Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research could revolutionise the future of electronic devices Credit: University of St Andrews Research led by the Universities of St Andrews and Tokyo reveals a new understanding on how to create topological electronic states in solids which could fuel the development of improved materials for fast and energy-efficient electronic devices. The findings could lead to new types of computer chips that could be much more powerful than those found in today's com
3h
Viden
Forældre kan få bugt med fødselsdepression under graviditeten Hvis en fødselsdepression bliver opdaget under graviditeten og forældrene hurtigt får samtaleterapi, så kan langt de fleste få det bedre, inden der er kommet et barn til verden. Det viser ny forskning som forskningsleder og psykolog Svend Aage Madsen fra Rigshospitalet har stået i spidsen for, skriver Politiken. Sammen med 30 praktiserende læger har han screenet 1.206 vordende forældre, da de var
2h
Ingeniøren
Efter Sundhedsplatformens besparelser: Region genansætter fyrede lægesekretærer Region H har afsat 22 millioner til at hyre lægesekretærer, for at overtage en del af det registreringsarbejde, der tager tid fra lægerne. Lægesekretærer er ellers blev afskediget fra regionens hospitaler siden Sundhedsplatformen blev indført. Med Sundhedsplatformen skal læger nemlig selv indtaste oplysninger direkte i systemet – frem for at indtale informationen til en diktafon, som så kan skriv
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LATEST

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers report a fundamental muscle speed limit Daubenton's bat ( Myotis daubentonii ) during prey capture. Credit: Lasse Jakobsen & Coen Elemans/SDU. When birds sing, bats echolocate, rattlesnakes rattle, and toadfish hum, they use so-called superfast muscles, the fastest vertebrate muscles known. New research shows that these muscles have reached a maximum speed attainable in any vertebrate muscle. Across all animals, different muscle types
6min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Efficient synthesis of a photosynthetic pigment in mammalian cells for optogenetics Four enzymes required for PCB synthesis from heme (HO1, PcyA, Fd, Fnr). The research group succeeded in synthesizing PCBs in animal cells by introducing these four enzyme genes. Credit: NIBB The optogenetic method of controlling the position of proteins in cells using light is an important method to understand intracellular signal transduction. In conventional methods, short wavelength light, suc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
High-refractive-index material retains high transmissivity after annealing at 850 degrees C Ph.D. student Takuya Yoshimoto holding a film of amorphous tantalum yttrium oxide. Credit: Toyohashi University Of Technology Toyohashi University of Technology researchers in collaboration with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), have developed a new material capable of retaining high transmissivity after thermal treatment at 850°C and successfully applied the material to optical de
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sulfur improves birefringence for developing liquid crystalline molecules Images of alkylthio group rod-like molecules exhibiting liquid crystallinity at room temperature, and the phase structures. Credit: Toyohashi University of Technology A team of researchers led by Assistant Professor Yuki Arakawa, Toyohashi University of Technology, has successfully liquid crystallized π-conjugated rod-like molecules with alkylthio groups containing sulfur, and developed high bire
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists discover an Upper Paleolithic cave painting of a camel in the Ural Mountains Credit: Vladislav Zhitenev/Lomonosov Moscow State University An ancient image of a two-humped camel has been discovered in the Kapova cave (Southern Urals). The age of the painting is preliminarily estimated to be between 14,500 and 37,700 years, a time when there were no camels in the Southern Urals. This discovery confirms researchers' belief that artists in the Upper Paleolithic could migrate
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Feminization of wild male trout in Denmark found to reverse Stream in Denmark. Credit: Jane Ebsen Morthorst/SDU The media has reported about feminised male fish for decades, but now researchers at SDU have announced that this feminisation has completely disappeared in certain parts of Denmark. Male fish that live in the proximity of discharges from wastewater treatment plants have proved to be feminised in many countries. This is mostly due to the presenc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
When magma prevents volcanic eruptions Following a large caldera-forming eruption some magma remains in the magma reservoir.This magma cools, its viscosity increases, and when new magma is injected, the magma left over after the caldera-forming eruption stops the fresh magma from propagating to the surface and promotes caldera resurgence. Credit: UNIGE / Roma Tre A spectacular proof of our planet's activity, calderas are huge topograp
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Endogenous protein reverses scarring in the lungs The endogenous protein RAGE, which has usually been negatively associated with chronic inflammation and diabetic complications, plays a major role in the repair of DNA damage—and also appears to heal tissue damaged as a result of accelerated cell senescence. This molecular mechanism was described in a study by scientists from Heidelberg University Hospital and the German Center for Diabetes Resea
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Dagens Medicin
Fire yngre forskere får støtte til diabetesprojekterDiabetesforeningen Forskningslegat 2017 er blevet uddelt af foreningens protektor Hans Kongelige Højhed Prins Joachim.
8min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Eco-friendly waterborne semiconductor inks using surfactant Comparison of the waterborne semiconductor ink of this study and that of the previous studies. Credit: Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST) A research team of Energy Science and Engineering at DGIST has developed a technology to produce environmentally friendly water-borne semiconductor inks using surfactants, additives that mix substances of different properties and are us
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tuning the wavelength of fluorescent carbon tubes Carbon is not just the most important element for life, it also has fascinating properties of its own. Graphene—a pure carbon sheet just one atom thick—is one of the strongest materials. Roll graphene into a cylinder and you get carbon nanotubes (CNTs), the key to many emerging technologies. Now, in a study reported in Chemical Communications , researchers at Japan's Kyushu University learned to
16min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The electronic origins of fluorescence in carbon nanotubes Technological progress is often driven by materials science. High-tech devices require "smart" materials that combine a range of properties. An impressive current example is carbon nanotubes (CNTs)—single sheets of carbon atoms rolled into a cylinder. These ultrathin tubes have enormous mechanical strength and electrical conductivity. They also emit infrared fluorescent light, rendering them dete
16min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicist explores the possibility of vestiges of a universe previous to the Big Bang Physicist publishes paper in General Relativity and Gravitation proposing to eliminate need for cosmological spacetime singularity and arguing that the current expansion phase was preceded by contraction. Credit: NASA / CXC / M. Weiss The Big Bang theory is the best known and most accepted explanation for the beginning and evolution of the universe, but it is hardly a consensus among scientists.
16min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Activity descriptors for electrocatalysts in energy storage applications (a) Different activity descriptors for electrochemical reactions and catalytic cycles of (b) hydrogen evolution reaction, (c) oxygen evolution reaction and (d) oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells. Credit: Science China Press Under the environmental concerns such as pollution and greenhouse effect, environment-friendly energy storage applications such as fuel cells, ammonia production and lith
16min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New computational method introduced for lighting in computer graphics Real-time rendering of an architectural scene illuminated by natural light using a new method introduced at SIGGRAPH ASIA. Credit: Ari Silvennoinen, Remedy Entertainment In films, video games, virtual reality environments and other computer graphics arenas, lighting is key in achieving accurate depictions of our physical world. Computing lighting that looks real remains complex and inefficient, a
16min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Greenpeace sounds alarm on nuclear safety with new break-in Around 20 activists took part in the latest stunt by the environmental campaign group A group of Greenpeace activists broke into a French nuclear plant on Tuesday and scaled the walls of a building containing spent nuclear fuel to highlight security shortcomings at the facility. Around 20 activists took part in the latest stunt by the environmental campaign group aimed at showing that France's 58
22min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Airbus, Rolls-Royce, Siemens working on hybrid planeThree big European companies are teaming up to develop a hybrid passenger plane that uses a single electric turbofan along with three conventional jet engines.
28min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biology and chemistry combine to generate new antibiotics Fruiting bodies from the mushroom Clitopilus passeckerianus generated in the laboratory. Credit: University of Bristol Combining the innovations of synthetic biology with biology and chemistry, a team of scientists at the University of Bristol have generated a brand-new platform that will allow the production of desperately needed brand-new antibiotics. With resistance growing to existing antibio
28min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula reveals a cryptic methane-fueled ecosystem in flooded caves Caves within a karst subterranean estuary are filled with separated fresh (green), brackish (gray) and saline (blue) waters. Within the subterranean estuary, methane (CH4) and other forms of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) created during the decomposition of soil from the overlying tropical forest sustain a complex cave-adapted ecosystem. Credit: Brankovits et al In the underground rivers and floo
28min
Dagens Medicin
Sundhedsplatformen – we can do it!De mange negative historier skaber en lynchstemning omkring Sundhedsplatformen, men i mit ambulatorie kører arbejdet fint. Hvis der er problemer, skyldes det snarere lægemangel.
36min
Dagens Medicin
AUH sætter navn på den femte hospitalsdirektør Nuværende lægefaglige direktør på Regionshospitalet Horsens og formand for Medicinrådet, Jørgen Schøler Kristensen, fuldender hospitalsdirektionen på Aarhus Universitetshospital.
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Ingeniøren
Ruslands nybyggede supersoniske bombefly meldes klar Sidste år brugte Rusland 5,3 procent af sit bruttonationalprodukt (BNP) på forsvar, og landet er i absolutte tal det land i verden, som bruger flest penge på sit forsvar efter USA og Kina. Det kommer også landets flyindustri til gode. Tupolev er i færd med at genoptage serieproduktionen af det strategiske bombefly Tu-160, 36 år efter at det fløj første gang. For et par uger siden rullede det førs
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Russia loses contact with new weather satellite Image copyright Reuters Image caption The Soyuz-2 spacecraft with Meteor-M satellite was launched from Vostochny Russia has lost contact with a weather satellite just hours after its launch from a new cosmodrome. "Contact has not been established because it is not on its planned orbit," the space agency Roscosmos said. The Meteor-M satellite was carried on a Soyuz rocket. The launch was at 14:41
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Dagens Medicin
Vi er alle direktører indenfor en radius af tre meterDen store udfordring er at ændre kulturen og få bredt ledelse mere ud, så forandringen understøttes af den enkelte medarbejder – ud fra mottoet ‘vi er alle direktører indenfor en radius af tre meter’.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Advances in MALDI mass spectrometry within drug discovery IMAGE: This is a special issue of SLAS Discovery . view more Credit: SLAS Collectively, the articles in the December 2017 special issue of SLAS Discovery on Advances in MALDI Mass Spectrometry within Drug Discovery present a snapshot of innovation in the MALDI application space as it stands today. Guest Editors Michael D. Scholle (SAMDI Tech) and Shannon Cornett (Bruker Daltonics) showcase
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula reveals a cryptic methane-fueled ecosystem in flooded cavesIn the underground rivers and flooded caves of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, where Mayan lore described a fantastical underworld, scientists have found a cryptic world in its own right.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biology and chemistry combine to generate new antibioticsCombining the innovations of synthetic biology with biology and chemistry, a team of scientists at the University of Bristol have generated a brand-new platform that will allow the production of desperately needed brand-new antibiotics.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Type 2 diabetes, it all starts in the liver Affecting as many as 650 million people worldwide, obesity has become one of the most serious global health issues. Among its detrimental effects, it increases the risk of developing metabolic conditions, and primarily type-2 diabetes. If the strong links between obesity and type-2 diabetes are well known, the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which obesity predisposes to the development of in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Migraines linked to high sodium levels in cerebrospinal fluid IMAGE: MR image examples of a migraine patient with exemplary region-of-interest placement in an external sodium reference phantom and in the white matter (right image). Left: Fused T1-MP-Rage and sodium image;... view more Credit: Radiological Society of North America CHICAGO - Migraine sufferers have significantly higher sodium concentrations in their cerebrospinal fluid than people without
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Weight loss through exercise alone does not protect knees IMAGE: Baseline and follow-up MRIs of the right knee of two obese women, one who lost no weight (A, B), and one who lost weight (C, D). view more Credit: Radiological Society of North America CHICAGO - Obese people who lose a substantial amount of weight can significantly slow down the degeneration of their knee cartilage, but only if they lose weight through diet and exercise or di
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fat distribution in women and men provides clues to heart attack risk CHICAGO - It's not the amount of fat in your body but where it's stored that may increase your risk for heart attack, stroke and diabetes, according to a new study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). The study looked at the differences in fat distribution patterns among overweight and obese men and women and their associated cardiometabolic r
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Ingeniøren
Vattenfall bestiller Siemens Gamesa til historisk stor havmølleordreSiemens Gamesa skal levere samtlige vindmøller til Kriegers Flak og to kystnære parker – i alt 950 MW effekt. En ordre til 12,7 mia. kroner.
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Ingeniøren
Ny blogger på ing: Derfor er det svært at få gang i cirkulær økonomi Her under en måned til jul, når forbrugsræset tager til, og der er fokus på mad og gaver i form af tøj, elektronik og dimser, åbner vi en ny blog med fokus på effektiviteten i samfundets ressourceforbrug. Bloggen skrives af Michael Søgaard Jørgensen, som til daglig er lektor på Aalborg Universitet og aktiv i to af IDAs faglige netværk: IDA Grøn Teknologi og IDA Teknologivurdering. 'Cirkulær økono
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New Scientist - News
A grim winter looms for UK hospitals but there’s an easy cure Pressures are rising Justin Kase/Alamy Stock Photo By Luke Allen In the UK, an annual ritual is unfolding. Several hospitals hit full capacity and policymakers toyed with the idea of banning walk-in A&E patients. There were proposals to use spare rooms in private homes for recuperating patients – dubbed Carebnb – to free up hospital beds ahead of what might become the “ worst winter in recent
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Science | The Guardian
Why are left-handers treated as outsiders? It’s just not right | Richard Easterbrook T he news that left-handers excel at some sports but not others confirmed my thoughts that the 10% of people that make up us southpaws are used to punching above our weight. A study published in the journal Biology Letters concludes that being left-handed is an advantage in sports where time pressures are particularly severe – such as table tennis, or cricket, or squash. I am the exception to the
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Ingeniøren
Sjusk med nye kloakker: Urenset toiletvand kan ramme kommuner i hele landet Fejl og sjusk i flere nybyggerier i den københavnske bydel Nordhavn har ledt vand fra toiletter og køkkenvaske direkte ud i havnebassinet. Fejlene blev kun opdaget, fordi kommunen tilfældigvis måler vandkvaliteten i området. Nedenfor lejlighederne er der nemlig indrettet en såkaldt badezone, og prøver herfra viste i august stærkt forhøjede niveauer af colibakterier og intestinale enterokokker. I
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Big Think
Mapping Russia's Most Drunk and Sober Regions Russians like a tipple. But some more than others. And quite a few not at all. This annual temperance map, just released by the 'Sober Russia' campaign, shows that again this year, Chechnya, Ingushetia and Dagestan (in that order) are the driest parts of Russia. These majority-Muslim republics in the Caucasus have a 'sobriety rating' of 18.75, 19.42 and 20.28, respectively. The rating is a poin
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Viden
Ny vaccine bekæmper brystkræft i mus Brystkræft er den hyppigst forekommende kræftsygdom hos kvinder i den vestlige verden. Men mange tilfælde af brystkræft ser nu ud til at kunne blive bekæmpet med ny vaccineteknik. Det viser forskere fra Københavns Universitet og University of Bologna i museforsøg. Det spændende ved vores behandlingsteknik er, at den lader kroppen selv gøre arbejdet. Man sprøjter ikke fremmede antistoffer ind, men
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Science-Based Medicine
Science Moms Fight Fears with Facts At the recent conference of the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry (CSICON) in Las Vegas, on October 28, 2017, I had the great privilege and pleasure of being in the audience for the American premiere of a new documentary, “Science Moms,” as well as for the following live panel discussion by the women featured in the movie. In the documentary, a group of scientists and science communicators who are
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Graphic Australian video of Japanese whaling released Japan hunts whales under a loophole in an international moratorium that allows for scientific research, but makes no secret of the fact that the animals' meat ends up on dinner tables Activist group Sea Shepherd on Tuesday released graphic video of Japanese fishermen harpooning whales in the Southern Ocean after a long battle with the Australian government to make the images public. Filmed in 200
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bitcoin hits new records, heads for $10,000 as bubble fears grow Bitcoin has enjoyed a stratospheric rise this year, approaching $10,000 from a 2017 low of $752 seen in January Bitcoin soared to fresh records Tuesday, putting it on course for $10,000, but the virtual currency's stratospheric rise has fuelled fears of a bubble after a 10-fold increase this year. The cryptocurrency, launched in 2009 as a bit of encrypted software written by someone using the Jap
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Burkina Faso launches Sahel region's largest solar power plant Star power: Burkina Faso may have no oil or gas, but has sunshine in abundance West Africa's biggest solar power plant goes onstream on Wednesday as Burkina Faso, one of the world's poorest countries, inaugurates a novel scheme to boost renewables and cut energy dependence on its neighbours. The 55-hectare (135-acre) plant at Zagtouli on the outskirts of the capital Ouagadougou will be able to ch
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bezos a $100 bn man as Amazon rises on cyber shoppingAmazon founder Jeff Bezos was a $100-billion man on Monday as the online retail colossus raked in cash from the holiday weekend's cyber shopping spree.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tumblr founder leaving Yahoo-owned blogging platform David Karp founded Tumblr, now owned by Yahoo, in New York in early 2007 as a platform where people could share writing and short-form media Tumblr founder and chief David Karp on Monday announced he is leaving the nearly 11-year-old blogging platform—with his departure coming in the wake of Verizon buying parent-company Yahoo. Karp said that he will leave by the end of this year and chief operat
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Russia launches second rocket from new cosmodrome National television broadcast live footage of the launch, showing the rocket taking off into a grey sky. Russia launched a second rocket from its new Vostochny cosmodrome in the far east on Tuesday, as Moscow seeks to ease dependence on Baikonur in Kazakhstan. Marking another milestone after the inaugural liftoff last year, the Soyuz rocket carrying a weather satellite and other equipment took of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Volcano gushing ash over Bali closes airport for a second day Passengers talk to ground crew as their flights are cancelled at Ngurah Rai International Airport in Bali, Indonesia, Tuesday, Nov. 28, 2017. Indonesia's disaster mitigation agency says the airport on the tourist island of Bali is closed for a second day due to the threat from volcanic ash. (AP Photo/Ketut Nataan) A volcano gushing towering columns of ash closed the airport on the Indonesian tour
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Identifying optimal adaptation of buildings threatened by hurricanes, climate change The need for adaptation strategies to reduce the threat of hurricanes to society is of critical importance, as evidenced by the recent damage to coastal regions in the U.S. and the Caribbean this past year. The fact that the number of residential buildings in coastal areas has increased significantly combined with the impacts of climate change means that the increase in hurricane intensity and fr
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Low frequency brain stimulation improves cognition in Parkinson's disease IMAGE: The image illustrates changes in prefrontal brain activity when the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is stimulated at: high frequencies (right head), not stimulated at all (left head), or stimulated at 4... view more Credit: Narayanan Lab, University of Iowa A multidisciplinary neuroscience study using rare, intraoperative brain recordings suggests that low frequency stimulation of a deep b
5h
Ingeniøren
Sebastian fravalgte The Big Five: »Jeg lærer helt vildt meget af at arbejde i en startup« Det kostede softwareingeniør Sebastian Thomsen hans opsparing, at han fravalgte kandidatuddannelsen og et stabilt job i et udviklerhus til fordel for livet som iværksætter. Til gengæld har det gjort hans hobby til et arbejde. Da han i 2015 tog til et arrangement for socialt entreprenørskab, vidste han ikke, at det ville sende ham på en vild karrieretur. Han var mest af alt med, fordi han datede e
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Ingeniøren
Kommunerne favner AI: Algoritmer skal hjælpe ledige i job Et stort tværfagligt og tværinstitutionelt projekt ved navn EcoKnow skal i fremtiden gøre den kommunale sagsbehandling lettere. En kunstig intelligens skal kunne kigge tidligere sager igennem for at finde mønstre, så den kan foreslå et behandlingsforløb. For eksempel ville algoritmen kunne hjælpe borgere og sagsbehandlere på et jobcenter med at kigge tidligere sager igennem for at finde fællestræ
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Gizmodo
The Post-Apocalypse Is a Little Less Bleak When You Have a Beloved Game of Thrones Star on Your Side Image: Dresden Pictures The year is 2054, and humanity’s prospects are very bleak in the wake of a devastating virus. London’s become an unstable wasteland of junk peddlers and wild-eyed zealots, but one tough, determined woman keeps it together for her much younger brother—until he’s spirited away by an unknown foe. Liam Garvo’s dystopian proof-of-concept film Biopunk creates a vividly chaotic a
6h
Gizmodo
DOJ Indicts Three Chinese Nationals For Allegedly Hacking Siemens, Trimble, and Moody's Photo: AP The Department of Justice has charged three Chinese nationals with allegedly hacking into the email account of an “influential economist” working for Moody’s Analytics, as well as stealing secrets from German engineering firm Siemens AG and GPS manufacturer Trimble, the Wall Street Journal reported . According to the Journal account, the individual widely rumored to be the economist is
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biogerontology Research Foundation trustee to keynote at the Digital Health World Congress IMAGE: Digital Health World Congress, Nov. 29-30, 2017, at the Kensington Conference and Events Centre in London, UK. view more Credit: Digital Health World Congress Friday, November 24th, 2017, London, UK: The Biogerontology Research Foundation is pleased to announce that its Managing Trustee, Dmitry Kaminskiy, will be giving a keynote presentation at the Digital Healthcare World Congress on Nov
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ASERF outlines recommendations to increase safety of gluteal fat grafting procedures New York, NY (November 20, 2017) - Buttock augmentation is one of the fastest growing aesthetic procedures in the United States. According to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS), more than 20,000 procedures were performed in 2016 alone, (a 3,267% increase compared to 2002, when ASAPS first began tracking statistics for buttock augmentation). ASAPS began tracking fat graftin
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists identify the segmentation and consolidation mechanism of long-term memories IMAGE: Lluís Fuentemilla & Ignacio Sols. view more Credit: IDIBELL A study led by the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL) has identified a neural mechanism in humans that allows us to segment our experience in discrete memory units. According to the research, published in the scientific journal Current Biology , the brain identifies context changes as "frontiers" in the flow of our
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Complications at birth associated with lasting chemical changes in the brain New King's College London research, published today (28 November) in eLife , shows that adults born prematurely - who also suffered small brain injuries around the time of birth - have lower levels of dopamine in the brain. This chemical change has been linked to lack of motivation and enjoyment in normal life, and changes to attention and concentration, which could all be early signs of more ser
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Largest study of opioid deaths reveals who is at most risk New York, NY (November 28, 2017)--Just over 60 percent of individuals who died from an opioid overdose had been diagnosed with a chronic pain condition, and many had been diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder, a study of more than 13,000 overdose deaths has found. The study, led by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC), is the first to determine the proportion of those who died
6h
New on MIT Technology Review
How High-Tech Mirrors Can Send Heat Into Space In the small rear suite of a light industrial building near the San Francisco airport, Eli Goldstein looks over a set of silver panels tilted on metal racking. The panels look like simple mirrors, but as ­Goldstein walks around them, he points out the black water pump along the left edge, the copper pipes running beneath the surface, and the metal box at the base. What his company, SkyCool System
6h
Ingeniøren
5 morgenrutiner, der garanterer toppræstationer Det første, du gør om morgenen, har stor indflydelse på resten af din dag. Derfor gælder det om at komme godt fra start. Jobfinder giver dig fem rutiner, du med fordel kan tage til dig. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/5-morgenrutiner-garanterer-toppraestationer-11369 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
7h
Gizmodo
Plex Has Now Added Commercial-Cutting to Its Cordcutting DVR Service Image: Gizmodo Plex, the cable box-killing media player and DVR service , has launched a new feature to automatically strip commercials from recorded media as it prepares to take its DVR functionality out of beta, Cord Cutters News reported this week. According to a description of the new function in the update, users can now choose to have Plex plunge into their video libraries and strip them of
7h
Ingeniøren
DSB må skrotte velfungerende eltog: Dømt for komplekse til nye signaler DSB bliver tvunget til at vinke farvel til sine mest pålidelige eltog, når den danske jernbane har fået sit nye signalsystem ERTMS. De 44 IR4-togsæt med hver fire vogne indgår nemlig ikke i Banedanmarks planer. IR4-togene er et yngre, elektrisk søstertog til IC3 og blev bygget med samme fysiske design på den nu lukkede fabrik i Randers frem til 1997. De to togtyper kan kobles sammen i forskellige
7h
Gizmodo
Upgrade to 5.1 Surround For $153, No Receiver Required VIZIO SB3851 38" 5.1 Sound Bar , $153 Vizio’s turnkey 5.1 surround sound system is back down to $153, the best price we’ve seen in months. I won’t rehash every detail here, but you can check out our Gear post for more information and reader comments. But needless to say, people love this thing.
9h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Bird pulled from brink of extinction facing poisoning threat Image copyright Getty Images Image caption The red kite (Milvus milvus) is declining throughout Europe The red kite has become more common in the UK in the past 30 years, thanks to conservation schemes. But, while numbers of the birds of prey are on the rise, scientists say human factors threaten to derail progress. Post-mortem tests on wild red kites found many had been poisoned by lead shot, ra
9h
Live Science
Dog Family: Facts About Canines & Their Cousins Dogs and humans have been best friends for thousands of years. Researchers know that dogs regularly lived with humans by about 10,000 years ago, and dogs and people are found buried together as early as 14,000 years ago. And for even longer, perhaps hundreds of thousands of years, humans walked alongside the domestic dog's ancestor, an extinct species of wolf. Domestic dogs and wolves are p
9h
Live Science
Stomach Ulcers: Causes, Symptoms & Treatments Peptic ulcers, also known as stomach ulcers, are open sores that develop in the lining of the esophagus, stomach or the first part of the small intestine, known as the duodenum. Over 25 million Americans will suffer from an ulcer at some point during their lifetime, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and there are approximately 500,000 to 850,000 new cases of ulc
10h
Popular Science
Volcanic eruptions are incredibly hard to predict. Here's why. The Indonesian volcano Agung on the island of Bali is rumbling, shooting a mix of gases and sharp fragments of ash in a column thousands of feet high into the sky. Airports are closed , and Indonesia’s National Board for Disaster Management announced on Monday the highest alert level for residents in the area, triggering evacuations from the immediate vicinity. A live video of the eruption is ava
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cognitive science
New study shows that those with prosocial (nice) patterns of brain activity are more likely to be depressed. Is there hope for the nice guys? A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
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Gizmodo
Anova's Sous-Vide Circulator Might Be the Best Deal of Cyber Monday At $84 If you’ve ever eaten at a nice steakhouse, you were probably eating sous-vide meat. Here’s a secret though: It’s really easy to get those kinds of results yourself, and Amazon’s here to help with a $85 deal on Anova’s Bluetooth sous-vide circulator . That’s over $10 better than the Black Friday deal they ran. $99 From amazon 16186 purchased by readers Gizmodo Media Group may get a commission Sous
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Gizmodo
The Women of the Marvel Cinematic Universe Come Together in One Glorious Photo This photo from Black Panther isn’t the photo in question. Image: Disney What happens when eight actresses who play heroes in the Marvel Cinematic Universe appear in a single photo? You’re about to find out. Today, Vanity Fair released a bunch of new photos of the stars from the upcoming Avengers: Infinity War , some of which were taken at a massive 83-person photo shoot comprised of nearly every
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Scientific American Content: Global
Chimps Able to Apprehend Another Chimp's Mindset [Alert hoo recording] That means danger—to a chimpanzee. Chimps use this call , known as an "alert hoo," to warn each other about a potential threat, like a dangerous snake on the forest floor. And researchers have now used recordings of that call to get inside the chimpanzee mind. "There is more studies showing that various animals seem to be able to take another's perspective into accou
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Ars Technica
Runaways is the best new TV series you probably missed reader comments 7 Why are our parents wearing blood-red robes in a ceremonial crypt beneath the house? Guys, I think this might be really, really bad... Alex just wants to get his old friends back together, the way it used to be. So he sends a slightly pathetic text... Hulu OK fine, we showed up after all. Why did you ask us to come? Hulu Well, you see, there's this secret lair in the room where
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Incidence of brain injury in babies estimated for first time using routine NHS data New research has estimated that each year five babies in every 1,000 born in England suffer a condition or sign linked to brain injury. The study, conducted by researchers at the Neonatal Data Analysis Unit at Imperial College London and Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, analysed data on babies born between 2010 and 2015 to assess the number that may have sustained brain inju
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Deaths during childbirth reduce by half The rate of term, singleton, intrapartum stillbirth and intrapartum-related neonatal death has more than halved since 1993 representing a reduction of around 220 intrapartum deaths per year. Capacity issues were identified as a problem in over a quarter of the cases undergoing panel review. The majority of staffing and capacity problems were related to delivery suite. The panel consensus was that
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Six in 10 food adverts during family TV shows push junk food, new study reveals A new report, based on research conducted at the University of Liverpool, shows that almost six in ten food and drink adverts shown during family programmes in the UK popular with children are for 'junk food' such as fast food, takeaways and confectionery. The same adverts would be banned from children's TV under UK regulations which prohibit the advertising of food and drinks high in fat, salt o
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Gizmodo
The Newest Batman Video Game Is One of the Best Explorations of the Joker in Years Episode three of Batman: The Enemy Within delivers a compellingly sympathetic portrait of a character that we’ve been trained to immediately hate on sight. In Telltale Games’ re-imagined Batman universe, Bruce Wayne and John Doe—the man who will become the Joker—are bros. Harley Quinn flirts with the former, while allowing the latter to float around her in an orbit of infatuation. But things are
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Futurity.org
Our brains ‘blink’ when we shift focus When you shift your attention from one thing to another, your brain “blinks” between focusing on the two things, researchers report. The blinks are short unconscious gaps in visual perception and came as a surprise to the team of psychologists who discovered the phenomenon while studying the benefits of attention. “Attention is beneficial because it increases our ability to detect visual signals
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Science : NPR
Dance By The Light Of The 2017 Supermoon: The How And When The moon rises beyond the University of Kansas campus in Lawrence, Kan., Nov. 13, 2016. The 2017 supermoon will appear Dec. 3. Orlin Wagner/AP hide caption toggle caption Orlin Wagner/AP The moon rises beyond the University of Kansas campus in Lawrence, Kan., Nov. 13, 2016. The 2017 supermoon will appear Dec. 3. Orlin Wagner/AP Between last year's historic November supermoon and August's partial
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Futurity.org
Amputees could control robotic arm with brain implant Neuroscientists have shown how amputees can learn to control a robotic arm through electrodes implanted in the brain. Their research also details changes that take place in both sides of the brain used to control the amputated limb and the remaining, intact limb. The results show both areas can create new connections to learn how to control the device, even several years after an amputation. “Tha
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Experts urge Europe to start planning for lung cancer screening Leading lung cancer specialists are urging EU countries to take action to initiate life-saving lung cancer screening programmes as soon as possible. The EU Position Statement on Lung Cancer Screening (EUPS) has been published today in Lancet Oncology . It presents the available evidence and the major issues that need to be addressed by policymakers to ensure lung screening programmes are successf
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Gizmodo
Save $24 On the New 2DS XL Pokéball Edition, While It Lasts Commerce Content is independent of Editorial and Advertising, and if you buy something through our posts, we may get a small share of the sale. Click here for more. The Switch might have stolen its thunder, but the 2DS/3DS game library is still an embarrassment of riches, and the beautiful New 2DS XL Pokéball Edition is in stock, and actually on sale for $136 right now for Cyber Monday, down from
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Ars Technica
Judge rules against 84-year-old doctor who can’t use a computer reader comments 0 A New Hampshire state judge has dismissed a case brought by an elderly doctor who recently gave up her medical license following a handful of allegations against her. Among other accusations, Dr. Anna Konopka, 84, has refused to use a computer and participate in the state's new law for an online opioid monitoring program . "The Court has admiration for Dr. Konopka's devotion to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UK obesity levels among the worst in Europe -- heart disease statistics from more than 45 countries A decline in deaths from heart attack and stroke in high income countries could be threatened by rising rates of obesity and diabetes, according to a study from the European Society of Cardiology with a leading contribution from Barts Heart Centre, Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). The study also finds that the UK is lagging behind many lower income countries in some aspects of heart dise
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Holding infants -- or not -- can leave traces on their genesThe amount of physical contact between infants and their caregivers can affect children at the molecular level. The study of DNA methylation patterns showed that children who had been more distressed as infants and had received less physical contact had a molecular profile that was underdeveloped for their age. This is the first study to show in humans that the simple act of touching, early in lif
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New Scientist - News
Men in the UK have the highest obesity rates in Europe Rising obesity could stop heart health gains Ed Simons / Alamy Stock Photo By Andy Coghlan Just when Europeans thought they’d licked heart disease , along come obesity and diabetes to ruin the party. An analysis of 56 countries across Europe, north Africa, and the Middle East suggests rising rates of obesity could halt the gains made by tackling heart disease in recent decades. Between 1985 a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Turning carbon dioxide into fuel and useful chemicalsTurning pollution into fuel: A new method could be used to transform greenhouse gases into useful fuels and chemicals, right at the power plant.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Identifying optimal adaptation of buildings threatened by hurricanes, climate changeThe need for adaptation strategies to reduce the threat of hurricanes to society is of critical importance, as evidenced by the recent damage to coastal regions in the U.S. and the Caribbean this past year. The fact that the number of residential buildings in coastal areas has increased significantly combined with the increasing risks of impacts of due climate change means that the cost of damage
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bridging the 'practice science gap' to optimize restoration projectsAs restoration projects throughout the country focus on restoring natural ecosystems, researchers are looking for ways to better bridge the 'practice science gap' between practitioners and biodiversity research in an effort optimize these types of projects.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genetic predisposition to later puberty causes lower bone density in children and adultsPeople whose genetic makeup triggers a later-than-average start to puberty have lower bone mineral density, especially in their lower spine. Because adolescence is a critical period for accruing bone, this effect may increase a person’s risk of osteoporosis and bone fractures later in life.
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Gizmodo
Study Estimates That Pokémon GO Has Caused More Than 100,000 Traffic Accidents Photo: Getty The Pokémon GO phenomenon has mostly faded, but the destruction left in its wake could be far larger than anyone imagined. Two professors from Perdue University have attempted to get an idea of the game’s effect on traffic accidents by studying data from one county in Indiana. The results don’t reflect well on Pikachu and friends. It’s probably unfair to solely blame a free mobile ga
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The Scientist RSS
Study: Autism Linked with Different Reactions to Chemical SignalsResponses to compounds in human sweat may help explain why people with autism spectrum disorder tend to struggle with social cues.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers identify information gaps about opioid antidote naloxone The nation's opioid epidemic kills 91 people a day, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The death toll would be even higher, were it not for emergency responders' heavy reliance on naloxone as an antidote that rapidly reverses the effects of overdose. However, a new systematic review of evidence by clinicians and researchers at OHSU in Portland, Oregon, reveals impor
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Muscles can't get any faster than this ... a fundamental muscle speed limitWhen birds sing their elaborate songs, bats echolocate, rattlesnakes rattle and toadfish hum they use so-called superfast muscles, the fastest vertebrate muscles known. New research shows that these muscles have reached a maximum speed attainable in any vertebrate muscle.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New tool in cell's invasion machinery may help explain cancer's ability to spreadScientists have discovered a new tool in the cell's invasion machinery that may help explain cancer's ability to spread. Time-lapse imaging of the worm C. elegans reveals a fleeting protrusion that wedges into a tiny gap in the protective layer that surrounds the cell, and swells until the breach is wide enough for the cell to squeeze through. The findings could point to new ways to prevent metast
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Deep ocean bacteria discovered to play large role in carbon captureMarine bacteria that live in the dark depths of the ocean play a newly discovered and significant role in the global carbon cycle, according to a new study.
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Bench to Bedside: Myelination 2 - Neuropathology of Multiple Sclerosis - Christine Stadelmann Improving our understanding of nerve cell myelination and remyelination in both animal models and humans may to improve treatment for demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Part 1: Myelination, Remyelination and Multiple Sclerosis: During multiple sclerosis, the myelin sheath around axons is destroyed and nerve function is lost. Yet sometimes a few lesions undergo remyelination. Why?
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Bench to Bedside: Myelination 1 - Myelination, Remyelination and Multiple Sclerosis - Mikael Simons Improving our understanding of nerve cell myelination and remyelination in both animal models and humans may to improve treatment for demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Part 1: Myelination, Remyelination and Multiple Sclerosis: During multiple sclerosis, the myelin sheath around axons is destroyed and nerve function is lost. Yet sometimes a few lesions undergo remyelination. Why?
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Bench to Bedside: A Change of Heart, pt.2 - In vivo Cellular Reprogramming - Deepak Srivastava Part 1: A Change of Heart: Embryonic Heart Development: Understanding the molecular pathways involved in normal heart development suggests treatments for both congenital and adult onset heart disease. Part 2: A Change of Heart: In vivo Cellular Reprograming: The introduction of specific genes into mammalian hearts caused fibroblasts to be reprogrammed to cardiac muscle cells. https://www.ibiology
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Bench to Bedside: A Change of Heart, pt.1 - Embryonic Heart Development - Deepak Srivastava Part 1: A Change of Heart: Embryonic Heart Development: Understanding the molecular pathways involved in normal heart development suggests treatments for both congenital and adult onset heart disease. Part 2: A Change of Heart: In vivo Cellular Reprograming: The introduction of specific genes into mammalian hearts caused fibroblasts to be reprogrammed to cardiac muscle cells. https://www.ibiology
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New on MIT Technology Review
Dear Future AI Overlords: Here Are Some Reasons Not to Kill Us Robots Get an ‘Undo’ Button That Could Help Them Learn Faster Deep reinforcement learning works a lot like a child learning a skill: practice makes perfect. For an autonomous agent like a robot, though, its environment has to be reset to its original state between attempts—a chore that can take hours as humans… Read more Deep reinforcement learning works a lot like a child learning a skill: pract
13h
Ars Technica
Creeping quackery: “Integrative” cancer care spreading in NIH-supported centers Enlarge / Various homeopathic remedies. reader comments 0 More than 60 percent of NIH-supported comprehensive cancer centers in the US include “ integrative medicine ” in their services and patient information. And in recent years, the centers’ inclusion of dubious treatments has only grown, according to a new article in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute Monographs . For instance, the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
SLU researchers discover BRCA cancer cells' last defense IMAGE: This is Alessandro Vindigni, Ph.D., professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at SLU. view more Credit: Saint Louis University ST. LOUIS -- In a new paper published in Nature Communications , a team led by Saint Louis University researcher Alessandro Vindigni, Ph.D. shares new information about how BRCA-deficient cancer cells operate, interact with chemotherapy drugs and what m
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Identifying optimal adaptation of buildings threatened by hurricanes, climate change The need for adaptation strategies to reduce the threat of hurricanes to society is of critical importance, as evidenced by the recent damage to coastal regions in the U.S. and the Caribbean this past year. The fact that the number of residential buildings in coastal areas has increased significantly combined with the impacts of climate change means that the increase in hurricane intensity and fr
14h
The Scientist RSS
US Court Issues Injunction Against Open-Access Publisher OMICSThe Federal Trade Commission won an initial ruling against the India-based publisher for allegedly misleading researchers and for misrepresenting journal impact factors and editorial boards.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reimagining autonomy in reproductive medicine Do the reproductive choices of prospective parents truly align with their values and priorities? How do doctors, reproductive technologies, and the law influence those choices? And why should certain women receive medical assistance to establish a pregnancy, while others are put in jail when they miscarry? A new Hastings Center special report, Just Reproduction: Reimagining Autonomy in Reproducti
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Promising target for treating brain tumors in children Findings published in Oncotarget offer new hope for children with highly aggressive brain tumors like atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT) and medulloblastoma. Previously, the authors of the study have shown that an experimental drug that inhibits polo-like kinase 4 (PLK4) stopped pediatric brain tumor growth in vitro. Now, they have demonstrated its success in an animal model - the drug shra
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Big Think
Your Identity Is Almost Entirely Based on Unconscious Brain Processes We often think that our deeply held beliefs, opinions, and emotions are the result of a long time spent thinking. We see ourselves as an executive of sorts somewhere inside our own head, pondering, making plans, and coming to decisions. This is what is known as a top-down model of executive control. It isn’t only laypeople who think this way, but scientists and scholars, many anyway. This has bee
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The Atlantic
The Decades-Long Quest to Make Virus-Proof Mosquitoes In the summer of 1922, as Simeon Burt Wolbach and Marshall Hertig slid their scalpels into 13 common house mosquitoes, they had no idea that they were about to stumble across one of the most successful microbes on the planet, nor that a century later, their discovery could potentially save millions of lives. In those dissected mosquitoes, the duo found a new bacterium, and 14 years later, Hertig
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Gizmodo
Quick Question: Do You Look Into The Window Of The Car Next To You? GIF I’ve noticed there’s something I seem to instinctively do as I drive, and I don’t think I’m alone. I don’t know why I do it, and I don’t really have a sense of how common it is, so consider this article my first attempt to learn more. Here’s what it is: if I’m stopped at a light, or keeping close pace with a car next to me, I find that I’ll often take a quick glance over into the other car, t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Laws of attraction: Pollinators use multiple cues to identify flowers across continentsAlthough at least 75 percent of our crop species depend on animal pollinators, little is known about their flower preferences. As global insect populations decline, it is of utmost importance for us to understand what factors attract wild pollinators to flowers, and how these preferences differ in the face of environmental change. Now, an international team of scientists have discovered that a gro
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sharks evolved aircraft-like attributes to suit habitatsResearchers report that shark species have evolved diverse physical attributes to help them thrive in different ocean ecosystems.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novice pilots improve visual responses to simulation by watching experts' eye movementsNovice military pilots can improve their visual responses to a simulated emergency procedure by observing the eye movements of expert pilots.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Unforeseen new drug target discovered for acute myeloid leukemiaA new study has found an unexpected new drug target for acute myeloid leukemia that could open new avenues to develop effective treatments against this potentially lethal disease. Researchers show that inhibiting the METTL3 gene destroys AML cells without harming non-leukemic blood cells and reveals why METTL3 is required for AML cell survival.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Trigger for most common form of vision loss discoveredResearchers have discovered a critical trigger for the damaging inflammation that causes macular degeneration and ultimately robs millions of their sight. The finding may allow doctors to halt the inflammation early on, saving people from blindness.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Freezing electrons makes them get in line Cartoon of electronic liquid-crystal phases at half-filling. This research indicates a transition from nematic (b) to smectic (c) phases. Credit: Purdue University New research published in Nature Communications suggests that electrons in a two-dimensional gas can undergo a semi-ordered (nematic) to mostly-ordered (smectic) phase transition, which has been discussed in physics theory but never se
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Big Think
How a Hackneyed Romantic Ideal Is Used to Stigmatise Polyamory There’s no longer anything unusual about wanting an open relationship. Many who consider themselves progressive about sex, gender, love and relationships know this. It’s just that almost nobody in an open relationship wants to be open about it. What’s surprising is that so many people feel the need for secrecy. I’ve been out as polyamorous for years. Because of this, non-monogamous people who a
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Gizmodo
You Can Finally Buy a Copy of the Voyager Golden Record, Gold Plating Not Included Image: Ozma Records The Voyager 1 spacecraft might be the most famous time capsule in history, soaring through space as a testament to humanity’s achievements. We don’t know if intelligent life will ever find the craft or its contents, launched in 1977 to explore the planets before sailing indefinitely beyond our solar system. But at least humans here on Earth can finally own a piece of its histo
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Live Science
Man Has Surgery to Remove 263 Coins, 100 Nails from Stomach "He had been eating metal for a year but did not tell anyone." https://t.co/NcZPAmrjRT — New York Daily News (@NYDailyNews) November 27, 2017 Doctors in India were shocked to find that a patient with stomach pain had swallowed hundreds of coins and nails, according to news reports. The 35-year-old patient was recently admitted to the hospital with abdominal pain, and doctors initial
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Science : NPR
Puerto Rico's Medical Manufacturers Worry Federal Tax Plan Could Kill Storm Recovery Jared Haley, general manager of the C-Axis plant in Caguas, Puerto Rico, says computer-operated milling machines, like this one can cost more than a half million dollars. Heat and humidity in the plant after Hurricane Maria left many of the machines inoperable, Haley says. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption toggle caption Greg Allen/NPR Jared Haley, general manager of the C-Axis plant in Caguas, Puerto
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Live Science
Could Climate Change Affect People’s Personalities? People's personalities may be shaped by the temperatures of the places in which they grew up, a new study suggests. This could mean that as climate change influences temperatures around the globe, shifts in personality may follow. The idea that someone's personality may be affected by where that person lives is not new: Previous research has suggested that many aspects of human personality
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook turns to AI to help prevent suicides Soft robotic actuators, which are pneumatic artificial muscles designed and programmed to perform lifelike motions, have recently emerged as an attractive alternative to more rigid components that have conventionally been ...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Prosecutors say Chinese cyber firm was front for hackersThree Chinese nationals are accused of operating a cybersecurity firm that used phishing scams and malware to steal data from international corporations.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spain reports case of 'mad cow disease' University of Louisville neurologist Robert P. Friedland, M.D., questions the safety of eating farmed fish in the June issue of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, adding a new worry to concerns about the nation's food supply.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study finds mycobacteria can sense presence of proteins that cause disease Patricia Champion, associate professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Notre Dame. Credit: University of Notre Dame Tuberculosis-causing mycobacteria use a select group of proteins known as virulence factors to transmit the disease, which infects roughly one third of the world's population and causes 1.7 million deaths annually. Those proteins are cargo transported b
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Turning emissions into fuel—method converts carbon dioxide into useful compounds Ball-and-stick model of carbon dioxide. Credit: Wikipedia MIT researchers have developed a new system that could potentially be used for converting power plant emissions of carbon dioxide into useful fuels for cars, trucks, and planes, as well as into chemical feedstocks for a wide variety of products. The new membrane-based system was developed by MIT postdoc Xiao-Yu Wu and Ahmed Ghoniem, the Ro
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Turning emissions into fuel CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- MIT researchers have developed a new system that could potentially be used for converting power plant emissions of carbon dioxide into useful fuels for cars, trucks, and planes, as well as into chemical feedstocks for a wide variety of products. The new membrane-based system was developed by MIT postdoc Xiao-Yu Wu and Ahmed Ghoniem, the Ronald C. Crane Professor of Mechanical
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Ars Technica
Security firm was front for advanced Chinese hacking operation, Feds say reader comments 0 Three men who worked for an Internet security firm in China have been indicted on federal charges for hacking into at least three multinational corporations. The malware they used has been tied to the Chinese government. Wu Yingzhuo, Dong Hao, and Xia Lei face federal charges that they conspired to steal hundreds of gigabytes of data belonging to Siemens AG, Moody’s Analytics, a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Estimates of recreational use values may remain stable over decades Recently published work by a cooperative team of researchers, including participants from the University of Montana and the USGS Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center, reports the economic value that private boaters of the Grand Canyon assigned to their recreational experience remained relatively stable between 1985 and 2015 when adjusted for inflation. But the larger finding of the study i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
About half of hydraulically fractured wells exist within 2 to 3 kilometers of domestic groundwater systems: study Hydraulically fractured wells in California's Central Valley. Credit: Debra Perrone How safe is the water you drink? For the 45 million Americans who get their drinking water from private groundwater wells rather than a public utility, the answer is decidedly murky. The Environmental Protection Agency regulations that protect public drinking water systems don't apply to privately owned wells, lea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Leave a buffer for your bumper: Study contradicts practice of traffic light tailgating Jonathan Boreyko (left) and graduate student Farzad Ahmadi monitor pedestrian spacing as a line empties at The Cube in Virginia Tech's Moss Arts Center. The team found that people move slowly but accelerate quickly, meaning packing tightly in lines increases pedestrians' chances of moving through faster. Credit: Virginia Tech When pulling up to a traffic light, most drivers get pretty close to th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Less life: Limited phosphorus recycling suppressed early Earth's biosphere As Earth's oxygen levels rose to near-modern levels over the last 800 million years, phosphorus levels increased, as well, according to modeling led by the UW's Michael Kipp and others. Accordingly, Kipp says, large phosphate deposits show up in abundance in the rock record at about this time. This is a Wyoming portion of The Phosphoria Formation, a deposit that stretches across several states in
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Decline in atmospheric carbon dioxide key to ancient climate transitionA decline in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels led to a fundamental shift in the behavior of the Earth's climate system around one million years ago, according to new research led by the University of Southampton.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain cortex development: Ryk needs a chaperoneProteins named Ryk and Smek contribute to the development of the brain's cortex, which is the gray matter responsible for consciousness, report scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Artificial muscles give soft robots superpowersResearchers have created origami-inspired artificial muscles that add strength to soft robots, allowing them to lift objects that are up to 1,000 times their own weight using only air or water pressure. Consisting of an inner 'skeleton' folded into a specific pattern and enclosed within a plastic or fabric 'skin' bag, these muscles can perform a greater variety of tasks and are safer than other mo
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dermatologist develops a molecular taxonomy for hair disordersThe first steps toward bringing a genomic strategy into dermatology have now been taken. These findings represent an initial step towards developing a molecular taxonomy for hair disorders.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Archaeologist challenging the idea that prehistoric people in the Southwest subsisted on maize Corn that prehistoric people grew in the Southwest 1,000 years ago looked nothing like the sweet corn people eat today. Credit: Joseph Fuqua II/UC Creative Services Conventional wisdom holds that prehistoric villagers planted corn, and lots of it, to survive the dry and hostile conditions of the American Southwest. But University of Cincinnati archaeology professor Alan Sullivan is challenging th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fighting plant disease at warm temperatures keeps food on the table An issue of global concern is the anticipated shortage of agricultural output to meet the steady rise in human population. Michigan State University scientists understand that overcoming crop loss due to disease and adverse weather will be key in achieving this goal. Credit: Layne Cameron An issue of global concern is the anticipated shortage of agricultural output to meet the steady rise in huma
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Gizmodo
Here's Why Scientists Cloned the First Cloned Dog Snuppy’s clones (Image: Kim et al, Sci. Rep (2017)) Ever since the first cloned mammal, Dolly the Sheep, died abnormally young, there’s been plenty of talk about clone aging . Now, scientists have cloned the world’s first cloned dog in order to study these “re-clones” to determine whether they die sooner and age quicker than their non-cloned counterparts. “Scientifically, this is very exciting,”
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Estimates of recreational use values may remain stable over decades, finds UM research MISSOULA - Recently published work by a cooperative team of researchers, including participants from the University of Montana and the USGS Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center, reports the economic value that private boaters of the Grand Canyon assigned to their recreational experience remained relatively stable between 1985 and 2015 when adjusted for inflation. But the larger finding of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fear of sharks influences seaweed growth on Fijian coral reefs A whitetip reef shark patrols a Fijian coral reef lagoon at high tide. In a recently published study, researchers from Bigelow Laboratory documented the first clear example of sharks causing cascading changes among other sea life in this ecosystem. Credit: Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences Fishes' fear of sharks helps shape shallow reef habitats in the Pacific, according to new research by a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Long-haired microbes named after Canadian band Rush Microbe named after Canadian musician Alex Lifeson. Credit: Patrick Keeling Three new species of microbe found in the guts of termites have been named after members of the Canadian prog-rock band Rush, owing to the microbes' long hair and rhythmic wriggling under the microscope. "A Spanish postdoc, Javier del Campo, asked me to recommend some good Canadian music, and I suggested he listen to Rush
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sharks evolved aircraft-like attributes to suit habitats Jean Potvin, Ph.D., physicist at Saint Louis University. Credit: Saint Louis University / Ellen Hutti In a paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences , researchers report that shark species have evolved diverse physical attributes to help them thrive in different ocean ecosystems. Lead author Adrian Gleiss, Ph.D., a biologist at Murdoch University Centre for Fish a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Large-scale approach reveals imperfect actor in plant biotechnology Scientist picking molecules from a tree. Credit: Steven Lee/Whitehead Institute A research team led by Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research has harnessed metabolomic technologies to unravel the molecular activities of a key protein that can enable plants to withstand a common herbicide. Their findings reveal how the protein—a kind of catalyst or enzyme, first isolated in bacteria and intro
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Small numbers of churches embrace same-sex marriage Researchers at the Universities of York and Leeds have found that the majority of places of worship that permit same-sex marriage carry out small numbers of ceremonies, with just over half having actually married a couple. Same-sex couples are prohibited from marrying in approximately 40,000 places of worship that permit different-sex couples to marry, and there are only 182 places of worship reg
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Popular Science
Is it possible to eat so much that your stomach explodes? Note: Below is the script for the video, above. You may want to just watch the video instead. While we have you, why don't you subscribe to Popular Science on YouTube? After eating too much, have you ever felt like that dude from Alien whose stomach explodes? Like somewhere in the meat and potatoes , a baby alien snuck in? We all have. But, baby alien explosion aside, how much can the human stoma
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NYT > Science
Gene Therapy Hits a Peculiar Roadblock: A Virus Shortage Few gene-therapy companies have the factories or expertise to make the viruses for use in clinical trials, where standards are exacting and comprehensive. The firms that can do it are swamped with orders and requests. The result is a logjam. Firms exploring new gene therapies may wait for years in line for bespoke viruses, said Dr. Jim Wilson, director of the gene therapy program at the Universit
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New Scientist - News
Feather-light artificial muscles lift 1000 times own weight This, but a tiny origami robot Joel Carillet/Getty By Timothy Revell Foldable artificial muscles can lift 1000 times their weight, be made in just 10 minutes and cost less than a dollar. Soft robots are getting better, but greater flexibility has a trade-off as softer materials are often weaker and less resilient than inflexible ones, limiting their use. But now researchers have created a 2.6
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fake news can backfire for companies caught in the act Credit: CC0 Public Domain In the era of fake news, less scrupulous businesses are using deceptive tactics to smear their rivals. But companies that spread fake news against their competitors ultimately experience the brunt of negative publicity and reputational damage. That's a key finding of new research co-authored by the UBC Sauder School of Business. The researchers examined a real-life case
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bridging the 'practice science gap' to optimize restoration projects As restoration projects throughout Massachusetts and the country focus on restoring natural ecosystems, researchers are looking for ways to better bridge the "practice science gap" between practitioners and biodiversity research in an effort optimize these types of projects. The findings were recently published in the journal Conservation Letters . "Our sense was that some of the science we do wa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Garlic can fight chronic infections Credit: Rüdiger Wölk An active sulphurous compound found in garlic can be used to fight robust bacteria in patients with chronic infections, a new study from the University of Copenhagen indicates. Here the researchers show that the garlic compound is able to destroy important components in the bacteria's communication systems, which involve regulatory RNA molecules. 'We really believe this metho
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New on MIT Technology Review
How Reuters’s Revolutionary AI System Gathers Global News “The advent of the internet and the subsequent information explosion has made it increasingly challenging for journalists to produce news accurately and swiftly.” So begin the research and development team at the global news agency Reuters in a paper on the arXiv this week. For Reuters, the problem has been made more acute by the emergence of fake news as an important factor in distorting the per
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Live Science
Giant Volcano on Bali Is Spewing Ash Clouds, May Erupt Soon Mount Agung, a volcano in Indonesia, erupted clouds of ash on Monday (Nov. 27). Credit: Donal Husni/NurPhoto/Getty Indonesia's Mount Agung is spewing towering clouds of ash, raising concerns that the giant 10,305-foot-tall (3,140 meters) volcano might have a big eruption soon, according to news sources. The volcano, located on the eastern side of the resort island of Bali, began erupting as
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Drug-delivering nanoparticles seek and destroy elusive cancer stem cells Illinois researchers developed nanoparticles that can target cancer stem cells (yellow), the rare cells within a tumor (blue) that can cause cancer to recur or spread. Credit: Dipanjan Pan University of Illinois researchers are sending tiny drug-laden nanoparticles on a mission to seek and destroy cancer stem cells, the elusive and rare cells that can cause cancer to come back even when years hav
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Barley is flavor of the month as new study settles centuries-old brewing debate Barley flavors beer. Credit: The Sainsbury Laboratory What makes a perfectly flavoured pint? It's been the obsession of brewers big and small for centuries. For some it's the hops, others say it's the water, or yeast. But the science of beer has just added a flavour to the mash...barley. The discovery follows a five-year study involving researchers at The Sainsbury Laboratory, Norwich, alongsid
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What can zebrafish teach us about our survival in the face of mutations? Adaptive mechanisms such as activation and use of cryptic splice sites or alternative transcription start sites as well as nonsense-associated alternative splicing and skipped exons maintaining reading frame shore up a sea of mutations expected to cause premature translation termination and loss of function. Credit: Artist: Neta Schwartz. Not too long ago, biologists would induce mutations in an
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Ars Technica
Federal student aid site offers one-stop shopping for ID thieves Enlarge / Former First Lady Michelle Obama delivers remarks during a FAFSA workshop in 2014. Identity theft was not the kind of "getting schooled" the First Lady had in mind. reader comments 26 The arrival of the holidays heralds another season soon to arrive: the tax season and, with it, the tax-return fraud season . And while the Internal Revenue Service has made some moves toward stanching the
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Inside Science
The Surprising Complexity in One Dimension The Surprising Complexity in One Dimension Two experiments test a 50-year-old theory on particles that move in a straight line. nanotube.jpg Artist's rendering of methane molecules flowing through a carbon nanotube. Image credits: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Physics Monday, November 27, 2017 - 15:00 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- Unlike one-dimensional personalities, one-di
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New method benchmarks organic mixed conductors OECT description and operation. a OECT cross section, wiring, and dimensions: channel length (L), and thickness (d). The source, drain, and gate (S, D, G, respectively), and relevant voltages (gate, drain voltage: V G, V D) and currents (drain current, I D) terms are also labeled. b Representative transfer (I D − V G) curve for a p-type accumulation mode device (V D Nature Communications (2017).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Maize pest exploits plant defense compounds to protect itself The western corn rootworm ( Diabrotica virgifera virgifera ), orginally from Central America, is more and more frequently found in Europe. Credit: Nowlan Freese, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology The western corn rootworm continues to be on the rise in Europe. Why attempts to biologically target this crop pest by applying entomopathogenic nematodes have failed, can now be explained by the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study finds mycobacteria can sense presence of proteins that cause disease IMAGE: This is Patricia Champion, associate professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Notre Dame. view more Credit: University of Notre Dame Tuberculosis-causing mycobacteria use a select group of proteins known as virulence factors to transmit the disease, which infects roughly one third of the world's population and causes 1.7 million deaths annually. Those p
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Gizmodo
Join The Smokeboy Cult With This Popular Kamado Grill, On Sale For Cyber Monday Char-Griller Akorn Kamado Kooker , $258 If you want a Big Green Egg charcoal grill, but don’t want to cash in your 401(k) to buy one, this Char-Griller alternative is down to $258 on Amazon today , the best price in months. The Char-Griller Akorn Kamado Kooker features a 306 square inch cast iron cooking surface (which is most similar to the $829 large Big Green Egg ), and traps heat inside a hea
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Archaeologist says fire, not corn, key to prehistoric survival in arid SouthwestArchaeologists have found scant evidence that people grew corn around the Grand Canyon 1,200 years ago. Instead, he said they used fire to prepare land for the cultivation of wild foods.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Less life: Limited phosphorus recycling suppressed early Earth's biosphereThe amount of biomass -- life -- in Earth's ancient oceans may have been limited due to low recycling of the key nutrient phosphorus, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Leave a buffer for your bumper: Study contradicts practice of traffic light tailgatingThe practice of packing tightly at traffic lights is widely accepted. Thanks to new research, drivers now have a good reason to dismiss this faulty line of roadway intuition.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ultrathin and flat graphene metalenses gain morace propertiesLenses made of graphene and precisely pierced gold sheets are able to concentrate terahertz beams to a spot, flip its polarization and modulate its intensity.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Here’s what really happened to Hanny’s Voorwerp The weird glowing blob of gas known as Hanny’s Voorwerp was a 10-year-old mystery. Now, Lia Sartori of ETH Zurich and colleagues have come to a two-pronged solution. Hanny van Arkel, then a teacher in the Netherlands, discovered the strange bluish-green voorwerp, Dutch for “object,” in 2008 as she was categorizing pictures of galaxies as part of the Galaxy Zoo citizen science project. Further obs
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Long-haired microbes named after Canadian band RushThree new species of microbe found in the guts of termites have been named after members of the Canadian prog-rock band Rush, owing to the microbes' long hair and rhythmic wriggling under the microscope.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Breakthrough in tornado short-term forecasting could mean earlier, more accurate warningsResearchers have developed a tornado-prediction method they say could buy as much as 20 minutes additional warning time. Using high-altitude turbulence radar can help researchers detect specific tornado signatures, with 90 percent accuracy within a 100-kilometer radius.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Parental diet affects offspring immunity: Meta-analysisA multidisciplinary wide-ranging study across the animal kingdom has found a close relationship exists between parents' diets and the immunity of offspring, with implications for wildlife conservation and animal husbandry as well as human health.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Women may be more vulnerable to concussions because of 'leaner' nerve fibers, studyWomen have smaller, more breakable nerve fibers in the brain compared to men that may make them more susceptible to concussions, suggests a new study.
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The Atlantic
A Photo Trip Along the Ancient Silk Road Recently, while reading an XKCD comic about temperature preferences , the name “Turpan” caught my eye, which led me down an internet rabbit-hole that eventually led me to create this trip along the ancient Silk Road for you, using photographs, traveling from east to west. Starting in Xi’an, China, the route winds its way through parts of Kazakhstan, Afghanistan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Iran, Ir
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The Atlantic
The Dangerous Myths About Sufi Muslims The attack on Al Rawdah mosque in the Sinai last Friday, during which Islamists claimed at least 305 lives, was quite possibly the deadliest terrorist atrocity in modern Egyptian history and one of the largest terrorist attacks worldwide. Because the mosque was often frequented by Muslims linked to a Sufi order, the massacre also brought to light the deeply flawed ways Sufism is discussed—both by
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In harm's way How safe is the water you drink? For the 45 million Americans who get their drinking water from private groundwater wells rather than a public utility, the answer is decidedly murky. The Environmental Protection Agency regulations that protect public drinking water systems don't apply to privately owned wells, leaving owners responsible for ensuring their water is safe from contaminants. In asses
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Leave a buffer for your bumper: Study contradicts practice of traffic light tailgating IMAGE: Jonathan Boreyko (left) and graduate student Farzad Ahmadi monitor pedestrian spacing as a line empties at The Cube in Virginia Tech's Moss Arts Center. The team found that people move... view more Credit: Virginia Tech When pulling up to a traffic light, most drivers get pretty close to the car in front of them, leaving just several feet of space between their bumper and the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Less life: Limited phosphorus recycling suppressed early Earth's biosphere IMAGE: As Earth's oxygen levels rose to near-modern levels over the last 800 million years, phosphorus levels increased, as well, according to modeling led by the UW's Michael Kipp and others.... view more Credit: Michael Kipp / University of Washington The amount of biomass - life - in Earth's ancient oceans may have been limited due to low recycling of the key nutrient phosphorus, accordi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Laws of attraction: Pollinators use multiple cues to identify flowers across continents Although at least 75% of our crop species depend on the activities of wild pollinators, little is known about their flower preferences. As global populations of domestic bee pollinators decline, it is of utmost importance for us to understand what factors attract wild pollinators such as hoverflies to flowers, and how these preferences differ in the face of environmental change. Now, a team of sc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Artificial muscles give soft robots superpowers Soft robotics has made leaps and bounds over the last decade as researchers around the world have experimented with different materials and designs to allow once rigid, jerky machines to bend and flex in ways that mimic and can interact more naturally with living organisms. However, increased flexibility and dexterity has a trade-off of reduced strength, as softer materials are generally not as s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Decline in atmospheric carbon dioxide key to ancient climate transition IMAGE: Reflected light image of the shell of a fossil planktic foraminifera Globigerinoides ruber. The boron isotopic composition of the shells of this species was used to reconstruct atmospheric CO2... view more Credit: Tom Chalk A decline in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels led to a fundamental shift in the behaviour of the Earth's climate system around one million years ago, accordi
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Soft Robots Acquire Origami Skeletons for Super-Strength I can’t sit here and promise you that the robot apocalypse isn’t coming, that the machines won’t eventually rise up and overthrow their makers. But what I can promise you is that not all of them will be able to punch you out. Because robots are going soft. Like, literally soft, controlled with liquid or air instead of traditional motors. It’s called soft robotics, naturally, and it’s hot at the m
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What can zebrafish teach us about our survival in the face of mutations?The CRISPR/Cas9 genome-editing tool reveals that sometimes an organism compensates for a mutation in a gene by changing how it regulates the expression of other related genes -- a workaround of sorts. A good way to hunt out these kinds of genomic workarounds is to look at the RNA phase, which is the intermediary between gene and protein.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fighting plant disease at warm temperatures keeps food on the tableAn issue of global concern is the anticipated shortage of agricultural output to meet the steady rise in human population. Scientists understand that overcoming crop loss due to disease and adverse weather will be key in achieving this goal.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
As climate warms, mice morphMilder winters have led to physical alterations in two species of mice in southern Quebec in the past 50 years -- providing a textbook example of the consequences of climate change for small mammals. These findings also reveal a stark reversal in the proportions of the two mice populations present in the area, adding to evidence that warming temperatures are driving wildlife north.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New method benchmarks organic mixed conductorsNew materials were used by researchers in organic electrochemical transistors to test and compare their performances for different applications.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Amputees can learn to control a robotic arm with their mindsNeuroscientists have shown how amputees can learn to control a robotic arm through electrodes implanted in the brain. The research details changes that take place in both sides of the brain used to control the amputated limb and the remaining, intact limb. The results show both areas can create new connections to learn how to control the device, even several years after an amputation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fear of sharks influences seaweed growth on Fijian coral reefsFishes' fear of sharks helps shape shallow reef habitats in the Pacific, according to new research. The study is the first clear case of sharks altering a coral reef ecosystem through an indirect effect - creating an atmosphere of fear that shifts where herbivores feed and seaweeds grow.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Mind's eye blink' proves 'paying attention' is not just a figure of speechPsychologists have discovered that when you shift your attention from one place to another, your brain 'blinks'--experiences momentary gaps in perception.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Barley is flavor of the month as new study settles centuries-old brewing debateA five-year study settles a debate among brewers -- does barley flavor your pint?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Asthma in infant boys may eventually be preventableA new study shows that the family risk for asthma -- typically passed from moms to babies -- may not be a result of genetics alone: it may also involve the microbes found in a baby's digestive tract.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Drug-delivering nanoparticles seek and destroy elusive cancer stem cellsResearchers are sending tiny drug-laden nanoparticles on a mission to seek and destroy cancer stem cells, the elusive and rare cells that can cause cancer to come back even when years have passed since the initial tumor was treated. Encapsulated in the particles is the drug niclosamide -- a drug commonly prescribed to treat tapeworm infections, but in cancer stem cells it turns off key gene pathwa
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fake news can backfire for companies caught in the actIn the era of fake news, less scrupulous businesses are using deceptive tactics to smear their rivals. But companies that spread fake news against their competitors ultimately experience the brunt of negative publicity and reputational damage.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Autism and the smell of fearAutism typically involves the inability to read social cues. We most often associate this with visual difficulty in interpreting facial expression, but new research suggests that the sense of smell may also play a central role in autism.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New technique can detect impurities in ground beef within minutesResearchers have found a better way to identify unwanted animal products in ground beef. They used a laser-equipped spectrometer and statistical analysis to determine with 99 per cent accuracy whether ground beef samples included other animal parts. They were able to say with 80 per cent accuracy which animal parts were used, and in what concentration.
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Gizmodo
What Bali’s Volcanic Eruptions Could Mean for the Climate A view of Mount Agung volcano erupting on Monday. Indonesia authorities raised the alert for the rumbling volcano to the highest level. Photo: AP Indonesia’s Mount Agung has played a game of will it/won’t it erupt for months with swarms of earthquakes and occasional ash plumes. That game ratcheted up a notch this weekend when much larger ash cloud shot into the atmosphere and lava made its way to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Artificial muscles give soft robots superpowers A demonstration of strength of the artificial muscle. Credit: Shuguang Li Soft robotics has made leaps and bounds over the last decade as researchers around the world have experimented with different materials and designs to allow once rigid, jerky machines to bend and flex in ways that mimic and can interact more naturally with living organisms. However, increased flexibility and dexterity has a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Laws of attraction: Pollinators use multiple cues to identify flowers across continents Hoverfly pollinators visited buttercups in Thangu Valley, North Sikkim, one of the trans-continental sites chosen. Credit: Shannon Olsson Although at least 75% of our crop species depend on the activities of wild pollinators, little is known about their flower preferences. As global populations of domestic bee pollinators decline, it is of utmost importance for us to understand what factors attra
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Decline in atmospheric carbon dioxide key to ancient climate transition Reflected light image of the shell of a fossil planktic foraminifera Globigerinoides ruber. The boron isotopic composition of the shells of this species was used to reconstruct atmospheric CO2 1 million years ago in this study. Credit: Tom Chalk A decline in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels led to a fundamental shift in the behaviour of the Earth's climate system around one million years a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ryk needs a chaperoneRyk has made the headlines by requiring a chaperone. But don't assume that Ryk is a badly behaved celebrity—it's actually a protein featured in a new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of the Sciences (PNAS).
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Gizmodo
Federal Student Aid Website Leaves Personal and Financial Info of Millions Vulnerable to Identity Thieves Photo: Getty For Americans, the Social Security number (SSN) has long been considered one of the most private pieces of personally identifiable information. With it, you can unlock an infinite number of doors; behind each is a bank account, a trove of medical records, your cellphone call history, and a bevy of other intimate details about your life. Essentially, it is the most important password
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Gizmodo
Pick Up New Shades, Plus a Spare Pair, With This BOGO Sale at Sunglass Warehouse Buy one, get one free on all sunglasses | Sunglass Warehouse | Use code BOGO Sunglass Warehouse has some of the best pricing out there, but they’ve amped it up this week. Their Cyber Monday Sale is basically a free-for-all. Use the code BOGO at check out, and you can grab two pairs of sunglasses for the price of of one , including sale styles. I mean, you can grab pairs for as low as $6, so you r
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Columbia researcher develops a molecular taxonomy for hair disorders Two decades ago, oncologists realized that molecular biologists could see medically important differences between tumors that looked identical to pathologists. Molecular biologists could read information in the genome to improve the precision of diagnoses, guide treatment strategies, and improve health outcomes. Now, a research team from Columbia University has taken the first steps toward bringi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Structure of primary optogenetic tool revealed IMAGE: Attempts to solve the structure of ChR2 go right back to the time of its discovery in 2003. But despite the efforts of numerous research groups from across the world,... view more Credit: MIPT Press Office An international team of researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Forschungszentrum Jülich, the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, the Institut de Bio
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novice pilots improve visual responses to simulation by watching experts' eye movements Brooklyn, NY - Novice military pilots can improve their visual responses to a simulated emergency procedure by observing the eye movements of expert pilots, according to new research from SUNY Downstate Medical Center. The findings were presented recently at Neuroscience 2017, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, recognized as the world's leading source of emerging news about brain
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Patients diagnosed with AF who seek cardiologist care more likely to survive first year Philadelphia, November 27, 2017 - Atrial fibrillation (AF) is growing to epidemic proportions worldwide. Investigators, hypothesizing that patients who received comprehensive cardiovascular care had a greater likelihood of survival during the first year following their initial diagnosis, found that cardiologist care was associated with a 32% lower death rate. However, views differ regarding wheth
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Small numbers of churches embrace same-sex marriage Researchers at the Universities of York and Leeds have found that the majority of places of worship that permit same-sex marriage carry out small numbers of ceremonies, with just over half having actually married a couple. Same-sex couples are prohibited from marrying in approximately 40,000 places of worship that permit different-sex couples to marry, and there are only 182 places of worship reg
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Garlic can fight chronic infections An active sulphurous compound found in garlic can be used to fight robust bacteria in patients with chronic infections, a new study from the University of Copenhagen indicates. Here the researchers show that the garlic compound is able to destroy important components in the bacteria's communication systems, which involve regulatory RNA molecules. 'We really believe this method can lead to treatme
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Large-scale approach reveals imperfect actor in plant biotechnologyScientists have unraveled the molecular activities of a key protein that can enable plants to withstand a common herbicide. Their findings reveal how the protein can sometimes act imprecisely, and how it can be successfully re-engineered to be more precise.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cancer drug starts clinical trials in human brain-cancer patientsA drug that spurs cancer cells to self-destruct has been cleared for use in a clinical trial of human patients with anaplastic astrocytoma, a rare malignant brain tumor, and glioblastoma multiforme, an aggressive late-stage cancer of the brain.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists identify novel therapeutic targets for metastatic melanomaNovel therapeutic targets for metastatic melanoma have now been identified by scientists, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Harvesting the sun for power and produce: Agrophotovoltaics increases the land use efficiency by over 60 percentUntil now, acreage was designated for either photovoltaics or photosynthesis, that is, to generate electricity or grow crops. An agrophotovoltaics (APV) pilot project, however, has now demonstrated that both uses are compatible. Dual use of land is resource efficient, reduces competition for land and additionally opens up a new source of income for farmers, say researchers.
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New Scientist - News
Fake embryonic stem cells tested in people with Parkinson’s A new type of stem cell is being used to treat problems in the brain sudok1/Getty By Clare Wilson For the first time, a new type of stem cell, derived from “virgin births”, has been tested in people. The cells have been injected into the brains of people with Parkinson’s disease, and will soon be tried out as a way of fixing physical brain injuries. Like embryonic stem cells, these cells coul
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New Scientist - News
What to expect if Indonesia’s volcano erupts in a big way Donal Husni/ZUMA Wire/REX/Shutterstock By Michael Le Page and Press Association The Mount Agung volcano in Bali began erupting on 24 November, and it is feared an even larger eruption could occur. Explosions in Mount Agung are hurling clouds of white and dark grey ash up to 3000 metres into the atmosphere , and lava is welling up in the crater. Mudflows, caused by the ash mixing with rain, ar
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New Scientist - News
Mysterious gamma rays in Crab nebula traced to pulsar winds By Adam Mann Waves of charged particles slamming into gas and dust may be responsible for unexpected super-bright flashes in the Crab nebula. The Crab, located about 6500 light years away in the constellation Taurus, is the remains of a star that exploded as a supernova in 1054 AD. At its heart is a compact neutron star – an ultra-dense object the size of a city but with several times the mas
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Gizmodo
Watch Thieves Hack Keyless Entry to Steal a Mercedes in Less Than a Minute Source: West Midlands Police A new surveillance video from Birmingham, England shows two hackers exploiting keyless technology to steal a sleeping man’s Mercedes—in less time than it takes to order something off Seamless. Released by the West Midlands Police Department on Monday, authorities believe it to be the first footage of thieves attacking a car using relay boxes, devices that can be progr
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New on MIT Technology Review
What I Learned from the People who Built the Nuclear Bomb When I began my career in elementary particle physics, the great figures who taught and inspired me had been part of the Manhattan Project generation that developed the atomic bomb. They were proud to have created a “disruptive” technology that ended World War II and deterred a third world war through more than 50 years of tense East-West standoff. They were also proud to have made nuclear power
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sharks evolved aircraft-like attributes to suit habitats IMAGE: This is Jean Potvin, Ph.D., physicist at Saint Louis University. view more Credit: Saint Louis University / Ellen Hutti ST. LOUIS - In a paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B , researchers report that shark species have evolved diverse physical attributes to help them thrive in different ocean ecosystems. Lead author Adrian Gleiss, Ph.D., a biologist at Murdoch Univ
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stem cells in intestinal lining may shed light on behavior of cancer cells URBANA, Ill. - The lining of the intestines - the epithelium - does more than absorb nutrients from your lunch. It grows, shrinks, and adjusts the very makeup of its cells in response to whatever you just ate. And understanding that process might just give scientists new insights into the behavior of cancer cells. "We are interested in how your diet affects the process of growth and renewal of in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Flip side of innovation: What causes doctors to scale back on the use of medical practices IMAGE: To better understand why doctors scale back on expensive medical treatments for certain medical practices, Dr. Bekelis and researchers at The Dartmouth Institute studied nearly 10,000 physicians who performed carotid... view more Credit: The Dartmouth Institute All countries face the challenge of funding ever-new and expensive treatments, with increasing pressure on budgets, harmful defi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MS patients who adhere to treatment have higher health costs-and better outcomes CHICAGO--November 27, 2017--Researchers examined the insurance claims and medical records of 681 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and found those who adhered to medication schedules had significantly better physical outcomes than patients who did not, although the total overall costs for their care were higher. The findings, published in the December edition of the Journal of the American Os
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mothers of teens with autism report higher levels of stress, but optimism can be a buffer Anyone who has ever survived being a teenager should be well aware that parenting a teenager can be no easy feat. But factor in a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or intellectual disability (ID), and you'll likely have the recipe for a unique set of challenges to the entire family unit. According to autism expert Jan Blacher , a distinguished professor in the Graduate School of Educati
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Archaeologist says fire, not corn, key to prehistoric survival in arid Southwest Conventional wisdom holds that prehistoric villagers planted corn, and lots of it, to survive the dry and hostile conditions of the American Southwest. But University of Cincinnati archaeology professor Alan Sullivan is challenging that long-standing idea, arguing instead that people routinely burned the understory of forests to grow wild crops 1,000 years ago. "There has been this orthodoxy abou
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
As access to legal marijuana increases, Kaiser Permanente researchers explore patient use About 1 in 7 adult primary care patients visiting medical offices reported having used marijuana at least once in the past year, according to a study conducted by Kaiser Permanente researchers since Washington state legalized nonmedical cannabis use in 2014. In young adults, that rate was higher: nearly 2 in 5. Young adults -- especially men age 18-29 who had depression or used tobacco -- were al
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bridging the 'practice science gap' to optimize restoration projects As restoration projects throughout Massachusetts and the country focus on restoring natural ecosystems, researchers are looking for ways to better bridge the "practice science gap" between practitioners and biodiversity research in an effort optimize these types of projects. The findings were recently published in the journal Conservation Letters . "Our sense was that some of the science we do wa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
York U research finds children show implicit racial bias from a young age TORONTO, Monday, November 27, 2017 - Do children show implicit racial preferences from an early age? According to new research from York University's Faculty of Health, they do. In three separate studies with over 350 five to twelve-year-old White children, York University researchers found that children show an implicit pro-White bias when exposed to images of both White and Black children. But
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Barley no longer an afterthought in beer flavor CORVALLIS, Ore. - Barley has always played second fiddle to hops and yeast when it comes to flavoring beer. Now the grain is ready for its solo. In two studies published this week in the Journal of the American Society of Brewing Chemists , a research team led by Oregon State University found notable differences in the taste of beers malted from barley varieties reputed to have flavor qualities.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Maize pest exploits plant defense compounds to protect itself IMAGE: The western corn rootworm ( Diabrotica virgifera virgifera ), orginally from Central America, is more and more frequently found in Europe. view more Credit: Nowlan Freese, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology The western corn rootworm continues to be on the rise in Europe. Why attempts to biologically target this crop pest by applying entomopathogenic nematodes have failed, can now be
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Gizmodo
Facebook Expands Self-Harm Prevention Program That Monitors Users’ ‘Thoughts of Suicide’ Image: Getty Facebook is expanding its artificial intelligence-based suicide prevention efforts. The company said today that it has plans to eventually monitor and respond to suicidal intent on Facebook “worldwide,” excluding the European Union. Today, Facebook’s vice president of product management Guy Rosen published a blog about the company’s efforts to detect and report users who express “tho
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
US arthritis prevalence is much higher than current estimatesNew research indicates that the prevalence of arthritis in the United States has been substantially underestimated, especially among adults <65 years old.
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Gizmodo
There's Never Been a Better Day to Upgrade Your Router Black Friday’s home networking scene was highlighted by a massive TP-Link sale on Amazon, but Cyber Monday belongs to NETGEAR . Inside, you’ll find routers, range extenders, modems, powerline kits, and more to fit any budget. For a smallish house or apartment, the Nighthawk R6700 is a screaming-good deal at $70. $70 From amazon 8552 purchased by readers Gizmodo Media Group may get a commission Th
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Scientific American Content: Global
Your Brain Is So Easily Fooled Your Brain Is So Easily Fooled Journalist Erik Vance talks about his first book, Suggestible You: The Curious Science of Your Brain’s Ability to Deceive, Transform and Heal. ABOUT THE AUTHOR(S) Erik Vance Erik Vance is a freelance writer in Mexico City who covers the environment and neuroscience. His first book, Suggestible You (National Geographic, 2016), is about how belief affects the brai
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Gizmodo
Sen. Chuck Schumer Wants the FTC to 'Take a Serious Look' at DNA Testing Companies Sen. Chuck Schumer earlier this month. Image: AP The science of how our genes affect our health, our looks and our personality is still pretty mysterious. Even more mysterious: What happens to your DNA after you spit in a test tube and send it to 23andMe or Ancestry to decode your DNA for a not-insignificant fee. On Sunday, New York Democrat Sen. Chuck Schumer called for more federal scrutiny of
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Possible vestiges of a universe previous to the Big BangA researcher proposes to eliminate the need for cosmological space-time singularity and argues that the current expansion phase was preceded by contraction.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New butterfly species discovered in Russia with an unusual set of 46 chromosomesFinding a new species is a rare event in easy-to-see and well-studied organisms like butterflies, especially if they inhabit well-explored areas such as Europe. Researchers have now discovered the previously unknown South-Russian blue using an array of modern research techniques. Furthermore, the new species was found to possess 46 chromosomes, just like a human, whereas its closest relative has 6
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Unique metal artifacts from Iron Age settlement shed new light on prehistoric feastingPrehistoric cauldrons, ancient sword and assorted metalwork among nationally significant findings just discovered by archaeologists at Glenfield Park, Leicestershire.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New pain treatment tested in humansNerve growth factor signals through receptors of the tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk) family, and research in animals has shown that inhibitors of Trks A, B, and C can reduce pain. Now a new study provides the first demonstration of pain relief in humans using a Trk inhibitor.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain impact of youth football: Brain changes after one season of playSchool-age football players with a history of concussion and high impact exposure undergo brain changes after one season of play, according to two new studies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Neurofeedback shows promise in treating tinnitusResearchers using functional MRI (fMRI) have found that neurofeedback training has the potential to reduce the severity of tinnitus or even eliminate it, according to a new study.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Hidden hoard hints at how ancient elites protected the family treasures BOSTON — Long before anyone opened a bank account or rented a safe deposit box, wealth protection demanded a bit of guile and a broken beer jug. A 3,100-year-old jewelry stash was discovered in just such a vessel, unearthed from an ancient settlement in Israel called Megiddo in 2010. Now the find is providing clues to how affluent folk hoarded their valuables at a time when fortunes rested on fan
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Ars Technica
Android 8.1 Preview 2 arrives on Google devices and enables that custom SoC Enlarge Google has posted the second developer preview of Android 8.1. This release brings a "near final" build of Android 8.1 to the Pixel 2 and 2 XL , the Pixel 1 and 1 XL, the Pixel C tablet, and the Nexus 6P and 5X. The first Android 8.1 Preview , which launched last month, was a bit of a mess. Google's incremental update files didn't work, so the company had to take them down . The full syst
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Viden
Ny gadget skal gøre dig mindre afhængig af din telefon Den ryger op af lommen under alt fra måltider til arbejdsmøder. Den stjæler din opmærksomhed med mails, nyheder og notifikationer på Facebook eller Twitter. Næsten alle danskere ejer i dag en smartphone, og hver tredje synes, det er ubehageligt ikke at havde den inden for rækkevidde. Det viser tidligere undersøgelser. Læs også: Har min smartphone gjort mig til en digital junkie? Nu har en den øst
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Unforeseen new drug target discovered for acute myeloid leukemia A study has found an unexpected new drug target for acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) that could open new avenues to develop effective treatments against this potentially lethal disease. Researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, the Gurdon Institute and their collaborators show that inhibiting the METTL3 gene destroys human and mouse AML cells without harming non-leukaemic blood cells. Re
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Long-haired microbes named after Canadian band Rush Three new species of microbe found in the guts of termites have been named after members of the Canadian prog-rock band Rush, owing to the microbes' long hair and rhythmic wriggling under the microscope. "A Spanish postdoc, Javier del Campo, asked me to recommend some good Canadian music, and I suggested he listen to Rush," says Patrick Keeling, a University of British Columbia microbiologist and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Increased oral pathogens, decreased bacterial diversity predict precancerous stomach cancer lesions Elevated pathogen colonization and a lack of bacterial diversity in the mouth were identified in people with precancerous lesions that could precede stomach cancer, finds a new study led by New York University College of Dentistry (NYU Dentistry) and New York University School of Medicine. The findings, published in the November issue of the Journal of Periodontology , provide new evidence that t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nodding raises likability and approachability The act of nodding positively affects the subjective likability of people by about 30 percent and their approachability by 40 percent, according to a study conducted by researchers from Hokkaido University and Yamagata University in Japan. In many countries, nodding is a communicative signal that means approval, and head shaking is a gesture of denial. Hokkaido University Associate Professor Jun-
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Efficient synthesis of a photosynthetic pigment in mammalian cells for Optogenetics IMAGE: Four enzymes required for PCB synthesis from heme (HO1, PcyA, Fd, Fnr). The research group succeeded in synthesizing PCBs in animal cells by introducing these four enzyme genes. view more Credit: NIBB The "Optogenetic" method of controlling the position of proteins in cells using light is becoming widely employed as an important method to understand intracellular signal transduction.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New proton record: Researchers measure magnetic moment with greatest possible precision IMAGE: Double Penning trap system for measuring the g-factor of the proton: the gold-plated cylindrical trap electrodes are isolated using sapphire rings. The approximately 20 centimeters tall structure is located within... view more Credit: photo/©: Georg Schneider The magnetic moment of an individual proton is inconceivably small, but can still be quantified. The basis for undertaking this meas
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mount Sinai scientists identify novel therapeutic targets for metastatic melanoma (New York, NY - November 27, 2017) - Mount Sinai researchers have identified novel therapeutic targets for metastatic melanoma, according to a study published in Molecular Cell . The study focused on a gene called AMIGO2 and its partner, called PTK7. Scientists' understanding of AMIGO2's role in cancer has been limited until now, but the researchers discovered that AMIGO2 and PTK7 is required for
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fake news can backfire for companies caught in the act In the era of fake news, less scrupulous businesses are using deceptive tactics to smear their rivals. But companies that spread fake news against their competitors ultimately experience the brunt of negative publicity and reputational damage. That's a key finding of new research co-authored by the UBC Sauder School of Business. The researchers examined a real-life case from 2012 in South Korea,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Barley is flavor of the month as new study settles centuries-old brewing debate IMAGE: Barley flavors beer. view more Credit: The Sainsbury Laboratory What makes a perfectly flavoured pint? It's been the obsession of brewers big and small for centuries. For some it's the hops, others say it's the water, or yeast. But the science of beer has just added a flavour to the mash...barley. The discovery follows a five-year study involving researchers at The Sainsbury Laboratory
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Gizmodo
5 Things to Know About Tencent, the Chinese Internet Giant That's Worth More Than Facebook Now Image: Tencent While most people in the United States still aren’t familiar with Tencent, the Chinese digital media and telecom conglomerate has quickly become one of the biggest players on the internet. Just last week, Tencent’s market cap valuation of $530 billion propelled it past Facebook and into the fifth spot among the largest corporations in the world. How it got started Founded in 1998,
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Gizmodo
Upsize to Amazon's Co-Branded 65" 4K TV For Just $765, While It Lasts Element 65" 4K TV - Fire TV Edition | $765 | Amazon Amazon partnered with Element this year to create affordable 4K TVs with Amazon’s Fire TV software and Alexa built in, and the 65" is back in stock for just $765 for Cyber Monday , $135 less than usual. We bought the 55" one for our office pod on Prime Day, and it’s been fantastic. Gizmodo’s Adam Clark Estes is also a fan . The sn
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Ars Technica
Radioactive land around Chernobyl to sprout solar investments Enlarge / In this aerial view electricity pylons stand near the new enclosure built over reactor number four at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant on August 19, 2017 near Chernobyl, Ukraine. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images) Getty Images reader comments 39 A mere 100 meters (328 feet) from the damaged reactor at Chernobyl in Ukraine, a one-megawatt, $1.2 million solar panel installation will lik
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Popular Science
Babies understand that getting what you want in life means putting in the effort In life, we often go through a lot of effort to get what we want. In fact, we’ve created an entire economical model out of it. Value is a balance of two things: how rewarding a particular thing is and the effort a person must go through to obtain it. Both cost and reward depend on the situation and the person—your goal may not be the same as someone else’s goal—as well as the particular challenge
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drug-delivering nanoparticles seek and destroy elusive cancer stem cells IMAGE: Illinois researchers developed nanoparticles that can target cancer stem cells (yellow), the rare cells within a tumor (blue) that can cause cancer to recur or spread. view more Credit: Image courtesy of Dipanjan Pan CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- University of Illinois researchers are sending tiny drug-laden nanoparticles on a mission to seek and destroy cancer stem cells, the elusive and rare cells
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Asthma in infant boys may eventually be preventable IMAGE: Anita Kozyrskyj, a professor of pediatrics at the University of Alberta, has published a study that shows moms passing on asthma to their babies is not just about genetics, and... view more Credit: University of Alberta A new University of Alberta study shows that the family risk for asthma--typically passed from moms to babies--may not be a result of genetics alone: it may also involve th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Trigger for most common form of vision loss discovered IMAGE: Jayakrishna Ambati, M.D., (left) and Nagaraj Kerur, Ph.D., have discovered a crucial trigger for macular degeneration, a condition which robs millions of their sight. The discovery may allow doctors to... view more Credit: Josh Barney | UVA Health System In a major step forward in the battle against macular degeneration, the leading cause of vision loss among the elderly, researchers at th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
As private funding of biomedical research soars, new risks arise IMAGE: Healthcare Transformation , a breakthrough peer-reviewed open access journal, delivers the foremost research in re-imagining healthcare delivery, education, technology, innovation, and discovery. view more Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers New Rochelle, NY, November 27, 2017--Academic medical centers (AMCs) in the U.S. are navigating an increasing shift in research funding from hi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hubble and Gaia team up to measure 3-D stellar motion with record-breaking precisionA team of astronomers used data from both the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and ESA's Gaia satellite to directly measure the 3-D motions of individual stars in a nearby galaxy. The achieved accuracy is better than anything previously measured for a galaxy beyond the Milky Way. The motions provide a field test of the currently accepted cosmological model and also measure the trajectory of the gal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Amputees can learn to control a robotic arm with their minds IMAGE: Monkeys were trained to use their thoughts to move a robotic arm and grasp a ball. view more Credit: Nicho Hatsopoulos, Karthikeyan Balasubramanian A new study by neuroscientists at the University of Chicago shows how amputees can learn to control a robotic arm through electrodes implanted in the brain. The research, published in Nature Communications , details changes that take place in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New method benchmarks organic mixed conductors Within the past five years, Northwestern University's Jonathan Rivnay has noticed a surge in the development of new organic mixed conductors -- polymer materials that can transport both electrons and ions. Lighter, more flexible, and easier to process than their inorganic counterparts, the carbon-based materials show promise in a broad assortment of applications, ranging from medical devices to e
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers uncover link between immune function and osteoarthritic pain and progression The immune system plays a pivotal role in the amount of pain and disease progression experienced by patients with osteoarthritis (OA), McMaster University researchers have found. This discovery could lead to new strategies for improving joint pain management and immune function in older adults with arthritis. The study, published in the medical journal Osteoarthritis and Cartilage , found that mo
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Gizmodo
Tumblr Founder David Karp Steps Down Image: AP After 11 years, Tumblr’s founder and public face David Karp announced his resignation from the company in a staff email this afternoon. The once booming platform which attracted artists, bloggers, and fandom communities in droves was purchased by in May of 2013 Yahoo for the obscene figure of $1 billion under Marissa Meyer’s leadership, but consistently struggled to find a road to profi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Galactic microquasar provides explanation for structure of faraway radio galaxiesNew results will aid the study of the distribution of gravitational waves from distant sources.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
When magma prevents volcanic eruptionsCalderas are huge topographic depressions formed by large volcanic eruptions. They sometimes experience an inflation of their floor of up to a kilometer, caused by magma injection. This process, dubbed 'caldera resurgence,' remains one of the least understood in volcanology. Researchers now show that non-erupted magma left after the caldera-forming eruption behaves as a 'rubber sheet' that inhibit
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First proper motions measured of stars in a small galaxy outside the Milky WayBy combining data from the Hubble Space Telescope and the Gaia mission, astronomers have been able to measure the proper motion of 15 stars in the Sculptor Galaxy, the first such measurement outside the Milky Way. Analysis shows an unexpected preference in the direction of movement, which suggests that the standard theoretical models used to describe the motion of stars and dark matter halos in ot
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Negative emotions' linked to higher rates of opioid use in sickle cell diseaseA link has been foundbetween negative emotions, such as sadness and anxiety, and higher opioid use in people with sickle cell disease whose pain levels were self-reported as relatively low. These conclusions come from a small study using data from daily electronic patient diaries.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
All missions on board for NASA heliophysics researchScientists have been studying the near-Earth environment for the better part of a century, but many mysteries -- like where the energetic particles that pervade the area originate and become energized -- still remain. In a new type of collaborative study, scientists combined data from 16 separate NASA and Los Alamos National Laboratory spacecraft to understand how a particle phenomenon in the magn
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Viden
Krammepude til voksne skal erstatte sovepiller Kan sovepiller erstattes af en pude, der simulerer menneskets åndedræt? Det mener det hollandske firma Somnox, som har udviklet det, de selv kalder for en soverobot. Nærmere bestemt har hollænderne designet en bønneformet krammepude, der ifølge firmaet “beroliger krop og sind”, så folk med søvnproblemer nemmere kan falde i søvn og i det hele taget sove bedre. Læs også: Sød musik skal redde snorke
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Ars Technica
Destiny 2 misrepresented XP gains to its players until the devs got caught Enlarge / When you boot Destiny 2 , you'll see various vignette shots that detail past adventures, depending on whether you played the original series. Bungie/Activision reader comments 70 Over the Thanksgiving weekend, the largest Destiny -related Reddit community exploded with data that seemed to confirm an unadvertised limitation in the game Destiny 2 . According to fan analysis, players of th
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Live Science
Politician's Man-Eating Crocodile Warning Is a Load of Crock Australian politician Bob Katter wants to launch a war … against crocodiles. Katter, known for his controversial opinions on multiple topics including same-sex marriage, claimed on Nov. 15 that there are too many crocodiles in Australia. They have no natural enemies, and in the Australian region of North Queensland alone, they eat up to four people each year, he said. Katter made the an
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Live Science
In Photos: Mexico's New Ocean Reserve Protects Stunning Biodiversity The Revillagigedo Archipelago, a chain of four volcanic islands in the Pacific Ocean near Mexico, is home to a spectacularly diverse community of sea life, including dozens of fish species found nowhere else on Earth. Mexico's President Enrique Peña Nieto recently designated these islands and the surrounding waters as a marine reserve and national park, prohibiting natural resource extraction, c
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Family-friendly overpasses are needed to help grizzly bears, study suggestsResearchers have determined how female grizzly bears keep their cubs safe while crossing the Trans-Canada Highway.
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Live Science
Mexico Designates Breathtaking Ocean Reserve, North America's Largest Mexico President Enrique Peña Nieto designated an ocean region near the southwestern coast of Mexico as a protected area. Uniquely rich in marine biodiversity, the area is North America's largest marine reserve, at nearly 58,000 square miles (150,000 square kilometers). On Friday (Nov. 24), President Nieto signed a decree to create the Revillagigedo Archipelago National Park in a region of
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BBC News - Science & Environment
How bats keep an ear on their prey Image copyright Getty Images A structure that allows sound information to be processed extremely fast has been identified in bats' brains. Researchers were able to analyse the echo-locating animals' neurones as they caught their insect prey in darkness. But the bats have to process a lot of sound information. "The vocalisations are insanely fast. It is a heavy processing load to perform this beha
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Gizmodo
The Nest Thermostat Just Fell An Extra $30 to $169 Commerce Content is independent of Editorial and Advertising, and if you buy something through our posts, we may get a small share of the sale. Click here for more. The Nest Learning thermostat has been marked down to $199 across the board for the last few days , but the standard stainless steel color just dropped an extra $30 , for some reason. We aren’t sure how long this will last, so if you h
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Viden
Dansk virksomhed afslører millionsvindel med netannoncer Ingen ved, hvem de er. Men bagmændene har tjent millioner af kroner på den omfattende svindel, hvor de solgte falske annoncer på nettet. Det er en af de største sager af sin art, der nogensinde er blevet afsløret. Og det er det danske tech-firma Adform, der har afsløret bedrageriet , hvor der hver dag blev solgt falske web-annoncer for millioner af dollars. Læs også: Facebook udleverer 3.000 anno
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study links proposed changes in US tax laws to rich-poor gap and mortality rates IMAGE: Projected impacts of federal tax plan scenarios on deaths from all causes in the United States. Error bars indicate 95 percent confidence intervals for estimates. view more Credit: Daniel Kim Amsterdam, November 27, 2017 - The income gap between the rich and poor in the United States has reached its highest levels since the Great Depression. Given past evidence that a wider rich-poor
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Mind's eye blink' proves 'paying attention' is not just a figure of speech IMAGE: When your attention shifts, your brain 'blinks.' view more Credit: Keith Wood, Vanderbilt University When your attention shifts from one place to another, your brain blinks. The blinks are momentary unconscious gaps in visual perception and came as a surprise to the team of Vanderbilt psychologists who discovered the phenomenon while studying the benefits of attention. "Attention i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
As climate warms, mice morph IMAGE: Biologists document changes in teeth and skull structure in two species in southern Quebec over past 50 years. view more Credit: McGill University, Virginie Millien New research by McGill University biologists shows that milder winters have led to physical alterations in two species of mice in southern Quebec in the past 50 years - providing a textbook example of the consequences of climat
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fear of sharks influences seaweed growth on Fijian coral reefs IMAGE: A whitetip reef shark patrols a Fijian coral reef lagoon at high tide. In a recently published study, researchers from Bigelow Laboratory documented the first clear example of sharks causing... view more Credit: Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences Fishes' fear of sharks helps shape shallow reef habitats in the Pacific, according to new research by a scientist at Bigelow Laborat
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How bat brain tracks prey The bat midbrain is uniquely organized to facilitate rapid integration of sensory and motor information required for tracking prey using biological sonar, according to neural recordings of wild bats obtained during laboratory experiments described in JNeurosci . The superior colliculus (SC) is a layered structure in the mammalian brain that uses sensory information to orient the animal to a parti
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Leave your ego at the door: Researchers uncover reality of wingsuit flyingResearchers are challenging the myth that extreme sports enthusiasts push themselves to the max and take risks no matter what the consequences.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Carbon capture is helped by oil revenue, but it may not be enoughThe oil industry incentivises the development of carbon-capturing tech, but researchers say this will not reduce emissions to low enough levels.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New microscope sets a record for visualizing surface wetting propertiesWetting is an everyday phenomenon that represents how well liquid spreads on a surface. When water comes into contact with an extremely water-repellent, or ‘superhydrophobic’ surface, droplets bead up and roll off easily. Researchers have developed a measurement technique called Scanning Droplet Adhesion Microscopy (SDAM) to understand and characterize the wetting properties of superhydrophobic ma
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nodding raises likability and approachabilityThe act of nodding positively affects the subjective likability of people by about 30 percent and their approachability by 40 percent, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New strategy for multiple myeloma immunotherapyA new target for monoclonal antibody-based treatment of cancer has been revealed by a team of researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Earthworms can reproduce in Mars soil simulantTwo young worms are the first offspring in a Mars soil experiment. A biologist found them in a Mars soil simulant that he obtained from NASA. At the start he only added adult worms. The experiments are crucial in the study that aims to determine whether people can keep themselves alive at the red planet by growing their own crops on Mars soils.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New computational method introduced for lighting in computer graphicsComputing lighting that looks real remains complex and inefficient, as the necessary consideration of all possible paths light can take remains too costly to be performed for every pixel in real-time. A pair of computer scientists, with expertise in video game development and lighting simulation algorithms, has developed a new computational method to address this key challenge.
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Gizmodo
So, Uh, You Might Want to Buy a New Monitor Or Two Today Cyber Monday Monitor and Accessory Sale | Amazon Cyber Monday is a great excuse to upgrade your home office or PC gaming battle station, as Amazon is running a wide-ranging sale on computer monitors, docking stations, and monitor arms for one day only . I’ll cut to the chase here, the showstopper in the sale is Samsung’s ridiculous 49" curved, HDR, Quantum Dot-powered display for $1000 , an
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Live Science
Where in the Pacific Northwest Will the Next Monstrous Earthquake Strike? Brookings Harris Beach in Oregon Credit: [Shutterstock/Tyler Hulett] Scientists have known that The Really big One, a monstrous 9.0-magnitude earthquake , may hit the Pacific Northwest within the next several decades. New geological research just determined that the quake is likely to strike northern Oregon or Washington State. The Pacific Northwest sits atop the Cascadia subduction zone, w
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Neural recordings of wild bats reveal unique organization of midbrain region for tracking and capturing preyThe bat midbrain is uniquely organized to facilitate rapid integration of sensory and motor information required for tracking prey using biological sonar, according to neural recordings of wild bats obtained during laboratory experiments described in The Journal of Neuroscience.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fighting plant disease at warm temperatures keeps food on the table IMAGE: An issue of global concern is the anticipated shortage of agricultural output to meet the steady rise in human population. Michigan State University scientists understand that overcoming crop loss due... view more Credit: Photo by Layne Cameron EAST LANSING, Mich. - An issue of global concern is the anticipated shortage of agricultural output to meet the steady rise in human population. Mi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetic predisposition to later puberty causes lower bone density in children and adults People whose genetic makeup triggers a later-than-average start to puberty have lower bone mineral density, especially in their lower spine. Because adolescence is a critical period for accruing bone, this effect may increase a person's risk of osteoporosis and bone fractures later in life. "If an individual is genetically programmed for later puberty, we found that he or she tends to have lower
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cancer drug starts clinical trials in human brain-cancer patients IMAGE: Pretzel's brain tumor shrank more than 40 percent after treatment with PAC-1 in a clinical trial for dogs with glioma, a brain cancer very similar to glioblastoma in humans.... view more Credit: Photo courtesy Tim Fan CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- A drug that spurs cancer cells to self-destruct has been cleared for use in a clinical trial of patients with anaplastic astrocytoma, a rare malignant brai
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Some men confuse sexual interest with consent regardless of the situation, new study shows BINGHAMTON, NY- Some men tend to confuse sexual interest with consent, regardless of the situation, according to a new paper co-written by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. Sexual victimization of women by men is a growing societal concern that is present in all environments of day-to-day life, according to the researchers. More specifically, instances of sexual viol
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What can zebrafish teach us about our survival in the face of mutations? IMAGE: Adaptive mechanisms such as activation and use of cryptic splice sites or alternative transcription start sites as well as nonsense-associated alternative splicing and skipped exons maintaining reading frame shore up... view more Credit: Artist: Neta Schwartz. Washington, DC--Not too long ago, biologists would induce mutations in an entire genome, isolate an organism that displayed a resul
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Women may be more vulnerable to concussions because of 'leaner' nerve fibers, Penn study IMAGE: "Train tracks " of female axons were more likely to break from a simulated brain injury than male axons. view more Credit: Penn Medicine PHILADELPHIA - Women have smaller, more breakable nerve fibers in the brain compared to men that may make them more susceptible to concussions, suggests a new study from Penn Medicine neuroscientists published online today in the journal Experimental Neur
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Muscles can't get any faster then this ... a fundamental muscle speed limit IMAGE: Daubenton's bat ( Myotis daubentonii ) during prey capture. view more Credit: Lasse Jakobsen & Coen Elemans/SDU. When birds sing their elaborate songs, bats echolocate, rattlesnakes rattle and toadfish hum they use so-called superfast muscles, the fastest vertebrate muscles known. New research shows that these muscles have reached a maximum speed attainable in any vertebrate muscle. Acro
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Large-scale approach reveals imperfect actor in plant biotechnology IMAGE: Scientist picking molecules from a tree. view more Credit: Steven Lee/Whitehead Institute Cambridge, MA. (Nov. 27) - A research team led by Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research has harnessed metabolomic technologies to unravel the molecular activities of a key protein that can enable plants to withstand a common herbicide. Their findings reveal how the protein -- a kind of catalyst
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Gizmodo
Like You Have Anything Better to Do Than Watch Someone Spend 66 Hours Assembling a Chainmail Shirt GIF No one’s pretending that life in the middle ages didn’t suck. There was the plague, unceasing catapult attacks, and beheading after beheading. But watching Evan Snider painstakingly make a chainmail shirt by hand once again reminds us to be extra thankful to live in this century. In addition to ten days of preparation and planning, the actual assembly of the shirt, made from hundreds of thous
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
How an underwater sensor network is tracking Argentina's lost submarine AP/REX/Shutterstock Argentina's ARA San Juan , a diesel-powered submarine, went missing this month off the east coast of South America. On 15 November, Argentina’s Navy lost contact with the ARA San Juan , a small diesel-powered submarine that had been involved in exercises off the east coast of Patagonia. About a week later, on 23 November, the Vienna-based Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US companies are investing less in scienceA new article reveals that large corporations are investing less in science. From 1980 to 2006, publications by company scientists have declined in a range of industries. The result holds across a range of industries.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dark ocean bacteria discovered to play large role in carbon capture Scientists collect water samples from the dark ocean -- the deep, unlit waters that comprise 90 percent of the ocean. In a new Science paper, Bigelow Laboratory researchers shared their discovery that nitrite-oxidizing bacteria play a major role in the capture of carbon dioxide in this realm. Credit: University of Vienna Marine bacteria that live in the dark depths of the ocean play a newly disco
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
All missions on board for NASA heliophysics research Scientists have been studying the near-Earth environment for the better part of a century, but many mysteries—like where the energetic particles that pervade the area originate and become energized—still remain. In a new type of collaborative study, scientists combined data from 16 separate NASA and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) spacecraft to understand how a particle phenomenon in the ma
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The Atlantic
Björk's Distant, Motherly Feminist Utopia Would it surprise you to learn that the new Björk album is full of birds chirping, keyboards gurgling, and the consonant “s” being treated in much the same way a pasta maker treats semolina? Or that the Icelandic icon sings of forests and mountains and souls and “a matriarchal dome”? Or that her latest videos encase her face in rainbow-robot prosthetics, her hair in golden butterflies, her heart
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
All missions on board for NASA heliophysics research Scientists have been studying the near-Earth environment for the better part of a century, but many mysteries -- like where the energetic particles that pervade the area originate and become energized -- still remain. In a new type of collaborative study, scientists combined data from 16 separate NASA and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) spacecraft to understand how a particle phenomenon in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ultrathin and flat graphene metalenses gain morace properties IMAGE: Metalenses are ultrathin (around 25 micrometers in thickness) and also very flat compared with conventional ones. view more Credit: IBS On the quest for miniaturization, scientists at the Center for Integrated Nanostructure Physics, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS, South Korea), in collaboration with researchers from the University of Birmingham and the Korea Advanc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
US companies are investing less in science A new article reveals that large corporations are investing less in science. From 1980 to 2006, publications by company scientists have declined in a range of industries. The result holds across a range of industries. Investigators also found that the value attributed to scientific research has dropped, whereas the value attributed to technical knowledge (as measured by patents) has remained stab
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Parental diet affects offspring immunity: Meta-analysis IMAGE: This is lead author Dr Catherine Grueber, a San Diego Zoo Global postdoctoral fellow at the University of Sydney. view more Credit: Sourced from University of Sydney A review of studies about parents' diet and the immunity of animal offspring has found a close relationship exists, with implications for wildlife conservation and livestock rearing as well as human health. The meta-anal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Johns Hopkins biologist leads team that unlocks mystery of protein function What makes the body of a person or any other organism work can for the most part be summed up in a word: proteins. These big molecules carry out almost all processes in living organisms, including moving other molecules from one place to another, replicating DNA, conveying genetic information from genes to cells, controlling immune response, driving metabolism and building muscle. Not all protein
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dark ocean bacteria discovered to play large role in carbon capture IMAGE: Scientists collect water samples from the dark ocean -- the deep, unlit waters that comprise 90 percent of the ocean. In a new Science paper, Bigelow Laboratory researchers shared their... view more Credit: University of Vienna Marine bacteria that live in the dark depths of the ocean play a newly discovered and significant role in the global carbon cycle, according to a new study publishe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Dark matter' discoveries could shine light on new treatments for diseases Soils from one of the highest, driest places on earth harbour microorganisms with the potential to treat HIV and tackle the world's antibiotic time bomb, research from Newcastle University, UK, has revealed. Analysis of soils from the Cerro Chajnantor mountain landscape of Chile within the Atacama Desert, one of only two coastal deserts in the world, has revealed a treasure trove of bacteria with
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Live Science
US Government Shuts Down Flat-Earther's Rocket Launch "Mad" Mike Hughes, a flat-Earth conspiracy theorist, will have to wait a little longer to test his science-busting rocket. Hughes had previously announced plans to launch himself in a homemade rocket to a height of 1,800 feet (550 meters) above California's Mojave Desert. But the launch, which Hughes had said would take place Nov. 25, did not happen. NPR reports that the Bureau of Land
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Gizmodo
Hold Up, the New Jumanji Movie Is Actually... Good? Image: Columbia Pictures Turns out, I truly am Jack Black in Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle— the upcoming Jumanji sequel that, against all odds, looks to actually be good—because “I just can’t even with this place.” First reactions are in for Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle , and things are looking solid for the sequel to the beloved Robin Williams children’s film. The early reviews of the movie,
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Gizmodo
One Does Not Simply Pay Full Price For the Lord of the Rings or Hobbit Extended Trilogies The Lord of the Rings: The Extended Motion Picture Trilogy , $26 | Hobbit Trilogy Extended , $38 There are quite a few permutations of the Lord of the Rings films out there on Blu-ray, but the extended editions are the ones you want, and the extended trilogy pack is down to $26 on Amazon for Cyber Monday, complete with all three extended films totaling 11 hours, plus 26 hours of special features
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Dark matter' discoveries could shine light on new treatments for diseases "Treasure trove" of bacteria with the potential to fight disease. Credit: Newcastle University Soils from one of the highest, driest places on earth harbour microorganisms with the potential to treat HIV and tackle the world's antibiotic time bomb, research from Newcastle University, UK, has revealed. Analysis of soils from the Cerro Chajnantor mountain landscape of Chile within the Atacama Deser
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Unlocking mystery of protein function What makes the body of a person or any other organism work can for the most part be summed up in a word: proteins. These big molecules carry out almost all processes in living organisms , including moving other molecules from one place to another, replicating DNA, conveying genetic information from genes to cells, controlling immune response , driving metabolism and building muscle. Not all prote
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bali's Mt. Agung volcano threatening to blow its top: experts If the Mt. Agung volcano erupts, an area of 10-12 kilometres around it will have to be evacuated, but not the whole island of Bali, experts say. Indonesian authorities have raised a maximum alert as Mount Agung on Bali—an island that attracted nearly five million tourists last year—threatens to erupt. Here's what experts say: Already erupting? Short answer: 'Yes'—but things could get much wor
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Ars Technica
Comcast hints at plan for paid fast lanes after net neutrality repeal reader comments 317 For years, Comcast has been promising that it won't violate the principles of net neutrality, regardless of whether the government imposes any net neutrality rules. That meant that Comcast wouldn't block or throttle lawful Internet traffic and that it wouldn't create fast lanes in order to collect tolls from Web companies that want priority access over the Comcast network. Thi
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The Atlantic
The Tools of Espionage Are Going Mainstream Deception is getting real. This month, lawyers for Facebook, Twitter, and Google testified before Congress, facing hard questions and ugly truths about Russia’s online operations to inflame American divisions and undermine American democracy. The story keeps getting worse. Twitter has now found more than 2,700 accounts controlled by Russians and 36,000 suspected Russian “bots”—accounts that autom
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Live Science
Attack of the (Adorable) Clones: Puppies Are 'Reclones' of First Cloned Dog Three puppies that were cloned from "Snuppy," the first cloned dog, photographed when they were nine months old. Credit: Min Jung Kim et al. Purebred puppies from the same litter tend to look pretty much the same. But a trio of littermates born recently in Korea don't just closely resemble each other — they're clones that share nuclear DNA from the same cells. In fact, those cells originate
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Popular Science
These are the best Cyber Monday deals on the internet For those that didn't get a chance to snag any deals this Black Friday weekend, Cyber Monday is here with a new crop of discounted products. We'll be on the lookout and updating this list all day and will also be posting updates on our Facebook group dedicated to finding deals . Some of these deals may only last for a limited time or sell out. We will try our best to remove those once the sales a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Negative emotions' linked to higher rates of opioid use in sickle cell disease In a small study using data from daily electronic patient diaries, Johns Hopkins researchers say they have found a link between negative emotions, such as sadness and anxiety, and higher opioid use in people with sickle cell disease whose pain levels were self-reported as relatively low. The researchers caution that their study wasn't set up to show that negative emotions or thinking causes peo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
High-refractive-index material retains high transmissivity after annealing at 850 degrees C Toyohashi University of Technology researchers in collaboration with Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), have developed a new material capable of retaining high transmissivity after thermal treatment at 850°C and successfully applied the material to optical devices. The researchers alternately laminated film of this high-refractive-index material and film of a low-refractive-inde
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Autism and the smell of fear Autism typically involves the inability to read social cues. We most often associate this with visual difficulty in interpreting facial expression, but new research at the Weizmann Institute of Science suggests that the sense of smell may also play a central role in autism. As reported today in Nature Neuroscience , Weizmann Institute of Science researchers show that people on the autism spectrum
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sulfur improves birefringence! Developing liquid crystalline molecules IMAGE: Images of alkylthio group rod-like molecules exhibiting liquid crystallinity at room temperature, and the phase structures. view more Credit: COPYRIGHT (C) TOYOHASHI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. A team of researchers led by Assistant Professor Yuki Arakawa, Toyohashi University of Technology, has successfully liquid crystallized π-conjugated 2 rod-like molecules w
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Big Think
How Long to Learn That Language? Here’s a Map for That For English-speakers, Romanian is easier to learn than German. And you’ll be speaking Russian sooner than Hungarian. How is that? Because the Foreign Service Institute says so. Located in Arlington, Virginia, the FSI is the U.S. government’s main provider of foreign affairs training, including language courses. As the chief learning organisation for the State Department, the FSI is where dipl
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BBC News - Science & Environment
EU settles dispute over major weedkiller glyphosate Image copyright AFP Image caption Crop-spraying in Meteren, northern France: glyphosate can have a big impact on biodiversity EU countries have voted to renew the licence of glyphosate, a widely used weedkiller at the centre of environmental concerns. The proposal at the EU Commission's Appeal Committee got 18 votes in favour and nine against, with one abstention, ending months of deadlock. The C
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Ars Technica
Study: Pokémon Go led to increase in traffic deaths, accidents Enlarge / Don't hunt for Pokémon and drive, kids... SOPHIA KEMBOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images reader comments 53 Pokémon Go View more stories Since Pokémon Go 's launch last summer, there have been plenty of anecdotal news reports and social media mentions of players being hurt or even killed while playing the game. A new study from Purdue University, though, uses detailed local traffic accident reports
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The Atlantic
Darkest Hour Is a Thunderous Churchill Biopic Viewers don’t meet Winston Churchill (Gary Oldman) for the first 10 minutes of his new biopic, Darkest Hour . The director Joe Wright ( Pride & Prejudice, Atonement ) wants to give the British leader an appropriate drumroll: The film melds impressive archival footage of troop buildup in Europe as the Second World War gets underway with scenes in Parliament of Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain st
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Studying heat transfer with computers is easier now "Our goal? To radically innovate numerical simulations in the field of thermal transport to take on the great science and technology issues in which this phenomenon is so central. This new study, which has designed a new method with which to analyse heat transfer data more efficiently and accurately, is an important step in this direction". This is how Stefano Baroni describes this new research p
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lab services associated with diagnoses of anaphylactic food reaction increased 871 percent 2007-16 IMAGE: A national health problem. view more Credit: FAIR Health NEW YORK, NY--November 27, 2017--The number of laboratory services associated with diagnoses of anaphylactic food reaction increased 871 percent from 2007 to 2016, and the amount of billed charges for those services increased even more--5,390 percent--in the same period, according to research from FAIR Health, a national, independent
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New pain treatment tested in humans Nerve growth factor signals through receptors of the tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk) family, and research in animals has shown that inhibitors of Trks A, B, and C can reduce pain. Now a new study in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology provides the first demonstration of pain relief in humans using a Trk inhibitor. The inhibitor was compared with pregabalin, ibuprofen, and placebo, in ra
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Quanta Magazine
The Overlooked Link Between Two of This Year’s Nobel Prizes This year, the Nobel Prizes in Physiology or Medicine and in Chemistry went to researchers working on the study of the circadian clock and the advancement of cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), respectively. What has attracted little comment is that these fields, seemingly disparate, have intersected: Cryo-EM has become one of the most important tools for pushing forward the research on the prote
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Experience Discovery TRVLR in 360° with Google Daydream View 360° Virtual Reality Series - WATCH NOW at Discovery VR: https://goo.gl/bnzvkQ Discovery TRVLR is a white-knuckle ride into the curious lives of locals from all seven continents. Get ready to explore mind-blowing locations and experiences as if you were there yourself. For the most immersive experience of our amazing 360 content download the Discovery VR app: http://www.discoveryvr.com Experience
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ice skating on water, even when it is really cold By combining two laser beams (illustrated as red and green) on the surface, a new light beam (blue) is produced that contains detailed information about the arrangement of water molecules on the surface of ice. Using this technique, the researchers discovered that the surface of ice behaves in exactly the same way as liquid water, even at a temperature of –30°C. Credit: AMOLF The outermost layer
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Big Think
This AI Can Beat You at Battleship by Learning How to Ask Smart Questions Researchers at NYU have apparently decided to ruin childhoods and taught an artificial-intelligence system to play the game of Battleship with amazing skill. In the somewhat modified version of Battleship that this AI can play, it has to find an opponent’s ships hidden on a small grid of squares. All it can do to accomplish that is ask a series of questions that can be answered with a word or a s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Coding and tech skills help refugees and low-income communities to succeed Hackathons that aim to come up with high-tech solutions to the challenges facing refugees are an example of social innovation in action. Credit: Techfugees What do the UK-based editor of a leading technology magazine and a self-taught coder from a low-income neighbourhood in Brussels, Belgium, have in common? They're both teaching tech skills to people from marginalised communities in order to br
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Infosys plans 500 new tech jobs in Rhode Island by 2022 India-based Infosys, an information technology outsourcing firm, announced Thursday it will hire 2,000 workers over the next four years for a technology hub in North Carolina, the second of four planned hubs in the U.S.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists identify key factors that help microbes thrive in harsh environments Credit: CC0 Public Domain Three new studies by University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) scientists have identified key factors that help microbes survive in harsh environments. The results, which have implications for biotechnology and understanding life in extreme conditions, were in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences ( PNAS ), Astrobiology , and the International Journ
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Breakthrough in tornado short-term forecasting could mean earlier, more accurate warnings An analysis of tornado signatures from the past 16 years -- including data from the Ontario-Quebec VHF Windprofiler Radar Network -- could mean faster, more accurate tornado prediction. Pictured here with antenna elements at a nearby radar array: researchers Anna Hocking, a Western University alumna and Ph.D., and Professor Wayne Hocking, who leads the Atmospheric Dynamics Group based at Western'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Endogenous protein reverses scarring in the lungs The endogenous protein RAGE, which has usually been negatively associated with chronic inflammation and diabetic complications, plays a major role in the repair of DNA damage - and also appears to heal tissue damaged as a result of accelerated cell senescence. This molecular mechanism was described in a study by scientists from Heidelberg University Hospital and the German Center for Diabetes Res
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New strategy for multiple myeloma immunotherapy IMAGE: MMG49 CAR T cells target the activated conformation of integrin b7 expressed on MM cells. view more Credit: Osaka University Osaka - In recent decades monoclonal antibody-based treatment of cancer has been established as one of the most successful therapeutic strategies for both solid tumors and blood cancers. Monoclonal antibodies (mAb), as the name implies, are antibodies tha
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cells bulge to squeeze through barriers IMAGE: This time-lapse video of an invading cell in the lab worm C. elegans shows a fleeting protrusion that may help explain how cancer spreads. view more Credit: Video by Kaleb Naegeli, Duke University. DURHAM, N.C. -- Invasive cells deploy a trick to break through tissues and spread to other parts of the body, researchers report. In a new study, 3-D time-lapse imaging of cellular "brea
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research on viral load of HIV patients reveals new cohort at risk of therapy failure A large cohort study in South Africa has revealed that that low-level viraemia (LLV) in HIV-positive patients who are receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART) is an important risk factor for treatment failure. Viraemia is a medical condition where viruses enter the bloodstream and thus have access to the rest of the body. The findings indicate that the current World Health Organization (WHO)-defi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tracking down genetic influences on brain disorders New findings will help to identify the genetic causes of brain disorders: researchers at the Universities of Basel, Bonn and Cologne have presented a systematic catalog of specific variable locations in the genome that influence gene activity in the human hippocampus, as they report in the journal Nature Communications . Individual differences in gene regulation contribute to the development of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New microscope sets a record for visualizing surface wetting properties IMAGE: The droplet probe of the microscope on a superhydrophobic golden birdwing ( Troides aeacus ) butterfly wing. view more Credit: Matti Hokkanen / Aalto University Wetting is an everyday phenomenon that represents how well liquid spreads on a surface. When water comes into contact with an extremely water-repellent, or 'superhydrophobic' surface, droplets bead up and roll off easily. Aalto Uni
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists identify key factors that help microbes thrive in harsh environments Three new studies by University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) scientists have identified key factors that help microbes survive in harsh environments. The results, which have implications for biotechnology and understanding life in extreme conditions, were in the Proceedings of the National Academy Of Sciences (PNAS), Astrobiology , and the International Journal of Astrobiology . "Our wo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists have discovered an Upper Paleolithic cave painting of a camel in the Ural Mountains An ancient image of a two-humped camel has been discovered in the Kapova cave (Southern Urals). The age of the painting is preliminarily estimated to be between 14,500 and 37,700 years, a time when there were no camels in the Southern Urals. This discovery confirms researchers' belief that artists in the Upper Paleolithic could migrate over long distances. The image of a camel's shape is painted
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ambush in a petri dish It is a gruesome spectacle that meets the eyes of Prasad Aiyar as he looks down the microscope. The doctoral candidate from India, who came to Jena to do his Master's degree in Molecular Life Sciences, examines the species Chlamydomonas reinhardtii on a microscope slide. The oval-shaped microalgae, a good 10 micrometres in size, have two flagella with which they busily swim around - that is,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Breakthrough in tornado short-term forecasting could mean earlier, more accurate warnings IMAGE: An analysis of tornado signatures from the past 16 years -- including data from the Ontario-Quebec VHF Windprofiler Radar Network -- could mean faster, more accurate tornado prediction. Pictured here... view more Credit: Western University, London, Canada When mere seconds of storm warning could mean the difference between harm or safety, two researchers with ties to Western University in
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Viden
Geolog: Derfor kan vulkan på Bali være farlig Op mod 100.000 mennesker er blevet beordret evakueret i en radius af ti km fra vulkanen Agung på øen Bali. Det sker efter et udbrud fra vulkanen i lørdags, og de lokale myndigheder frygter endnu et udbrud kan være på vej. De ældre beboere på Bali vil måske også kunne huske sidste gang, at vulkanen Agung var i udbrud. Det var i 1963. Dengang blev over 1000 mennesker dræbt. Ifølge geolog og seniorf
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Ars Technica
Thanks to the Play Store, Microsoft Office arrives on Chromebooks reader comments 65 Word on an Android tablet. Pay for Office 365, and you'll get this version on a Chromebook. Microsoft Excel. Microsoft Powerpoint. Microsoft Through the magic of the Play Store, the official Microsoft Office apps have arrived on Chromebooks. It has been a long journey to get here, with random individual Chromebook models gaining and losing Office support for the past year, but
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Popular Science
Light pollution is getting worse Goodbye darkness , my old friend. According to a study published last week in Science Advances , the world is getting brighter. And not in a 'my future's so bright I gotta wear shades' kinda way. The future's so bright that we should probably all be wearing eyeshades to bed, and turning some lights off while we're at it. “We're losing more and more of the night on a planetary scale,” Kip Hodges,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Male trout are now real males againThe media has been telling us about feminised male fish for decades, but now researchers at SDU announce that this feminisation has completely disappeared in certain parts of Denmark.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Carbon capture is helped by oil revenue, but it may not be enough IMAGE: Comparing world scenarios and CCS development. view more Credit: Imperial College London The oil industry incentivises the development of carbon-capturing tech, but researchers say this will not reduce emissions to low enough levels. Carbon dioxide can be used to extract oil, accelerating the development carbon-capturing technologies and limiting climate change. However, in a new analysi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Flamingo feces and their way of walking stimulate organic matter filtering in saline wetlands An international group of researchers led by the University of Granada (UGR) has proven that the greater flamingo (Phoenicopterus roseus) facilitates microbial 'filtering' of organic matter in saline wetlands, thus improving water quality and reducing nitrogen loads by promoting denitrification. This is a facilitating role these animals possess which was unknown until now. UGR researchers Gema
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Removing chemical used to make Teflon-like coatings has led to fewer low birth weights and less brain damage Government and industry efforts since 2003 to phase out chemicals used to make non-stick coatings, such as Teflon, have prevented more than 118,000 low-weight births and related brain damage in the United States. This is the main finding of a new report -- based on analysis of new mothers' blood samples gathered for a national health study -- published Nov. 23 in the International Journal of Hygi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discovery points the way to better and cheaper transparent conductors IMAGE: Compensating acceptor fluorine interstitials (light green) dramatically reduce electronic performance of tin dioxide transparent conducting glass coatings doped with fluorine atoms (dark green). view more Credit: University of Liverpool Researchers at the University of Liverpool have made a discovery that could improve the conductivity of a type of glass coating which is used on items
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Price changes for seven foods could save thousands of lives per year, study says BOSTON (Nov. 27, 2017)--Changing the prices of seven foods, including fruits, vegetables and sugar-sweetened beverages, could reduce deaths due to stroke, diabetes and cardiovascular disease and address health disparities in the United States, finds a study led by researchers from Tufts University. In the study, published today in BMC Medicine , the team of researchers used a comparative risk a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First proper motions measured of stars in a small galaxy outside the Milky Way By combining data from the Hubble Space Telescope and the Gaia mission, University of Groningen astronomers have been able to measure the proper motion of 15 stars in the Sculptor Galaxy, the first such measurement of stars in a small galaxy outside the Milky Way. Analysis shows an unexpected preference in the direction of movement, which suggests that the standard theoretical models used to desc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Floods are necessary for maintaining healthy river ecosystems, research shows CORVALLIS, Ore. - Flooding rivers can wreak havoc on homes and roads but are necessary for healthy ecosystems, research at Oregon State University suggests. The study shows that alterations to rivers' natural flow patterns - because of dams, diversions and changes in precipitation - cause damage to riparian plant communities and river ecosystems in general. Even minor shifts in temporal flow patt
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When physics gives evolution a leg up by breaking one Genetic mutation may drive evolution, but not all by itself. Physics can be a powerful co-pilot, sometimes even setting the course. In a new study, physicists and evolutionary biologists at the Georgia Institute of Technology have shown how physical stress may have significantly advanced the evolutionary path from single-cell to multicellular organisms. In experiments with clusters of yeast cells
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is patient satisfaction lower when physicians deny requests for services? What: An observational study of outpatients visiting a family physician at an academic health center Why: To examine associations between clinician denial of patient requests (e.g. for services or medication) and patient satisfaction. Why This Is Interesting: Physician evaluations and compensation increasingly depend on measures of patient experience and satisfaction. Physician denial of pati
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A series of fortunate events Geoscientists from Michigan Technological University, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh and ETH Zurich have traced the age and chemical signatures stored in tiny zircon minerals to examine the recycling of carbon from the mantle to the surface through time. A better understanding of these changes in carbon recycling help improve models about how the planet's early processes transitioned from the co
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Second 'don't eat me' signal found on cancer cells by Stanford researchers A second biological pathway that signals immune cells not to engulf and kill cancer cells has been identified by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. An antibody that blocks the "don't eat me" signal has shown promise as a cancer treatment in animal models and is currently in clinical trials. Combining that antibody, known as anti-CD47, with another that blocks this newly di
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Changes in bacterial mix linked to antibiotics increase risk for inflammatory bowel disease Exposure to antibiotics in mothers may increase risk for inflammatory bowel diseases in their offspring. This is the finding of a study in mice led by researchers from NYU School of Medicine and published Nov. 27 in the journal Nature Microbiology . The study results center on the microbiome, the mix of bacterial species that live in our intestines and co-evolved with humans to play roles in dige
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: People in high-deductible plans aren't acting like consumers, may need more help ANN ARBOR, Mich. --- More and more Americans have health insurance that requires them to open their wallets for the first few thousand dollars' worth of care they receive every year, before the insurance coverage kicks in. But a new study suggests that despite the rise in these high-deductible health plans (HDHPs), most Americans who have them aren't saving, shopping around for better prices, tal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When magma prevents volcanic eruptions IMAGE: Following a large caldera-forming eruption some magma remains in the magma reservoir.This magma cools, its viscosity increases, and when new magma is injected, the magma left over after the caldera-forming... view more Credit: UNIGE / Roma Tre A spectacular proof of our planet's activity, calderas are huge topographic depressions, similar to flat-bottomed craters, with a diameter of severa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Unique metal artefacts from Iron Age settlement shed new light on prehistoric feasting Copper alloy horn-cap ULAS. Credit: University of Leicester A unique collection of Iron Age metal artefacts which sheds new light on feasting rituals among prehistoric communities has been discovered by archaeologists from the University of Leicester during an excavation at Glenfield Park, Leicestershire. The team, from the University of Leicester Archaeological Services (ULAS), has located a tro
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New Scientist - News
Good news: one form of air pollution may be falling in Europe Car trouble: air quality is still a health issue despite drop in nitrogen pollution Jason Hawkes/Getty By Chris Baraniuk The fumes belched out by road vehicles are deadly – but levels of one harmful component, nitrogen dioxide, may already have peaked in Europe. “It’s not air quality solved or anything, but it is positive,” says lead author Stuart Grange at the University of York, UK. Nitroge
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New Scientist - News
We’ve found a bunch of dwarf galaxies we thought didn’t exist There you are NASA, ESA, and E. Tollerud (STScI) By Jesse Emspak The so-called missing satellites problem has been solved. Based on our models of how dark matter clumps together, we know there ought to be more small satellite galaxies around the Milky Way than we have seen. But we haven’t been able to find them. Now, there is a simple answer: they were there all along, we just missed them . S
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New technique can detect impurities in ground beef within minutes IMAGE: Yaxi Hu, a PhD candidate in food science at the University of British Columbia, analyzes a meat sample's spectra against those that have been previously collected in a library. Hu... view more Credit: Paul Joseph/UBC Researchers at the University of British Columbia have found a better way to identify unwanted animal products in ground beef. Food science students led by profe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Physicists make most precise measurement ever of the proton's magnetic moment An international collaboration of scientists from RIKEN's Ulmer Fundamental Symmetries Laboratory (FSL), Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg and GSI Darmstadt, have used high-precision techniques to make the most precise measurement to date of the magnetic moment of the proton, finding it to be 2.79284734462 plus or minus 0.00000000082 nuclea
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Haze pollution affects satellite cloud detection IMAGE: Haze affects the accuracy of satellite sensor MODIS. (a) MODIS true-color image on haze day. (b) Vertical cross-sections of the CloudSat cloud mask for the orbit shown in (a), with... view more Credit: Saichun Tan It is very important to observe and study cloud properties because clouds play an important role in weather, climate, and the Earth's energy balance. Satellite remote sensing
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NUS scientists develop artificial photosynthesis device for greener ethylene production IMAGE: The research team from the NUS Department of Chemistry developed an artificial photosynthesis system that can produce ethylene using only sunlight, carbon dioxide and water. From left to right: Mr Ren... view more Credit: National University of Singapore A team of scientists from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has developed a prototype device that mimics natural photosyn
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Eco-friendly waterborne semiconductor inks using surfactant IMAGE: This is Professor Dae Sung Chung from the Department of Energy Science and Engineering. view more Credit: Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST) A research team of Energy Science and Engineering at DGIST has developed a technology to produce environmentally friendly water-borne semiconductor inks using surfactant, which is additives that mix substances of diffe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Unique metal artefacts from Iron Age settlement shed new light on prehistoric feasting IMAGE: This is a copper alloy horn-cap ULAS. view more Credit: University of Leicester A unique collection of Iron Age metal artefacts which sheds new light on feasting rituals among prehistoric communities has been discovered by archaeologists from the University of Leicester during an excavation at Glenfield Park, Leicestershire. The team, from the University of Leicester Arch
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Neuroimaging of soccer fans' brain reveals neural basis of ingroup altruistic motivation Rio de Janeiro, Brazil - Why sports fans can be so crazy about their teams? The answer lies deeply rooted in their brains, says a new study. Group belongingness is considered a basic human need and has been stated as a critical feature for hominin evolution. In the past decades, studies have shown our tendency to benefit ingroup over outgroup members during decisions, which can be explained by th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Self-help book works to combat burnout and stress -- without a therapist Around a third of all employees find their work stressful. Interventions for stress and burnout are available, but often not accessible for many employees. A self-help book based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) has the potential to reduce burnout, stress and symptoms of depression - without any therapist contact. Researchers from the University of Basel have reported these findings in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biologists studied cellular cannibalism in cancerous growths IMAGE: Entosis in the culture of human skin cells: a - morphology of cells in the process of entosis, staining with hematoxylin-eosin, light microscopy; b-d - evidence of cell localization within... view more Credit: Anastasiia Garanina Researchers from Lomonosov MSU Faculty of Biology have studied the stages of entosis, a process of cell death when one cell invades the other and gets digested in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The origin of a new species of Darwin's finches Darwin's finches in the Galápagos archipelago provide an iconic model for the evolution of biodiversity on earth due to natural selection. A team of scientists from Princeton University and Uppsala University now reports that they have observed the origin of a new species. A new lineage was formed by the hybridization of two different species of Darwin's finches. The study is published in Science
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Graphene oxide making any material suitable to create biosensors IMAGE: Single cell immobilization on GO modified substrates. view more Credit: Tomsk Polytechnic University TPU scientist Raul Rodrigez and his colleagues from Lithuania and Germany were the first in the world to suggest how with the help of graphene oxide, in fact ordinary graphene as in pencils, but oxidized to make the surface of any material suitable for immobilization of living cells. Device
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate change: Earth-air heat exchanger best to protect animals in livestock buildings IMAGE: Earth-air heat exchanger best to protect farm animals against heat stress. view more Credit: Michael Bernkopf/Vetmeduni Vienna The higher temperatures resulting from climate change will require certain measures to be taken in pig and poultry production. Without suitable cooling systems, animals kept in confined livestock buildings would face increased heat stress. That would have a negativ
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Flies could help to monitor disease outbreaks by acting as 'autonomous bionic drones' An international research team led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have proposed that swarms of flies can be used to help monitor disease outbreaks. This follows their research that shows how whole communities of bacteria - known as a microbiome - can "hitch a ride" on common carrion flies and can be transferred to any surface where the flies land. Their research is
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Clean air target 'could be met more quickly' Image copyright Reuters Targets for reducing illegal levels of NO2 pollution from vehicles will be achieved more quickly than the government expects, a study says. Researchers say government projections of future NO2 are too pessimistic, because they ignore the latest real world data. They say cities may achieve roadside emissions standards several years earlier than ministers expect. The researc
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Science | The Guardian
How dangerous is Bali's Mount Agung and what action has been taken? What’s happening? Mount Agung , a volcano on the Indonesian island of Bali, has been in a state of unrest for several weeks and is now emitting smoke and ash. Mudflows, known as lahars, are running down the mountainside and loud booms have been heard. Experts say a large eruption could happen imminently. What action has been taken? The volcano alert status has been set at the highest level and 10
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Futurity.org
Fluorescent dye finds ‘lost’ ocean microplastics The smallest microplastics in the oceans— many as small as 20 micrometers or the width of a human hair—go largely undetected. A new inexpensive method that uses a fluorescent dye could offer a way to distinguish them from other natural materials. Large plastic objects fragment over time due to weathering processes, breaking down into smaller and smaller particles termed “microplastics.” Microplas
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Futurity.org
How to make 174 more donor kidneys available per year Broadening the geographic range where a number of deceased-donor kidneys would be available would increase the number of transplants, research shows. This shift would also improve the lives of patients unlikely to receive one based on where they live, according to the new study. “Where you are located is very important in terms of how long you’re going to wait for your kidney.” “The problem is th
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The Atlantic
What Meghan Markle Means for the Royal Family LONDON—To most families, Meghan Markle might seem like the ideal daughter-in-law. The American actor and humanitarian graduated from Northwestern with a double major in theater and international relations. She’s devoted to public service, acting as a global ambassador for World Vision and a United Nations advocate for women. And she has a distinctly entrepreneurial bent—until recently, Markle ran
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A series of fortunate events—Antarctic zircons tell story of early volcanism Volcanoes emit a lot of carbon dioxide -- some much more so than others. Alkaline volcanoes like Mount Etna in Italy and Mount Erebus in Antarctica dwarf the carbon output of other volcanoes by 10 to 50 times. Credit: Shawn Appel on Unsplash Geoscientists from Michigan Technological University, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh and ETH Zurich have traced the age and chemical signatures stored in ti
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First proper motions measured of stars in a small galaxy outside the Milky Way The Sculptor Galaxy taken with the ESO VISTA telescope at the Paranal Observatory in Chile. Credit: ESO By combining data from the Hubble Space Telescope and the Gaia mission, University of Groningen astronomers have been able to measure the proper motion of 15 stars in the Sculptor Galaxy, the first such measurement of stars in a small galaxy outside the Milky Way. Analysis shows an unexpected p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Floods are necessary for maintaining healthy river ecosystems, research shows River Kvirila at Sachkhere, Georgia. Credit: Wikipedia Flooding rivers can wreak havoc on homes and roads but are necessary for healthy ecosystems, research at Oregon State University suggests. The study shows that alterations to rivers' natural flow patterns - because of dams, diversions and changes in precipitation - cause damage to riparian plant communities and river ecosystems in general. Ev
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
When physics gives evolution a leg up by breaking one Simulated growth and breakage of multicellular yeast clusters, in which physical tensions create a lifecycle in lieu of a biological program to do so. Credit: Georgia Tech / Yunker, Ratcliff Genetic mutation may drive evolution, but not all by itself. Physics can be a powerful co-pilot, sometimes even setting the course. In a new study, physicists and evolutionary biologists at the Georgia Instit
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Gizmodo
Finally Make the Move to 4K With These Cyber Monday Sony Deals Commerce Content is independent of Editorial and Advertising, and if you buy something through our posts, we may get a small share of the sale. Click here for more. Amazon promised Sony TV deals for Cyber Monday, and they’ve delivered with all-time low prices on three different sizes . These aren’t the highest-end TVs in Sony’s lineup, but they all feature 4K resolution, HDR10 support, and smart
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EU renews licence for controversial weedkiller for five years EU states on Monday renewed the licence for the controversial weedkiller glyphosate for five years, in a surprise decision to break a long stalemate over a substance that critics say causes cancer EU states on Monday renewed the licence for the controversial weedkiller glyphosate for five years, in a surprise decision to break a long stalemate over a substance that critics say causes cancer. Heav
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Meredith buying Time Inc. for about $1.8 billion This March 11, 2015, file photo shows the Meredith Corp. headquarters building in Des Moines, Iowa. Meredith Corp. said Sunday, Nov. 26, 2017, that it is buying Time Inc. for about $1.8 billion in a deal that joins two giant magazine companies. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall, File) Magazine and broadcasting company Meredith is buying magazine publisher Time for about $1.8 billion to bulk up on read
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New butterfly species discovered in Russia with an unusual set of 46 chromosomes The South-Russian blue ( Polyommatus australorossicus ), a new butterfly species discovered in European Russia. Credit: Vladimir Lukhtanov What looked like a population of a common butterfly species turned out to be a whole new organism, and, moreover - one with a very peculiar genome organisation. Discovered by Vladimir Lukhtanov, entomologist and evolutionary biologist at the Zoological Institu
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Gizmodo
An Asteroid Will Pass Near Earth Next Month But No, You Don't Have to Worry (3200) Phaethon’s track (Image: Marco Langbroek/Wikimedia Commons) Every day it seems another natural disaster could bring about the apocalypse. Volcanoes . Earthquakes. Hurricanes . Sometimes that list includes asteroids. But despite exaggerated headlines from the usual suspects, there’s no need to worry about the latest nearby asteroid approach. (3200) Phaethon is a rock five kilometers in diam
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
The science of cells that never get old | Elizabeth BlackburnWhat makes our bodies age ... our skin wrinkle, our hair turn white, our immune systems weaken? Biologist Elizabeth Blackburn shares a Nobel Prize for her work finding out the answer, with the discovery of telomerase: an enzyme that replenishes the caps at the end of chromosomes, which break down when cells divide. Learn more about Blackburn's groundbreaking research -- including how we might have
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Futurity.org
To spot concussions in kids, check their spit MicroRNAs—tiny snippets of noncoding RNA—in saliva may be able to help diagnose concussions in kids and predict their duration more accurately than patient surveys alone. “The tools we use [currently] to diagnose and manage concussions are subjective…” The findings could result in a more fact-based way to diagnose and treat concussion patients, says Steven Hicks, an assistant professor of pediatr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Long-term logging study demonstrates impacts on chimpanzees and gorillas in Republic of Congo A logging concession in the Republic of Congo. Researchers from Lincoln Park Zoo in Chicago are working with the timber company to understand the impacts of selective logging practices on wild western lowland gorilla and chimpanzee populations. Credit: Sharon Dewar Research has shown human disturbance can have detrimental effects on great ape populations but now, due to a study published in Biolo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quest for new medicines could be helped by cell discovery Scientists have made a key discovery that could speed up the production of cells in the lab for studying diseases such as multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's disease. Experts say it could also help to boost supplies of cells for use in drug discovery research and could eventually aid production of cells for use as therapies. Researchers at the University of Edinburgh have pinpointed two molecule
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Ingeniøren
Hårdfør mikrochip kan gøre os klogere på naboplaneten Venus Ingeniører fra Nasa er i gang med at teste en ny type mikrochip af siliciumkarbid, der kan lade forskere komme helt tæt på planeten Venus. Det skriver Science . Det særlige ved mikrochippens materiale er, at det udvikles specielt til at kunne modstå de fysiske forhold på Venus. Målet er, at det inden for en overskuelig fremtid vil være muligt at lande på planetens overflade med robotter, hvis ele
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New butterfly species discovered in Russia with an unusual set of 46 chromosomes IMAGE: This is the South-Russian blue ( Polyommatus australorossicus ), a new butterfly species discovered in European Russia. view more Credit: Vladimir Lukhtanov What looked like a population of a common butterfly species turned out to be a whole new organism, and, moreover - one with a very peculiar genome organisation. Discovered by Vladimir Lukhtanov , entomologist and evolutionary b
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quest for new medicines could be helped by cell discovery Scientists have made a key discovery that could speed up the production of cells in the lab for studying diseases such as multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's disease. Experts say it could also help to boost supplies of cells for use in drug discovery research and could eventually aid production of cells for use as therapies. Researchers at the University of Edinburgh have pinpointed two molecules
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Long-term logging study demonstrates impacts on chimpanzees and gorillas (Republic of Congo) IMAGE: A chimpanzee rests in the canopy of the Goualogo Triangle in the Republic of Congo. Researchers from Lincoln Park Zoo in Chicago have been conducting a 20+ year study... view more Credit: Sharon Dewar Chicago (November 27, 2017) - Research has shown human disturbance can have detrimental effects on great ape populations but now, due to a study published in Biological Conservation on Nov.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Physicist assumes the possibility of vestiges of an Universe previous to the Big Bang Although for five decades, the Big Bang theory has been the best known and most accepted explanation for the beginning and evolution of the Universe, it is hardly a consensus among scientists. Brazilian physicist Juliano Cesar Silva Neves part of a group of researchers who dare to imagine a different origin. In a study recently published in the journal General Relativity and Gravitation , Neves s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The electronic origins of fluorescence in carbon nanotubes Fukuoka, Japan - Technological progress is often driven by materials science. High-tech devices require "smart" materials that combine a range of properties. An impressive current example is carbon nanotubes (CNTs) - single sheets of carbon atoms rolled into a cylinder. These ultrathin tubes have enormous mechanical strength and electrical conductivity. They also emit infrared fluorescent light,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tuning the wavelength of fluorescent carbon tubes Fukuoka, Japan - Carbon is not just the most important element for life, it also has fascinating properties of its own. Graphene - a pure carbon sheet just one atom thick - is one of the strongest materials. Roll graphene into a cylinder and you get carbon nanotubes (CNTs), the key to many emerging technologies. Now, in a study reported in Chemical Communications , researchers at Japan's Kyushu U
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fault-tolerant quantum computation: Attraction of all-optical control IMAGE: Schematic setup of the scalable implementation with optical fiber linked fused-silica microsphere optical cavities. view more Credit: ©Science China Press Modern IT is based on the IC of semi-conductors. However, as the size a transistor is so small that the quantum effect of a IC is no longer negligible. Therefore, explore quantum devices that can operate single quantum particle is one of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hormone therapy in the menopause transition does not increase risk of stroke Postmenopausal hormone therapy is not associated with increased risk of stroke, provided that it is started early, according to a report from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in the journal PLOS Medicine . Roughly three in ten women in the menopause transition are afflicted by symptoms that seriously affect their wellbeing, such as hot flushes, dry mucosa and insomnia. However, althoug
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Effects of ethnocentrism on consumers The concepts of local product, regional product, and traditional product have been addressed by the literature as if they were independent. Yet in practice these concepts are interrelated in many food products. The paper published now aims to resolve two key questions: firstly, to find out the valuation of food products that combine the features of local, regional and traditional products through
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Eurac Research submits a report on environmental crimes in the Carpathians to European Parliament IMAGE: Researchers Isidoro De Bortoli and Filippo Favilli in front of the European Parliament in Brussels. In the middle, Thomas Streifeneder, head of the Institute for Regional Development of Eurac Research. view more Credit: Eurac Research The Carpathians are one of the last bastions of biodiversity left in Europe, but poaching and uncontrolled logging endanger its survival. There are several i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How displaying real-time sales and stock levels online affects shoppers In the classic Filene's Basement sales scenario, eager shoppers would lunge for the pile of sweaters that was disappearing fastest, on the theory that those sweaters must present the most attractive deal. Now researchers from Australia's Monash University business school have shown that providing real-time cues about the number of items sold and current levels of stock - easily presentable in the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Harvey is one of the top 10 most costly natural disasters of all-time Due to Hurricane Harvey, this is now the eighth year in a row where global losses have exceeded 100 billion USD. Credit: KIT Hurricane Harvey, which at the beginning of the week has hit the US state of Texas with devastating damage and now rages over Louisiana, is in third place among the world's most expensive storm disasters. This was found out by researchers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technolog
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Futurity.org
What 1.3 million tweets tell us about ADHD Twitter can reveal quite a bit about what life is like for people with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, research suggests. Twitter data might also provide clues to help facilitate more effective treatments. “On social media, where you can post your mental state freely, you get a lot of insight into what these people are going through, which might be rare in a clinical setting,”
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds family-friendly overpasses are needed to help grizzly bears A screen shot from Banff's Temple overpass shows a female grizzly escorting her cubs across the Trans-Canada Highway. Credit: UBC Okanagan Researchers have determined how female grizzly bears keep their cubs safe while crossing the Trans-Canada Highway. Adam Ford, Canada Research Chair in Wildlife Restoration Ecology at UBC's Okanagan campus, along with Montana State University's Tony Clevenger,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Newly discovered twin planets could solve puffy planet mystery A Planet Inflated By Its Host Star. Upper left: Schematic of the K2-132 system on the main sequence. Lower left: Schematic of the K2-132 system now. The host star has become redder and larger, irradiating the planet more and thus causing it to expand. Sizes not to scale. Main panel: Gas giant planet K2-132b expands as its host star evolves into a red giant. The energy from the host star is transf
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Ars Technica
Formula 1 e-sports now more exciting than the real thing—and that’s a problem reader comments 1 On Sunday, the 2017 Formula 1 season drew to a close with the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix. It was a deathly boring end to a season that started with so much promise back in March. The series had a new owner , Liberty Media, which promised to stop ignoring things like the Internet and 21st century. The cars were wider and had more grip than seasons past. And there was the threat of actu
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Ingeniøren
EU forlænger omstridt ukrudtsmiddel i fem år EU's appeludvalg har i dag vedtaget en fornyet godkendelse af landets mest udbredte sprøjtemiddel, glyphosat, der er det aktive stof i Roundup. Det oplyser Miljøstyrelsen i en kortfattet pressemeddelelse . Beslutningen kommer efter at være blevet udskudt flere gange, fordi der ikke kunne opnås det kvalificerede flertal, der kræves blandt EU's medlemslande for at give tilladelsen. Glyphosat Glypho
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Holy grail' for batteries: Solid-state magnesium battery a big step closer First-principles Mg and Zn migration barriers in sulfides, selenides, and tellurides AX2Z4 spinels (with A = Mg or Zn). a tet–oct–tet migration path in the AX2Z4 framework, with energy of the tet, oct, and transition sites indicated by E tet, E oct, E a, respectively. E a corresponds to the migration energy. b Effect of the anion size on the shared (triangular) face between tet and oct sites. c a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers conduct novel wheat microbiome analysis under four management strategies Different crop management strategies can produce various and noticeable effects on a crop and its yield. But what are the effects at the microbial level...not just in the roots but the entire plant? Molecular biologists Kristi Gdanetz and Frances Trail of Michigan State University sought to answer that question, developing a descriptive analysis of the wheat microbiome under four common types of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Turning photos into an interactive experience Human facial expressions, big and small, have the ability to convey what a person is feeling. Imagine being able to bring out a wide range of human emotions in any still photo, and to do so, automatically. Computer scientists at Tel-Aviv University collaborated with researchers at Facebook to develop a new computational technique that makes it possible for users to animate still images in a highl
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Scientific American Content: Global
Nice Brains Finish Last We all like to think that being kind, responsible, and fair will lead to a happy life. But what if we’re wrong? What if nice guys really do finish last? A new study published in Nature Human Behavior suggests that those who value economic equity, at their brain’s core, are more likely to be depressed. Those who prefer everything for themselves tend to be happier. According to the model of “so
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Gizmodo
Drone Pilot Drops 'Anti-Media' Leaflets Over NFL Games, Fails to Send Message A Wingcopter VTOL drone at the Dronemasters 2017 convention in Berlin, Germany. (Photo: Getty) On Sunday, one man decided to take to the skies with a consumer drone to spread his manifesto over two NFL stadiums in California. He probably would’ve been better off just posting on Reddit. The San Francisco 49ers were entering the second quarter of their face-off against the Seattle Seahawks at Levi’
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Inside Science
BRIEF: The World's Smallest Remote-controlled Cyborg Bug BRIEF: The World's Smallest Remote-controlled Cyborg Bug Robotic bugs may someday help in search and rescue. CyborgBeetle.jpg Image credits: Courtesy Nanyang Technological University Technology Monday, November 27, 2017 - 10:00 Marcus Woo, Contributor (Inside Science) -- This is no ordinary beetle. There's an electronic chip attached to its back, and that chip connects to the bug's antennae, firi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Common cold viruses reveal one of their strengths Common cold season is back, which has people wondering why we catch the same virus, year after year. Why don't we ever develop immunity against the common cold? Professor Pierre Talbot at INRS has known about the incredible variability of coronaviruses for some time. They're responsible for the common cold as well as many other infections, including neurological diseases. Along with his research
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New chemistry method simplifies late-stage modification of drug compounds Jin-Quan Yu, Ph.D., Frank and Bertha Hupp Professor in the Department of Chemistry at TSRI. Credit: The Scripps Research Institute Chemists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have invented a technique that overcomes a long-standing problem in organic chemistry and should streamline the process of discovery and development for many new drugs. The technique, known as ligand-accelerated non-di
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Return of the native wild turkey—setting sustainable harvest targets when information is limited A wild turkey peers through rain in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, 6 Nov 2017. Credit: Lisa Hupp/USFWS As American families sit down for the traditional turkey dinner this Thanksgiving, some will be giving thanks for a wild bird that is truly free range. Meleagris gallopavo , the wild turkey, has steadily gained in popularity with hunters since successful restoration efforts put it back on
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The Atlantic
What Godless Says About America In the opening scene of Godless , Marshal John Cook (Sam Waterston) rides into the town of Creede, Colorado, as a dust storm swirls around him. The marshal lowers his bandana and squints into the distance, surveying the scene impassively as the landscape slowly comes into focus. He takes in the carnage of a firefight, a wrecked train, and countless bodies who seem to have all been shot in the hea
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Common cold viruses reveal one of their strengths Common cold season is back, which has people wondering why we catch the same virus, year after year. Why don't we ever develop immunity against the common cold? Professor Pierre Talbot at INRS has known about the incredible variability of coronaviruses for some time. They're responsible for the common cold as well as many other infections, including neurological diseases. Along with his research
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Promising new treatment for rare pregnancy cancer leads to remission in patients Three out of four patients with the cancerous forms of gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) went into remission after receiving the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab in a clinical trial carried out by researchers at Imperial College London. The trial, which took place at Charing Cross Hospital, part of Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, is the first to show that pembrolizumab can be used
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Batteries with better performance and improved safety IMAGE: This is a diagram of the composition of the solid sodium battery. view more Credit: Empa Phones, laptops, electric cars - batteries are everywhere. And to meet the expectations of today's consumers, these batteries are increasin­gly lighter, more powerful and designed to last longer. Currently the core technology for these applications is lithium ion batteries. But the technology is ex
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
BGRF trustees present at Financial Times and The Economist Longevity Conferences IMAGE: These are the Financial Times Global Pharmaceutical and Biotechnology Conference 2017 and The Economist Business of Longevity 2017 Conference logos. view more Credit: Financial Times & The Economist Monday, November 27, 2017, London, UK: Biogerontology Research Foundation Trustee Dmitry Kaminskiy and Chief Science Officer Alex Zhavoronkov spoke at the Aging and Longevity Panel at the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Highly charged molecules behave paradoxically A number of chemistry researchers from several institutions including Lund University in Sweden, have managed to identify a new mechanism that makes certain charged biomolecules attach to each other. The biomolecules in the present study serve as models for antibacterial peptides, that is, protein-like molecules that fulfil important functions in the body. "Antibacterial peptides are important fo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Activity descriptors for electrocatalysts in energy storage applications IMAGE: (a) Different activity descriptors for electrochemical reactions and catalytic cycles of (b) hydrogen evolution reaction, (c) oxygen evolution reaction and (d) oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells. view more Credit: ©Science China Press Under the environmental concerns such as pollution and greenhouse effect, environment-friendly energy storage applications such as fuel cells, ammon
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New HIV guidelines outline prevention strategies for high-risk populations IMAGE: Dr. Darrell Tan, lead author of the guidelines, is an infectious disease physician and scientist at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto. view more Credit: Courtesy of St. Michael's Hospital TORONTO, Nov. 27, 2017--New Canadian guidelines recommend the use of new medications by HIV-negative people from high-risk populations both before and after exposure to the virus to prevent HIV infectio
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Get'em while they're hot In the classic Filene's Basement sales scenario, eager shoppers would lunge for the pile of sweaters that was disappearing fastest, on the theory that those sweaters must present the most attractive deal. Now researchers from Australia's Monash University business school have shown that providing real-time cues about the number of items sold and current levels of stock - easily presentable in the
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Taste it, you'll like itNew research has led to a model that assesses the short- and long-term effects of in-store product sampling on sales of both the products offered on sample and competitive products.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Neurobiology: The chemistry of memory Learning requires the chemical adaptation of individual synapses. Researchers have now revealed the impact of an RNA-binding protein that is intimately involved in this process on learning and memory formation and learning processes. The formation of memories requires subtle changes in brain structures. This is because learning and memory are the result of the incessant modification of synapses -
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Gizmodo
Anker's Popular Dash Cams Are Cheaper Than Ever For Cyber Monday Anker Roav Dash Cam C1 1080P Wi-Fi | $60 | Amazon Anker Roav Dash Cam C1 Pro 2K GPS/Wi-Fi | $80 | Amazon Anker’s first foray into the dash cam market has been a huge hit with our readers, and you can get it for an all-time low $60 today , or the new pro model for $80 . You can read our impressions of the original model here , but honestly, the Pro’s the way to go here if it’s in stock. It’s only
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Piezoelectric effect of lysozyme was experimentally provedDirect evidence of the piezoelectric effect of lysozyme in monoclinic and tetragonal aggregate films of lysozyme has now been captured by researchers. The sufficiently high piezoelectric coefficient is several times higher than that of the classical quartz piezoelectricity, which makes it possible to use this material for various biomedical purposes, for example, to generate electric charges in ce
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
High levels of natural immune suppressor correlate with poor survival in the most common leukemiaPatients diagnosed with the most common form of leukemia who also have high levels of an enzyme known to suppress the immune system are most likely to die early, researchers say.
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Futurity.org
This brain training program cuts dementia risk Certain cognitive training via the computer may reduce the risk of dementia among older adults, researchers report. “…we found that those who received more training also gained a greater protective benefit…” Specifically, researchers found that computerized speed of processing training, or UFOV training, resulted in a decreased risk of dementia across the 10-year period, with a 29 percent lower r
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Rough lessons can lessen the pull of human scent on a mosquito DENVER – After unpleasant lessons in the lab, mosquitoes can learn some restraint in their zest for pursuing the scent of human skin. The test, a kind of aversion therapy for mosquitoes to see if they can associate smells with bad experiences, was reported at the annual Entomological Society of America meeting. “Mosquitoes have this very challenging task of finding food that’s hidden under the sk
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Blood lead levels lower, but tooth decay higher in children who do not drink tap waterAmerican children and adolescents who do not drink tap water, which is typically fluoridated, are much more likely to have tooth decay, according to a new study. However, the study confirms that those who drink tap water are more likely to have elevated levels of lead in their blood.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
White male gun owners with money stress more likely to be morally attached to their gunsWhite male gun owners who have lost, or fear losing, their economic footing tend to feel morally and emotionally attached to their guns, according to a study. They are also more likely to say the violence against the government is sometimes justified.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New HIV guideline outlines cost-effective prevention strategies for high-risk peopleA new Canadian guideline outlines how new biomedical strategies to prevent HIV infection can best be used in high-risk populations both before and after exposure to the virus. The guideline applies to adults at risk of HIV infection through sexual activity or injection drug use.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Soil researchers quantify an underappreciated factor in carbon release to the atmosphereSoil plays a critical role in global carbon cycling, in part because soil organic matter stores three times more carbon than the atmosphere. Now scientists have, for the first time, provided evidence that anaerobic microsites play a much larger role in stabilizing carbon in soils than previously thought.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scale at which Earth's mantle composition variesGeochemists suggest that Earth's upper mantle varies in composition over kilometer-sized pockets.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Radiologists detect injury patterns of intimate partner violenceCommon clinical and radiologic patterns could alert radiologists of potential intimate partner violence, to spark a conversation with the referring physician and multi-disciplinary care team to get patients the help they need.
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Gizmodo
The Walking Dead Took a Breather and Rick Immediately Did Something Idiotic Image: Jackson Lee Davis/AMC. After five episodes detailing the three-pronged attack on the Saviors’ headquarters, several outposts, and a great deal of post-op clean-up, it makes perfect sense that the show would finally see what the hell everyone else is up to. Unfortunately, it means last night’s episode was a bit of a letdown from its recent hot streak, but as a lead-in to the half-season’s “
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Gizmodo
Amazon Saved Its Best Instant Pot Deal For Cyber Monday Instant Pot IP-DUO Plus | $75 | Amazon Amazon’s run several Instant Pot discounts over Deals Week, but they held back the best one for last: The Instant Pot Plus, now down to an all-time low $75 , and only $7 more than the all-time low for the standard DUO60. “Plus” doesn’t refer to the size of the device—it’s the same six quarts as the DUO60—but rather its capabilities. In addition to everything
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Taste it, you'll like it: Assaying the impact of in-store product sampling Credit: Johnny Dod/public domain In big box stores, supermarkets, and even smaller grocers, food manufacturers' representatives seem to lurk at the end of every aisle hawking their canape-size samples. But how effective are such strategies at attracting customer purchases and loyalty beyond that day's free lunch? New research, appearing in the December issue of the Journal of Retailing , has led
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Children who commute to school unaccompanied have greater autonomy and decision-making ability IMAGE: The authors of the study at the facilities of the Faculty of Sport Science, University of Granada. From left to right: Emilio Villa, Manuel Herrador and Palma Chillón. view more Credit: University of Granada Researchers from the University of Granada (UGR) belonging to the research group PROFITH have proven that children who actively commute to school (that is, walking or cycling) with
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UBC study finds family-friendly overpasses are needed to help grizzly bears IMAGE: A screen shot from Banff's Temple overpass shows a female grizzly escorting her cubs across the Trans-Canada Highway. view more Credit: UBC Okanagan Researchers have determined how female grizzly bears keep their cubs safe while crossing the Trans-Canada Highway. Adam Ford, Canada Research Chair in Wildlife Restoration Ecology at UBC's Okanagan campus, along with Montana State Univer
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists reveal new avenue for drug treatment in neuropathic pain New research from King's College London has revealed a previously undiscovered mechanism of cellular communication, between neurons and immune cells, in neuropathic pain. The authors, who published their findings today in Nature Communications , identified a new method of treating neuropathic pain in mice, which could be more safe and effective than current treatments comprising of opioids and an
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When friends become objects Why do people use social media? Striving to answer this question, social psychologists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have conducted a survey with more than 500 Facebook users with regard to their personality structure and the way they use the platform. Based on the results, they have developed the first comprehensive theory of social media usage. According to that theory, self-regulation is the key:
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Lost' 99 percent of ocean microplastics to be identified with dye? IMAGE: Smaller ocean microplastics (below 1mm) made visible with fluorescent dye -- viewed through a microscope. view more Credit: University of Warwick Smallest microplastics in oceans - which go largely undetected - identified more effectively with innovative and cheap new method, developed by University of Warwick researchers New method can detect microplastics as small as the width of a huma
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate change could increase volcano eruptions IMAGE: Tephras -- rock fragments and particles ejected by a volcanic eruption. view more Credit: Dr. Graeme Swindles, University of Leeds Shrinking glacier cover could lead to increased volcanic activity in Iceland, warn scientists. A new study, led by the University of Leeds, has found that there was less volcanic activity in Iceland when glacier cover was more extensive and as the glaciers
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Popular Science
The best gadgets for your friends who aren't super tech-savvy Personal tech has totally transformed how we live our lives—but that doesn't mean everybody is thrilled about the latest and greatest. You no doubt have a few people in your family or social circle that wouldn't appreciate a bunch of complicated gadgetry this holiday season. But don't give up hope. Here we've picked great hardware that can suit anyone in your life, no matter their level of techni
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Dagens Medicin
Ortopædkirurgiske afdeling på Bispebjerg får ny ledende overlæge Henrik Palm skal stå i spidsen for ortopædkirurgiske afdeling på Bispebjerg Hospital
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Off and running Image copyright BLOODHOUND SSC A British team is developing a car that will be capable of reaching 1,000mph (1,610km/h). Powered by a rocket bolted to a Eurofighter-Typhoon jet engine, the vehicle will first mount an assault on the world land speed record (763mph; 1,228km/h) in 2019. Bloodhound will run on Hakskeen Pan in Northern Cape, South Africa, in 2019. "Bloodhound is Operational." In three
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Gizmodo
I Can't Believe There's Not a Single Collision in This Massive Swarm of Birds GIF GIF: Vimeo Filmmaker Jan van Ijken’s documentary, The Art of Flying , captures the hypnotic movements of hundreds of thousands of starlings flying in massive flocks that appear to be completely random and chaotic , but miraculously, not a single mid-air collision ever occurs. Murmurations, as these starling flocks are also known, are especially intriguing to researchers as there isn’t a singl
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Science : NPR
Video: A View Of A Breathing Earth Joshua Stevens/NASA Earth Observatory Joshua Stevens/NASA Earth Observatory For this post-Thanksgiving week, I'd like to suggest a remarkable video produced over two decades by NASA scientists. Satellites monitored populations of plant life on land and oceans, mapping variations of green regions of vegetation and snow cover on the North and South Poles. As seasons pass, we witness a rhythmic danc
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The Scientist RSS
Health Officials Agree Undetectable HIV Levels Likely Mean UninfectiousMedical organizations endorse the 'Undetectable = Untransmissible' campaign, which aims to raise awareness of scientific evidence showing that virally suppressed people living with HIV cannot infect others.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New discovery to accelerate development of salt-tolerant grapevines A recent discovery by Australian scientists is likely to improve the sustainability of the Australian wine sector and significantly accelerate the breeding of more robust salt-tolerant grapevines. With funding from Wine Australia, a team of scientists from the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology at the University of Adelaide and CSIRO Agriculture and Food identified genes expressed i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers conduct novel wheat microbiome analysis under four management strategies St. Paul, Minn. (November 2017)--Different crop management strategies can produce various and noticeable effects on a crop and its yield. But what are the effects at the microbial level...not just in the roots but the entire plant? Molecular biologists Kristi Gdanetz and Frances Trail of Michigan State University sought to answer that question, developing a descriptive analysis of the wheat micro
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New chemistry method simplifies late-stage modification of drug compounds LA JOLLA, Calif. - Nov. 22, 2017 - Chemists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have invented a technique that overcomes a long-standing problem in organic chemistry and should streamline the process of discovery and development for many new drugs. The technique, known as ligand-accelerated non-directed C-H functionalization, is expected to find application not just in the pharmaceutical che
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Latest research on blockchain and AI for healthcare was presented at TaiwanChain Blockchain Summit IMAGE: The life data ecosystem converges the blockchain and the next-generation artificial intelligence technologies to decentralized and accelerate biomedical research and healthcare. view more Credit: Insilico Medicine Monday, 27th of November, 2017, Baltimore, MD - Insilico Medicine, a Baltimore-based next-generation artificial intelligence company specializing in the application of deep
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Worried about holiday weight gain? your scale isn't giving you the whole picture IMAGE: This illustration compares moderate weight loss for two men of similar age, baseline weight, waist circumference, and visceral fat proportion. It shows that a MED/LC diet and physical activity induces... view more Credit: Ben-Gurion U. BEER-SHEVA, Israel...November 27 - A new, long-term diet study published in the high impact American Heart Association journal, Circulation , used MRI i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Holy grail' for batteries: Solid-state magnesium battery a big step closer BERKELEY, CA / ARGONNE, IL - A team of Department of Energy (DOE) scientists at the Joint Center for Energy Storage Research (JCESR) has discovered the fastest magnesium-ion solid-state conductor, a major step towards making solid-state magnesium-ion batteries that are both energy dense and safe. The electrolyte, which carries charge back and forth between the battery's cathode and anode, is a li
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Analysis reveals barriers to routine HIV testing in high-income countries A new HIV Medicine study identified several barriers to routine HIV testing in emergency departments and acute medical units in the UK and US. For the study, investigators searched electronic databases for US and UK studies published between 2006 and 2015 that described the offer of HIV testing to adults. HIV testing coverage ranged from 10%-38% and 19%-26% while uptake levels were higher (70%-84
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The piezoelectric effect of lysozyme was experimentally proved A group of researchers from the University of Limerick (Ireland) and Ural Federal University (Russia) received direct evidence of the piezoelectric effect of lysozyme in monoclinic and tetragonal aggregate films of lysozyme. The sufficiently high piezoelectric coefficient is several times higher than that of the classical quartz piezoelectricity, which makes it possible to use this material for v
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Light facilitates n-doping of organic semiconductors IMAGE: The illustration shows how photons break the dimers into the individual organometallic molecules again, which then effectively n-dope the organic semiconductor. view more Credit: Jing Wang and Xin Lin Semiconductor devices are omnipresent - not just in microchips, but also in solar cells that convert light into electrical energy, and in many other applications that are part of daily life.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Harvey is one of the top 10 most costly natural disasters of all-time IMAGE: Due to Hurricane Harvey, this is now the eighth year in a row where global losses have exceeded 100 billion USD. view more Credit: Figure: KIT Hurricane Harvey, which has hit the US state of Texas with devastating damage, is in third place among the world's most expensive storm disasters. This was found out by researchers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). Their estimated expected
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers show stress suppresses response to cancer treatments New research shows that chronic stress suppresses the immune system's response to cancer, reducing the effectiveness of immunotherapy treatments. University of Queensland scientists say they are investigating dual therapies for patients to reduce stress signalling and improve their response to treatments. UQ Diamantina Institute researcher Dr Stephen Mattarollo said lymphoma progressed more rapid
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Under Affordable Care Act, Americans have had more preventive care for heart health IMAGE: Dr. Joseph Ladapo. view more Credit: UCLA Health By reducing out-of-pocket costs for preventive treatment, the Affordable Care Act appears to have encouraged more people to have health screenings related to their cardiovascular health, a UCLA study found. Comparing figures from 2006 through 2013, researchers found that more people were screened for diabetes, high cholesterol, cigarette use
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Return of the native wild turkey -- setting sustainable harvest targets with limited data As American families sit down for the traditional turkey dinner this Thanksgiving, some will be giving thanks for a wild bird that is truly free range. Meleagris gallopavo , the wild turkey, has steadily gained in popularity with hunters since successful restoration efforts put it back on the table in the around the new millenium, bucking the trend of declining participation in hunting throughout
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Futurity.org
Ancient oxygen spike lined up with lots more biodiversity Oxygen levels appear to increase at about the same time as a three-fold increase in biodiversity during the Ordovician Period, between 445 and 485 million years ago, according to new research. “This oxygenation is supported by two approaches that are mostly independent from each other, using different sets of geochemical records and predicting the same amount of oxygenation occurred at roughly th
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Scientific American Content: Global
Bali Volcano: Indonesia Orders Immediate Evacuation as Highest Alert Issued DENPASAR, Indonesia, Nov 27 (Reuters) - Indonesia closed the airport on the tourist island of Bali on Monday and ordered 100,000 residents living near a grumbling volcano spewing columns of ash to evacuate immediately, warning that the first major eruption in 54 years could be "imminent". The airport was closed for 24 hours from Monday morning, disrupting 445 flights and some 59,000 passenger
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Dagens Medicin
Sygehusledelser – bak op om demonstration 1. decemberVi har brug for, at afdelingsledelserne på landets sygehuse bakker op om de ansatte, som er blevet utrygge ovenpå Svendborg-sagen. Giv derfor flest muligt fri til at deltage demonstration 1. december – og gå gerne med selv.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Digitally printed cyanobacteria can power small electronic devices Demonstration of inkjet-printed bioenergy wallpaper. 1: Printed photosynthetic organisms in green; 2: Printed CNT anode; 3: Printed CNT cathode; 4: Paper substrate; 5: Solid medium. Credit: M. Sawa et al. Nature Communications (Phys.org)—Researchers have used a simple inkjet printer to print a "bio-ink" of cyanobacteria onto a conductive surface, creating a biophotovoltaic cell. Unlike convention
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Holding infants -- or not -- can leave traces on their genes IMAGE: This is Michael Kobor, Professor of Medical Genetics at University of British Columbia and Investigator, BC Children's Hospital Research Institute view more Credit: UBC Faculty of Medicine The amount of close and comforting contact between infants and their caregivers can affect children at the molecular level, an effect detectable four years later, according to new research from the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Turning photos into an interactive experience BANGKOK, Thailand, DATE TK--Human facial expressions, big and small, have the ability to convey what a person is feeling. Imagine being able to bring out a wide range of human emotions in any still photo, and to do so, automatically. Computer scientists at Tel-Aviv University collaborated with researchers at Facebook to develop a new computational technique that makes it possible for users to ani
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New computational method introduced for lighting in computer graphics BANGKOK, Thailand, DATE TK--In films, video games, virtual reality environments and other computer graphics arenas, lighting is key in achieving accurate depictions of our physical world. Computing lighting that looks real remains complex and inefficient, as the necessary consideration of all possible paths light can take remains too costly to be performed for every pixel in real-time. A pair of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research reveals the scale at which Earth's mantle composition varies IMAGE: The mantle beneath Earth's mid-oceanic ridges contains heterogeneous blobs of material. A new study puts new constraints on the sizes of those blobs. view more Credit: Boda Liu ROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] -- New research by Brown University geochemists provides new insights on the scale at which Earth's mantle varies in chemical composition. The findings could help scientists be
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Immune deficiency explains rampant caries in some children Researchers at Umeå University in Sweden have made a novel discovery connecting genetic innate immunity deficiencies to rampant caries and increased risk of dental caries affecting about one in five children. The results could lead to a better way of identifying high-risk patients and treat their caries. The study has been published in the journal EBioMedicine . In a five-year study, in which s
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Ars Technica
NASA’s next flagship telescope is “not executable” in its current form Enlarge / Concept image of the WFIRST space telescope. NASA reader comments 0 First came the Hubble Space Telescope. Now, NASA is finalizing development of the James Webb Space Telescope for launch in 2019 . And finally, the space agency is beginning to design and develop its next great space telescope, the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope , or WFIRST. This instrument will have a primary mirr
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Gizmodo
Find Out Where You Came From With This AncestryDNA Kit, Just $55 For Cyber Monday Commerce Content is independent of Editorial and Advertising, and if you buy something through our posts, we may get a small share of the sale. Click here for more. Saliva-based ancestry DNA tests probably won’t tell you if you’re related to Queen Elizabeth, but they’re fun, and make great gifts, so you may want to pick one for an all-time low $55 today. $55 From amazon 680 purchased by readers G
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Dagens Medicin
Hæstorp: Måske skal vi genansætte lægesekretærer Regionsrådsformand vil se på fordeling af arbejdsopgaver efter indførelse af Sundhedsplatformen – måske har vi været for hurtig til at fyre lægesekretærer, erkender Sophie Hæstorp Andersen.
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Ars Technica
Don’t lose a finger: The 200-year evolution of the can opener Enlarge / In the 19th century, decades after the invention of canning, there were virtually no can openers. Canned food, like these sardines, came with its own "key" to peel back the tin lid. Wikimedia Commons reader comments 0 Over the Thanksgiving weekend, odds are that you watched a perfect red cylinder of cranberry sauce wobble itself out of a can into a bowl. Or maybe you shook a bunch of mu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How websites watch your every move and ignore privacy settings Credit: Shutterstock Hundreds of the world's top websites routinely track a user's every keystroke, mouse movement and input into a web form – even before it's submitted or later abandoned, according to the results of a study from researchers at Princeton University. And there's a nasty side-effect: personal identifiable data, such as medical information, passwords and credit card details, could
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study takes a different approach to showing fracking causing earthquakes in Texas Post-2008 seismicity rate change in the central United States. Since 2009, seismicity has occurred both in areas that were seismically active before 2008 (for example, the Mississippi embayment) and in regions with no pre-2008 historical or instrumental seismicity (for example, the Fort Worth Basin). Credit: Magnani et al., Sci. Adv . 2017;3: e1701593 (Phys.org)—A team of researchers with Souther
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Star formation in the Chamaeleon Credit: ESA/Herschel; acknowledgement: Á. Ribas A dark cloud when observed with optical telescopes, the Chamaeleon I region reveals itself as an active hub of star formation in this far-infrared image from ESA's Herschel space observatory. Only around 550 light-years away in the southern constellation of Chamaeleon, it is one of the closest areas where stars are bursting into life. Launched in 20
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The Scientist RSS
Flies Feet Can Spread BacteriaLab experiments and metagenomic analyses of flies' resident bacteria indicate that the insects carry microbes from place to place on their legs.
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Mussel BubbleScientists examine the effect of ocean acidification on mussel larvae.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
You don't need to build a rocket to prove the Earth isn't flat – here's the simple science Credit: Shutterstock Could 2,000 years of belief be wrong? Are we in fact living on a disc rather than a globe? One believer from the Flat Earth Society is determined to find out. "Mad" Mike Hughes is all set to build his own rocket to see for himself that the Earth is flat . For the last 50 years, we've been able to view pictures of the Earth from space, which might seem like all the proof you n
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A metamaterial that twists to right or the left in response to straight, solid push Calculated deformed cell and displacement under uniaxial loading. The arrows aid the discussion of the mechanism: 1. The arms connecting the corners with the rings move downward. 2. This motion leads to a rotation of the rings. 3. This rotation exerts forces onto the corners in the plane normal to the pushing axis, resulting in an overall twist of the unit cell around this axis. Credit: (c) Scien
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop world's first alcoholic beverage made from tofu whey Associate Professor Liu Shao Quan (right) and PhD student Mr Chua Jian Yong (left), both from the Food Science & Technology Programme under the NUS Faculty of Science, successfully turned tofu whey into a tasty alcoholic beverage which they named Sachi. Credit: National University of Singapore A research team from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has successfully turned tofu whey, a liq
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Scientific American Content: Global
What Pot Really Does to the Teen Brain American parents have been warning teenagers about the dangers of marijuana for about 100 years. Teenagers have been ignoring them for just as long. As I write this, a couple of kids are smoking weed in the woods just yards from my office window and about a block and a half from the local high school. They started in around 9 A.M., just in time for class. Exaggerating the perils of cannabis—the r
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Popular Science
Why you’re never really happy with the things you buy anymore I wasn’t supposed to be looking at leather jackets in Macy’s. Had I gone in the entrance closest to the online order pick-up desk, I wouldn’t have found myself stroking the smooth lambskin sleeves of a black moto jacket placed conveniently in my eyeline. But I did. I tried it on, fell in love, then looked at the price tag: $450. Nevermind. Less than a week later, I was Googling the jacket for the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Australia can meet carbon emissions target at zero net cost Credit: CC0 Public Domain A new study by ANU has found Australia can easily meet its 2030 carbon emissions target by replacing coal-fired power stations with renewables at zero net cost. At the global climate talks in Paris two years ago, Australia pledged to reduce emissions by 26-28 per cent on 2005 levels by 2030. Lead researcher Professor Andrew Blakers said the net cost to meet this target
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How flamingos influence organic matter filtering in saline wetlands Flamingos at the Fuente de Piedra lake. Credit: Javier Almellones An international group of researchers led by the University of Granada (UGR) has proven that the greater flamingo (Phoenicopterus roseus) facilitates microbial filtering of organic matter in saline wetlands, thus improving water quality and reducing nitrogen loads by promoting denitrification. This is a facilitating role which was
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Dagens Medicin
Sundhedsplatformen indført i Region Sjælland: »Vi kom godt fra start« Alt gik som planlagt, da Sundhedsplatformen i weekenden blev taget i brug i Region Sjælland, siger regionsledelsen. Andre advarer mod at glæde sig for tidligt.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Start-up aims at producing sodium-ion batteries Credit: © Beaujot/RS2E Two years after the first battery prototype using sodium ions in a standard industrial format was designed, the start-up Tiamat has been created to design, develop and produce this promising technology. This could counter some of the limits of lithium-ion batteries that dominate the market today, including recharge rate, lifetime and production cost. Specifically, sodium-io
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Viden
Møgbeskidte fluer flyver rundt med hundreder af bakterier Fluer kan være irriterende. De lander i din sandwich. De summer om næsen på dig, når du forsøger at tage en lur på sofaen. Og selvfølgelig gør de det altid lige efter, at de har siddet i en skraldespand eller på en hundelort på fortovet. Det her får dig virkelig til at tænke dig om igen, når du næste gang er på udflugt og kartoffelsalaten har stået lidt for sig selv Donald Bryant, professor, biok
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Feed: All Latest
How Two Googlers Use Engineering Techniques to Solve Marital Disputes I approached finding a spouse the way I do even the most emotional decisions: with logic. A few years ago, before I started dating, I wrote a list of requirements and some optional good-to-have features, similar to how one might decide on a smart phone. A friend who was helping me complained that I eliminated 90 percent of the population with my requirements, but this was intentional: I wanted to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
As climate warms, mice morph Credit: McGill University New research by McGill University biologists shows that milder winters have led to physical alterations in two species of mice in southern Quebec in the past 50 years – providing a textbook example of the consequences of climate change for small mammals. The findings also reveal a stark reversal in the proportions of the two mice populations present in the area, adding t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The next Mars rover's wheels won't get torn apart The Mars Spring Tire being tested at NASA GRS' Slope lab. Credit: NASA/JPL The Curiosity rover has made some incredible discoveries during the five years it has been operating on the surface of Mars. And in the course of conducting its research, the rover has also accrued some serious mileage. However, it certainly came as a surprise when during a routine examinations in 2013, members of the Curi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Multinational companies struggle to understand service needs Technology companies are increasingly trying to grow their revenue by creating value to customers through services. In practice, however, customer and company have differing views on value and its creation. This is shown in a doctoral dissertation by Tiina Leposky considering the service transition of a Finnish multinational enterprise. "The challenge in large, multinational companies is that kno
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Ingeniøren
Ny standard for big data på vej Mens flere og flere virksomheder indsamler data om deres forretning og deres kunder, arbejder det britiske institut National Physics Laboratory, der allerede har lavet flere anerkendte ISO-standarder, på en ny, systematisk tilgang til at måle sikkerheden af de mange data, som verdens virksomheder indsamler. Det skriver TheRegister . »Vi prøver at bruge den måde man tænker på i den fysiske måleind
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New method to measure neutron star size uses modeling based on thermonuclear explosions Credit: University of Turku Neutron stars are made out of cold, ultra-dense matter. How this matter behaves is one of the biggest mysteries in modern nuclear physics. Researchers have developed a new method for measuring the radius of neutron stars to understand what happens to the matter inside the star under extreme pressure. The method relies on modeling how thermonuclear explosion in the uppe
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Dagens Medicin
Hæstorp ude af formandskapløb Sophie Hæstorp (S) erkender nu, at hun har tabt kampen om at efterfølge Bent Hansen (S) som formand for Danske Regioner. Kampen står nu mellem Ulla Astman (S) eller Stephanie Lose (V).
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Ars Technica
Ubuntu 17.10: Return of the GNOME reader comments 134 Canonical's video introduction to Ubuntu 17.10 If you've been following the Linux world at all, you know this has been an entire year for spring cleaning. Early in 2017, Canonical stopped work on its homegrown Unity desktop, Mir display server, and its larger vision of "convergence"—a unified interface for Ubuntu for phones, tablets, and desktops. And now almost exactly six ye
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Invention detects black ice in traffic Credit: Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) A new Finnish invention by EEE Innovations Ltd and VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland revolutionizes the way black ice is detected and provides several other improvements in traffic safety as well. The software installed in vehicles can also guide drivers to drive more economically. Software-based, the invention can be installed into a majo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cells bulge to squeeze through barriers An invading cell (green) breaks through the protective barrier (black) that separates the cell from other tissues. Duke University researchers have discovered a new tool in the cell’s invasion machinery that may help explain cancer’s ability to spread. Credit: Duke University Invasive cells deploy a trick to break through tissues and spread to other parts of the body, researchers report. In a new
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Magnetoelectric material shows promise as memory for electronics The UW-Madison research team includes (from left) Physics Professor Mark Rzchowski, materials science and engineering PhD student Jonathan Schad, physics PhD student Julian Irwin, and Materials Science and Engineering Professor Chang-Beom Eom, pictured in Eom’s lab in the Engineering Centers Building. Credit: Sarah Page Our smartphones and computers wouldn't be nearly as useful without all the ap
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
All-in-one repair kit makes CRISPR gene editing more precise Graduate student Jared Carlson-Stevermer observes real-time CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing at the microscope. Credit: Stephanie Precourt. For the past five years, CRISPR-Cas9 technology has revolutionized the field of gene editing due to its ease and low cost. But although this technology reliably finds and cuts the targeted stretch of DNA sequence, fixing that cut as desired has been something of a hi
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Ingeniøren
Tysk-fransk konsortium skal bygge Sydhavnsmetro til 9,1 mia. kr Den 9,1 mia. kr dyre metroafgrening til den københavnske Sydhavn skal bores og graves af et tysk-fransk konsortium bestående af entreprenørgiganterne Hochtief Infrastructure GmbH og Vinci Construction Grand Projets. Det har Metroselskabet indstillet til sine ejere, staten, Københavns og Frederiksberg Kommuner. Det fortæller selskabet i en pressemeddelelse. Foto: Metroselskabet »Vi har haft en rig
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New microscope sets a record for visualizing surface wetting properties The droplet probe of the microscope on a superhydrophobic golden birdwing (Troides aeacus) butterfly wing. Credit: Matti Hokkanen / Aalto University The microscope is 1000 times more precise than current techniques, allowing the creation of wetting maps as a new concept for hydrophobic surface characterization. Wetting is an everyday phenomenon that represents how well liquid spreads on a surface
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How will Canada manage its wildfires in the future? The wildfires in Chile wiped out the village of Santa Olga, Maule, previously home to 4,500 inhabitants. Credit: EU/ECHO/Vladimir Rodas 2017, CC BY-NC-ND It's been a record-setting year for devastating and deadly wildfires across Canada and throughout the world. This year alone, wildfires globally have burned about four million square kilometres of land, taken hundreds of lives and resulted in bi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fighting online abuse shouldn't be up to the victims Credit: Leremy/Shutterstock.com The fight against online abuse has put increasing pressure on social media corporations to take responsibility for the content that appears on their platforms. As a result, Twitter, Facebook and other sites have created buttons for reporting harassment and blocking unwanted contact – and they occasionally ban particularly egregious offenders. Facebook's latest effo
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Scientific American Content: Global
Smoke Taint: Wildfires Pose a Growing Threat to Winegrowers Smoke Taint: Wildfires Pose a Growing Threat to Winegrowers Wildfires can contaminate grapes and ruin the beverage's flavor Credit: Rob White Getty Images Advertisement Some wines, like those aged in toasted oak barrels, taste great with a hint of smoke. But too much can spoil the flavor. As the climate warms and wildfires grow more frequent and intense, pollution from them can drift into vineyar
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Studying circadian rhythms in plants and their pathogens might lead to precision medicine for people Though not this obvious from the outside, plants are keeping time. Credit: Hua Lu, CC BY-ND At dusk, the leaves of the tamarind tree close, waiting for another dawn. Androsthenes, a ship captain serving under Alexander the Great, made the first written account of these leaf movements in the fourth century B.C. It took centuries longer to discover that he was describing the effects of the circadia
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ultrathin and flat graphene metalenses gain more properties Comparison between conventional lenses and metalenses for terahertz (THz) radiation. Metalenses are ultrathin (around 25 micrometers in thickness) and also very flat compared with conventional ones. Credit: Institute for Basic Science On the quest for miniaturization, scientists at the Center for Integrated Nanostructure Physics, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS, South Korea), in colla
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Earthworms can reproduce in Mars soil simulant Young worm, born in mars soil simulant. Credit: Wieger Wamelink, WUR Two young worms are the first offspring in a Mars soil experiment at Wageningen University & Research. Biologist Wieger Wamelink found them in a Mars soil simulant that he obtained from NASA. At the start he only added adult worms. The experiments are crucial in the study that aims to determine whether people can keep themselves
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How the SuperNEMO experiment could help solve the mystery of the origin of matter in the universe Justin Evans, the author, creating a grid of fine steel wire, now sitting inside the SuperNEMO detector. The Savoy region of France is best known for its fir-lined ski slopes and picturesque Alpine villages. Less known is the fact that, deep beneath some of these slopes, scientists are investigating one of the greatest mysteries in physics: the origin of matter. The Fréjus road tunnel in the regi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
We need robots that can improvise, but it's not easy to teach them right from wrong One day we could have an intelligent robot cook up surprise meals at home. Credit: Besjunior/Shutterstock Industrial robots have existed since the 1960s, when the first Unimate robotic arm was installed at a General Motors plant in the United States. Nearly six decades on, why don't we have capable robots in our homes, beyond a few simple domestic gadgets ? One of the reasons is that the rules an
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The Atlantic
Poor Girls Are Leaving Their Brothers Behind MERCED, California—Nita Vue’s parents, refugees from Laos, wanted all nine of their children go to college. But Nita, now 20, is the only one of her brothers and sisters who is going to get a degree. A few of her sisters began college, and one nearly completed nursing school, she told me. Her brothers were less interested. “The way I grew up, the girls were more into schooling,” she said. “Women
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bacterial viruses found to interact with human cells, study finds Bacterial viruses known as ‘bacteriophages’ can penetrate the epithelial cell layers of the gut and spread throughout the sterile regions of the body. Credit: T2Q/Rob Cot International research co-authored by a Monash biologist has shown for the first time that bacterial viruses (bacteriophages) directly interact with the cells of the human body. The findings published in the journal mBio show th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dogs used to sniff out rare species Emma Bennett with her dogs. Credit: Monash University A new study has found that dogs can greatly aid conservation efforts in finding rare species by smelling out their poo. "Dogs have been trained to find evidence of the elusive and endangered Tiger Quoll by finding where they go to the toilet," says Ms Emma Bennett, a PhD candidate at the Monash School of Biological Sciences. "Tiger Quolls we
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
In a time of robots, educators must invest in emotional labour Another way to see it is that emerging tech is increasing our capacity to focus our collective energies —on the social, cultural, ethical and emotional demands of our rapidly changing world. Everything from smart phones to smart cities are freeing us up to care more for others and to commit more resources to transforming the parts of our societies and economies where need and inequities persist
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Viden
Kan primaters seksuelle adfærd sige noget om mennesker? Ifølge en række forskere fra The National Center for Scientific Research i Montpellier, Frankrig kan deres resultater vise en sammenhæng mellem primaters seksuelle adfærd og mennesker. En nylig undersøgelse udarbejdet af zoologen Elise Huchard, blandt andre forskere er kommet frem til, at sexchikane blandt dyr er en effektiv parringsstrategi. Forskerne har særligt studeret adfærden hos primater -
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Latest Headlines | Science News
‘Arrow of time’ reversed in quantum experiment Your lukewarm cup of coffee won’t suddenly heat itself up, no matter how long you put off the trek to the microwave. But the same rule doesn’t necessarily apply to quantum systems. Like chilly air warming a mug, heat can spontaneously flow from a cold quantum particle to a hotter one under certain conditions, researchers report November 10 at arXiv.org. This phenomenon seems to reverse the “ arro
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An Old Technique Could Put Artificial Intelligence in Your Hearing Aid Dag Spicer is expecting a special package soon, but it’s not a Black Friday impulse buy. The fist-sized motor, greened by corrosion, is from a historic room-sized computer intended to ape the human brain. It may also point toward artificial intelligence's future. Spicer is senior curator at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California. The motor in the mail is from the Mark 1 Perceptr
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Live Science
3 Roman-Era Shipwrecks Found Off Egyptian Coast Divers have discovered the remains of three Roman-era shipwrecks, along with a votive bark likely dedicated to the god Osiris, off the coast of Alexandria, Egypt. Credit: Egypt Ministry of Antiquities Three Roman-era shipwrecks have been uncovered just off the coast of Alexandria, Egyptian antiquities authorities announced. In addition to the shipwrecks , divers found a crystal carving of a
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Ingeniøren
Techtopia #28: Danish Tech Challenge Det vrimler med gode ideer, når 20 start-ups er i acceleratorforløb fra august til december på Scion DTU. En af dem løber med 500.000 kr. i præmie, men foreløbig arbejder de sammen, koder og lodder og pitcher for hinanden, for investorer og for coaches. Danish Tech Challenge er både for nyetablerede og lidt mere erfarne virksomheder, der udvikler ny hardware. Abonnér på Techtopia Klik her for at
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Scientific American Content: Global
Beyond the Cuckoo's Nest: The Quest for Why Shock Therapy Can Work While examining brain tissue through a microscope of hospital patients in the 1930’s, Hungarian neuropathologist Ladislaus Meduna made an intriguing observation: Brain cells, called glia , increased greatly in tissue taken from people with epilepsy. But samples from patients with schizophrenia and depression had far fewer glia in the cerebral cortex than normal. Unlike neurons, glia cannot fi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bringing social media to unconnected areas Zaatari refugee camp in northern Jordan, where researchers tested an independant messaging system. Credit: UNHCR/Photo Unit The number of connected devices may be on the rise, but large swaths of the global population still live in areas without telecom infrastructure or a reliable internet connection. A group of EPFL researchers, working with the Pennsylvania State University and Médecins Sans F
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research team develops new composite material made of carbon nanotubes Scientists from the Functional Nanomaterials working group at Kiel University (CAU) and the University of Trento have now developed a process to form a stable, tear-resistant layer out of tiny, thread-like carbon nanotubes (CNTs). They arrange themselves -- almost like felting. Credit: Fabian Schütt Carbon nanotubes are extremely lightweight, electrically highly conductive, and more stable than s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Discovery points the way to better and cheaper transparent conductors Compensating acceptor fluorine interstitials (light green) dramatically reduce electronic performance of tin dioxide transparent conducting glass coatings doped with fluorine atoms (dark green). Credit: University of Liverpool Researchers at the University of Liverpool have made a discovery that could improve the conductivity of a type of glass coating which is used on items such as touch screens
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Starting young vital to lifelong volunteering and social action, says new research Children undertaking volunteering and service related activities from a young age, with strong support networks in place, are more likely to develop a habit of lifelong service, say researchers. The University of Birmingham research found that participants who first engaged with service or volunteering under the age of 10 were more than twice as likely to have developed a ' habit ' of social acti
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Ingeniøren
Britisk rapport: Elbiler kan blive en gevinst for elnettet Hvis der kommer mange elbiler ud i gaderne, og hvis de alle skal oplades på samme tidspunkt, vil det uvægerligt give problemer for elnettet. Det er de fleste enige om. Hvis der samtidig er masser af vedvarende energi fra vindmøller og solceller, der leverer energi ind i elnettet, så opstår der nemt tidspunkter, hvor elnettet bliver overbelastet eller kommer ud af balance. I oktober måned kom det
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New technique can detect impurities in ground beef within minutes Yaxi Hu loads a spectrometer with a sample of ground beef in the food sciences lab at UBC. Credit: Paul Joseph/UBC Researchers at the University of British Columbia have found a better way to identify unwanted animal products in ground beef. Food science students led by professor Xiaonan Lu used a laser-equipped spectrometer and statistical analysis to determine with 99 per cent accuracy whether
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Star wanders too close to a black holeThis artist's rendering shows the tidal disruption event named ASASSN-14li, where a star wandering too close to a 3-million-solar-mass black hole was torn apart.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Carbon capture is helped by oil revenue, but it may not be enough Credit: Imperial College London The oil industry incentivises the development of carbon-capturing tech, but researchers say this will not reduce emissions to low enough levels. Carbon dioxide can be used to extract oil, accelerating the development carbon-capturing technologies and limiting climate change. However, in a new analysis researchers say this will not be enough to reduce emissions to t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First comprehensive inventory of Neotropical snakes An international team made up of scientists from Brazil, Australia, the U.S., Ecuador, Germany and Sweden has published the results of an extensive database of snakes of the American tropics. This database is made up of museum collections from the past 150 years and demonstrates that some Neotropical regions, such as the Cerrado in the central Brazil, contain a disproportionately high diversity.
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Live Science
Ancient Helmet-Wearing Wormy Creature Was Covered in 'Cocktail Sticks' About 515 million years ago, a tiny sea critter that was "strange beyond measure"wasn't taking any chances about its safety: Armor covered its back and sides, a helmet-like shell protected its head and pointy spikes stuck out from its sides, researchers have found. "The creature is like a mythical beast," said study researcher Martin Smith, an assistant professor in the Department of Earth
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers study unique underwater stalactites The Hells Bells in the El Zapote cave near Puerto Morelos on the Yucatán Peninsula. Credit: E.A.N./IPA/INAH/MUDE/UNAM/HEIDELBERG In recent years, researchers have identified a small group of stalactites that appear to have calcified underwater instead of in a dry cave. The "Hells Bells" in the El Zapote cave near Puerto Morelos on the Yucatán Peninsula are just such formations. A German-Mexican r
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Ingeniøren
Slagsmålet om landbrugspakken: Videnskabsredaktør giver svarene Landbrugspakken blev vedtaget (nøjagtigt sidste år) efter meget debat og afsløringer, der blev kendt som gyllegate. Hvad var de vigtigste elementer? Med landbrugspakken fik landmændene lov til at udlede større mængder kvælstof til markerne for at forbedre udbyttet og deres økonomi. Miljø- og Fødevareministeriets fremlæggelse af forskernes konsekvensberegninger blev præsenteret på den måde, som fo
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New Scientist - News
Who will really benefit from the coming smart-city revolution? City designs must be about more than egos Michael Malorny/Getty By Paul Marks Have you ever felt like you are destined to become a supplicant whose chief purpose is to be sensed electronically, generate data and have it processed by intelligent machines for somebody else’s benefit? If not, you are probably lucky enough to have been spared the hype of the smart-city lobby. Not for long though.
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New Scientist - News
Another psychedelic revolution, but this time it’s different Illustration: Yehrin Tong/Retouching: Westmac THERE’S an old joke in renewable energy circles: nuclear fusion is 30 years away, and always will be. This is slightly unfair, but it carries a whiff of truth. The breakthrough always seems tantalisingly close, yet never arrives. If biomedicine has a nuclear fusion of its own, it has to be psychedelic medicine. Every few years, there is a surge in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Frustrated magnetic skyrmions and antiskyrmions could enable novel spintronic applications Skyrmions and antiskyrmions with different topological numbers in a frustrated magnet. Credit: Xichao Zhang The 2016 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to three theoretical physicists for their discoveries of topological phase transitions and topological phases of matter, which highlights the role and significance of topology in understanding the physical world. In the field of magnetism, topolog
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Ingeniøren
Kommentar: Den nye Femern Bælt-forbindelse er en kolos på lerfødder Hans Schjær-Jacobsen er civilingeniør, ph.d., HD En talstærk delegation på 13 medlemmer med Folketingets Transportudvalg i spidsen drog 1.-2. november på studietur til Kiel, hvor de holdt møder med repræsentanter for Slesvig-Holstens parlament, regering og erhvervsliv. Det implicitte formål var at skaffe mere trafik til den nødlidende faste Femern Bælt-forbindelse. Uden tilstrækkeligt trafikgrund
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Ingeniøren
Ugens job: Energinet, Forsvaret og Man Diesel har flere ledige stillinger På dagens liste finder du job for ingeniører og naturvidenskabelige kandidater i flere forskellige firmaer. Blandt andet som specialist, projektleder, konsulent og mere endnu. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/ugens-job-energinet-forsvaret-man-diesel-har-flere-ledige-stillinger-11342 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astronomers identify dozens of new OB-type stars in the Cygnus OB2 stellar association Inverse Spitzer 8 µm image of the Cygnus region showing the location of the 61 OB candidates. The 42 confirmed massive OB-type stars earlier than B3 are indicated with red dots. The remaining stars are late B and foreground A-F-G stars which are indicated with green dots. The solid line circle delimits the 1 degree radius area of Cygnus OB2 adopted by Comerón & Pasquali (2012). For reference, the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New computational methodology gives unexpected answers to two Hilbert problemsA paper titled "Numerical infinities and infinitesimals: Methodology, applications, and repercussions on two Hilbert problems," published in EMS Surveys in Mathematical Sciences describes a recent computational methodology related to the separation of mathematical objects from numeral systems involved in their representation. It allows mathematicians to work with infinities and infinitesimals nume
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Dagens Medicin
Midtjylland ønsker ’armslængde-princip’ for sponsoreret efteruddannelse Nye retningslinjer for midtjyske lægers efteruddannelse åbner for sponsorater fra medicinalindustrien, hvis regionen selv kan bestemme, hvilke læger der skal have støtte.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Radiologists detect injury patterns of intimate partner violence IMAGE: Radiology images from a 76-year-old female who presented with right sided vision loss after being punched by her husband. The patient was found to have right orbital floor and right... view more Credit: Elizabeth George, Brigham and Women's Hospital Radiology images can reveal critical clues not only about a patient's current injuries, but also about patterns of violence a person
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Xenophobia strongly linked to Brexit, regardless of voter age, gender or education As concerns increase about Russian influence on the UK's Brexit referendum, new research provides evidence that British citizens who agreed that immigrants threaten their values and way of life were more likely to have voted for the United Kingdom to leave the European Union. The study, published today in open access journal Frontiers in Psychology , shows that this xenophobia, or a fear of other
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Neurofeedback shows promise in treating tinnitus IMAGE: Whole brain effects of neurofeedback training. view more Credit: Radiological Society of North America CHICAGO - Researchers using functional MRI (fMRI) have found that neurofeedback training has the potential to reduce the severity of tinnitus or even eliminate it, according to a study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Radiology offers clues in cases of domestic abuse and sexual assault IMAGE: Image of 21-year-old woman, who presented with a chronic nasal bone fracture and soft tissue swelling of the left lateral face. Review of electronic medical records revealed presentation to an... view more Credit: Radiological Society of North America CHICAGO - Radiologic signs of injury could help identify victims of intimate partner violence, according to a study presented today at
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New studies show brain impact of youth football CHICAGO - School-age football players with a history of concussion and high impact exposure undergo brain changes after one season of play, according to two new studies conducted at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas and Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem and presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). Both studies analyzed the default mod
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Ingeniøren
Facebook lover at sige til, hvis du er stødt på russiske valgreklamer Facebook har nu lovet at udvikle et værktøj, som kan advare brugere, hvis de på nogen måde har interageret med reklamer, der er betalt af russiske selskaber. Det skriver The Guardian . Værktøjets formål er kort og godt at fortælle brugeren, hvis vedkommende på noget tidspunkt er ved at interagere med den såkaldte Internet Research Agency, den Sankt Petersborg-baserede og statsstøttede organisatio
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why the central Pacific El Nino is harder to predict than eastern Pacific El NinoThe El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), which is one of the most striking interannual variabilities in the tropical Pacific, has been extensively studied for several decades. Understanding the changes in its characteristics is still an important issue in environmental and socioeconomic spheres worldwide. Recently, a new type of El Niño, the central Pacific (CP) El Niño, has emerged, in which maxi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A huge hydrogen generator at the Earth's core-mantle boundary The oxygen and hydrogen cycling in the deep Earth. Credit: ©Science China Press Splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen is a major theme in the development of clean, abundant energy source. A new study led by an international research group revealed that when water meets the iron core of the Earth, the extremely high pressures and temperatures existing at the core-mantle boundary can naturally c
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Horror as Norway freight trains mow down over 100 reindeer Reindeer are pictured in Kautokeino, a town in Finnmark county, located in northeastern Norway. Many reindeer have been killed by trains recently More than 100 reindeer have been mowed down by freight trains in northern Norway in recent days in what has been called a "bloodbath" during their winter migration, said the nation's public broadcaster. One train killed 65 deer on a track on Saturday wh
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Science : NPR
Apps Can Cut Blue Light From Devices, But Do They Help You Sleep? If you're regularly checking your phone at night in a dark room, you're probably tricking your body into thinking it's still daytime. Artur Debat/Moment Editorial/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Artur Debat/Moment Editorial/Getty Images If you're regularly checking your phone at night in a dark room, you're probably tricking your body into thinking it's still daytime. Artur Debat/Moment
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Science : NPR
Light Therapy Might Help People With Bipolar Depression Katherine Streeter for NPR Katherine Streeter for NPR As the months grow colder and darker, many people find themselves somewhat sadder and even depressed. Bright light is sometimes used to help treat the symptoms of seasonal affective disorder, or SAD . Researchers are now testing light therapy to see if it also can help treat depression that's part of bipolar disorder. It's unclear how lack of
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The Atlantic
Jordan's 'Holy War on Dogs' AMMAN—Jordan’s “holy war against dogs” began in late October, after a two-year-old girl, Malak al-Qaraan, died from a rabid dog’s bite. Malak was outside with her family when a stray dog appeared and bit her face, according to her uncle, 23-year-old Abdullah Rawashdeh. When they got to the hospital, the doctor stitched up her wound without treating or checking her for rabies, Rawashdeh said. Thre
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Science : NPR
Indonesia Tries To Evacuate 100,000 People Away From Erupting Volcano On Bali Hide caption Clouds of ashes rise from the Mount Agung volcano erupting in Karangasem, Indonesia, on Monday. Previous Next Firdia Lisnawati/AP Hide caption View of Mount Agung Volcano Erupted in the morning from Amed Beach. Mount Agung Volcano erupted, sending skyward a 3,000-meter cloud of ash. Previous Next NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images Hide caption A Balinese farmer works his field as Mou
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Ingeniøren
Norsk forsker vil skabe isfri broer uden saltning For at prøve at få brugen af salt ned på norske veje ser ph.d.-stipendiat Josef Johnsson ved Chalmers tekniske högskola på mulighden for at få bugt med noget af isen på vejene ved hjælp af vedvarende energikilder. Arbejdet er en del av Johnssons ph.d. ‘Safe and ice-free bridges using renewable thermal energy sources’ i forbindelse med udviklingen af vejruten Ferjefri E39 på vestlandet i Norge. Be
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Ingeniøren
Læserne løser problemet: Kan man lade et batteri på et minut? Sidste uge kom den danske bildesigner Henrik Fisker med en opsigtsvækkende nyhed, der skabte voldsom debat på ing.dk: I sin kommende elbil eMotion vil han om seks år lægge et batteri med en energitæthed, som er 2,5 gange højere end nutidens lithium-ion-batterier. Men ikke nok med det: Batteriet, der skal give Fiskers elbil en række­vidde på 800 km, vil kunne oplades på bare ét minut. Siger Fisker
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Different strokes: Taiwan's creative campaign for traditional characters As a growing number of people around the world learn simplified Chinese instead of the more complicated traditional characters, young creatives in Taiwan are fighting to promote what they fear will become a dying art As a growing number of people around the world learn simplified Chinese instead of the more complicated traditional characters, young creatives in Taiwan are fighting to promote what
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Greenpeace slams Indonesia palm oil industry on deforestation Vast swathes of rainforest are destroyed to make way for palm oil plantations, threatening endangered species and pushing indigenous people off their lands `Greenpeace slammed Indonesia's palm oil industry Monday for failing to live up to a pledge to halt deforestation, as the lucrative sector faces possible restrictions in Europe over environmental concerns. Palm oil is used in everything from s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EU deadlock over weedkiller goes to appeal The European Union will on Monday attempt to determine the future of glyphosate, a controversial weedkiller hugely relied on by farmers but which critics say causes cancer and whose use has been thrown into doubt. Since its introduction in the United States in 1974 by pesticides and seed maker Monsanto as Roundup, the use of glyphosate has soared across the globe. It is sprayed on food crops bu
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Science-Based Medicine
The integration of mysticism and pseudoscience with oncology continues apace in NCI-designated comprehensive cancer centers Last week, I took note of how what is now a major medical society devoted to integrative oncology, the Society for Integrative Oncology (SIO), revealed itself to be unable to define , other than in platitudes and vague feel-good verbiage, just what the heck “integrative oncology” even is when it published a monograph in JNCI . What I didn’t take note of last week was that the November issue in wh
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Indonesia volcano forces mass evacuation, shuts Bali airport (Update) A view of the Mount Agung volcano erupting in Karangasem, Bali, Indonesia, Monday, Nov. 27, 2017. The volcano on the Indonesian tourist island of Bali erupted for the second time in a week on Saturday, disrupting international flights even as authorities said the island remains safe. (AP Photo/Firdia Lisnawati Indonesian authorities ordered a mass evacuation of people Monday from an expanded dang
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Stores hoping people keep shopping offer Cyber Monday deals After offering online deals for days, retailers are rolling out even more promotions for Cyber Monday, hoping to keep people buying stuff on their smartphones or computers. Shoppers are expected to spend $6.6 billion on Cyber Monday, up more than 16 percent from a year ago, according to Adobe Analytics, the research arm of software maker Adobe. And more people will be picking up their phones to s
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Science | The Guardian
Dubious forensic evidence? That's what happens when we sell off public services T he mass review of 10,000 criminal cases because of concerns over forensic evidence is shocking – it’s the biggest recall of samples in British criminal justice history. But it comes as little surprise to our union. Forensic data handled by Randox Testing’s laboratory in Manchester is being questioned as it may have been manipulated. Police review 10,000 cases in forensics data 'manipulation' in
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Dagens Medicin
Lægestuderende på simulationscentre arbejder uden overenskomst De medicinstuderende, der arbejder på landets simulationscentre, hvor man tester medicin og kirurgi, får ikke løn under sygdom, ligesom de ikke bliver kompenseret for at være fleksible med deres vagter. Nogle kan blive opsagt uden varsel, mens der også er forskellige lønningsniveauer for de godt 200 studerende, der arbejder på centrene. Det er nogle af grundene til, at Foreningen af Danske Lægest
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Scientists warn Lake Victoria is dyingThey blame over-fishing and pollution for severely damaged fish stocks in Africa's largest freshwater lake.
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Ingeniøren
Microsoft-boss: Kemiingeniører kan blive glimrende programmører Manglen på it-arbejdskraft er et globalt problem. Derfor må it-branchen selv byde ind med konkrete initiativer, som kan få flere til at satse på en it-karriere. Sådan lyder budskabet fra Marianne Dahl Steensen, formand for Dansk Industris digitaliseringspanel og administrerende direktør i Microsoft Danmark. »Alle undersøgelser viser, at vi har et kæmpe gap mellem udbud og efterspørgsel, når det g
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Ingeniøren
Teknikken drillede ved Danmarks største eSports-event: Fredag aften gik i sort Tekniske problemer betød, at der ved BLAST Pro Series slet ikke blev spillet en eneste kamp fredag aften. Det betød, at kampene, der skulle have været spillet om fredagen, nu blev spillet lørdag morgen - før publikum kunne komme ind. Royal Arena i København skulle i weekenden fyldes med Counter-Strike-fans, der skulle se seks af verdens bedste hold tørne sammen. Men i stedet endte fredag aften me
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
High levels of natural immune suppressor correlate with poor survival in the most common leukemia IMAGE: Patients diagnosed with the most common form of leukemia who also have high levels of an enzyme known to suppress the immune system are most likely to die early, researchers... view more Credit: Phil Jones, Senior Photographer, Augusta University AUGUSTA, Ga. (Nov. 27, 2017) - Patients diagnosed with the most common form of leukemia who also have high levels of an enzyme known to sup
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Soil researchers quantify an underappreciated factor in carbon release to the atmosphere IMAGE: UMass Amherst biogeochemist Marco Keiluweit and others report that anaerobic microsites play a much larger role in stabilizing carbon in soils than previously thought, and current models used to predict... view more Credit: UMass Aherst AMHERST, Mass. - Soil plays a critical role in global carbon cycling, in part because soil organic matter stores three times more carbon than the atm
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
White male gun owners with money stress more likely to be morally attached to their guns White male gun owners who have lost, or fear losing, their economic footing tend to feel morally and emotionally attached to their guns, according to a Baylor University study. This segment of the population also is most likely to say that violence against the United States government is sometimes justified, reported researchers F. Carson Mencken, Ph.D., and Paul Froese, Ph.D., professors of soci
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New HIV guideline outlines cost-effective prevention strategies for high-risk people A new Canadian guideline outlines how new biomedical strategies to prevent HIV infection can best be used in high-risk populations both before and after exposure to the virus. The guideline, published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www. cmaj. ca/ lookup/ doi/ 10. 1503/ cmaj. 170494 , applies to adults at risk of HIV infection through sexual activity or injection drug use. "
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
US arthritis prevalence is much higher than current estimates New research indicates that the prevalence of arthritis in the United States has been substantially underestimated, especially among adults Arthritis & Rheumatology findings indicate that research is needed to better monitor arthritis prevalence in the US population and to develop better prevention strategies. Current national estimates of arthritis rely on a single survey question, asking partic
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Blood lead levels lower, but tooth decay higher in children who do not drink tap water Ann Arbor, November 27, 2017 - American children and adolescents who do not drink tap water, which is typically fluoridated, are much more likely to have tooth decay, according to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine . However, the study confirms that those who drink tap water are more likely to have elevated levels of lead in their blood. Public awareness of the hazards of
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Ingeniøren
Jobsamtale: Overbevis arbejdsgiver med 3 svar Hvad ved du om virksomheden? Du kan komme ud for at blive forhørt i, hvad du ved om virksomheden. Og her skal du ikke bare genfortælle, hvad der står på hjemmesiden. Nye jobtilbud hver uge. Tjek Jobfinder. Begynd i stedet for med nogle sætninger, som understreger, at du forstår firmaets overordnede mission og mål. Nævn eventuelt nogle af de nøgleord, der også bruges på hjemmesiden. Men efter det
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Ingeniøren
Toiletvand direkte i Københavns Havn : Håndværkere hældte beton i kloakken og byttede om på rørene I starten af august opdagede Københavns Kommune meget høje niveauer af e-coli-bakterier og intestinale enterokokker i prøver fra Sandkaj i Nordhavn. Prøverne fra vandet viste niveauer på 7.100 MPN/100 ml for e-coli og 2.000 MPN/100 ml for enterokokker. Normalt ligger begge parametre under 15 MPN/100 ml. E-coli og intestinale enterokokker er tegn på, at der ryger toiletvand direkte i havnen. Derfo
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Scientific American Content: Global
Even without Hands Honeybees Show Handedness Honeybees. They have a difficult task. First, they have to find food. Then they have to return to the hive to tell their compatriots where to find it. The bees have to fly back and forth between the hive and their food , over and over again. And they need to deal with whatever obstacles lie along their flight paths. "Honeybees face a lot of challenge in choosing efficient foraging routes thro
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Ars Technica
Dealmaster: All the Cyber Monday tech deals we can find [Updated] reader comments 67 Update (11/27 5:30 PM ET) : The deals are winding down, but we've added a few more offers (marked below) and removed others that have expired. Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our friends at TechBargains , we have a big round of Cyber Monday deals to share. Well, at least some of the deals are specific to Cyber Monday—at this point, Black Friday and Cyber Monday have melded into
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NYT > Science
As Health Care Changes, Insurers, Hospitals and Drugstores Team Up Given the uncertainty over the Affordable Care Act and the potentially limited appeal of the core insurance business, insurers are looking to follow the strategy pursued by UnitedHealth Group. The big insurer, which acquired a chain of outpatient surgery centers earlier this year, has a wide array of profitable health care businesses like its own pharmacy benefit manager and various consulting ar
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NYT > Science
As Health Care Changes, Insurers, Hospitals and Drugstores Team Up Given the uncertainty over the Affordable Care Act and the potentially limited appeal of the core insurance business, insurers are looking to follow the strategy pursued by UnitedHealth Group. The big insurer, which acquired a chain of outpatient surgery centers earlier this year, has a wide array of profitable health care businesses like its own pharmacy benefit manager and various consulting ar
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Gizmodo
Save $30 On the Ultimate Nightstand Companion For Apple Devotees Belkin PowerHouse Charge Dock for Apple Watch and iPhone | $70 | Amazon This Belkin nightstand dock is a great gift for the Apple fan in your life, and it’s $30 less than usual today. Unlike a lot of these docks, it actually has the Lightning connector and Apple Watch charger built in, so they won’t have to run two separate cables to their nightstand. More importantly though, they’ll be able to k
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Gizmodo
The 20 Best Early Cyber Monday Deals That You Can Buy Right Now It’s Cyber Monday Eve, which means a lot of great deals have already gone live to beat the rush. These are our 20 favorites that we saw today, but for all of the best deals from around the web, don’t miss our main Cyber Monday post , which we’ll continue updating tonight and through tomorrow. Head over to our main post for more deals, and follow us on Twitter and Facebook to never miss a chance t
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Gizmodo
James Cameron Talks Developing the Avatar Sequels and the Uncertain Future of His Franchises Image: 20th Century Fox In a wide-ranging interview, the director sheds some light on the long gap between the first Avatar film and its several planned sequels, as well as offering some insight into his return to the Terminator franchise. First, on Avatar , it appears he’s spent most of the long gap between the first and second film writing: It was highly optimistic that we could start quickly u
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Science | The Guardian
Starwatch: the December night sky Night sky in December 2017 The Summer Triangle of Vega, Deneb and Altair is dominating the high SW sky as our long December nights begin, while the smaller and less impressive Square of Pegasus is just as high in the SE. By our map times, the Square has shifted to the SW and the striking form of Orion is climbing in the ESE. Orion’s Belt slants up to Aldebaran in Taurus, which stands to the right
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The Atlantic
Misunderstanding the Victims of the Sinai Massacre What are Sufis? This was a question many were asking after at least 305 Egyptians were massacred on Friday in the Sinai. They were killed in an assault by Islamist militants (likely from the local Islamic State affiliate, although the group has not yet made a claim of responsibility) on Al Rawdah mosque, which is commonly described as a “Sufi mosque.” The implication is that its congregants obser
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Gizmodo
Track Your Dog's Whereabouts With This $50 Pet Tracker Whistle 3 GPS Pet Tracker | $50 | Amazon Sure, you can microchip your pets and put tags on their collars, but the Whistle 3 GPS Pet Tracker is proactive about finding lost pets by notifying you when your furry friends leave designated safe spaces. Using Wi-Fi and a cellular plan, the Whistle will pinpoint your pet’s location, similar to the Find My Phone app. I could see this helping ease a lot o
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Gizmodo
Over 75,000 Evacuated in Bali as Mount Agung Spews Gigantic Clouds of Ash Photo: AP Authorities evacuated tens of thousands of people from 224 points on the Indonesian island of Bali this weekend after the eruption of Mount Agung, which spewed gigantic clouds of potentially life-threatening ash into the atmosphere, CNN reported . Up to 7,000 air passengers are stranded on the island at the main Bali airport of Ngurah Rai, while Indonesia’s Center for Volcanology and Ge
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Gizmodo
Take The Rebellion Into Your Own Hands With These Cyber Monday LEGO Deals LEGO Star Wars TIE Striker Walker | $34 | Amazon LEGO Star Wars Kylo Ren’s Command Shuttle | $66 | Amazon Squash some Rebels, or deal with some daddy issues, with these two LEGO sets. First, pick up the TIE Striker Walker , which has adjustable wings, shootable missiles, and four minifigs, for just $34. Or, go for Kylo Ren’s insanely impractical Command Shuttle with six minifigs for $66. My opini
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Big Think
Activists are Using 3D Printing to Save the Rhinos Rhino poaching continues to be a big threat to the rhino population numbering a mere 30,000 animals globally. China and Vietnam are the biggest markets for rhino horns, which are primarily used for ornamental and medicinal purposes with no scientific basis . The higher the prices of rhino horn, the more incentivized poachers are to take risks and continue the illegal trade. Rhino horn prices
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Scientific American Content: Global
Bathroom, Mathroom “Wherever you are on World Toilet Day, make it about toilets.” So recommends the World Toilet Day website . Today, I’m writing about math on this blog, so I’m going to make it about toilets. Or at least about the rooms they inhabit. On a recent trip out to breakfast, I went to the restroom. When I got back to the table, I grabbed my phone and went to the bathroom again. I was a little worried
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Big Think
The 10 Greatest Living Scientists in the World Today Ranking the world’s greatest contemporary scientists may be a no-win proposition, with inevitable questions about how to evaluate one’s contribution over another. How does a discovery in one field measure up to a discovery in a different one? And what about Richard Dawkins, where is he on this list? All reasonable questions, but ultimately we need to start the discussion somewhere. So here’s a de
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Thousands of carob trees planted as Cyprus revives 'black gold' A group of men plant a carob tree during the first stage of a project in Oreites, near Paphos on November 26, 2017 aimed at reviving the Mediterranean island's " black gold" Nearly 6,000 carob trees were planted on Sunday in Cyprus as the Mediterranean island seeks to revive its tradition of producing "black gold". "We're going to plant 40,000 carob trees before the end of March," said Constantin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Clean-up dives, recycling: Lebanese respond to garbage crisis Lebanese divers take part in cleaning the seabed of trash off the coastal city of Batroun. The Lebanese divers plunge below the surface, scuba tanks on their backs and nets in hand. But what they're looking for under the ocean surface is not treasure, it's trash. The group is conducting a clean-up below the waves, one of many initiatives emerging from Lebanon's civil society and private sector in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China's tech giants reach global elite with gamers, shoppers China's one billion smartphones have opened up a bonanza for giants Alibaba and TenCent, who are racing up the league of the world's largest companies Powered by Chinese smartphone users splurging billions on mobile games and online shopping, China's tech giants Tencent and Alibaba are racing up the elite league of the world's most valuable companies. Hong Kong-listed Tencent, famous for its game
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Coral transplant raises Barrier Reef survival hopes A coral transplanting technique being trialled on the Great Barrier Reef offers hope that damaged ecosystems could be restored, Australian scientists say Coral bred in one part of the Great Barrier Reef was successfully transplanted into another area, Australian scientists said Sunday, in a project they hope could restore damaged ecosystems around the world. In a trial at the reef's Heron Island
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Belarus nuclear power plant stirs fears in Lithuania The proximity of a nuclear power plant under construction in Belarus to the border and Lithuania's capital Vilnius has been a source of concern. Thirty years after the Chernobyl disaster spewed radioactive clouds into the sky and sent shockwaves across Europe, Belarus is building a nuclear reactor on the doorstep of the EU despite fears in neighbouring Lithuania. Construction of the facility, loc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bali volcano dusts resorts in ash; Lombok airport closes A view of the Mount Agung volcano erupting at sunrise in Karangasem, Bali island, Indonesia, Sunday, Nov. 26, 2017. A volcano on the Indonesian tourist island of Bali erupted for the second time in a week on Saturday, disrupting international flights even as authorities said the island remains safe. (AP Photo/Firdia Lisnawati) A volcano on the Indonesian island of Bali has rumbled to life with er
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