay a , Michelle Yu-Ying Wong a , Jean-Sébastien Teoh a , Tarika Vijayaraghavan a , Massimo A. Hilliard b , and Brent Neumann a , 1 a Neuroscience Program, Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute and Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Monash University, Melbourne VIC 3800
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
let-7 miRNA controls CED-7 homotypic adhesion and EFF-1-mediated axonal self-fusion to restore touch sensation following inȷury [Neuroscience]
let-7 miRNA controls CED-7 homotypic adhesion and EFF-1–mediated axonal self-fusion to restore touch sensation following injury Atrayee Basu a , Shirshendu Dey b , Dharmendra Puri a , Nilanjana Das Saha a , Vidur Sabharwal c , Pankajam Thyagarajan a , Prerna Srivastava a , Sandhya Padmanabhan Koushika c , and Anindya Ghosh-Roy a , d , 1 a National Brain Research Centre , Manesar, Nainwal Mode, Gu
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Definition of the hypothalamic GnRH pulse generator in mice [Neuroscience]
Definition of the hypothalamic GnRH pulse generator in mice Jenny Clarkson a , b , 1 , Su Young Han a , b , 1 , Richard Piet a , b , Timothy McLennan a , b , Grace M. Kane a , b , Jamie Ng a , b , Robert W. Porteous a , b , Joon S. Kim a , b , William H. Colledge c , Karl J. Iremonger a , b , and Allan E. Herbison a , b , 2 a Centre for Neuroendocrinology, University of Otago , Dunedin 9054, New
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
DSCAM-mediated control of dendritic and axonal arbor outgrowth enforces tiling and inhibits synaptic plasticity [Neuroscience]
DSCAM-mediated control of dendritic and axonal arbor outgrowth enforces tiling and inhibits synaptic plasticity Aaron B. Simmons a , Samuel J. Bloomsburg a , Joshua M. Sukeena a , Calvin J. Miller a , Yohaniz Ortega-Burgos b , Bart G. Borghuis c , 1 , and Peter G. Fuerst a , d , 1 a Department of Biological Sciences, University of Idaho , Moscow, ID 83844; b Department of Chemistry, University of
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
M-current inhibition rapidly induces a unique CK2-dependent plasticity of the axon initial segment [Neuroscience]
M-current inhibition rapidly induces a unique CK2-dependent plasticity of the axon initial segment Jonathan Lezmy a , b , Maya Lipinsky a , b , Yana Khrapunsky c , d , Eti Patrich a , b , Lia Shalom a , b , Asher Peretz a , b , Ilya A. Fleidervish c , d , 1 , and Bernard Attali a , b , 1 a Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University , Tel Aviv 69978
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
An RNA structure-mediated, posttranscriptional model of human {alpha}-1-antitrypsin expression [Systems Biology]
An RNA structure-mediated, posttranscriptional model of human α-1-antitrypsin expression Meredith Corley a , b , Amanda Solem a , Gabriela Phillips a , Lela Lackey a , Benjamin Ziehr c , d , Heather A. Vincent c , d , Anthony M. Mustoe e , Silvia B. V. Ramos f , Kevin M. Weeks e , Nathaniel J. Moorman c , d , and Alain Laederach a , b , 1 a Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at C
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Danhart et al., Conformational and chemical selection by a trans-acting editing domain [Correction]
Correction for Danhart et al., Conformational and chemical selection by a trans -acting editing domain BIOCHEMISTRY Correction for “Conformational and chemical selection by a trans -acting editing domain,” by Eric M. Danhart, Marina Bakhtina, William A. Cantara, Alexandra B. Kuzmishin, Xiao Ma, Brianne L. Sanford, Marija Košutić, Yuki Goto, Hiroaki Suga, Kotaro Nakanishi, Ronald Micura, Mark P. F
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Sansone et al., Packaging and transfer of mitochondrial DNA via exosomes regulate escape from dormancy in hormonal therapy-resistant breast cancer [Correction]
MEDICAL SCIENCES Correction for “Packaging and transfer of mitochondrial DNA via exosomes regulate escape from dormancy in hormonal therapy-resistant breast cancer,” by Pasquale Sansone, Claudia Savini, Ivana Kurelac, Qing Chang, Laura Benedetta Amato, Antonio Strillacci, Anna Stepanova, Luisa Iommarini, Chiara Mastroleo, Laura Daly, Alexander Galkin, Basant Kumar Thakur, Nadine Soplop,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]
In This Issue Neanderthal and modern human noses 3D reconstruction of Neanderthal skulls based on CT scans. Image courtesy of A. Balzeau (Musée de l’Homme, Paris, France). Both Neanderthals and modern humans settled in cold, dry Eurasian environments. This development may have required adaptations in internal nasal anatomy that facilitated warming and humidification of air before it reached the l
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Redox potentials in the decaheme cytochrome MtrF: Poisson-Boltzmann vs. molecular dynamics simulations [Biological Sciences]
Redox potentials in the decaheme cytochrome MtrF: Poisson–Boltzmann vs. molecular dynamics simulations Marian Breuer a , Kevin M. Rosso b , and Jochen Blumberger c , 1 a Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign , Urbana, IL 61801; b Physical Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory , Richland, WA 99352; c Department of Physics and Astronomy, University C
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Breuer et al.: Molecular dynamics simulations do not provide functionally relevant values of redox potential in MtrF [Biological Sciences]
Reply to Breuer et al.: Molecular dynamics simulations do not provide functionally relevant values of redox potential in MtrF Hiroshi C. Watanabe a , b , Yuki Yamashita a , and Hiroshi Ishikita a , b , 1 a Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo , Tokyo 113-8654, Japan; b Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Crossbills were unlikely resident in the Bahamas; thus, there was no population to be extirpated [Biological Sciences]
Crossbills were unlikely resident in the Bahamas; thus, there was no population to be extirpated Craig W. Benkman a , 1 a Department of Zoology and Physiology, University of Wyoming , Laramie, WY 82071-3166 In PNAS, Steadman and Franklin ( 1 ) make the argument that the large reduction in land area and shift in vegetation in the Bahamian Archipelago from ∼15–9 ka caused declines and extirpation o
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Benkman: Hispaniolan crossbills formerly resided in the Bahamas [Biological Sciences]
Reply to Benkman: Hispaniolan crossbills formerly resided in the Bahamas David W. Steadman a and Janet Franklin b , c , 1 a Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida , Gainesville, FL 32611; b School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning, Arizona State University , Tempe, AZ 85287; c Department of Botany and Plant Sciences, University of California, Riverside , CA 92521 We ap
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
IL-33/ST2 signaling boosts inflammation and pain [Biological Sciences]
IL-33/ST2 signaling boosts inflammation and pain We read with interest the work of Taracanova et al. ( 1 ) on the synergic effect of substance P (SP) and IL-33 over TNF-α production. Notably, IL-33 potentiates SP-induced TNF-α production by more than 100-fold in mast cells. Both IL-33 and SP increase the expression of each other receptor, and more interestingly, ST2 coimmunoprecipitates with neur
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Fattori et al.: Action of SP and IL-33 on mast cells [Biological Sciences]
Reply to Fattori et al.: Action of SP and IL-33 on mast cells Theoharis C. Theoharides a , b , c , 1 , Alexandra Taracanova a , b , Irene Tsilioni a , Pio Conti d , and Susan E. Leeman e a Laboratory of Molecular Immunopharmacology and Drug Discovery, Department of Integrative Physiology and Pathobiology, Tufts University School of Medicine , Boston, MA 02111; b Graduate Program in Pharmacology a
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Prebiotic phosphorylation enabled by microdroplets [Chemistry]
Prebiotic phosphorylation enabled by microdroplets Veronica Vaida a , b , 1 a Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado , Boulder, CO 80309 ; b Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado , Boulder, CO 80309 The significant acceleration of reactions in confined environments has recently been reported in the literature ( 1 ⇓ ⇓ ⇓ ⇓ ⇓ –
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Haplotype resolution at the single-cell level [Genetics]
Haplotype resolution at the single-cell level Andrew C. Adey a , b , 1 a Department of Molecular & Medical Genetics, Oregon Health & Science University , Portland, OR 97239-3098 ; b Knight Cardiovascular Institute, Oregon Health & Science University , Portland, OR 97239-3098 One of the most rapidly advancing areas in genomics in recent years has been the explosion of platforms to assess propertie
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Epigenetic switch turns on genetic behavioral variations [Genetics]
Epigenetic switch turns on genetic behavioral variations Yehuda Ben-Shahar a , 1 a Department of Biology, Washington University in St. Louis , St. Louis, MO 63130 What roles do environmental factors, genes, and heredity play in shaping the behaviors of individuals? In his 1963 article entitled “Behavior genetics and individuality understood,” the pioneering behavioral geneticist Jerry Hirsch ( 1
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Filament rigidity and connectivity tune the deformation modes of active biopolymer networks [Applied Physical Sciences]
Filament rigidity and connectivity tune the deformation modes of active biopolymer networks Samantha Stam a , b , Simon L. Freedman c , d , Shiladitya Banerjee c , e , f , Kimberly L. Weirich c , Aaron R. Dinner b , c , g , and Margaret L. Gardel b , c , d , 1 a Biophysical Sciences Graduate Program, University of Chicago , Chicago, IL 60637; b Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, University of Ch
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Highly scalable multichannel mesh electronics for stable chronic brain electrophysiology [Applied Physical Sciences]
Highly scalable multichannel mesh electronics for stable chronic brain electrophysiology Tian-Ming Fu a , 1 , Guosong Hong a , 1 , Robert D. Viveros b , Tao Zhou a , and Charles M. Lieber a , b , 2 a Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University , Cambridge, MA 02138; b John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University , Cambridge, MA 02138 Contribu
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Immature HIV-1 lattice assembly dynamics are regulated by scaffolding from nucleic acid and the plasma membrane [Chemistry]
Immature HIV-1 lattice assembly dynamics are regulated by scaffolding from nucleic acid and the plasma membrane Alexander J. Pak a , b , c , John M. A. Grime a , b , c , Prabuddha Sengupta d , e , Antony K. Chen e , f , Aleksander E. P. Durumeric a , b , c , Anand Srivastava g , Mark Yeager h , i , John A. G. Briggs j , k , Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz d , e , and Gregory A. Voth a , b , c , 1 a
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Aggregation control in natural brush-printed conjugated polymer films and implications for enhancing charge transport [Chemistry]
Aggregation control in natural brush-printed conjugated polymer films and implications for enhancing charge transport Gang Wang a , b , c , Wei Huang a , b , c , Nicholas D. Eastham a , b , c , Simone Fabiano a , d , e , Eric F. Manley a , f , Li Zeng g , Binghao Wang a , b , c , Xinan Zhang a , b , c , Zhihua Chen d , Ran Li b , c , h , Robert P. H. Chang b , c , h , Lin X. Chen a , b , c , f ,
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Cell-to-cell variation sets a tissue-rheology-dependent bound on collective gradient sensing [Physics]
Cell-to-cell variation sets a tissue-rheology–dependent bound on collective gradient sensing Brian A. Camley a , b , c , 1 and Wouter-Jan Rappel c a Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218; b Department of Biophysics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218; c Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 Edited by
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
New free-exchange model of EmrE transport [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
New free-exchange model of EmrE transport Anne E. Robinson a , 1 , Nathan E. Thomas b , Emma A. Morrison a , 2 , Bryan M. Balthazor a , 3 , and Katherine A. Henzler-Wildman a , b , 4 a Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis , St. Louis, MO 63110; b Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin at Madison , Madison, WI 53706
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
GPCR-controlled membrane recruitment of negative regulator C2GAP1 locally inhibits Ras signaling for adaptation and long-range chemotaxis [Cell Biology]
GPCR-controlled membrane recruitment of negative regulator C2GAP1 locally inhibits Ras signaling for adaptation and long-range chemotaxis Xuehua Xu a , 1 , Xi Wen a , Douwe M. Veltman b , Ineke Keizer-Gunnink b , Henderikus Pots b , Arjan Kortholt b , and Tian Jin a a Chemotaxis Signaling Section, Laboratory of Immunogenetics, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Instit
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Proof of region-specific multipotent progenitors in human breast epithelia [Cell Biology]
Proof of region-specific multipotent progenitors in human breast epithelia Agla J. Fridriksdottir a , b , 1 , René Villadsen a , b , 1 , Mikkel Morsing a , b , Marie Christine Klitgaard a , b , c , Jiyoung Kim a , b , Ole William Petersen a , b , and Lone Rønnov-Jessen c , 2 a Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen , DK-2200 Copenhagen
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structure and function of yeast Atg20, a sorting nexin that facilitates autophagy induction [Cell Biology]
Structure and function of yeast Atg20, a sorting nexin that facilitates autophagy induction Hana Popelka a , Alejandro Damasio b , Jenny E. Hinshaw c , Daniel J. Klionsky a , d , 1 , and Michael J. Ragusa b , 1 a Life Sciences Institute, University of Michigan , Ann Arbor, MI 48109; b Department of Chemistry, Dartmouth College , Hanover, NH 03755; c Laboratory of Cell and Molecular Biology, Natio
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Sea anemone model has a single Toll-like receptor that can function in pathogen detection, NF-{kappa}B signal transduction, and development [Cell Biology]
Sea anemone model has a single Toll-like receptor that can function in pathogen detection, NF-κB signal transduction, and development Joseph J. Brennan a , Jonathan L. Messerschmidt a , Leah M. Williams a , Bryan J. Matthews a , Marinaliz Reynoso a , and Thomas D. Gilmore a , 1 a Department of Biology, Boston University , Boston, MA 02115 Edited by Kathryn V. Anderson, Sloan Kettering Institute,
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Periodic production of retinoic acid by meiotic and somatic cells coordinates four transitions in mouse spermatogenesis [Developmental Biology]
Periodic production of retinoic acid by meiotic and somatic cells coordinates four transitions in mouse spermatogenesis Tsutomu Endo a , 1 , 2 , Elizaveta Freinkman a , 3 , Dirk G. de Rooij a , and David C. Page a , b , c , 1 a Whitehead Institute , Cambridge, MA 02142; b Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology , Cambridge, MA 02139; c Howard Hughes Medical Institute , Whiteh
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Climate extremes and predicted warming threaten Mediterranean Holocene firs forests refugia [Ecology]
Warmer and drier climatic conditions are projected for the 21st century; however, the role played by extreme climatic events on forest vulnerability is still little understood. For example, more severe droughts and heat waves could threaten quaternary relict tree refugia such as Circum-Mediterranean fir forests (CMFF). Using tree-ring data and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
SIRP{alpha}+ dendritic cells regulate homeostasis of fibroblastic reticular cells via TNF receptor ligands in the adult spleen [Immunology and Inflammation]
SIRPα + dendritic cells regulate homeostasis of fibroblastic reticular cells via TNF receptor ligands in the adult spleen Yasuyuki Saito a , 1 , Datu Respatika a , Satomi Komori a , Ken Washio a , b , Taichi Nishimura a , Takenori Kotani a , Yoji Murata a , Hideki Okazawa a , Hiroshi Ohnishi c , Yoriaki Kaneko d , Katsuyuki Yui e , Koji Yasutomo f , Chikako Nishigori b , Yoshihisa Nojima d , and
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Blocking immunosuppression by human Tregs in vivo with antibodies targeting integrin {alpha}V{beta}8 [Immunology and Inflammation]
Blocking immunosuppression by human Tregs in vivo with antibodies targeting integrin αVβ8 Julie Stockis a , Stéphanie Liénart a , Didier Colau b , Amandine Collignon a , Stephen L. Nishimura c , Dean Sheppard d , Pierre G. Coulie a , and Sophie Lucas a , 1 a de Duve Institute, Université catholique de Louvain , B-1200 Brussels, Belgium; b Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Brussels branch, B-1
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Peptidyl arginine deiminase immunization induces anticitrullinated protein antibodies in mice with particular MHC types [Medical Sciences]
Peptidyl arginine deiminase immunization induces anticitrullinated protein antibodies in mice with particular MHC types Fanny Arnoux a , Charlotte Mariot a , 1 , Elisa Peen a , 1 , Nathalie C. Lambert a , Nathalie Balandraud a , b , Jean Roudier a , b , 2 , and Isabelle Auger a a INSERM UMR 1097, Aix Marseille University , 13009 Marseille, France; b Service de Rhumatologie, Hôpital Sainte Marguer
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
HIF and HOIL-1L-mediated PKC{zeta} degradation stabilizes plasma membrane Na,K-ATPase to protect against hypoxia-induced lung inȷury [Medical Sciences]
HIF and HOIL-1L–mediated PKCζ degradation stabilizes plasma membrane Na,K-ATPase to protect against hypoxia-induced lung injury Natalia D. Magnani a , 1 , Laura A. Dada a , 1 , Markus A. Queisser a , Patricia L. Brazee a , Lynn C. Welch a , Kishore R. Anekalla a , Guofei Zhou a , 2 , Olga Vagin b , c , Alexander V. Misharin a , G. R. Scott Budinger a , Kazuhiro Iwai d , Aaron J. Ciechanover e , 3
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
DGR mutagenic transposition occurs via hypermutagenic reverse transcription primed by nicked template RNA [Microbiology]
DGR mutagenic transposition occurs via hypermutagenic reverse transcription primed by nicked template RNA Santa S. Naorem a , Jin Han a , Shufang Wang a , William R. Lee b , Xiao Heng b , Jeff F. Miller c , d , 1 , and Huatao Guo a , 1 a Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, University of Missouri School of Medicine , Columbia, MO 65212; b Department of Biochemistry, University of
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Radiocarbon test for demographic events in written and oral history [Anthropology]
Radiocarbon test for demographic events in written and oral history Kevan Edinborough a , 1 , Marko Porčić b , Andrew Martindale c , Thomas Jay Brown c , Kisha Supernant d , and Kenneth M. Ames e a Institute of Archaeology, University College London , London WC1H 0PY, United Kingdom; b Department of Archaeology, Faculty of Philosophy, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia; c Department of Anthropology, Universi
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Nasal airflow simulations suggest convergent adaptation in Neanderthals and modern humans [Anthropology]
Author contributions: S.d.A., M.F.G., C.C., O.V., R.R.P., and R.G.-J. designed research; S.d.A., M.F.G., C.C., V.R., M.Q.-S., F.M., T.H., C.P., A.R., P.N., B.A.P., C.C.S.d.C., O.V., F.R.-R., N.C., H.G.C., R.R.P., and R.G.-J. performed research; O.V., F.R.-R., H.G.C., R.R.P., and R.G.-J. contributed new reagents/analytic tools; S.d.A., M.F.G., C.C., V.R., M.Q.-S., F.M., T.H., C.P., A.R., P.N., B.A
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Inner Workings: Medical microrobots have potential in surgery, therapy, imaging, and diagnostics [Applied Biological Sciences]
Inner Workings: Medical microrobots have potential in surgery, therapy, imaging, and diagnostics Trypanosoma brucei , the pathogen that causes sleeping sickness, has a clever and insidious trick to help it navigate its hosts’ innards: It changes shape depending on its surroundings. In bodily fluids, the bacterium assumes a long and narrow shape to propel itself forward, whipping its tail-like fla
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Oxalate-curcumin-based probe for micro- and macroimaging of reactive oxygen species in Alzheimer’s disease [Applied Biological Sciences]
Oxalate-curcumin–based probe for micro- and macroimaging of reactive oxygen species in Alzheimer’s disease Jian Yang a , b , 1 , Xueli Zhang a , b , 1 , Peng Yuan c , d , 1 , Jing Yang a , e , Yungen Xu b , Jaime Grutzendler c , Yihan Shao f , Anna Moore a , and Chongzhao Ran a , 2 a Molecular Imaging Laboratory, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Blockade of activin type II receptors with a dual anti-ActRIIA/IIB antibody is critical to promote maximal skeletal muscle hypertrophy [Applied Biological Sciences]
Blockade of activin type II receptors with a dual anti-ActRIIA/IIB antibody is critical to promote maximal skeletal muscle hypertrophy Frederic Morvan a , Jean-Michel Rondeau b , Chao Zou b , Giulia Minetti a , Clemens Scheufler b , Meike Scharenberg c , Carsten Jacobi a , Pascale Brebbia a , Veronique Ritter a , Gauthier Toussaint a , Claudia Koelbing a , Xavier Leber c , Alain Schilb a , Floria
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
How social information can improve estimation accuracy in human groups [Applied Physical Sciences]
How social information can improve estimation accuracy in human groups Bertrand Jayles a , b , Hye-rin Kim c , Ramón Escobedo b , Stéphane Cezera d , Adrien Blanchet e , f , Tatsuya Kameda g , Clément Sire a , and Guy Theraulaz b , e , 1 a Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, CNRS, Université de Toulouse (Paul Sabatier) , 31062 Toulouse, France; b Centre de Recherches sur la Cognition Animale, Cent
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Engineering of a membrane-triggered activity switch in coagulation factor VIIa [Biochemistry]
Engineering of a membrane-triggered activity switch in coagulation factor VIIa Anders L. Nielsen a , Anders B. Sorensen a , Heidi L. Holmberg a , Prafull S. Gandhi a , Johan Karlsson a , Jens Buchardt a , Kasper Lamberth a , Mads Kjelgaard-Hansen a , Carsten Dan Ley a , Brit B. Sørensen a , Wolfram Ruf b , c , Ole H. Olsen a , and Henrik Østergaard a , 1 a Global Research, Novo Nordisk A/S , DK-2
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Protein engineering of the chemokine CCL20 prevents psoriasiform dermatitis in an IL-23-dependent murine model [Biochemistry]
Protein engineering of the chemokine CCL20 prevents psoriasiform dermatitis in an IL-23–dependent murine model A. E. Getschman a , Y. Imai b , c , O. Larsen d , F. C. Peterson a , X. Wu b , e , M. M. Rosenkilde d , S. T. Hwang b , e , and B. F. Volkman a , 1 a Department of Biochemistry, Medical College of Wisconsin , Milwaukee, WI 53226; b Department of Dermatology, Medical College of Wisconsin
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Ribonucleotides incorporated by the yeast mitochondrial DNA polymerase are not repaired [Biochemistry]
Ribonucleotides incorporated by the yeast mitochondrial DNA polymerase are not repaired Paulina H. Wanrooij a , 1 , Martin K. M. Engqvist b , c , 2 , Josefin M. E. Forslund a , 2 , Clara Navarrete b , Anna Karin Nilsson a , Juhan Sedman d , Sjoerd Wanrooij a , Anders R. Clausen b , and Andrei Chabes a , e , 1 a Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Umeå University , SE-901 87 Umeå, S
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Quantifying the limits of transition state theory in enzymatic catalysis [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Quantifying the limits of transition state theory in enzymatic catalysis Kirill Zinovjev a and Iñaki Tuñón a , 1 a Departament de Química Física, Universitat de València , 46100 Burjassot, Spain Edited by Donald G. Truhlar, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, and approved October 3, 2017 (received for review June 15, 2017) Significance Transition state theory (TST) is the most popular theor
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Limiting (zero-load) speed of the rotary motor of Escherichia coli is independent of the number of torque-generating units [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Limiting (zero-load) speed of the rotary motor of Escherichia coli is independent of the number of torque-generating units Bin Wang a , b , Rongjing Zhang a , b , and Junhua Yuan a , b , 1 a Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China , Hefei, Anhui 230026, China; b Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structural basis for arginine methylation-independent recognition of PIWIL1 by TDRD2 [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Structural basis for arginine methylation-independent recognition of PIWIL1 by TDRD2 Heng Zhang a , 1 , Ke Liu a , 1 , Natsuko Izumi b , 1 , Haiming Huang c , Deqiang Ding d , Zuyao Ni e , Sachdev S. Sidhu c , Chen Chen d , Yukihide Tomari b , f , 2 , and Jinrong Min a , g , 2 a Structural Genomics Consortium, University of Toronto , Toronto, ON M5G 1L7, Canada; b Institute of Molecular and Cellu
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Ultraaccurate genome sequencing and haplotyping of single human cells [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Ultraaccurate genome sequencing and haplotyping of single human cells Wai Keung Chu a , Peter Edge b , Ho Suk Lee c , Vikas Bansal b , d , Vineet Bafna b , 1 , Xiaohua Huang a , 1 , and Kun Zhang a , 1 a Department of Bioengineering, University of California, San Diego , La Jolla, CA 92093; b Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of California, San Diego , La Jolla, CA 92093;
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Charged residues in the H-NS linker drive DNA binding and gene silencing in single cells [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Charged residues in the H-NS linker drive DNA binding and gene silencing in single cells Yunfeng Gao a , Yong Hwee Foo a , Ricksen S. Winardhi b , Qingnan Tang b , Jie Yan a , b , and Linda J. Kenney a , c , d , 1 a Mechanobiology Institute, National University of Singapore , Singapore 117411; b Department of Physics, National University of Singapore , Singapore 117411; c Jesse Brown Veterans Adm
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Diminished Ost3-dependent N-glycosylation of the BiP nucleotide exchange factor Sil1 is an adaptive response to reductive ER stress [Cell Biology]
Diminished Ost3-dependent N-glycosylation of the BiP nucleotide exchange factor Sil1 is an adaptive response to reductive ER stress Kofi L. P. Stevens a , b , Amy L. Black a , b , Kelsi M. Wells a , b , K. Y. Benjamin Yeo c , Robert F. L. Steuart b , Colin J. Stirling d , 1 , Benjamin L. Schulz c , and Carl J. Mousley a , b , 2 a School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin U
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Syntenin mediates SRC function in exosomal cell-to-cell communication [Cell Biology]
Syntenin mediates SRC function in exosomal cell-to-cell communication Naga Sailaja Imjeti a , b , c , d , Kerstin Menck b , c , d , Antonio Luis Egea-Jimenez a , b , c , d , Celine Lecointre e , Frederique Lembo b , c , d , Habib Bouguenina b , c , d , Ali Badache b , c , d , Rania Ghossoub b , c , d , Guido David a , b , c , d , Serge Roche e , and Pascale Zimmermann a , b , c , d , 1 a Departme
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Selective deuteration illuminates the importance of tunneling in the unimolecular decay of Criegee intermediates to hydroxyl radical products [Chemistry]
Selective deuteration illuminates the importance of tunneling in the unimolecular decay of Criegee intermediates to hydroxyl radical products Amy M. Green a , 1 , Victoria P. Barber a , 1 , Yi Fang a , Stephen J. Klippenstein b , and Marsha I. Lester a , 2 a Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania , Philadelphia, PA 19104-6323; b Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne Nat
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Enzyme stabilization via computationally guided protein stapling [Chemistry]
Enzyme stabilization via computationally guided protein stapling Eric J. Moore a , Dmitri Zorine b , c , William A. Hansen b , c , d , Sagar D. Khare b , c , d , 1 , and Rudi Fasan a , 1 a Department of Chemistry, University of Rochester , Rochester, NY 14627; b Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854; c Center for Integrative Proteomics Research, Ru
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Efficient gene knockin in axolotl and its use to test the role of satellite cells in limb regeneration [Developmental Biology]
Efficient gene knockin in axolotl and its use to test the role of satellite cells in limb regeneration Ji-Feng Fei a , b , c , 1 , Maritta Schuez a , Dunja Knapp a , Yuka Taniguchi a , b , David N. Drechsel b , d , and Elly M. Tanaka a , b , 1 a Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG)-Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden, Technische Universität Dresden , 01307 Dresden, Germany; b Research Inst
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Ion pair particles at the air-water interface [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Ion pair particles at the air–water interface Manoj Kumar a and Joseph S. Francisco a , 1 a Department of Chemistry, University of Nebraska–Lincoln , Lincoln, NE 68588 Contributed by Joseph S. Francisco, October 17, 2017 (sent for review June 2, 2017; reviewed by R. Benny Gerber and Veronica Vaida) Significance According to our Born–Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations, the ion pair particl
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Incremental heating of Bishop Tuff sanidine reveals preeruptive radiogenic Ar and rapid remobilization from cold storage [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Incremental heating of Bishop Tuff sanidine reveals preeruptive radiogenic Ar and rapid remobilization from cold storage Nathan L. Andersen a , 1 , 2 , Brian R. Jicha a , Brad S. Singer a , 1 , and Wes Hildreth b a Department of Geoscience, University of Wisconsin–Madison , Madison, WI 53706; b United States Geological Survey , Menlo Park, CA 94025 Edited by Kenneth A. Farley, California Institut
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Effect of paleoseawater composition on hydrothermal exchange in midocean ridges [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Effect of paleoseawater composition on hydrothermal exchange in midocean ridges Michael A. Antonelli a , 1 , Nicholas J. Pester b , Shaun T. Brown a , b , and Donald J. DePaolo a , b a Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California, Berkeley , CA 94720; b Earth and Environmental Sciences, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory , Berkeley, CA 94720 Edited by Mark H. Thiemens, U
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Scale-dependent portfolio effects explain growth inflation and volatility reduction in landscape demography [Ecology]
Scale-dependent portfolio effects explain growth inflation and volatility reduction in landscape demography Cang Hui a , b , Gordon A. Fox c , d , and Jessica Gurevitch d , e , 1 a Centre for Invasion Biology, Department of Mathematical Sciences, Stellenbosch University , Matieland 7602, South Africa; b Mathematical and Physical Biosciences, African Institute for Mathematical Sciences , Cape Town
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Near-infrared remotely triggered drug-release strategies for cancer treatment [Engineering]
Near-infrared remotely triggered drug-release strategies for cancer treatment Amanda M. Goodman a , Oara Neumann b , Kamilla Nørregaard c , Luke Henderson a , Mi-Ran Choi d , Susan E. Clare d , and Naomi J. Halas a , b , e , f , 1 a Department of Chemistry, Rice University , Houston, TX 77005; b Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University , Houston, TX 77005; c The Niels Bo
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Myoanatomy of the velvet worm leg revealed by laboratory-based nanofocus X-ray source tomography [Evolution]
Myoanatomy of the velvet worm leg revealed by laboratory-based nanofocus X-ray source tomography Mark Müller a , b , 1 , Ivo de Sena Oliveira c , d , Sebastian Allner a , b , Simone Ferstl a , b , Pidassa Bidola a , b , Korbinian Mechlem a , b , Andreas Fehringer a , b , Lorenz Hehn a , b , Martin Dierolf a , b , Klaus Achterhold a , b , Bernhard Gleich b , Jörg U. Hammel e , f , Henry Jahn c , G
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Abiotic production of sugar phosphates and uridine ribonucleoside in aqueous microdroplets [Evolution]
Abiotic production of sugar phosphates and uridine ribonucleoside in aqueous microdroplets Inho Nam a , b , Jae Kyoo Lee a , Hong Gil Nam b , c , 1 , and Richard N. Zare a , 1 a Department of Chemistry, Stanford University , Stanford, CA 94305; b Center for Plant Aging Research, Institute for Basic Science , Daegu 42988, Republic of Korea; c Department of New Biology, Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Epigenetic mechanisms modulate differences in Drosophila foraging behavior [Genetics]
Epigenetic mechanisms modulate differences in Drosophila foraging behavior Ina Anreiter a , b , Jamie M. Kramer c , d , and Marla B. Sokolowski a , b , 1 a Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto , Toronto, ON, Canada M5S 3B2; b Child and Brain Development Program, Canadian Institute for Advanced Research , Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1M1; c Department of Physiology and
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Coordinated regulation of heterochromatin inheritance by Dpb3-Dpb4 complex [Genetics]
Coordinated regulation of heterochromatin inheritance by Dpb3–Dpb4 complex Haijin He a , 1 , Yang Li b , c , 1 , Qianhua Dong a , 1 , An-Yun Chang d , e , Feng Gao b , Zhongxuan Chi a , Min Su b , Faben Zhang b , c , Hyoju Ban a , Rob Martienssen d , Yu-hang Chen b , c , 2 , and Fei Li a , 2 a Department of Biology, New York University , New York, NY 10003-6688; b State Key Laboratory of Molecula
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Key amino acid residues conferring enhanced enzyme activity at cold temperatures in an Antarctic polyextremophilic {beta}-galactosidase [Genetics]
Key amino acid residues conferring enhanced enzyme activity at cold temperatures in an Antarctic polyextremophilic β-galactosidase Victoria J. Laye a , Ram Karan a , Jong-Myoung Kim a , Wolf T. Pecher a , Priya DasSarma a , and Shiladitya DasSarma a , 1 a Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Maryland School of Medicine , Baltim
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
DNA damage response protein TOPBP1 regulates X chromosome silencing in the mammalian germ line [Genetics]
DNA damage response protein TOPBP1 regulates X chromosome silencing in the mammalian germ line Elias ElInati a , Helen R. Russell b , Obah A. Ojarikre a , Mahesh Sangrithi c , Takayuki Hirota a , Dirk G. de Rooij d , e , Peter J. McKinnon b , and James M. A. Turner a , 1 a Sex Chromosome Biology Laboratory, The Francis Crick Institute , London NW1 1AT, United Kingdom; b Department of Genetics, St
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Metabolic control of regulatory T cell (Treg) survival and function by Lkb1 [Immunology and Inflammation]
Metabolic control of regulatory T cell (Treg) survival and function by Lkb1 Nanhai He a , Weiwei Fan a , Brian Henriquez a , Ruth T. Yu a , Annette R. Atkins a , Christopher Liddle b , Ye Zheng c , Michael Downes a , 1 , and Ronald M. Evans a , d , 1 a Gene Expression Laboratory, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies , La Jolla, CA 92037; b Storr Liver Centre, Westmead Institute for Medical R
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Circadian clock cryptochrome proteins regulate autoimmunity [Immunology and Inflammation]
Circadian clock cryptochrome proteins regulate autoimmunity Qi Cao a , b , 1 , 2 , Xuan Zhao c , 1 , Jingwen Bai a , d , Sigal Gery a , Haibo Sun a , De-Chen Lin a , Qi Chen e , Zhengshan Chen b , f , Lauren Mack g , Henry Yang h , Ruishu Deng i , Xianping Shi a , Ling-Wa Chong c , Han Cho c , Jianjun Xie a , Quan-Zhen Li j , k , Markus Müschen f , Annette R. Atkins c , Christopher Liddle l , Rut
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Science and Culture: Researchers find history in the diagrams of Euclid’s Elements [Mathematics]
Science and Culture: Researchers find history in the diagrams of Euclid’s Elements The fourth book of Euclid’s Elements, a 2,300-year-old geometry text, includes directions for constructing a 15-sided polygon inside a circle. The first step is familiar to geometry students: Draw an equilateral triangle and a regular pentagon so their vertices touch the circle and the two shapes share one vertex.
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Natural language indicators of differential gene regulation in the human immune system [Medical Sciences]
Natural language indicators of differential gene regulation in the human immune system Matthias R. Mehl a , Charles L. Raison b , c , Thaddeus W. W. Pace d , Jesusa M. G. Arevalo e , f , and Steve W. Cole e , f , 1 a Department of Psychology, University of Arizona , Tucson, AZ 85721; b School of Human Ecology, University of Wisconsin–Madison , Madison, WI 53706; c School of Medicine and Public He
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Effect of naturally occurring Wolbachia in Anopheles gambiae s.l. mosquitoes from Mali on Plasmodium falciparum malaria transmission [Microbiology]
Effect of naturally occurring Wolbachia in Anopheles gambiae s.l. mosquitoes from Mali on Plasmodium falciparum malaria transmission Fabio M. Gomes a , Bretta L. Hixson a , Miles D. W. Tyner a , Jose Luis Ramirez a , 1 , Gaspar E. Canepa a , Thiago Luiz Alves e Silva a , Alvaro Molina-Cruz a , Moussa Keita b , Fouseyni Kane b , Boïssé Traoré b , Nafomon Sogoba b , and Carolina Barillas-Mury a , 2
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structure and mechanotransmission mechanism of the MacB ABC transporter superfamily [Microbiology]
Structure and mechanotransmission mechanism of the MacB ABC transporter superfamily Allister Crow a , 1 , Nicholas P. Greene a , 1 , Elise Kaplan a , and Vassilis Koronakis a , 2 a Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge , Cambridge CB2 1QP, United Kingdom Edited by Thomas J. Silhavy, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, and approved October 10, 2017 (received for review July 10, 2017) S
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Contemporary H3N2 influenza viruses have a glycosylation site that alters binding of antibodies elicited by egg-adapted vaccine strains [Microbiology]
Contemporary H3N2 influenza viruses have a glycosylation site that alters binding of antibodies elicited by egg-adapted vaccine strains Seth J. Zost a , Kaela Parkhouse a , Megan E. Gumina a , Kangchon Kim b , Sebastian Diaz Perez a , Patrick C. Wilson c , John J. Treanor d , Andrea J. Sant e , Sarah Cobey b , and Scott E. Hensley a , 1 a Department of Microbiology, Perelman School of Medicine, U
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Directed evolution of SecB chaperones toward toxin-antitoxin systems [Microbiology]
Directed evolution of SecB chaperones toward toxin-antitoxin systems Ambre Julie Sala a , 1 , Patricia Bordes a , Sara Ayala a , Nawel Slama a , Samuel Tranier b , Michèle Coddeville a , Anne-Marie Cirinesi a , Marie-Pierre Castanié-Cornet a , Lionel Mourey b , and Pierre Genevaux a , 2 a Laboratoire de Microbiologie et de Génétique Moléculaires, Centre de Biologie Intégrative, Université de Toul
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Three-dimensional visualization and a deep-learning model reveal complex fungal parasite networks in behaviorally manipulated ants [Microbiology]
Three-dimensional visualization and a deep-learning model reveal complex fungal parasite networks in behaviorally manipulated ants Maridel A. Fredericksen a , Yizhe Zhang b , Missy L. Hazen c , Raquel G. Loreto a , d , Colleen A. Mangold d , e , Danny Z. Chen b , and David P. Hughes a , d , f , 1 a Department of Entomology, Pennsylvania State University , University Park, PA 16802; b Department o
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Host-based lipid inflammation drives pathogenesis in Francisella infection [Microbiology]
Host-based lipid inflammation drives pathogenesis in Francisella infection Alison J. Scott a , Julia Maria Post b , Raissa Lerner b , Shane R. Ellis c , Joshua Lieberman d , Kari Ann Shirey e , Ron M. A. Heeren c , Laura Bindila b , and Robert K. Ernst a , 1 a Department of Microbial Pathogenesis, School of Dentistry, University of Maryland , Baltimore, MD 21201; b Laboratory for Eicosanoids and
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Subplate neurons are the first cortical neurons to respond to sensory stimuli [Neuroscience]
Subplate neurons are the first cortical neurons to respond to sensory stimuli Jessica M. Wess a , 1 , Amal Isaiah a , b , 1 , Paul V. Watkins a , and Patrick O. Kanold a , 2 a Department of Biology, University of Maryland , College Park, MD 20742; b Department of Otorhinolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, University of Maryland, Baltimore , MD 21201 Edited by Carla J. Shatz, Stanford University,
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Epoxide metabolites of arachidonate and docosahexaenoate function conversely in acute kidney inȷury involved in GSK3{beta} signaling [Pharmacology]
Epoxide metabolites of arachidonate and docosahexaenoate function conversely in acute kidney injury involved in GSK3β signaling Bing-Qing Deng a , Ying Luo a , Xin Kang a , Chang-Bin Li a , Christophe Morisseau b , c , Jun Yang b , c , Kin Sing Stephen Lee b , c , Jian Huang a , Da-Yong Hu a , Ming-Yu Wu a , Ai Peng a , Bruce D. Hammock b , c , 1 , and Jun-Yan Liu a , 1 a Center for Nephrology an
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Observation of a remarkable reduction of correlation effects in BaCr2As2 by ARPES [Physics]
Observation of a remarkable reduction of correlation effects in BaCr 2 As 2 by ARPES Jayita Nayak a , Kai Filsinger a , Gerhard H. Fecher a , Stanislav Chadov a , Ján Minár b , Emile D. L. Rienks c , d , Bernd Büchner c , d , Stuart P. Parkin e , 1 , Jörg Fink a , c , d , 1 , and Claudia Felser a a Solid State Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids , D-01187 Dresden, Germa
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
High-temperature charge density wave correlations in La1.875Ba0.125CuO4 without spin-charge locking [Physics]
High-temperature charge density wave correlations in La 1.875 Ba 0.125 CuO 4 without spin–charge locking H. Miao a , 1 , J. Lorenzana b , G. Seibold c , Y. Y. Peng d , e , A. Amorese f , F. Yakhou-Harris f , K. Kummer f , N. B. Brookes f , R. M. Konik a , V. Thampy a , G. D. Gu a , G. Ghiringhelli d , e , L. Braicovich d , e , and M. P. M. Dean a , 1 a Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Scien
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Poaceae-specific MS1 encodes a phospholipid-binding protein for male fertility in bread wheat [Plant Biology]
Poaceae-specific MS1 encodes a phospholipid-binding protein for male fertility in bread wheat Zheng Wang a , 1 , Jian Li a , 1 , Shaoxia Chen b , 1 , Yanfang Heng c , 1 , Zhuo Chen c , 1 , Jing Yang c , Kuanji Zhou a , Jiawei Pei c , Hang He b , 2 , Xing Wang Deng b , 2 , and Ligeng Ma c , 2 a Frontier Laboratory of System Crop Design , Beijing 102206, China; b State Key Laboratory of Protein and
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nano-watch has steady hands
A new nanomechanical hand shows the time of an electronic clock, by spinning a tiny cylinder using light. A silicon nanorod, less than a thousandth of a millimetre long, can be trapped in thin air using focused laser beams, and spun to follow the ticking of a clock, losing only one-millionth of a second over four days.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How disposable diapers can improve measurements of tumor growth
In pursuit of a better imaging phantom for improved tumor measurements, scientists hit upon an effective but unconventional solution: injecting water into disposable diapers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Turtles and technology advance understanding of lung abnormality
A study of an unusual snapping turtle with one lung found shared characteristics with humans born with one lung who survive beyond infancy. New digital 3-D anatomical models made the detailed research possible.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How to get sprayed metal coatings to stick
New research reveals the best way to make metal particles stick to a surface in a spray-coating process. Surprisingly, melting hurts rather than helps.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Maintaining sufficient vitamin D levels may help to prevent rheumatoid arthritis
Maintaining sufficient vitamin D levels may help to prevent the onset of inflammatory diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, research has discovered.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Underwater acoustic localization of marine mammals, vehicles
An underwater acoustic system for the localization of marine mammals, underwater vehicles and other sound sources in the ocean, using no more than a single hydrophone (basically an underwater microphone) as a receiver.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Water cooling for the Earth's crust
How deep can seawater penetrate through cracks and fissures into the seafloor? By applying a new analysis method, an international team of researchers has now discovered that the water can penetrate to depths of more than 10 kilometers below the seafloor. This result suggests a stronger cooling effect on the hot mantle.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
3-D folding of DNA provides important epigenetic mechanisms in the formation of cardiac muscle cells
The three-dimensional folding of DNA provides important epigenetic mechanisms in the formation of cardiac muscle cells.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Brazil nut effect' helps explain how rivers resist erosion
Geophysicists have found that granular segregation helps explain the tendency of riverbeds to be lined by, or 'armored' with, a layer of relatively larger particles.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Autoimmune disease discovery could spark new treatments
Researchers have discovered a potent, drug-like compound that could someday revolutionize treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ancient barley took high road to China
First domesticated 10,000 years ago in the Fertile Crescent of the Middle East, wheat and barley took vastly different routes to China, with barley switching from a winter to both a winter and summer crop during a thousand-year detour along the southern Tibetan Plateau, suggests new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ice shapes the landslide landscape on Mars
How good is your Martian geography? Scientists now explain the extent to which ice may have been an important medium of lubrication for landslides on Mars.
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Science | The Guardian
Britain’s diminished role after the Brexit vote | Letters
In recent days the UK’s standing in the world has further diminished as the impacts of Brexit become more tangible. Earlier this week the relocation of two EU agencies currently based in London was announced. The European Medicines Agency will move to Amsterdam, while the European Banking Authority will be lost to Paris, which narrowly pipped Dublin to host this prestigious organisation ( London
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Virtual reality allows you to look inside your body and could help improve drug delivery
Renderings of 3-D cells in the body are traditionally displayed using 2-D media, such as on a computer screen or paper; however, the advent of Virtual Reality (VR) headsets means it is now possible to visualize and interact with scientific data in a 3-D virtual world.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What does it mean for the husband when his wife keeps her own surname?
When a woman chooses not to take her husband's surname after marriage, people perceive her husband as being higher in traits related to femininity and lower in traits related to masculinity. He is also perceived as having less power in the relationship.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New database catalogues plants that soak up contamination
Hyperaccumulators are unusual plants that can absorb much larger amounts of metal compounds in their leaves and stems than normal plants, and they are very useful for cleaning up contaminated land.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Corn genetics research exposes mechanism behind traits becoming silent
For more than a century, plant geneticists have been studying maize as a model system to understand the rules governing the inheritance of traits, and a team of researchers recently unveiled a previously unknown mechanism that triggers gene silencing in corn.
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'Stranger Things' Is Based on a True Story. Kinda
Demogorgons, inverted worlds, really bad psychokinesis-induced nosebleeds—a lot of really unbelievable things exist in the world of Stranger Things . Hence the name. But that doesn’t mean everything in Hawkins, Indiana is fiction. At least not entirely. In fact, Hawkins itself has real-world roots. “It’s based on a place in Montauk, New York called Camp Hero,” says Stranger Things star Gaten Mata
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: The Scuba Diving Flies of California’s Mono Lake
The fly’s secret to staying dry is an air bubble — a tight, flexible, silvery sheath that the fly dons like a “a superhero costume,” said Dr. Dickinson. An alkali fly diving at Mono Lake. Caltech Its body — hairier and waxier than that of other flies and insects — repels water, forming a bubble around itself as it dives. In a way, the fly carries the dry sky down with it
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Gizmodo
Samsung's Fast Charge Qi Pad Works With the New iPhones Too, and Has Never Been Cheaper
Samsung Qi Wireless Charger | $24 | Amazon Samsung makes some of the most highly rated Qi chargers on the market, and their Fast Charge pad is down to an all-time low $24 for Black Friday . Hilariously, this will also work with the new iPhones. It also comes with a microUSB cable and a fast charge wall charger to plug it in, so you’ll have everything you need.
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Quanta Magazine
Hidden Supercluster Could Solve Milky Way Mystery
Glance at the night sky from a clear vantage point, and the thick band of the Milky Way will slash across the sky. But the stars and dust that paint our galaxy’s disk are an unwelcome sight to astronomers who study all the galaxies that lie beyond our own. It’s like a thick stripe of fog across a windshield, a blur that renders our knowledge of the greater universe incomplete. Astronomers call it
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Science | The Guardian
Francis Crick Institute's £700m building 'too noisy to concentrate'
It is a £700m cathedral to biomedical science , where scientists work together to make breakthroughs in cancer, neuroscience, pandemics and genetics. But the Francis Crick Institute is not proving to be the easiest place to concentrate. A year after opening, some of the 1,250 people working at the Crick Institute, in its central London laboratory, have complained that the open plan design, intend
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The Atlantic
The Transparent Allegations and the 'Politicized' Workplace
As they entertainingly crash through old ideas of gender and sex, the flaky and self-involved Pfefferman family of Transparent demonstrate that living liberally isn’t the same thing as transcending cruelty, narcissism, or lust. Now two transgender women have alleged abusive behavior by the show’s star Jeffrey Tambor, a cisgender man who is publicly a vocal advocate for the dignity of transgender
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers identify how bacterium survives in oxygen-poor environments
Columbia University biologists have revealed a mechanism by which bacterial cells in crowded, oxygen-deprived environments access oxygen for energy production, ensuring survival of the cell. The finding could explain how some bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa ( P. aeruginosa ), are able to thrive in oxygen-poor environments like biofilms and resist antibiotics. " P. aeruginosa biofilm infe
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Good cells gone bad: Scientists discover PINK-SNO[W]
A new study is the first to show precisely how a process in nerve cells, called the S-nitrosylation (SNO) reaction, may contribute to Parkinson's disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Model by which plants adapt their photosynthetic metabolism to light intensity
A new model explains the molecular mechanism used by plants to adapt their photosynthetic mechanism to light intensity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Refining pesticides to kill pests, not bees
Scientists have unlocked a key to maintain the insecticide's effectiveness in eliminating pests without killing beneficial bugs, such as bees. The study shows that molecular tweaks can make the difference.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New simple test could help cystic fibrosis patients find best treatment
While new CF drugs are life-changing for some patients, they don't work for everyone. Now, researchers present a simple test that aims to predict which treatment is most likely to work for each patient, an approach known as personalized or precision medicine.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Atopic eczema: One size does not fit all
Five distinct subgroups of eczema have been identified by researchers, a finding that helps explain how the condition can affect people at different stages of their lives.
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Ars Technica
New Windows search interface borrows heavily from macOS
Enlarge Press clover-space on a Mac (aka apple-space or command-space to Apple users) and you get a search box slap bang in the middle of the screen; type things into it and it'll show you all the things it can find that match. On Windows, you can do the same kind of thing—hit the Windows key and then start typing—but the results are shown in the bottom left of your screen, in the Start menu or C
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UCLA engineers use deep learning to reconstruct holograms and improve optical microscopy
IMAGE: An artificial neural network is used to transform low-resolution microscopic images of samples into high-resolution images, revealing more details of the sample, which could be crucial for pathology and medical... view more Credit: Ozcan Research Group/UCLA A form of machine learning called deep learning is one of the key technologies behind recent advances in applications like real-ti
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Poll: Most LGBTQ Americans report violence, threats, or sexual harassment
This report is part of a series titled "Discrimination in America." The series is based on a survey conducted for National Public Radio, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. While many surveys have explored Americans' beliefs about discrimination, this survey asks people about their own personal experiences with discrimination. Majority of LGBTQ peopl
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study points the way to therapy for rare cancer that targets the young
IMAGE: This is a cross-section of a normal human liver (left) and one transformed by fibrolamellar carcinoma. view more Credit: Laboratory of Cellular Biophysics at The Rockefeller University After years of rigorous research, a team of scientists has identified the genetic engine that drives a rare form of liver cancer. The findings offer prime targets for drugs to treat the usually lethal di
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bridging the gap
As we work to toward more sustainable ways of powering our lifestyles, there is a quest to bridge the gap between the carbon dioxide-emitting fossil fuels we rely on for our most basic needs, and the cleaner, but not yet economically feasible alternative technologies. To that end, a group at UC Santa Barbara has explored methods by which currently cheap and abundant methane (CH4) can be reduced t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Unexpected atmospheric vortex behavior on Saturn's moon Titan
Recently reported unexpected behavior on Titan, the largest moon of Saturn, is due to its unique atmospheric chemistry. Titan is the largest moon of Saturn, is bigger than the planet Mercury, and is the only moon in our solar system to have a substantial atmosphere.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Simple electrocardiogram can determine whether a patient has major depression or bipolar disorder, study finds
A simple 15-minute electrocardiogram could help a physician determine whether a patient has major depression or bipolar disorder, a groundbreaking new study reports.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sensors could identify biomarkers, improve early-stage detection, treatment of diseases
Researchers have found a method of identifying biological markers in small amounts of blood that they believe could be used to detect a myriad of diseases, infections and different medical conditions at early stages. The researchers have created microelectromechanical resonators, or small vibrating sensors, that can detect these biomarkers using just a drop or two of blood.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Anticholinergic cognitive burden scale helps identify risk of adverse outcomes
Anticholinergic burden assessed with the Anticholinergic Cognitive Burden Scale consistently shows dose-response relationships with a variety of adverse outcomes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New malaria parasites identified in wild bonobos
Malaria parasites, although widespread among wild chimpanzees and gorillas, have not been detected in bonobos, a chimp cousin. Although the researchers saw evidence of a new malaria species in bonobos, it was limited to one small area of their range. This work helps the hunt for biological loopholes to potentially exploit the life history of ape pathogens to better understand how they cross over t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tempting your taste buds: Food cues entice consumers to overeat
The mouth-watering aroma of juicy burgers and crispy fries, and the eye-catching menu signs with delicious food pictures can tempt many hungry patrons to stop at fast-food restaurants.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Revolutionary imaging technique uses CRISPR to map DNA mutations
A new nanomapping technology could transform the way disease-causing genetic mutations are diagnosed and discovered.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cinnamon turns up the heat on fat cells
New research has determined how a common holiday spice -- cinnamon -- might be enlisted in the fight against obesity.
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The Atlantic
Ending Open Secrets—Both Inside and Outside the Newsroom
“You have me riveted,” reads the incoming text. “How long will you be in NY?” Later that evening, my phone lights up again: “Reading with pleasure.” The next ping: “Exquisite pleasure in fact.” The man writing me these texts was James Toback. He’d struck up a conversation earlier that day at The Harvard Club in New York, where he’d spotted me sitting alone with a cup of tea, typing away at my lap
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Moon's crust underwent resurfacing after forming from magma ocean
IMAGE: This is a moon crust formation graphic. view more Credit: The University of Texas at Austin/Jackson School of Geosciences The Earth's Moon had a rough start in life. Formed from a chunk of the Earth that was lopped off during a planetary collision, it spent its early years covered by a roiling global ocean of molten magma before cooling and forming the serene surface we know to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows how to get sprayed metal coatings to stick
Research from MIT reveals the best way to make metal particles stick to a surface in a spray-coating process. Surprisingly, melting hurts rather than helps.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers link post-right stroke delirium and spatial neglect to common brain mechanism
IMAGE: Dr. Boukrina is a research scientist in Stroke Rehabilitation Research at Kessler Foundation. view more Credit: Kessler Foundation East Hanover, NJ. Nov.20, 2017. Stroke researchers at Kessler Foundation have proposed a theory for the high incidence of delirium and spatial neglect after right-brain stroke. Their findings are detailed in " Disruption of the ascending arousal syste
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Male triathletes may be putting their heart health at risk
Competitive male triathletes face a higher risk of a potentially harmful heart condition called myocardial fibrosis, according to new research. The increased risk, which was not evident in female triathletes, was directly associated with the athletes' amount of exercise.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US regulator unveils plan to end 'net neutrality' (Update)
Credit: Wikipedia The top US telecom regulator unveiled a formal plan Tuesday to roll back the "net neutrality" rules adopted in 2015 aimed at treating all online traffic equally. The announcement by Federal Communications chairman Ajit Pai marked the latest twist in a decade-old political dispute with both sides claiming to represent a "free and open" internet. Pai unveiled a "Restoring Intern
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Gizmodo
I'm Completely Hypnotized by These Strutting Randomly-Generated Monsters
GIF GIF: Random Access Character If you scroll through your phone, you’ll undoubtedly find a bunch of novelty apps you rarely use. The same fate could eventually befall a simple PC and Mac app called Random Access Character that generates an infinite number of bizarre characters using random shapes and textures—but only if you somehow get tired of watching them sassily stroll across your screen.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Black academics soon to outnumber white researchers in South Africa
There will soon be more black academics in South Africa than white ones, a study of demographic data suggests. Although more than 80% of the country’s population is black, its academic sector has remained disproportionately white — a legacy of the apartheid era. But over the past decade, the proportion of black South African researchers has risen steadily: from 26% in 2005 to 35% in 2015, accordi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
FCC chairman sets out to repeal 'net neutrality' rules
Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai is following through on his pledge to repeal 2015 regulations designed to ensure that internet service providers treat all online content and apps equally.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Controlling diabetes with your phone might be possible someday
Think about this. You have diabetes, are trying to control your insulin levels and instead of taking a pill or giving yourself an injection, you click an app on your phone that tells your pancreas to bring blood sugar levels back to normal. Sound improbable? Not according to Luis Ulloa, an immunologist at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School in a paper published today in Trends in Molecular Medicine
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drug could cut transplant rejection
A diabetes drug currently undergoing development could be repurposed to help end transplant rejection, without the side-effects of current immunosuppressive drugs, according to new research by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). In the study, funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and published in Immunity , researchers found that the enzyme glucokinase increases the movement of a type
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The isoforms of the HP1 protein regulate the organization and structure of heterochromatin
IMAGE: This is Àlex Vaquero, Jessica González, Helena Raurell and Laia Bosch. view more Credit: IDIBELL Researchers from the Epigenetics and Cancer Biology Program of the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), led by Dr. Àlex Vaquero, have elucidated the role of HP1 proteins in relation to chromatin structure and genome stability, distinguishing different functions based on the pr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers at IST Austria define function of an enigmatic synaptic protein
IMAGE: The triple function of Synaptotagmin 7. view more Credit: Chong Chen et al., Cell Reports Communication is often mired in contradiction - also in the brain. Neuroscientists at IST Austria were now able to resolve one such contradiction. In our brains, neurons communicate by sending chemical signals across their connections, the synapses. The molecular machinery required to send a signal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Good cells gone bad
LA JOLLA, Calif. - Nov. 21, 2017 - A new study from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) is the first to show precisely how a process in nerve cells called the S-nitrosylation (SNO) reaction--which can be caused by aging, pesticides and pollution--may contribute to Parkinson's disease. The leader of the study, TSRI Professor Stuart Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., is now investigating how new pharmaceutical
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New findings to help HIV scientists establish 'template' for potent antibodies
IMAGE: This graphical abstract depicts the co-evolution of HIV and broadly neutralizing antibodies in an African donor, including the viral features found to promote antibody breadth. view more Credit: © Elise Landais, International AIDS Vaccine Initiative New data published today in Immunity further illuminate how some human beings generate powerful, HIV-blocking antibodies. Led by sci
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Gizmodo
My Adventure With an 11-Year-Old Thinkpad
I’m sitting here, looking at a screen that’s way too tall waiting, seconds turning into minutes, just so I can log into Windows. Thank god I didn’t have to cold boot. Five minutes later, when my laptop finally approaches a functioning state, I reach down to move the mouse cursor over the Slack icon only to be greeted with a bare patch of hard black plastic—then I remember my 11-year-old Thinkpad
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Science | The Guardian
Nasa to be hit by CSIRO engineers' stop-work action over pay
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team detects pathogenic bacteria in Texas groundwater near natural gas extraction sites
Kevin Schug, Shimadzu Distinguished Professor of Analytical Chemistry and Director of UTA's Collaborative Laboratories for Environmental Analysis and Remediation, or CLEAR, Lab. Credit: UTA Three new research studies from the University of Texas at Arlington have found harmful pathogenic bacteria in Texas groundwater near unconventional natural gas extraction sites. "Our latest published research
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Watching atoms move in hybrid perovskite crystals reveals clues to improving solar cells
The inside back cover image of the Nov. 20, 2017 issue of Advanced Materials illustrates how ion migration in a hybrid perovskite crystal affects solar cell performance in different areas of the crystal. Credit: AMOLF A team of researchers led by the University of California San Diego has for the first time observed nanoscale changes deep inside hybrid perovskite crystals that could offer new ins
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Eight-year research stretch yields treatise on tapeworms along with hundreds of new species
Scanning electron micrograph of the anterior attachment structure of a new genus of tapeworm from the Giant Shovelnose Ray from Australia. Credit: K. Jensen Before setting out to assemble a 400-page tome on tapeworms, it might be a good time for a gut check. That's what researchers have spent nearly a decade doing: collecting tapeworms from the digestive tracts of vertebrate species in 54 nations
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Gizmodo
Skype Removed From Apple's App Store in China
Photo: Getty Skype is now absent from several app stores in China, namely Apple’s, making it the latest victim of the nation’s harsh internet censorship efforts known as the Great Firewall . The New York Times reports thats the messaging and calling app was removed from the online stores almost a month ago. Advertisement “We have been notified by the Ministry of Public Security that a number of v
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Linguistics team using Ohio Supercomputer Center to translate lesser-known languages
This graph displays an algorithm that explores the space of possible probabilistic grammars and maps out the regions of this space that have the highest probability of generating understandable sentences. Credit: Ohio Supercomputer Center Off the top of your head, how many languages can you name? Ten? Twenty? More? It is estimated there are more than 7,000 languages worldwide. For those involved
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The Atlantic
Global Warming Might Be Especially Dangerous for Pregnant Women
At 12:13 p.m. Pacific Standard Time on September 1, 2017, the San Francisco Bay Area National Weather Service office issued an urgent weather message: “Dangerously hot conditions to begin the Labor Day weekend.” The heat wave set a new record temperature of 106 degrees Fahrenheit in downtown San Francisco, handily beating the previous record of 103 degrees set in 2000. “Hot temperatures will crea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Report highlights opportunities and risks associated with synthetic biology and bioengineering
Credit: University of Cambridge Human genome editing, 3D-printed replacement organs and artificial photosynthesis - the field of bioengineering offers great promise for tackling the major challenges that face our society. But as a new article out today highlights, these developments provide both opportunities and risks in the short and long term. Rapid developments in the field of synthetic biolo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Corn genetics research exposes mechanism behind traits becoming silent
Diverse maize cobs showing the varying genetic traits of kernel and cob colors. Credit: Surinder Chopra, Penn State For more than a century, plant geneticists have been studying maize as a model system to understand the rules governing the inheritance of traits, and a team of researchers recently unveiled a previously unknown mechanism that triggers gene silencing in corn. Gene silencing turns of
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Gizmodo
Hand Sanitizer Alters the Results of Breathalyzer Tests in New Experiment
Image: Andrew Braithwaite /Flickr If a police officer pulls you over for driving while intoxicated, you could be brought in for a breath alcohol test. If that happens, you’d better hope the test operator doesn’t slather their hands in an alcohol-based hand sanitizer, first. Alcohol-based hand sanitizers make frequent appearances in law enforcement offices—they’re often found next to the fingerpri
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Feed: All Latest
Flight Delayed? Know Your Rights to Compensation
It’s that time of year again. Yes, it’ll feel great to be home, chilling out, stuffing yourself, falling asleep on the sofa. But boy, it’s going to suck getting there. That’s because 24 million people will travel on US airlines over the Thanksgiving period (up 6 percent from last year), according to the TSA. This week, even a short flight will feel like an epic journey, with many perils and demon
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The isoforms of the HP1 protein regulate the organization and structure of heterochromatin
Àlex Vaquero, Jessica González, Helena Raurell and Laia Bosch. Credit: IDIBELL Researchers from the Epigenetics and Cancer Biology Program of the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), led by Dr. Àlex Vaquero, have elucidated the role of HP1 proteins in relation to chromatin structure and genome stability, distinguishing different functions based on the presence of different variants
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Corn genetics research exposes mechanism behind traits becoming silent
IMAGE: Diverse maize cobs showing the varying genetic traits of kernel and cob colors. view more Credit: Surinder Chopra, Penn State For more than a century, plant geneticists have been studying maize as a model system to understand the rules governing the inheritance of traits, and a team of researchers recently unveiled a previously unknown mechanism that triggers gene silencing in corn.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Watching atoms move in hybrid perovskite crystals reveals clues to improving solar cells
IMAGE: The inside back cover image of the Nov. 20, 2017 issue of Advanced Materials illustrates how ion migration in a hybrid perovskite crystal affects solar cell performance in different areas... view more Credit: AMOLF A team of researchers led by the University of California San Diego has for the first time observed nanoscale changes deep inside hybrid perovskite crystals that could offer
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
OSU linguistics team using Ohio Supercomputer Center to translate lesser-known languages
Off the top of your head, how many languages can you name? Ten? Twenty? More? It is estimated there are more than 7,000 languages worldwide. For those involved in disaster relief efforts, the breadth and variety of that number can be overwhelming, especially when addressing areas with low resources. William Schuler, Ph.D., a linguistics professor at The Ohio State University, is part of a project
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Scientific American Content: Global
Exoplanet Hunters Rethink Search for Alien Life
Steve Desch can see the future of exoplanet research, and it’s not pretty. Imagine, he says, that astronomers use NASA’s upcoming James Webb Space Telescope to scour the atmosphere of an Earth-mass world for signs of life . Then imagine that they chase hints of atmospheric oxygen for years—before realizing that those were false positives produced by geological activity instead of living things.
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Live Science
How Did an Opera Singer Hit the Highest Note Ever Sung at the Met?
It's a note so high it may register as more of a squeak to some: a high A above high C. And it's being sung for the first time ever at the Metropolitan Opera in New York City by soprano Audrey Luna, The New York Times reported Nov 7. Luna sings the note — which has never been sung in the 100-year-plus history of the Metropolitan Opera — in the opera "The Exterminating Angel," according to t
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Gizmodo
Could the Personalized Medicine Revolution Actually Slow Innovation?
Image: Rob Brewer/Flickr The promise of personalized medicine is a pretty big one: Tailoring treatments to a patient’s genes, their environment or their lifestyle, the thinking goes, will result in treatments that are much more likely to work. The same disease can manifest differently in different people, so why treat patients with a one-size-fits-all-approach? But a new paper from the National B
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Are patients sufficiently shielded against stray radiation during CT scans?
IMAGE: Journal of Endourology and Videourology is the leading peer-reviewed journal and innovative videojournal companion exclusively focused on minimally invasive urology research, applications, and clinical outcomes. view more Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers New Rochelle, NY, November 21, 2017--Radiation exposure during diagnostic imaging such as computed tomography (CT) contribu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New simple test could help cystic fibrosis patients find best treatment
IMAGE: These are nasospheroids that developed from a CF patient's nasal tissue in a dish. UNC researchers are using them to screen the effectiveness of CF treatments. view more Credit: Gentzsch Lab, UNC School of Medicine CHAPEL HILL, NC - Several cutting-edge treatments have become available in recent years to correct the debilitating chronic lung congestion associated with cystic fibrosis.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Eight-year research stretch yields treatise on tapeworms along with hundreds of new species
IMAGE: Scanning electron micrograph of the anterior attachment structure of a new genus of tapeworm from the Giant Shovelnose Ray from Australia. view more Credit: K. Jensen LAWRENCE -- Before setting out to assemble a 400-page tome on tapeworms, it might be a good time for a gut check. That's what researchers have spent nearly a decade doing: collecting tapeworms from the digestive
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UTA detects pathogenic bacteria in Texas groundwater near natural gas extraction sites
IMAGE: This is Kevin Schug, Shimadzu Distinguished Professor of Analytical Chemistry and Director of UTA's Collaborative Laboratories for Environmental Analysis and Remediation, or CLEAR, Lab. view more Credit: UTA Three new research studies from the University of Texas at Arlington have found harmful pathogenic bacteria in Texas groundwater near unconventional natural gas extraction sites.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Report highlights opportunities and risks associated with synthetic biology and bioengineering
Human genome editing, 3D-printed replacement organs and artificial photosynthesis - the field of bioengineering offers great promise for tackling the major challenges that face our society. But as a new article out today highlights, these developments provide both opportunities and risks in the short and long term. Rapid developments in the field of synthetic biology and its associated tools and
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Scientific American Content: Global
Interstellar Asteroid Looks Like a Spinning Space Cigar
When astronomers using the Pan-STARRS1 telescope in Hawaii spotted a mysterious object dashing through our solar system on Oct. 19, they immediately knew it was something special. Traveling at high speed and originating from interstellar space , this object was originally thought to be an ancient comet, but observations revealed it was, in fact, an asteroid from another star system. "For
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Science | The Guardian
No more middots: French PM clamps down on gender-neutral language
The French prime minister, Édouard Philippe, has clamped down on attempts to make the French language more female-friendly, issuing a ban on “inclusive writing” in official texts. Moves to end the linguistic dominance of the masculine over the feminine have sparked impassioned debate in France , coming as a flurry of revelations about sexual harassment and assault continue to dominate global head
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Gizmodo
Male Humpback Dolphins Gather Gifts to Get Laid
Male humpback dolphins do more than just perform acrobatics to attract a mate—they also offer gifts, according to new research. (Image: Simon Allen/UWA) Marine biologists working off the northwest coast of Australia have observed a rare mating display in which male dolphins were seen gathering and offering large marine sponges to females. Scientists have never seen this behavior in dolphins befor
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The Atlantic
Mugabe's Time Runs Out
When Robert Mugabe became Zimbabwe’s first leader in 1980, Jimmy Carter was still in the White House, Leonid Brezhnev led the seemingly invincible Soviet Union, and Nelson Mandela was 18 years into a 27-year sentence on Robben Island in apartheid-era South Africa. In the four decades since that time, Mugabe, who is now 93 years old, tightened his hold on Zimbabwe, stifled the opposition, and dism
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
PPPL scientists deliver new high-resolution diagnostic to national laser facility
Scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have built and delivered a high-resolution X-ray spectrometer for the largest and most powerful laser facility in the world. The diagnostic, installed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the DOE's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, will analyze and record data from high-energy density exper
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Children with Alagille Syndrome have malformed bile ducts
Serious liver and heart problems can affect children with Alagille Syndrome early in life. While there is as yet no cure, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have discovered that the liver disease part of the syndrome is caused by specific malformations of the bile ducts. The results, which are published in the journal Gastroenterology , were discovered with the aid of a new mouse mode
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mucosal healing: An objective measure of disease activity?
(Boston)--The absence of inflammatory and ulcerative lesions in all segments of the colon, also known as mucosal healing, should be the end goal in treating patients with ulcerative colitis according to an editorial in the journal Gastrointestinal Endoscopy . The authors believe the analysis in the study by Flores and colleagues, Impact of Mucosal Inflammation on Risk of Colorectal Neoplasia in P
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
PPPL scientists deliver new high-resolution diagnostic to national laser facility
IMAGE: The three spectrometer channels inside the instrument. view more Credit: Elle Starkman Scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have built and delivered a high-resolution X-ray spectrometer for the largest and most powerful laser facility in the world. The diagnostic, installed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Turtles & technology advance understanding of lung abnormality
IMAGE: This is a live turtle and 3-D model. view more Credit: LSU Health New Orleans New Orleans, LA - A study of an unusual snapping turtle with one lung found shared characteristics with humans born with one lung who survive beyond infancy. Digital 3D anatomical models created by Emma Schachner, PhD, Assistant Professor of Cell Biology & Anatomy at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Unexpected atmospheric vortex behavior on Saturn's moon Titan
A new study led by a University of Bristol earth scientist has shown that recently reported unexpected behaviour on Titan, the largest moon of Saturn, is due to its unique atmospheric chemistry. Titan's polar atmosphere recently experiences and unexpected and significant cooling, contrary to all model predictions and differing from the behaviour of all other terrestrial planets in our solar syste
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Emergency department visits for self-inflicted injuries increase among young US females
Emergency department visits for self-inflicted injuries among young females increased significantly in recent years, particularly among girls 10 to 14.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can an insulin pill delay or prevent type 1 diabetes?
Bottom Line: A daily insulin pill did not delay or prevent the development of type 1 diabetes among relatives of people with type 1 diabetes at increased risk of this disease. Why The Research Is Interesting: A previous trial of oral insulin to prevent Type 1 diabetes hinted that in a group of relatives with insulin antibodies, oral insulin might prevent or delay the disease. Prevention or delay
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Hungary rewards highly cited scientists with bonus grants
Richard Wareham Fotografie/Alamy Hungarian commissioner for research and innovation József Pálinkás has designed grants that reward research excellence. Earlier this year, cell biologist Attila Reményi was facing his toughest decision since returning to his native Hungary a decade ago. With his generous start-up funding about to run out, should he downsize his lab? Then, in June, the government’s
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Gizmodo
What It's Like To Drive A Car That Gives Birth To A Motorcycle
For some reason, just because I always seem to seek out slow, miserable, painful failures of cars to drive on Jason Drives, the idea has gotten around that I like to drive slow, miserable, painful failures of cars. That’s only half true. While I do, perversely, like that, I also like driving things that are, you know, delightful to drive. This week, I’m driving a car that’s a joy to drive, and ha
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Drug-driving cases dropped over forensics
Image copyright Thinkstock Image caption Most of the 10,000 cases that could be affected involved traffic offences Around 50 drug driving prosecutions have been dropped because original test results may have been "manipulated". More than 10,000 cases involving drugs - including violent and sexual crimes - may have been affected, according to the National Police Chiefs' Council. It looked into Ran
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Russia denies nuclear accident after radioactive traces found
Russia says a nuclear accident has not occurred on its territory despite "extremely high" traces of a radioactive isotope being found. Russia's weather service acknowledged it had measured pollution of ruthenium-106 at 1,000 times normal levels in the Ural mountains. It said there was no health risk. The announcement appeared to confirm a report by France's nuclear safety institute which detected
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Bialowieza forest: EU threatens Poland with fine over logging
Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption Białowieża is home to European bison, wolves, lynx and elks, among other rare species Europe's top court has given Poland 15 days to prove it has complied with a court order to stop logging in Europe's oldest forest or face fines of €100,000 ($118,000; £89,000) a day. The European Court of Justice said it was taking action to avoid seriou
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Gizmodo
Your Android Phone Has Been Sending Location Data to Google, Even If You Opted Out
GIF Image Source: Google Tech companies like Google and Facebook provide services in exchange for your data. We’ve known this. But they’ve always stood by the reasoning that it’s nothing to worry about because you’re given a choice. Sometimes the choice is agreeing to a terms of service. With location tracking, Google has always made it possible to opt out, but according to a new report, Android
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The Atlantic
The Gunk on Old Teeth Could Help Scientists Map Ancient Migrations
Left undisturbed by brushing and flossing, the bacteria in your mouth will form a sticky film called plaque. Left further undisturbed, plaque will turn hard and yellow, calcifying on teeth as dental calculus, also known as tartar. At this point, the tartar is very durable. Just ask these Neanderthals , whose 40,000-year-old tartar scientists recently analyzed to figure out the real paleo diet. Ta
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Gizmodo
Use This Alexa Skill to Get the Perfect Brine on Your Thanksgiving Turkey
Source: Max Pixel If you’re on the hook for turkey duty this Thanksgiving and you’re freaking out, Amazon is here to help. The same company that will happily sell you a turkey over the internet can teach you how to prepare it, too, thanks to a new Alexa skill from Morton Salt. Morton Brine Time is the first voice-activated brining assistant, according to the salt-seller (not that we doubt them on
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Augmented reality' brings art alive in Vienna
For artist Pablo Picasso, 1901 was a pivotal time to experiment and find his own unique style. At just 19 years old, he was living in Paris, painting furiously and dirt poor, so it wasn't unusual for him to take one canvas ...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Refining pesticides to kill pests, not bees
Researchers at Michigan State University's entomology department have unlocked a key to maintain the insecticide's effectiveness in eliminating pests without killing beneficial bugs, such as bees. The study, featured in the current issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , shows that molecular tweaks can make the difference. Credit: Bill Ravlin Pyrethroid pesticides are effective
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Archeologists find Roman shipwrecks off Egypt's north coast
Egypt says archaeologists have discovered three sunken shipwrecks dating back more than 2,000 years to Roman times off the coast of the city of Alexandria.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New database catalogues plants that soak up contamination
Hyperaccumulators are unusual plants that can absorb much larger amounts of metal compounds in their leaves and stems than normal plants, and they are very useful for cleaning up contaminated land. As described in a New Phytologist article, researchers have published a database that provides easier access to information on the plant world's hyperaccumulators.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Unexpected atmospheric vortex behavior on Saturn's moon Titan
This unprocessed image of Saturn's moon Titan was captured by NASA's Cassini spacecraft during its final close flyby of the hazy, planet-sized moon on April 21, 2017. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute A new study led by a University of Bristol earth scientist has shown that recently reported unexpected behaviour on Titan, the largest moon of Saturn, is due to its unique atmospheric
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Should I Confess My Internet Stalking to My Date?
Q: Before a date, I like to do a little online research on the person. If I find interesting stuff, should I bring it up? A: Sir John Hawkins was a British slave trader who voyaged through what is now Florida in 1565. The landscape Hawkins traversed was murky, disorienting, wild—a new world that no European could easily comprehend. Hawkins tried his best to make sense of what he saw. But in addit
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Are lipid-based products more effective for treating dry eye disease?
IMAGE: Journal of Ocular Pharmacology and Therapeutics is the only multidisciplinary, peer-reviewed journal providing basic and clinical research that focuses on biopharmaceuticals that have the potential to prevent, treat, and/or diagnose... view more Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers New Rochelle, NY, November 21, 2017-New treatments for dry eye disease that deliver lipids to the o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Refining pesticides to kill pests, not bees
IMAGE: Researchers at Michigan State University's entomology department have unlocked a key to maintain the insecticide's effectiveness in eliminating pests without killing beneficial bugs, such as bees. The study, featured in... view more Credit: Photo by Bill Ravlin EAST LANSING, Mich. - Pyrethroid pesticides are effective. Sometimes too effective. Researchers at Michigan State University
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Internists offer recommendations to improve CMS's approach to testing new payment models
Washington (Nov. 21, 2017)--While the American College of Physicians (ACP) is supportive of the role that the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (CMMI) plays in the move toward value-based payment models, it has significant concerns about several elements of its plans to test new payment models. In a letter sent in response to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' (CMS) Innovat
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Latest Headlines | Science News
The dietary habits of the emerald ash borer beetle are complicated
DENVER — An invasive beetle has unexpected — and potentially troublesome — tastes in trees. Now two new studies are clarifying the insects’ dining habits, researchers reported at the annual Entomological Society of America meeting. Metallic-green Asian beetles called emerald ash borers ( Agrilus planipennis ) have devastated wide swaths of forest in North America. For years, researchers believed
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video: The art and science of glassblowing
If you've ever tapped a screen to send a tweet, opted for a glass bottled soda because of taste, or drooled over art glass in a gallery, then your life has been changed for the better by the transparent yet durable combination of sand and simple chemicals we call glass.
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Scientific American Content: Global
This Thanksgiving Pass the Stuffing--and Don't Pass on the Discussion of Social Issues
An oft-repeated adage to never discuss sex, religion or politics at the dinner table is probably never truer than on Thanksgiving. However, in an America where polling reveals we are increasingly divided over political issues, social science suggests the dinner table may be the ideal place to start. Decades of research reveal we are more open to new information from people who are similar to us.
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Live Science
Headless Skeleton of Extinct Sea Cow Unearthed in Siberia
An unusually complete — albeit headless — skeleton of a Steller's sea cow was recently found in northeast Russia. Despite the missing noggin, the remains may help researchers solve several mysteries about this enormous, extinct animal. For instance, researchers aren't sure how many vertebrae (the bones that make up the backbone) the Steller's sea cow had, and they aren't certain wha
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New Scientist - News
An Argentinian submarine has vanished – here’s how to find it
The ARA San Juan in an undated photo AP/REX/Shutterstock By Chris Baraniuk A massive search and rescue operation is underway off the coast of Argentina. Last Wednesday, the ARA San Juan, an Argentinian military submarine, went missing with 44 crewmembers on board. There’s a good chance the crew are still alive and trapped inside. Now the tricky part is finding them. Teams from Argentina, Braz
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New Scientist - News
Russia confirms ‘extremely high’ radiation levels in toxic cloud
France’s Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) produced this graphic to show where the radiation c IRSN By New Scientist staff and Press Association Russian authorities have confirmed reports of a spike in radioactivity in the air over the Ural Mountains. The Russian Meteorological Service said it recorded the release of Ruthenium-106 in the southern Urals in late September
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The Atlantic
How Coral Researchers Are Coping With the Death of Reefs
When she was in high school, Madhavi Colton was known as Miss Enthusiasm. “I’ve always been a die-hard optimist,” she says. “I tend to be perky. In my family, I was always the one who thought that everything was going to be fine, that we can do this.” Recent years have tested her optimism. Colton is now a director at Coral Reef Alliance, a nonprofit dedicated to protecting coral reefs. And corals
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Ingeniøren
VIDEO: Space-rockwool og varmetæpper holder Danmarks største rumprojekt lunt
ASIM er et klimaobservatorium, der skal monteres på Den Internationale Rumstation, ISS, i marts 2018. ASIM er Danmarks største rumprojekt til dato. ASIM skal gennem to år hjælpe med at undersøge, hvordan en række fænomener som f.eks. kæmpelyn, der både går op og ned i atmosfæren, har indflydelse på den kemiske sammensætning af atmosfæren og ozonlaget – og om det i sidste ende betyder noget for kli
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
How Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google manipulate our emotions | Scott Galloway
The combined market capitalization of Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google is now equivalent to the GDP of India. How did these four companies come to infiltrate our lives so completely? In a spectacular rant, Scott Galloway shares insights and eye-opening stats about their dominance and motivation -- and what happens when a society prizes shareholder value over everything else. Followed by a Q&A wi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US charges Iranian over 'Game of Thrones' HBO hack
The Night King from the Game of Thrones visited the 2017 Comic-Con event in San Diego, California The United States on Tuesday charged an Iranian computer whiz with hacking into HBO, stealing scripts and plot summaries for "Games of Thrones," and trying to extort $6 million in Bitcoin out of the network. US prosecutors in New York unveiled a seven-count indictment against Behzad Mesri, whom they
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Norway court grants reprieve to seven wolves
There are between 105 and 112 wolves in Norway A Norwegian court on Tuesday granted a reprieve to seven wolves near Oslo caught in the middle of a battle between environmental activists and sheep farmers. The Oslo district court granted a request from the Norwegian branch of the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and issued an injunction temporarily stopping the hunt of 12 wolves in the Oslo region—five o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China says ex-top internet regulator under investigation
China's former top internet regulator and censor is being investigated by the ruling Communist Party's anti-corruption arm, the agency said Tuesday. The party 's anti-graft watchdog agency said in a brief statement on its website that Lu Wei is suspected of "serious violations of discipline." Until Tuesday's announcement, Lu had been deputy head of the party's propaganda department. Lu was know
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Virtual reality allows you to look inside your body and could help improve drug delivery
Renderings of 3D cells in the body are traditionally displayed using 2D media, such as on a computer screen or paper; however, the advent of Virtual Reality (VR) headsets means it is now possible to visualize and interact with scientific data in a 3D virtual world. In a perspective article published in Traffic , experts highlight how cutting edge imaging techniques can be used to build a 3D virtu
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Ars Technica
New hardware lets any computer run an interactive, 3D interface
reader comments 16 Video shot and edited by Justin Wolfson. Click here for transcript . My first experience with a hologram was, like so many other people's, completely fictional: a small, blue figure projected from R2-D2 in the original Star Wars . About a decade later, I got a taste of the real-world state of the art from New York City's Museum of Holography, now closed . Holograms did exist in
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The main switch
IMAGE: The interplay between three-dimensional folding of DANN and epigenetic markers in cardiomyocytes. view more Credit: Institute for Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology During differentiation of pluripotent stem cells to cardiomyocytes, the three-dimensional folding of the DNA reorganizes itself. This reorganization of the DNA architecture precedes and defines important
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How disposable diapers can improve measurements of tumor growth
In pursuit of a better imaging phantom for improved tumor measurements, NIST scientists hit upon an effective but unconventional solution: injecting water into disposable diapers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The art and science of glassblowing (video)
WASHINGTON, Nov. 21, 2017 -- If you've ever tapped a screen to send a tweet, opted for a glass bottled soda because of taste, or drooled over art glass in a gallery, then your life has been changed for the better by the transparent yet durable combination of sand and simple chemicals we call glass. Reactions visited McFadden Art Glass in Baltimore, Maryland, to learn about the chemistry of this a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
For infants with heart disease, are shunts or stents better to maintain blood flow?
IMAGE: Andrew Glatz, MD, is a pediatric cardiologist at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. view more Credit: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Infants with various forms of congenital heart disease require a stable source of blood flow to their lungs in order to survive until a more definitive operation can be performed. In a recent study, pediatric researchers compared two methods to pro
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Integrative medicine approaches for pain treatment -- can they be an alternative to opioids?
Nov. 21, 2017 - Can acupuncture and yoga help to fight the opioid epidemic? These and other integrative medicine approaches have shown at least preliminary evidence of effectiveness in pain management, according to an article in the December issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia -- a special thematic issue addressing the opioid crisis. "In the current opioid crisis era, many integrative medical thera
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Water cooling for the Earth's crust
IMAGE: The hydrothermal circulation changes the ocean crust and increases the Chlorine (CL) concentration of the rocks by incorporation of sea water. The magma takes up parts of this crust leading... view more Credit: GEOMAR Hot vents in the deep sea and geysers on land document the penetration of water into the hot interior of the Earth. This happens primarily in regions where the crust brea
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nano-watch has steady hands
IMAGE: An international team of researches from the Universities of Vienna, Duisburg-Essen and Tel Aviv use tiny silicon nano-cylinders as the ultra-stable hands of a clock. Using a laser to levitate... view more Credit: James Millen/University of Vienna Tick... tock... Very regular clocks are essential in our everyday lives. They enable us to navigate, from the marine chronometers used to de
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New database catalogues plants that soak up contamination
IMAGE: These are new database catalogues plants that soak up contamination. view more Credit: New Phytologist Hyperaccumulators are unusual plants that can absorb much larger amounts of metal compounds in their leaves and stems than normal plants, and they are very useful for cleaning up contaminated land. As described in a New Phytologist article, researchers have published a database that p
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New genes discovered that influence the risk of allergic diseases
The world's largest study into allergies has shown that the genetic risk factors for atopic dermatitis (eczema), hay fever, and asthma are generally inherited together. The findings of this study by a consortium of researchers, including research groups from the MDC and Charité, have now been published in Nature Genetics . What does an allergic reaction of the skin have to do with asthma and ha
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New details on aged brain, Alzheimer's and dementia
In a comprehensive analysis of samples from 107 aged human brains, researchers have discovered details that will help researchers better understand the biological bases for Alzheimer's disease and dementia in older populations.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Imaging technique unlocks the secrets of 17th century artists
The secrets of 17th century artists can now be revealed, thanks to 21st century signal processing. Using modern high-speed scanners and the advanced signal processing techniques, researchers are peering through layers of pigment to see how painters prepared their canvasses, applied undercoats, and built up layer upon layer of paint to produce their masterpieces.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Greater government responsiveness is paramount to maintaining stable societies
Credit: George Hodan/public domain The Brexit is the perfect example of a time-delayed event. It will happen, if at all, only several years after the referendum vote. Dynamical systems with time delays, like societies making political decisions, have attracted considerable attention from physicists specialised in complex systems. In this new study published in The European Physical Journal B , Cl
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ice shapes the landslide landscape on Mars
Credit: NASA How good is your Martian geography? Does Valles Marineris ring a bell? This area is known for having landslides that are among the largest and longest in the entire solar system. They make the perfect object of study due to their steep collapse close to the scarp, extreme thinning, and long front runout. In a new research paper published in EPJ Plus , Fabio De Blasio and colleagues f
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Gizmodo
Beneath Antarctica's Sea Ice, Scientists Discover a Rapidly Changing World
Scientists dive beneath Antarctica’s sea ice and conduct a chamber experiment on the ocean floor. Photo Courtesy Science Under the Ice Whoever you are, whatever you do, your job is almost certainly boring as hell compared with the researchers who spent the last six weeks diving beneath Antarctica’s sea ice to study alien life forms on the ocean floor. The scientists, from New Zealand and Finland,
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Ars Technica
There’s no good reason for the new PlayStation VR headset to exist
reader comments 13 At a quick glance, it's hard to tell which is version 1 (left) and which is version 2 (right). The v2 Processor Unit (right) is a bit taller but much smaller in other dimensions. It also includes useful HDR passthrough capabilities. A redesigned back on the v2 Processor Unit (right) keeps the same connections in a much nicer presentation. Top: the redesigned, thinner PSVR v2 co
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Simple test predicts diabetes remission following weight loss surgery
A new simple test that helps predicts which people with type 2 diabetes will benefit most from weight loss surgery has been developed by a UCL-led team. The study, published today in Diabetic Medicine , also reports that keeping the weight off after bariatric surgery is more important than which type of weight loss operation was done. Taken together, the findings should help maximise the health b
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quantum optics allows us to abandon expensive lasers in spectroscopy
An international research group together with scientists from the MSU have developed a time-resolved spectroscopy method that allows studying fast processes in samples. The new method works by analyzing quantized light transmitted through a sample, without the use of femtosecond lasers and complex detection systems. This design is much cheaper than the one used currently and, moreover, allows you
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What does it mean for the husband when his wife keeps her own surname?
When a woman chooses not to take her husband's surname after marriage, people perceive her husband as being higher in traits related to femininity and lower in traits related to masculinity. He is also perceived as having less power in the relationship. This is according to a study led by Rachael Robnett of the University of Nevada in the US. The research is published in Springer's journal Sex Ro
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Social networks and survival: Social ties could help with cancer management
Researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital led by Ying Bao, MD, ScD, an epidemiologist in BWH's Channing Division of Network Medicine and Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School, have found that women with stronger social networks had better survival after colorectal cancer diagnosis and conclude that social network strengthening could be a tool for management of colorectal cancer. Color
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study calculates contribution of risk factors to cancer in the United States
IMAGE: Population attributable fraction of cancer deaths by risk factor; men, women, and combined. view more Credit: American Cancer Society A new American Cancer Society study calculates the contribution of several modifiable risk factors to cancer occurrence, expanding and clarifying the role of known risk factors, from smoking to low consumption of fruits and vegetables. The study finds
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Gizmodo
Silly String Was Originally Designed to Be an Instant Spray-on Cast For Broken Bones
GIF GIF: YouTube Some of humanity’s greatest inventions were created by accident. Corn Flakes were originally meant to be a dough made from boiled wheat, Silly Putty was supposed to be an artificial rubber, and Silly String was designed by a chemist to be an instant spray-on cast , but went on to become a fun way to ambush party goers and newlyweds. A series of mini-docs from CNN’s Great Big Stor
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Scientific American Content: Global
Think Hurricane Harvey's Flooding Was Bad? Just Wait until 2100
This season Hurricane Harvey slammed Houston and surrounding southeastern Texas with torrential rains that broke records and created what felt to many like biblical-scale flooding. Harvey was an unusually wet and potent storm by today’s standards—and it may provide a glimpse of North America’s future. A new study predicts the continent will experience more storms that dump similarly huge volumes
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Big Think
By 2050, There Will Be More Plastic in the Ocean Than Fish
It’s no secret that disposable plastics are strangling the ocean. Besides the so-called “Great Pacific Garbage Patch,” estimated to be a million square miles, another in the South Pacific is just as impressive. It's bigger than Mexico. These aren’t collections of plastic bottles and bags per se, but of microplastic particles which get pressed together, making them really hard to clean up. How p
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Gizmodo
Foxconn Reportedly Used Illegal Student Labor to Manufacture iPhone Xs
Workers at a Foxconn facility in 2010. (Image: AP) Hon Hai Precision Industry, more commonly known as Foxconn, came into the public consciousness earlier this decade when a salvo of exposés described the degrading and often dangerous conditions its poorly-paid workers endured to build expensive trinkets like the iPhone. Today, the Financial Times reports that illegal labor practices persist. Six
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Jaron Lanier Q&A: VR Visionary and Author of 'Dawn of the New Everything'
Jaron Lanier may not have sired the term virtual reality —that honor generally goes to French playwright Antonin Artaud in 1938—but he’s one hell of a father figure. As the founder of legendary VR company VPL Research, he both popularized the term and helped create most of the enduring icons of early VR, from The Lawnmower Man ’s snazzy headset and gear to the ill-fated Nintendo Power Glove. Now,
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Gizmodo
Water Isn't Actually Flowing on Mars, Suggests New Result
Image: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona/USGS Facts are built into the fabric of the Universe, but science can sometimes be a problematic tool for establishing them. On occasion, even the most exciting discoveries can be overturned with more evidence. “Flowing liquid water in the current Martian climate has always been an extraordinary claim.” Take the flowing water on Mars. Two years ago, NASA made
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A model by which plants adapt their photosynthetic metabolism to light intensity
Researchers from cicCartuja, a centre jointly run by the University of Seville and the Centro Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (Higher Scientific Research Centre - CSIC), have proposed a model that explains the molecular mechanism used by plants to adapt their photosynthetic mechanism to light intensity. Photosynthesis is the Earth's primary production process for organic material and ox
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Virtual reality allows you to look inside your body and could help improve drug delivery
Renderings of 3D cells in the body are traditionally displayed using 2D media, such as on a computer screen or paper; however, the advent of Virtual Reality (VR) headsets means it is now possible to visualize and interact with scientific data in a 3D virtual world. In a perspective article published in Traffic , experts highlight how cutting edge imaging techniques can be used to build a 3D virtu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Atopic eczema: One size does not fit all
Researchers from the UK and Netherlands have identified five distinct subgroups of eczema, a finding that helps explain how the condition can affect people at different stages of their lives. Doctors and patients have long known that the itchy skin condition can affect people in many different ways. Now Professor Sara Brown from the University of Dundee and collaborators at the University of Bris
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Disordered eating among young adults found to have long-term negative health effects
According to a recent study from the University of Helsinki, Finland, disordered eating among young adults has long-term effects on their health. Disordered eating among 24-year-old women and men was an indicator of higher body weight, larger waist circumference and lower psychological wellbeing as well as a lower self-evaluation of general health both at age 24 and ten years later. "Disordered
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Women's health has worsened while men's health has improved, trends since 1990 show
IMAGE: Trends indicating "worse " or "better " self-rated health 1990-2014. Light purple columns indicate better while dark purple columns indivate worse health among men according to a self-rated comparison with peers. For... view more Credit: Umeå University/PLOS One Researchers at Umeå University and Region Norrbotten in Sweden have studied health trends among women and men aged 25-34 from
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Scientific American Content: Global
Babies Learn What Words Mean before They Can Use Them
(Reuters Health) - Babies begin to learn words and what they mean well before they begin talking, and researchers are beginning to understand how they do it. "I think it's especially intriguing that we find evidence that for infants, even their early words aren't 'islands': even with a very small vocabulary they seem to have a sense that some words and concepts are more 'similar' than others,
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Dagens Medicin
Senderovitz: Hollænderne vil fortsat give Danmark behørig plads i EMA
Lægemiddelstyrelsens direktør Thomas Senderovitz afviser sundhedsøkonom Jes Søgaards udsagn om, at Holland i sit værtskab for EMA kun vil få øjne for det centrale Europa. Danmark vil fortsat få masser af indflydelse, forsikrer han – ikke mindst i arbejdet med Brexit.
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Big Think
Irony: First FDA Approved Digital Pill Tracks Schizophrenic Patients
The FDA has approved the first pill with an embedded ingestible sensor that can track when, or if, a patient takes their medication. The sensor will be used with the drug Abilify MyCite—which is prescribed to treat schizophrenia, bi-polar disorders and depression—and automatically shares data with doctors, caregivers, family members or anyone else the patient has pre-approved. The sensor atte
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Popular Science
13 science-backed ways to improve your Thanksgiving
Thanksgiving can be a stressful time of year. So let's turn to science. These hacks will help you stay sane as you cook the perfect meal, entertain your guests, and avoid any trips to the hospital. Food The festive meal is arguably the most important part of Thanksgiving. Here's how to cook that turkey—and a few classic side dishes—to perfection. Cooking is all about chemistry. So in this guide ,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Physicists explain metallic conductivity of thin carbon nanotube films
IMAGE: This is a slider. view more Credit: MIPT Press Office An international team of researchers from MIPT; Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS; Prokhorov General Physics Institute, RAS; Skoltech; and Aalto University (Finland) has examined the optical and dielectric properties of thin macroscopic films based on single-walled carbon nanotubes and obtained an explanation for the metallic natu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ice shapes the landslide landscape on Mars
How good is your Martian geography? Does Valles Marineris ring a bell? This area is known for having landslides that are among the largest and longest in the entire solar system. They make the perfect object of study due to their steep collapse close to the scarp, extreme thinning, and long front runout. In a new research paper published in EPJ Plus, Fabio De Blasio and colleagues from Milano-Bic
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Greater government responsiveness is paramount to maintaining stable societies
The Brexit is the perfect example of a time-delayed event. It will happen, if at all, only several years after the referendum vote. Dynamical systems with time delays, like societies making political decisions, have attracted considerable attention from physicists specialised in complex systems. In this new study published in EPJ B, Claudius Gros from Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany has show