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Here's How the End of Net Neutrality Will Change the Internet Internet service providers like Comcast and Verizon may soon be free to block content, slow video-streaming services from rivals, and offer “fast lanes” to preferred partners. For a glimpse of how the internet experience may change, look at what broadband providers are doing under the existing “net neutrality” rules. When AT&T customers access its DirecTV Now video-streaming service, the data doe
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Ingeniøren
Nyt letbane-koks i Aarhus: Nu er næste strækning også forsinket på ubestemt tid Endnu ved selskabet bag Aarhus Letbane ikke, hvornår passagerne kan stige om bord på de første af de Stadler-tog, som i øjeblikket tøffer rundt på den nye, 12 kilometer lange strækning fra byens banegård til byggepladsen i nord, hvor Skejby Sygehus bliver udvidet. Men nu er også næste strækning af letbanen forsinket, igen på ubestemt tid, og igen fordi letbaneselskabet er gået galt af Trafikstyre
9h
Viden
Professor: Klimaforandringerne bliver værre, end vi har troet - Vi kan godt vinke farvel til målsætningen om at holde den globale temperaturstigning under 1,5 grader, og 2 grader ser efterhånden også urealistisk ud. Så dyster er vurderingen fra den danske klimaprofessor og direktør for Nansen Centeret i Bergen, Sebastian H. Mernild. Professorens dalende optimisme er ikke mindst et resultat af klimatopmødet COP23 og den arktiske klimarapport SWIPA 2017 , der
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LATEST

Ars Technica
Why the FCC ignored public opinion in its push to kill net neutrality
Enlarge / FCC Chairman Ajit Pai at The American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research on May 5, 2017 in Washington, DC. Getty Images | Chip Somodevilla reader comments 0 Net neutrality rules are popular with Americans who use the Internet. When the Federal Communications Commission deliberated on possible net neutrality rules in 2014 and 2015, millions of comments poured in to support s
10min
Live Science
Lightning Bolts Are Churning Out Antimatter All Over Planet Earth
Particles split in the hot belly of a lightning bolt. Radioactive particles decay in the afterglow. Gamma rays rain down to Earth. Teruaki Enoto, a physicist at Kyoto University in Japan, proved for the first time, in a paper published Nov. 23, that lightning bolts work as natural particle accelerators. Enoto and his co-authors' results confirm for the first time speculation dating back to
12min
Big Think
How the End of Net Neutrality Could Change Your Experience of the Internet
Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai has announced a proposal to repeal net neutrality regulations set forth by the Obama administration in 2015 . If passed, it will fundamentally change how Americans access the internet, and we are here to explain how. What is net neutrality? Net neutrality is a principle (often enshrined in legal regulations) that holds that internet service prov
36min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New mechanisms found of cell death in neurodegenerative disorders
New mechanisms of cell death have now been discovered, which may be involved in debilitating neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, report scientists.
41min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genetic factors linked to acquired narrowing of the airway
Endotracheal intubation and tracheotomy are widely used in the hospital setting for elective surgery and in cases of serious illness or critical injury. In rare instances the procedures result in the development of scarring and narrowing of the larynx and trachea, or acquired laryngotracheal stenosis (ALTS). Who is susceptible to ALTS -- and why -- is unclear, but according to new research, geneti
41min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Health service complaints system putting patients at risk, harming doctors' mental health
Current process for complaints against doctors reduces their wellbeing and causes fear-driven working practices that could compromise patient care, suggests a new English study.
41min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Felling pines: Doing it sooner rather than later is better for fynbos
Here's some advice for landowners wanting to remove pine trees in the hope of seeing fynbos plants on their properties again: do so before the trees have grown there for more than 30 years. The longer they wait, the less likely the chances that any fynbos seeds will be left in the soil to sprout successfully, according to researchers.
41min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
HLF-gene controls generation of our long-term immune system
When the HLF (hepatic leukemia factor) gene -- which is expressed in immature blood cells -- does not shut down on time, we are unable to develop a functional long-term immune system, investigators have found. This could be a very early stage of leukemia, they say.
41min
NYT > Science
Trilobites: ‘Crazy Jigsaw Puzzles’ Improve Our Views of Coral Reefs
A century ago, if you wanted to document ocean life, you’d throw on a 60-pound glass helmet, dive in and sketch whatever passed by with a lead pencil on a zinc tablet. Today most scientists studying corals still dive with an hour’s worth of oxygen and a plastic piece of paper, using their personal judgments to jot down all they can before the air runs out. But over the last few years, technology
42min
NYT > Science
Q&A: Shake, Rattle and Roll
Photo Credit Victoria Roberts Q. What are a rattlesnake’s rattles made of? Is it born with them? And what determines how many rattles it has? A. Much like fingernails, the rattles are made of a protein called keratin, which strengthens cells in the outer layer of the snake’s skin. As the snake outgrows its skin and sheds it, remnants of these hardened cells are left behind, forming a rattle segme
42min
Live Science
Ghostly Cosmic Neutrinos Are Stopped Cold by Planet Earth, New Study Shows
The IceCube lab in Antarctica, backdropped by the Milky Way and an aurora on the horizon. Image taken in May 2017. Credit: Martin Wolf/IceCube/NSF Subatomic particles called neutrinos are notoriously hard to catch because they pass right through regular matter like ghosts. But a new study shows that high-energy neutrinos from cosmic sources aren't totally unstoppable. Researchers from the I
50min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cool lizards are better at learning socially
Bearded dragons which are incubated in colder environments are better at solving cognitive tasks as adults than incubated in warmer temperatures, according to new research. Scientists tested the social learning abilities of bearded dragons which had been incubated in either an average of 30°C or 27°C and found that those from the colder incubation environment picked up new skills faster than their
55min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Common jellyfish is actually two species, scientists find
Sea nettle jellyfish found in Rehoboth and Chesapeake Bay are actually two species, researchers have discovered.
55min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Rainfall can indicate that mosquito-borne epidemics will occur weeks later
Outbreaks of mosquito-borne viruses Zika and Chikungunya generally occur about three weeks after heavy rainfall, research shows. Researchers also found that Chikungunya will predominate over Zika when both circulate at the same time.
55min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
MRI shows brain differences among ADHD patients
Information from brain MRIs can help identify people with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and distinguish among subtypes of the condition, according to a new study.
55min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Species may appear deceptively resilient to climate change
Natural habitats play a vital role in helping other plants and animals resist heat stresses ramping up with climate change -- at least until the species they depend on to form those habitats become imperiled.
55min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Schooling fish mainly react to one or two neighbors at a time
Schooling fish constantly change who they decide to pay attention to and respond to one or two neighbors at a time, new research shows.
55min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Video game improves balance in youth with autism
Playing a video game that rewards participants for holding various "ninja" poses could help children and youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) improve their balance, according to a recent study.
55min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Biomechanical model could reduce wobbling of pedestrian bridges
The dangerous wobbling of pedestrian bridges could be reduced by using biomechanically inspired models of pedestrian response to bridge motion and a mathematical formula to estimate the critical crowd size at which bridge wobbling begins, according to a study.
55min
Big Think
The First Gene Editing Procedure Has Begun in Humans
“ It’s kind of humbling ,” says Brian Madeux of being the first patient to have doctors attempt to edit genes inside his body. The experimental treatment aims to cure his Hunter syndrome, a genetic disorder that can cause “permanent, progressive damage affecting appearance, mental development, organ function and physical abilities,” according to Mayo Clinic’s article on the disease. The proce
57min
Live Science
You'd Never Suspect an Octopus Was Lying on this Seafloor
Camouflage level 9000 A video of an octopus' hiding in plain sight before popping out to spook a diver has gone viral. The video shows a nearly invisible octopus , seamlessly blending in with the seafloor, before turning white, floating up from its hiding place and transforming into what looks like a terrifying, bug-eyed sea monster. It turns out that the octopus in the vide
58min
NYT > Science
Out There: An Interstellar Visitor Both Familiar and Alien
Dr. Meech’s team has now published the first report of their observations in Nature. The paper describes the interstellar visitor as both reassuringly familiar and utterly alien. “We don’t see anything like that in our solar system,” Dr. Meech said. In its color and other imputed properties, Oumuamua resembles the asteroids we already know and fear will one day smash the Earth and human civilizat
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Gizmodo
Scientist Sleuths Used DNA to Track Spread of Superbug
Cultivated anaerobic Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteria. Image: CDC When an outbreak occurs, in order to effectively figure out how to stop it, researchers typically try to figure out how it started. The answer to that question, though, can be elusive. And as so-called superbug infections have spread across the country’s hospitals, scientists and public health officials have subsequently struggled to
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Whole-brain map of electrical connections key to forming memories constructed by researchers
A team of neuroscientists has constructed the first whole-brain map of electrical connectivity in the brain based on data from nearly 300 neurosurgical patients with electrodes implanted directly on the brain. The researchers found that low-frequency rhythms of brain activity, when brain waves move up and down slowly, primarily drive communication between the frontal, temporal and medial temporal
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brains of children with a better physical fitness possess a greater volume of gray matter
Physical fitness in children may affect their brain structure, which in turn may have an influence on their academic performance, new research indicates.
1h
Live Science
Evidence Mounts Against So-Called Climate Change Hiatus
A seasonal ice beacon collects temperature data in the Arctic. Credit: Ignatius Rigor/Polar Science Center, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington Evidence is mounting against the so-called climate change hiatus — a period lasting from 1998 to 2012 — when global temperatures allegedly stopped rising as sharply as they had before. This misconception can be explained, in part, by mi
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Big Think
The Problem With Apu: Indian-Americans Resist "The Simpsons" Character
It’s 1925 and you want chicken. As you’re driving around Salt Lake City you pass a new restaurant that fits the bill. The Coon Chicken Inn, featuring a smiling African-American porter as a logo—as well as a twelve-foot high “Coon head” entrance—also opened in Seattle and Portland, Oregon. The mini-chain kept those latter locations in operation until 1949, while the Utah original finally shut it
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New Scientist - News
Soft robot that squeezes your heart keeps damaged organs pumping
By Timothy Revell IT’S a pump that could bring your heart back to life. A lack of donated hearts often means people with heart failure die waiting for a replacement. But now a robotic device has been designed to help out with pumping duties to keep diseased hearts beating for longer. Nikolay Vasilyev at Boston Children’s Hospital, one of the creators of the device, hopes it may even allow a f
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New Scientist - News
Light pollution is set to double between now and 2050
Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam ADB/Alamy Stock Photo By Andy Coghlan Light pollution is getting exponentially worse. The area of Earth lit by artificial lights grew by 9 per cent in four years. If that continues, the total illuminated area of the Earth will double from what it was in 2012 before 2050. The retreat is likely to impact nocturnal wildlife and people’s health , by disrupting natural da
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Popular Science
What is the healthiest way to eat sweet foods?
The healthiest way to eat a dessert (or any type of added sugar) is to not eat it. That being said, what is life if you don’t live it? For me, a life without the occasional glazed doughnut for breakfast or Sour Patch Kids at the movies is a life not fully lived. Most Americans, including doctors and nutritionists, would likely agree. Nevertheless, studies show that sugar, in excess, can contribut
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Gizmodo
The Best Bargains In Vaping Start At Just $66 For Black Friday
G Pen Elite | $85 | Greenco Science | Promo code KINJA-BFCM G Pen Pro | $66 | Greenco Science | Promo code KINJA-BFCM The Greenco G Pen Elite was already one of the best vaporizers for the money at its usual $150 , but for Black Friday, you can get it for an all-time low $85 with promo code KINJA-BFCM . Of, for just $66 with the same code, you can also opt for the smaller G Pen Pro , which should
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Feed: All Latest
Black Friday 2017: Best Headphone Deals from Beats to Bose
This is a perfect time of year to upgrade your dirty old white Apple earbuds to just about anything else. Want to finally get the Sonos system you've been dreaming of? It's on sale. From Bose to Beats, here are the best audio and headphone deals we've found for Black Friday. (Be sure to also check out our main Black Friday Deals Guide for a lot more sales.) Our Favorite Headphones Deals Bose Quie
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
AI-controlled brain implants for mood disorders tested in people
BSIP/UIG/Getty Brain implants that deliver electrical pulses tuned to a person’s feelings and behaviour are being tested in people for the first time. Two teams funded by the US military’s research arm, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), have begun preliminary trials of ‘closed-loop’ brain implants that use algorithms to detect patterns associated with mood disorders. These de
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NIH scientists and collaborators find prion protein in skin of CJD patients
IMAGE: The brain of one patient who died from sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease (sCJD) appears nearly identical to the brain of a mouse inoculated with infectious prions taken from the skin of... view more Credit: Case Western Reserve University National Institutes of Health (NIH) scientists and collaborators at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have detected abnormal prion prot
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tiny robots step closer to treating hard-to-reach parts of the body
IMAGE: Spirulina algae coated with magnetic particles to form a microrobot. Devices such as these could be developed to diagnose and treat illness in hard-to-reach parts of the body. view more Credit: Yan et al Science Robotics 2017 Tiny remotely operated robots could be designed to diagnose and treat illness in hard-to-reach areas of the human body, research suggests. In tests, a swarm of robo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A 'half-hearted' solution to one-sided heart failure
IMAGE: This is an illustration showing sectional view of a heart with the soft robotic system helping to draw blood into (left) and pump blood out (right) of the heart's right... view more Credit: Boston Children's Hospital Soft robotic actuators, which are pneumatic artificial muscles designed and programmed to perform lifelike motions, have recently emerged as an attractive alternative to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bowhead whales come to Cumberland Sound in Nunavut to exfoliate
Aerial drone footage of bowhead whales in Canada's Arctic has revealed that the large mammals molt and use rocks to rub off dead skin. The footage provides one answer to the mystery of why whales return to Cumberland Sound, Nunavut, every summer, and helps explain some unusual behavior that has been noted historically by Inuit and commercial whalers living and working in the area. "This was an in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Artificial lights increasing 'loss of night,' especially in some nations
Artificial Lights Increasing "Loss of Night," Especially in Some Nations: In a long-term, high-resolution global analysis of night light emissions, researchers report that the artificially lit surface of our planet is still growing - in both size and brightness - in most countries. In fewer countries has it stayed stable or declined, they say. Notably, the growth in nighttime light from 2012 to 2
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Getting under the skin of prion disorders
Infectious prion proteins - the causative agents of the fatal neurodegenerative disorder Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease - can be detected in the skin of afflicted individuals, researchers now report. The findings raise the remote possibility that prion diseases may be transmitted through surgical procedures involving the skin. Prion disorders like Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease arise when misfolded version
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers find infectious prions in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patient skin
Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD)--the human equivalent of mad cow disease--is caused by rogue, misfolded protein aggregates termed prions, which are infectious and cause fatal damages in the patient's brain. CJD patients develop signature microscopic sponge-like holes in their brains. The initial signs of CJD include memory loss, behavior changes, movement disorder, and vision problems, which usua
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
EU trade ban brings down global trade in wild birds by 90 percent
Trade of wild birds has dropped about 90% globally since the EU banned bird imports in 2005. A study published today in the recognized scientific journal Science Advances demonstrates how the EU's ban decreased the number of birds traded annually from about 1.3 million to 130.000. International trade of wild birds is a root cause of exotic birds spreading worldwide. The study was led by scientist
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New approach to tracking how deadly 'superbugs' travel could slow their spread
ANN ARBOR, Mich. -- Killer bacteria - ones that have out-evolved our best antibiotics -- may not go away anytime soon. But a new approach to tracking their spread could eventually give us a fighting chance to keep their death toll down. Using data from a 2008 outbreak of one of the most-feared "superbugs," and modern genetic sequencing techniques, a team has successfully modeled, and predicted, t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research points to diagnostic test for top cause of liver transplant in kids
Biliary atresia is the most common cause of liver transplants for children in the United States. Researchers report in Science Translational Medicine finding a strong biomarker candidate that could be used for earlier diagnosis and lifesaving treatments that could avoid more invasive procedures like liver transplant. A research team led by Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center identified m
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
By saving cost and energy, the lighting revolution may increase light pollution
IMAGE: Photograph of Calgary, Alberta, Canada, taken from the International Space Station on Nov. 27, 2015. Many areas on the outskirts are newly lit compared to 2010, and many neighborhoods have... view more Credit: NASA's Earth Observatory/Kyba, GFZ Municipalities, enterprises, and households are switching to LED lights in order to save energy. But these savings might be lost if their neighbour
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Camponotini ant species have their own distinct microbiomes
Camponotini ant species have their own distinct microbiomes and the bacteria may also vary by developmental stage, according to a study published November 22, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Manuela Oliveira Ramalho from the Universidade Estadual Paulista "Júlio de Mesquita Filho", Brazil, and colleagues. Many plant and animal species may have symbiotic relationships with bacteria t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Molting bowhead whales likely rub on rocks to facilitate sloughing off skin
IMAGE: Example of an animal with nearly no sloughing skin (i.e., proportion of body with sloughing skin = 66%... view more Credit: Fortune et al (2017) Bowhead whales molt and rub on large rocks -- likely facilitating exfoliation -- in coastal waters in the eastern Canadian Arctic during late summer, according to a study published November 22, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Sarah
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
One-size treatment for blood cancer probably doesn't fit all, USC researchers say
Though African-American men are three times more likely to be diagnosed with a blood cancer called multiple myeloma, most scientific research on the disease has been based on people of European descent, according to a study led by researchers at the Keck School of Medicine of USC. That trend is problematic considering that African-Americans -- the most at-risk population for multiple myeloma --
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BBC News - Science & Environment
High-energy 'ghost particles' absorbed by Earth
Image copyright Jamie Yang / IceCube Image caption Artwork: IceCube consists of an array of sensors embedded in very clear ice near the South Pole Neutrinos are known as "ghost particles", because they are known to travel through solid objects with ease. But a new study demonstrates that some of these sub-atomic particles are stopped in their tracks when they encounter our planet. Neutrinos inter
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Feed: All Latest
This New Robot Will Help Keep Hearts Pumping
You don’t want to be among the first human cyborgs. Because doctors won’t be replacing all your limbs with super-strong robotic ones, and they won’t be giving you cameras for eyes. More than likely, they’ll be saving your life by wrapping your heart in a robot. Today in the journal Science Robotics , researchers introduced a new kind of device to keep a heart pumping: It cradles the organ and use
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The Atlantic
Zimbabwe Celebrates Mugabe's Downfall
A week after members of the Zimbabwe Defence Forces assumed military control of parts of the capital city of Harare and placed President Robert Mugabe under house arrest, the 93-year-old leader of Zimbabwe announced he was resigning after a brutal 37-year reign. The current crisis was initiated by a power struggle between potential successors to Mugabe: First Lady Grace Mugabe and the former Vice
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Science | The Guardian
Grenfell Tower death toll of 71 unlikely to rise as last inquests open
The last two of the 70 inquests for victims of the Grenfell Tower fire were opened and adjourned on Wednesday with the coroner paying tribute to bereaved families and the “unrelenting work of dedicated professionals” who recovered and identified remains. Westminster coroner Fiona Wilcox, who has presided over 19 hearings in the past five months, said the final inquests marked an important milesto
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: Even Whales Have to Exfoliate
In August 2014, Sarah Fortune was trying to tag bowhead whales with transmitters so she could study their feeding habits in Canada’s Cumberland Sound, where many of the large sea mammals spend their summers. But the whales kept swimming into a small, shallow bay with large boulders, where at least one removed a transmitter by rubbing against the rocks. “The whales were just rolling onto their sid
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NYT > Science
Abnormal Proteins Discovered in Skin of Patients With Rare Brain Disease
They deteriorate mentally, weaken, move uncontrollably, and may become blind and unable to speak. The disease belongs to the same class of brain disorders as mad-cow disease. The findings do not mean that Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease can be transmitted by touch or casual contact, said the senior author of the study, Dr. Wen-Quan Zou, at Case Western University School of Medicine. Patients are not da
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Science : NPR
Earth Is Lit, And That's A Problem
Astronauts aboard the International Space Station took this image of southern Scandinavia lit up at night. A green aurora is visible over the horizon. NASA hide caption toggle caption NASA Astronauts aboard the International Space Station took this image of southern Scandinavia lit up at night. A green aurora is visible over the horizon. NASA The ever-widening use of artificial lights is making t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bowhead whales come to Cumberland Sound in Nunavut to exfoliate
Example of an animal with nearly no sloughing skin (i.e., proportion of body with sloughing skin = 66% of body) and a blotchy skin type (B). Credit: Fortune et al (2017) Aerial drone footage of bowhead whales in Canada's Arctic has revealed that the large mammals molt and use rocks to rub off dead skin. The footage provides one answer to the mystery of why whales return to Cumberland Sound, Nunav
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Camponotini ant species have their own distinct microbiomes
Camponotini ant species have their own distinct microbiomes and the bacteria may also vary by developmental stage, according to a study published November 22, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Manuela Oliveira Ramalho from the Universidade Estadual Paulista "Júlio de Mesquita Filho", Brazil, and colleagues. Many plant and animal species may have symbiotic relationships with bacteria tha
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A 'half-hearted' solution to one-sided heart failure—Soft robotic system provides support
Illustration showing sectional view of a heart with the soft robotic system helping to draw blood into (left) and pump blood out (right) of the heart's right ventricle. Credit: Boston Children's Hospital Soft robotic actuators, which are pneumatic artificial muscles designed and programmed to perform lifelike motions, have recently emerged as an attractive alternative to more rigid components tha
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EU trade ban brings down global trade in wild birds by 90 percent
The popular pet bird, the yellow-fronted canary, was one of the most traded wild bird birds before EU's trade ban on wild birds in 2005. Today, the most traded wild birds globally are parrots. Credit: Derek Keats, 2016 Trade of wild birds has dropped about 90% globally since the EU banned bird imports in 2005. A study published today in the recognized scientific journal Science Advances demonstra
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Live Science
Birdwatch: Technicolor Turkey Sports Iridescent Feathers
Behold the ocellated turkey: a regal-looking bird with iridescent feathers, a blue face, and cranberry-like bumps of red and orange on its head. You won't find the ocellated turkey ( Meleagris ocellata ) on any Thanksgiving plates, but that's probably for the best. The tropical bird is "near threatened" in its native home in Mexico's Yucatán Peninsula, northern Belize and northern Guatemala
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Light pollution: Night being lost in many countries
Image copyright NASA Image caption Composite images, like this one of Europe, are produced from several months of satellite data A study of pictures of Earth by night has revealed that artificial light is growing brighter and more extensive every year. Between 2012 and 2016, the planet's artificially lit outdoor area grew by more than 2% per year. Scientists say a "loss of night" in many countrie
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Gizmodo
The Switch to Outdoor LED Lighting Has Completely Backfired
The Florida panhandle at night. (Image: NASA/JSC) To reduce energy consumption, many jurisdictions around the world are transitioning to outdoor LED lighting. But as new research shows, this solid-state solution hasn’t yielded the expected energy savings, and potentially worse, it’s resulted in more light pollution than ever before. Using satellite-based sensors, an international team of scientis
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Ars Technica
By year’s end, you’ll know if you liked a Kremlin-created Facebook page
Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images reader comments 0 On Wednesday, Facebook announced that it would create a "portal to enable people on Facebook to learn which of the Internet Research Agency Facebook Pages or Instagram accounts they may have liked or followed between January 2015 and August 2017." The Internet Research Agency (which the New York Times Magazine extensively profiled in 20
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Gizmodo
Confirmed: Lightning Causes Nuclear Reactions in the Sky
Image: Dmitry Kalinin / Flickr Lightning is nuts. It’s a supercharged bolt of electricity extending from the sky to the ground that can kill people. But it can also produce nuclear reactions, according to new research. Scientists have long known that thunderstorms can produce high-energy radiation, like this one from December, 2015 that blasted a Japanese beach town with some gamma radiation. But
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ribbed mussels could help improve urban water quality
Ribbed mussels partially covered with mud. Credit: NOAA Fisheries/Mark Dixon, NEFSC Ribbed mussels can remove nitrogen and other excess nutrients from an urban estuary and could help improve water quality in other urban and coastal locations, according to a study in New York City's Bronx River. The findings, published in Environmental Science and Technology , are part of long-term efforts to impr
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How the Earth stops high-energy neutrinos in their tracks
For the first time, a science experiment has measured Earth's ability to absorb neutrinos -- the smaller-than-an-atom particles that zoom throughout space and through us by the trillions every second at nearly the speed of light. The experiment was achieved with the IceCube detector, an array of 5,160 basketball-sized sensors frozen deep within a cubic kilometer of very clear ice near the South Po
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Surprising roles for muscle in tissue regeneration, study finds
Researchers have illuminated an important role for different subtypes of muscle cells in orchestrating the process of tissue regeneration. Notably, in the absence of these muscles, regeneration fails to proceed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lightning, with a chance of antimatter
Researchers find that lightning strikes causes photonuclear reactions in the atmosphere, creating antimatter.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UVA aims to help patients with cancer make complex care decisions
IMAGE: Timothy Showalter, M.D., a radiation oncologist at the University of Virginia Cancer Center, is developing a tool to help patients with cancer weigh the risks and rewards of their treatment... view more Credit: UVA Health System Researchers at the University of Virginia Cancer Center are developing a tool to help patients with prostate cancer better understand the potential risks and rewar
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Gizmodo
These PS4 Black Friday Deals Are Already Live, and Aren't Likely to Get Cheaper
Overwatch - Game of the Year [Digital] | $30 | Amazon Crash Bandicoot N-Sane Trilogy [Digital] | $30 | Amazon The Evil Within II [Digital] | $30 | Amazon Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Siege [Digital] | $20 | Amazon Uncharted: The Nathan Drake Collection [Digital] | $8 | Amazon Horizon Zero Dawn [Digital] | $20 | Amazon Final Fantasy XV Digital Premium Edition [Digital] | $30 | Amazon Final Fantasy XV
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Reducing phosphorus runoff
Throughout the United States, toxic algal blooms are wreaking havoc on bodies of water, causing pollution and having harmful effects on people, fish and marine mammals. One of the main contributors to these algal blooms is excess phosphorus that runs off from agricultural fields and while there has been a lot of efforts in recent years by farmers to improve agricultural management, the problem pe
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Popular Science
Wild turkeys are in trouble
Wild turkeys are in a bit of a bind. The birds were nearly wiped out by hunters and habitat destruction by the early 1900s, but made a comeback thanks to conservation efforts in the 20th century. Yet for the past 15 years or so, turkey populations have again started to fall across much of the United States. These turkeys are the same species as the birds that might grace your Thanksgiving table ,
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Gizmodo
First Brief Look at Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom Showcases the Cutest Deadly Carnivore Ever
Image: Universal Aww, Velociraptors are adorable ! So what if they were the scariest creatures in Jurassic Park— making us sympathize with a T-Rex because, hey, at least it had a fighting chance against those awful things? Here, in the first (very brief) look at Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom , we’ve got the return of Chris Pratt: The Raptor Whisperer. But who cares, Blue’s back! Jurassic World d
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Lightning makes new isotopes
Magalie L’Abbé/Getty A lightning storm illuminates clouds over Kagoshima, Japan. A streak of lightning in the skies over Japan has generated positrons — the antimatter equivalents of electrons — and radioactive carbon-14, confirming a theoretical prediction, according to a paper published in Nature on 22 November 1 . Since the 1990s, orbiting observatories designed to observe the heavens have als
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
European Medicines Agency to move to Amsterdam
Aurore Belot/AFP/Getty A man crosses a canal in Amsterdam. After more than a year of uncertainty, the new home of the European Medicines Agency (EMA) is finally clear. The European Union member states chose Amsterdam from among 19 candidates, after a secret ballot on 20 November. The transition is expected to be relatively smooth because more than 80% of staff indicated in a survey earlier this y
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
How alkali flies stay dry
Floris van Breugel/Caltech More than 150 years ago, American writer Mark Twain described how flies enter Mono Lake in California then “pop up to the surface as dry as a patent office report”. Now scientists have identified how they do so. The alkali fly Ephydra hians can crawl down the side of the lake to depths of 8 metres and remain submerged for 15 minutes before emerging unscathed. Not only c
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Engineers model the California reservoir network
For the first time, engineers at Caltech have developed an empirical statewide model of the California reservoir network. The model was built from data gathered over a 13-year period that includes the latest drought, allowing researchers to make observations about how 55 of the state's major reservoirs respond to a variety of external conditions as a unified system. Reservoirs act as the state's
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The genome of Leishmania reveals how this parasite adapts to environmental changes
Credit: Center for Genomic Regulation Leishmaniasis is an important human and veterinary disease caused by Leishmania parasites that affect 12 million people in over 98 endemic countries. The disease is now emerging in Europe due to climate change and massive population displacement. The parasite is known to rapidly adapt to novel environments with important consequences for disease outcome. It h
2h
New Scientist - News
UK vote didn’t deny animal sentience but could harm welfare
There’s no doubt it’s feeling something… Benjamin Rondel/Plaimpicture By Michael Le Page “MPs quietly voted ‘that animals cannot feel pain or emotions’,” claimed one headline, after the UK’s parliament voted against an amendment on animal sentience. That has led to widespread outrage on social media, and more than one petition. But MPs did not really vote that animals cannot feel pain and suf
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New Scientist - News
Private mission may get us back to Enceladus sooner than NASA
RUSSIAN billionaire Yuri Milner has set his sights on Saturn’s moon Enceladus. Milner founded the $100 million Breakthrough Starshot project, an attempt to send small probes to Alpha Centauri. Now, he has announced plans to explore funding a mission to Enceladus. The icy moon is thought to be a prime location in the search for alien life thanks to the global ocean under its surface. Geysers s
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New Scientist - News
How do you link the world’s blockchains? With another blockchain
It’s like the tower of Babel in here Dave Tacon/Polaris/Eyevine By Amalia Illgner THE blockchain revolution is struggling. The much-vaunted technology behind bitcoin promises to enable trusted transactions without intermediaries, so why have the overwhelming majority of new blockchain projects failed? One problem is that there is no longer a single blockchain: the past few years have seen an
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New Scientist - News
Signs of running water on Mars dunes are probably just dry sand
Streaky slopes: Don’t add water NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona By Mika McKinnon Mysterious dark lines that appear on the slopes of Martian dunes and craters each warm season may be dry landslides instead of flowing water as previously thought. Dark flows streak down hills and craters on Mars each summer, before fading away in the colder months. Initially, these lines – called recurrin
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New Scientist - News
Lightning leaves clouds of radiation and antimatter in its wake
Radiation risk? planes and gamma rays don’t mix Dayle Gilka-Botzow/EyeEm/Getty By Shannon Hall Thunderbolts and lightning are more than just frightening – they also create radiation. For the first time, we have definitive proof that lightning sparks radiation and even clouds of antimatter, though it’s not clear how or if this will affect the health of people on the ground. “Nature still has a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ribbed mussels could help improve urban water quality
Ribbed mussels can remove nitrogen and other excess nutrients from an urban estuary and could help improve water quality in other urban and coastal locations, according to a study in New York City's Bronx River. The findings, published in Environmental Science and Technology , are part of long-term efforts to improve water quality in the Bronx River Estuary. Researchers at NOAA Fisheries Milford
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reducing phosphorus runoff
Researchers test a variety of incentives to learn how best to motivate farmers to curb phosphorus runoff.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Engineers model the California reservoir network
For the first time, engineers at Caltech have developed an empirical statewide model of the California reservoir network. The model was built from data gathered over a 13-year period that includes the latest drought, allowing researchers to make observations about how 55 of the state's major reservoirs respond to a variety of external conditions as a unified system. Reservoirs act as the state's
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lightning, with a chance of antimatter
IMAGE: A Kyoto University-based team has unraveled the mystery of gamma-ray emission cascades caused by lightning strikes. view more Credit: Kyoto University/Teruaki Enoto Japan -- A storm system approaches: the sky darkens, and the low rumble of thunder echoes from the horizon. Then without warning... Flash! Crash! -- lightning has struck. This scene, while familiar to anyone and repeated cons
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Surprising roles for muscle in tissue regeneration, study finds
A team of researchers at Whitehead has illuminated an important role for different subtypes of muscle cells in orchestrating the process of tissue regeneration. Notably, in the absence of these muscles, regeneration fails to proceed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
IceCube experiment finds Earth can block high-energy particles from nuclear reactions
IMAGE: This image shows a visual representation of one of the highest-energy neutrino detections superimposed on a view of the IceCube Lab at the South Pole. view more Credit: IceCube Collaboration EMBARGOED: Publication of information about the research described here is prohibited -- in any medium -- by the journal Nature until the paper's Advance Online Publication (AOP) at 1:00 p.m.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Encouraging oxygen's assault on iron may offer new way to kill lung cancer cells
Blocking the action of a key protein frees oxygen to damage iron-dependent proteins in lung and breast cancer cells, making them easier to kill.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How the Earth stops high-energy neutrinos in their tracks
IMAGE: The IceCube Lab in March 2017, with the South Pole station in the background. view more Credit: IceCube Collaboration Neutrinos are abundant subatomic particles that are famous for passing through anything and everything, only very rarely interacting with matter. About 100 trillion neutrinos pass through your body every second. Now, scientists have demonstrated that the Earth s
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mysterious deep-Earth seismic signature explained
IMAGE: The movement of seismic waves through the material of the mantle allows scientists to image Earth's interior, just as a medical ultrasound allows technicians to look inside a blood vessel.... view more Credit: Edward Garnero and Allen McNamara Washington, DC-- New research on oxygen and iron chemistry under the extreme conditions found deep inside the Earth could explain a longstanding
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Icebound detector reveals how ghostly neutrinos are stopped cold
MADISON, Wis. -- Famously, neutrinos, the nearly massless particles that are a fundamental component of the universe, can zip through a million miles of lead without skipping a beat. Now, in a critical measurement that may one day help predict new physics beyond the Standard Model of particle physics -- the model that seeks to explain the fundamental forces of the universe -- an international tea
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quantum internet goes hybrid
IMAGE: Schematic illustration of a hybrid information network with two quantum nodes composed by a cold cloud of Rubidium (left red cloud) and a doped crystal with Praseodymium ions (right white... view more Credit: ICFO/Scixel In a recent study, published in Nature , ICFO researchers Nicolas Maring, Pau Farrera, Dr. Kutlu Kutluer, Dr. Margherita Mazzera, and Dr. Georg Heinze led by
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nanosponges show promise for potentially blinding eye infections
Washington, DC - November 22, 2017 - In recent years, the number of eye surgeries for conditions including cataracts and glaucoma has dramatically increased and with it, so has the number of potentially blinding intraocular infections. In a new study, researchers demonstrate using a mouse model that engineered nanosponges can be used to protect eyes from infections caused by Enterococcus faecalis
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Meningococcal vaccine could protect against 91 percent of targeted bacterial strains
Washington, DC - November 22, 2017 - Up to 91 percent of bacterial strains causing a common type of invasive serogroup B meningococcal disease in children and young adults are likely to be covered by a four-component vaccine called MenB-4C (Bexsero), according to laboratory studies conducted by investigators at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and at GlaxoSmithKline, m
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How to cut your lawn for grasshoppers
Picture a grasshopper landing randomly on a lawn of fixed area. If it then jumps a certain distance in a random direction, what shape should the lawn be to maximize the chance that the grasshopper stays on the lawn after jumping?
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Ars Technica
Review: Coco delivers Pixar’s best technical and emotional magic
Enlarge / Miguel and his "spirit guide" Dante cross the flower petal bridge into the Land of the Dead on Día de Muertos. Pixar/Disney reader comments 48 Like Pixar's greatest films, such as Toy Story , Up , and Inside Out , the Thanksgiving weekend treat Coco is a gorgeously rendered fantasy about the good and bad (but mostly good) of family life. Set in small-town Mexico on Día de Muertos, or th
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Feed: All Latest
Cyber Monday 2017: Best Tech Deals, from Playstations to Sonos Speakers
We put together a few different WIRED Black Friday Deals Guides to help you find the best deals at home over Thanksgiving weekend and avoid the horrible lines and madness at your local store or mall. Cyber Monday, which is November 27 this year, will likely have even better deals going on. There aren’t a lot of deals yet, and most Cyber Monday pages from retailers are still blank, but we’ve colle
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NYT > Science
Matter: Young Again: How One Cell Turns Back Time
On Thursday in the journal Nature, Dr. Bohnert and Cynthia Kenyon, vice president for aging research at Calico, reported the discovery of one way in which the germline stays young. Right before an egg is fertilized, it is swept clean of deformed proteins in a dramatic burst of housecleaning. The researchers discovered this process by studying a tiny worm called Caenorhabditis elegans. The worm ha
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quantum internet goes hybrid
Schematic illustration of a hybrid information network with two quantum nodes composed by a cold cloud of Rubidium (left red cloud) and a doped crystal with Praseodymium ions (right white cube). Credit: ICFO/Scixel In a recent study published in Nature , ICFO researchers led by ICREA Prof. Hugues de Riedmatten report an elementary "hybrid" quantum network link and demonstrate photonic quantum com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lightning, with a chance of antimatter
A Kyoto University-based team has unraveled the mystery of gamma-ray emission cascades caused by lightning strikes. Credit: Kyoto University/Teruaki Enoto A storm system approaches: the sky darkens, and the low rumble of thunder echoes from the horizon. Then without warning... Flash! Crash!—lightning has struck. This scene, while familiar to anyone and repeated constantly across the planet, is no
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How the Earth stops high-energy neutrinos in their tracks
The IceCube Lab in March 2017, with the South Pole station in the background. Credit: IceCube Collaboration Neutrinos are abundant subatomic particles that are famous for passing through anything and everything, only very rarely interacting with matter. About 100 trillion neutrinos pass through your body every second. Now, scientists have demonstrated that the Earth stops energetic neutrinos—they
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New composite material made of carbon nanotubes
Due to their unique properties, carbon nanotubes would be ideal for numerous applications, but to date they cannot be combined adequately with other materials, or they lose their beneficial properties. Scientists have developed an alternative method of combining, so they retain their characteristic properties. As such, they 'felt' the thread-like tubes into a stable 3-D network.
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Gizmodo
Ghost Particles Detected on Far Side of Earth Bolsters Crucial Physics Theory
Image: Stephan Richter, IceCube/NSF If we’re ever going to truly understand how our Universe works, we’ll need to take lots of different measurements, but measuring can be one of science’s most difficult tasks. How, for example, do scientists measure an invisible thing that passes directly through solid matter without stopping? The inventions scientists come up with to make this possible are ofte
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Viden
Google tracker din Android-telefon, selvom du siger 'nej tak'
Google har de sidste 11 måneder indsamlet oplysninger om Android-telefoners fysiske placering og sendt dataene tilbage til egne servere - uagtet at placeringstjenester er slået fra på telefonen og endda selvom, der ikke er noget SIM-kort i. Det viser en undersøgelse som mediet Quartz har foretaget . En talsperson fra Google bekræfter overfor Quartz, at det er korrekt. Læs også: UPS… Google-dims o
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Ars Technica
Belgium denounces loot boxes as gambling; Hawaiian legislator calls them “predatory”
Enlarge / In Belgium, this is similar to a loot box. reader comments 64 Belgium's Gaming Commission has ruled that loot boxes—in-game purchases where what you receive is randomized and only known once you open the box—are gambling. The country's minister of justice, Koen Geens, has said that he wants to see them banned Europe-wide, reports PC Gamer (and, in Dutch, VTM Nieuws ). Amid outcry over t
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Ingeniøren
Radioaktive isotoper dannes ved lynnedslag
Under en tordenstorm 6. februar 2017 detekterede en japansk forskergruppe en kortvarig intens gammastråling med varighed mindre end et millisekund. Det blev efterfulgt af længerevarende, mindre intens gammastråling med en energi på 0,511 megaelektronvolt, som varede ca. et minut. Der er kun en god forklaring på det sidste signal, nemlig af det stammer fra annihilation af en elektron og en positro
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The genome of Leishmania reveals how this parasite adapts to environmental changes
Leishmaniasis is an important human and veterinary disease caused by Leishmania parasites that affect 12 million people in over 98 endemic countries. The disease is now emerging in Europe due to climate change and massive population displacement. The parasite is known to rapidly adapt to novel environments with important consequences for disease outcome. It has therefore been recognized as an eme
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mysterious deep-Earth seismic signature explained
The movement of seismic waves through the material of the mantle allows scientists to image Earth's interior, just as a medical ultrasound allows technicians to look inside a blood vessel. Image is courtesy of Edward Garnero and Allen McNamara's 2008 Science paper Structure and Dynamics of Earth's Lower Mantle, provided with Garnero's permission. Credit: Edward Garnero and Allen McNamara New rese
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Ars Technica
Judge: EFF’s “Stupid Patent of the Month” clearly protected by Constitution
reader comments 1 A federal judge in California has ruled in favor of the Electronic Frontier Foundation after the organization was recently sued over its "Stupid Patent of the Month" blog posts. As a result, the advocacy group is not required to remove a recent post simply because an Australian patent entity (often called "trolls") doesn’t like it. The case began back in April 2017 when EFF coun
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The Atlantic
This Isn't the End of the Merkel Era
Angela Merkel has been chancellor of Germany for 12 years to the day , and many observers are predicting this anniversary could be her last. Murmurs about the “beginning of the end” of the German chancellor and a “world without Merkel” gained volume this week after Germany’s coalition talks to form its next government collapsed, following the unexpected exit by the pro-business Free Democrats (FD
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Forest plantations are a potent blend for coffee production
Growing coffee under the forest canopy can help preserve biodiversity. Credit: ‘Coffee Plant near the Quilalí - San Juan del Río Coco border’ by Elizabeth Sampson is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 Climate change is threatening Europe's coffee supplies, but the impacts could be diluted by planting the crops amongst trees - a technique known as agroforestry, which is also being revived in European far
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Gizmodo
The Feds Are Officially Cracking Down on Basement Biohackers
Image: Pixabay The Food and Drug Agency has issued a stern warning to anyone who might be crazy enough to undertake gene therapy in the do-it-yourself fashion. Definitely don’t do this at home, a statement released on Tuesday implies. And if you do, we’ll throw every law we can at you. The FDA’s deterrent comes on the heels of a brazen DIY gene therapy experiment, in which a 27-year-old software
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Gizmodo
Facebook Plans to Tell Users Which Russian Accounts They Followed
Screenshot: Gizmodo Facebook is creating a tool that will allow users to check whether or not they followed Russian propaganda accounts on Facebook or Instagram during the 2016 election cycle, the company announced today. The tool, which is expected to launch by the end of this year, is a response to continued pressure from lawmakers who have demanded that Facebook be more transparent about elect
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Metabolites altered in chronic kidney disease
SAN ANTONIO, Texas - Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects 1 in 7 people in the United States, according to the U.S. National Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). These individuals have a very high risk of cardiovascular disease, and some will also progress to kidney failure requiring dialysis and transplantation. However, few options exist to treat them, and few major br
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Intranasal ketamine has more minor side effects than intranasal fentanyl in children with acute pain
DES PLAINES, IL-- Minor adverse events (e.g., bad taste in the mouth and dizziness) occur more frequently with intranasal ketamine than with intranasal fentanyl in children with suspected extremity fractures. That is the primary finding of a study to be published in the December 2017 issue of Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM), a journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM). The
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Black goat' to thrive again in Israel
Israeli shepherd Avshalom Yaaran tends to one of his black goats, also called Syrian goats, before walking them to graze near Moshav Nes Harim A breed of goat limited for decades by law in Israel is expected to prosper once again in the Jewish state. The black goat , also called the Syrian goat, has since 1950 been barred from forests and woodlands under a law that says they cause environmental d
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lofty Thanksgiving: Astronauts feasting on pouches of turkey
In this undated image provided by NASA, NASA astronauts Joe Acaba, left, Randy Bresnik, center, and Mark Vande Hei give interviews on the International Space Station. The trio along with their international crewmates plan to feast on pouches of Thanksgiving turkey and single-serving bags of sides on Thursday, Nov. 23, 2017. (NASA via AP) Astronauts at the International Space Station will feast Th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Satellite shows storms on both US coasts for Thanksgiving travelers
On Nov. 22 at 10:15 a.m. EST (1515 UTC) NOAA's GOES-East satellite captured this visible image of the US showing storm systems on the East and West coasts for Thanksgiving travelers. Credit: NOAA/UWM-CIMSS Satellites are keeping an eye on the U.S. and NOAA's GOES East satellite showed two storm systems for pre-Thanksgiving travelers on Wednesday, Nov. 22, 2017. One system was exiting the northeas
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Gizmodo
Here's What the CIA Thought of Australia's Anti-Communist Prime Minister, Robert Menzies
Prime Minister Robert Menzies chats with President Kennedy during a visit to the White House, Washington, Feb. 24, 1961. They posed for photographers in the Red Room of the Mansion. (AP Photo) Sir Robert Menzies was Australia’s longest serving Prime Minister, first holding office at the beginning of World War II from 1939 until 1941, and then again from 1949 until 1966. And thanks to a recent Fre
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Inside Science
Medicaid Expansion and Radiation Therapy
Medicaid Expansion and Radiation Therapy Population study shows that 2010 Affordable Care Act improved insurance coverage rates for patients receiving one form of cancer treatment. RadiationTherapy_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Rhoda Baer/ National Cancer Institute Human Wednesday, November 22, 2017 - 12:00 Jason Socrates Bardi, Editor (Inside Science) -- A new study looking at how passage of the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study reveals new mechanisms of cell death in neurodegenerative disorders
Researchers at King's College London have discovered new mechanisms of cell death, which may be involved in debilitating neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. This novel research, published today in Current Biology , could lead to new therapeutic approaches for treating or delaying the progression of neurodegenerative conditions that are currently inc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Do birdsong and human speech share biological roots?
IMAGE: These are two zebra finches. view more Credit: Raina Fan Do songbirds and humans have common biological hardwiring that shapes how they produce and perceive sounds? Scientists who study birdsong have been intrigued for some time by the possibility that human speech and music may be rooted in biological processes shared across a variety of animals. Now, research by McGill University biolo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Desert ants cannot be fooled
Cataglyphis fortis desert ants can learn visual or olfactory cues to pinpoint their nest, but only if these cues are unique to specify the nest entrance. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, discovered that the insects ignore visual landmarks or odors as nest-defining cues, if these occur not only near the nest but also along the route. Hence, ants are ab
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Plague likely a Stone Age arrival to central Europe
IMAGE: Map of proposed Yersinia pestis circulation throughout Eurasia. A) Entrance of Y. pestis into Europe from Central Eurasia with the expansion of Yamnaya pastoralists around 4,800 years ago. B) Circulation... view more Credit: Aida Andrades Valtueña. Andrades Valtueña et al. (2017). The Stone Age Plague and its Persistence in Eurasia. Current Biology . A team of researchers led by scientists
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What are the likely effects of Brexit on UK regions?
A new Papers in Regional Science article that highlights the possible implications of Brexit for the UK and its regions notes that the results for the UK economy may not be as damaging as some forecasters say.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Growing teeth and a backbone: Studies trace early origins of skeletal tissues
Two new studies on the evolutionary origin of teeth and of vertebra further illuminate the human connection to marine organisms that goes back millions of years. Both studies were conducted in the little skate (Leucoraja erinacea).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Antibiotics resistance: Researchers succeed to block genes of resistance
Scientists have design better molecules that make it harder for plasmids to move between bacteria.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Plague reached Europe by Stone Age
Image copyright Stadtarchäologie Ausgburg Image caption Plague may already have been capable of causing epidemics in the Stone Age Plague was present in Europe during the late Stone Age, according to a study of ancient remains. Writing in Current Biology journal, researchers suggest the deadly bacterium entered Europe with a mass migration of people from further east. They screened more than 500
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Gizmodo
LA Traffic Looks Like Your Arteries Will After Thanksgiving
Photo: Getty Thanksgiving is almost here. You know what that means: Lots of turkey and lots of traffic. That’s especially true in Los Angeles, where this year, like most years, the holiday congestion is reminiscent of another thing Americans should probably associate with Thanksgiving—clogged arteries. For people in major cities like LA, just the thought of traveling to a relative’s house can det
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA views severe rain storms over western Saudi Arabia
As intense rain storms moved into Jeddah, Saudi Arabia on Nov. 21, NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement Mission or GPM core satellite analyzed the severe storms.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Energy from electric cars could power our lives—but only if we improve the system
Credit: CC0 Public Domain Power stored in electric cars could be sent back to the grid - thereby supporting the grid and acting as a potential storage for clean energy - but it will only be economically viable if we upgrade the system first. In a new paper in Energy Policy , two scientists show how their seemingly contradictory findings actually point to the same outcome and recommendations: that
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Live Science
Giant, Dark Hole Opens Up in Sun's Atmosphere
The ominous black feature encroaching on the sun in this ultraviolet image is simply a region of low density in the star's atmosphere. Credit: NASA/GSFC/Solar Dynamics Observatory A large, dark "hole" has opened up in the sun's atmosphere, allowing solar winds to rush out into space — an ordinary occurrence, but a spectacular one to see . NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captured this ultr
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Gizmodo
FCC Won't Help Uncover Identity Theft in Net Neutrality Comments, Says New York's Top Prosecutor
Photo: Getty On Tuesday, the FCC finally unveiled its plans to kill net neutrality , and on the same day, New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman publicly excoriated the agency for refusing to cooperate with his office’s investigation into the hundreds of thousands of likely fake comments that were filed in support of ending the open web. In a letter addressed to FCC Chairman Ajit Pai, Schnei
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Ars Technica
Simple visual processing exercise is the first intervention to limit dementia
Enlarge / Exercises that help you to quickly pick out details seem to have the biggest effect on dementia. reader comments 0 Dementia strikes many people as they age, and there's currently not much we can do about it. It would be nice to think that there could be a fix to stave it off, like a computer game or something that could do more than help you improve at that computer game. Well now, for
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New method to measure neutron star size uses modeling based on thermonuclear explosions
Neutron stars are made out of cold ultra-dense matter. How this matter behaves is one of the biggest mysteries in modern nuclear physics. Researchers developed a new method for measuring the radius of neutron stars which helps them to understand what happens to the matter inside the star under extreme pressure.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Preliminary stages of dementia reduce human face memorization ability
Scientists have revealed that elderly people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) have a particularly weakened ability to memorize human faces in the short term when compared to healthy elderly people. MCI patients also had a different gaze behavior when trying to memorize a face. This research may lead to the early detection of dementia.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Worldwide increase in methane bubbles due to climate change
Due to climate change, including rising temperatures, more and more methane is bubbling up from lakes, ponds, rivers and wetlands throughout the world. The release of methane -- a potent greenhouse gas -- leads to a further increase in temperature, thus creating a positive feedback loop (also known as a 'vicious circle').
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Do birdsong and human speech share biological roots?
Two zebra finches. Credit: Raina Fan Do songbirds and humans have common biological hardwiring that shapes how they produce and perceive sounds? Scientists who study birdsong have been intrigued for some time by the possibility that human speech and music may be rooted in biological processes shared across a variety of animals. Now, research by McGill University biologists provides new evidence t
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Plague likely a Stone Age arrival to central Europe
Map of proposed Yersinia pestis circulation throughout Eurasia. A) Entrance of Y. pestis into Europe from Central Eurasia with the expansion of Yamnaya pastoralists around 4,800 years ago. B) Circulation of Y. pestis to Southern Siberia from Europe. Only complete genomes are shown. Credit: Aida Andrades Valtueña. Andrades Valtueña et al. (2017). The Stone Age Plague and its Persistence in Eurasia
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Desert ants are able to assess the reliability of landmarks as they search for the way home
The desert ant Cataglyphis fortis inhabits the barren salt pans in the deserts of South Tunisia. Credit: Markus Knaden, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology Cataglyphis fortis desert ants can learn visual or olfactory cues to pinpoint their nest, but only if these cues are unique to specify the nest entrance. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, dis
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Satellite shows storms on both US coasts for Thanksgiving travelers
Satellites are keeping an eye on the U.S. and NOAA's GOES East satellite showed two storm systems for pre-Thanksgiving travelers on Wednesday, Nov. 22, 2017. One system was exiting the northeastern U.S. while the other was affecting the Pacific Northwest. On Nov. 22 at 10:15 a.m. EST (1515 UTC) NOAA's GOES-East satellite captured this visible image of the U.S. showing storm systems on the East an
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
This week from AGU: Scientists counter threat of flooding on coral reef coasts
GeoSpace Scientists counter threat of flooding on coral reef coasts Scientists have developed a computer simulation tool to predict short-term flood hazards on coral-reef-lined coasts and to assess longer-term impacts from climate change. Their results have been accepted for publication in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans . Scientists discover evidence of recent water flows on Mar
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The Atlantic
The Butterball Turkey Talk-Line Is Ready for the Future
They say journalism is dying in the digital age. And paper maps. And human interaction. But the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line? The Butterball Turkey Talk-Line is thriving. For the uninitiated, the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line is pretty much what it sounds like. During November and December, you can call a special hotline to ask questions about your turkey. Everything from “What size should I get to
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Smart people have better connected brains
Differences in intelligence have so far mostly been attributed to differences in specific brain regions. However, are smart people's brains also wired differently to those of less intelligent persons? A new study supports this assumption. In intelligent persons, certain brain regions are more strongly involved in the flow of information between brain regions, while other brain regions are less eng
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
To forget or to remember? Memory depends on subtle brain signals
Understanding how brains actively erase memories may open new understanding of memory loss and aging, and open the possibility of new treatments for neurodegenerative disease.
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Inside Science
BRIEF: How Pop-Up Turkey Timers Work
BRIEF: How Pop-Up Turkey Timers Work First inspired by fire sprinkler systems, the gadgets pop when a material that softens in heat releases a spring. PopupTimer_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Patrick Fitzgerald via Flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Culture Wednesday, November 22, 2017 - 11:30 Catherine Meyers, Editor (Inside Science) -- What do fire sprinkler systems and pop-up turkey timers h
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA views severe rain storms over western Saudi Arabia
As intense rain storms moved into Jeddah, Saudi Arabia on Nov. 21, NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement Mission or GPM core satellite analyzed the severe storms. Heavy downpours caused schools and universities to close and the General Authority of Meteorology and Environment Protection predicted that heavy rain will continue for a couple days. NASA's GPM Core Observatory satellite measures pre
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Energy from electric cars could power our lives -- but only if we improve the system
Oxford, November 22, 2017 - Power stored in electric cars could be sent back to the grid - thereby supporting the grid and acting as a potential storage for clean energy - but it will only be economically viable if we upgrade the system first. In a new paper in Energy Policy , two scientists show how their seemingly contradictory findings actually point to the same outcome and recommendations: th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Certain popular cigars deliver more nicotine than cigarettes
Cigars may have a reputation for being safer than cigarettes, but they may be just as harmful and addictive, according to Penn State researchers, who add that small cigars have just as much if not more nicotine than cigarettes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New method to measure neutron star size uses modeling based on thermonuclear explosions
Neutron stars are made out of cold ultra-dense matter. How this matter behaves is one of the biggest mysteries in modern nuclear physics. Researchers developed a new method for measuring the radius of neutron stars which helps them to understand what happens to the matter inside the star under extreme pressure. A new method for measuring neutron star size was developed in a study led by a high-
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Ars Technica
Net neutrality supporters plan nationwide protests on December 7
Enlarge / Net neutrality supporters march past the FCC headquarters before a commission meeting on May 15, 2014. (credit: Getty Images | The Washington Post) The Obama administration's network neutrality rules are in danger , and the activists who helped get those regulations enacted aren't giving up without a fight. They're planning a series of protests nationwide to pressure the Federal Communi
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Ars Technica
Thirty years later, “Max Headroom” TV pirate remains at large
Enlarge / Not creepy at all. reader comments 22 Thirty years ago today, a person or persons unknown briefly hijacked the signal of two Chicago television stations, broadcasting a bizarre taped message from a man wearing a Max Headroom mask. The "broadcast intrusion" interrupted a primetime news broadcast from Chicago's WGN, and then (more successfully) the 11:00pm broadcast of Dr. Who on the Chic
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Underwater acoustic localization of marine mammals and vehicles
IMAGE: Elizaveta Dubrovinskaya during the experiment on a boat off the coast of Northern Israel. She was acquiring data from an underwater acoustic communication system using a 'rugged' computer, specifically designed... view more Credit: @IMDEA Networks Institute Researchers at IMDEA Networks (Spain) in collaboration with University of Haifa (Israel) have developed an underwater ac
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Growing teeth and a backbone: Studies trace early origins of skeletal tissues
WOODS HOLE, Mass.-- Two new studies on the evolutionary origin of teeth and of vertebra further illuminate the human connection to marine organisms that goes back millions of years. Both studies in the little skate ( Leucoraja erinacea ) are published this week by J. Andrew Gillis and Katharine Criswell of the University of Cambridge, U.K., who conduct research as Whitman Center Scientists at the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Increased use of ambulatory surgery centers for cataract surgery
ANN ARBOR, Mich. - National data shows a major shift in eye surgeries from hospitals to less expensive ambulatory surgery centers where care may be delivered faster and closer to home for some patients. Over the past decade the proportion of cataract surgeries performed at surgery centers increased steadily, reaching 73 percent in 2014, compared to 43.6 percent in 2001. University of Michigan
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Schizophrenia drug development may be 'de-risked' with new research tool
New York, November 22, 2017--Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and the New York State Psychiatric Institute (NYSPI) have identified biomarkers that can aid in the development of better treatments for schizophrenia. The findings were published online today in JAMA Psychiatry . In the past two decades, the pharmaceutical industry has spent over $2.5 billion to develop new sch
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Considerable gap exists in US between having hearing loss and receiving medical evaluation treatment
Bottom Line: Nearly a third of about 40 million adults in the United States who report hearing difficulties have not seen a specialist for their hearing problems. Why The Research Is Interesting: Hearing loss is extremely common and is associated with negative physical, social, cognitive, economic, and emotional consequences. Who and When : A representative sample of U.S. adults who participa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How common are new cancers in cancer survivors?
Bottom Line: One quarter of adults 65 or older and 11 percent of younger patients diagnosed with cancer from 2009 to 2013 had a prior cancer history. Why The Research Is Interesting: The number of cancer survivors in the United States is growing and is estimated to reach 26 million by 2040. Understanding how common a subsequent cancer is among patients with a history of cancer is important for
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Gizmodo
The Department of Defense Is Developing Plants That Are Spies
Image: Warner Bros. The US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency wants to bioengineer plants so that the military can turn foliage into spies. DARPA calls the Black Mirror -esque effort the Advanced Plant Technologies (APT) program . The end goal doesn’t appear to be developing a ficus that narcs on you, but rather organic “discreet, self-sustaining sensors” that can monitor and remotely repo
5h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
How can groups make good decisions? | Mariano Sigman and Dan Ariely
We all know that when we make decisions in groups, they don't always go right -- and sometimes they go very wrong. How can groups make good decisions? With his colleague Dan Ariely, neuroscientist Mariano Sigman has been inquiring into how we interact to reach decisions by performing experiments with live crowds around the world. In this fun, fact-filled explainer, he shares some intriguing result
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Research money central to Budget
Image copyright PA Image caption Mr Hammond was given a tour of the Crick Institute in London in October The Chancellor Philip Hammond has made investment in research the centrepiece of his budget. Mr Hammond said extra money for research announced last year would continue and be increased slightly. He also said that the government's target is to increase public and private research investment fr
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Feed: All Latest
'Vapor Wake' Explosive-Sniffing Dogs Help Protect the Thanksgiving Day Parade
As many as a million spectators turn out for the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade. Another 200,000 show up the night before to watch the enormous balloons inflate. Keeping New York City safe on an ordinary day is challenging enough; locking down a massive parade route is all the more so. But the New York Police Department has recently deployed a new secret weapon to counter body-worn bombs: A team
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ocean acidification affects mussels at early life stages
Two-day-old mussels larvae viewed by a polarizing microscope. Credit: F. Melzner, GEOMAR. Mussels are popular seafood in northern Germany. Mussels in their blue-black shells, are found in tidal regions of the coastal zones. Like many creatures in the oceans, which protect themselves with a calcareous shell from predators, mussels are endangered by the increasing acidification of seawater caused b
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Gizmodo
30 Years Later, the Max Headroom TV Hackers Remain at Large
For 25 seconds in 1987, in the middle of WGN-TV anchor Dan Roan’s sportscast, thousands of Chicagoans’ feeds were replaced with a low analog whine and the eery image of a masked man nodding over and over as if in a state of mania. “If you’re wondering what’s happened, so am I,” Roan said to his audience once WGN regained control of the signal. What he couldn’t have known is that the rest of the w
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Ingeniøren
Arup betaler ‘mindst 480 mio. kr’ i sag om ‘absurde’ trafikprognoser
Et godt engelsk udtryk - her i en lidt modereret udgave - siger, at ‘assumption is the mother of all screw-ups.’ Udtrykket er måske blevet brugt nogle gange hos rådgivningsfirmaet Arup på det sidste. Arups australske afdeling estimerede i 2008, hvilke trafikmængder, der kunne forventes på en ny betalingsvej i Brisbane i Australien. Estimatet faldt ikke synderligt heldigt ud. 89.000 færre bilister
5h
Inside Science
What Do Self-Driving Cars Really Need To Work Safely?
What Do Self-Driving Cars Really Need To Work Safely? 3-D camera technology gets behind the wheel of self-driving cars. What Do Self-Driving Cars Really Need To Work Safely? Video of What Do Self-Driving Cars Really Need To Work Safely? Technology Wednesday, November 22, 2017 - 08:45 Karin Heineman, Executive Producer (Inside Science) -- The race to develop self-driving cars is on. We’ve already
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Temple researchers identify genetic factors linked to acquired narrowing of the airway
IMAGE: Ahmed M.S. Soliman, M.D., Professor and Interim Chair of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, and Director of the Voice, Airway, and Swallowing Center at the Lewis Katz School of... view more Credit: Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University (Philadelphia, PA) - Endotracheal intubation, in which a tube is inserted through the voice box (larynx) into the windpipe, and tracheotom
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What are the likely effects of Brexit on UK regions?
A new Papers in Regional Science article that highlights the possible implications of Brexit for the UK and its regions notes that the results for the UK economy may not be as damaging as some forecasters say.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study examines which adolescents benefit most from sleep interventions
In a recent study of adolescents, the benefits of cognitive-behavioral sleep interventions were greatest among individuals with higher levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms. The results, which are published in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry , were consistent across genders. "We know there is a strong link between emotional problems, like anxiety and depression, and sleep probl
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Opening windows and doors may improve sleep
A recent Indoor Air study found that opening windows or doors before going to bed can reduce carbon dioxide levels in bedrooms and improve sleep quality. Participants subjective assessment of their sleep depth, which was obtained through questionnaires, correlated with carbon dioxide levels. Objectively measured sleep efficiency and number of awakenings, which were assessed through senses worn du
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
ID microstructure of stock useful in financial crisis
Every day, thousands of orders for selling or buying stocks are registered and processed within milliseconds. Electronic stock exchanges, such as NASDAQ, use what is referred to as microscopic modelling of the order flow - reflecting the dynamics of order bookings - to facilitate trading. The study of such market microstructures is a relatively new research field focusing on the trading interacti
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Ars Technica
Decades later, Vietnam vets may be silently fighting cancer-causing parasite
Enlarge / An adult Clonorchis sinensis . reader comments 8 A small pilot study hints that a startling number of Vietnam veterans may be infected with a liver parasite that can induce a rare type of cancer, the Associated Press reports . The study, conducted by the Northport VA Medical Center in New York, involved blood samples from 50 Vietnam veterans. Testing performed at Seoul National Universi
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Ars Technica
Chasing ‘Oumuamua—unfortunately human technology isn’t up to the task
Enlarge / An illustration of a New Horizons spacecraft atop an illustration of 'Oumuamua. Nothing is to scale. European Southern Observatory / M. Kornmesser reader comments 65 A little more than a month ago, an interstellar visitor now known as 'Oumuamua passed within 24 million kilometers of Earth. It is now moving rapidly away from the Sun at a velocity of approximately 26km/s. That is consider
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists identify new marker of arthritis in mice
Researchers have discovered a new marker of arthritis in mice that can be used non-invasively to both identify joints with established arthritis and to predict subsequent joint swelling. The finding is published in Arthritis & Rheumatology . The investigators note that imaging tests with the marker--called Ratiometric thrombin-Activatable Cell Penetrating Peptide--might help clinicians monitor th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In vitro fertilization linked with increased risk of congenital heart defects
A new analysis of published studies found a 45% increased risk of congenital heart defects in newborns when women become pregnant via in vitro fertilization (IVF)/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) than through spontaneous conception. The Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology analysis included 8 studies with 25,856 children obtained from IVF techniques and 287,995 children spontaneously co
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fine felted nanotubes
Extremely lightweight, electrically highly conductive, and more stable than steel: due to their unique properties, carbon nanotubes would be ideal for numerous applications, from ultra-lightweight batteries to high-performance plastics, right through to medical implants. However, to date it has been difficult for science and industry to transfer the extraordinary characteristics at the nano-scale
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Do education and poverty affect knee surgery success?
In an Arthritis Care & Research study of individuals who underwent total knee replacement, those who did not attend college had worse pain and function after two years if they lived in poor communities, but educational level was not linked with pain or function in wealthy communities. How education might protect those in impoverished communities warrants further study. "This study illustrates the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sclerosis medicine can fight multi-resistant bacteria
Encountering bacteria with innocent names such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacteriaceae can lead to hospitalisation and - in a worst-case scenario - can also be life-threatening. The bacteria, which cause infections such as pneumonia, frequently develop multi-resistance towards classic antibiotics. Researchers from Aarhus University have discovered that a drug known as glatiramer acetate,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bacteria as pacemaker for the intestine
IMAGE: The typical contraction pattern of the freshwater polyp Hydra: contraction and relaxation of the same animal over the course of three minutes. view more Credit: Animation: Andrea Murillo-Rincon, Dr. Alexander Klimovich Spontaneous contractions of the digestive tract play an important role in almost all animals, and ensure healthy bowel functions. From simple invertebrates to humans, there
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Smart people have better connected brains
Understanding the foundations of human thought is fascinating for scientists and laypersons alike. Differences in cognitive abilities - and the resulting differences for example in academic success and professional careers - are attributed to a considerable degree to individual differences in intelligence. A study just published in Scientific Reports shows that these differences go hand in hand w
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New research suggests high-intensity exercise boosts memory
The health advantages of high-intensity exercise are widely known but new research from McMaster University points to another major benefit: better memory. The findings could have implications for an aging population which is grappling with the growing problem of catastrophic diseases such as dementia and Alzheimer's. Scientists have found that six weeks of intense exercise--short bouts of interv
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Science | The Guardian
On the Iraq border archaeological digs are a minefield – in every sense
M odern conflict archaeology, the study of 20th and 21st century conflicts, is a new and slightly uncomfortable discipline in the world of archaeology. It’s problematic in a number of ways. Firstly, very little of it involves what most people would recognise as archaeology – digging up cultural material from the ground for study. Most of the material legacies of modern conflicts remain above grou
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Gizmodo
Filling a Turkey With Molten Aluminum Is a Terrible Way to Cook Thanksgiving Dinner
GIF Toss a turkey in the oven and it cooks from the outside in, which can take hours of roasting before it’s done. But what if you cooked a turkey from the inside out? That’s what Allen Pan tried by filling a raw turkey with molten aluminum and then letting the whole thing cook, cool, and solidify, en route to a friend’s Thanksgiving party. The results were, well, disastrous. It turns out there’s
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NYT > Science
Giving Thanks, but Not for Turkey-Powered Energy
Photo Turkeys on a farm near Sauk Centre, Minn. “Turkey litter is a good fuel,” said Steve Olson, executive director of the Minnesota Turkey Growers Association. “It’s a valuable resource.” Credit Janet Hostetter/Associated Press Want the latest climate news in your inbox? You can sign up here to receive Climate Fwd:, our new email newsletter. This is a story of loggers, an energy company and tur
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Seeds coated in a common pesticide might affect birds’ migration
MINNEAPOLIS — Pesticides that kill insects can also have short-term effects on seed-eating birds. Ingesting even small amounts of imidacloprid, a common neonicotinoid pesticide, can disorient migratory white-crowned sparrows, researchers report. Neonicotinoid pesticides were designed to be safer than traditional pesticides: toxic to insects, but comparatively harmless to other animals. But the ne
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Gizmodo
One of the Most Famous Movie Robots of All Time Just Sold for $5.4 Million
Photo: Bonhams Long before robots like R2-D2 or the Terminator hit the silver screen, a 1956 movie called Forbidden Planet featured a humanoid automaton that, in all likelihood, blew your grandparents’ minds. Robby the Robot might be primitive by today’s movie prop standards, but the three-piece costume is so iconic that it recently sold at a Bonhams auction in New York for a staggering $5,375,00
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Weight before pregnancy linked with children's neurodevelopment
A recent Obesity Reviews analysis of published studies found that, compared with children of normal weight mothers, children whose mothers were overweight or obese prior to pregnancy had 17% and 51% increased risks for compromised neurodevelopmental outcomes, respectively. Pre-pregnancy obesity was linked with a 62% increased risk of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, a 36% increased risk
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lower levels of microRNA 29 may protect from cardiac fibrosis rather than causing it
Cardiac fibrosis involves an increase of connective tissue in the cardiac muscle, causing a loss of function. A team of researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now discovered that microRNA 29 (miR-29) plays an important role in the formation of tissue fibrosis. They occur less frequently when miR-29 is suppressed in cardiac muscle cells. Older studies had suggested that it was
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ID microstructure of stock useful in financial crisis
Every day, thousands of orders for selling or buying stocks are registered and processed within milliseconds. Electronic stock exchanges, such as NASDAQ, use what is referred to as microscopic modelling of the order flow - reflecting the dynamics of order bookings - to facilitate trading. The study of such market microstructures is a relatively new research field focusing on the trading interacti
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ocean acidification affects mussels at early life stages
IMAGE: Two-day-old mussels larvae viewed by a polarizing microscope. view more Credit: Photo: F. Melzner, GEOMAR. Mussels are popular seafood in northern Germany. Mussels in their blue-black shells, are found in tidal regions of the coastal zones. Like many creatures in the oceans, which protect themselves with a calcareous shell from predators, mussels are endangered by the increasing acidificat
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cool lizards are better at learning socially
Bearded dragons which are incubated in colder environments are better at solving cognitive tasks as adults than incubated in warmer temperatures, according to new research published today. Scientists tested the social learning abilities of bearded dragons which had been incubated in either an average of 30°C or 27°C and found that those from the colder incubation environment picked up new skill
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lung cancer triggers pulmonary hypertension
IMAGE: Hypertension associated with lung cancer: In the diagram, a tumor is shown in the right lung. Histological comparison of two blood vessels shows dramatic thickening of the wall of the... view more Credit: MPI f. Heart and Lung Research Shortness of breath and respiratory distress often increase the suffering of advanced-stage lung cancer patients. These symptoms can be triggered by pulmona
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Towards better understanding of railway ballast
SNCF engineers have been using mathematical models for many years to simulate the dynamic behavior of railways. These models have not been able to take into account large portions of the track have been extremely limited at modelling ballast, the gravel layer located under railway tracks. This is why SNCF Innovation & Recherche asked for help from specialists in wave propagation for all types of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Numerical infinities and infinitesimals open new horizons in computations and give unexpected answers to 2 Hilbert problems
In the last issue of the prestigious journal EMS Surveys in Mathematical Sciences published by the European Mathematical Society there appeared a 102 pages long paper entitled "Numerical infinities and infinitesimals: Methodology, applications, and repercussions on two Hilbert problems" written by Yaroslav D. Sergeyev, Professor at Lobachevsky State University in Nizhni Novgorod, Russia and Disti
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Big data creates family tree of constitutions
IMAGE: A segment of the constitution family tree shows how founding documents and constitutional ideas evolve. view more Credit: Daniel Rockmore HANOVER, N.H. - Nov. 22, 2017 - Inspired by the challenge to see how ideas are shared between nation's through their founding documents, researchers at Dartmouth College have constructed a big data, evolutionary taxonomy of the world's constitutions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Low-salt & heart-healthy dash diet as effective as drugs for some adults with high blood pressure
A study of more than 400 adults with prehypertension, or stage 1 high blood pressure, found that combining a low-salt diet with the heart-healthy DASH diet substantially lowers systolic blood pressure -- the top number in a blood pressure test -- especially in people with higher baseline systolic readings. Results of the randomized clinical trial of the dietary combination, conducted by researche
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dark matter and dark energy: Do they really exist?
Researchers have hypothesized that the universe contains a 'dark matter.' They have also posited the existence of a 'dark energy.' These two hypotheses account for the movement of stars in galaxies and for the accelerating expansion of the universe. But -- according to a researcher at UNIGE -- these concepts may be no longer valid: the phenomena can be demonstrated without them. This research expl
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Big Think
Why This Priest Wants to Stop Using the Word" Christmas" and Replace It with Another
If you think Christmas has become largely about stressful gift-giving and a nearly two-month-long Christmas sales season, with little of Christ and his message, you are not alone. A Catholic priest from Ireland called on Christians to accept that they have “lost Christmas,” urging them to abandon the word completely. Why? Father Desmond O’Donnell believes that the word has lost all sacred mea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Big data creates family tree of constitutions
A segment of the constitution family tree shows how founding documents and constitutional ideas evolve. Credit: Daniel Rockmore Inspired by the challenge to see how ideas are shared between nation's through their founding documents, researchers at Dartmouth College have constructed a big data, evolutionary taxonomy of the world's constitutions. The analysis traces the textual ties that bind and h
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Ars Technica
Google Lens is coming to the Google Assistant in “the coming weeks”
Enlarge (credit: Google) Google will soon be extending the reach of Google Lens, its visual search interface. In a blog post , the company announced Lens would be integrated into the Google Assistant in the coming weeks. The feature is still exclusive to Pixel phones, but now it should be a lot easier to access. Google Lens came out in beta on the Google Pixel 2 , which launched last month. The s
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Feed: All Latest
'She’s Gotta Have It: Spike Lee’s Netflix Series Is a Defiant, Savvy Love-Fest
To consider anything about She’s Gotta Have It , the attentive Netflix series that modernizes Spike Lee’s 1986 debut feature of the same name, first requires one address its final episode. It’s Thanksgiving night and Nola Darling (DeWanda Wise), a Brooklyn painter and self-identified “polyamorous pansexual” with hypnotic charm, has summoned her three suitors to dinner. Up until this point, they’d
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Droplet explosion by shock waves, relevant to nuclear medicine
An arrow shooting through an apple, makes for a spectacular explosive sight in slow motion. Similarly, energetic ions passing through liquid droplets induce shock waves, which can fragment the droplets. In a study published in The European Physical Journal D , Eugene Surdutovich from Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan, USA with his colleagues from the MBN Research Centre, Frankfurt, Germany
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Felling pines: Doing it sooner rather than later is better for fynbos
Credit: Stellenbosch University Here is some advice for landowners who want to remove pine trees from their properties in the hope of seeing fynbos plants grow there again: if you have any choice in the matter, do so before the trees have grown there for more than 30 years. The longer you wait, the less likely the chances that any fynbos seeds will be left in the soil to sprout successfully. This
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists find why CP El Niño is harder to predict than EP El Niño
IMAGE: In addition to the eastern Pacific El Niño which we have been quite familiar with, a second El Niño in the central Pacific has emerged. view more Credit: Fei Zheng El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), which is one of the most striking interannual variabilities in the tropical Pacific, has been extensively studied for several decades. Understanding the changes in its characteristics is stil
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Droplet explosion by shock waves, relevant to nuclear medicine
In a study published in EPJ D, Eugene Surdutovich from Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan, USA and colleagues have examined the possibility of observing the multi-fragmentation of small droplets due to shock waves initiated by ions that passed through them. The discovery of ion-induced shock waves will significantly affect our understanding of how radiation damage occurs in biomolecules due t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The HLF-gene controls the generation of our long-term immune system
A research group at Lund University in Sweden has found that when the HLF (hepatic leukemia factor) gene -which is expressed in immature blood cells - does not shut down on time, we are unable to develop a functional long-term immune system. This could be a very early stage of leukemia. Blood stem cells give rise to all of our blood cells: the red blood cells that transport oxygen, the platelets
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Felling pines: Doing it sooner rather than later is better for fynbos
Here's some advice for landowners wanting to remove pine trees in the hope of seeing fynbos plants on their properties again: do so before the trees have grown there for more than 30 years. The longer they wait, the less likely the chances that any fynbos seeds will be left in the soil to sprout successfully, according to researchers from Stellenbosch University and the City of Cape Town, in the S
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Enhancing the quantum sensing capabilities of diamond
IMAGE: This photo shows a diamond sample illuminated by green light in home-built microscope. The sample is placed on a special mount, within a printed circuit board, used to deliver microwaves... view more Credit: (Credit: Yoav Romach) Researchers have discovered that dense ensembles of quantum spins can be created in diamond with high resolution using an electron microscopes, pavi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Do dark matter and dark energy exist?
Dark matter map of KiDS survey region (region G12). Credit: KiDS survey Researchers have hypothesized that the universe contains "dark matter." They have also posited the existence of "dark energy." These two hypotheses account for the movement of stars in galaxies and for the accelerating expansion of the universe. But according to a researcher at UNIGE, these concepts may be no longer valid, as
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Live Science
Charles Manson's Brain Probably Looked a Lot Like Yours
Charles Manson, the cult leader who organized a series of nine murders in 1969, is dead. And a lot of people want scientists to poke around in his brain. A lot of people — at least according to social media posts. I can't wait to see what they find when they disect Manson's brain — Alison Schneider (@Al_Schneezy) November 21, 2017 @MSNBC @CNN does anyone know if there is intenti
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Enhancing the quantum sensing capabilities of diamond
A diamond sample illuminated by green light in home-built microscope. The sample is placed on a special mount, within a printed circuit board, used to deliver microwaves which allow quantum manipulations and magnetic sensing with the NVs. Credit: Yoav Romach Researchers have discovered that dense ensembles of quantum spins can be created in diamond with high resolution using an electron microscop
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Popular Science
Six gadgets that work with your smart speaker to automate your home
The Google Home and Amazon Echo speakers make dumb homes smart in an instant, and for a relatively low price point—you can pick up the smallest members of the Home and Echo lines for $50 (or even less during sales season ). While both smart speakers can do an impressive number of tricks right out of the box, they're even more powerful if you sync them with third-party devices. To control a smart
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Dagens Medicin
Overblik: Sådan gik regionsrådsvalget
Få et overblik over, hvordan valget gik i de enkelte regioner.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A material with promising properties
The Collaborative Research Centre CRC 1214 at the University of Konstanz has developed a method for synthesising Europium (II) oxide nanoparticles - a ferromagnetic semiconductor that is relevant for data storage and data transport Ferromagnetic semiconductors have attracted increasing attention over the last decade. Their properties make them promising functional materials that can be used in th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A huge hydrogen generator at the Earth's core-mantle boundary
Splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen is a major theme in the development of clean, abundant energy source. A new study lead by an international research group revealed that when water meets the iron core of the Earth, the extremely high pressures and temperatures existing at the core-mantle boundary can naturally cause water to split into hydrogen and a super oxidized iron dioxide. Both the r
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Male escorts for women, couples demand grows: global survey
A global survey of 61 countries which host male escort websites found an emerging market for male escorts who count women and couples among their clients. Credit: QUT A quarter of Australia's 516 male escorts cater to women and couples, a global survey of the 61 countries which host online male escort websites has found. But Australia is well behind the United Kingdom in sites catering for women
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Gizmodo
I Let an $800 Alexa Robot Creep Around My House Like a Tiny, Mechanical Zombie
GIF All photos & GIFs: Andrew Liszewski/Gizmodo Have you ever fantasized about having the weather read to you every morning like it was a beautiful Shakespearean sonnet? That’s probably the best reason to choose UBTECH Robotics’ new Alexa-enabled Lynx robot over the Amazon Echo—that, or you’re very, very lonely. GIF Lynx’s glowing eyes let you know when the robot’s online, listening to your v
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Gizmodo
Here Are Your Black Friday Nest Discounts
Nest 3rd Gen Learning Thermostat | $199 | Amazon Nest Protect 2nd Gen Smoke + CO Alarm | $100 | Amazon Nest Cam Indoor Security Camera | $139 | Amazon Nest Cam Outdoor Security Camera | $149 | Amazon Nest’s iconic thermostats don’t go on sale often, and sizable discounts on their other products are even rarer still, so Black Friday really is the best time of year to join the ecosystem, or expand
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
High yield, protein with soybean gene
Harvesting soybean research plots with a plot combine. Credit: Brian Diers Leftovers can be quite valuable. For instance, when soybean seed is crushed and the oil extracted, what's left is called soybean meal. You'll want to save this leftover. Soybean meal contains high-quality protein. Globally, close to 98% of soybean meal produced is used in animal feed. The United Nations Food and Agricultur
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists open the door to the first direct measurement of Berry curvature in solid matter
This artist’s rendition features Berry curvature represented by the twisting ribbons at the top. Credit: Brian Long Berry curvature may not be the most well-known scientific concept, but to many physicists, its direct measurement is something akin to a holy grail. A powerful unifying principle in several branches of classical and quantum physics, Berry curvature is a strange and elusive quantum m
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Ars Technica
New paper makes the case that Mars is dry
Enlarge / Those dark streaks come and go with the seasons. We still don't know what causes them. reader comments 26 Mars clearly had extensive water in the past, and there's still plenty of it locked up as ice in glaciers and the polar ice caps. But the atmosphere is too thin and cold to allow liquid water to exist on the surface, which makes prospects for life on the Red Planet far less likely.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New X-ray spectroscopy explores hydrogen-generating catalyst
Using a newly developed technique and one of the world's most advanced X-ray sources, researchers from Japan, Germany and the US are studying enzymes that can produce hydrogen gas. Understanding these reactions could be important in developing a clean-fuel economy powered by hydrogen. Credit: Cramer Lab, UC Davis Using a newly developed technique, researchers from Japan, Germany and the U.S. have
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Ingeniøren
Fremtidens præcisionslandbrug sprøjter nanogødning på markerne
Når landmænd i dag skal kunstgøde markerne, kører de rundt på markerne med gødningsspredere, der strøer fosforgødningskorn ud på jorden. Desværre optager planterne kun 20-30 procent af fosforen. Når fremtidens præcisionslandbrug derimod skal gøde kornmarken, måler landmanden først med et håndholdt device, om planterne reelt har brug for fosfor. Hvis afgrøderne mangler fosfor, henter man sprøjten
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Scientific American Content: Global
Fly-By of Interstellar Asteroid Portends Quadrillion Trillion More in Galaxy
From its vantage on the 10,000-foot summit of Maui’s Haleakala, the Pan-STARRS project is tasked to find asteroids that might threaten our planet. Its cameras image a full seventh of the sky every night, sifting the firmament for hints of anything that moves or changes. On October 19, the project’s computers detected a fast-moving object on images taken the previous evening. An alert went out, an
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Live Science
Flat-Earther to Launch Himself in Homemade Steam Rocket Saturday
Well, this should liven up everyone's Thanksgiving weekend. A flat-Earth enthusiast who claims not to believe in science plans to launch himself 1,800 feet (550 meters) above California's Mojave Desert in a homemade steam rocket on Saturday (Nov. 25), the Associated Press reported . The daredevil, 61-year-old limo driver "Mad" Mike Hughes, built the rocket and its launch ramp himsel
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Dagens Medicin
Psykiatrilisten fik ét mandat, 15 mio. kr. og en plads i forretningsudvalget
Med godt 20.000 stemmer fra borgere i Region Midtjylland sikrede Psykiatrilisten sig en plads i regionsrådet og forretningsudvalget. Med sig hjem fik den også mange millioner til en opnormering af personale og senge.
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The Scientist RSS
Different Alcoholic Drinks Tied to Different Moods
An online survey finds that people report feeling most relaxed with a glass of red wine or beer, and most aggressive when drinking spirits.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The brains of children with a better physical fitness possess a greater volume of gray matter
IMAGE: Brain regions showing independent positive associations of cardiorespiratory fitness and speed-agility with gray matter volume in overweight and obese children. view more Credit: UGR Researchers from the University of Granada (UGR) have proven, for the first time in history, that physical fitness in children may affect their brain structure, which in turn may have an influence on their aca
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Strong hosts help parasites spread farther
Large, physically strong Masu salmon disperse farther when infected with parasites, potentially escaping from further infections at the contaminated site but ironically resulting in the greater expansion of the parasite, according to Hokkaido University researchers. Infected hosts are the "vehicle" of sluggish parasites, and their dispersal behavior largely determines the extent parasites spread
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
High yield, protein with soybean gene
IMAGE: These are soybean crossing plots from trials in Urbana, Illinois. view more Credit: Brian Diers Leftovers can be quite valuable. For instance, when soybean seed is crushed and the oil extracted, what's left is called soybean meal. You'll want to save this leftover. Soybean meal contains high-quality protein. Globally, close to 98% of soybean meal produced is used in animal feed
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate change models of bird impacts pass the test
A major study looking at changes in where UK birds have been found over the past 40 years has validated the latest climate change models being used to forecast impacts on birds and other animals. Led by the University of Adelaide, in collaboration with an international team of researchers, the scientists compared forecasts from ecological models with observed changes to the bird populations - and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Preliminary stages of dementia reduce human face memorization ability
IMAGE: [LEFT] Patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) have a significantly reduced ability to memorize faces in comparison to healthy controls (HCs). [RIGHT] The gaze pattern of MCI patients (yellow) is... view more Credit: Toshikazu Kawagoe A Japanese research group has revealed that elderly people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) have a particularly weakened ability to memorize human
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New X-ray spectroscopy explores hydrogen-generating catalyst
IMAGE: Using a newly developed technique and one of the world's most advanced X-ray sources, researchers from Japan, Germany and the US are studying enzymes that can produce hydrogen gas. Understanding... view more Credit: Cramer Lab, UC Davis Using a newly developed technique, researchers from Japan, Germany and the U.S. have identified a key step in production of hydrogen gas by a bacterial enz
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
HIV-positive adults receive inferior cardiovascular care compared with those without HIV
People with both HIV and risk factors for heart disease and stroke were less likely to be treated with cholesterol-lowering statin drugs and aspirin than patients without HIV. The researchers believe this to be the first national study comparing statin use in patients with and without HIV and the first extensive analysis using U.S. data. Statins and aspirin are frequently recommended to reduce th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hidden properties of solids
Berry curvature may not be the most well-known scientific concept, but to many physicists, its direct measurement is something akin to a holy grail. A powerful unifying principle in several branches of classical and quantum physics, Berry curvature is a strange and elusive quantum mechanical property of solids. It governs the dynamics of the motion of charges in semiconductors yet itself cannot b
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Gizmodo
New Game of Thrones Rumors Set the Stage for A Major Battle to Come
We’ve got even more confirmation that an actor from the original Star Wars trilogy will not be in The Last Jedi . Arrow has an unlikely guest star this week. There’s forking good news for The Good Place . Plus, new footage from the big CW/DC crossover, and Terry Gilliam talks The Man Who Killed Don Quixote . To me, my spoilers! Star Wars: The Last Jedi Despite the fact we’ve known if for over hal
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Feed: All Latest
This Thanksgiving, Reunite With Your Long-Lost Family—Old Videogames
Tucked away in my mother's house, somewhere in the room that used to be mine, is a Nintendo GameCube that's not mine. My own GameCube is God-knows-where—languishing on some GameStop warehouse shelf, or in someone's garage, buried beneath an electric drill after an impulsive used-game purchase in the late 2000s. But this other GameCube, the one that's there now? I have no idea how it got into my r
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Futurity.org
Food cues boost our cravings but not our pleasure
Food cues—like smelling French fries or seeing photos of them on a menu display—can amp up our hunger and cravings, but not our enjoyment. “Food-related cues can make people want or crave food more, but don’t have as much of an impact on their liking, or the pleasure they get from eating the food,” says Michelle Joyner, a psychology graduate student at the University of Michigan and the study’s l
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Army scientist studies thunderstorms to improve battlefield missions
An Army scientist working at the Army Research Laboratory has discovered a new pattern in the evolution of thunderstorms that can be used to better predict how weather and the environment will affect Army assets such as unmanned aerial systems on the battlefield. Dr. Xiping Zeng, ARL meteorologist, recently presented his research at the 2017 NASA Precipitation Measurement Meeting, where he discus
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rainfall can indicate that mosquito-borne epidemics will occur weeks later
IMAGE: The Aedes aegypti mosquito, which carries the Zika and Chikungunya viruses. view more Credit: James Gathany/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention A new study demonstrates that outbreaks of mosquito-borne viruses Zika and Chikungunya generally occur about three weeks after heavy rainfall. Researchers also found that Chikungunya will predominate over Zika when both circulate at the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Army scientist studies thunderstorms to improve battlefield missions
IMAGE: ARL meteorologist Dr. Xiping Zeng works in ARL's Atmospheric Modeling Branch located at the lab's headquarters in Adelphi, Md. view more Credit: Jhi Scott, ARL Photographer ADELPHI, Md. -- An Army scientist working at the Army Research Laboratory has discovered a new pattern in the evolution of thunderstorms that can be used to better predict how weather and the environment will affect Arm
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
To forget or to remember? Memory depends on subtle brain signals, scientists find
IMAGE: Professor Ron Davis, co-chair of the Department of Neuroscience at TSRI. view more Credit: The Scripps Research Institute JUPITER, Fla. - Nov. 21, 2017 - The fragrance of hot pumpkin pie can bring back pleasant memories of holidays past, while the scent of an antiseptic hospital room may cause a shudder. The power of odors to activate memories both pleasing and aversive exists in many anim
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Gizmodo
Cassini Swan Song Image of Saturn Left Me Speechless
Planets and robots lack hearts and minds, but they’re especially good at impacting ours. In its last days before ending itself, human-built Cassini turned around and snapped this farewell mosaic image of Saturn. Its title: “Farewell to Saturn.” I don’t have the words to accurately describe the photo’s sublimity. I suggest you take a minute to view it full screen—and you might be left speechless,
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Live Science
Rare 400-Year-Old Map Traces Indigenous Roots in Mexico
This 1593 map shows southern Puebla from the church of Todos Santos (now northeast of Mexico City) and Lake Texcoco, to the church of Santa Cruz Huitziltepec, Pue (lower right). The map also reveals the genealogy and land ownership for the Nahuatl "de Leon" family from 1480 to 1593. Credit: Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division A rare, indigenous-made map of Mexico from the era of the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New technology will help blind people 'see' at the cinema
Credit: shutterstock Sight loss affects around two million people in the UK, a number that is likely to increase to four million by 2050 . Losing sight can of course change many areas of a person's life – even seemingly insignificant things like being able to watch a good film or a new programme on television. A recent survey of over 100 visually impaired people found that 34% hadn't attended the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Towards better understanding of railway ballast
Amplitude of the displacement field after a train passes on the track. The left-hand figure corresponds to a simulation with homogeneous ballast and the right-hand image to a simulation with heterogeneous ballast. Credit: Lucio de Abreu Corrêa, Laboratoire de Mécanique des Sols, Structures et Matériaux (CNRS/CentraleSupélec) SNCF engineers have been using mathematical models for many years to sim
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tax plastic takeaway boxes, the scourge of the oceans
Credit: Shutterstock/wk1003mike That takeaway box that was in your hands for 10 minutes on Friday night could be in the ocean forever. Single use plastics are a real concern for the planet. The use and throwaway nature of items such as food packaging and drinks bottles means that millions of tons of plastic waste are created. Unfortunately, much of this can enter waterways and oceans. This week,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How drones are being used in Zanzibar's fight against malaria
Makame Makame from the Zanzibar Malaria Elimination Programme holds one of the drones used to map malaria vectors. Credit: Andy Hardy On a typically hot and humid July day in Stonetown, the capital of Zanzibar, a gaggle of children, teenagers and the odd parents watched our small drone take flight. My colleagues Makame Makame, Khamis Haji and I had finally found the perfect launch spot. With a hi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bacteria as pacemaker for the intestine
The typical contraction pattern of the freshwater polyp Hydra: Contraction and relaxation of the same animal over the course of three minutes. Credit: Andrea Murillo-Rincon, Dr. Alexander Klimovich Spontaneous contractions of the digestive tract play an important role in almost all animals, and ensure healthy bowel functions. From simple invertebrates to humans, there are consistently similar pat
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Big Think
8 Harvard University Courses You Can Take Right Now, for Fre
Last week, we published an article outlining how you can take Yale university courses for free, right now . Given the response to that article, we have decided to show you more classes that you can access at no cost. Just like last time, a certificate of completion is available for all of these classes for a fee, if you want to prove that you have bettered yourself this way. So, here are 8 Harvar
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Science | The Guardian
Divine intervention: yes, water companies using dowsing really is that bad
OK, so most UK water companies have people who use divining rods to find leaks and burst pipes , although many have since back-pedalled on these admission s since the story broke, thanks to the sterling work of science writer Sally Le Page, who deserves all credit for it. Understandable perhaps; if you were a major utility provider earning millions by providing an essential resource to large popu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Re-cloning of first cloned dog deemed successful thus far
The three surviving reclones at 2 month of age. They were dervived by SCNT of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) taken from Snuppy at five years of age. Credit: Scientific Reports (2017). DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-15328-2 (Phys.org)—A team of researchers with Seoul National University, Michigan State University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has re-cloned the first do
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Third Roman temple in Silchester may have been part of emperor's vanity project
Credit: University of Reading A Roman temple uncovered in a Hampshire farmyard by University of Reading archaeologists may be the first building of its kind in Britain to be dated back to the reign of Emperor Nero. The temple remains were found within the grounds of the Old Manor House in the Roman town at Silchester, along with rare tiles stamped with the name of the emperor, who ruled AD54-68.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tropical Cyclone Information System updated to include new satellite data sets
The Tropical Cyclone Information System (TCIS) is a tool that fuses hurricane models and observations within a web-based system to improve forecasting capabilities. TCIS provides scientists with the capability to overlay user-selected observational data on top of a variety of user-selected model predictions, and to perform online analysis of models and observations. TCIS required development of pr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change may be making bearded dragons less intelligent
Central bearded dragon. Credit: Greg Hume/Wikipedia/CC BY-SA 3.0 (Phys.org)—A team of researchers affiliated with the University of Lincoln in the U.K. has found evidence suggesting that as the planet heats up due to global warming, the bearded dragon may become less intelligent. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science , the group describes exposing incubating bearded d
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
White meat or dark meat? Serving up big data to decipher Thanksgiving dinner
Will Stone, Cat Hayes, and Duke Nguyen talk turkey as they review data from the mass spectrometer. Credit: Virginia Tech For Virginia Tech biochemistry majors Cat Hayes, Duke Nguyen, and Will Stone, turkey has taken on a whole new meaning. The three, along with their General Biochemistry classmates, were challenged by Richard Helm, an associate professor in the College of Agriculture and Life Sci
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Ars Technica
The McLaren Formula 1 team just hired the World’s Fastest Gamer
Enlarge / 25-year-old Rudy Van Buren beat out 30,000 gamers to win a year's contract with the McLaren F1 team as its new simulator driver. McLaren reader comments 32 After an exhausting week of fitness tests, engineering debriefs—plus plenty of racing games—the McLaren F1 team has crowned Rudy Van Buren from Leystad, Netherlands as the World's Fastest Gamer. More than just a fancy title and bragg
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New Scientist - News
Let’s hope chickless penguin colony can come back from the brink
Better times ahead? Wayne Lynch/Getty By Olive Heffernan For the Adélie penguins on Petrel Island in East Antarctica, this is a critical moment. It is early summer and adult birds are returning in their tens of thousands to breed. If all goes well, the island should soon be abuzz with the squawks of raucous chicks calling for food. Taking turns to waddle and slide across the ice, their parent
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Dagens Medicin
Kristian Rørbæk Madsen: Møde med ledelsen var et forsøg på at knægte min ytringsfrihed
Overlæge Kristian Rørbæk Madsen, der i debatindlæg har været kritisk over for ledelsen på OUH i forbindelse med Svendborg-sagen, siger nu direkte, at ‘kammeratlig samtale’ var et forsøg på at knægte hans ytringsfrihed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Testing the advantage of being left-handed in sports
Credit: CC0 Public Domain (Phys.org)—Sports scientist Florian Loffing with the Institute of Sport Science, University of Oldenburg in Germany has conducted a study regarding the possibility of left-handed athletes having an advantage over their right-handed counterparts. In his paper published in the journal Biology Letters , Loffing describes assembling data on athletes from several sports, anal
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What can albatross poo tell us about climate change?
Sometimes science leads to unexpected places. Just ask Julie McInnes. She measures the effects of climate change by studying fresh albatross poo. If there is one quality that scientists possess, it's dedication. They train for years, mastering complex concepts and theories, all in pursuit of answering the universe's questions. Sometimes these questions lead to … unexpected places. Just ask Dr
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Ingeniøren
Batterier fryses i nitrogen for at finde mikroskopiske fejl
En nobelprisvindende metode kan give svar på, hvorfor lithium-ion-batterier svigter. Det indebærer, at de skal fryses og undersøges på atomart niveau.
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Gut Sweet Home
Researchers describe more than 200 species of tapeworm from a decade-long collection of tapeworms from the digestive systems of animals around the world.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
To succeed, large ocean sanctuaries need to benefit both sea life and people
Credit: Rebecca Gruby, CC BY-ND There is growing concern that the world's oceans are in crisis because of climate change , overfishing , pollution and other stresses. One response is creating marine protected areas , or ocean parks, to conserve sea life and key habitats that support it, such as coral reefs. In 2000, marine protected areas covered just 0.7 percent of the world's oceans. Today 6.4
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Popular Science
Different kinds of alcohol might make you feel different emotions
Humans have been buddies with booze for thousands of years. Some scientists believe this love affair goes back even further. The so-called drunken monkey hypothesis speculates that our ancestors possessed an unusual knack for consuming ethanol without keeling over dead, allowing them to access the sweet, sweet caloric payloads of rotting, fermenting fruit. But we’ve come a long way from merely to
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Futurity.org
These genes could save soybeans from sudden death
Researchers have found a gene in the plant Arabidopsis that could protect soybeans from diseases, like sudden death syndrome, that plague the plant. “We think we may find that multiple genes working together will build the resistance levels…” Madan Bhattacharyya, a professor of agronomy at Iowa State University and lead author of the study, says his current research points toward several Arabidop
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Standardised tests are culturally biased against rural students
Credit: shutterstock It is generally reported that rural students are up to one and a half years behind their metropolitan peers in the National Assessment Program – Literacy and Numeracy ( NAPLAN ) and Programme for International Student Assessment ( PISA ) tests. They are also less likely to complete year 12, and half as likely to go to university. However, there are two key problems with how t
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Dagens Medicin
Vicedirektør er optimistisk efter møde med styrelsen
Efter tirsdagens møde mellem Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed og 13 hospitalsdirektører fra Region Sjælland, er vicedirektør Knut Borch-Johnsen optimistisk med hensyn til at finde fælles løsninger.
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New Scientist - News
Making your brain cells longer could help ward off Alzheimer’s
Mental acuity plays a part Madeline Gray/The Palm Beach Post/Zumapress.com/Alamy By Clare Wilson RESISTANCE isn’t futile, especially when it comes to Alzheimer’s. Some people’s brains can withstand the ravages of the disease by elongating the connections between brain cells – a process that seems to counter mental decline. Now we need to understand why some brains can respond to the disease i
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Feed: All Latest
The TSA Is Testing New Scanners to Make Airport Security More Efficient
It’s that time of year again. Prepare for inspection. Get to the airport hours early, just to stand in line with other sleep-deprived travelers. March forward, splay open your belongings. Separate your valuable electronics and leak-prone liquids into trays. Try to ignore the frustrated tutting of the guy behind you. This is the airport TSA shuffle we all know and abhor. But now, thanks to new tec
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Ars Technica
Facebook (still) lets housing advertisers exclude users by race
Enlarge / The Facebook sign and logo at its Menlo Park, California, headquarters. Josh Edelson/Getty Images reader comments 108 This article originally appeared on ProPublica on November 21, 2017. It has been lightly edited. In February, Facebook said it would step up enforcement of its prohibition against discrimination in advertising for housing, employment, or credit. But our tests showed a si
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Underwater acoustic localization of marine mammals and vehicles
Elizaveta Dubrovinskaya during the experiment on a boat off the coast of Northern Israel. She was acquiring data from an underwater acoustic communication system using a “rugged” computer, specifically designed to operate reliably in harsh usage environments and conditions. Credit: IMDEA Networks Institute Researchers at IMDEA Networks (Spain) in collaboration with University of Haifa (Israel) ha
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
2017 hurricanes and aerosols simulation
Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Tracking the aerosols carried on the winds let scientists see the currents in our atmosphere. This visualization follows sea salt, dust, and smoke from July 31 to November 1, 2017, to reveal how these particles are transported across the map. The first thing that is noticeable is how far the particles can travel. Smoke from fires in the Pacific Northwest
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Finns want to look for remains of Arctic meteorite (Update)
The remains of a blazing meteorite that lit up the dark skies of the Arctic last week are believed scattered near a lake in northern Finland, amateur Finnish astronomers said Wednesday. The Ursa astronomical association says their calculations show the parts would have crashed in a remote area near the Norwegian and Russian borders. The meteorite—which Norwegian scientists said gave "the glow o
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BBC News - Science & Environment
How dinosaur scales became bird feathers
Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Birds and alligators are closely related, both belonging to the Allosaur group The genes that caused scales to become feathers in the early ancestors of birds have been found by US scientists. By expressing these genes in embryo alligator skin, the researchers caused the reptiles' scales to change in a way that may be similar to how the earliest feathers
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A material with promising properties
Researchers at the University of Konstanz have developed a method for synthesising Europium (II) oxide nanoparticles, a ferromagnetic semiconductor that is relevant for data storage and data transport Ferromagnetic semiconductors are promising functional materials that can be used in the field of spin-based electronics (spintronics). Spintronics is of crucial importance for the storage and transp
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Futurity.org
Oil from cinnamon drives fat cells to burn energy
Cinnamaldehyde, an essential oil that gives cinnamon its flavor, may improve metabolic health, researchers report. The ingredient induces fat cells, or adipocytes, to start burning energy through a process called thermogenesis, the research finds. Scientists had previously observed that cinnamaldehyde appeared to protect mice against obesity and hyperglycemia. But the mechanisms underlying the ef
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Gizmodo
The Philips OneBlade For $17 Might Be the Best Deal In the History of Shaving
Philips Norelco OneBlade , $17 The Philips Norelco OneBlade is the shaver of choice for every guy on our staff, and Amazon’s offering an unprecedented 50% discount on it for Black Friday. If you aren’t familiar with this thing yet, Shane shared his thoughts about it on Lifehacker Gear : I’m pretty blown away by the Philips OneBlade. I was expecting a deconstructed electric razor or a souped up Gi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Discovery of cigar-shaped asteroid from outer space could help unveil secrets of extrasolar worlds
Artist’s impression of the enigmatic space rock. Credit: ESO/M. Kornmesser, CC BY-SA It came from outer space … and went back there two weeks later, having astonished and excited astronomers and planetary scientists. A cigar-shaped object, less than half a kilometre long and barely bright enough to be detected by the world's most powerful telescopes, paid us a flying visit in October this year –
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why scientific monitoring of the effects of industry on priceless WA rock art is inadequate
The Burrup Peninsula, or Murujuga, contains over a million individual works of rock art by the Yaburara people. Credit: Shutterstock.com Scientific studies used to monitor the impact of industry on Aboriginal rock art in north west Western Australia are inadequate, potentially exposing more than a million individual artworks to damage, according to a recent paper published by myself and co-author
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The secret to turtle hibernation is butt-breathing
Turtles can’t head south for the winter, so they hibernate in rivers, lakes and ponds. Credit: Pexels To breathe or not to breathe, that is the question. What would happen if you were submerged in a pond where the water temperature hovered just above freezing and the surface was capped by a lid of ice for 100 days? Well, obviously you'd die. And that's because you're not as cool as a turtle.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Which square is bigger? Honeybees see visual illusions like humans do
Flowers may take advantage of visual illusions to attract bees. Credit: www.shutterstock.com When a human looks at a distant skyscraper, it appears small to the eye. It's a visual illusion, and we use other contextual information to know the building is actually tall. Our new study shows, for the first time, that honeybees see size-based visual illusions too. Whether a size illusion is seen, or n
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What we know about medicanes—hurricane-like storms in the Mediterranean
A Mediterranean “hurricane” named Numa struck Greece last week. Credit: NASA A rare type of storm struck Greece last week, killing at least 20 people and reportedly damaging 1,000 homes with flash floods and mudslides. Photos of the storm, named Numa, showed clouds swirling around a central eye. It's the type of storm we're accustomed to seeing in the tropical waters of the Atlantic and Pacific O
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Futurity.org
How to cheer up a dolphin in captivity
Researchers have created a new program to help a dolphin in captivity named Moonshine feel more comfortable. Although a chronic liver problem has confined Moonshine to human care for the rest of his life, a research team that includes University of Florida professor of psychology Nicole Dorey and alumna Barbara Perez has developed an enrichment program that includes several custom-made toys. Pere
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Science | The Guardian
The media has a problem with alcoholism – and it's stopping people getting help
The term alcoholism has long been retired from official alcohol clinical and policy guidance , abandoned as a reductionist and stigmatising label for problem drinking. Instead, alcohol use disorders , some including varying degrees of dependency, reflect the wider continuum nature of alcohol problems. Despite this, inappropriate references to “alcoholics” are ubiquitous in everyday narratives inc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Methane bubbles are effect and cause of rise in temperature
Credit: Radboud University Nijmegen Due to climate change, more methane is bubbling up from lakes, ponds, rivers and wetlands throughout the world. The release of methane, a potent greenhouse gas, leads to a further increase in temperature, thus creating a vicious circle. This is the conclusion of a team of biologists led by Radboud University in an article published in Nature Communications on 2
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What airline passengers want most—to get through security quickly
Expedited screenings carry a minimal risk to passenger safety, according to researchers. Credit: Photo/iStock The Transportation Security Administration should consider expanding expedited screening measures like TSA Precheck for airline passengers, according to a new study in the journal Risk Analysis . "A value-measure for public sector enterprise risk management: A TSA case study" was co-autho
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Ars Technica
Aston Martin’s DB11 looks like a million bucks, only costs a quarter of that
reader comments 34 Video shot and edited by Justin Wolfson. Click here for transcript. To the casual observer, Aston Martin cars might all look the same. A long hood. Voluptuous curves over the wheels. That iconic grille. It's a design language that you can trace back through the decades to the 1950s. Sixty years later that formula is still being obeyed, but it would be a mistake to think that ma
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why are global CO2 emissions on the rise again?
The annual Carbon Budget report found that, after remaining steady between 2014-16, fossil fuel emissions are on the rise again in 2017, says atmospheric sciences professor Atul Jain. Credit: L. Brian Stauffer Illinois atmospheric scientist Atul Jain was among the many scientists worldwide who contributed data to the Global Carbon Budget 2017, released Nov. 13. Jain talked about this year's findi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Virtual and augmented reality technologies influence consumers' eating experiences
Could health-promoting foods be made more appealing by using digital tools to enhance consumers' eating experiences? VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has used Virtual Reality (VR) to amplify such experiences. VR immersion had significant effects on brain signals and consumers' evaluations of the pleasantness of their eating situation and emotional responses. Healthy and nutritious foods a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Strong hosts help parasites spread farther
Young Masu salmon, the host of Margaritifera laevis. The circled inset shows the gill of a Masu salmon infected with parasites. The white dots are larvae of the freshwater mussel. Credit: Hokkaido University Large, physically strong Masu salmon disperse farther when infected with parasites, potentially escaping from further infections at the contaminated site but ironically resulting in the great
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Science-Based Medicine
New Tools Against Antibiotic Resistance
Antibiotic resistance is a serious problem that may lead to a post-antibiotic era. However, there are potential solutions that deserve research priority.
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The Atlantic
Turkeys Are Twice as Big as They Were in 1960
A turkey today is not the turkey of yesteryear. For decades, animal breeders have been transforming the genomes of turkeys to make them grow larger. Since 1960, the weight of turkeys has gone up about a quarter of a pound each year. The average weight of a turkey has gone from 15.1 pounds in 1960 to 31.1 pounds in 2017. Average Turkey Weight 1960-2016 Average turkey weight at slaughter, according
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How carbon farming can help solve climate change
Farmers in Virginia check the outcome of their no-till farming practices. Credit: USDA, CC BY Under the 2015 Paris Agreement, nations pledged to keep the average global temperature rise to below 2C above pre-industrial levels and to take efforts to narrow that increase to 1.5C. To meet those goals we must not only stop the increase in our greenhouse gas emissions, we must also draw large amounts
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Dagens Medicin
Ulla Astman fortsætter som formand i Nordjylland
Socialdemokratiet fik 41,6 pct. af stemmerne ved regionsrådsvalget i Nordjylland.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How an iconic photograph of an apple inspired an improved cellular analysis
A proven method simplified: many cells flow through parallel loops, allowing them to be measured together instead of one after another. Credit: deMello Group/Chem Identifying a small number of pathogenic cells among many millions of cells is tricky. Researchers at ETH Zurich have now developed a technology that is able to identify enormous quantities of cell properties on a small scale, individua
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The Archaeologists Saving Miami's History From the Sea
This story originally appeared on CityLab and is part of the Climate Desk collaboration. When Hurricane Irma sprinted toward Miami-Dade County, Jeff Ransom couldn’t sleep. He wasn’t just worried about gusts shattering windows, or sheets of rain drowning the highway—that’s far from unusual near his home in Broward County, where extreme weather verges on routine, and patches of U.S. 1 are regularly
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Would You Put the Genetically Modified Arctic Apple in Your Pie?
On the last Monday of September, 32 field workers stepped onto a 15-acre experimental plot in an undisclosed part of Washington and made apple harvest history. The fruits they plucked from each tree were only a few months old. But they were two decades and millions of dollars in the making. And when they landed, pre-sliced and bagged on grocery store shelves earlier this month, they became the fi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA's TSIS-1 keeps an eye on sun's power over ozone
Light can be split into many wavelengths and a rainbow illustrates this in visible light. Each color is a different wavelength of light. NASA’s TSIS- 1 will see more than 1,000 wavelength bands of sunlight reaching the top of the atmosphere, including light we cannot sense with our eyes. Credit: Matthew Almon Roth (via Creative Commons) High in the atmosphere, above weather systems, is a layer of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The benefits of being a total space cadet
Space research. What's it ever done for me? Well, quite a bit as it turns out ... It's official— Australia is getting a space agency . But what does that mean to us on the ground? Well, as it turns out, a lot . I spoke with Glen Nagle of the Canberra Deep Space Communication Complex (a collaboration between CSIRO and NASA) to find out about how research into space travel benefits us down here o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Singapore to deploy driverless buses from 2022: minister
Singapore has so far avoided the massive traffic jams choking other Asian cities like Manila and Jakarta Driverless buses will appear on some roads in Singapore from 2022 as part of plans to improve mobility in the land-scarce city-state, its transport minister said Wednesday. Singapore has so far avoided the massive traffic jams that choke other Asian cities like Manila and Jakarta by imposing r
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Scientific American Content: Global
Black Hole Pretenders May Be Superfast-Spinning Pulsars
Identifying black holes isn’t a matter of simply finding an empty spot in space. These massive objects can famously swallow everything—even light—that could proffer obvious signs of their presence. Scientists seeking them out must rely on more circumstantial evidence, which comes from the fact black holes are messy eaters: As material funnels into one, it piles up into a spinning disk of glow
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Dagens Medicin
Psykiatrilisten kommer med i aftale i Midtjylland
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sexual assault worse for those who don't attend college
One in four women in the United States will experience forced intercourse by the time they're 44, and the risk is greater for women who have attended little or no college compared to those who attend four or more years of college. Women who have attended little or no college are at about 2.5 times greater risk for experiencing forced intercourse. About 8 percent of men report forced intercourse,
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Ingeniøren
Amerikaner ændrer sine gener for at få større muskler
I sidste måned fik biokemikeren Josiah Zayner nok sine følgere på Facebook til spærre øjnene op. Under en livesending tog han et hætteglas med klar væske og en kanyle, og så sprøjtede han væsken ind i sig. Væsken indeholdt Crispr-komponenter, der skal øge hans muskelstyrke ved at fjerne genet for myostatin, som regulerer muskelvæksten. Ifølge tidsskriftet New Scientist er Josiah Zayner dermed det
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Live Science
How Did This Weird, Super-Salty Pond Form in Antarctica?
At the bottom of the world, in a frigid Antarctic desert, sits a weird pond only a few inches deep that is so salty, it stays liquid even at temperatures of minus 58 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 50 degrees Celsius). The source of the pond's unusually heavy and pure load of salt has been a geochemical mystery since it was discovered during a 1961 expedition. Scientists had generally assumed tha
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Live Science
Man Develops Rare Infection 30 Years After First Exposure
An uncommon fungal infection appears to have lingered in one man's body for 30 years before making itself known in his brain — and a heart transplant may have played a role in making him sick, a new report of the man's case reveals. The 70-year-old man was diagnosed with histoplasmosis, an infection caused by inhaling the spores of a fungus called Histoplasma capsulatum . Histoplasma is
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Live Science
Here Come the Macy's Balloons, There Goes Our Helium?
On Thanksgiving, enormous balloons of popular characters from cartoons, comics and animated TV shows and movies make their much-anticipated appearance in a stately procession down New York City avenues, part of the traditional Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, now in its 91st year. Helium is what keeps these balloons aloft — approximately 300,000 cubic feet (8,495 cubic meters) of helium, Liv
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pore-scale wetting patterns and antecedent soil moisture alter carbon dynamics at every scale
Soils are the Earth's largest terrestrial reservoir of carbon. It is important to know how soil carbon is stored in a "sink" and how it is released into the atmosphere as a "source." Understanding that requires studying soil microorganisms, including where they live, and their access to stored carbon for food. When microbes have access to carbon and oxygen, they decompose those elements into carb
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The YouTube Celebrity Taking the H-1B Visa Fight Public
When he uploaded his first YouTube video, there was no way Kumar could have expected that he’d become a public face of H-1B visas: an advocate—and a whistleblower—for a way of life he can barely tolerate. On his channel, Kumar Exclusive , Kumar serves as an everyman narrator of the experience of recipients of the coveted H-1B skilled worker visa, which allows foreign workers to fill technical job
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Ingeniøren
Skype smidt ud af Kina: Fjernet fra App Store
Skype er en af flere tjenester, der er blevet smidt ud af Apples App Store i Kina, fordi de ikke overholder lokal lov. Det skriver Reuters . En talsperson fra Apple siger til nyhedbureauet, at Kinas ministerium for offentlig sikkerhed mener, at en række apps, der tilbyder opkald over internettet, forbryder sig mod lovgivningen. »Derfor er disse apps blevet fjernet fra App Store i Kina,« lyder det
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Scientific American Content: Global
Puppy-Dog Eyes May Have Evolved in Stages
When a dog gazes deeply into the eyes of its human, a powerful bond forms. The extended eye contact triggers the same hormone response that helps human mothers bond with their babies. As the dog stares, the hormone oxytocin floods the owner’s brain, causing him or her to lavish attention on the canine, which experiences a similar spike in the hormone and proceeds to stare even harder—and on it go
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Declines in population don't always reflect quality of life, according to sociologist
This map shows the locations of 12 Iowa towns, marked by stars inside green circles, determined to be “shrink-smart.” Credit: David Peters You can still live large in a small town. A new report from an Iowa State University sociologist identifies a dozen Iowa towns where residents believe quality of life in their community is improving at the same time the population is shrinking. David Peters, a
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Science | The Guardian
Self-taught rocket scientist plans launch to test flat Earth theory
Science is littered with tales of visionaries who self-funded pioneering research to prove their theories, and this weekend “Mad” Mike Hughes is hoping to join them. He plans to launch a homemade rocket in California as part of a bid to eventually prove that the Earth is flat. Hughes has spent $20,000 (£15,000) building the steam-powered rocket in his spare time, and will be livestreaming the lau
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA is sending E. coli to space for astronaut health
Credit: NASA Ever wonder what would happen if you got sick in space? NASA has sent bacteria samples into low-Earth orbit to help find out. One of the agency's latest small satellite experiments is the E. coli Anti-Microbial Satellite, or EcAMSat, which will explore the genetic basis for how effectively antibiotics can combat E. coli bacteria in the low gravity of space. This CubeSat – a spacecraf
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Dagens Medicin
Nyvalgt regionsråd i Hovedstaden sætter fokus på Sundhedsplatformen
Sophie Hæstorp Andersen som formand for Region Hovedstaden.
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Dagens Medicin
Sjælland får uprøvet Regionsrådsformand
Aftale i Region Sjælland sikrer døgndækning med læger på skadestuerne i Næstved og Roskilde.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA telescope studies quirky comet 45P
Comet 45P/Honda-Mrkos-Pajdušáková is captured using a telescope on December 22 from Farm Tivoli in Namibia, Africa. Credit: Gerald Rhemann When comet 45P zipped past Earth early in 2017, researchers observing from NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility, or IRTF, in Hawai'i gave the long-time trekker a thorough astronomical checkup. The results help fill in crucial details about ices in Jupiter-family
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gadgets for Mars
A couple of spacewalkers explore the barren and dry landscape of Lanzarote in the Canary Islands to simulate a planetary mission. Credit: European Space Agency A mini-rover, tools once used on the moon and lasers for 3-D mapping are in the backpack of the explorers of tomorrow. The terrain will be hazardous and it will be dark in volcanic caves, but this equipment could one day help to scout othe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Tending your garden in space
On Jan. 16, 2016, Expedition 46 Commander Scott Kelly shared photographs of a blooming zinnia flower in the Veggie plant growth system aboard the International Space Station. Kelly wrote, "Yes, there are other life forms ...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Rover sunset
A rover crawls over rocky terrain on Spain's Canary Island of Lanzarote, also known as the island of a thousand volcanoes. A drone follows it closely from the sky as the Sun sets.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Long-lived catalytic converter reduces diesel emissions
Diesel vehicles today emit fewer pollutants than older vehicles, thanks to a zeolite catalytic converter that was invented around 10 years ago. Although many groups have investigated this catalyst since then, it was still unclear why it is so much more effective. By observing the catalyst's interior in three dimensions at the nanoscale level, researchers from Utrecht University and Oak Ridge Nati
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How carbon nanotubes could be used in future electronic devices
Schematic of a carbon nanotube field-effect transistor contact. Credit: Skoltech A team of Skoltech scientists, in collaboration with researchers from the IBM Watson Research Center, have shed light on the behavior of electrical contacts in carbon semiconductor nanotubes, which could pave the way to next-generation electronics. In the past, silicon digital electronics were made possible by a redu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New step towards future complex oxide electronics
Credit: Delft University of Technology Researchers from TU Delft, Cornell University and the University of Cagliari report an interesting method for turning a highly insulating material into a highly conducting system. The process involves combining three different metal oxides in a sharp interface. They have recently published their findings in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces . Lead author Gi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Water cooling for the Earth's crust—seawater penetrates much deeper than previously thought
The hydrothermal circulation changes the ocean crust and increases the Chlorine (CL) concentration of the rocks by incorporation of sea water. The magma takes up parts of this crust leading to an increase of chlorine of the magma. If the magma erupts at the sea floor, basalt lava is formed that we sampled and investigated in detail. Credit: GEOMAR Hot vents in the deep sea and geysers on land doc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A model by which plants adapt their photosynthetic metabolism to light intensity
Researchers from the University of Seville and the Centro Superior de Investigaciones Científicas have proposed a model that explains the molecular mechanism used by plants to adapt their photosynthetic mechanism to light intensity. Photosynthesis is the Earth's primary production process for organic material and oxygen. During the day, CO2 fixation and photosynthetic metabolism remain active in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists reveal the mystery about the origin of gold
Peridotite from the deep mantle (green) enclosed in lava (black) from a Patagonian volcano, which was found by the researchers. Credit: UGR An international group of scientists, with the participation of the University of Granada (UGR), has shed new light on the origin of gold, one of the most intriguing mysteries for the scientific community. Their work, which has been recently published in Natu
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The Atlantic
The Inconvenience of Being a Woman Veteran
I happen to be a woman. This is often inconvenient. It was inconvenient for the military and, now that I’m out of the military, it’s still inconvenient. In multiple surveys and anecdotes , both women who are serving and women who have served repeatedly list gender bias as an issue, though the way it manifests itself differs during and after their time in the military. The military doesn’t just ur
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Ingeniøren
Danske it-chefer: Andre organisationer evner ikke at beskytte mine persondata
Under halvdelen af de danske it-chefer, nemlig 46 procent, tror på, at andre organisationer har kompetencerne til at beskytte deres personlige data. I gennemsnit er tilliden blandt it-chefer i EU på 55 procent med Frankrig som det land, hvor tilliden til persondatahåndtering er højest (76 procent). Direktør for Kaspersky Lab, Norden, Leif Jensen Foto: Kaspersky Lab Resultaterne fremgår af en unde
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Dagens Medicin
Radikale er kongemager i Danske Regioner: Vi kan samarbejde til begge sider
Der et dødt løb mellem rød og blå blok i bestyrelsen i Danske Regioner. Radikale sidder på det afgørende mandat og er åben for at forhandle med både rød og blå blok.
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Science : NPR
From 'Inky's Great Escape' To Singing Seahorses: Animal Books For The Holidays
Maica/Getty Images/iStockphoto Maica/Getty Images/iStockphoto A Sunday column by David Sax in The New York Times quotes a cheering statistic from the Association of American Publishers : Sales of "old-fashioned print books" are up for the third year in a row. Cox explains this trend well: "People are buying books because a book engages nearly all their senses, from the smell of the paper and glue
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quantum optics offers alternative to expensive lasers in spectroscopy
Interferometer developed at Moscow State University. Credit: Elizaveta Melik-Gaikazyan An international research group, together with scientists from the MSU, have developed a time-resolved spectroscopy method that allows studying fast processes in samples. The new method works by analyzing quantized light transmitted through a sample without the use of femtosecond lasers and complex detection sy
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Here is Cassini’s last broad look at the Saturn system
In the Nov. 25 SN : Charting lumpy space, Bronze Age movers and shakers, T. rex ’s slasher arms, gene editor corrects typos, the Great Pyramid hides a void, mosses chronicle Arctic warming, an itty-bitty insect-inspired robot and more.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Enzymes from fungi simplify chemical synthesis
Using natural enzymes obtained from fungi, scientists from TU Delft have potentially made the synthesis of certain pharmaceuticals, cosmetics and agrochemicals much simpler, cheaper and environmentally more benign. They have recently reported their findings in Nature Catalysis..
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Managing antibiotics not enough to reverse resistance
Credit: CC0 Public Domain Researchers have discovered that reducing the use of antibiotics will not be enough to reverse the growing prevalence of antibiotic resistance for some types of bacteria. Besides passing along the genes bestowing antibiotic resistance to their offspring, many bacteria can also swap genes amongst themselves through a process called conjugation. There has long been a debat
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Ingeniøren
Forskere advarer: Flere voldsomme jordskælv i 2018
De seneste par måneder har kraftige jordskælv kostet menneskeliv i både Mexico og Mellemøsten. Og vi kan højst sandsynligt forvente flere af denne type naturkatastrofer i løbet af 2018, lyder hypotesen fra to amerikanske forskere i geofysik. Det skriver blandt andet The Guardian . De amerikanske forskere forventer, at der vil komme flere jordskælv fra næste år, fordi Jorden roterer langsommere om
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Dagens Medicin
Ida Sofie Jensen: Danmark fik ikke agenturet på grund af sin geografi
Danmark og Sverige havde formentlig stået bedre i kampen, hvis de fra begyndelsen var blevet enige om at lave en alliance, sådan som man gør i Centraleuropa. Det vurderer lægemiddelindustriforeningens direktør Ida Sofie Jensen.
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Dagens Medicin
Stephanie Lose fortsætter som formand i Syddanmark
Trods stor fremgang fik SF ingen andel i aftale om konstituering i Region Syddanmark.
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Dagens Medicin
Nye opgaver skal ikke ændre almen praksis
Almen praksis skal ikke kunne præcis det, som sygehusambulatorierne kan, understreger regionsrådsformand. PLO glæder sig over tilkendegivelsen, for almen praksis skal bevares på egne præmisser.
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Dagens Medicin
Unge læger kan dele arbejdstid mellem almen praksis og hospital
Region Nordjylland indgår en samarbejdsaftale med de praktiserende læger i Frederikshavn, der kalder sig Læger på Toppen, om en helt ny type ansættelse.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Penn team constructs whole-brain map of electrical connections key to forming memories
A team of neuroscientists at the University of Pennsylvania has constructed the first whole-brain map of electrical connectivity in the brain based on data from nearly 300 neurosurgical patients with electrodes implanted directly on the brain. The researchers found that low-frequency rhythms of brain activity, when brain waves move up and down slowly, primarily drive communication between the fro
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Alzheimer's Tau protein forms toxic complexes with cell membranes
The brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease contain characteristic tangles inside neurons. These tangles are formed when a protein called Tau aggregates into twisted fibrils. As a result, the neurons' transport systems disintegrate, essential nutrients can't move through, and the cells begin to die, affecting the brain's functions and giving rise to the disease's symptoms. Given its role in t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Managing antibiotics not enough to reverse resistance
DURHAM, N.C. -- Researchers have discovered that reducing the use of antibiotics will not be enough to reverse the growing prevalence of antibiotic resistance for some types of bacteria. Besides passing along the genes bestowing antibiotic resistance to their offspring, many bacteria can also swap genes amongst themselves through a process called conjugation. There has long been a debate, however
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Worldwide increase in methane bubbles due to climate change
Never before have such unequivocal, strong relationships between temperature and emissions of methane bubbles been shown on such a wide, continent-spanning scale.", says biologist Sarian Kosten of Radboud University. The study focused on shallow lakes, ponds, rivers and wetlands. These aquatic environments are relevant in the context of climate change because they are responsible for much of glob
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Viden
Dommedagsfrygt og pessimisme inspirerer forskere
- Der er masser af udfordringer og problemer. Det er enormt deprimerende at snakke om fremtiden. Men det er samtidig også en tid, som er fuld af entusiasme. Sådan siger professor og antropolog Nils Bubandt, som leder forskningsprojektet AURA på Aarhus Universitet ( Aarhus University Research on the Antropocene ). Læs også: Jorden får sin første menneskeskabte tidsalder I AURA samarbejder biologer
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Danmark har fået et internationalt grundforskningscenter i privathed
03. november 2017 Danmark har fået et internationalt grundforskningscenter i privathed ÅBNING Grundforskningscenteret Centre for Privacy Studies (PRIVACY) er nu officielt åbnet ved en ceremoni på Københavns Universitet. Centeret samler et tværfagligt hold af forskere inden for arkitektur, religiøs kultur, jura og politisk tænkning. De skal undersøge den historiske udvikling privatheds-begrebet, d
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Ingeniøren
Radioaktiv sky også observeret over Rusland – landet benægter kendskab
Et russisk meteorologisk institut har målt mængder af ruthenium 106 på 986 gange den normale mængde fra baggrundsstråling. Men på trods af det benægter det nukleare anlæg, som befinder sig nær epicenteret, kendskab til nogen hændelse, der kan ligge til grund for den forhøjede mængde. Det skriver The Guardian Kalder til undersøgelse Greenpeace i Rusland kaldte til undersøgelse, da Ruslands atomage
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Thousands flee over Bali volcano eruption fears
Mount Agung belched smoke as high as 700 metres (2,300 feet) above its summit late Tuesday afternoon, sparking an exodus from the settlements near the mountain Thousands living in the shadow of a rumbling volcano on Indonesia's resort island of Bali fled Wednesday as fears grow that it could erupt for the first time in more than 50 years. Mount Agung belched smoke as high as 700 metres (2,300 fee
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UK made grave errors over Hinkley nuclear project: MPs
An undated handout image released by EDF Energy in London on July 28, 2016, shows a computer generated image (CGI) of the French energy producer's proposed two nuclear reactors, Hinkely Point C (HPC), at their Hinkley Point power plant in England Britain made "grave strategic errors" in its handling of the Franco-Chinese Hinkley Point nuclear project, a critical parliamentary report concluded Wed
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Skype joins list of apps on China blacklist
Skype, no longer available for download on the China Apple Store or Android sites, seems to have joined the lengthening list of internet communication tools on China's blacklist Skype has apparently joined the lengthening list of internet tools on China's blacklist, disappearing from download stores with Apple saying Wednesday it was ordered by the government to remove certain apps. Skype is no l
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China's former internet czar faces graft probe
China's former internet czar Lu Wei (L) who oversaw a tightening of online censorship during his tenure, was a powerful figure both at home and abroad, being personally received by Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg and travelling with President Xi Jinping China's former internet czar, who oversaw a tightening of online censorship during his tenure, has become the latest top Communist Party figure to be
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Austria: Bitcoins stolen over public wireless network
Austrian police say cyber thieves transferred bitcoins worth more than 100,000 euros ($117,000) from a man's account while he was logged in on a restaurant's public wireless network.
11h
Ingeniøren
Solpanel trykt på inkjet-printer kan snart oplade mobiltelefoner inden døre
En ny slags ledende plast, som kan fange lys ved flere bølgelængder end konventionelle solceller, er på vej. Den enhed, der kommer ud af det hele, vejer kun lidt, kan foldes og printes på en inkjet-printer. »Vores materiale kan fange energi fra lys inden døre, hvilket ikke kan lade sig gøre med silicium,« fortæller Sadok Ben Dkhil fra virksomheden Dracula Technologies, der står i spidsen for det
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Booming life for 'PUBG' death-match computer game
Scores of virtual warriors faced off in a Hunger Games-style death match in a massive, real-world eSports matchup of upstart shooter game "PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds." The computer game 's rise has been epic, with some industry trackers branding this the year of 'PUBG' even though it is technically still in trial mode with a final version yet to be released. In a colossal two-day event that