BBC News - Science & Environment
Three cups of coffee a day 'may have health benefits' Image copyright Getty Images Image caption The effects of caffeine can vary from person to person Moderate coffee drinking is safe, and three to four cups a day may have some health benefits, according to a large review of studies, in the BMJ. It found a lower risk of liver disease and some cancers in coffee drinkers, and a lower risk of dying from stroke - but researchers could not prove coffee
2h
Viden
Glutenfri kost kan være en usund modedille Hvis du går ind i et af de større supermarkeder, så prøv at smutte forbi hylden med knækbrød. Der er mange slags at vælge mellem. Der er med sesamfrø, hørfrø, fuldkornsspelt, surdej, urter, havsalt og så videre. De fleste danskere behøver (...) ikke at snyde sig selv for at sætte tænderne i et friskbagt, knasende sprødt fransk hvedebaguette Iben Møller Jønsson Aarhus Universitet og Gitte Leth Møl
3h
Ingeniøren
Første elflymotor klar til testSeattle-firma er i fuld gang med at udvikle elektriske fly. De første tests af motorerne er på trapperne.
3h

LATEST

Gizmodo
If You Transplant a Human Head, Where Do You Get the Body? Sergio Canavero. Image: AP Two years ago, the controversial Italian neurosurgeon Sergio Canavero made a brazen announcement: In December 2017, for the first time in history, he would transplant a human head. The prospect of a head transplant raises all kinds of questions, both technical and ethical. There may be no bigger question, though, than the one that also seems most obvious: From where, ex
0min
New Scientist - News
Secure phone uses sonar to watch your mouth saying a passphrase Is that really you? imagesource/getty By Paul Marks “My voice is my password.” Passphrases that use biometric voice recognition to verify it’s really you are becoming increasingly popular. But their increasing use carries a risk: someone with a recording of your voice could easily splice the right spoken words together and spoof their way into your digital life. Now a new technology detects s
3min
Futurity.org
Access to family planning cut child poverty Children born after the introduction of family planning programs in the US from 1964 through 1973 had household incomes 2.8 percent higher than those born before, researchers report. These children were also 7 percent less likely to live in poverty and 12 percent less likely to live in households receiving public assistance. “…the large implications of family planning programs for the financial s
7min
Dagens Medicin
Se de lægelige stemmeslugere her Fire læger er valgt i Region Hovedstaden og Sjælland. Dermed er der i alt 12 læger at finde i de fem regionsråd.
11min
Gizmodo
Buy, Upgrade, or Build a Gaming PC With This Black Friday Sale on Amazon Commerce Content is independent of Editorial and Advertising, and if you buy something through our posts, we may get a small share of the sale. Click here for more. Whether you’re building a new gaming PC, buying one pre-made, or upgrading your existing rig, Amazon’s Black Friday PC gaming deal has something for you. You’ll want to go to Amazon to see the full list of deals , but here are a few h
12min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wines and their labels: crafting narratives that speak to usMarketing professionals often consider packaging to be a product's primary means of communication. It communicates explicit and implicit messages to the consumer, particularly through its visual aspect.
21min
The Atlantic
The GOP Tax Plan Would Make It Harder for Workers to Get New Skills How can workers adapt to a constantly changing labor market and the oncoming threat of automation? One of the suggestions researchers and policymakers have is to go back to school and acquire new skills. As my colleague Derek Thompson wrote recently, “Making it easier for adults to attend college part-time is crucial if, as the White House has claimed , the U.S. economy [actually] suffers from a
23min
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BMW Proposes Elevated Cycling Paths for Congested Cities In its first century as a company, BMW has made industrial engines, motorcycles, Steve Urkel’s Isetta , and a whole lot of cars. Now, it wants to build something altogether new: an elevated bike path. This week, the automaker’s somewhat redundantly named Research, New Technologies, Innovations division, based in Mountain View, Tokyo, and Seoul, revealed its idea of building a network of bike lane
27min
Feed: All Latest
This Stripped-Down Blogging Tool Exemplifies Antisocial Media Recently, Rob Beschizza—a coder and the managing editor of Boing Boing—released a stripped-down blogging tool called txt.fyi. Write something, hit Publish, and voilà: your deathless prose, online. But here’s the thing: txt.fyi has no social mechanics. None. No Like button, no Share button, no comments. No feed showing which posts are most popular. Each post has a tag telling search engines not to
27min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Friday essay: why grown-ups still need fairy talesFor as long as we have been able to stand upright and speak, we have told stories. They explained the mysteries of the world: birth, death, the seasons, day and night. They were the origins of human creativity, expressed in words but also in pictures, as evidenced by the cave paintings of Chauvet (France) and Maros (Indonesia). On the walls of these caves, the paintings, which date back to around
27min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Evidence-based education needs standardised assessment Standardised assessments can inform what teachers teach, based on evidence of student learning. Credit: Shutterstock The latest Gonski review aims to improve evidence-based decision-making in Australian school education. It recognises that governments' educational investment must be based on more than politics, just as teachers' instructional decisions must be based on more than intuition. Like o
27min
Futurity.org
Songbirds may have ‘universal grammar’ Young zebra finches are intrinsically biased to learn certain patterns of sound over others—and these patterns mirror the ones humans use, experiments show. “In addition, these sound patterns resembled patterns that are frequently observed across human languages and in music,” says Jon Sakata, associate professor of biology at McGill University and senior author of a paper in Current Biology . Sc
28min
Gizmodo
Tom Baker's Message For Doctor Who's Anniversary Is a Perfect Reminder of How Delightful Tom Baker Is Image: Still via Youtube Today is not just Thanksgiving in America, but also Doctor Who’s 54th anniversary. That means while the U.S. has spent its day cramming Turkey into its collective self, well wishes of many happy returns have been sent to one of the U.K.’s most venerable scifi shows. Naturally, Tom Baker’s the best, by the virtue of him being... well, Tom Baker. 54 is an odd number to cele
30min
Ars Technica
The best board games we played at PAX Unplugged reader comments 0 Welcome to Ars Cardboard, our regular look at tabletop games! Check out our complete board gaming coverage at cardboard.arstechnica.com . PAX branched out from video games into board games with last weekend's PAX Unplugged , a celebration of all things tabletop. The show was packed with gamers, but we fought the hordes for table space on which to try some of the newest releases.
31min
Dagens Medicin
Læger i Midtjylland insisterer på at blive hørt om efteruddannelseDet regionale overlægeråd, den regionale lægeforening og Yngre Læger har bedt om et møde med koncerndirektionen i Region Midtjylland for at udfordre dens beslutning om at indføre stop mod sponsoreret efteruddannelse.
32min
Science : NPR
To Save Water, Should You Wash Your Hands Of Hand Washing Dishes? Dishwashers have come a long way since this 1921 model, which was designed mainly to help minimize the drudgery of housework. But today's sleek models are also designed with water conservation in mind. Bettmann/Bettmann Archive/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Bettmann/Bettmann Archive/Getty Images Dishwashers have come a long way since this 1921 model, which was designed mainly to help m
32min
Scientific American Content: Global
Cetaceans' Big Brains Are Linked to Their Rich Social Life Killer whales have group-specific dialects, sperm whales babysit one another’s young and bottlenose dolphins cooperate with other species. These social skills are all closely linked with the aquatic mammals’ brain sizes, according to a recent study in Nature Ecology & Evolution. Scientists first proposed a relation between social living and brain expansion, or encephalization, nearly three de
34min
Dagens Medicin
Her er stemmeslugerne ved regionsrådsvalget Stephanie Lose (V) og Villy Søvndal (SF) fik flest stemmer ved valget til regionerne. Det var dog en helt tredje kandidat, der opnåede den største andel af stemmerne i sin region.
39min
Ingeniøren
Transformator Podcast: Digitale forsøgsdyr, forudsigelse af jordskælv og snyd med NOxKom bag om ugens historier fra ing.dk i vores fredagsprodcast Transformator
49min
Ingeniøren
Stik imod ministerens forklaring: Banedanmarks ledelse har ansvar for problemer med nye togsignalerTransportminister Ole Birk Olesen har forklaret, at kun Banedanmarks forhenværende ledelse har et ansvar for de nyeste forsinkelser og fordyrelser i signalprogrammet. Ekstern undersøgelse tegner det modsatte billede.
56min
Futurity.org
Flowing sand, not water, left ‘dark streaks’ on Mars Granular flows—grains of sand and dust slipping downhill—may have caused the “dark steaks” on Mars, which had been considered evidence for flowing water on the red planet. The findings argue against the presence of enough liquid water for microbial life to thrive at these sites. Continuing examination of these still-perplexing seasonal dark streaks with the University of Arizona-led High Resoluti
56min
Popular Science
These are the best Black Friday deals on the internet For the deal seeker, there are few days headier than Black Friday (and maybe the day after Christmas). Unlike, say, Amazon Prime Day, Black Friday is kind of a monster we're always trying to tackle to the ground, one that grows more limbs every year. The "Black Friday" discounts started over a week ago, and almost every major retailer is making it seem like they're going all-out this year. The nu
1h
The Atlantic
The Tiny Dominican Factory That Disproves the Need for Sweatshops The quest for ethical clothing production can seem futile. Many in the industry see low pay, unsafe labor conditions, and a host of other indignities commonly associated with garment-factory work abroad as vexing and intractable problems. For one thing, there are real doubts that consumers’ desire for clothing made in less-abusive conditions could ever override their desire for low prices. Anothe
1h
The Atlantic
The Delights of Parsing the Beatles' Most Nonsensical Song “It seems very pretty,” she said when she had finished it, “but it’s rather hard to understand!” (You see she didn’t like to confess, even to herself, that she couldn’t make it out at all.) “Somehow it seems to fill my head with ideas—only I don’t exactly know what they are!” —Alice, upon first reading “Jabberwocky” in Through the Looking-Glass Inspired nonsense has held me in its spell for as lo
1h
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Galactic Glow, Thought to Be Dark Matter, Now Hints at Hidden Pulsars In 2009, Dan Hooper and his colleagues found a glow coming from the center of our galaxy that no one had ever noticed before. After analyzing publicly available data from the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope, a satellite launched a year earlier, the team concluded that the center of the Milky Way was radiating more gamma rays than astrophysicists could account for. Quanta Magazine About Original s
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Feed: All Latest
Your 2017 Black Friday Booklist: Eight Essential Science Reads The holidays are prime reading season. All that travel and post-meal lounging will give you plenty of time to plow through the books that have been stacking up on your bedside table for the past year. Just be sure to grab a good one. Your body will already be full of empty calories—you don't want your brain to be stuffed with junk, too. Endurance by Scott Kelly When Scott Kelly returned to Earth
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Feed: All Latest
What Amazon Echo and Google Home Do With Your Voice Data—And How to Delete It Amazon Echo and Google Home—and other devices that have Alexa and Google Assistant built in—are some of the most promising new technologies to come along in years. And they’re genuinely useful to have around , whether it’s to settle a bet or help out with a recipe. But it can also feel a little creepy to have a speaker in your house that’s always listening . What exactly is it doing with that inf
1h
Science | The Guardian
Kidney disease drug recommended by Nice 'may do more harm than good' The UK’s drug guidelines body is recommending a type of medication to treat chronic kidney disease despite no firm evidence that it benefits patients – and some signs that the drugs may do more harm than good, experts have warned. Phosphate binders are commonly prescribed to lower blood phosphate levels in patients with advanced kidney disease, including those on dialysis. High phosphate has been
1h
Science | The Guardian
The Swiss cannabis farm aiming to supply 'legal weed' across Europe I n fields across Switzerland the harvest time for cannabis is coming to an end, and workers are distributing the crop to shops in France and Switzerland. Soon, the plants could be available across much of Europe . The man behind the operation is 31-year-old Jonas Duclos, a former banker, and what he is doing is legal. His business, CBD420, sells BlueDream, a strain of hemp cultivated to ensure t
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon workers in Germany, Italy stage Black Friday strikeWorkers at a half dozen Amazon distribution centers in Germany and one in Italy walked off the job Friday, in a protest timed to coincide with "Black Friday" to demand better wages from the American online giant.
2h
Ingeniøren
Det hjalp: Rensning af spildevand har reddet han-ørreder fra at blive hunner I begyndelsen af 2000’erne målte forskerne på Syddansk Universitet, SDU, udbredt feminisering blandt nogle bækørred-hanner i fynske vandløb. Feminiseringen viste sig blandt andet ved forhøjede koncentrationer af æggeblommeproteiner i blodet hos hannerne. I dag er denne feminisering af hanfisk væk, viser ny forskning fra SDU. Forklaringen er ifølge forskerne, at der de seneste år er kommet en lang
2h
Science : NPR
The Sea Level Threat To Cities Depends On Where The Ice Melts — Not Just How Fast Glacial melting ice floats in Los Glaciares National Park, part of the Southern Patagonian Ice Field, in 2015 in Argentina. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Mario Tama/Getty Images Glacial melting ice floats in Los Glaciares National Park, part of the Southern Patagonian Ice Field, in 2015 in Argentina. Mario Tama/Getty Images The world's oceans are rising. Over the past centur
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Ingeniøren
VIDEO FRA GRÆNSEN: Her er teknologien der skal fange lastbiler med NOx-fuskMiljøstyrelsen har indIedt jagten på lastbiler, der snyder med røgrensningen. Værktøjet der testes hedder Remote Sensing Device.
2h
Ingeniøren
Ugens it-job: FE søger analytiker til at bekæmpe statsstøttede hackerangreb Arbejd med machine learning og AI Danmarks Radio Business Intelligence Business Analyst Novo Nordisk A/S Developer with competences in databases Ørsted Dygtige og innovative softwareudviklere Sweco Skarp IT-specialist Finanstilsynet Vicekontorchef med solid IT-revisionserfaring Finanstilsynet Selvstændig FullStack .Net Developer Bloom ApS Dygtig C#/WPF Frontend Udvikler Bloom ApS CRM konsulent Bl
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Viden
Forskere er nu sikre: Mystisk objekt er fra et fremmed solsystem Et mystisk, aflangt himmellegeme har verden over fanget astronomers opmærksomhed. Objektet er helt særligt, fordi det kommer fra et andet solsystem. Det er første gang, forskere har opdaget sådan et objekt. Interstellart objekt Et interstellart objekt er et objekt, der rejser mellem stjernerne. Det kan blandt andet være en komet eller en asteroide, men det kunne også være en rumsonde. Objektet, d
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Flies' disease-carrying potential may be greater than thought, researchers say IMAGE: Researchers used a scan electron microscope to find where bacterial cells and particles attach to the fly body. The electron microscope captures an up close look at the head of... view more Credit: Ana Junqueira and Stephan Schuster Flies can be more than pesky picnic crashers, they may be potent pathogen carriers, too, according to an international team of researchers. In a st
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
To address hunger effectively, first check the weather, says new study Too little rain, or too much, is often a driver of poverty and hunger, leading to poor nutrition and food insecurity among vulnerable populations. According to a new study, rainfall patterns also provide clues on how to most effectively alleviate food insecurity. The study, to be published November 24 in Scientific Reports , is the first to analyze on a large scale the relationship between food i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lack of food contributing to students' poor health and absenteeism Teenagers whose families worry about money for food are more likely to be overweight, have poor mental and physical health, and miss school, according to new University of Auckland research. Rising food security concerns among New Zealand adolescents and association with health and wellbeing has been published in Kōtuitui: New Zealand Journal of Social Sciences Online . Food security concerns i
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Science : NPR
NASA Taps Young People To Help Develop Virtual Reality Technology A virtual reality program developed by NASA could help scientists visualize the magnetic fields around the earth. NASA hide caption toggle caption NASA A virtual reality program developed by NASA could help scientists visualize the magnetic fields around the earth. NASA NASA has big hopes for virtual reality technology. The agency is developing a suite of virtual reality environments at Goddard S
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Ingeniøren
Region Sjælland ruller Sundhedsplatformen ud i morgen: Vi kan gå ned med 30-40 pct Region Sjælland ruller Sundhedsplatformen ud på alle hospitalerne i morgen, og regionen har på baggrund af erfaringerne i Region H forberedt sig på, at kapaciteten falder: »Vi skruer noget ned for de planlagte patienter, og planlægger at kunne varetage med de akutte patienter. Det mener vi er meget realistisk – også på baggrund af vores erfaringer fra Region Hovedstaden,« siger Lars Onsberg Henri
3h
Ingeniøren
Prisen for personoplysninger på dark web: 6-50 kroner It-kriminelle handler løs med folks oplysninger på the dark web. Det gælder alt lige fra personnumre til kreditkortoplysninger. Det amerikanske sikkerhedsfirma Flashpoint har lavet en undersøgelse, hvor det har fundet ud af, hvad det koster at købe disse oplysninger, skriver DR . Det er nok ikke overraskende, at det er dyrere at købe pakker med flere informationer om samme person. Især kreditkort
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists develop artificial photosynthesis device for greener ethylene production Credit: National University of Singapore A team of scientists from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has developed a prototype device that mimics natural photosynthesis to produce ethylene gas using only sunlight, water and carbon dioxide. The novel method, which produces ethylene at room temperature and pressure using benign chemicals, could be scaled up to provide a more eco-friendly a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Are our lakes on the brink of suffocation? Credit: © 2017 EPFL Physics of Aquatic Systems Laboratory In order to gain insight into how lakes breathe, EPFL scientists have studied oxygen depletion in the depths of Lake Geneva – the first time such research has been carried out. By collecting key data, they were able to enhance their understanding of the lake's ecosystem and how it is likely to evolve over time. In the autumn, lakes undergo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
To address hunger effectively, first check the weather, says new study A study of nearly 2,000 smallholder farms in Africa and Asia found that climate context mattered in determining the most effective response to endemic food insecurity. Credit: Mitchell Maher/International Food Policy Institute Too little rain, or too much, is often a driver of poverty and hunger, leading to poor nutrition and food insecurity among vulnerable populations. According to a new study,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Flies' disease-carrying potential may be greater than thought, researchers say Researchers used a scan electron microscope to find where bacterial cells and particles attach to the fly body. The electron microscope captures an up close look at the head of a blowfly in this picture. Credit: Ana Junqueira and Stephan Schuster Flies can be more than pesky picnic crashers, they may be potent pathogen carriers, too, according to an international team of researchers. In a study o
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
We learn from our mistakes: how to make better predictions from tweets Credit: CC0 Public Domain Social media is viewed as a potential goldmine of information. The key is to work out how to mine this abundant source of public sentiment. Linking social media sentiment with human behaviour is a relatively new and evolving field of study. It has a lot of potential – we successfully used it to predict the result of the 2016 US election . But we got it wrong with Austr
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The Atlantic
The Push to Make French Gender-Neutral “My homeland is the French language,” author Albert Camus once wrote—and many French people would agree. That’s why any attempt at changing the language is often met with suspicion. So the uproar was almost instantaneous when, this fall, the first-ever school textbook promoting a gender-neutral version of French was released. It was a victory for a subset of French feminists who had argued that t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Crowdsourcing predicts new product success Threadless T-shirts. Credit: Flickr / Susan Evaluating the commercial potential for new product designs is challenging – think drop-crotch pants or gold sneakers – who knew they'd be a hit? But new research reveals crowdsourcing could be the key to helping companies hit the jackpot. A study led by Dr Ping Xiao from UTS Business School and Dr Anirban Mukherjee from Singapore Management University,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Jack the Ripper and the commodification of sexual violence More men are victims of murder than women in the UK. Yet the media reporting and fictional representations of murder have a tendency to suggest otherwise. Numerous novels, TV shows and films centre around the hunt for the killer of the usually young, usually attractive, usually white, and usually female murder victim. In real life cases – where the victim fits this demographic – photos are gleane
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
David Willetts interview: 'We need a broader view of what constitutes a good university' David Willetts was minister for universities and science in the coalition government from 2010 to 2014, when the cap on tuition fees was raised to £9,000 per year in England and Wales. In his new book, A University Education , he provides a defence of that policy following intense recent debate about it. Willetts, who now sits in the House of Lords and is also the executive chair of the Resolutio
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Going underground: Cambridge digs into the history of geology with landmark exhibition Credit: University of Cambridge A box full of diamonds, volcanic rock from Mount Vesuvius, and the geology guide that Darwin packed for his epic voyage on the Beagle will go on display in Cambridge this week as part of the first major exhibition to celebrate geological map-making. Uncovering how the ground beneath our feet was mapped for the first time – and revealing some of the controversies an
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists make most precise measurement ever of the proton's magnetic moment Image of a proton trapped in magnetic fields. Credit: RIKEN An international collaboration of scientists from RIKEN's Ulmer Fundamental Symmetries Laboratory (FSL), Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg and GSI Darmstadt, have used high-precision techniques to make the most precise measurement to date of the magnetic moment of the proton, findi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
It's great that Blue Planet II is pushing hard on plastic pollution in the oceans – but please use facts, not conjecture Must we always talk for victory, and never once for truth, for comfort, and joy – Ralph Waldo Emerson. On Sunday night we gasped in awe at the latest stunning images of marine life in BBC's marvellous Blue Planet II. Blue sharks dodged great whites to scavenge on oceanic carrion; a baby turtle took its chance to shelter on some remote piece of driftwood; albatrosses sadly caressed one another as
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cooking fats in the atmosphere may affect climate more than previously thought Credit: CC0 Public Domain Fats being released into the atmosphere from cookers such as deep fat fryers may be enhancing the formation of clouds, which have a major cooling effect on the planet. In a Nature Communications paper published today, scientists demonstrated for the first time that fatty acid molecules emitted during cooking can spontaneously form complex 3-D structures in atmospheric ae
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Four things the Catalan crisis can teach us about social unity The Catalan crisis has made headlines numerous times around the world over the past few months. It has sparked heated arguments between pro-independance and anti-independence supporters. And in many of the reports, the Catalan people – especially pro-independants – have been referred to as " troublemakers " and "nationalists". While some Catalan people might indeed be nationalists, not everyone i
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Science | The Guardian
The Quantum Astrologer’s Handbook by Michael Brooks review – maths contests and the nature of the universe W hat, you might ask, is a quantum astrologer? This beautifully written book is a kind of experimental scientific biography that mashes up science with what seems to be non‑science, the better to explore the boundaries of what we still don’t know. If quantum astrology were a thing, after all, it wouldn’t be any more ridiculous than what modern physics asks us to believe. The book’s hero, the alle
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Keeping staff satisfied really is good business, says new study Imagine sitting down to your business meeting in a ball-pool room with multi-coloured walls and bean bags instead of chairs. If that's not crazy enough, how about a massive hammock to take a breather on during a hectic nine-hour shift? Many companies are coming up imaginative ways to keep their staff satisfied. The theory goes that with more entertaining and exciting work spaces, employees no lon
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Ingeniøren
US Army: Tordenvejr kan have afgørende betydning på slagmarken Kraftigt tordenvejr øger ikke kun risikoen for atmosfæriske forstyrrelser, der breder sig til signalproblemer på landjorden. Uvejret kan også sætte teknologisk udstyr ud af drift ved jordoverfladen, selv om det ikke bliver ramt af lynnedslag eller oversvømmelser. Det viser ny forskning, som meteorologen Xiping Zeng, ansat på USA’s Army Research Laboratory, har offentliggjort, efter at han har opd
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Highly charged molecules behave paradoxically Chemistry researchers have now discovered how certain small biomolecules attach to one another. The researchers' study also overturns the standard picture – particles with the same electrical charge appear to be drawn together and not vice versa. The results may be important for the development of new drugs. A number of chemistry researchers from several institutions including Lund University in
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Forty years of Meteosat Meteosat-1 lifted off at 13:35 GMT on 23 November 1977 from Cape Canaveral in Florida. Credit: European Space Agency ESA's first Earth observation satellite was launched on 23 November 1977. When the first Meteosat satellite took its place in the sky, it completed coverage of the whole globe from geostationary orbit and laid the foundations for European and world cooperation in meteorology that c
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Dagens Medicin
Leif Vestergaard Pedersen siger farvel til Kræftens BekæmpelseKræftens Bekæmpelse skal have ny direktør
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Science | The Guardian
'Indiana Joan': Perth woman, 95, accused of looting Egypt artefacts The Australian government has confirmed it is looking into the case of a 95-year-old Perth woman accused of looting artefacts from countries including Egypt. Monica Hanna of Egypt’s Heritage Taskforce posted an open letter to Australia’s ambassador to Egypt, Neil Hawkins, on Facebook this month, alleging Joan Howard spent most of her time during her husband’s diplomatic trips looting archaeologic
5h
Dagens Medicin
Her er de bedste til behandling af ni hjerte-kar-sygdommeDagens Medicin hædrer Danmarks bedste hospitaler til behandling af hjerte-kar-sygdomme.
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
KU-forskere høster ny viden om høj-energi neutrinoer 23. november 2017 KU-forskere høster ny viden om høj-energi neutrinoer Neutrinoforskning: Forskere fra Niels Bohr Institutet ved Københavns Universitet har sammen med kolleger fra hele verden målt neutrinoer i kosmisk stråling ved energiniveauer 1.000 gange højere end dem, man her på Jorden kan skabe i partikelacceleratorer. Beregninger viser, at neutrinoerne opfører sig i overensstemmelse med st
5h
Dagens Medicin
På OUH er god hjertebehandling ikke raketvidenskabFor andet år i træk kårer Dagens Medicin OUH som Danmarks bedste hospital til behandling af hjerte-kar-sygdom. Førstepladsen er bl.a. en følge af, at hospitalet siden sidste kåring har formået at løfte kvaliteten på isoleret bypassoperation. Et tæt samarbejde på tværs af faglighederne og et dagligt fokus på at gøre tingene til perfektion er opskriften på succes, lyder det.
5h
Dagens Medicin
Dødeligheden efter PCI overholdes på tværs af landetDanmarks bedste til ballonudvidelser 2017
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Dagens Medicin
Uacceptabelt lang ventetid til operation i halspulsåren Uacceptabelt lang ventetid til operation i halspulsåren Danmarks bedste til carotis trombektomi 2017 Anne Mette Steen-Andersen Close: Desværre, kun abonnenter har adgang til at læse denne artikel. Allerede abonnent – log ind Målet for, hvor længe patienter med symptomer på en forbigående blodprop i hjernen (TCI) må vente på operation, lyder på tre dage. Landsregisteret K
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Dagens Medicin
Kun få centre har indberettet tilstrækkelige data for EVAR Kun få centre har indberettet tilstrækkelige data for EVAR Danmarks bedste til abdominale aortaaneurismer 2017 Anne Mette Steen-Andersen Close: Desværre, kun abonnenter har adgang til at læse denne artikel. Allerede abonnent – log ind Ved sidste års kåring viste tallene fra Landsregisteret Karbase, at det stort set havde været muligt at eliminere 30-dages dødelighed ved
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Nobel laureates demand release of Iranian scholar facing death sentence HAND OUT/Belga/PA Images Iranian researcher Ahmadreza Djalali has appealed against the death sentence he received on 21 October. Some 75 Nobel prizewinners have called on the Iranian government to release Ahmadreza Djalali, a researcher in disaster medicine who was sentenced to death last month. The letter is the latest and most powerful protest against the ruling by the scientific community so f
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Dagens Medicin
Stadig lav dødelighed efter isoleret bypassDanmarks bedste til isoleret bypass 2017
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Dagens Medicin
For mange sårkomplikationer efter perifer bypass For mange sårkomplikationer efter perifer bypass Danmarks bedste til perifer bypass 2017 Anne Mette Steen-Andersen Close: Desværre, kun abonnenter har adgang til at læse denne artikel. Allerede abonnent – log ind Karkirurgerne kæmper fortsat med sårkomplikationer i form af blodansamlinger, lymfesiven, lymfeansamling og vævsdød i arret efter perifer bypass. Det fremgår af
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Dagens Medicin
Ingen dødsfald blandt lavrisikopatienterDanmarks bedste til klapoperation med samtidig bypass 2017
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Dagens Medicin
Først komplette data for mere skånsom operationsmetode næste årDanmarks bedste til isoleret aortaklapoperation 2017
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Science | The Guardian
British Library project discovers two new words – thanks to Guardian readers It’s not every day you discover a new word, or at least a new meaning for an old word. But when the Guardian asked its readers to contribute their favourite dialect words, it discovered not one, but two. “Webs” and “trabs” – both of which can mean trainers and were contributed from Liverpool – were just two of the dialectal words and phrases contributed by Guardian readers following an article ab
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Dagens Medicin
Her er Dagens Medicin bedst og værstPå denne plads skyder vi til daglig med skarpt på magthaverne. I anledning af vores fødselsdag får nogle af dem lov til at svare igen. Lidt.
6h
Ingeniøren
Årets it-arbejdsplads: »Diversitet giver mere innovation« »Jeg er den, de andre har sværest ved at forstå. Og jeg har engelsk som modersmål.« Version2 IT Company Rank-analysen Mediehuset Ingeniørens analyseafdeling har for første gang gennemført IT Company Rank, som er en analyse af 50 udvalgte it-virksomheders ‘talent attraction image’ – dvs. hvor gode forudsætninger virksomhederne har for at tiltrække it-medarbejdere. Analysen er baseret på en spørges
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Science | The Guardian
We're living longer but in poorer health, warns thinktank Adults are spending an increasing number of their retirement years in poor health, a thinktank on ageing and population has warned. The report, which focuses on the situation facing those approaching retirement, also highlights the growing inequalities in life expectancy around the country . “We need to start having very frank discussions about what social care is going to look like, what healthc
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Ingeniøren
Leder: Vi budgetterer signaler og tunneler med hovedet under armen Desværre er de nye signaler til den danske jernbane langtfra alene om at koste staten milliarder af kroner mere end planlagt. Store professionelle offentlige organisationer lægger stadig budget med hovedet under armen, selv om erfaringerne i over 40 år har været, at budgetterne igen og igen bliver overskredet. Tag nu blot tre skybrudstunneler under København, som skal lede det regnvand væk, der e
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Dagens Medicin
»Så kan man jo ringe 112« Primærsektoren kan godt overveje, om ikke gærdet kan løftes lidt op, så 112 reserveres til det, som det er beregnet til – og ikke den gråzone af patienter, der unødigt kontakter 112.
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Dagens Medicin
Prioritering, prioritering, prioriteringHospitalerne i dag har budgetter, der burde gøre det muligt at sikre en fagligt forsvarlig prioritering
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New on MIT Technology Review
Why America’s Biggest Bank Digs Anonymous Cryptocurrency Whatever JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon meant last month when he called Bitcoin a “fraud,” he sure doesn’t seem to view its blockchain in the same light. His bank is at the forefront of the effort to adapt the technology for use in the financial industry. Even more surprising, though, is JPMorgan’s collaboration with the people behind a digital currency that’s like Bitcoin except completely anony
8h
Ingeniøren
Fem tip til at tage en længere pause fra arbejdsmarkedet Som millennials langsomt overtager arbejdspladser verden over, kan det blive mere normalt, at arbejdstagere tillader sig selv længere varende pauser fra erhvervslivet. Nye jobtilbud hver uge. Tjek de nyeste opslag på Jobfinder. Det kan være for at tilbringe tid med familien, for at rejse ud og opleve hverdagen på andre kontinenter eller kaste sig over sine barndomsdrømme. Grundene kan være mange,
9h
NYT > Science
Why Is This Bacterium Hiding in Human Tumors? The colon cancer story began in 2011 , when Dr. Matthew Meyerson of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Dr. Robert A. Holt of Simon Fraser University in British Columbia independently reported finding Fusobacteria, which normally inhabit the mouth, in human colon cancers. That instigated a rush to confirm. Researchers around the world reported finding Fusobacteria in colon cancers, but their wor
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Dagens Medicin
Sundhedsvæsenet er gået fra lokalt til nationalt på tyve år Det danske sundhedsvæsen er i dag reelt et statsligt sundhedsvæsen, mener historikeren Kurt Jacobsen. Det er den helt afgørende begivenhed i sundhedsvæsenet siden 1997 – det overgår langt internettets gennembrud, kortlægningen af genomet og andre store begivenheder, mener han.
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Ingeniøren
Vores digitale tvilling gror frem i forskermiljøet In silico, eller på dansk: ‘på computeren’. Det begreb bliver mere og mere almindeligt blandt forskere. In vitro (forsøg i reagensglas) eller in vivo (forsøg på dyr eller mennesker) er ellers normalen, når det handler om at teste farlige stoffer eller medicin. Men fremtidens ‘forsøgsperson’ bliver en virtuel kopi af mennesket lagret i de koder af ettaller og nuller, der løber gennem computerchipp
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cognitive science
What if consciousness is not what drives the human mind? A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
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Live Science
See, Smell, Touch: Why Your Kids Will Love New Senses Exhibit The smell of rain, the flashing red of a stoplight, the rough texture of sandpaper: Every day, we are flooded with sights, sounds, tastes and smells; we experience them through our senses, which filter these signals and send them to our brains to help us interpret and navigate the world around us. This interplay is central to "Our Senses: An Immersive Experience," a new exhibit at the Ameri
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Live Science
'Star Wars' Black Friday Deals: Best of 2017 From a galaxy far, far away, we're bringing you the best Black Friday deals on "Star Wars" merchandise. Friday may still be a few days away, but the force is already super strong with these Black Friday deals. With the Dec. 15 premiere of " Star Wars: The Last Jedi " nearly upon us, there are lots of new items that tie in with this latest entry to the franchise, as well as plenty of toys, a
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Ars Technica
Dealmaster: All the Black Friday tech deals we can find [Updated] Staff — Dealmaster: All the Black Friday tech deals we can find [Updated] Here's our rolling master list of Black Friday's noteworthy tech deals. Ars Staff - Nov 24, 2017 2:01 am UTC reader comments 14 Update (9/24 4:55 AM ET) : We've added several new deals and removed a few more offers that have expired for the time being. Original post: Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our friends at TechBargai
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Nasa timelapse paints 'most complete picture of life' to dateScientists call the new timelapse video the "most complete global picture of life on Earth to date".
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Avatar therapy 'reduces power of schizophrenia voices' Image copyright King's College London Image caption Patients speak face to face with the avatar and practise standing up to it Confronting an avatar on a computer screen helped patients hearing voices to cope better with hallucinations, a UK trial has found. Patients who received this therapy became less distressed and heard voices less often compared with those who had counselling instead. Exper
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Serious mortuary errors could be reduced by applying common patient safety protocols New research investigating serious incidents occurring in the management of patient remains after their death concludes that safe mortuary care may be improved by applying lessons learned from existing patient safety work. The research, published today by the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine , analysed 132 incidents reported in England to a national NHS database between 1 April 2002 and 3
13h
New Scientist - News
Putting a face on hallucinations aids symptoms of schizophrenia By Jessica Bond For people who hear voices, interacting with a virtual avatar that embodies that voice might be key to a speedy reduction in the power it has over them and the distress it causes. That’s according to the first large trial of avatar therapy – the creation of a computerised avatar that is voiced by a therapist. Between 5 and 28 per cent of people will hear voices that no one els
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Gizmodo
GameStop's (Mistakenly?) Taking An Extra 10% Off the Switch, Xbox One X, PS4 Pro, and More. 10% off Physical Items | GameStop | Promo code TY10 GameStop appears to be offering a 10% off sitewide coupon with code TY10 , and at least for now, it works on consoles. That means you can get the PS4 Pro for an unprecedented $315 , or an Xbox One X for $450 . You can also try it on already-discounted Xbox One S bundles , or the PS4 Slim . It wouldn’t surprise me if they kill this very quickly,
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genome of Leishmania reveals how this parasite adapts to environmental changesScientists demonstrate that Leishmania adaptation results from frequent and reversible chromosomal amplifications. This novel insight into Leishmania genomic instability should pave the way for the identification of parasite drug resistance mechanisms and help discover biomarkers.
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Gizmodo
How Did You Get Into Star Wars? Star Wars: The Last Jedi. Image: Walt Disney Studios At some point or another, we were all bitten by the Star Wars bug—er—sandflea. We were dragged to a theater by a cool uncle, handed an N64 controller to play Star Wars Episode I: Pod Racer (let’s be kind to those whose first exposure may not have been the original trilogy), or just caught a marathon over Thanksgiving weekend. For me, it came in
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
From Fat To Fuel, See How Biodiesel Is Made! | Hot Grease Hot Grease Business owner Jim Eberle explains the process of transforming used cooking oil into biodiesel, which can be used as a renewable replacement for diesel fuel. Full Film Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/hot-grease/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Di
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The psychology of Black Friday – how pride and regret influence spending Credit: CC0 Public Domain Black Friday is upon us once again. Deals for cut-price clothes, televisions, appliances – you name it – are popping up. And for a limited time only. While stocks last, you could snag a bargain before Christmas. Traditionally in the UK, you had to wait until the day after Christmas for these kinds of offers. But the last few years have seen Black Friday imported from the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Can passion make better teachers and cure Indonesia's poor learning level? Research shows the teacher is a key to learning improvement. What teachers know, do and care about accounts for 30% of success in students' learning. According to an interview with an officer with a national agency, Indonesia has allocated 52% of the 2017 education budget for teachers . Despite the huge percentage of the education budget being spent on teachers, including to raise their salarie
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why saving our blue planet may lie in the hands of citizen scientists Seagrass meadows are present around the coasts of all continents except the Antarctic. Credit: Benjamin Jones, Author provided Some 95% of the ocean is completely unexplored, unseen by human eyes. That naturally means that there are many marine environments that we don't know much about, but that we're still putting at risk from damaging activities such as bottom trawling . Meadows of seagrass –
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Gizmodo
This $58 Harmony Remote Comes With the $88 Harmony Hub Logitech Harmony Smart Control | $58 | Amazon Logitech Harmony Companion Remote | $100 | Amazon $58 for a Logitech Harmony remote is a great deal on its face, but the real reason to buy this model is the included Harmony Home Hub. The Hub allows you to use your iPhone, Android device, or even an Amazon Echo to control everything a Harmony remote can (which is basically any piece of home theater g
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Water use, drought-tolerant hybrids still key to dryland crop production First planting of dryland sorghum in early August. Credit: Texas A&M AgriLife photo by Dr. Qingwu Xue Risk management is the name of the game when it comes to growing dryland sorghum and corn, which both offer cropping alternatives "when and if" conditions are right, according to recent Texas A&M AgriLife studies. Side-by-side dryland grain sorghum and dryland corn studies were planted this past
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First light for the pioneering SESAME light source Inside the SESAME ring. Credit: Noemi Caraban Gonzalez/CERN At 10:50 yesterday morning scientists at the pioneering SESAME light source saw First Monochromatic Light through the XAFS/XRF (X-ray absorption fine structure/X-ray fluorescence) spectroscopy beamline, signalling the start of the laboratory's experimental programme. This beamline, SESAME's first to come on stream, delivers X-ray light t
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study shows 'fast fashion' continues to risk garment workers' health and well-being Garment workers often face low wages, poor working conditions, long hours and adverse health effects. Credit: University of Sussex On the 24th November 2012, a fire in the Tazreen Fashions factory in Bangladesh led to the death of at least 112 workers, while the collapse of the Rana Plaza building just five months later killed 1,134 garment workers and injured hundreds of survivors. Now, five yea
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Gizmodo
The Roomba For Your Lawn Has the Biggest Discount Ever For Black Friday, and It's Not Even Close Worx Landroid | $649 | Amazon Robotic vacuums have finally started to catch on in the mainstream, but mowing the lawn might actually be the more odious chore, especially when it’s hot out. Luckily, the Roomba for your yard exists, and it’s on sale right now for $649, an all-time low by about $100. The Worx Landroid runs seven days per week to keep your lawn perfectly manicured at all times, and l
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Gizmodo
Everyone's Excited to Punch Nazis In the Latest Trailer for Crisis on Earth-X GIF There are, apparently, two things on this Earth (on multiple Earths, technically) that can unite the disparate heroes of the CW/DC universe. The first is socially obligated wedding appearances. The other? Fighting alternate-universe Nazis. While not as joyously excitable at our first look at Crisis on Earth-X earlier this week , the latest trailer for the big gooey mashup of Arrow , Flash , S
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
As shoppers mobilize on Thanksgiving, retailers branch out In this Wednesday, Nov. 23, 2016, file photo, Denver Walmart Supercenter employee Aaron Sanford stocks toys on shelves in preparation for a Thanksgiving night rush that kicks off Black Friday weekend. Retailers are kicking off the holiday shopping season with an eye toward wooing shoppers away from rivals. (AP Photo/Jim Anderson, File) Shoppers are hitting the stores on Thanksgiving and will be f
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Gizmodo
Dolly the Sheep Didn’t Die Prematurely Because She Was a Clone Dolly the cloned sheep. (Image: The Roslin Institute/The University of Edinburgh., CC BY-NC) Dolly the Sheep made biotech history in 1996 when she became the first animal cloned from adult somatic cells. She lived to the age of seven, which is young for sheep, leading scientists to speculate that her premature death had something to do with her being a clone. New research now shows this wasn’t th
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Science | The Guardian
Weatherwatch: rescuing weather records from Ben Nevis I n 1883 a weather observatory was opened on Britain’s highest peak, Ben Nevis. For the next 21 years the summit observatory was manned continuously by three meteorologists, with detailed measurements taken every hour, day and night, throughout the year. This week around 3,600 “citizen-scientists” finished transcribing the 1.5m observations into digital form. “We will be able to better examine pa
16h
Popular Science
10 shopping apps that will save you cash this holiday season This article was originally published on Working Mother . It's hard to stick to a budget, especially during the holiday season. Coupon clipping and meal planning are great options to save some money , but they're time-consuming and not always the most efficient way to spend less. Below, 10 apps that can help you save on essential ingredients and perfect presents. Here's how to use them. This app
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Reducing phosphorus runoffResearchers test a variety of incentives to learn how best to motivate farmers to curb phosphorus runoff.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ribbed mussels could help improve urban water qualityRibbed mussels can remove nitrogen and other excess nutrients from an urban estuary and could help improve water quality in other urban and coastal locations, according to a study in New York City's Bronx River. The findings are part of long-term efforts to improve water quality in the Bronx River Estuary.
16h
NYT > Science
Review: ‘Bombshell’ Tells the Amazing Story of Hedy Lamarr, the Star and Inventor Photo Alexandra Dean’s documentary “Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story” focuses on the Hollywood star’s work as an inventor who helped revolutionize modern communication. Credit Everett Collection/Zeitgeist Films “Any girl can be glamorous,” the actress Hedy Lamarr once said. “All you have to do is stand still and look stupid.” It’s a withering observation, especially for a Hollywood star once know
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Gizmodo
New Star Wars: The Last Jedi Footage Features Shocking, Unadulterated Porg Violence GIF Chewbacca, how dare you . Every day we get closer to The Last Jedi , more and more snippets of footage come out. But today, dear reader, instead of delightful shots of Poe Dameron drifting in an X-Wing or Luke Skywalker emotionally entering the Millennium Falcon, we have something sinister. Something cruel . DON’T HIT THE PORG, CHEWIE! Ever since the fluffly little darlings wormed their way i
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Gizmodo
Gifts for Your Soon-to-Be Ex As you sit around the fire, your arm lifelessly draped around the person you know you don’t want to spend the rest of your life with but who you misguidedly bought a roundtrip ticket to your parents house for the holidays, consider a painfully mediocre gift. Something that says, “I heard you repeatedly hint that you wanted that cool leather jacket, but here, have a nice pullover I bought at the a
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Gizmodo
Re-Up Your PlayStation Plus and Xbox Live Gold Memberships With Some Black Friday Discounts 1 Year PlayStation Plus | $40 | Amazon 1 Year Xbox Live Gold | $50 | Amazon Whether you’re re-upping your own subscription or giving them out as gifts, both PlayStation Plus and Xbox Live Gold are on sale for Black Friday. The PlayStation Plus deal has been available for a few days, and is pretty straightforward: A year for $40 . Buy it. The Xbox Live deal isn’t quite as good, but paying $50 now
17h
New Scientist - News
Huge dose of brain chemical dopamine may have made us smart Tiziana Fabi/AFP/Getty Images By Andy Coghlan We may owe some of our unique intelligence to a generous supply of a signalling chemical called dopamine in brain regions that help us think and plan. Our brains produce far more dopamine in these regions than the brains of other primates like apes. Dopamine is a brain signalling chemical that is vital for our control of movement. It is depleted i
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Gizmodo
This Photo Exhibit Captures Standing Rock's Striking Beauty All Photos Courtesy of Richard Tsong-Taatarii The indigenous-led force against the Dakota Access Pipeline drew nationwide attention last year in part for its powerful visuals of protestors and communal activism. Now a Minneapolis Photo Center exhibit offers a collection of some of the most powerful of these images by photographer Richard Tsong-Taatarii, who told Earther the movement spoke to him.
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Gizmodo
Wolfenstein II For $25 Is One of Black Friday's Best Gaming Deals Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus | $25 | Amazon | PS4 , Xbox One Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus only just came out ( and it’s really good unless you think Nazis are very fine people), but you can already get it for $25 . $25 From amazon 15 purchased by readers Gizmodo Media Group may get a commission $25 From amazon 13 purchased by readers Gizmodo Media Group may get a commission The warm sun b
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nepal on target to meet aim of doubling tiger population by 2022 Credit: INASP The wild tiger population in the world has declined by more than 98% in the past 200 years; the present tiger population of 3,643 is only 5% of the population a century ago. Concerned by this sharp decline of an iconic animal of the Asian tropical forests, the heads of government of 13 tiger range countries conferred at the International Tiger Forum in St Petersburg, Russia in 2010.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change could increase volcano eruptions Tephras - rock fragments and particles ejected by a volcanic eruption . Credit: University of Leeds Shrinking glacier cover could lead to increased volcanic activity in Iceland, warn scientists. A new study, led by the University of Leeds, has found that there was less volcanic activity in Iceland when glacier cover was more extensive and as the glaciers melted volcanic eruptions increased due to
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NeuWrite San Diego
Science and S’mores: SciCommCamp 2017 Science and S’mores: SciCommCamp 2017 Posted by jonesfreelancewriting on November 23, 2017 in Education , Professional Development , Science communication | Leave a comment SciCommCamp can be best described as a not-so-average conference for a diverse group of fabulously nerdy science communicators with a common goal: to make science publicly accessible. I left SciCommCamp with pep in my step and
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Big Think
Monopoly Was Invented to Demonstrate the Evils of Capitalism ‘Buy land – they aren’t making it any more,’ quipped Mark Twain. It’s a maxim that would certainly serve you well in a game of Monopoly, the bestselling board game that has taught generations of children to buy up property, stack it with hotels, and charge fellow players sky-high rents for the privilege of accidentally landing there. The game’s little-known inventor, Elizabeth Magie, would no d
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mixing the ancient and the new—preserving rock art at the touch of a button Ballochmyle. Credit: Newcastle University Some of the world's most ancient art could be protected with a new app designed by Newcastle University heritage and software experts. Rock art – also known as cups and rings – is under threat. Made by our Neolithic and Early Bronze Age ancestors between 6000 and 3800 years ago, it is mostly found in the countryside. There are more than 6,000 panels in th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Galapagos study finds that new species can develop in as little as 2 generations IMAGE: The breeding of two distinct parent species gave rise to a new lineage (termed "Big Bird " by the researchers). This lineage has been determined to be a new species. This... view more Credit: Copyright P. R. Grant The arrival 36 years ago of a strange bird to a remote island in the Galapagos archipelago has provided direct genetic evidence of a novel way in which new species arise. In th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The world needs to rethink the value of water Research led by Oxford University highlights the accelerating pressure on measuring, monitoring and managing water locally and globally. A new four-part framework is proposed to value water for sustainable development to guide better policy and practice. The value of water for people, the environment, industry, agriculture and cultures has been long-recognised, not least because achieving safely-
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Physicists develop faster way to make Bose-Einstein condensates The world of an atom is one of random chaos and heat. At room temperatures, a cloud of atoms is a frenzied mess, with atoms zipping past each other and colliding, constantly changing their direction and speed. Such random motions can be slowed, and even stopped entirely, by drastically cooling the atoms. At a hair above absolute zero, previously frenetic atoms morph into an almost zombie-like s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How badly do you want something? Babies can tell CAMBRIDGE, MA -- Babies as young as 10 months can assess how much someone values a particular goal by observing how hard they are willing to work to achieve it, according to a new study from MIT and Harvard University. This ability requires integrating information about both the costs of obtaining a goal and the benefit gained by the person seeking it, suggesting that babies acquire very early an
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
World's smallest tape recorder is built from microbes VIDEO: A video of a sample during measurement. The left part exhibits a bottom view onto the plate in between the left- and right-handed part of the samples. The right part... view more Credit: T. Frenzel et al., Science (2017) NEW YORK, NY (Nov. 23, 2017) -- Through a few clever molecular hacks, researchers at Columbia University Medical Center have converted a natural bacterial im
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Antimalarial drugs could support existing cancer treatments in two-pronged attack Antimalarial drugs chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine could find another use as cancer treatments, according to a new clinical study published in ecancermedicalscience . Researchers from the Repurposing Drugs in Oncology (ReDO) project, an international collaboration between the Anticancer Fund, Belgium, and USA-based GlobalCures, say there is evidence to include these drugs in further clinical i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Small but distinct differences among species mark evolution of human brain The most dramatic divergence between humans and other primates can be found in the brain, the primary organ that gives our species its identity. However, all regions of the human brain have molecular signatures very similar to those of our primate relatives, yet some regions contain distinctly human patterns of gene activity that mark the brain's evolution and may contribute to our cognitive abil
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Push to twist: Achieving the classically impossible in human-made material Researchers have designed a metamaterial that can twist to the right or the left in response to a straight, solid push. Such a chiral response is counterintutitive from the viewpoint of ordinary solid mechanics, says Corentin Coulais in a related Perspective. Achieving this paradoxical mechanical behavior in metamaterial brings the field a step closer to designing artificial materials engineered
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tumor-associated bacteria hitches a ride to metastatic sites The same bacteria present in primary tumors of patients with colorectal cancer are also present in liver metastases, a new study finds. What's more, presence of the bacteria was found to correlate with tumor growth. Previous studies have found an abundance of Fusobacterium nucleatum in human colon cancers. To explore whether colon cancer that has spread to other parts of the body also harbors the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Comparison of primate brains hints at what makes us human A detailed comparative analysis of human, chimpanzee and macaque brains reveals elements that make the human brain unique, including cortical circuits underlying production of the neurotransmitter dopamine. To pinpoint differences among primate brains, André M. M. Sousa et al. evaluated brain tissue samples from six humans, five chimpanzees, and five macaques. They generated transcriptional profi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Infants understand that more desirable rewards require more effort Infants who observe someone putting more effort into attaining a goal attribute more value to it, a new study finds. Past work has shed light on ways in which infants come to realize the differences in the value of an object; for example, if a person consistently chooses one item over another, infants will attribute more value to the selected item. Yet, it remains to be determined whether infants
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Solving the mysteries of life: Crystallographers identify 1,000 protein structures PDB ID: 6B0S The Canadian Light Source is celebrating two milestones reached by scientists who have conducted research at the national facility at the University of Saskatchewan. Scientists have solved 1,000 protein structures using data collected at CLS's CMCF beamlines. These have been added to the Protein Data Bank – a collection of structures solved by researchers globally. Researchers have a
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Gizmodo
Lizzie Borden's Potentially Haunted Second Home Is for Sale Image via AP If you’ve been considering purchasing a house in Fall River, Massachusetts, home to several lovely ponds and the site of two gruesome 19th century murders, there’s a fourteen-room Queen Anne Victorian currently on sale for a mere $799,000. The home once belonged to Lizzie Borden , famously tried and acquitted for the aforementioned murders, so in addition to eight bedrooms, a parlor,
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Gizmodo
Make Your Own Droid, No Bad Motivator, With This littleBits Set Commerce Content is independent of Editorial and Advertising, and if you buy something through our posts, we may get a small share of the sale. Click here for more. While you may mess up an entire plot point of an epic franchise, you can pick up this droid littleBits set and make your own R2 unit the way you want. These sets are basically like if LEGO and K’nex had a baby and added a battery. $79
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Science current issue
Comment on "Water harvesting from air with metal-organic frameworks powered by natural sunlight" Kim et al . (Reports, 28 April 2017, p. 430) describe a method for harvesting water from air, using a metal-organic framework (MOF) as the adsorbent. The process as described in the paper is, however, inadequate, and the system cannot deliver the claimed amount of liquid water in an arid climate. A modification of the process design and the use of more suitable MOFs may be more likely to achieve
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Science current issue
Response to Comment on "Water harvesting from air with metal-organic frameworks powered by natural sunlight" The Comment by Meunier states that the process we described in our report cannot deliver the claimed amount of liquid water in an arid climate. This statement is not valid because the parameters presented in our study were inappropriately combined to draw misguided conclusions.
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Science current issue
Blurring disciplinary boundaries Summary The ambitious and integrated framework of the United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) demonstrates that complex global problems span the natural and social sciences and that solutions to such problems demand a joint approach of the two. Despite decades of efforts toward better integration, much of society still presumes a stark divide between the disciplines, and most sci
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Science current issue
News at a glance AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Science current issue
Battle over drilling in Arctic refuge reignites AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Science current issue
GM banana shows promise against deadly fungus strain AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Science current issue
Congress offers defense scientists a bigger payday AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Science current issue
An earthly search for gold's cosmic origins AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Science current issue
Do bacteriophage guests protect human health? AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Science current issue
Survey of archaea in the body reveals other microbial guests AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Science current issue
Tougher than hell Summary Venus is closest in size and composition to Earth. It's also our nearest neighbor. Yet for decades it has remained veiled. NASA hasn't sent a mission there since 1989, and although Europe and Japan have sent orbiters there more recently, their investigations have stopped largely at the top of the planet's thick sulfur clouds. No planet has touched down on the surface since 1985, when the
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Into the hot zone AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Why do Earth's equatorial waves head east? AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Editing peptide presentation to T cells AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Viruses hijack a host lncRNA to replicate AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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As the extension, so the twist AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Enhancing the RNA engineering toolkit AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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The way forward for vector control Summary Prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of vector-borne diseases such as malaria, leishmaniasis, and dengue fever is a complex problem. Major reductions in transmission require multiple different interventions, including both disease treatment and vector control. This is particularly crucial in the high-transmission areas where conditions are optimal, or when epidemics are triggered. However
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Channelrhodopsin reveals its dark secrets AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Quantum interference beyond the fringe AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Valuing water for sustainable development AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Common grounds AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Making the future AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Listening In: Cybersecurity in an Insecure Age AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Mexico's logging threatens butterflies AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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China's new era of ecological civilization AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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NextGen VOICES: Research resolutions AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Ecuador's sharks face threats from within AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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AAAS champions women in science at international events Please log in to add an alert for this article.
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2017 AAAS Fellows approved by the AAAS Council In October 2017, the Council of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) elected 396 members as Fellows of AAAS. These individuals will be recognized for their contributions to science and technology at the Fellows Forum to be held on 17 February 2018 during the AAAS Annual Meeting in Austin, Texas. Presented by section affiliation, they are: Section on Agriculture, Food, an
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AAAS Council reminder The next meeting of the AAAS Council will take place during the 2018 AAAS Annual Meeting in Austin, Texas, and will begin at 9:00 a.m. on 18 February 2018 at the Hilton Austin Hotel. Individuals or organizations wishing to present proposals or resolutions for possible consideration by the council should submit them in written form to AAAS Chief Executive Officer Rush Holt by 10 January 2018. This
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Brightening nights across the globe AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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The makings of the primate brain AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Precise transcriptome engineering AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Behavioral universality across size scales AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Nailing down the proton magnetic moment AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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In network science, change is good AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Two snapshots of the TAPBPR-MHC I complex AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Ranking valuations on the basis of observed choices AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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A tale of two receptors AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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The inner workings of an optogenetic tool AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Tuning diamagnetism with current AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Purifying ethylene with flexible zeolites AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Fluid waves with topological origins AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Getting twisted with metamaterials AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Packing rubidium into quantum degeneracy AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Dissolved inorganic carbon fixers revealed AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Structural basis for mRNA 3'-end processing AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Control the vector, beat the disease AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Host RNA helps promote viral replication AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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A nuclear off-switch for fibrosis AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Tumor immunity flounders without FIP200 AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Prickly problems of cacti phylogeny The genomes and relationships of columnar cacti, such as the saguaro, have been resolved. PHOTO: JAYPIERSTORFF/SHUTTERSTOCK The evolutionary history of cacti has been difficult to resolve. Copetti et al. sequenced the genomes of four species of columnar cacti, including the icon of the American Southwest, the saguaro cactus. A single optimal phylogenetic tree was generated through analysis of the
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Rescuing remyelination Targeting the blood-clotting protein fibrinogen could help promote brain repair after injury. In many brain injuries and neurodegenerative diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, neurons lose their myelin coating, reducing their ability to transmit signals. Petersen et al. have discovered that when the blood-brain barrier is disrupted, fibrinogen from the blood leaks into the central nervous system
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Determining the twist of structured light Light can encode information in several different ways, through parameters such as wavelength, polarization, pulse width, and amplitude. Light can also be prepared with optical angular momentum, whereby the propagating light is structured with a twist or spiral-like structure. However, a receiver typically finds it difficult to determine the twist of arbitrary or multimode structured light beams.
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Coactivator starts and stalls In embryonic development and growth control, the histone acetyltransferase p300/CBP (CBP) serves as a transcriptional coactivator with hundreds of different partner transcription factors. By examining the role of CBP in fruitfly cells, Boija et al. have extended its functional repertoire in regulating gene expression. Promoters cobound with CBP and GAGA factor were among the most highly expressed
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Getting help from Mother Nature Enlisting nature's help can go a long way toward keeping a future global temperature increase below 2°C. PHOTO: PETER ESSICK/AURORA PHOTOS The Paris Climate Agreement established the goal of holding climate warming below 2°C, an ambitious target that will require nations to take aggressive action to reduce carbon emissions. How much help can we expect to get from the environment? Griscom et al. o
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Mosquito symbiont malaria defense A bacterium in mosquitoes blocks malaria parasite transmission. PHOTO: JIM GATHANY/CDC The bacterium Wolbachia is found in many arthropods, in which it can manipulate host reproductive success. It has long been considered a candidate for controlling disease-carrying mosquitoes. Until recently, Wolbachia had not been found in anopheline malaria-transmitting mosquitoes. Gomes et al. add to recent d
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High-symmetry silver The high-symmetry “buckyball” structure of C 60 captured the imagination as a reflection of nature's intrinsic elegance at the molecular scale. Wang et al. now report a similar icosahedral cage composed of 180 silver ions, capped and compensated by an array of organic thiolate and sulfonate ions. Fragile crystals emerged after heating simple precursors in methanol and were characterized by x-ray
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RNA editing with CRISPR-Cas13 Nucleic acid editing holds promise for treating genetic disease, particularly at the RNA level, where disease-relevant sequences can be rescued to yield functional protein products. Type VI CRISPR-Cas systems contain the programmable single-effector RNA-guided ribonuclease Cas13. We profiled type VI systems in order to engineer a Cas13 ortholog capable of robust knockdown and demonstrated RNA edi
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Molecular and cellular reorganization of neural circuits in the human lineage To better understand the molecular and cellular differences in brain organization between human and nonhuman primates, we performed transcriptome sequencing of 16 regions of adult human, chimpanzee, and macaque brains. Integration with human single-cell transcriptomic data revealed global, regional, and cell-type–specific species expression differences in genes representing distinct functional ca
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Structure-property relationships from universal signatures of plasticity in disordered solids When deformed beyond their elastic limits, crystalline solids flow plastically via particle rearrangements localized around structural defects. Disordered solids also flow, but without obvious structural defects. We link structure to plasticity in disordered solids via a microscopic structural quantity, "softness," designed by machine learning to be maximally predictive of rearrangements. Experim
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Ten-month-old infants infer the value of goals from the costs of actions Infants understand that people pursue goals, but how do they learn which goals people prefer? We tested whether infants solve this problem by inverting a mental model of action planning, trading off the costs of acting against the rewards actions bring. After seeing an agent attain two goals equally often at varying costs, infants expected the agent to prefer the goal it attained through costlier
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The fundamental advantages of temporal networks In network science, change is good Historically, network science focused on static networks, in which nodes are connected by permanent links. However, in networked systems ranging from protein-protein interactions to social networks, links change. Although it might seem that permanent links would make it easier to control a system, Li et al. demonstrate that temporality has advantages in real and
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Major role of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in dark ocean carbon fixation Carbon fixation by chemoautotrophic microorganisms in the dark ocean has a major impact on global carbon cycling and ecological relationships in the ocean’s interior, but the relevant taxa and energy sources remain enigmatic. We show evidence that nitrite-oxidizing bacteria affiliated with the Nitrospinae phylum are important in dark ocean chemoautotrophy. Single-cell genomics and community metag
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An interferon-independent lncRNA promotes viral replication by modulating cellular metabolism Viruses regulate host metabolic networks to improve their survival. The molecules that are responsive to viral infection and regulate such metabolic changes are hardly known, but are essential for understanding viral infection. Here we identify a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) that is induced by multiple viruses, but not by type I interferon (IFN-I), and facilitates viral replication in mouse and hu
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Architecture of eukaryotic mRNA 3'-end processing machinery Structural basis for mRNA 3′-end processing The eukaryotic mRNA 3′-end processing machinery interacts with the transcription machinery and adds the polyadenylation tail on the mRNA substrate. Casañal et al. used cryo-electron microscopy, mass spectrometry, and biochemical reconstitutions to show that the mRNA 3′-end processing machinery is organized into nuclease, polymerase, and phosphatase modu
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Structure of the TAPBPR-MHC I complex defines the mechanism of peptide loading and editing Adaptive immunity is shaped by a selection of peptides presented on major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) molecules. The chaperones Tapasin (Tsn) and TAP-binding protein–related (TAPBPR) facilitate MHC I peptide loading and high-affinity epitope selection. Despite the pivotal role of Tsn and TAPBPR in controlling the hierarchical immune response, their catalytic mechanism remains unkno
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Crystal structure of a TAPBPR-MHC I complex reveals the mechanism of peptide editing in antigen presentation Central to CD8 + T cell–mediated immunity is the recognition of peptide–major histocompatibility complex class I (p–MHC I) proteins displayed by antigen-presenting cells. Chaperone-mediated loading of high-affinity peptides onto MHC I is a key step in the MHC I antigen presentation pathway. However, the structure of MHC I with a chaperone that facilitates peptide loading has not been determined.
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Control of zeolite framework flexibility and pore topology for separation of ethane and ethylene The discovery of new materials for separating ethylene from ethane by adsorption, instead of using cryogenic distillation, is a key milestone for molecular separations because of the multiple and widely extended uses of these molecules in industry. This technique has the potential to provide tremendous energy savings when compared with the currently used cryogenic distillation process for ethylen
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Three-dimensional mechanical metamaterials with a twist Rationally designed artificial materials enable mechanical properties that are inaccessible with ordinary materials. Pushing on an ordinary linearly elastic bar can cause it to be deformed in many ways. However, a twist, the counterpart of optical activity in the static case, is strictly zero. The unavailability of this degree of freedom hinders applications in terms of mode conversion and the re
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Topological origin of equatorial waves Topology sheds new light on the emergence of unidirectional edge waves in a variety of physical systems, from condensed matter to artificial lattices. Waves observed in geophysical flows are also robust to perturbations, which suggests a role for topology. We show a topological origin for two well-known equatorially trapped waves, the Kelvin and Yanai modes, owing to the breaking of time-reversal
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Creation of a Bose-condensed gas of 87Rb by laser cooling Protocols for attaining quantum degeneracy in atomic gases almost exclusively rely on evaporative cooling, a time-consuming final step associated with substantial atom loss. We demonstrate direct laser cooling of a gas of rubidium-87 ( 87 Rb) atoms to quantum degeneracy. The method is fast and induces little atom loss. The atoms are trapped in a two-dimensional optical lattice that enables cycles
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Double-trap measurement of the proton magnetic moment at 0.3 parts per billion precision Precise knowledge of the fundamental properties of the proton is essential for our understanding of atomic structure as well as for precise tests of fundamental symmetries. We report on a direct high-precision measurement of the magnetic moment μ p of the proton in units of the nuclear magneton μ N . The result, μ p = 2.79284734462 (±0.00000000082) μ N , has a fractional precision of 0.3 parts pe
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Current-induced strong diamagnetism in the Mott insulator Ca2RuO4 Mott insulators can host a surprisingly diverse set of quantum phenomena when their frozen electrons are perturbed by various stimuli. Superconductivity, metal-insulator transition, and colossal magnetoresistance induced by element substitution, pressure, and magnetic field are prominent examples. Here we report strong diamagnetism in the Mott insulator calcium ruthenate (Ca 2 RuO 4 ) induced by
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New Products Summary A weekly roundup of information on newly offered instrumentation, apparatus, and laboratory materials of potential interest to researchers.
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Webinar | CRISPR unleashed: New tools and applications in live-cell imaging Summary The CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing system has been a boon for researchers, enabling them to manipulate a broad range of genomes quickly and accurately. This novel, versatile tool has been used with great precision for DNA editing as well as a multitude of other applications. Recent enhancements have expanded its abilities; one example is a new, hyperaccurate Cas9 variant that demonstrates high
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Sponsored Collection | Advancing precision medicine: Current and future proteogenomic strategies for biomarker discovery and development CUSTOM PUBLISHING OFFICE SPONSORED SUPPLEMENT Sponsored Collection | Advancing precision medicine: Current and future proteogenomic strategies for biomarker discovery and development See all Hide authors and affiliations Science 24 Nov 2017: Vol. 358, Issue 6366, pp. 1088 DOI: 10.1126/science.358.6366.1088-c
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Learning to be a mentor My early experiences mentoring undergraduate students didn't go well. My first attempt came during the second year of my Ph.D. I was still trying to learn some lab techniques myself, and I wasn't sure whether I would be able to invest the time needed to train a student. But I was interested in developing my mentoring skills, and my adviser encouraged me to give it a try. The student required hand
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Structural insights into ion conduction by channelrhodopsin 2 The light-gated ion channel channelrhodopsin 2 (ChR2) from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a major optogenetic tool. Photon absorption starts a well-characterized photocycle, but the structural basis for the regulation of channel opening remains unclear. We present high-resolution structures of ChR2 and the C128T mutant, which has a markedly increased open-state lifetime. The structure reveals two c
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Galapagos finches caught in act of becoming new species Image copyright Pr Grant Image caption This is an image of the Big Bird lineage, which arose through the breeding of two distinct parent species: G. fortis and G. conirostris A population of finches on the Galapagos has been discovered in the process of becoming a new species. This is the first example of speciation that scientists have been able to observe directly in the field. Researchers foll
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists develop faster way to make Bose-Einstein condensates Rb atoms are trapped in a 2D lattice formed by two orthogonal retroreflected trapping beams at 1064 nm. The cooling light at 795 nm propagates along the magnetic field (z) and is sigma(–) -polarized. Credit: Science (2017). 10.1126/science.aan5614 The world of an atom is one of random chaos and heat. At room temperatures, a cloud of atoms is a frenzied mess, with atoms zipping past each other and
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World's smallest tape recorder is built from microbes Audio signals can be stored in a magnetic tape medium; similarly the microscopic data recorder stores biological signals into a CRISPR tape in bacteria. Credit: Wang Lab/Columbia University Medical Center Through a few clever molecular hacks, researchers at Columbia University Medical Center have converted a natural bacterial immune system into a microscopic data recorder, laying the groundwork f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Galapagos study finds that new species can develop in as little as two generations The breeding of two distinct parent species gave rise to a new lineage (termed "Big Bird" by the researchers). This lineage has been determined to be a new species. This image is of a member of the Big Bird lineage. Credit: Copyright P. R. Grant The arrival 36 years ago of a strange bird to a remote island in the Galapagos archipelago has provided direct genetic evidence of a novel way in which n
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The world needs to rethink the value of water Credit: CC0 Public Domain Research led by Oxford University highlights the accelerating pressure on measuring, monitoring and managing water locally and globally. A new four-part framework is proposed to value water for sustainable development to guide better policy and practice. The value of water for people, the environment, industry, agriculture and cultures has been long-recognised, not least
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Gizmodo
This Double-Handed Glove Lets You Hold Four Beers Instead of Just Two GIF GIF: YouTube Federico Ciccarese and his company, Youbionic , imagine a not-too-distant future where everything we see is enhanced through augmented reality, and our body’s ability to interact with the world is upgraded through augmented physicality. What does that look like? For starters, a $2,000+ 3D-printed glove that puts two hands on the end of your arms, instead of just one. The potentia
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Science : NPR
Human Brains Have Evolved Unique 'Feel-Good' Circuits A chimpanzee skull, at left, and a human skull. Scientists are probing why our brains evolved so differently despite many similarities. D. Roberts/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra hide caption toggle caption D. Roberts/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra A chimpanzee skull, at left, and a human skull. Scientists are probing why our brains evolved so differently despite many similarities. D. Roberts/
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Tiger Subspecies Revised, 2017 There are certain animal species where – for reasons related to the charisma of the animal concerned, and the distinct nature of its various populations – we tend to learn about the various subspecies. Giraffes are one good example. Another is the Tiger Panthera tigris . Not all tigers are the same. Small size and a prominent facial ruff shows here that we're dealing with a Sumatran tiger
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Popular Science
No, turkey doesn’t make you sleepy ‘Tis the season for giblets, wattles and snoods—oh my. On Thanksgiving and Christmas, Americans consume about 68 million turkeys—one for about every five of us. In fact, 29 percent of all turkeys gobbled down in the U.S. are consumed during the holidays. And where turkey is being eaten, there is inevitably talk of tryptophan—a naturally occurring chemical found in turkey and other foods. This bui
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Glucocorticoids offer long-term benefits for patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophyGlucocorticoids, a class of steroid hormone medications often prescribed to patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, offer long-term benefits for this disease, including longer preservation of muscle strength and function and decreased risk of death.
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Four simple tests could help GPs spot pneumonia and reduce unnecessary antibioticsTesting for fever, high pulse rate, crackly breath sounds, and low oxygen levels could be key to helping GPs distinguish pneumonia from less serious infections, according to a large study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
By saving cost and energy, the lighting revolution may increase light pollutionMunicipalities, enterprises, and households are switching to LED lights in order to save energy. But these savings might be lost if their neighbors install new or brighter lamps. Scientists fear that this 'rebound effect' might partially or totally cancel out the savings of individual lighting retrofit projects, and make skies over cities considerably brighter.
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EU trade ban brings down global trade in wild birds by 90 percentTrade of wild birds has dropped 90 percent globally since EU banned bird imports in 2005. A new study demonstrates how it decreased the number of birds traded annually from 1.3 million to 130,000. International trade of wild birds is a root cause of exotic birds spreading worldwide.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Women prefer getting mammograms every yearWomen prefer to get their mammograms every year, instead of every two years, according to a new study.
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Prion protein found in skin of CJD patientsScientists have detected abnormal prion protein in the skin of several people who died from Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). The scientists also exposed healthy mice to skin extracts from two CJD patients, and all developed prion disease. The study results raise questions about the possible transmissibility of prion diseases via medical procedures involving skin, and whether skin samples might be
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Save Nearly $100 On the Essential KitchenAid Artisan Stand Mixer Commerce Content is independent of Editorial and Advertising, and if you buy something through our posts, we may get a small share of the sale. Click here for more. No kitchen is complete without a KitchenAid stand mixer, and the ever-popular Artisan series is down to $224 on Amazon for Black Friday, in a variety of colors. Note : A few color options are below, but click around, there are more. $
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Turn Your Leftover Halloween Candy Into a Giant Turkey Lollipop and Win Thanksgiving GIF Here’s a harsh truth the country needs to hear: turkey is actually the worst part of your Thanksgiving meal. It’s bland, it’s often dry, and it takes up valuable space in the oven all day long. There’s an easy fix, however, that doesn’t involve brining or frying. Just replace your bird with a giant turkey-shaped lollipop made from leftover Halloween candy. Specifically, you’ll need to dig out
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New discovery to accelerate development of salt-tolerant grapevinesA discovery is likely to improve the sustainability of the Australian wine sector and significantly accelerate the breeding of more robust salt-tolerant grapevines.
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Imaging technique shows progress Alzheimer's diseaseUsing ‘Raman’ optical technology, scientists can now produce images of brain tissue that is affected by Alzheimer’s disease. The images include the surrounding areas, already showing changes.
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Flamingo feces and their way of walking stimulate organic matter filtering in saline wetlandsThe greater flamingo (Phoenicopterus roseus) facilitates microbial ‘filtering’ of organic matter in saline wetlands, thus improving water quality and reducing nitrogen loads by promoting denitrification, research concludes. This is a facilitating role these animals possess which was unknown until now.
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Meadows beat out shrubs when it comes to storing carbonWhile the world focuses on controlling global warming caused by carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels, less attention has been paid to the capacity of vegetation and soils to take up and store carbon. A remote field site in the Norwegian mountains is improving our understanding of carbon cycling in high-latitude alpine areas.
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New approach to tracking how deadly 'superbugs' travel could slow their spreadUsing a real-world outbreak as a test case, a team combined patient-transfer data and whole-genome sequencing to identify hotspots for transmission of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
One-size treatment for blood cancer probably doesn't fit all, researchers sayThough African-American men are three times more likely to be diagnosed with a blood cancer called multiple myeloma, most scientific research on the disease has been based on people of European descent. That trend is problematic considering that African-Americans -- the most at-risk population for multiple myeloma -- have different genetics that can affect how this type of cancer progresses and wh
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Science | The Guardian
Welcome to the (possible) future: V&A shows tech's hottest ideas New technology could allow us to clean up devastating damage to the environment, charge a phone with our clothes and create vast factories in space. But it appears to have its limits: the tedium of laundry, a new exhibition suggests, will still be down to us. An exhibition next year at the V&A on possibly revolutionary design will include some notable missteps besides the successes – the robot, f
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Two NASA Science Planes Are Capturing Some Glorious Images of Antarctica Sea ice forming off the edge of Nobile Glacier on the Antarctic Peninsula during Operation IceBridge’s first flight of the 2017 Antarctic campaign, on Oct, 29, 2017. Photo: NASA/Nathan Kurtz Every year, NASA’s Operation Icebridge plumbs the wonders and woes of the ice at both poles, and 2017 is no different. Icebridge’s Antarctic field mission kicked off about a month ago, and satellites and plan
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Engineers model the California reservoir networkAn empirical model of 55 of California's major reservoirs reveals how they respond to shifting drought conditions and to one another.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Meningococcal vaccine could protect against 91 percent of targeted bacterial strainsUp to 91 percent of bacterial strains causing a common type of invasive serogroup B meningococcal disease in children and young adults are likely to be covered by a four-component vaccine called MenB-4C (Bexsero), according to laboratory studies.
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Nanosponges show promise for potentially blinding eye infectionsUsing a mouse model that engineered nanosponges can be used to protect eyes from infections caused by Enterococcus faecalis, researchers demonstrate. Enterococcus faecalis contain a toxin called cytolysin, which is found in roughly 50 percent of isolates that cause post-operative intraocular infections seen in the United States.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Quantum internet goes hybridResearchers report the first demonstration of an elementary link of a hybrid quantum information network, using a cold atomic cloud and a doped crystal as quantum nodes as well as single telecom photons as information carriers. The study demonstrates the communication and transmission of quantum information between two completely different types of quantum nodes placed in different labs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Icebound detector reveals how ghostly neutrinos are stopped coldFamously, neutrinos, the nearly massless particles that are a fundamental component of the universe, can zip through a million miles of lead without skipping a beat. Now, in a critical measurement that may one day help predict new physics beyond the Standard Model of particle physics -- the model that seeks to explain the fundamental forces of the universe -- an international team of researchers w
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All Of Your Flash Storage Needs Are Covered In This Massive SanDisk Sale Commerce Content is independent of Editorial and Advertising, and if you buy something through our posts, we may get a small share of the sale. Click here for more. There’s no such thing as owning too much flash storage, and you can stock up on flash drives and SD cards in Amazon Black Friday sale . I suspect that the most popular items here will be the high-capacity microSD cards, which are grea
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Gifts for People Looking for New Ways to Escape This Hellish Reality The real world is... well, you know. And at some point or another we all need a break from it. Helping your loved ones transport themselves to an entirely different realm is a gift just about anyone would enjoying receiving this holiday season, and these gifts are just the ticket. Game of Thrones Live Concert Experience Get out your fur-lined handkerchiefs, because we’ve only got one season of Ga
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Ingeniøren
Skal filosofikum genindføres på universitetet, eller er det spild af tid? Lad mig begynde med et citat: »Fremtidens arbejdsmarked stiller krav om omstillingsparate medarbejdere, der evner selvstændigt at lære gennem hele livet. Der bliver brug for både faglighed og tværfaglighed.« Indlysende rigtigt, men noget floskelagtigt, kan vi sikkert blive enige om. Men hvem har skrevet dette, hvornår og hvorfor? Skal vi snuppe fortsættelsen, som giver en del af svaret. Filosofik
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bowhead whales come to Cumberland Sound in Nunavut to exfoliateAerial drone footage of bowhead whales in Canada's Arctic has revealed that the large mammals molt and use rocks to rub off dead skin.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stock market microstructures: Modeling could help evaluate financial crisesResearchers have analyzed the statistical regularities and irregularities in the recent order flow of 96 different NASDAQ stocks. Since prices are strongly correlated during financial crises, they evolve in a way that is similar to what happens to nerve signals during epileptic seizures. The findings contribute to modeling price evolution, and could ultimately be used to evaluate the impact of fin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
From cars to Mars: What's good for F1 is good for life across the universe Rocks used to surface the race track at the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix originate from a Shropshire quarry that is being studied by geoscientists from the University of Aberdeen. Credit: University of Aberdeen The rocks used to surface the track at this weekend's Abu Dhabi Grand Prix are helping scientists understand how life might occur on other planets. The rocks originate from a Shropshire quarry tha
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
ESA's latest technology CubeSat cleared for launch site Technology CubeSats GomX-4A (left) and GomX-4B (right) in ESA’s Mechanical Systems Laboratory, about to undergo thermal–vacuum testing in June 2017. The pair of nanosatellites was placed inside a vacuum chamber to simulate the hard vacuum and temperature extremes they will experience in their 540 km-altitude orbit. Credit: European Space Agency GomX-4B, ESA's latest and largest technology-testing
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Lost' 99% of ocean microplastics to be identified with dye? Smaller ocean microplastics (below 1mm) made visible with fluorescent dye - viewed through a microscope. Credit: University of Warwick The smallest microplastics in our oceans – which go largely undetected and are potentially harmful – could be more effectively identified using an innovative and inexpensive new method, developed by researchers at the University of Warwick. New research, led by Ga
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Wall of Hertz test chamberThese spiky carbon-impregnated foam pyramids, seen here in ESA's Hertz test chamber, cover the walls of facilities that simulate the endless void of space.
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Gizmodo
Yep, It's Still Not a Good Idea to Eat Raw Cookie Dough Image: Albertine Watson/Wikimedia For some, sneaking a mouthful of raw cookie dough while baking is an indelible—and certainly delicious—part of the process. But while we’ve been told to avoid dough containing raw eggs, a new investigation confirms that tainted raw flour was responsible for an E. coli outbreak in 2016—a finding that will surely test our temptation to lick the bottom of the bowl.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Children show implicit racial attitudes from a young age, research confirms Credit: University of Bristol White children show signs of implicit racism from the age of five by favouring people with the same skin colour, according to new research. Academics from the University of Bristol and York University in Toronto measured the automatic attitudes of 359 white children aged five to 12-years-old by testing their preferences of unknown white and black children in photogra
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Big data creates family tree of constitutionsResearchers have constructed a big data, evolutionary taxonomy of the world's constitutions resulting in a mathematically-derived genealogy of founding documents.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study questions exclusion of cancer survivors from trialsA quarter of newly diagnosed cancer patients 65 or older are survivors who had a prior cancer – often preventing them from participating in clinical trials, researchers have found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Frictional heat powers hydrothermal activity on EnceladusA computer simulation shows how icy moon heats water in a porous rock core. This study also offers among others an answer to the long-standing question of where the energy that can support water in liquid form on a small, cryovulcanic moon far from the sun comes from.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Intranasal ketamine has more minor side effects than intranasal fentanyl in children with acute painMinor adverse events (e.g., bad taste in the mouth and dizziness) occur more frequently with intranasal ketamine than with intranasal fentanyl in children with suspected extremity fractures, research shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dark matter and dark energy: Do they really exist?Researchers have hypothesized that the universe contains a 'dark matter.' They have also posited the existence of a 'dark energy.' These two hypotheses account for the movement of stars in galaxies and for the accelerating expansion of the universe. But, according to a researcher, these concepts may be no longer valid: the phenomena can be demonstrated without them. This research exploits a new th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Morocco to pray for rain A man walks through what used to be an oasis near the southeast Moroccan town of Erfoud in the Sahara Desert Parched Morocco which is heavily dependent on its agricultural sector is to hold prayers for rain Friday in mosques across the country under a royal decree. "Water is becoming more and more scarce. We keep having to dig deeper to find any," said Houcine Aderdour, president of a producers'
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Lost' 99% of ocean microplastics to be identified with dye?The smallest microplastics in oceans, which go largely undetected, can be identified more effectively with an innovative and cheap new method, report researchers. The new method can detect microplastics as small as the width of a human hair, using a fluorescent dye. Previous scientific field work surveys report that only 1% of the plastic waste in the oceans has been found. This new research could
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mysterious deep-Earth seismic signature explainedNew research on oxygen and iron chemistry under the extreme conditions found deep inside the Earth could explain a longstanding seismic mystery called ultralow velocity zones. The findings could have far-reaching implications on our understanding of Earth's geologic history, including life-altering events such as the Great Oxygenation Event, which occurred 2.4 billion years ago.
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Science | The Guardian
Could octopus DNA reveal the secrets of west Antarctica’s ice sheet collapse? T here are a lot of scientific eyes on west Antarctica right now, for some pretty obvious reasons. The West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) holds a lot of water – enough to push up sea levels around the world by 3m or so. Even though this sort of melting would play out over century-long time scales, getting a handle on how much melting there would be, and how fast it could happen , are big questions w
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Gizmodo
Here Are Your Philips Hue Black Friday Deals, Including a $60 White Starter Kit Philips Hue White Smart Bulb Starter Kit (4 A19 Bulbs and 1 Bridge) | $60 | Amazon Philips Hue A19 White and Color Bulb | $32 | Amazon Philips Hue LightStrip Plus Dimmable LED Smart Light | $50 | Amazon Black Friday’s here to brighten your day with an array of Philips Hue smart lighting deals. In my opinion, the Hue White starter kit for $60 is a better way to get started than the more popular co
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Ars Technica
Judge who once ruled against NSA metadata program tosses lawsuit Enlarge / Larry Klayman, seen here in 2014. reader comments 6 A federal judge in Washington, DC has dismissed two long-running lawsuits that aimed to shed light on the often secretive surveillance state. As the National Security Agency’s metadata program no longer exists , the cases are now moot. "This Court, in the final analysis, has no choice but to dismiss these cases for plaintiffs’ failure
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Scientific American Content: Global
Nature's Response to the Catastrophic California Wildfires SANTA ROSA, CA. Propelled by gale-force Diablo winds, the devastating wildfire struck the Pepperwood Preserve —a biodiverse “hotspot” that is home to 900 species of plants and animals—during the night of October 8. It swept through low-lying chaparral, scorched grasslands, and incinerated dead or damaged trees that had fallen in the forest, leaving behind ghostly white ash imprints of their canop
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Gizmodo
Lenovo's Yoga 720 Is a Lot of Laptop for Not a Lot of Money All images: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo Thanks to Lenovo’s expertise in making 2-in-1 laptops, which let you use it as a laptop or a thick tablet, you can now get a relatively inexpensive machine that doesn’t make you feel like you picked your computer up from the prize counter at Chuck E. Cheese’s. The $750 Lenovo Yoga 720 might not be the slickest 2-in-1 Lenovo’s made this year—the Yoga 920 is nearly pe
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Neurobiology: The chemistry of memoryLearning requires the chemical adaptation of individual synapses. Researchers have now revealed the impact of an RNA-binding protein that is intimately involved in this process on learning and memory formation and learning processes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Climate change could increase volcano eruptionsShrinking glacier cover could lead to increased volcanic activity in Iceland, warn scientists in a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hunting for the finest dropletModern passenger airplanes already consume less than three liters fuel per one hundred kilometers and passenger. Scientists are currently working on further improving this value. In addition, engineers plan to optimize the combustion process such that exhaust gas emission is reduced considerably. For this purpose, they use supercomputers and simulation methods that are usually applied for tsunami
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Highly charged molecules behave paradoxicallyChemistry researchers have now discovered how certain small biomolecules attach to one another. The researchers’ study also overturns the standard picture – particles with the same electrical charge appear to be drawn together and not vice versa. The results may be important for the development of new drugs.
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New Scientist - News
App can tell you if a mosquito is about to give you malaria Should you worry? Stephen Dalton/Nature Picture Library/Getty By Nicole Kobie A mosquito bite can infect you with malaria , dengue or zika , diseases that kill hundreds of thousands of people every year. But how can you tell if the mosquitoes near you are dangerous? Well, now there’s an app for that. Only 40 of the 3500 mosquito species bite humans. It would be nearly impossible to identify t
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New Scientist - News
Strong bones may be vital for maintaining memory in old age Remember to pump some iron Thomas Barwick/Getty By Viviane Callier A hormone released by bones seems to reverse age-related memory loss. The hormone can be boosted by exercise, suggesting that lifting weights might protect the brain from the ravages of old age. Eric Kandel of Columbia University in New York and colleagues were interested in understanding the mechanisms behind normal age-relat
20h
Ars Technica
Guidemaster: Want an Alexa device? Here’s every Amazon Echo, compared Valentina Palladino reader comments 1 Amazon debuted the original Echo a few years ago, and it raised eyebrows in the tech industry. The Echo is a smart home speaker that houses Amazon's Alexa virtual assistant, an AI helper that helps you complete daily tasks using only your voice. Since its debut, users of all levels of tech prowess have embraced Echo and Alexa, finding practicality in a voice-
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Radiographs of Dolly's skeleton show no signs of abnormal osteoarthritisOriginal concerns that cloning caused early-onset osteoarthritis (OA) in Dolly the sheep are unfounded, report experts.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Key to regenerating blood vessels discoveredA signaling pathway that is essential for angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels, has been discovered by researchers. The findings may improve current strategies to improve blood flow in ischemic tissue, such as that found in atherosclerosis and peripheral vascular disease associated with diabetes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
China's reversing emission flows revealed by researchThe flow of China's carbon emissions has reversed, according to new research. The study estimates the carbon implications of recent changes in the country's economic development patterns and role in international trade since the global financial crisis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ocean floor mud reveals secrets of past European climateSamples of sediment taken from the ocean floor of the North Atlantic Ocean have given researchers an unprecedented insight into the reasons why Europe's climate has changed over the past 3,000 years.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New batteries with better performance, improved safetyCurrently the most important technology for batteries is the lithium-ion battery technology, but the technology is expensive and contains a flammable liquid. To satisfy the growing demand from emerging markets, researchers have devised a new battery prototype: known as "all-solid-state," this battery has the potential to store more energy while maintaining high safety and reliability levels.
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Gizmodo
This Is the Only Black Friday Deal I Care About Image: LG/Gizmodo This Black Friday, when I’m swollen with cold turkey and yams, I’m going to lounge on my couch, some mindless Netflix marathon playing in the background, and I’m going to stare at the expected delivery date for the one thing I’ve actually bothered to order this week, on the occasion of the most hallowed of shopping holidays: A $2300 OLED TV from LG . It was not easy deciding to
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Gizmodo
Save $5 On Any $20 Book Order From Amazon For the first time since Prime Day, Amazon’s offering a sitewide discount on all physical books they sell; save $5 on any order of $20 or more with code GIFTBOOK17 . Just like previous, similar deals, this deal excludes Kindle titles and audiobooks, but if there are any commemorative coffee table-type books or collector’s editions that you’ve been eyeing, this is a great opportunity. Just choose
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Holiday gift ideas: Cord-cutting choices to please even hard-core TV enthusiasts It's a great time to be a TV consumer. We have great choices for pay TV services from companies like AT&T, Spectrum, DirecTV, Dish and a few others. Cord cutters can also have their pick of streaming services, from Sling TV, Playstation Vue, Hulu, YouTube, DirecTV Now and a few others. There's plenty of TV-watching gear to shop for this year. Here's a good mix of items I've come across. - Sling
21h
The Economist: The world this week
KAL's cartoon Inheritance tax A hated tax but a fair one The case for taxing inherited assets is strong
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lead poisoning deaths up in New Hampshire loons despite law More than year after New Hampshire passed one of the nation's toughest bans on using lead fishing tackle, loons are still dying from ingesting fishing weights and lures. The 2016 law prohibits the sale and use of lead tackle in the state as part of an effort to revive the state's loon population. But Loon Preservation Committee senior biologist Harry Vogel says eight loons have died this year fro
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Even small black holes emit gravitational waves when they collide, and LIGO heard them A black hole devouring a star. Credit: NASA LIGO scientists say they have discovered gravitational waves coming from another black hole merger, and it's the tiniest one they've ever seen. The findings , submitted to the Astrophysical Journal Letters , could shed light on the diversity of the black hole population - and may help scientists figure out why larger black holes appear to behave differe
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Gizmodo
This Brilliant Peelable Paint Is a Screen Protector For Every Surface In Your Home If you’re as protective of your gadgets as I am, you’ve probably got a screen protector ready to apply to your new phone as soon as you’ve taken it out of the box. But how do you protect all the other surfaces in your home you don’t want getting dinged and dented? You cover it with this perfectly clear screen protector paint . If you’ve ever peeled dried white glue off your fingers after a craft
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Gizmodo
The Best Noise Cancelling Headphones On Earth Just Got Their First Discount Ever Sony WH1000XM2s | $298 | Amazon Sony MDRXB650BT/B Extra Bass Bluetooth Headphones | $72 | Amazon Sony XB950B1 Extra Bass Wireless Headphones with App Control | $98 | Amazon Sony XB950N1 Extra Bass Wireless Noise Canceling Headphones, Black | $123 | Amazon Sony’s WH1000XM2s put the noise-canceling headphone world on notice when they were released earlier this year, and now, you can get them at a d
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Airbnb takes steps to welcome travelers with disabilities In response to complaints that its platform isn't always accommodating of guests with disabilities, Airbnb recently revealed new steps to address that problem. The San Francisco-based home-sharing company has acquired Accomable, a London-based home-sharing site that caters specifically to disabled travelers. Accomable was founded in 2015 by Srin Madipalli and Martyn Sibley - frequent travelers
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Gizmodo
After the Water Crisis, Thanksgiving In Flint Is About Healing Thanksgiving will never be the same for families in Flint, Michigan, the city that made national news in 2015 for its lead-contaminated drinking water. Mae Collins, 50, is no exception. Her annual family tradition has changed drastically since 2014, when city officials switched the city’s drinking water source to the Flint River, turning tap water into brown filth. Since then, using tap water—for
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Dolly the sheep health fears 'unfounded' Image copyright SPL Image caption Dolly the Sheep on display in Edinburgh's Royal Museum Concerns that Dolly the cloned sheep suffered from early-onset arthritis were unfounded, a study suggests. In fact, wear-and-tear in her joints was similar to that of other sheep of her age, regardless of how they were conceived, say researchers. Dolly, the first mammal cloned from an adult cell, made countle
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tech education that pays, or you don't With tuitions ever rising and student debt exploding to $1.45 trillion, there has been increased pressure on schools to demonstrate their value based on their success in placing graduates in good-paying jobs. A for-profit computer-coding boot camp in Philadelphia, the local branch of the New York Code and Design Academy, has taken the bull by the horns. In October, it began offering students a yo
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Gizmodo
Run, Don't Walk To Score Fitbit's Black Friday Discounts Commerce Content is independent of Editorial and Advertising, and if you buy something through our posts, we may get a small share of the sale. Click here for more. It’s the best time of year to buy a Fitbit, as most of the lineup is on sale for Black Friday. Fitbit Alta HR for $100 is probably the one you want to buy , unless you’re interested in a full-featured smart watch , in which case the F
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Encouraging oxygen's assault on iron may offer new way to kill lung cancer cellsBlocking the action of a key protein frees oxygen to damage iron-dependent proteins in lung and breast cancer cells, making them easier to kill, report investigators.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Low-salt, heart-healthy dash diet as effective as drugs for some adults with high blood pressureA study of more than 400 adults with prehypertension, or stage 1 high blood pressure, found that combining a low-salt diet with the heart-healthy DASH diet substantially lowers systolic blood pressure -- the top number in a blood pressure test -- especially in people with higher baseline systolic readings.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Increased use of ambulatory surgery centers for cataract surgeryOver the past decade there's been a dramatic increase in the proportion of cataract surgeries performed at ambulatory surgery centers. In some communities nearly all cataract surgeries are done in a surgery center rather than a hospital. Consumers save money from the shift but it may impact access to eye care and raises questions about safety.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Schizophrenia drug development may be 'de-risked' with new research toolBiomarkers that can help with development of better treatments for schizophrenia have now been identified, report investigators.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How common are new cancers in cancer survivors?One quarter of adults 65 or older and 11 percent of younger patients diagnosed with cancer from 2009 to 2013 had a prior cancer history.
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Gizmodo
National Science Foundation Envisions the Future of Thanksgiving Dinner Image: NSF Science would probably progress a whole lot slower without the infinite human imagination. We talk frequently about times that science fiction has predicted coming science advances. But this time, the National Science Foundation has let its scientists do the imagining. This week, the NSF presented its Future of Scientific Imagination , that is, futures extrapolated from present-day NSF
22h
Ars Technica
Here’s how to emotionally manipulate your family with alcohol this holiday Keeping things chill (or slightly below room temperature). reader comments 7 When it comes to engineering the fickle emotions of humans, alcohol can do it all. It’s raised for successes and downed in sorrow. It can energize and relax us. It temporarily erases regrets while creating new ones. It’s liquid courage and a downer. It can smooth a first date or conjure tears alone. And this holiday—as w
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Trappers ask court to throw out lawsuit over US fur exports Fur trappers are asking a federal judge to throw out a lawsuit from wildlife advocates who want to block the export of bobcat pelts from the United States. Attorneys for trapping organizations said in recent court filings that the lawsuit against the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service infringes on the authority of state and tribal governments to manage their wildlife . The plaintiffs in the case al
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Tyranny of Extraterrestrial Messaging Some of the basic assumptions we make about extraterrestrial communication can be woefully naïve. Consider the situation in its gory detail. You decide (perhaps as a species, or perhaps as some resource-rich subset) that you want to ping the cosmos to find out if something else is listening, thinking, and as technological as you are. So you fire up your radio transmitter, or your big laser and st
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A possible explanation for how germlines are rejuvenated Caenorhabditis elegans. Credit: Wikipedia (Phys.org)—A pair of researchers affiliated with the University of California and Calico Life Sciences, has discovered a possible explanation regarding how human germlines are rejuvenated. In their paper published in the journal Nature , Adam Bohnert and Cynthia Kenyon describe work they have done with worms in their lab and the possible implications thei
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Review: It's not just the year of the iPhone X for smartphone shoppers It's been a bit of a banner fall for fans of new flagship smartphones. Samsung made headlines first with the Galaxy S8 and Note 8, even as much of the tech universe awaited Apple's spiffy iPhoneX. Don't forget Google, with the introduction of the Pixel 2, and Motorola has the Z2 Force, which is affordable and robust. And there's a whole wave of flashy Chinese smartphones that will eventually co
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Smart tech makes smarter shoppers Credit: Brunel University Shops will find it pays to wise up to the ways smart technology upgrades customer experience. That's the message from a new study on how people shop. Smartphones, magic mirrors, in-store beacons, heat mapping technology , smart pay systems, body scanners and more signify a new era of in-store shopping. Such added extras from smart technology — interactive technology co
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Do birdsong and human speech share biological roots?Do songbirds and humans have common biological hardwiring that shapes how they produce and perceive sounds? Scientists who study birdsong have been intrigued for some time by the possibility that human speech and music may be rooted in biological processes shared across a variety of animals. Now, research provides new evidence to support this idea.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Desert ants cannot be fooledCataglyphis fortis desert ants can learn visual or olfactory cues to pinpoint their nest, but only if these cues are unique to specify the nest entrance. Scientists have discovered that the insects ignore visual landmarks or odors as nest-defining cues, if these occur not only near the nest but also along the route. Hence, ants are able to evaluate the informative value of such cues.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Plague likely a Stone Age arrival to central EuropeA research team has sequenced the first six European genomes of the plague-causing bacterium Yersinia pestis dating from the Late Neolithic to the Bronze Age (4,800 to 3,700 years ago). Analysis of these samples suggests that the Stone Age Plague entered Europe during the Neolithic with a large-scale migration of people from the Eurasian steppe.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Health threat from mercury in freshwater fish could be blowing away in the windMercury is one of the top 10 chemical concerns for public health according to the World Health Organization (WHO). In more than half of Swedish lakes the mercury levels are so high that eating the fish is a threat to the health of people and wildlife. To make matters worse, the problem seems to have no solution in sight. But new research gives hope: the mercury problem could very well be blowing a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
High-intensity exercise boosts memory, new research suggestsThe health advantages of high-intensity exercise are widely known but new research points to another major benefit: better memory. The findings could have implications for an aging population which is grappling with the growing problem of catastrophic diseases such as dementia and Alzheimer's.
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Science | The Guardian
Alan Dickinson obituary The geneticist Alan Dickinson, who has died aged 87, was aware even as a young man that he might not live to answer the question that dominated his career: what causes mind-rotting diseases such as scrapie in sheep and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in people? Such was the risk faced by a scientist who in the 1950s chose to specialise in a field then known as “slow viruses”. As these disorders,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook opens 2nd office combating hate speech in GermanyFacebook is adding 500 more contractors in Germany to review content posted to the social media site, after a new law came into force targeting online hate speech.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tech firms scrounging for skilled workers training their own (Update) Some information technology companies are growing so concerned about their inability to find enough digital talent that they're training their own. IBM, Amazon and Microsoft all now have apprenticeship programs that pay workers while they train for jobs demanding hard-to-find IT skills. Tech companies view apprenticeships—a staple of European labor for centuries and common in the U.S. for trades
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Twitter verboten? German parliament edict irks lawmakers Soft robotic actuators, which are pneumatic artificial muscles designed and programmed to perform lifelike motions, have recently emerged as an attractive alternative to more rigid components that have conventionally been ...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Radiographs of Dolly's skeleton show no signs of abnormal osteoarthritis Prof David Gardner setting up radiographs. Credit: University of Nottingham Original concerns that cloning caused early-onset osteoarthritis (OA) in Dolly the sheep are unfounded, say experts at the University of Nottingham and the University of Glasgow. The team, who published last year's Nottingham Dollies research which showed that the 8 year-old Nottingham 'Dollies' had aged normally, have no
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Gizmodo
Neil Gaiman's Anansi Boys Is Being Turned Into a Radio Drama Image: BBC It’s been a very good year for fans of Neil Gaiman. American Gods was excellent, there’s Good Omens on the way, and now another of his works is being brought to life on radio: his 2005 fantasy novel Anansi Boys . Sharing a loose connection to American Gods —while not officially a sequel, the book features American God ’s West African Trickster deity Anansi , also known as Mr. Nancy, in
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Popular Science
What not to do on Black Friday Hear that sound? Those are the rapidly approaching footsteps of Black Friday 2017. As your thoughts turn toward the money you might save this year, and the shiny new gadgets you hope to grab, remember that you shouldn't just pull out your credit card and charge into the mall (or its online equivalent). To find the deals that are worth fighting for—and skip those that are best avoided — preparatio
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Dagens Medicin
En knytnæve midt i sundhedsdebatten I anledning af Dagens Medicins 20-års fødselsdag uddeler vi Knytnæveprisen. En pris, der skal gå til en sundhedsperson, som frivilligt eller ufrivilligt er havnet på øretævernes holdeplads. Første prismodtager er læge Thomas Emil Christensen, Herlev Hospital.
23h
Ingeniøren
ANALYSE: Netneutraliteten tilbagerulles i USA Foto: Nanna Skytte Hvis man har været omkring den amerikanske del af internettet det sidste stykke tid, er termer som »FCC,« »Net Neutrality« nok nogle, man særligt i den senere tid er ramlet ind i. I tirsdags kunne blandt andet The New York Times meddele, at agenturet Federal Communications Commission (FCC) har annonceret, at man pr. 14. december 2017 planlægger at tilbagerulle de regler, som kr
23h
Dagens Medicin
En legende kommer på frimærke Et enormt fingeraftryk er hvad, professor og praktiserende læge Frede Olesen har sat på almen praksis og sundhedssektoren. Han er ikke lige populær i alle lejre, men ikke desto mindre har han haft fingrene nede i mange, afgørende forandringer. Derfor er han den første, som kommer på Dagens Medicins legendefrimærke.
23h
New Scientist - News
The UK just missed a big chance to cut harmful diesel pollution Just drive less Phanie/Alamy By Tim Chatterton Criticism of the UK government’s weak stance on air quality has been growing in recent years. In the face of increasing evidence about the harm diesel engine pollution causes in particular, there was much anticipation that yesterday’s budget would tackle this head-on. It never happened. Chancellor Philip Hammond just fiddled at the margins instea
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ludwig researchers unravel novel mechanism by which tumors grow resistant to radiotherapy IMAGE: Ralph Weichselbaum is the co-director of the Ludwig Center at Chicago. view more Credit: Ludwig Cancer Research NOVEMBER 23, 2017, New York -- A Ludwig Cancer Research study has uncovered a key mechanism by which tumors develop resistance to radiation therapy and shown how such resistance might be overcome with drugs that are currently under development. The discovery addresses a longstand
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Radiographs of Dolly's skeleton show no signs of abnormal osteoarthritis Original concerns that cloning caused early-onset osteoarthritis (OA) in Dolly the sheep are unfounded, say experts at the University of Nottingham and the University of Glasgow. The team, who published last year's Nottingham Dollies research which showed that the 8 year-old Nottingham 'Dollies' had aged normally, have now published a radiographic assessment of the skeletons of Dolly herself, B
23h
The Atlantic
The Truth About Dolly the Cloned Sheep Dolly the sheep was the first animal to be cloned from an adult cell, and like many firsts, she came to stand in for all of her kind. So when scientists suspected she had short telomeres —stretches of DNA that normally shorten with age—people wondered if it was because she was cloned from an adult cell. When she started to limp at age five, headlines said that her arthritis “ dents faith in cloni
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The Atlantic
The Case of Jay Bilas vs. the NCAA Will Now Be Heard After 22 years as a college-basketball commentator for ESPN, Jay Bilas is now slogging through his busiest November yet. Finding himself far-flung during a month stacked with tournaments and traveling from Chicago to Maui—with maybe a night to recharge in his Charlotte-area home—is common practice by now. But the addition of the Phil Knight 80, a Thanksgiving tournament in Oregon that commemorate
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Feed: All Latest
11 Streaming Thanksgiving Movies to Queue Up After Your Meal The only Thanksgiving tradition more prevalent than turkey and stuffing is falling asleep in front of the TV as soon as dinner is over. (Just us? Oh, OK.) But falling asleep watching what? For a lot of folks it's sports, for others it's the NFL (zing!)—but once the food coma starts to hit, classic Turkey Day-themed movies are where it's at. Movies like Planes, Trains & Automobiles are time-honore
23h
Viden
Fåret Dolly og hendes klonede klan led ikke af slidgigt 21 år efter at det klonede får ”Dolly” kom til verden under massiv international bevågenhed, er den afdøde celebrity’s skelet nu blevet røntgenfotograferet og undersøgt for slidgigt. Læs også: VIDEO 20 år siden det klonede får Dolly kom til verden Dolly blev aflivet i 2003 i en alder af seks et halvt år på grund af en lungesygdom. Men da havde hun angiveligt i flere år døjet med gigt, og der var
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Bones show Dolly’s arthritis was normal for a sheep her age In the Nov. 25 SN : Charting lumpy space, Bronze Age movers and shakers, T. rex ’s slasher arms, gene editor corrects typos, the Great Pyramid hides a void, mosses chronicle Arctic warming, an itty-bitty insect-inspired robot and more.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Jet Fuel from Sugarcane? It's Not a Flight of Fancy The following essay is reprinted with permission from The Conversation , an online publication covering the latest research. The aviation industry produces 2 percent of global human-induced carbon dioxide emissions. This share may seem relatively small—for perspective, electricity generation and home heating account for more than 40 percent – but aviation is one of the world’s fastest-growing
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Thunderstorms create radioactivity, scientists discover A simulation of a cosmic ray shower formed when a proton hits the atmosphere about 20km above the ground. Credit: wikipedia, CC BY-SA Thunder and lightning have sparked awe and fear in humans since time immemorial. In both modern and ancient cultures, these natural phenomena are often thought to be governed by some of the most important and powerful gods – Indra in Hinduism , Zeus in Greek mythol
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Ars Technica
Mug shots: How Ars Technica editors prefer to stay caffeinated Enlarge / Everyone's cabinets/cupboards basically look like this, right? reader comments 64 It's Thanksgiving in the US, and much of our staff is at work in a kitchen instead of an office space. As is becoming Ars tradition, we use such holiday times to provide a rare glimpse into life around the Orbital HQ: see prior peeks via desks , pets , chairs , or cars for example. Perhaps you can think of
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Feed: All Latest
Is Your Turkey Trot Going to Burn Off That Pie? This Thanksgiving, you have a plan: You've signed up for a race. Nothing crazy, just a few miles, but what better way to offset the culinary onslaught of Turkey-day dinner than by torching a few calories first thing in the morning? That fourth slice of pumpkin pie isn't going to eat itself, dammit, and you're going to need somewhere to put it. So you're going to run a turkey trot. You and everyon
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Scientific American Content: Global
Scientists Genetically Engineer a Form of Gluten-Free Wheat A freshly baked roll is as delightful as a soft, fluffy cloud on a summer’s day. What gives bread much of its appealing texture is gluten, a group of proteins found in wheat, rye and barley. But in people with a serious autoimmune disorder called celiac disease, gluten damages the small intestine. Many others may have milder gluten intolerance and avoid foods that contain it. Most gluten-free b
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gadgets: Extraordinary gifts for the one-of-a-kinds on your list If you're struggling to find a different, out of the ordinary gift for someone special, here's a head start. Wallace Detroit Guitars are one-of-a-kind handmade instruments made of reclaimed wood from several Detroit historical landmarks. Each guitar has an original story since each has a unique grain pattern. The wood comes from places such as floorboards of the former Detroit Fire Department Hea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Designing new metal alloys using engineered nanostructures Materials scientist Jason Trelewicz in an electron microscopy laboratory at Brookhaven's Center for Functional Nanomaterials, where he characterizes nanoscale structures in metals mixed with other elements. Credit: Brookhaven National Laboratory Materials science is a field that Jason Trelewicz has been interested in since he was a young child, when his father—an engineer—would bring him to work.
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Dagens Medicin
Hovedstaden risikerer millionregning for manglende effektiviseringerProblemer med Sundhedsplatformen er medvirkende til, at Region Hovedstaden ikke forventer at kunne leve op til produktivitetskravet i år. Dermed kan regionen se frem til en regning på 430 mio. kr.
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Dagens Medicin
Stemmerne er talt op: Sådan har lægerne klaret sigOtte læger er foreløbigt valgt ind i regionsrådene og seks i kommunerne. Der mangler fortsat stemmeoptælling i Region Hovedstaden og Sjælland.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Helpers at the nest may allow mother birds to lay smaller eggs According to the research from the University of Cambridge, females in species such as the sociable weaver tend to produce smaller eggs when help with rearing offspring is at hand compared to when parents are on their own. Credit: Jessie Walton Cooperatively breeding birds and fish may have evolved the adaptive ability to reduce the size of their eggs when helpers are available to lighten the par
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New Scientist - News
Birds have childhood sweethearts that they stay with as adults A pair of whooping cranes bugling Danita Delimont/Alamy Stock Photo By Sam Wong Many pairs of bird parents were childhood sweethearts. The majority of whooping crane couples begin making friends at least a year before they first breed together. Most birds form monogamous couples, and bonded pairs often stick together for life. Little is known about how they form these long-term partnerships, but
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Helpers at the nest may allow mother birds to lay smaller eggs IMAGE: According to the research from the University of Cambridge, females in species such as the sociable weaver tend to produce smaller eggs when help with rearing offspring is at hand... view more Credit: Jessie Walton Cooperatively breeding birds and fish may have evolved the adaptive ability to reduce the size of their eggs when helpers are available to lighten the parental load, a new
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Experiments in robotics could help Amazon beat Australia's slow delivery problem Dominos DRU delivery robots RE currently in the trial stage but will be able to deliver piping hot food and ice cold drinks to the customers doorstep. Credit: Dominos Amazon's launch in Australia today is likely to put fresh scrutiny on the speed of Australia Post's own deliveries. To that end, Australia Post is trialling the use of robots to deliver parcels more promptly. Research finds that con
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Dagens Medicin
Radikales forhandlinger med begge fløje i Danske Regioner er i gang De Radikale, der sidder på det afgørende mandat i den nyvalgte bestyrelse i Danske Regioner, har talt med både rød og blå blok om eventuel støtte.
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Science | The Guardian
Gove says UK law will specifically recognise animal sentience Michael Gove has promised to make “any necessary changes” to UK law to recognise that animals can feel pain, after a social media campaign accused Conservative MPs of voting down proposals to accept they are sentient beings . The environment secretary issued a statement to the House of Commons insisting that it was a misconception to say Tory MPs voted against the idea that animals are sentient a
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The Atlantic
The Dark and Divisive History of America’s Thanksgiving Hymn In the days leading up to Thanksgiving, millions of Americans in their churches and community celebrations will sing the hymn that has become the de facto anthem of the holiday. “We gather together to ask the Lord’s blessing,” reads the opening stanza of the familiar song, a line that suggests the pluralistic and communal spirit Americans associate with Thanksgiving. As Pilgrims and Native Americ
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
No, we aren't running out of new ideas The paper argues that productivity growth has been low or declining since the 1940s, despite an increase in the number of researchers. The idea is that a rising number of researchers should lead to an acceleration of productivity. A proven good idea can potentially be applied to the whole production system and so a rise in researchers should increase this effect. This message should be taken se
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NYT > Science
A Radiation Cloud, and a Mystery, From Russia Ruthenium 106, which is obtained from spent fuel, is used mostly in medicine. It is considered not particularly dangerous because of its short half-life, 373 days, and harmless at the low concentrations that have turned up in Europe. But mystery lingers around the cloud all the same. The German Federal Office for Radiation Protection reported the radiation cloud, and then on Oct. 9 pinpointed its
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NYT > Science
This Exhibition Will Help You Make Sense of Your Senses Seeing Photo In a gallery focused on the sense of sight, different images reveal themselves on the wall as the lighting alternates between blue, green and red. Credit Sam Hodgson for The New York Times Past the blocks, you reach a room where the lighting alternates between blue, green and red. As the colors cycle through, you’ll notice something odd: What once appeared to be a red lion on the wal
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Feed: All Latest
Why Can't America Have a Single, Interoperable Tolling System? Because Bureaucracy In a perfect world, the electronic tolling infrastructure in the United States would be Mastercard seamless: Any transponder would get you through any toll plaza, debiting your account as you breeze across bridges and through tunnels with interstate abandon. But you can't. You should be able to though: In 2012 Congress passed a law requiring the nation's various electronic tolling authorities to
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Feed: All Latest
Want a Perfect Turkey? Calculate Its Specific Heat Capacity As I understand it, the whole point of cooking a turkey is to take it at some temperature and then increase it to a higher temperature. Sure, maybe there's something about family togetherness in there, but really, Thanksgiving is all about thermal transfer. The USDA recommends a minimum internal temperature of 165°F (74°C) . I guess this is the minimum temperature to kill all the bad stuff in the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
With a few smart moves, we can relieve the pressure on gas A new report from ClimateWorks Australia has found that the national demand for gas could be reduced by 25% by 2030 through better energy efficiency measures and using gas alternatives in industry and buildings. These expected savings could meet up to 70% of the projected shortfall in gas supply on the east coast , estimated at around 465 petajoules (PJ) by 2030, while lowering energy costs for a
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Viden
Så meget betaler kriminelle for dine data på det mørke net På det mørke internet, også kaldet dark web, handler kriminelle i fuld anonymitet. Noget af det, som bliver solgt i stor stil, er stjålne data såsom personnumre og kreditkortoplysninger. Det amerikanske sikkerhedsfirma Flashpoint har netop offentliggjort en rapport over, hvad amerikanske borgeres personlige data bliver sat til salg for. Firmaet har undersøgt en række engelsksprogede websites. Læs
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Dagens Medicin
Midtjylland offentliggør udkast til sponsorreglerUdkastet rummer en opskrift på, hvad den enkelte speciallæge og afdelingsledelse skal gøre for at sikre, at habiliteten ved efteruddannelse er i intakt.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mercury decline in seabirds due to diet, not emissions controls Pacific seabirds, such as this Great Blue Heron, can accumulate mercury in their bodies from the fish they eat. Credit: Flickr, CC BY For 47 years, biologists have plucked eggs from seabird nests along the British Columbia coast. Many of the eggs were collected from remote rocky islands surrounded by some of the world's roughest seas. In all, they collected 537 eggs from six species, including an
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Science | The Guardian
What's the difference between explorers, anthropologists and tourists? An anthropologist, an explorer and a tourist walk into a bar. They’re each clutching a spear. The anthropologist describes how it was presented to her on her seventh fieldwork season by the elders of the tribe. The explorer regales them with the tale of how he won the spear upon completing an initiation challenge the tribe had set for him, filmed for a documentary. The tourist explains that he pa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How the tax package could blur the separation of church and politics The tax package pending in Congress includes a provision that would leave churches and other nonprofits, which by law must be nonpartisan, suddenly free to engage in political speech. This measure, currently only in the House version of the bill, could potentially change charitable life as we know it. As an accounting professor who teaches nonprofit taxation, I believe that this significant cha
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Angry Birds maker posts loss despite jump in sales There are Angry Birds theme parks in several countries, including Finland, China and Spain Finland's Rovio Entertainment, creator of the popular smartphone game Angry Birds, on Thursday posted a loss for the third quarter despite rising sales, as it increased its investments with a view to boost its winnings in future. Sales reached 70.7 million euros (nearly $84 million) in the third quarter com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
World's only particle accelerator for art revs up in Paris The world's only particle accelerator dedicated to art was switched on at the Louvre in Paris Thursday to help experts analyse ancient and precious works. The 37-metre (88-foot) AGLAE accelerator housed underneath the huge Paris museum will be now be used for the first time to routinely study and help authenticate paintings and other items made from organic materials. The Centre for Research an
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists counter threat of flooding on coral reef coasts Credit: The image is released free of copyrights under Creative Commons CC0. Scientists have developed a computer simulation tool to predict short-term flood hazards on coral-reef-lined coasts and to assess longer-term impacts from climate change. The assessments will give input to estimate societal or economic risk and damage from such flooding. The tool can be used to play "what-if" games and a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Symbiosis and cell evolution: Lynn Margulis and the origin of eukaryotes Lynn Margulis receiving the National Science Award from U.S. President Bill Clinton in 1999. Lou Gold/Flickr, CC BY-NC-SA Although that for a long-time symbiosis was considered to be quite exceptional and restricted to few classical textbooks examples like lichens, American biologist Lynn Margulis (1938-2011) devoted most of her professional life to demonstrate that it is in fact a pervasive mech
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists discover evidence of recent water flows on Mars Credit: Frances Butcher an NASA, JPL-Caltech, MSSS A team of scientists led by The Open University has discovered evidence of recent glacial meltwater on Mars, despite the widely-held view that the recent climate was too cold for ice to melt. Planetary scientists from the OU, in collaboration with University College Dublin, the University of Cambridge and the University of Nantes (CNRS), have dis
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Ingeniøren
Protest-aktion i gang mod lukning af netadgang til skoleprøver En underskriftsindsamling mod lukning af skoleelevernes netadgang under prøver er sat i gang. Det skriver Folkeskolen.dk Det er Jesper Luther, it-vejleder på Brøndbyøster Skole, der står bag underskiftsindsamlingen. Han opfatter nye regler, som træder i kraft 1. december og som begrænser netadgangen markant. som et stort pædagogisk tilbageskridt: »Jeg har gennem en årrække arbejdet på at klæde læ
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
City-wide trial shows how road use charges can reduce traffic jams Credit: CC0 Public Domain Road congestion in large Australian cities is estimated to cost more than A$16 billion a year . Economists have long argued the best way to improve traffic flow is to charge drivers for their contribution to road congestion. We have now analysed data collected from 1,400 drivers across Melbourne to see whether road user charging can change their behaviour in ways that ea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The way we tell the story of Hollywood sexual assault and harassment matters Hollywood women who have spoken out against sexual harassment. Reporter Paula Froelich claims she once observed Harvey Weinstein assault a woman at a book party . Her editor responded with, "Maybe it's not really a story." As it turns out, Weinstein and others are becoming a never-ending story, as more women reveal experiences with powerful men – not just in Hollywood, but across multiple industr
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BBC News - Science & Environment
How we are losing the nightSatellite images show that artificially-lit areas are expanding around the world.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Does Black Friday still matter? You might be surprised Lining up at midnight for Black Friday deals on electronics may be a waning holiday tradition. Credit: Robert Stromberg If you're among the throngs in the stores this Friday—or even late Thursday—you might not realize it, but in retail circles many experts are asking one question: With shopping options galore, does Black Friday even matter anymore? "Many of us like to marvel at, complain about or
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Ingeniøren
Dansk raketbygger i spidsen for nye lavpris-raketter i Europa Markedet for opsendelse af små satellitter forventes at vokse eksplosivt i de kommende år. Og ét af de firmaer, der har sat kurs mod det marked er det britiske raketfirma Orbex, hvor den danske raketbygger Kristian von Bengtson er teknisk direktør. Firmaet har været i gang i to år, og målet er at tilbyde opsendelser af satellitter til lav pris omkring Jorden i Low Earth Orbit (LEO). Onsdag gav Or
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Science | The Guardian
How soon will the 'ice apocalypse' come? I’ve been gripped by the story of Antarctic ‘ice cliff instability’ ever since Rob DeConto and Dave Pollard published their controversial predictions last year. They suggested disintegration of ice shelves caused by global warming could leave behind coastal ice cliffs so tall they would be unstable, crumbling endlessly into the ocean and causing rapid, sustained sea level rise. I’m glad Eric Holt
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cognitive science
Why Chatbots? A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Batavia's mysteries unfold with discovery of mass grave Credit: University of Western Australia An international team of archaeologists, including scientists from The University of Western Australia and the Western Australian Museum, has discovered a new communal grave in the Abrolhos Islands, the result of deaths after a shipwreck of the Dutch East India company ship Batavia. The Batavia was wrecked in 1629 on the Morning Reef off the Western Austral
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Solar cell discovery opens a new window to powering tomorrow's cities Credit: Argonne National Laboratory Buildings of the future may come equipped with windows that can generate their own electricity, thanks to a finding of a team led by Jacqui Cole, a materials scientist from the University of Cambridge, UK, currently based at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory. For the first time, Cole and colleagues determined the molecular struct
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research reveals the scale at which Earth's mantle composition varies The mantle beneath Earth's mid-oceanic ridges contains heterogeneous blobs of material. A new study puts new constraints on the sizes of those blobs. Credit: Boda Liu New research by Brown University geochemists provides new insights on the scale at which Earth's mantle varies in chemical composition. The findings could help scientists better understand the mixing process of mantle convection, th
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Deep fat fryers may help form cooling clouds Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Molecules from deep fat frying may have a cooling effect on the climate Fatty acids released into the air from cooking may help form clouds that limit global warming, say scientists. Researchers believe these molecules arrange themselves into complex 3-D structures in atmospheric droplets. These aerosols persist for longer than normal and can seed the fo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Organic grain, soybean study establishes early production recommendations Organic grain sorghum under conventional tillage planted in College Station. Credit: Texas A&M AgriLife photo by Dr. Nithya Rajan After one year of studying organic grain and soybean cropping systems, Texas A&M AgriLife scientists say they know more about what not to do moving forward. Three Texas A&M researchers are using a $475,000 U.S. Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and A
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ocean floor mud reveals secrets of past European climate Samples of sediment taken from the ocean floor of the North Atlantic Ocean have given researchers an unprecedented insight into the reasons why Europe's climate has changed over the past 3000 years. From the warmer climates of Roman times when vineyards flourished in England and Wales to the colder conditions that led to crop failure, famine and pandemics in early medieval times, Europe's climate
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research reveals China's reversing emission flows The flow of China's carbon emissions has reversed according to new research led by scientists at the University of East Anglia (UEA). The study estimates the carbon implications of recent changes in the country's economic development patterns and role in international trade since the global financial crisis. The researchers found that emission flows have changed greatly in both domestic and forei
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists find key to regenerating blood vessels IMAGE: The laboratory of Masanobu Komatsu, Ph.D., studies the regulation of blood vessel growth and remodeling to aid the treatment of cancer and heart disease view more Credit: SBP Lake Nona, Fla., November 23, 2017 - A new study led by researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) identifies a signaling pathway that is essential for angiogenesis, the growth of ne
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Dagens Medicin
Her er det nye regionsråd i Nordjylland17 af de 41 medlemmer af det nye nordjyske regionsråd er nyvalgte. Det gælder blandt andet en tidligere minister.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The sky's the limit for sustainable wooden skyscrapers 5 King St in Brisbane will be the world’s tallest timber commercial building. Credit: University of Queensland Australia will soon hold the record for the world's tallest timber office building at 5 King St Brisbane, and with the help of The University of Queensland's new research hub, wooden skyscrapers could become the norm. ARC Future Timber Hub (Australian Research Council) which launched tod
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Dagens Medicin
Mange kræftoverlevere udvikler PTSDMere end hver femte kræftoverlever får posttraumatisk stresssyndrom efter diagnosen, viser undersøgelse offentliggjort i tidsskriftet ‘Cancer’.
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Ingeniøren
Genredigering på sprøjte skal kurere genetiske sygdomme Tænk, hvis lægerne aldrig skulle lede efter en egnet donor, men bare kunne bruge den syge patient som donor. Det kan blive fremtiden inden for få år. Inden for et år går de første forsøg med genredigering til patienter med genetiske blodsygdomme i gang. Planen er først at tage blodstamceller ud af patienten, behandle dem i laboratoriet og føre dem tilbage i patienten. Men processen vil tage tid,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: The beauty of iceIce can be stunningly beautiful and also quite varied in its appearance. The most obvious differences are between the two main ice types: land ice and sea ice. But even sea ice can vary dramatically from one place to another. On November 14, Operation IceBridge scientist John Sonntag took this photograph of ice in the Weddell Sea, a part of the Southern Ocean off the Antarctic Peninsula.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Professor proposes solutions to reduce recidivism and impact of incarceration A Penn State Abington professor is proposing public policy solutions to help reduce the mental health impact of incarceration among African-American men. Frances Veale, assistant professor of Rehabilitation and Human Services, presented "The Impact of Post-Incarceration Syndrome Among African-American Male Offenders: An Emergent Need for Operational Intervention" at the college's Faculty Research
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New discovery to accelerate development of salt-tolerant grapevines Credit: CC0 Public Domain A recent discovery by Australian scientists is likely to improve the sustainability of the Australian wine sector and significantly accelerate the breeding of more robust salt-tolerant grapevines. With funding from Wine Australia, a team of scientists from the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology at the University of Adelaide and CSIRO Agriculture and Food id
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research reveals China's reversing emission flows Credit: CC0 Public Domain The flow of China's carbon emissions has reversed according to new research led by scientists at the University of East Anglia (UEA). The study estimates the carbon implications of recent changes in the country's economic development patterns and role in international trade since the global financial crisis. The researchers found that emission flows have changed greatly
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ocean floor mud reveals secrets of past European climate Credit: CC0 Public Domain Samples of sediment taken from the ocean floor of the North Atlantic Ocean have given researchers an unprecedented insight into the reasons why Europe's climate has changed over the past 3000 years. From the warmer climates of Roman times when vineyards flourished in England and Wales to the colder conditions that led to crop failure, famine and pandemics in early mediev
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Dagens Medicin
Multidisciplinære pionerer får Den Gyldne SkalpelDe multidisciplinære pakkeforløb for hoved-halskræft på Odense Universitetshospital får Dagens Medicins initiativpris, Den Gyldne Skalpel. Det fynske koncept behandler suverænt flest patienter inden for kræftpakkens dead­lines på landsplan. Men det sikrer også en maksimal patient­involvering, fordi patienterne er inviteret med til konference sammen med specialisterne i deres egen sygdom.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Schoolchildren digitise cigarette case that saved WW1 soldier's life Pupils at Cheney School digitising material related to the First World War Credit: Rumble Museum A cigarette case which saved a man's life at the Battle of Passchendaele was one of the treasures explored by schoolchildren aiming to preserve the stories of the First World War. Cheney School pupils recorded the stories behind an array of war-related objects brought along by people in the community
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Ingeniøren
YouTube strammer op på sikkerheden for børn YouTube skruer bissen på overfor profiler og videoer, der ikke lever op til YouTubes reglement. Det siger de, efter de blev kritiseret for ikke at beskytte børn ordenligt mod voksent indhold. Streamingsiden har derfor i sidste uge slettet over 50 brugere, og har ikke kørt reklamer på over 3,5 millioner videoer siden juni, skriver Reuters . »Overordnet bruger vi flere ressourcer på at sikre at tus
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Ingeniøren
YouTube skruer op for sikkerheden for børn YouTube skruer bissen på overfor profiler og videoer, der ikke lever op til YouTubes reglement. Det siger de, efter de blev kritiseret for ikke at beskytte børn ordenligt mod voksent indhold. Streamingsiden har derfor i sidste uge slettet over 50 brugere, og har ikke kørt reklamer på over 3,5 millioner videoer siden juni, skriver Reuters . »Overordnet bruger vi flere ressourcer på at sikre at tus
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using modern genomics to turn alligator scales into birdlike feathers Normal embryonic scales (left) compared with the elongated feather-like appendage following genetic manipulation (right). Credit: USC Upon first glance, most people wouldn't think alligators or birds were evolutionary cousins. But indeed, reptiles are the closest living relatives of birds, and all descended from the archosaurs, the "ruling reptiles" who once dominated the Earth 250 million years
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Gizmodo
Discounted Echoes, Fire TV Stick, $30 Tablets, and the Rest of Amazon's Black Friday Deals Amazon’s first-party gadgets are always hot commodities come the holidays, and all of their Black Friday deals (that we know of) are available now. Echoes Amazon’s breakthrough Echo smart speaker has spawned an entire family of products, and a whole bunch of them are down to all-time low prices for Black Friday, including a $20 discount on the brand new flagship Echo , a $30 discount on the smart
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Ingeniøren
Miljøstyrelsen tester NOx-laser ved grænsen Laser og ultraviolet lys skyder henover vejbanen nær den tyske grænse i Padborg. Stribevis af lastbiler kører gennem strålerne, der på niveau med udstødningen måler, om røggassen bliver renset for det sundhedsskadelige NOx eller om en lille ulovlig sort boks omgår køretøjets rensningssystem. Forsøget er første af sin slags i Danmark og bliver foretaget af den danske virksomhed NEQ for Miljøstyrel
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wolves' return to Oregon brings conflict and opportunity In this May 19, 2011, photo provided by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Imnaha wolf pack's alpha male OR-4 is lies down after being refitted with a working GPS collar in Wallowa County east of Joseph, Ore. It's a political debate playing out against the backdrop of a rapidly growing wolf population, a jump in wolf poaching and demands from ranchers and hunters who say the predator
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers developed an initial prototype of a solid sodium battery with the potential to store extra energy Phones, laptops, electric cars - batteries are everywhere. And to meet the expectations of today's consumers, these batteries are increasingly light, more powerful and designed to last longer. Currently the most important technology for these applications is the lithium-ion battery technology: but the technology is expensive and contains a flammable liquid, which may represent a safety hazard, wh
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New batteries with better performance and improved safety Phones, laptops, electric cars - batteries are everywhere. And to meet the expectations of today's consumers, these batteries are increasingly light, more powerful and designed to last longer. Currently the most important technology for these applications is the lithium-ion battery technology: but the technology is expensive and contains a flammable liquid, which may represent a safety hazard, wh
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Retailers look to woo shoppers from rivals as Amazon grows Toys and TVs at J.C. Penney, Barbies at Best Buy, kitchen appliances like wine refrigerators at B.J.'s. As the holiday shopping season officially kicks off Thursday, shoppers may find some surprises at their favorite stores. Even as retailers are counting on a lift from a better economy, they're looking beyond economic data and mapping out ways to pick up sales from other retailers as Amazon expa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Polar bears crowd on Russian island in sign of Arctic change Tourists in the far eastern Russian Arctic spotted some 200 polar bears in September roaming on a mountain slope where they had feasted on a whale carcass, but scientists see the gathering as a sign of the Arctic changing A boatload of tourists in the far eastern Russian Arctic thought they were seeing clumps of ice on the shore, before the jaw-dropping realisation that some 200 polar bears were
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New CO2 device for unmanned ocean vessels National Oceanography Centre vessel known as the Autonaut. Credit: National Oceanography Centre Carbon dioxide in remote parts of the world's oceans will be measured by a new instrument being developed by scientists. The CaPASOS (Calibrated pC02 in Air and Surface Ocean Sensor), created by the University of Exeter and the National Oceanography Centre, will be carried on unmanned robotic boats to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Meadows beat out shrubs when it comes to storing carbon Norway's high-latitude alpine areas are seeing an increase in the areas being overtaken by shrubs. Researchers wanted to know what that means for carbon cycling in the region. Credit: Mia Vedel Sørensen Excess carbon dioxide, emitted by burning fossil fuels like coal and petroleum, is one of the most important factors in driving global warming. While the world is focused on controlling global war
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Ingeniøren
Fire grunde til at begå fejl Mange frygter at træde ved siden af. De er bange for at skuffe chefen, eller gøre kollegerne vrede over fejltagelser på arbejdspladsen. Men tit er bekymringen faktisk værre end realiteten. Nye jobtilbud hver uge. Tjek Jobfinder. Nogle gange er fejl fatale for et projekt eller et en arbejdsopgave - langt oftest vil du dog i stedet kunne udnytte dine fejl til din fordel, frem for at de skader din k
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Science-Based Medicine
Happy Thanksgiving! We celebrate Thanksgiving today in the U.S. and SBM is taking the day off. We are thankful for all of our readers and commenters and wish you a Happy Thanksgiving.
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Ingeniøren
Dårlig forandringsledelse får it-gevinster til at gå op i hat og briller Business casen skal generelt sørge for, at investeringer i ny it og teknologi kan betale sig for en given virksomhed. Men alt for ofte bliver business casen skrevet af de forkerte, brugt forkert og gevinsten tabt på gulvet. Det viser en undersøgelse foretaget af konsulenthuset 1stroke. Blandt over 1.000 respondenter svarer under 40 procent, at de mener deres virksomhed gør nok for at hente gevins
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Big Think
Is Dog Man’s Best Friend Because of Oxytocin? According to the scientists involved in the University of Helsinki's Canine Mind project, a dog’s eyes are the window to his or her souls just as much as a human’s are. Especially dog’s pupils, whose size is affected by their emotional state and their level of attentiveness. "We were among the first researchers in the world to use pupil measurements in the evaluation of dogs' emotional states,” s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Meadows beat out shrubs when it comes to storing carbon IMAGE: Norway's high-latitude alpine areas are seeing an increase in the areas being overtaken by shrubs. Researchers wanted to know what that means for carbon cycling in the region. view more Credit: Mia Vedel Sørensen Excess carbon dioxide, emitted by burning fossil fuels like coal and petroleum, is one of the most important factors in driving global warming. While the world is focuse
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New on MIT Technology Review
A Blockchain for Turkeys Is More Than a Thanksgiving Gimmick Looking for something to be thankful for this Thanksgiving? Give it up for turkeys, which are test subjects in a new experiment meant to see whether blockchain technology can be used to track birds from farm to market and help consumers understand where their birds are coming from. This holiday season, buyers of Cargill’s Honeysuckle White turkeys in some areas can send a text with a code taken f
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Ingeniøren
Uprøvet klimafiks til 188 mio. kroner skuffer atter – nu ruller pengene igen Et 188 millioner kroner dyrt klimafiks – den såkaldte biocoverordning – skranter stadig gevaldigt . Der er endnu ikke bygget ét eneste anlæg, prisen pr. reduceret ton Co2 er fordoblet og den samlede CO2-reduktion bliver mindre end forudsat. Det fremgår af en ny statusrapport fra energi- og miljøministerierne over ordningen. Ordningen blev i al hast etableret i 2014 for at fylde et hul i klimaregn
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Science | The Guardian
Why the nights are getting brighter – but not in a good way The world’s nights are getting alarmingly brighter – bad news for all sorts of creatures, humans included – as light pollution encroaches on darkness almost everywhere. Satellite observations made by researchers during five consecutive Octobers show Earth’s artificially lit outdoor area grew by 2% a year from 2012 to 2016. So did nighttime brightness. Breathless in Delhi: a taste of environmental
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Gizmodo
Search For Lost Argentine Submarine ARA San Juan Hits 'Critical Phase' as Air Supply May Run Out Photo: AP The search for an Argentine Navy submarine lost with some 44 souls on board has reached a “ critical phase ,” a naval spokesman told Reuters, as the length of the seven-day search indicates the vessel is likely not on the surface and could be reaching the limits of its air supply. Per Reuters, a search team involving 4,000 personnel from various nations and militaries has been frantical
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Scientific American Content: Global
A New Recipe for Counting Cranberries Engineering 60-Second Science A New Recipe for Counting Cranberries Estimating cranberry harvests involves tedious hand counting. But microwave analysis could change all that. Christopher Intagliata reports. Wisconsin is famous for cheese. But it's also the United States' number one producer of a tart, red fruit that’s on pretty much every Thanksgiving dinner table . "We have this reputation
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When traveling on public transport, you may want to cover your ears The noise levels commuters are exposed to while using public transport or while biking, could induce hearing loss if experienced repeatedly and over long periods of time, according to a study published in the open access Journal of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery . Efforts to control noise should focus on materials and equipment that provide a quieter environment, researchers at the Universi
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Popular Science
Here's even more evidence that you need to spend time enjoying nature Twentieth Century German social psychologist Erich Fromm first advanced the notion that humans hold an inborn connection to nature . Later, it was popularized by biologist E.O. Wilson as “the urge to affiliate with other forms of life.” In the ensuing years, support for the positive effects of nature has gained considerable traction, grounded in a growing body of research. In recent weeks, at lea
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Gizmodo
YouTube Says It Will Crack Down on All Those Creepy Videos Targeted at or Featuring Kids Photo: AP Google, along with fellow tech giants like Amazon, Facebook, and Twitter has drawn increasing scrutiny this year over concerns that its “concentrated authority resembles the divine right of kings,” as the New York Times put it . In recent months, it’s faced stumbling blocks when it returned misinformation and conspiracy theories during crises like mass shootings and became embroiled in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
GP online consultations: Not the panacea policy makers are hoping for Online GP consultation systems may not be the silver bullet for reducing GP workload and patient waiting times that government policymakers are hoping for, NIHR-funded research from the University of Bristol has found. These systems offer the potential to revolutionise use of primary care, but only with careful implementation and effective marketing, the researchers concluded. NHS England is of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Children with heart disease are being let down by lack of clinical trials, study finds Less than one per cent of UK children born with congenital heart disease are enrolled in clinical trials looking to improve treatments, research funded by the British Heart Foundation and led by the University of Birmingham and Birmingham Children's Hospital has found. The study, published in the European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery today, is the first systematic review of its kind into
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Four simple tests could help GPs spot pneumonia and reduce unnecessary antibiotics Testing for fever, high pulse rate, crackly breath sounds, and low oxygen levels could be key to helping GPs distinguish pneumonia from less serious infections, according to a large study published in the European Respiratory Journal [1] . Pneumonia is a severe lung infection that can be life-threatening and often requires treatment with antibiotics. However, it is notoriously difficult to disc
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Gizmodo
Your Christmas Decorations Can't Compete With the Light-Up Millennium Falcon on This Family's Roof If you’re the type of person who gets caught up in decorating competitions around the holidays, be thankful you don’t live near Colby Powell and his family. Instead of inflatable Santas or a towering tree, they built a light-up Millennium Falcon on the roof of their house that measures almost 29 feet long. Make magazine has all the details of the entire build, which included lots of lumber, lots
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Looking for cures The moment Tristan Roberts became the first human to inject an untested, experimental gene therapy into his stomach fat, he was sitting on a leather couch in his friend-slash-yoga instructor's living room, not on a doctor's examining table. The glass coffee table in front of him was strewn with syringes. A Chihuahua mix wearing an inflatable recovery collar snored beside him. The event was livest
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Gizmodo
The 15 Best Black Friday Deals That Went Live on Thanksgiving GIF Tomorrow is officially Black Friday, but you can get a head start on the shopping with a ton of deals that are already available. You can find all of the best discount throughout the weekend on our main Black Friday post , but these are our 15 favorites that went live today. Head over to our main post for more deals, and follow us on Twitter and Facebook to never miss a chance to save. You ca
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BBC News - Science & Environment
EU ban on bird imports sees 'massive' cuts in global trade Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Ring necked parakeets have become well established in the UK and elsewhere in Europe A new study says that an EU ban on the trade in wild birds has helped reduce the global business by 90%. Prior to the 2005 regulation that limited the market, European countries were the foremost importers of birds, mainly from West Africa. These imported creatures often
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Moderate coffee drinking 'more likely to benefit health than to harm it' say experts Drinking coffee is "more likely to benefit health than to harm it" for a range of health outcomes, say researchers in The BMJ today. They bring together evidence from over 200 studies and find that drinking three to four cups of coffee a day is associated with a lower risk of death and getting heart disease compared with drinking no coffee. Coffee drinking is also associated with lower risk of so
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Glucocorticoids offer long-term benefits for patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy WASHINGTON--(Nov. 22, 2017)--Glucocorticoids, a class of steroid hormone medications often prescribed to patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), offer long-term benefits for this disease, including longer preservation of muscle strength and function and decreased risk of death. These findings support the standard prescribing practices in many clinics and could help sway parents who are o
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Popular Science
Jaybird Run wireless earbud review: solid sound for your sweat and swole sessions It’s a relatively crowded night at my gym and I’m covered in sweat, shaking my head like a madman in the corner. It’s conspicuous and not very attractive, but that’s my MO at the gym most days anyway, and I had to find out just how hard it is to dislodge the Jaybird Run wireless headphones from my ears. They didn’t budge—and no one called gym security—which gave me plenty of time to discover a lo
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NYT > Science
Thanks a Lot! New Reasons Not to Eat Cookie Dough “It’s a new view of flour,” said Dr. Marguerite A. Neill, an associate professor of medicine at Brown University Medical School and an expert on food-borne illnesses , who was not involved in this study. “It would have seemed incredible that this dry, powdery substance, stored on a shelf for months, could have a live micro-organism that didn’t spoil the flour but still could make someone sick.” D
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Popular Science
In 1964, Popular Science answered 'stupid' questions about what you eat In November of 1964, Popular Science published "Stupid Questions About What You Eat" because "most [people] have many mistaken notions" about the digestive process. The article sought to answer "fundamental questions about what and why you eat—with digested answers." The text of the article (formatted for the web) follows below. It can also be read in its original format through the Popular Scien
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Big Think
Why Sexual Desire Is Objectifying – and Hence Morally Wrong The 18th-century philosopher Immanuel Kant believed that human beings tend to be evil. He wasn’t talking about some guy rubbing his hands and crowing with glee at the prospect of torturing an enemy. He was thinking about the basic human tendency to succumb to what we want to do instead of what we ought to do, to heed the siren-song of our desires instead of the call of duty. For Kant, morality is
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The future of sutures and staples: A sealant inspired by slugs Although sutures and staples have been used for decades to close wounds or surgical incisions, both have their drawbacks: suturing can be time-consuming and can lead to extended and costly procedures, while staples are limited to use during open procedures and can cause tissue damage upon insertion, which can lead to infection. Additionally, neither offer a waterproof seal and are much stiffer th
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Ars Technica
When F2P goes wrong: NCSoft gave latest game five months before pulling plug Say goodbye to all of your favorite MxM characters, like... uh... that one dude from City of Heroes , and... er... frog-person. (credit: NCSoft ) Korean game studio NCSoft took an hours-before-Thanksgiving moment to announce bad news for fans of its most recent game, Master X Master : the free-to-play (F2P) game, which only launched five months ago, is already about to go dark. The company's offi
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Big Think
4 Geniuses Whose Brains Were Studied by Science—and What They Reveal Many people have wondered about the minds of great thinkers. What must Einstein have been thinking when he sat down at his piano and came to the conclusions that gave us relativity? How does such a fantastic mind work? For Neuroscientists, who view mental activity as brain activity, some of their curiosity be satisfied by studying the brains of great thinkers and seeing how they differ from the n
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Step away from the cookie dough. E. coli outbreaks traced to raw flour Eggs, long condemned for making raw cookie dough a forbidden pleasure, can stop taking all the blame. There’s another reason to resist the sweet uncooked temptation: flour. The seemingly innocuous pantry staple can harbor strains of E. coli bacteria that make people sick. And, while not a particularly common source of foodborne illness, flour has been implicated in two E. coli outbreaks in the Un
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What happens once 'net neutrality' rules bite the dust? (Update)The Federal Communications Commission formally released a draft of its plan to kill net-neutrality rules , which equalized access to the internet and prevented broadband providers from favoring their own apps and services.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Forest Service weighs changes to protections for sage grouse The U.S. Forest Service is rethinking protection plans for sage grouse in six Western states after a U.S. court agreed with mining companies and others that the agency illegally created some safeguards in Nevada. The agency announced Tuesday that it's working with the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, which also is reviewing its plans for the struggling bird following an order by Interior Secretary
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook to show people if they fell for Russian propaganda (Update) This Monday, June 19, 2017, photo shows a user signing in to Facebook on an iPad, in North Andover, Mass. Facebook says it will show users if they followed or "liked" Russia propaganda accounts on its service or on Instagram. The company said Wednesday, Nov. 22, 2017, it will launch a portal to let people see which accounts of the Internet Research Agency they followed between January 2015 and Au
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Energy-saving LEDs boost light pollution worldwide LED lights are more efficient because they need far less electricity to provide the same amount of light, but then people might install more and more lights in a behavior called the "rebound effect" They were supposed to bring about an energy revolution—but the popularity of LED lights is driving an increase in light pollution worldwide, with dire consequences for human and animal health, researc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Raging debate: Does culling wolves curb poaching? Wolves, such as this one seen in France in 2015, are at risk of local extinction in Norway, where there are 105 to 112 individuals, according to the latest count A researcher in Norway launched the latest salvo Wednesday in a fierce, sometimes caustic debate on how legal hunting impacts the poaching of large predators. Many regional and national governments in Europe and North America have long p
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Ars Technica
The PC BIOS will be killed off by 2020 as Intel plans move to pure UEFI Enlarge / The original IBM PC. reader comments 104 Speaking at UEFI Plugfest, a hardware interoperability testing event held by the Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) Forum earlier this month, Intel announced that by 2020 it was going to phase out the last remaining relics of the PC BIOS by 2020, marking the full transition to UEFI firmware. The BIOS ("Basic Input/Output System") is a s
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The Atlantic
To Hell With the Witch-Hunt Debate One of the principal pleasures of Mad Men , on rich display beginning with the pilot episode, was looking at all of the crazy things people used to be able to do in offices: smoke, drink, and—if they were male—grope and corner and sexually humiliate the women, who could either put up with it or quit. It’s just about impossible to imagine someone lighting a cigarette in today’s hyper-sanitized wor
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
An interview with the Queen of Creole Cuisine | Leah Chase and Pat MitchellLeah Chase's New Orleans restaurant Dooky Chase changed the course of American history over gumbo and fried chicken. During the civil rights movement, it was a place where white and black people came together, where activists planned protests and where the police entered but did not disturb -- and it continues to operate in the same spirit today. In conversation with TEDWomen Curator Pat Mitchell,
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