Popular Science
How to set up your new 4K TV for the best possible picture Getting a new TV is exciting, especially when you had to battle the Black Friday crowds to get it. But, if you want the best out of your new display, you’ll need to make sure you’re setting it up properly. Here are some tips to help you avoid crucial television mistakes. Make sure your media source supports 4K playback A fancy TV is only as good as the content you push into it, which means that R
51min
Gizmodo
FCC Chair Says Twitter and YouTube's Political Biases Are the Real Threat to an Open Internet Photo: AP Would more Nazis and terrorists on social media make our internet more free? FCC Chairman Ajit Pai, speaking Tuesday at a panel on the “future of internet freedom,” asked and answered this question in staunchly libertarian terms, calling out YouTube, Facebook and Twitter’s purported double standards against conservatives and identifying them as the “actual threat” to the open internet.
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Futurity.org
Invading cells bulge to get through barriers Scientists have figured out how invasive cells deploy a trick to break through tissues. The findings may help explain how cancer spreads to other parts of the body. In a new study, 3D time-lapse imaging of cellular “break-ins” in the transparent worm C. elegans reveals a fleeting, yet key structure in action. A single protrusion bulges out from the cell surface, wedges a hole through the protecti
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Live Science
Could the US Stop Nuclear Weapons? Editor's Note: This story was updated on Nov. 28 at 7:00 p.m. E.T. With tensions brewing between the United States and North Korea — highlighted by a flurry of nuclear missile tests and fighting words by both countries — the possibility of nuclear war seems closer than it has been in years, according to experts. Pentagon officials announced today (Nov. 28) that North Korea conducted a n
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Feathered dinosaurs were even fluffier than we thought Fossil feather comparison: novel form versus modern form. Credit: University of Bristol A University of Bristol-led study has revealed new details about dinosaur feathers and enabled scientists to further refine what is potentially the most accurate depiction of any dinosaur species to date. Birds are the direct descendants of a group of feathered, carnivorous dinosaurs that, along with true bird
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The Atlantic
DNA Reveals the Yeti Is Actually a Bunch of Bears In the fall of 2013, Charlotte Lindqvist got a call from a film company making an Animal Planet documentary about the yeti, the mythical apelike creature that roams the Himalayas. So, not the kind of thing scientists usually like to mess with. “Friends or colleagues were saying, ‘Oh, watch out. Don’t get into this whole area,’” she recalls with a laugh. But she said yes. Lindqvist said yes becaus
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Futurity.org
Bacteria hitch rides on flies like ‘airborne shuttles’ Researchers have found that, in certain cases, flies carry hundreds of different species of bacteria, many of which are harmful to humans, adding to evidence that flies carry and spread disease. “We believe that this may show a mechanism for pathogen transmission that has been overlooked by public health officials, and flies may contribute to the rapid transmission of pathogens in outbreak situat
8min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Living in a 'war zone' linked to delivery of low birthweight babies Mums-to-be living in war zones/areas of armed conflict are at heightened risk of giving birth to low birthweight babies, finds a review of the available evidence published in the online journal BMJ Global Health . But the evidence for any impact on the rate of other complications of pregnancy is less clear. People living in war zones are under constant threat of attack, which has a detrimental ef
20min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Marriage may help stave off dementia Marriage may lower the risk of developing dementia, concludes a synthesis of the available evidence published online in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry . Lifelong singletons and widowers are at heightened risk of developing the disease, the findings indicate, although single status may no longer be quite the health hazard it once seemed to be, the researchers acknowledge. They
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Futurity.org
Bigger muscle patch could repair heart attack damage Scientists have created a fully functioning artificial human heart muscle large enough to patch over damage typically seen in patients who have suffered a heart attack. The advance takes a major step toward the end goal of repairing dead heart muscle in human patients. “Right now, virtually all existing therapies are aimed at reducing the symptoms from the damage that’s already been done to the h
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The Scientist RSS
A Growing Open Access ToolboxLegal methods to retrieve paywalled articles for free are on the rise, but better self-archiving practices could help improve accessibility.
42min
BBC News - Science & Environment
Three beavers released into the wildThe latest trio has been introduced to Knapdale Forest in Argyll, Scotland.
43min
Ars Technica
macOS bug lets you log in as admin with no password required Patrick Wardle reader comments 16 In one of Apple's biggest security blunders in years, a bug in macOS High Sierra allows untrusted users to gain unfettered administrative control without any password. The bypass works by putting the word "root" (without the quotes) in the user name field of a login window, moving the cursor into the password field, and then hitting enter button with the password
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Gizmodo
The Deepest Fish Ever Captured Is So Ugly I Want to Throw It Back in the Sea A CT scan of the Mariana snailfish. The green shape, a small crustacean, is seen in the snailfish’s stomach. Photo: Adam Summers/University of Washington The deep sea is a dark place both literally and figuratively, home to the stuff of nightmares . Now, scientists have named a new unholy terror deep beneath the ocean’s surface. The Mariana snailfish ( Pseudoliparis swirei for the nerds out there
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bipartisan group of lawmakers targets 'revenge porn' onlineA bipartisan group of lawmakers is intent on combating online sexual exploitation as allegations of inappropriate sexual behavior continue to stack up against prominent members of Congress.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers use advanced technology to study child mummyResearchers from Northwestern University and Argonne National Laboratory near Chicago are using advanced technology to unwrap the mysteries of an 1,800-year-old mummy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Retail group: Those using both online, stores spending more In this Monday, Dec. 12, 2016, file photo, an online shopper searches a site. On Tuesday, Nov. 28, 2017, the National Retail Federation estimated that people who shopped both online and in stores from Thanksgiving to Cyber Monday, spent more than those who stuck to one or the other. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee, File) A retail trade group estimates that people who shopped both online and in stores from
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Remains of ancient sea cow unearthed on California islandScientists say they've unearthed fossil remains of a sea cow that lived off Southern California's Channel Islands some 25 million years ago.
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Science : NPR
Robot Muscles Inspired By Origami Lift 1000 Times Their Weight A demonstration of strength of the artificial muscle. Shuguang Li/Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences hide caption toggle caption Shuguang Li/Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences A demonstration of strength of the artificial muscle. Shuguang Li/Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences The delicate art of paper folding is playing a crucial role in designing robotic ar
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: Things Looked Bleak Until These Birds Rapidly Evolved Bigger Beaks Photo A North American snail kite in Florida. Researchers say the bird species has rapidly evolved larger beaks and bodies to eat a larger, invasive snail. Credit Robert Fletcher/University of Florida Conservationists have been sounding the alarm over invasive species for years, warning of the damage they can cause to habitats and native animals. But in Florida, an invasive snail might be helping
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Newfound protein may prevent viral infection and herpes-induced cancer The researchers found a protein that helps prevent human herpes virus 8 from replicating by detecting a specific modification on viral messenger RNA. Credit: Brandon Tan Keck School of Medicine of USC researchers have identified a human protein that could prevent cancer by restricting a type of herpes virus from replicating. The scientists examined the human herpes virus 8, otherwise known as Kap
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sometimes, it pays for the boss to be humble: study Credit: CC0 Public Domain It's good to be humble when you're the boss - as long as that's what your employees expect. Researchers studying workplaces in China found that some real-life teams showed more creativity if the employees rated their bosses as showing more humility. "Whether leader humility is a good thing really depends on the team members ' expectations," said Jia (Jasmine) Hu, lead au
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Big Think
How Virtual Reality Will Bring Our Loved Ones Back from the Dead You wake up, get ready for work, have some toast and coffee with your spouse, then wave goodbye. It’s your typical workday. There is, however, something unusual: your beloved has been dead for many years. You didn’t have breakfast with your spouse – but rather with a simulation of your spouse. The simulation lives in a virtual environment, perhaps accessed by a device such as the Oculus Rift. A
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New 3-D printer is ten times faster than commercial counterparts MIT engineers have developed a new desktop 3-D printer that performs up to 10 times faster than existing commercial counterparts. Whereas the most common printers may fabricate a few Lego-sized bricks in one hour, the new design can print similarly sized objects in just a few minutes. The key to the team's nimble design lies in the printer's compact printhead, which incorporates two new, speed-en
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team reveals rules for making ribs Mouse rib cage stained to show cartilage (blue) and bone (red) Credit: Francesca Mariani Scientists from the USC Stem Cell lab of Francesca Mariani recently shared a recipe for ribs, and it doesn't even require barbecue sauce. In a new publication in the journal eLife , first authors Jennifer Fogel from USC, Daniel Lakeland from Lakeland Applied Sciences and colleagues examine the development of
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Ars Technica
The world’s slowest, most boring bus simulator finally has a VR version Enlarge / All aboard the most boring VR bus ever. reader comments 3 After roughly 22 years, one of the worst video games of all time, Desert Bus , finally has a sequel. In very good news for anybody who hears "notorious game's sequel" and flinches, this new take, dubbed Desert Bus VR , is now completely free to own for PC gamers , whether they own a virtual reality headset or not. My "quick" test
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Gizmodo
The 10 Best Deals of November 28, 2017 Before you head out for the day, check out the 10 best deals we found today from around the web. Head over to our main post for more deals, and follow us on Twitter and Facebook to never miss a chance to save. You can also join our Kinja Deals Community Facebook group to connect with your fellow deal hunters. #1: USB-C Battery RAVPower USB-C Power Delivery Battery Pack | $52 | Amazon | Promo code
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Gizmodo
Watch These Daredevil Wingsuit Flyers Land in a Flying Plane GIF Because jumping off a mountain with just a pair of thin fabric wings underneath your arms isn’t already dangerous enough, professional wingsuit flyers Fred Fugen and Vince Reffet decided to do that and then try and land inside an airborne plane , using a side door that was just a few feet from the aircraft’s spinning propeller. The pair, who call themselves the Soul Flyers, practiced the stun
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
There's a deeper fish in the sea CT scan of the Mariana snailfish. The green shape, a small crustacean, is seen in the snailfish's stomach. Credit: Adam Summers/University of Washington The ocean's deepest fish doesn't look like it could survive in harsh conditions thousands of feet below the surface. Instead of giant teeth and a menacing frame, the fishes that roam in the deepest parts of the ocean are small, translucent, beref
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Testosterone may be one reason why men don’t get asthma as much as women Testosterone may tamp down asthma caused by inhaling pollen, dust or other airborne allergens. That’s partly why more women suffer from the lung disease than men, new research suggests. The male sex hormone acts on a group of immune cells that are part of the first line of the body’s defense against invaders. These cells are thought to kick-start inflammation in the lungs, which causes airways to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New computer model sheds light on biological events leading to sudden cardiac death Each rectangular structure represents a heart cell in the computer model. The color bursts depict propagating waves of calcium. Each cell is identical but exhibits a distinct pattern of calcium waves due to random ion channel gating. The team investigated how this randomness gives rise to sudden unpredictable heart arrhythmia. Credit: PLOS Computational Biology /Mark A. Walker Some heart disease
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Gizmodo
Man Pleads Guilty In Massive Yahoo Hack Photo: Getty Karim Baratov, the 23-year-old Canadian man implicated in the hacking of 500 million Yahoo accounts, pleaded guilty to multiple charges in a California court today. Baratov pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit computer fraud and abuse, and eight counts of aggravated identity theft. He could face up to 20 years in prison for his limited role in the coordinated effort, a
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Gizmodo
Marvel's New Editor-in-Chief Just Admitted That He Used a Pseudonym Years Ago to Pretend to Be Japanese Image: Getty Images When news broke that C.B. Cebulski was Marvel’s new Editor-in-Chief, many lauded his history of bringing fresh, diverse voices and perspectives into the company. But the news also rekindled longstanding rumors that Cebulski had been spent months writing for Marvel as “Akira Yoshida,” a Japanese man. Cebulski is not Japanese. This week Cebulski, a white man, finally acknowledge
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Big Think
Babies Can Evaluate Your Goals and Whether the Effort Is Worth It How well can you evaluate how other people make decisions? This might be an inherent quality , according to a recent joint MIT and Harvard University study. It found that babies just 10 months-old can tell what you’re goal is and how motivated you are to reach it. The results were published in the journal Science . When setting a goal, we do a cost-benefit analysis. How much effort are we inves
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The Scientist RSS
One Way to Fix Reproducibility Problems: Train Scientists BetterLeonard Freedman, president of the Global Biological Standards Institute, discusses the causes of irreproducible science and his latest effort to spread best practices.
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The Scientist RSS
European Commission Grants Five-Year License Renewal for GlyphosateThe approval of the Roundup ingredient follows an extensive debate amidst conflicting evidence over the health effects of the world's most popular weed killer.
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Gizmodo
Google Decides Android Users Deserve Full Beers All images: Emojipedia / Gizmodo Stand down, fierce citizens. Google has fixed its beer emoji . The beer icons that were once half empty but confusingly topped with froth are now full. Oh and those un-American burger emoji with cheese on the bottom bun? The cheese is now on top. The updated emoji are included in the forthcoming Android 8.1 release . Developers running a beta version of the operat
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Big Think
Lab-Grown "Clean Meat" is Almost Here. Will You Eat It? Would you consume artificial frozen water produced by a machine? In 1805 this wasn’t a crazy question. Frederic Tudor wondered why people couldn’t enjoy cold beverages whenever they wanted. Within three decades he became known as the “ Ice King ,” with humble origins shipping eighty tons of Northeastern winter ice to Martinique in hopes that Caribbean residents would jump all over it. They di
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
There's a deeper fish in the sea IMAGE: A specimen of the new species, Mariana snailfish. view more Credit: Mackenzie Gerringer/University of Washington The ocean's deepest fish doesn't look like it could survive in harsh conditions thousands of feet below the surface. Instead of giant teeth and a menacing frame, the fishes that roam in the deepest parts of the ocean are small, translucent, bereft of scales -- and
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fat distribution in women and men provides clues to heart attack riskIt's not the amount of fat in your body but where it's stored that may increase your risk for heart attack, stroke and diabetes, according to a new study. The study looked at the differences in fat distribution patterns among overweight and obese men and women and their associated cardiometabolic risk.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Weight loss through exercise alone does not protect kneesObese people who lose a substantial amount of weight can significantly slow down the degeneration of their knee cartilage, but only if they lose weight through diet and exercise or diet alone, according to a new MRI study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Migraines linked to high sodium levels in cerebrospinal fluidMigraine sufferers have significantly higher sodium concentrations in their cerebrospinal fluid than people without the condition, according to the first study to use a technique called sodium MRI to look at migraine patients.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Denying patient requests lowers physician ratingsPatients who ask for specialist referrals, laboratory tests or certain medications and don't get them tend to be less satisfied with their doctors than those whose requests are fulfilled, new research shows. Based on the results, the study authors recommend communications training for physicians that fosters positive experiences for patients without agreeing to all requests for particular diagnost
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Science | The Guardian
Preserve your dialect: tell us about the unusual Australian words you use I f you live or work in Australia you may have heard people use different words to describe what women wear when they go swimming. If you’re near Queensland women wight be wearing togs; if you’re in the Victoria area they’re bathers, and if you’re in New South Wales they’re cozzies. However, language regions in Australia do not follow state boundaries according to Dr Pauline Bryant, visiting fell
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Diabetes and obesity together responsible for nearly 800,000 cancers worldwide The study, led by Imperial College London, found that nearly six per cent of new worldwide cancer cases in 2012 were caused by the combined effects of diabetes and being overweight (BMI of over 25 kg/m2) or obese (BMI of over 30 kg/m2). For the 12 cancers types studied, diabetes and high BMI combined were responsible for nearly 800,000 new cancer cases. As individual risk factors, being overweigh
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New on MIT Technology Review
Why Government Banks Have Complicated Feelings About Cryptocurrencies This Robot Picks Up Groceries It’s Never Seen Before Using Its Little Suction Cup A cannister of oatmeal, a tube of chips, or a box of teabags—it’s all the same to this warehouse automaton. Developed by Ocado, the world’s largest online-only grocery retailer, the machine has been designed to pick individual items out of big crates… Read more A cannister of oatmeal, a tube of chips, or a box of te
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
The future of good food in China | Matilda HoFresh food free of chemicals and pesticides is hard to come by in China: in 2016, the Chinese government revealed half a million food safety violations in just nine months. In the absence of safe, sustainable food sources, TED Fellow Matilda Ho launched China's first online farmers market, instituting a zero-tolerance test towards pesticides, antibiotics and hormones in food. She shares how she's
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UNM researcher finds stress during pregnancy affects the size of the baby IMAGE: Of the 21 mammal species studied, many were primates and rodents. view more Credit: Kittisak Srithorn A new study has been published that suggests babies are physically affected by the stress level of their mother during pregnancy. It has been previously found that adversity in the womb enhances or hampers offspring development and performance. Researchers from The Universities
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Texas A&M-Galveston team finds cave organisms living off methane gas IMAGE: Bil Phillips, cave explorer, who was also a member of the Texas A&M-led team uses a flashlight and line to navigate the underwater cave. view more Credit: HP Hartmann In a surprising find deep in an underwater cave in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, a team of researchers led by a Texas A&M University at Galveston doctoral student have discovered that cave-adapted organisms can exist off of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Defending the science of infant imitation Since the 1970s, studies have suggested that infants can imitate facial gestures, finger movements, and other actions just hours after birth. University of Miami Assistant Professor Elizabeth Simpson studies this phenomenon, known as neonatal imitation, in babies from birth to one year of life in her Social Cognition Lab in the Department of Psychology's Child Division. Recently, Simpson, whose r
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers trace timeline of tumor evolution in metastatic breast cancer patients IMAGE: Theresa Werner, MD, Medical Director of the Clinical Trials Office at Huntsman Cancer Institute and Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of Utah. view more Credit: Huntsman Cancer Institute SALT LAKE CITY - A new study by researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah observed how breast cancer tumors evolve over time and demonstrated how changes
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Gizmodo
We Need a National Revenge Porn Law, But This Bill Is Flawed Photo: Getty Up until this month , revenge porn wasn’t criminalized in New York City, and there are still 11 states without laws criminalizing the unwanted distribution of private images. But on Tuesday, four US Senators introduced a revenge porn bill, titled ENOUGH, the Ending Nonconsensual Online User Graphic Harassment Act . The bill was introduced by Senators Kamala Harris (D-CA), Richard Bur
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New computer model sheds light on biological events leading to sudden cardiac deathA powerful new computer model replicates the biological activity within the heart that precedes sudden cardiac death.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Geophysicists uncover new evidence for an alternative style of plate tectonicsScientists have determined that a volcano and mountain plateau across Turkey formed not by the collision of tectonic plates, but by a massive detachment of plate material beneath Earth's surface. They propose that uplift of the Central Anatolian Plateau over 10 million years was caused by a dripping of the deep lithosphere. It first formed an above-ground basin which sprang up when the weight belo
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Gizmodo
Dark Matter Is Not Dead The Bullet Cluster Image: X-ray: NASA/CXC/CfA/M.Markevitch et al.; Optical: NASA/STScI; Magellan/U.Arizona/D.Clowe et al.; Lensing Map: NASA/STScI; ESO WFI; Magellan/U.Arizona/D.Clowe et al. It can be easy to take hyped-up science papers as fact, especially when they involve the most esoteric imaginable ideas. But scientists are taking issue with a hyped-up new paper that claims it can eliminate
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Big Think
New Study Finds the Egg May Actually "Choose" the Sperm If you’ve attended high school, you can probably remember filling in a Punnett square during a biology class. It was the simple diagram that could not only make you feel like a knowledgeable budding geneticist, but could also help you figure out the probability of your kids having blue eyes in the case the cute classmate you had a crush on agreed to live with you happily ever after. Credit:
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Ars Technica
Researchers find oddities in high-profile gender studies Enlarge / Nicolas Guéguen may have something to say about Audrey Hepburn's dress in Funny Face , but is his research on solid ground? Two fellow researchers question that. Archive Photos/Getty Images reader comments 0 Psychologist Nicolas Guéguen publishes studies that create irresistible headlines . His research investigating the effects of wearing high heels made it into Time : " Science Proves
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Science : NPR
Testosterone May Help Protect Men From Asthma Boys are more likely to have asthma than girls, but that flips after puberty. Researchers suspect that sex hormones are a factor. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Westend61/Getty Images Boys are more likely to have asthma than girls, but that flips after puberty. Researchers suspect that sex hormones are a factor. Westend61/Getty Images Women are more likely to have asthma than
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ACR submits comments to CMS regarding 2019 benefit and payment parameters proposed rule ATLANTA - In its response yesterday to the 2019 Benefit and Payment Parameters proposed rule, which governs the state and federal health exchanges created by the Affordable Care Act, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) urged the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to reconsider proposals that would reduce health exchange insurance coverage, affordability and patient choice. "T
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists reveal rules for making ribs IMAGE: Mouse rib cage stained to show cartilage (blue) and bone (red) view more Credit: Francesca Mariani Scientists from the USC Stem Cell lab of Francesca Mariani recently shared a recipe for ribs, and it doesn't even require barbecue sauce. In a new publication in the journal eLife , first authors Jennifer Fogel from USC, Daniel Lakeland from Lakeland Applied Sciences and colleagues exam
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Popular Science
This squishy little robot can lift 1,000 times its own weight Our future robotic overlords may have a gentle—but firm—touch. Researchers from Harvard and MIT have created a soft robot with origami-inspired muscles capable of hoisting incredibly heavy loads. There are plenty of good reasons to make your robot a squishy one . So-called soft robots are perfectly suited for squeezing into the tight spaces one might expect in a search-and-rescue scenario after a
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Live Science
'Bone Treats' for Dogs Linked with 90 Pet Illnesses, 15 Deaths Dog owners may want to get their pets gifts this holiday season, but you probably don't want to literally "throw them a bone." The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is warning dog owners that pet products known as "bone treats" — which are real bones that are processed and packaged for sale — could cause serious illness and even death in pets. The agency said it has received 68 re
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BBC News - Science & Environment
River departed 'before Indus civilisation emergence' Image copyright A.Singh Image caption Drilling sediments in the Ghaggar-Hakra palaeo-channel Further light has been shed on the emergence and demise of one of the earliest urban civilisations. The Indus society came to prominence in what is now northwest India and Pakistan some 5,300 years ago thanks in large part to the sustenance of a long-lost Himalayan river. Or so it was thought. New evidenc
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Gizmodo
There's a Massive Security Vulnerability in the New macOS All images: Gizmodo In software, there are bugs, and there are dangerous bugs. It looks like macOS High Sierra has one of those dangerous bugs; one that could give someone full access to virtually any user account. And holy buckets, it is scary. Turkish software developer Lemi Orhan Ergin pointed out an apparent macOS security vulnerability in a tweet on Tuesday afternoon. Basically, if you open
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Gizmodo
Boogie Board's Discounted Drawing Tablets Make Great Gifts Boogie Board Sync | $81 | Amazon Boogie Board | $16 | Amazon The original Boogie Board LCD writing tablet was one of our most popular items on Black Friday, and today, the larger Boogie Board Sync is on sale for $81 right now, which while not an all-time low price, is the best deal we’ve seen since August. Unlike the original ( which is still on sale for $16 ), which had no ability to save or syn
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Live Science
'Tomb of Jesus' Dates Back Nearly 1,700 Years The shrine (sometimes called the Edicule) that holds the tomb of Jesus is seen in this photograph. The shrine is located within the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. Credit: Lior Mizrahi/Getty Images A tomb that, according to legend, held the body of Jesus Christ dates back almost 1,700 years, scientific tests show. Whether the tomb ever truly held the body of Jesus is unknown. The
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The Physics Behind the Strange Interstellar Asteroid 'Oumuamua For the first time, humans have detected an interstellar asteroid—a space rock they're calling 'Oumuamua , which is a Hawaiian word meaning "scout." It's the only object we've ever seen that entered the solar system from beyond our little collection of planets. That's a pretty big deal on its own. But on top of that, this asteroid has a really interesting shape: It's very long and skinny, with a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers trained neural networks to be fashion designers (sort of) IMAGE: Each row is a separate retrieval/optimization process for a given user and product category. At left are real images; at right, synthetic ones. The values are preference scores for each... view more Credit: University of California San Diego Researchers from the University of California San Diego and Adobe Research have demonstrated how artificial intelligence and neural networks c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Newfound protein may prevent viral infection and herpes-induced cancer IMAGE: The researchers found a protein that helps prevent human herpes virus 8 from replicating by detecting a specific modification on viral messenger RNA. view more Credit: Brandon Tan Keck School of Medicine of USC researchers have identified a human protein that could prevent cancer by restricting a type of herpes virus from replicating. The scientists examined the human herpes virus 8,
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The Atlantic
Some E-Cigarette Flavors May Be More Harmful Than Others In the 1990s, several employees of a Missouri popcorn factory began reporting mysterious symptoms. They were always tired, wheezing, and out of breath. After doctors found scar tissue inside the factory workers’ lungs, they diagnosed the workers with an irreversible lung disease: bronchiolitis obliterans, which would later be nicknamed “popcorn lung.” Its cause was traced back to the chemical beh
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Ars Technica
After two months of quiet, North Korea launches another ballistic missile Enlarge / A Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) photo of the ballistic missile test on August 29, 2017. North Korea has conducted another test. (credit: DPRK state media, via Getty Images ) South Korean and US officials have confirmed that North Korea has apparently conducted yet another ballistic missile test. The missile launched at just after 3am Wednesday local time from Sin-ni in South Pyongya
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Gizmodo
Guillermo del Toro's The Shape of Water Is a Beautiful Love Story Where the Story Doesn't Matter All Images: Fox Searchlight In Guillermo del Toro’s latest film The Shape of Water , a mute cleaning lady falls in love with a mysterious fishman. It’s a weird premise, to be sure, but nothing about how it’s handled feels weird. Instead, del Toro’s film is poetic, sumptuous, emotionally complex, and yet almost strikingly simple in its narrative. The Shape of Water takes place in the early 1960s.
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Science : NPR
75 Years Ago, Scientists Conducted An Unprecedented Nuclear Experiment A reunion of atomic scientists in 1952 on the 10th anniversary of the first controlled nuclear fission chain reaction, Dec. 2, 1942, at the University of Chicago. Courtesy University of Chicago Photographic Archive hide caption toggle caption Courtesy University of Chicago Photographic Archive A reunion of atomic scientists in 1952 on the 10th anniversary of the first controlled nuclear fission c
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Live Science
'Poop Pills' Work Just As Well As Traditional Fecal Transplants "Poop transplants" given as a pill may work just as well as those delivered via colonoscopy, and the pill form may be a more pleasant treatment method for patients, a new study from Canada finds. The medical name for these transplants is fecal microbiota transplantations (FMTs), but they're commonly referred to as poop transplants . They are used to help treat patients who suffer from Clost
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Ars Technica
Civilization VI: Rise and Fall will let you seize cities without firing a shot reader comments 2 A new expansion for Civilization VI , called Civilization VI: Rise and Fall , was announced today. The expansion looks to majorly shake up the flow of the game with era-long modifiers that will force you to shift your strategy for fear of losing your cities or ambition to seize others'. Its centerpiece feature is the addition of "Golden Ages," "Dark Ages," and "Heroic Ages"—macr
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New on MIT Technology Review
A New Algorithm Identifies Candidates for Palliative Care by Predicting When Patients Will Die This Robot Picks Up Groceries It’s Never Seen Before Using Its Little Suction Cup A cannister of oatmeal, a tube of chips, or a box of teabags—it’s all the same to this warehouse automaton. Developed by Ocado, the world’s largest online-only grocery retailer, the machine has been designed to pick individual items out of big crates… Read more A cannister of oatmeal, a tube of chips, or a box of te
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Regulators should not consider 'lost pleasure' of quitting smoking IMAGE: Federal officials considering new regulations on tobacco products should give more weight to the fact that a majority of smokers are unhappy about feeling addicted to cigarettes, and should put... view more Credit: Georgia State University Federal officials considering new regulations on tobacco products should give more weight to the fact that a majority of smokers are unhappy about f
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sometimes, it pays for the boss to be humble COLUMBUS, Ohio - It's good to be humble when you're the boss - as long as that's what your employees expect. Researchers studying workplaces in China found that some real-life teams showed more creativity if the employees rated their bosses as showing more humility. "Whether leader humility is a good thing really depends on the team members' expectations," said Jia (Jasmine) Hu, lead author of th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New technique reduces side-effects, improves delivery of chemotherapy nanodrugsCarnegie Mellon University researchers have developed a new method for delivering chemotherapy nanodrugs that increases the drugs' bioavailability and reduces side-effects. Their study, published online in Scientific Reports, shows that administering an FDA-approved nutrition source prior to chemotherapy can reduce the amount of the toxic drugs that settle in the spleen, liver and kidneys.
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Gizmodo
Here's When Android 8.0 Oreo Is Coming to Your Current Phone It’s been just over three months since Google released Android 8.0 Oreo , but unless you’re using one of the company’s own devices , you still might be missing out on the latest version of Android. Phone-makers like Samsung, LG, HTC, and Sony often take months to bring each Android update to even their newest high-end smartphones. If you’re using a semi-recent phone and wondering when your Androi
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The Atlantic
You Had to Be There There’s a question going around on Twitter, courtesy of the writer Matt Whitlock: “Without revealing your actual age, what’s something you remember that if you told a younger person they wouldn’t understand?” This simple query has received, at this date, 18,000 responses. Here is just a tiny selection: A/S/L Pagers Manual car windows “ Be kind, please rewind ” “ Waiting by the radio for my song t
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How a Colombian Professor Combines His Love of Math and Music "Nadie te quita lo bailado.” (No one can take from you what you’ve danced.) For Federico Ardila, this Latin American expression epitomizes his approach to life and mathematics. It’s the driving force behind the parties he DJs in venues across the San Francisco Bay Area, where people dance till morning to the beats of his native Colombia. The dance floor is a place “where you have your freedom and
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Popular Science
Humans still rule drone racing, but NASA's AI pilot might change that In a California warehouse in October, quadrocopter drones zoomed and buzzed, racing through an obstacle course of black-and-white checkered arches. On one team: drones guided by software and AI, the work of a team from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. On the other: a drone steered by a human professional—Ken Loo, a Google engineer and Drone Racing League pilot. The official results? Score one fo
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brazilian ethanol can replace 13.7 percent of world's crude oil consumptionExpansion of sugarcane cultivation for biofuel in areas not under environmental protection or reserved for food production could also reduce global emissions of carbon dioxide by up to 5.6%, according to a study by researchers in Brazil, the US and Europe.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
UK obesity levels among the worst in Europe: Heart disease statistics from more than 45 countriesA decline in deaths from heart attack and stroke in high income countries could be threatened by rising rates of obesity and diabetes, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Upscaling is a catalyst for inequality, researchers argueThe laws of nature are what drive wealth inequality within a given society -- unless society takes action to counteract their effect, such as by adopting laws on taxation. The larger the scale, the greater the inequality. Today's globalization trend is thus a process that naturally reinforces inequality. At the same time, globalization also makes it more difficult to provide societal counterbalanc
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Six in 10 food ads during family TV shows push junk food, UK study revealsA new report shows that almost six in ten food and drink advertisements shown during family programs in the UK popular with children are for 'junk food' such as fast food, takeaways and confectionery.
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Gizmodo
How to Switch Browsers Without Losing Everything Image: Gizmodo Impressed with the new spit and polish of Firefox Quantum ? Or ready to return to the warm embrace of Safari ? We now carry so much of our digital lives around with us in our browsers that switching isn’t all that straightforward—here’s how to make sure you take everything with you when you jump from one to the other. We’re going to arrange this guide by the name of the browser you
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Science : NPR
The Ancient Andean Tradition of Eating Clay May Have Helped To Protect Health A bowl of chaco clay at a home in Peru's Puno region. People usually eat this clay sauce with potatoes, especially during the potato harvest season. Tony Dunnell hide caption toggle caption Tony Dunnell A bowl of chaco clay at a home in Peru's Puno region. People usually eat this clay sauce with potatoes, especially during the potato harvest season. Tony Dunnell Talking about clay makes Amilcar A
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Prehospital supraglottic airway is associated with good neurologic outcome in cardiac arrest victims DES PLAINES, IL-- With the adjustment of postresuscitation variables, as well as prehospital and resuscitation variables, the prehospital use of supraglottic airway (SGA) is associated with good neurologic outcome in cardiac arrest victims, particularly in those who receive CPR. That is the primary finding of a study to be published in the December 2017 issue of Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New 3-D printer is 10 times faster than commercial counterparts MIT engineers have developed a new desktop 3-D printer that performs up to 10 times faster than existing commercial counterparts. Whereas the most common printers may fabricate a few Lego-sized bricks in one hour, the new design can print similarly sized objects in just a few minutes. The key to the team's nimble design lies in the printer's compact printhead, which incorporates two new, speed-en
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The pediatric submersion score predicts children at low risk for injury following submersions DES PLAINES, IL--A risk score can identify children at low risk for submersion-related injury who can be safely discharged from the ED after observation. That is the primary finding of a study to be published in the December 2017 issue of Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) , a journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM). The lead author of the study is Rohit P. Shenoi, MD, associ
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New computer model sheds light on biological events leading to sudden cardiac death IMAGE: Each rectangular structure represents a heart cell in the computer model. The color bursts depict propagating waves of calcium. Each cell is identical but exhibits a distinct pattern of calcium... view more Credit: PLOS Computational Biology/Mark A. Walker Some heart disease patients face a higher risk of sudden cardiac death, which can happen when an arrhythmia -- an irreg
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BBC News - Science & Environment
How to solve the problem of space junkA British spacecraft is trying to clean up what we send up but never bring down.
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New on MIT Technology Review
A New Algorithm Finds Patients for Palliative Care by Predicting When They’ll Die This Robot Picks Up Groceries It’s Never Seen Before Using Its Little Suction Cup A tub of oatmeal, a tube of chips, or a box of teabags—it’s all the same to this warehouse automaton. Developed by Ocado, the world’s largest online-only grocery retailer, the machine has been designed to pick individual items out of big crates of groceries,… Read more A tub of oatmeal, a tube of chips, or a box of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Antibiotics administered during labor delay healthy gut bacteria in babies Hamilton, ON (Nov. 28, 2017) - Antibiotics administered during labour for Group B Streptococcus (GBS) affect the development of gut bacteria in babies, according to a study from McMaster University. The research showed that babies exposed to the antibiotics for GBS during labour had a delay in the maturation of their gut bacteria, known as microbiota. The data also showed that this delay increase
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research finds midlife women twice as likely as men to have asthma IMAGE: Dawn C. Newcomb, PhD, assistant professor of Medicine and of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. view more Credit: Photo courtesy of Vanderbilt University Medical Center In childhood, asthma is more common in boys than girls. But around the time of puberty, that picture reverses. By midlife women are twice as likely as men to have ast
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Second phase 3 study results for LMTX® published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease IMAGE: This is the TauRx logo. view more Credit: TauRx ABERDEEN, Scotland and Singapore, Nov. 27, 2017 - TauRx Therapeutics Ltd today reported the full results from its second Phase 3 clinical study of LMTX®, the first tau aggregation inhibitor in Alzheimer's disease, published online in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease . Results from this study (TRx-237-005) are consistent with those fro
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
BU: Immediate ART treatment improves retention rates Starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) immediately following an HIV diagnosis dramatically improves retention in clinical HIV care, according to a study led by a Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researcher. The study, published in PLOS Medicine , suggests that the benefits of providing immediate ART may be larger than previously thought. "Treatment outcomes are a result of b
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Continuous glucose monitors warn of low blood sugar threat WASHINGTON--Continuous glucose monitors (CGM) can protect individuals who have had type 1 diabetes for years and are at risk of experiencing dangerously low blood sugar by increasing their awareness of the symptoms, according to a study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism . Episodes of low blood sugar, known as hypoglycemia, are a major barrier to a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Resilience of Great Barrier Reef offers opportunities for regeneration New research has found that, despite the extensive damage to coral in recent events, there are still 100 reefs on the Great Barrier Reef that are well suited to promoting the regional recovery of the ecosystem after major disturbances. The results publishing 28 November in the open access journal PLOS Biology by Dr Karlo Hock, Prof Peter Mumby, and colleagues from the University of Queensland, CS
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New on MIT Technology Review
Undoing Aging with Molecular and Cellular Damage Repair Since the dawn of medicine, aging has been doctors’ foremost challenge. Three unsuccessful approaches to conquering it have failed: treating components of age-related ill health as curable diseases, extrapolating from differences between species in the rate of aging, and emulating the life extension that famine elicits in short-lived species. SENS Research Foundation is spearheading the fourth ag
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Gizmodo
Deadspin Tom Savage’s Four-Second Press Conference Was The Only Mercy | Jezebel Bad Thing, She Said Deadspin Tom Savage’s Four-Second Press Conference Was The Only Mercy | Jezebel Bad Thing, She Said | Splinter Video Shows Roy Moore Staffer Physically Accosting Photojournalist at Rally | Earther Mexico Just Created a Marine Reserve the Size of Michigan | The Root ‘Happily Gentrifying Since 2014’: Colorado Coffee Shop Puts Up Ridiculous Sign, and I’ll Give You 1 Guess as to What Happened |
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New Scientist - News
‘Super-spreader’ coral could restore trashed Great Barrier Reef Still not beyond saving Brandon Cole/naturepl.com By Alice Klein They are the seed banks of the sea. Hubs of healthy coral in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef could help rebuild damaged areas by spreading their larvae via ocean currents. Protecting these areas could be key to the future of the ecosystem. The Great Barrier Reef is threatened by repeated coral bleaching, outbreaks of coral-eating
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Office-sharing startup WeWork announces tie-up with Meetup Office-sharing startup WeWork on Tuesday announced a deal to buy Meetup, an online social network devoted to organizing real-world activities based on common interests. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed, but news website Axios cited a source as saying it was valued at about $200 million. New York-based Meetup has grown to 35 million members since it launched in June of 2002, accord
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Better support for a small effective population size of Neandertals and a long shared history of Neandertals and Denisovans [Biological Sciences] Better support for a small effective population size of Neandertals and a long shared history of Neandertals and Denisovans Fabrizio Mafessoni a and Kay Prüfer a , 1 a Department of Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology , 04103 Leipzig, Germany Rogers et al. ( 1 ) compare the sharing of derived alleles among the genomes of Africans, non-Africans, a Neandertal,
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Mafessoni and Prufer: Inferences with and without singleton site patterns [Biological Sciences] Reply to Mafessoni and Prüfer: Inferences with and without singleton site patterns Alan R. Rogers a , 1 , Ryan J. Bohlender b , and Chad D. Huff b a Department of Anthropology, University of Utah , Salt Lake City, UT 84112; b Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center , Houston, TX 77030 Mafessoni and Prüfer ( 1 ) (MP) make three points: ( i ) Low variation amon
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structures of the type I DNA restriction enzymes [Biological Sciences] Structures of the type I DNA restriction enzymes David T. F. Dryden a , 1 a Department of Biosciences, Durham University , Durham DH1 3LE, United Kingdom The article by Liu et al. ( 1 ) on the structure of type I DNA restriction and modification enzymes purports to significantly advance our understanding of these enzymes and proposes a model for their operation. While the partial structure of one
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Exceptional body size-extinction risk relations shed new light on the freshwater biodiversity crisis [Biological Sciences] Exceptional body size–extinction risk relations shed new light on the freshwater biodiversity crisis Gregor Kalinkat a , 1 , Sonja C. Jähnig b , and Jonathan M. Jeschke b , c , d a Department of Biology and Ecology of Fishes, Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB), 12587 Berlin, Germany; b Department of Ecosystem Research, Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and In
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Kalinkat et al.: Smallest terrestrial vertebrates are highly imperiled [Biological Sciences] Reply to Kalinkat et al.: Smallest terrestrial vertebrates are highly imperiled William J. Ripple a , 1 , Christopher Wolf a , Thomas M. Newsome a , b , c , d , Michael Hoffmann e , f , Aaron J. Wirsing d , and Douglas J. McCauley g a Global Trophic Cascades Program, Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society, Oregon State University , Corvallis, OR 97331; b School of Life and Environmental Scie
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Intrusion and extrusion of water in hydrophobic nanopores [Applied Physical Sciences] Intrusion and extrusion of water in hydrophobic nanopores Antonio Tinti a , Alberto Giacomello a , 1 , Yaroslav Grosu b , and Carlo Massimo Casciola a a Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica e Aerospaziale, Sapienza Università di Roma , 00184 Rome, Italy; b CIC Energigune , Miñano 01510, Spain Edited by Christoph Dellago, University of Vienna, Vienna, and accepted by Editorial Board Member John D.
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Parallel magnetic field suppresses dissipation in superconducting nanostrips [Applied Physical Sciences] Parallel magnetic field suppresses dissipation in superconducting nanostrips Yong-Lei Wang a , b , c , Andreas Glatz a , d , Gregory J. Kimmel a , e , Igor S. Aranson a , f , Laxman R. Thoutam a , d , Zhi-Li Xiao a , d , Golibjon R. Berdiyorov g , François M. Peeters h , George W. Crabtree a , i , j , k , 1 , and Wai-Kwong Kwok a a Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory , Argonne
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Closed-loop control of targeted ultrasound drug delivery across the blood-brain/tumor barriers in a rat glioma model [Engineering] Closed-loop control of targeted ultrasound drug delivery across the blood–brain/tumor barriers in a rat glioma model Tao Sun a , b , 1 , Yongzhi Zhang a , Chanikarn Power a , Phillip M. Alexander a , Jonathan T. Sutton a , Muna Aryal a , Natalia Vykhodtseva a , Eric L. Miller b , and Nathan J. McDannold a a Focused Ultrasound Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harv
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Social preferences of future physicians [Economic Sciences] Social preferences of future physicians Jing Li a , William H. Dow b , 1 , and Shachar Kariv c , 1 , 2 a Department of Healthcare Policy and Research, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065; b School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720; c Department of Economics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 Edited by Eric S. Maskin, Harvard University, Cambri
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Nutritional and greenhouse gas impacts of removing animals from US agriculture [Sustainability Science] Nutritional and greenhouse gas impacts of removing animals from US agriculture Robin R. White a , 1 , 2 and Mary Beth Hall b , 1 , 2 a Department of Animal and Poultry Science, Virginia Tech , Blacksburg, VA 24061; b US Dairy Forage Research Center, US Department of Agriculture–Agricultural Research Service , Madison, WI 53706 Edited by B. L. Turner, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, and appro
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Early Neolithic wine of Georgia in the South Caucasus [Anthropology]Chemical analyses of ancient organic compounds absorbed into the pottery fabrics from sites in Georgia in the South Caucasus region, dating to the early Neolithic period (ca. 6,000–5,000 BC), provide the earliest biomolecular archaeological evidence for grape wine and viniculture from the Near East, at ca. 6,000–5,800 BC. The chemical...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Specific inhibition of GPCR-independent G protein signaling by a rationally engineered protein [Biochemistry] Specific inhibition of GPCR-independent G protein signaling by a rationally engineered protein Anthony Leyme a , 1 , Arthur Marivin a , 1 , Marcin Maziarz a , Vincent DiGiacomo a , Maria P. Papakonstantinou a , Prachi P. Patel a , Juan B. Blanco-Canosa b , Isha A. Walawalkar a , Gonzalo Rodriguez-Davila a , Isabel Dominguez c , and Mikel Garcia-Marcos a , 2 a Department of Biochemistry, Boston Un
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Proteome-wide modulation of degradation dynamics in response to growth arrest [Biochemistry] Proteome-wide modulation of degradation dynamics in response to growth arrest Tian Zhang a , Clara Wolfe a , Andrew Pierle a , Kevin A. Welle b , Jennifer R. Hryhorenko b , and Sina Ghaemmaghami a , b , 1 a Department of Biology, University of Rochester , Rochester, NY 14627; b Mass Spectrometry Resource Laboratory, University of Rochester , Rochester, NY 14627 Edited by David A. Baker, Universit
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Insights into functions of the H channel of cytochrome c oxidase from atomistic molecular dynamics simulations [Biophysics and Computational Biology] Insights into functions of the H channel of cytochrome c oxidase from atomistic molecular dynamics simulations Vivek Sharma a , b , 1 , Pablo G. Jambrina c , d , 1 , Markus Kaukonen a , Edina Rosta e , and Peter R. Rich f , 2 a Department of Physics, University of Helsinki , FI-00014, Helsinki, Finland; b Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki , FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland; c Departame
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
RNA stem structure governs coupling of dicing and gene silencing in RNA interference [Biophysics and Computational Biology] RNA stem structure governs coupling of dicing and gene silencing in RNA interference Hye Ran Koh a , b , 1 , Amirhossein Ghanbariniaki a , c , d , and Sua Myong a , c , d , 1 a Department of Biophysics, Johns Hopkins University , Baltimore, MD 21218; b Department of Chemistry, Chung-Ang University , Seoul 06974, Korea; c Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois , Urbana, IL 61801; d
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Analysis of high-resolution 3D intrachromosomal interactions aided by Bayesian network modeling [Biophysics and Computational Biology] Analysis of high-resolution 3D intrachromosomal interactions aided by Bayesian network modeling Xizhe Zhang a , Sergio Branciamore a , Grigoriy Gogoshin a , Andrei S. Rodin a , and Arthur D. Riggs a , 1 a Department of Diabetes Complications and Metabolism, Diabetes and Metabolism Research Institute, City of Hope , Duarte, CA Contributed by Arthur D. Riggs, October 2, 2017 (sent for review Decemb
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Recovery of taste organs and sensory function after severe loss from Hedgehog/Smoothened inhibition with cancer drug sonidegib [Cell Biology] Recovery of taste organs and sensory function after severe loss from Hedgehog/Smoothened inhibition with cancer drug sonidegib Archana Kumari a , Alexandre N. Ermilov b , Marina Grachtchouk b , Andrzej A. Dlugosz b , c , 1 , Benjamin L. Allen c , 1 , Robert M. Bradley a , 1 , and Charlotte M. Mistretta a , 1 , 2 a Department of Biologic and Materials Sciences, University of Michigan School of Den
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
In vivo measurements of interindividual differences in DNA glycosylases and APE1 activities [Cell Biology] In vivo measurements of interindividual differences in DNA glycosylases and APE1 activities Isaac A. Chaim a , b , Zachary D. Nagel a , b , Jennifer J. Jordan a , b , Patrizia Mazzucato a , b , Le P. Ngo a , b , and Leona D. Samson a , b , c , d , 1 a Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology , Cambridge, MA 02139; b Center for Environmental Health Sciences, Mass
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Dual function for Tango1 in secretion of bulky cargo and in ER-Golgi morphology [Cell Biology] Dual function for Tango1 in secretion of bulky cargo and in ER-Golgi morphology L. D. Ríos-Barrera a , 1 , S. Sigurbjörnsdóttir a , 1 , 2 , M. Baer b , 3 , and M. Leptin a , b , 4 a Directors' Research Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory , 69117 Heidelberg, Germany; b Institute of Genetics, University of Cologne , 50674 Cologne, Germany Edited by Kai Simons, Max Planck Institute of Molecu
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Human resistin protects against endotoxic shock by blocking LPS-TLR4 interaction [Immunology and Inflammation] Human resistin protects against endotoxic shock by blocking LPS–TLR4 interaction Jessica C. Jang a , 1 , Jiang Li a , 1 , Luca Gambini a , Hashini M. Batugedara a , Sandeep Sati b , Mitchell A. Lazar c , d , Li Fan b , Maurizio Pellecchia a , and Meera G. Nair a , 2 a Division of Biomedical Sciences, University of California, Riverside , CA 92521; b Biochemistry Department, University of Californ
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
T cell receptor sequencing of early-stage breast cancer tumors identifies altered clonal structure of the T cell repertoire [Immunology and Inflammation] T cell receptor sequencing of early-stage breast cancer tumors identifies altered clonal structure of the T cell repertoire John F. Beausang a , Amanda J. Wheeler b , Natalie H. Chan b , Violet R. Hanft b , Frederick M. Dirbas b , Stefanie S. Jeffrey b , and Stephen R. Quake a , c , d , 1 a Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University , Stanford, CA 94305; b Department of Surgery, Stanford U
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Resident macrophages of pancreatic islets have a seminal role in the initiation of autoimmune diabetes of NOD mice [Immunology and Inflammation] Resident macrophages of pancreatic islets have a seminal role in the initiation of autoimmune diabetes of NOD mice Javier A. Carrero a , 1 , Derrick P. McCarthy a , 1 , Stephen T. Ferris a , 1 , Xiaoxiao Wan a , 1 , Hao Hu a , Bernd H. Zinselmeyer a , Anthony N. Vomund a , and Emil R. Unanue a , 2 a Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine , St. Louis, MO 6
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Role of estrogen receptor beta in neural differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells [Medical Sciences] Role of estrogen receptor beta in neural differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells Mukesh K. Varshney a , José Inzunza a , Diana Lupu a , b , c , Vaidheeswaran Ganapathy a , b , Per Antonson a , Joëlle Rüegg b , d , Ivan Nalvarte a , 1 , 2 , and Jan-Åke Gustafsson a , e , 1 , 2 a Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet , 141 83 Huddinge, Sweden; b Swetox, Unit of Toxico
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structural basis for antibody recognition of the NANP repeats in Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein [Microbiology] Structural basis for antibody recognition of the NANP repeats in Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein David Oyen a , Jonathan L. Torres a , Ulrike Wille-Reece b , Christian F. Ockenhouse b , Daniel Emerling c , Jacob Glanville d , Wayne Volkmuth c , Yevel Flores-Garcia e , Fidel Zavala e , Andrew B. Ward a , C. Richter King b , and Ian A. Wilson a , f , 1 a Department of Integrative Str
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Multiple Legionella pneumophila effector virulence phenotypes revealed through high-throughput analysis of targeted mutant libraries [Microbiology] Multiple Legionella pneumophila effector virulence phenotypes revealed through high-throughput analysis of targeted mutant libraries Stephanie R. Shames a , 1 , Luying Liu a , James C. Havey a , Whitman B. Schofield a , b , Andrew L. Goodman a , b , and Craig R. Roy a , 2 a Department of Microbial Pathogenesis, Yale University School of Medicine , New Haven, CT 06519; b Microbial Sciences Institu
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Microbial pathway for anaerobic 5'-methylthioadenosine metabolism coupled to ethylene formation [Microbiology] Microbial pathway for anaerobic 5′-methylthioadenosine metabolism coupled to ethylene formation Justin A. North a , Anthony R. Miller a , John A. Wildenthal a , Sarah J. Young a , and F. Robert Tabita a , 1 a Department of Microbiology, The Ohio State University , Columbus, OH 43210 Edited by Bob B. Buchanan, University of California, Berkeley, CA, and approved October 20, 2017 (received for revi
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Sparsity enables estimation of both subcortical and cortical activity from MEG and EEG [Neuroscience] Sparsity enables estimation of both subcortical and cortical activity from MEG and EEG Pavitra Krishnaswamy a , b , c , Gabriel Obregon-Henao d , Jyrki Ahveninen a , e , Sheraz Khan a , e , f , Behtash Babadi g , Juan Eugenio Iglesias a , Matti S. Hämäläinen a , e , h , i , 1 , 2 , and Patrick L. Purdon d , e , 1 , 2 a Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology,
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Intact hemisphere and corpus callosum compensate for visuomotor functions after early visual cortex damage [Neuroscience] Intact hemisphere and corpus callosum compensate for visuomotor functions after early visual cortex damage Alessia Celeghin a , b , Matteo Diano a , b , Beatrice de Gelder c , Lawrence Weiskrantz d , 1 , Carlo A. Marzi e , f , and Marco Tamietto a , b , d , 1 a Department of Psychology, University of Torino , 10123 Torino, Italy; b Department of Medical and Clinical Psychology, Tilburg University
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Gap junctional coupling between retinal amacrine and ganglion cells underlies coherent activity integral to global object perception [Neuroscience] Gap junctional coupling between retinal amacrine and ganglion cells underlies coherent activity integral to global object perception Kaushambi Roy a , Sandeep Kumar a , and Stewart A. Bloomfield a , 1 a Department of Biological and Vision Sciences, State University of New York College of Optometry , New York, NY 10036 Edited by John E. Dowling, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, and approved Octo
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Dopamine reward prediction error signal codes the temporal evaluation of a perceptual decision report [Neuroscience] Dopamine reward prediction error signal codes the temporal evaluation of a perceptual decision report Stefania Sarno a , b , Victor de Lafuente c , Ranulfo Romo d , e , 1 , and Néstor Parga a , b a Departamento de Física Teórica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid , Cantoblanco 28049, Madrid, Spain; b Centro de Investigación Avanzada en Física Fundamental, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Unprecedented pathway of reducing equivalents in a diflavin-linked disulfide oxidoreductase [Biochemistry] Unprecedented pathway of reducing equivalents in a diflavin-linked disulfide oxidoreductase Rubén M. Buey a , Juan B. Arellano b , Luis López-Maury c , Sergio Galindo-Trigo b , Adrián Velázquez-Campoy d , e , f , g , h , i , José L. Revuelta a , José M. de Pereda j , Francisco J. Florencio c , Peter Schürmann k , Bob B. Buchanan l , 1 , and Monica Balsera b , 1 a Metabolic Engineering Group, Depa
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Dominant negative effect of the loss-of-function {gamma}-secretase mutants on the wild-type enzyme through heterooligomerization [Biochemistry] Dominant negative effect of the loss-of-function γ-secretase mutants on the wild-type enzyme through heterooligomerization Rui Zhou a , b , c , 1 , 2 , Guanghui Yang a , b , c , 1 , 2 , and Yigong Shi a , b , c , d , 2 a Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Structural Biology, Tsinghua University , Beijing 100084, China; b Tsinghua-Peking Joint Center for Life Sciences, Tsinghua University , Be
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correlating kinetic and structural data on ubiquinone binding and reduction by respiratory complex I [Biochemistry] Correlating kinetic and structural data on ubiquinone binding and reduction by respiratory complex I Justin G. Fedor a , Andrew J. Y. Jones a , Andrea Di Luca b , Ville R. I. Kaila b , and Judy Hirst a , 1 a Medical Research Council Mitochondrial Biology Unit, University of Cambridge , Cambridge, CB2 0XY, United Kingdom; b Department of Chemistry, Technical University of Munich , D-85747 Garching
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Cell-autonomous adiposity through increased cell surface GLUT4 due to ankyrin-B deficiency [Cell Biology] Cell-autonomous adiposity through increased cell surface GLUT4 due to ankyrin-B deficiency Damaris N. Lorenzo a , b , 1 , 2 and Vann Bennett a , b , 2 a Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Duke University , Durham, NC 27710; b Department of Biochemistry, Duke University , Durham, NC 27710 Edited by Barbara B. Kahn, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, and approved October 26, 2017 (rece
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
SNARE priming is essential for maturation of autophagosomes but not for their formation [Cell Biology] SNARE priming is essential for maturation of autophagosomes but not for their formation Adi Abada a , Smadar Levin-Zaidman b , Ziv Porat c , Tali Dadosh b , and Zvulun Elazar a , 1 a Department of Biomolecular Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science , 76100 Rehovot, Israel; b Department of Chemical Research Support, Weizmann Institute of Science , 76100 Rehovot, Israel; c Life Sciences Core Facil
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Adding landscape genetics and individual traits to the ecosystem function paradigm reveals the importance of species functional breadth [Ecology] Adding landscape genetics and individual traits to the ecosystem function paradigm reveals the importance of species functional breadth Antonio R. Castilla a , Nathaniel S. Pope a , Megan O’Connell a , María F. Rodriguez a , Laurel Treviño a , Alonso Santos b , and Shalene Jha a , 1 a Department of Integrative Biology, University of Texas at Austin , Austin, TX 78712; b Museo de Invertebrados G.
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Imaging and quantifying ganglion cells and other transparent neurons in the living human retina [Engineering] Imaging and quantifying ganglion cells and other transparent neurons in the living human retina Zhuolin Liu a , 1 , Kazuhiro Kurokawa a , Furu Zhang a , John J. Lee b , and Donald T. Miller a a School of Optometry, Indiana University , Bloomington, IN 47405; b Purdue School of Engineering and Technology, Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis , Indianapolis, IN 46202 Edited by David R.
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Gut microbiomes and reproductive isolation in Drosophila [Evolution] Gut microbiomes and reproductive isolation in Drosophila Philip T. Leftwich a , b , Naomi V. E. Clarke a , Matthew I. Hutchings a , and Tracey Chapman a , 1 a School of Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia , Norwich Research Park, Norwich NR4 7TJ, United Kingdom; b The Pirbright Institute , Woking, Surrey GU24 0NF, United Kingdom Edited by Jerry A. Coyne, The University of Chicago, Chic
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Adaptive benefits from small mutation supplies in an antibiotic resistance enzyme [Evolution] Adaptive benefits from small mutation supplies in an antibiotic resistance enzyme Merijn L. M. Salverda a , b , Jeroen Koomen a , 1 , Bertha Koopmanschap a , Mark P. Zwart a , c , 2 , and J. Arjan G. M. de Visser a , 3 a Laboratory of Genetics, Department of Plant Sciences, Wageningen University , 6708PB Wageningen, The Netherlands; b Institute for Translational Vaccinology , 3721MA Bilthoven, Th
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Frequent nonallelic gene conversion on the human lineage and its effect on the divergence of gene duplicates [Evolution] Frequent nonallelic gene conversion on the human lineage and its effect on the divergence of gene duplicates Arbel Harpak a , 1 , 2 , Xun Lan b , 1 , Ziyue Gao b , c , and Jonathan K. Pritchard a , b , c , 2 a Department of Biology, Stanford University , Stanford, CA 94305; b Department of Genetics, Stanford University , Stanford, CA 94305; c Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University ,
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Sequential induction of Fur-regulated genes in response to iron limitation in Bacillus subtilis [Genetics] Sequential induction of Fur-regulated genes in response to iron limitation in Bacillus subtilis Hualiang Pi a and John D. Helmann a , 1 a Department of Microbiology, Cornell University , Ithaca, NY 14853-8101 Edited by Alan D. Grossman, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, and approved October 11, 2017 (received for review July 21, 2017) Significance Fur is a key regulator of bac
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
RSK2 phosphorylates T-bet to attenuate colon cancer metastasis and growth [Immunology and Inflammation] RSK2 phosphorylates T-bet to attenuate colon cancer metastasis and growth Ke Yao a , b , 1 , Cong Peng a , c , 1 , Yuwen Zhang a , 1 , Tatyana A. Zykova a , 1 , Mee-Hyun Lee a , b , Sung-Young Lee a , Enyu Rao a , Hanyong Chen a , Joohyun Ryu a , Lei Wang a , Yi Zhang a , b , d , Ge Gao a , b , d , Wei He a , b , Wei-Ya Ma a , Kangdong Liu a , b , d , Ann M. Bode a , Ziming Dong d , Bing Li a , 2
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Repression of miR-31 by BCL6 stabilizes the helper function of human follicular helper T cells [Immunology and Inflammation] Repression of miR-31 by BCL6 stabilizes the helper function of human follicular helper T cells A. Ripamonti a , 1 , E. Provasi a , 1 , M. Lorenzo a , 1 , M. De Simone a , V. Ranzani a , S. Vangelisti a , S. Curti a , R. J. P. Bonnal a , L. Pignataro b , c , S. Torretta b , c , J. Geginat a , G. Rossetti a , M. Pagani a , d , 2 , and S. Abrignani a , c , 2 a Istituto Nazionale Genetica Molecolare
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Assigning chemoreceptors to chemosensory pathways in Pseudomonas aeruginosa [Microbiology] Assigning chemoreceptors to chemosensory pathways in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Davi R. Ortega a , 1 , Aaron D. Fleetwood b , c , 1 , 2 , Tino Krell d , Caroline S. Harwood e , Grant J. Jensen a , f , and Igor B. Zhulin b , c , 3 a Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology , Pasadena, CA 91125; b Computational Sciences and Engineering Division, Oak Ridge Nat
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Phasic inhibition as a mechanism for generation of rapid respiratory rhythms [Neuroscience] Phasic inhibition as a mechanism for generation of rapid respiratory rhythms Jared M. Cregg a , Kevin A. Chu a , Thomas E. Dick a , b , Lynn T. Landmesser a , 1 , and Jerry Silver a , 1 a Department of Neurosciences, Case Western Reserve University , Cleveland, OH 44106; b Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University , Cleveland
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Default mode contributions to automated information processing [Neuroscience] Default mode contributions to automated information processing Deniz Vatansever a , b , c , 1 , David K. Menon a , d , and Emmanuel A. Stamatakis a , b , d a Division of Anaesthesia, School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge , Cambridge CB2 0QQ, United Kingdom; b Department of Clinical Neurosciences, School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge , Cambridge CB2 0QQ, United Kingd
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Brain network dynamics are hierarchically organized in time [Neuroscience] Brain network dynamics are hierarchically organized in time Diego Vidaurre a , 1 , Stephen M. Smith b , and Mark W. Woolrich a , b a Oxford Centre for Human Brain Activity (OHBA), Wellcome Centre for Integrative Neuroimaging, Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford , Oxford OX3 7JX, United Kingdom; b Oxford Centre for Functional MRI of the Brain (FMRIB), Wellcome Centre for Integrative Neu
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Environmental and geographic variables are effective surrogates for genetic variation in conservation planning [Sustainability Science] Environmental and geographic variables are effective surrogates for genetic variation in conservation planning Jeffrey O. Hanson a , 1 , Jonathan R. Rhodes b , Cynthia Riginos a , and Richard A. Fuller a a School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland , Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia; b School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of Queensland , Brisbane, QLD 4072, Aus
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Ecosystem management and land conservation can substantially contribute to California’s climate mitigation goals [Sustainability Science] Ecosystem management and land conservation can substantially contribute to California’s climate mitigation goals D. Richard Cameron a , 1 , David C. Marvin a , b , Jonathan M. Remucal c , and Michelle C. Passero a a The Nature Conservancy , San Francisco, CA 94105; b Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science , Stanford, CA 94305; c Jonathan Remucal Consulting , Madison, WI 53
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Mann, News Feature: Lighting the way for dark matter [Correction]NEWS FEATURE Correction for “News Feature: Lighting the way for dark matter,” by Adam Mann, which was first published October 31, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1716618114 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114:11557–11560). The editors note that on page 11559, right column, third full paragraph, lines 4–5, “cooled to 4.2 Kelvin” should have appeared...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Wang et al., Assembly of silver Trigons into a buckyball-like Ag180 nanocage [Correction]CHEMISTRY Correction for “Assembly of silver Trigons into a buckyball-like Ag180 nanocage,” by Zhi Wang, Hai-Feng Su, Yuan-Zhi Tan, Stan Schein, Shui-Chao Lin, Wei Liu, Shu-Ao Wang, Wen-Guang Wang, Chen-Ho Tung, Di Sun, and Lan-Sun Zheng, which was first published October 27, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1711972114 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114:12132–12137)....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Wang et al., Heterochronic truncation of odontogenesis in theropod dinosaurs provides insight into the macroevolution of avian beaks [Correction]EVOLUTION Correction for “Heterochronic truncation of odontogenesis in theropod dinosaurs provides insight into the macroevolution of avian beaks,” by Shuo Wang, Josef Stiegler, Ping Wu, Cheng-Ming Chuong, Dongyu Hu, Amy Balanoff, Yachun Zhou, and Xing Xu, which was first published September 25, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1708023114 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114:10930–10935)....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Coghill et al., Neural correlates of interindividual differences in the subjective experience of pain [Correction]NEUROSCIENCE Correction for “Neural correlates of interindividual differences in the subjective experience of pain,” by Robert C. Coghill, John G. McHaffie, and Ye-Fen Yen, which was first published June 24, 2003; 10.1073/pnas.1430684100 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 100:8538–8542). The authors note that the author name Ye-Fen Yen should instead appear...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
In This Issue [This Week in PNAS] In This Issue Early evidence of Near Eastern viniculture Neolithic jar from Khramis Didi-Gora, Georgia. Image courtesy of the Georgian National Museum. As the climate in the mountainous Near East improved following the last Ice Age, Neolithic hunter-gatherers innovated viniculture of the Eurasian grapevine ( Vitis vinifera ). The earliest known chemical evidence for grape wine in the region dates
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Preprint servers facilitate scientific discourse [Editorials] Preprint servers facilitate scientific discourse Preprints are scientific manuscripts posted online before formal peer-review and publication in journals. Preprints have become prominent in scientific publishing, which is increasingly shaped by an emphasis on speed, transparency, and accessibility. Important as they are, those factors are entwined with the journal’s primary role as an arbiter of
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Dominant negative mechanism of Presenilin-1 mutations in FAD [Biochemistry] Dominant negative mechanism of Presenilin-1 mutations in FAD Hirotaka Watanabe a and Jie Shen b , 1 a Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine , Tokyo, 160-8582, Japan; b Department of Neurology, Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Program in Neuroscience, Harvard Medical School , Boston, MA 02115 Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia, afflicting more than 5 mil
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Quest for adequate biodiversity surrogates in a time of urgency [Sustainability Science] Quest for adequate biodiversity surrogates in a time of urgency Félix Forest a , 1 a Royal Botanic Gardens , Kew, Richmond, Surrey, TW9 3DS, United Kingdom Earth’s biodiversity is declining at an alarming rate, in what some have dubbed the “sixth mass extinction” that life has faced in the history of our planet ( 1 ). This rapid decline of biodiversity, the realization that some of its components
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Converging evidence for the role of transmodal cortex in cognition [Neuroscience] Converging evidence for the role of transmodal cortex in cognition Daniel S. Margulies a , 1 and Jonathan Smallwood b , 1 a Max Planck Research Group for Neuroanatomy & Connectivity, Max Planck Institute for Cognition and Brain Sciences , 04103 Leipzig, Germany; b Department of Psychology, University of York , Heslington, YO10 5DD York, United Kingdom The studies by Vidaurre et al. ( 1 ) and Vata
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Toroidal plasmoid generation via extreme hydrodynamic shear [Applied Physical Sciences] Toroidal plasmoid generation via extreme hydrodynamic shear Morteza Gharib a , 1 , Sean Mendoza a , Moshe Rosenfeld b , Masoud Beizai a , and Francisco J. Alves Pereira c , d , 1 a Graduate Aerospace Laboratories, California Institute of Technology , Pasadena, CA 91125; b School of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University , Tel Aviv 69978, Israel; c Istituto Nazionale p
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
In vivo bioluminescence imaging of labile iron accumulation in a murine model of Acinetobacter baumannii infection [Biochemistry] In vivo bioluminescence imaging of labile iron accumulation in a murine model of Acinetobacter baumannii infection Allegra T. Aron a , 1 , Marie C. Heffern a , 1 , 2 , Zachery R. Lonergan b , 1 , Mark N. Vander Wal a , Brian R. Blank c , Benjamin Spangler c , Yaofang Zhang d , e , Hyo Min Park f , Andreas Stahl f , Adam R. Renslo c , Eric P. Skaar b , 3 , and Christopher J. Chang a , g , h , 3 a
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correlating cell shape and cellular stress in motile confluent tissues [Biophysics and Computational Biology] Correlating cell shape and cellular stress in motile confluent tissues Xingbo Yang a , 1 , Dapeng Bi b , Michael Czajkowski c , Matthias Merkel c , M. Lisa Manning c , and M. Cristina Marchetti c a Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138; b Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115; c Physics Department, Syracuse University, Syr
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Energy decomposition analysis of single bonds within Kohn-Sham density functional theory [Chemistry] Energy decomposition analysis of single bonds within Kohn–Sham density functional theory Daniel S. Levine a , b and Martin Head-Gordon a , b , 1 a Kenneth S. Pitzer Center for Theoretical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of California , Berkeley, C A 94720; b Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory , Berkeley, CA 94720 Contributed by Martin Head-Gordon, Oct
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Selective killing of Helicobacter pylori with pH-responsive helix-coil conformation transitionable antimicrobial polypeptides [Chemistry] Selective killing of Helicobacter pylori with pH-responsive helix–coil conformation transitionable antimicrobial polypeptides Menghua Xiong a , 1 , Yan Bao b , 1 , Xin Xu c , 1 , Hua Wang a , Zhiyuan Han a , Zhiyu Wang d , Yeqing Liu e , Songyin Huang e , Ziyuan Song a , Jinjing Chen b , Richard M. Peek, Jr. f , Lichen Yin c , 2 , Lin-Feng Chen b , 2 , and Jianjun Cheng a , c , d , g , h , i , j
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reviewer bias in single- versus double-blind peer review [Computer Sciences] Reviewer bias in single- versus double-blind peer review Andrew Tomkins a , 1 , Min Zhang b , and William D. Heavlin a a Google, Inc. , Mountain View, CA 94043; b State Key Laboratory of Intelligent Technology and Systems, Department of Computer Science and Technology, Tsinghua University , Beijing 100084, China Edited by Susan T. Fiske, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, and approved October 1
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Assessing the present and future probability of Hurricane Harvey’s rainfall [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences] Assessing the present and future probability of Hurricane Harvey’s rainfall Kerry Emanuel a , 1 a Lorenz Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology , Cambridge, MA 02139 Contributed by Kerry Emanuel, October 4, 2017 (sent for review September 15, 2017; reviewed by Cindy L. Bruyere, Efi Foufoula-Georgiou, and James A. Smith) Significance Natural disasters such as the recent Hurricanes Harvey, I
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Mechanism of SOA formation determines magnitude of radiative effects [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences] Mechanism of SOA formation determines magnitude of radiative effects Jialei Zhu a , Joyce E. Penner a , 1 , Guangxing Lin b , Cheng Zhou a , Li Xu c , and Bingliang Zhuang d a Department of Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering, University of Michigan , Ann Arbor, MI 48109; b Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory , Richland, WA 99354; c Depart
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Normalized value coding explains dynamic adaptation in the human valuation process [Neuroscience] Normalized value coding explains dynamic adaptation in the human valuation process Mel W. Khaw a , Paul W. Glimcher b , c , and Kenway Louie b , c , 1 a Department of Economics, Columbia University , New York, NY 10027; b Center for Neural Science, New York University , New York, NY 10003; c Institute for the Study of Decision Making, New York University , New York, NY 10003 Edited by Randolph Bl
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Matter wave speckle observed in an out-of-equilibrium quantum fluid [Physics] Matter wave speckle observed in an out-of-equilibrium quantum fluid Pedro E. S. Tavares a , Amilson R. Fritsch a , Gustavo D. Telles a , Mahir S. Hussein b , François Impens c , Robin Kaiser d , and Vanderlei S. Bagnato a , 1 a Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, 13560-970 São Carlos, SP, Brazil; b Departamento de Física, Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronaútica, 12.228-900
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Parochial trust and cooperation across 17 societies [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences] Parochial trust and cooperation across 17 societies Angelo Romano a , b , 1 , Daniel Balliet a , Toshio Yamagishi c , and James H. Liu d a Department of Experimental and Applied Psychology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam , Amsterdam 1081BT, The Netherlands; b Department of Psychology, University of Turin , Turin 10124, Italy; c Graduate School of International Corporate Strategy, Hitotsubashi Unive
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Psychological targeting as an effective approach to digital mass persuasion [Social Sciences] Psychological targeting as an effective approach to digital mass persuasion S. C. Matz a , 1 , M. Kosinski b , 2 , G. Nave c , and D. J. Stillwell d , 2 a Columbia Business School, Columbia University , New York City, NY 10027; b Graduate School of Business, Stanford University , Stanford, CA 94305; c Wharton School of Business, University of Pennsylvania , Philadelphia, PA 19104; d Cambridge Jud
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Skill networks and measures of complex human capital [Social Sciences] Skill networks and measures of complex human capital Katharine A. Anderson a , 1 a Tepper School of Business, Carnegie Mellon University , Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Edited by Matthew O. Jackson, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, and approved October 24, 2017 (received for review April 20, 2017) Significance The relationship between worker human capital and wages is a question of considerable economic
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How having too much or too little of CHRNA7 can lead to neuropsychiatric disordersUsing new pluripotent stem cell technology, researchers have discovered unexpected effects on calcium flux on neurons from patients with neuropsychiatric disorders carrying either fewer or extra copies of the CHRNA7 gene.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Microwave-based test method can help keep 3-D chip designers' eyes openScientists have invented a new approach to testing the multilayered, three-dimensional computer chips that now appear in some of the latest consumer devices. The novel method may be the answer the semiconductor industry needs to quickly assess the reliability of this relatively new chip construction model.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cardiovascular disease: The immune response to heart attacksThe damage caused by a heart attack triggers an inflammatory reaction which degrades the affected tissue. This response is orchestrated by immune cells that reside in the nearby pericardial adipose tissue, as a new study shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Quantum systems that correct themselvesQuantum devices allow us to accomplish computing and sensing tasks that go beyond the capabilities of their classical counterparts. However, protecting quantum information from being corrupted by errors is difficult. Now researchers have put forward a new method to protect quantum information stored in trapped ions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Controlling a vortex using polymersAlthough ubiquitous in the environment, vortices have proven difficult to capture and study in the laboratory. Recently, researchers created a way to examine these small-scale whirlpools with the aid of a device specially developed for this purpose. Their recent paper examines the formation of vortices in fluids with and without added polymers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Digital scan of the eye provides accurate picture of a person’s general healthLooking into the eye -- using digital techniques and analysing Big Data -- can provide an accurate picture of a person's general medical condition, facilitate early diagnosis and treatment, and make for transparent patients, research shows.
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Blog » Languages » English
The Eyewire Activity Tracker Clearly see your accuracy history and click to jump and review any recent cube you’ve played with Activity Tracker. We’re honored to release an official feature based on an excellent player script from developer and all around great guy @KrzysztofKruk. The new Activity Tracker provides detailed gameplay stats and accuracy feedback through Review Mode, as well as unlocks Jump for all Eyewirers. Th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Resilience of Great Barrier Reef offers opportunities for regeneration Diversity of coral forms shows rich underwater life found on healthy coral reefs. Credit: Peter J. Mumby New research has found that, despite the extensive damage to coral in recent events, there are still 100 reefs on the Great Barrier Reef that are well suited to promoting the regional recovery of the ecosystem after major disturbances. The results publishing 28 November in the open access jour
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Live Science
What's the Difference Between the Right Brain and Left Brain? Are you right-brained or left-brained? It's a popular question, hovering at the edges of sound neuroscience. The left brain is supposed to be more creative and artistic, the right brain more organized and logical. Indeed, Google "right-brain dominance" or "left-brain dominance," and you'll find endless blog posts on the subject. You'll also find quizzes that purport to tell readers which so
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
If termites eat bait for one day, they die within 90, study findsTermites that feed on a well-known bait for one day are eventually doomed, which is good news for those who want to protect their property from the destructive pest, an entomologist says.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Quantum-emitting answer might lie in the solutionLead trihalide perovskite nanocrystals are promising candidates as light sources. Coupling quantum emitters with nanophotonic cavities can significantly boost efficiency, but this approach hasn't been explored with these nanocrystals. Now, researchers have demonstrated a simple approach for coupling solution-synthesized cesium lead tribromide perovskite nanocrystals to silicon nitride photonic cav
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Key component for quantum computing inventedIn a critical step towards scaling up quantum computers, physicists have invented a microcircuit based on topological insulators, a new phase of matter awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physics. The circuit will be a vital component in the scaling up of quantum information systems.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Significant breakthrough in topological insulator based devicesThe realization of room temperature spin-orbit torque driven magnetization switching in topological insulator-ferromagnet heterostructures has promising applications in low power consumption and high integration density memories and logic devices.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gastric cancer: A new strategy used by Helicobacter pylori to target mitochondriaScientists have recently identified new strategies used by Helicobacter pylori bacteria to infect cells. By specifically targeting mitochondria these bacteria, despite being extracellular, can optimize infection in the host. These findings pave the way for new strategies to combat H. pylori infection, which is associated with most cases of gastric cancer and several other gastric disorders.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CHOP researchers highlight advances in pediatric heart disease at 2017 AHA scientific sessions Physician-researchers from the Cardiac Center at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) recently presented new findings on pediatric cardiovascular disease at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2017 in Anaheim, Calif. Among many abstracts presented were research on racial disparities in bystander CPR methods in children with sudden cardiac arrest, and findings that children
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: How to get patients to share electronic health records BUFFALO, N.Y. - Education is the key to getting patients to share their medical records electronically with health care providers, according to a new study from the University at Buffalo School of Management. Published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (September 2017), the study found that while patient education has typically focused on the benefits of electronic records, privacy conc
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Most blue whales are ‘righties,’ except for this one move View the video Blue whales, it turns out, are a tad ambidextrous. When hunting in deep water, the whales tend to be “right-handed,” lunging at krill while twisting 180 degrees or less onto their right side. But when gobbling up the tiny crustaceans near the surface, the whales tend to be lefties, launching themselves upward while performing a 360-degree barrel roll to the left , researchers repor
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Gizmodo
What's on the Ground in The Jetsons? Who lives on the ground in the world of The Jetsons ? Homeless people and walking birds. This isn’t a fan theory. This is canon. Fight me. Whenever I see jokes about The Jetsons on Twitter (and there are a lot of good ones ) people inevitably float fan theories about the show. Some people believe that maybe The Flintstones takes place in some post-apocalyptic world after The Jetsons, which is ind
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Geophysicists uncover new evidence for an alternative style of plate tectonics Cave city in volcanic rocks of uplifted Central Anatolian plateau. Credit: Russell Pysklywec When renowned University of Toronto (U of T) geophysicist J. Tuzo Wilson cemented concepts in the emerging field of plate tectonics in the 1960s, he revolutionized the study of Earth's physical characteristics and behaviours. Decades later, successor researchers at U of T and Istanbul Technical University
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researcher studies how professional sports fans use mobile phones Credit: University of Texas at San Antonio Seok Kang, an associate professor in the Department of Communication at The University of Texas at San Antonio, is researching how professional sports teams build loyalty by engaging their fans through their mobile devices. Kang published "Mobile communication and pro sports: motivation and fan loyalty ," a study in the International Journal of Mobile Co
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why do more women have asthma than men? Blame hormonesWomen are twice as likely as men to have asthma, and this gender difference may be caused by the effects of sex hormones on lung cells. Researchers have found that testosterone hindered an immune cell linked to asthma symptoms, such as inflammation and mucus production in the lungs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New genetic variations linked to educational attainment: Genetic overlap between cognitive ability and longevityInvestigators have discovered dozens of new genetic variations associated with a person's general cognitive ability. While profiling cognitive ability, researchers also discovered a genetic overlap with longevity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dual virtual reality/treadmill exercises promote brain plasticity in Parkinson's patientsA new study suggests that a therapy that combines virtual reality and treadmill exercise dramatically lowers the incidence of falling among Parkinson's patients by changing the brain's behavior and promoting beneficial brain plasticity, even in patients with neurodegenerative disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cases of unexplained anaphylaxis linked to red meat allergyWhile rare, some people experience recurrent episodes of anaphylaxis -- a life-threatening allergic reaction -- for which the triggers are never identified. Recently, researchers found that some patients' seemingly inexplicable anaphylaxis was actually caused by an uncommon allergy to a molecule found naturally in red meat. They note that the allergy, which is linked to a history of a specific typ
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
DIY: Scientists release a how-to for building a smartphone microscopeAdd one more thing to the list of tasks your smartphone can perform. Researchers have released an open-source dataset offering instructions to people interested in building their own smartphone microscope.
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Live Science
People Are Freaking Out Over This Monster Fungus That Smells Like Rotting Crab Meeeeuurghhhkkkkk! That's not the sound the Clathrus archeri fungus makes when it erupts from its egg-sack. But it sure seems like it should be. When the squid-like stinkhorn fungus raises its gloopy, toothed arms to the heavens, it might look like it's enacting some salutation to an alien sun. But its purpose is in fact much more earthly: to attract swarms of hungry flies that will spr
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Live Science
Physical Activity May Change Your Heart As You Age (In a Good Way) People who increase their physical activity may experience beneficial changes in their heart's structure, and these changes could reduce the risk of heart failure , a new study suggests. In the study, researchers analyzed information from more than 2,700 people who'd had their heart examined with an MRI at the start of the study, and again 10 years later. The participants — who were around
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UTSA researcher studies how professional sports fans use mobile phones (Nov. 28, 2017) - Seok Kang, an associate professor in the Department of Communication at The University of Texas at San Antonio, is researching how professional sports teams build loyalty by engaging their fans through their mobile devices. Kang published "Mobile communication and pro sports: motivation and fan loyalty," a study in the International Journal of Mobile Communications that describe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Geophysicists uncover new evidence for an alternative style of plate tectonics TORONTO, ON - When renowned University of Toronto (U of T) geophysicist J. Tuzo Wilson cemented concepts in the emerging field of plate tectonics in the 1960s, he revolutionized the study of Earth's physical characteristics and behaviours. Decades later, successor researchers at U of T and Istanbul Technical University have determined that a series of volcanoes and a mountain plateau ac
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Making a case for health literacy IMAGE: Karen Edison, M.D., director of the MU Center for Health Policy and contributing author of the report. view more Credit: Justin Kelley, University of Missouri Health The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates half of the adult population in the United States may have inadequate health literacy skills. The inability to understand and effectively use health information is l
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Gizmodo
This Discounted USB-C Battery Pack Is a Great Gift For Any MacBook or Nintendo Switch Owner RAVPower USB-C Power Delivery Battery Pack | $52 | Amazon | Promo code PB058BCM RAVPower USB-C Wall Charger | $14 | Amazon | Promo code RPPC17TY There are only a handful of USB battery packs out there with USB-C Power Delivery, and this is one of the best prices we’ve ever seen on one of them . $52 gets you RAVPower’s 26,800mAh battery pack , complete with a 30W USB-C port that can power a MacBoo
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Popular Science
Great gifts for people who live in small apartments Living spaces come in all sizes, including "snug," "adorable," and "I can't breathe." If you've lived in one of these glorified closets, you know the struggle of the gift season: sometimes there simply isn’t room to store your new presents. Don't add stress to their holiday and choose something that offers a big impact with a tiny footprint. Read on. There are few better ways to start your day th
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The Atlantic
The Algorithm That Catches Serial Killers “I wonder if we could teach a computer to spot serial killers in data,” Thomas Hargrove thought as he parsed the FBI’s annual homicide reports. The retired news reporter would soon answer his own question. He created an algorithm that, in his words, “can identify serial killings—and does.” In The Dewey Decimal System of Death , a new film from FreeThink , Hargrove explains how “the real world is
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BBC News - Science & Environment
RemoveDebris: Space junk mission prepares for launch Image copyright RemoveDebris Mission Image caption The spacecraft will test clean-up technologies after it launches next year A mission that will test different methods to clean up space junk is getting ready for launch. The RemoveDebris spacecraft will attempt to snare a small satellite with a net and test whether a harpoon is an effective garbage grabber. The probe has been assembled in Surrey
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
France to monitor air-borne farm chemicalsFrench air quality experts will begin monitoring the presence of air-borne pesticides and other chemicals at around 50 sites across France next year, their umbrella group ATMO France said Tuesday.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Infant stars found surprisingly near galaxy's supermassive black holeALMA has revealed the telltale signs of eleven low-mass stars forming perilously close -- within three light-years -- to the Milky Way's supermassive black hole.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers inadvertently boost surface area of nickel nanoparticles for catalysisResearchers have discovered that a technique designed to coat nickel nanoparticles with silica shells actually fragments the material -- creating a small core of oxidized nickel surrounded by smaller satellites embedded in a silica shell. The surprising result may prove useful by increasing the surface area of nickel available for catalyzing chemical reactions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dogs mouth-lick to communicate with angry humansNew research has found that dogs lick their mouths as a response to looking at angry human faces, suggesting that domestic canines may have a functional understanding of emotional information.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Switchable solar window developedThermochromic windows capable of converting sunlight into electricity at a high efficiency have been developed. Relying on such advanced materials as perovskites and single-walled carbon nanotubes, the new technology responds to heat by transforming from transparent to tinted. As the window darkens, it generates electricity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Incidence of brain injury in babies estimated for first time using routine NHS dataNew research has estimated that each year five babies in every 1,000 born in England suffer a condition or sign linked to brain injury.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Not blinded by the light: Rods in the retina contribute to daylight visionInternational research team may be beneficial for new treatments for patients suffering from loss of vision in bright light, report investigators.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Abbreviated breast MRI may be additional screening option for dense breastsAmong women with dense breast tissue, for whom traditional mammograms are less effective at detecting cancer, who request additional screening after a negative mammogram, abbreviated breast MRI (AB-MR) may be a valuable cancer detection tool.
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The Scientist RSS
How Bad Will the Flu Season Get? Forecasters Are Competing to Figure it OutFrom analyses of surface protein evolution to tweets on social media, scientists are gathering all the data they can to accurately predict influenza dynamics.
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Ars Technica
VR headset sales are slowly rising out of the doldrums How long until one of these Lawnmower Man setups is in every home in America? New Line / Time Warner reader comments 10 For all the hubbub and sometimes lofty predictions surrounding virtual reality's wide consumer launch last year, the immediate sales figures and impact of the technology have been decidedly muted. As hardware prices come down and software offerings begin to catch up , though, th
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Gizmodo
A Ghost Ship Carrying 8 'Skeletonized' Bodies Washed Up in Japan—and It's Not the First Time Screencap: TV Asahi via CNN A battered wooden fishing vessel containing eight partially skeletonized bodies washed ashore in northern Japan over the weekend. Disturbingly, it’s just the latest in a string of similar “ghost ships” that seem to be coming from North Korea. At the moment, it’s unclear how long the boat had been floating in the Sea of Japan before it was found, but it can take only a
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Viden
Fitnessfirma klar med ny mobil betalingsløsning En måned efter Apple Pay blev lanceret til danskere med konto i Jyske Bank eller Nordea, kommer der nu endnu en spiller ind på det danske mobilbetalingsmarked. Dog i en markant mindre målestok. Det er det amerikanske firma Fitbit, der nok er mest er kendt for sine motions-trackere, som nu lancerer Fitbit Pay. Læs også: Apple Pay er nu i Danmark: Kræver den rigtige bank Fitbits helt egen mobilbeta
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: Seeking the Source of the Vanishing Great Salt Lake “Before we did this analysis people were just saying, ‘Oh the lake goes up; the lake goes down,’ ” Dr. Wurtsbaugh said. But natural variability in water levels and climate change are no longer excuses for inaction, he and his colleagues write. When the researchers looked at historical data, they saw no trends in water level fluctuations. But development and water diversion since the mid-19th cent
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Live Science
Mystery Solved: How the Ancient Indus Civilization Survived Without Rivers Almost 5,000 years ago, a civilization developed in what is today northwest India and Pakistan, rivaling Mesopotamia and ancient Egypt in scope. The people of the Indus civilization farmed everything from cotton to dates, and eventually established at least five major cities with basic indoor plumbing and public sewage systems. A few of these cities, including the famed sites of Harappa and
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Ars Technica
Researcher discovers classified Army intel app, data on open public AWS bucket "Let me just pull all that TS/NOFORN stuff out of that public AWS bucket..." reader comments 53 After uncovering a massive trove of social media-based intelligence left on multiple Amazon Web Services S3 storage buckets by a Defense Department contractor, the cloud security firm UpGuard has disclosed yet another major cloud storage breach of sensitive intelligence information. This time, the data
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why is massive star formation quenched in galaxy centers?A new study proposes that one of the reasons that slows down the rate at which massive stars form in galaxies is the existence of relatively large magnetic fields. Research has revealed that this process occurs around the center of the galaxy NGC 1097.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Holy Grail' for batteries: Solid-state magnesium battery a big step closerScientists have discovered the fastest magnesium-ion solid-state conductor, a major step towards making solid-state magnesium-ion batteries that are both energy dense and safe.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How social media can help people lose weightSharing the triumphs and tribulations of your weight loss journey with other members of an online virtual support community plays an important role in achieving success, according to a new study. The study examines the role of virtual communities and public commitment in setting and reaching weight loss goals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The WHT measures the size of a stellar-mass black hole jet IMAGE: Researchers of the IAC participate in a study, in which they have measured the delay between the X-rays and the visible light of a jet emitted by a black hole.... view more Credit: Gabriel Pérez, SMM (IAC). Nothing can emerge from a black hole. Yet, in nature, we find ultra-powerful jets of energy that shoot out from the immediate vicinities of growing black holes. How these jets for
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New Scientist - News
Teenage brains can’t tell what’s important and what isn’t Appropriate behaviour? Clarissa Leahy/Getty By Jessica Hamzelou Teenagers may know full well how important final exams are – but that won’t stop some putting in minimal effort. This may be because their brains aren’t developed enough to properly assess how high the stakes are, and adapt their behaviour accordingly. Adults are generally pretty good at being able to tell when a situation is wor
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New Scientist - News
Pokémon Go isn’t the only app that may cause fatal car crashes Distractions can kill Daren Fentiman/Zuma/Eyevine By Timothy Revell Using a mobile phone while driving is dangerous. Trying to catch Pokémon at the wheel could be even worse. According to a new analysis, the mobile game Pokémon Go may have contributed to nearly 150,000 traffic accidents, 256 deaths and economic costs of $2 billion to $7.3 billion in the first 148 days after its introduction t
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Gizmodo
Earth’s Heaviest Organism Could Be Eaten to Death…By Deer Utah’s aspen grove. Image: Wikimedia Commons Think of the heaviest living organism on Earth, and an image of a blue whale might come to mind. In fact, the honor goes to a single massive cluster of quaking aspen stems in Utah—but maybe not for long. The Pando aspen grove, a 106-acre colony composed solely of quaking aspens, is a clone; it started out as a single male tree thousands of years ago. Q
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Peru's abundant ruins feel the squeeze of urbanization In this Sept. 22, 2017 photo, the pre-Columbian archeological site La Luz is flanked by a private soccer field players rent in Lima, Peru. Many people in modern-day Peru are raised among the Incan ruins built before the Spanish colonized South America. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd) From her small home near two golf courses and three slums, Gianina Rojas gazes up at a crumbling adobe pyramid, remnants of
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Popular Science
What Meghan Markle’s engagement ring can teach us about Southern Africa's ancient continental crust If you have a very limited media diet, you may not have heard that Prince Henry of Wales (usually referred to as Prince Harry) recently proposed to American actress, model, and humanitarian Meghan Markle. Along with his hand in marriage and a place in the British royal family, she has accepted a glittering rock from Botswana. It formed hundreds of thousands of feet under ground, billions of years
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Ars Technica
Tabs come to every window in Windows 10 “Sets” reader comments 124 VIDEO Windows Sets. The basics of window management in Windows haven't really changed a whole lot since the days of Windows 3. You can maximize windows to make them take up a whole monitor or you can have them free-floating and arbitrarily sized—that's about it. macOS gives maximized windows a slight twist with its full-screen view, and Windows 7 introduced Aero Snap, a way to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon's cloud-computing unit takes a new approach in battle with rivals: advertising Amazon Web Services has defeated IBM in a competition for lucrative federal contracts, threatened Microsoft's core businesses, and reshaped corporate technology. In the past few months, the cloud-computing unit of the online retail giant has taken a page from the playbook of some of its more traditional competitors: It started advertising. Ads have been splashed across billboards and in airport
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microwave-based test method can help keep 3-D chip designers' eyes open These 'eye' diagrams reveal how much noise is present in a digital signal. As the signal grows noisier, its characteristic shape grows distorted, shrinking the center so it resembles an eye closing. NIST's new 3-D chip-testing method passes microwaves through chip material, allowing researchers to quickly detect flaws that would create noise and make the diagram change from the open-eyed clarity
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Freezing electrons makes them get in lineNew research suggests that electrons in a two-dimensional gas can undergo a semi-ordered (nematic) to mostly-ordered (smectic) phase transition, which has been discussed in physics theory but never seen in practice before.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Exercise may help protect smokers from inflammation, muscle damageRegular exercise may protect smokers from some of the negative effects associated with smoking, such as muscle loss and inflammation, according to a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Understanding a therapeutic paradox for treating thrombo-vascular complications in kidney diseaseResearchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have discovered a potential treatment target to prevent chronic kidney disease patients from developing blood clots without causing bleeding complications - an unwanted and perplexing side effect. They say the strategy offers a much-needed therapeutic alternative to standard-of-care heparin, which throws off the finely-tuned balance betwee
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why is massive star formation quenched in galaxy centers? The current cosmological model to explain our universe, the "Big Bang" model, aims to describe all the phenomena we observe, which includes the galaxies and their evolution from earliest times to the present day. One of the major problems faced by the standard form of this model is that it has predicted a star formation rate -speed at which new stars are born- which is far too big. All
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brazilian ethanol can replace 13.7 percent of world's crude oil consumptionExpansion of sugarcane cultivation for biofuel in areas not under environmental protection or reserved for food production could also reduce global emissions of carbon dioxide by up to 5.6%, according to a study by researchers in Brazil, the US and Europe.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Decoding the molecular mechanisms of ovarian cancer progression (PHILADELPHIA) -- Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy in the United States, resulting in an estimated 14,100 deaths and 22,500 new cases in 2017 alone. This high mortality is primarily caused by resistance to therapy and the diagnosis of ovarian cancer after it has already metastasized, which occurs in approximately 80 percent of patients. A new study from Sidney Kimmel Cance
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Kant, Hume, and the retailer's dilemma If you're wondering how 18th century philosophers could possibly serve to guide 21st century retailers, this paper places their opposing perspectives on ethics in the context of how merchants react to customers who violate company policy or norms of ethical behavior. In "When Ethical Transgression of Customers Have Beneficial Long-Term Effects in Retailing: An Empirical Investigation," Zhao Yang
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cyber Monday: Biggest online shopping day in U.S. history pits Amazon vs. Walmart Safely back in their office cubicles, Americans let their fingers do the shopping Monday, racking up $6.59 billion in online sales by the end of the day. Cyber Monday topped out at a new online record, compared with Black Friday online sales of $5.03 billion, according to Adobe Analytics. That's up from the previous record for Cyber Monday, which was last year's $5.65 billion, a 16.8% increase.
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Viden
Cyber-kriminelle sælger luksusrejser på det mørke internet kl. 18.32 Det lyder som et forrygende godt tilbud. Køb din flyrejse hos Tornado Travel, og få den til kun 30 procent af den officielle billetpris. Og ikke nok med det. Du kan også få dit hotelværelse til 30 procent af prisen. Og billejen? Den får du også med samme solide rabat. Det lyder måske for godt til at være sandt. Og gæt selv. Det er da også ulovligt. - Den her type produkter stammer for d
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
United Kingdom relies on science to revive flagging economy Geoff Pugh/AFP/Getty UK Chancellor Philip Hammond has promised tax-credit incentives to boost private spending on research. The United Kingdom has laid out how it will pour money into research to boost its economy — including cash for artificial intelligence and other high-tech industries — as the country prepares to leave the European Union in 2019. Science does not usually sit at the forefront
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
European Union nations vote to keep using controversial weedkiller glyphosate Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty An activist in Brussels holds a sign that reads: “ We are being deceived on glyphosate’s safety”. The weedkiller was deemed “probably” carcinogenic by the World Health Organization, but key EU safety bodies say it is not. In a long-awaited decision, the European Union has voted to allow for another five years the sale and use of the controversial herbicide glyphosate. Th
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Feed: All Latest
How Bots Broke the FCC's Public Comment System During the Net Neutrality Debate On a single day in late May, hundreds of thousands of public comments poured into the Federal Communications Commission regarding its plans to roll back net neutrality protections . A week and a half later, on June 3, hundreds of thousands more followed. The spikes weren't the voices of pro-net neutrality Americans, worried what will happen if the FCC allows internet service providers to block an
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Microwave-based test method can help keep 3-D chip designers' eyes open IMAGE: These 'eye' diagrams reveal how much noise is present in a digital signal. As the signal grows noisier, its characteristic shape grows distorted, shrinking the center so it resembles an... view more Credit: Y. Obeng and N. Hanacek/NIST Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have invented a new approach to testing multilayered, three-dimensional compu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How having too much or too little of CHRNA7 can lead to neuropsychiatric disorders Studying the genetic code allows researchers to know whether some patients with neuropsychiatric disorders either have extra copies of the CHRNA7 gene or are missing copies. However, little was known about the functional consequences of this genetic imbalance in brain cells. "For several years we have been studying patients with these conditions in different ways and also worked with mouse models
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dyslexia: When spelling problems impair writing acquisition Dyslexia is a learning difficulty which affects the ability to adopt the automatic reflexes needed to read and write. Several studies have sought to identify the source of the problems encountered by individuals with dyslexia when they read. Little attention, however, has been paid to the mechanisms involved in writing. Sonia Kandel, Professor at the GIPSA-Lab of the Université Grenoble Alpes (CN
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ALMA discovers infant stars surprisingly near galaxy's supermassive black hole IMAGE: An ALMA image of the center of the Milky Way galaxy revealing 11 young protostars within about 3 light-years of our galaxy's supermassive black hole. The lines indicate the direction... view more Credit: ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO), Yusef-Zadeh et al.; B. Saxton (NRAO/AUI/NSF) At the center of our galaxy, in the immediate vicinity of its supermassive black hole, is a region wracked by
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Kant, Hume, and the retailer's dilemma If you're wondering how 18th century philosophers could possibly serve to guide 21st century retailers, this paper places their opposing perspectives on ethics in the context of how merchants react to customers who violate company policy or norms of ethical behavior. In "When Ethical Transgression of Customers Have Beneficial Long-Term Effects in Retailing: An Empirical Investigation," Zhao Yan
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Feinstein Institute researchers identify new genes associated with cognitive ability - Investigators at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research discovered dozens of new genetic variations associated with a person's general cognitive ability. The findings, which were published online today in Cell Reports , have the potential to help researchers develop more targeted treatment for cognitive and memory disorders. "For the first time, we were able to use genetic information to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Malaria: Protective antibodies following natural infection No effective vaccine exists to date against the tropical disease malaria. Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have now studied how the human immune system responds to natural infection by the malaria parasite. Analyzing individual immune cells, they discovered that the immune system produces antibodies that are protective against the disease in mice. In addition, long-lived m
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How do cells release IL-1? After 3 decades, now we know Researchers at Boston Children's Hospital have identified, for the first time, the molecule that enables immune cells to release interleukin-1 (IL-1), a key part of our innate immune response to infections. Findings were published online today by the journal Immunity . IL-1, first described in 1984, is the original, highly potent member of a large family of cellular signaling mole
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why do more women have asthma than men? Blame hormones Women are twice as likely as men to have asthma, and this gender difference may be caused by the effects of sex hormones on lung cells. Researchers at Vanderbilt University and Johns Hopkins found that testosterone hindered an immune cell linked to asthma symptoms, such as inflammation and mucus production in the lungs. The study in human cells and rodents appears November 28 in the journal Cell
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Gizmodo
Watch These Toys Get Annihilated During a 120 MPH Crash Test GIF GIF: YouTube If you had access to a crash test facility, whenever you weren’t smashing cars you’d probably be spending all of your free time thinking of other things you could launch at a wall at 120 miles per hour. Like toys, which the good people at Switzerland’s Dynamic Test Center did, and were kind enough to film and share the resulting destruction with the world . Unlike cars, whose occ
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
In populations of microbes, bioengineers find a balance of opposing genomic forces Sergei Maslov is a Professor of Bioengineering and Physics Sergei Maslov of the Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois. Credit: L. Brian Stauffer Sergei Maslov, a professor of bioengineering and physics at the University of Illinois, sees a "universe in a grain of sand." His research seeks to explore that universe by focusing on the genomic diversity of its constituen
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA begins checkout of Dellingr spacecraft designed to improve robustness of CubeSat platforms The Dellingr spacecraft right before its release. NASA specifically developed this spacecraft to provide high-quality science data on a small platform. Credit: Nanoracks/Larry Kepko NASA ground controllers have begun checking out and commissioning a shoebox-sized spacecraft that the agency purposely built to show that CubeSat platforms could be cost-effective, reliable, and capable of gathering h
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Beating heart patch is large enough to repair the human heartEngineers have developed a 'heart patch' that is just as strong and electrically active as healthy adult cardiac tissue and large enough to cover the damage caused by most heart attacks.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Improving urban green spaces increase thermal comfort of citizensThe link between urban green spaces and the thermal comfort sensation of people has been the focus of new research. The results provide significant suggestions to improve thermal comfort of citizens.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dogs mouth-lick to communicate with angry humans Pictured is a dog in the experiment licking its lips when the image of an angry human is shown, suggest that dogs may have a functional understanding of emotional information. Credit: Natalia Albuquerque Animal behaviour researchers in the UK and Brazil have found that dogs lick their mouths as a response to angry human faces, according to new study. Scientists examined the behaviour of dogs in r
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
DIY: Scientists release a how-to for building a smartphone microscope Fig. 1. (a) Slide-launched TIR-guided illumination: elastically scattered photons are blockedby the filter, while fluorescent photons can reach the smartphone camera. (b) Photorealisticcut-out rendering (c) Assembly procedure: inkjet-printed lens attached onto smartphonecamera, smartphone adapter (1) fitted on smartphone, adhesive ring (2) attached to removestray light, color filter attached on a
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New on MIT Technology Review
A Lightweight AI Could Stop Strangers from Spying on Your Smartphone This Robot Picks Up Groceries It’s Never Seen Before Using Its Little Suction Cup A tub of oatmeal, a tube of chips, or a box of teabags—it’s all the same to this warehouse automaton. Developed by Ocado, the world’s largest online-only grocery retailer, the machine has been designed to pick individual items out of big crates of groceries,… Read more A tub of oatmeal, a tube of chips, or a box of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NREL develops switchable solar window Lance Wheeler (front) developed a switchable photovoltaic window along with (from left) Nathan Neale, Robert Tenent, Jeffrey Blackburn, Elisa Miller, and David Moore. Credit: Dennis Schroeder/NREL Thermochromic windows capable of converting sunlight into electricity at a high efficiency have been developed by scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL
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Science | The Guardian
Testosterone could explain why asthma is more common in women than men The puzzle of why asthma is about twice as common in women as men may have been solved, according to researchers who say it might partly be down to testosterone. While boys are about 1.5 times as likely to have asthma as girls, the situation changes with adolescence – a factor that has led scientists to probe whether sex hormones could be behind the trends. To unpick possible mechanisms behind th
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Science : NPR
Does This Robot Freak You Out? Just before Thanksgiving, the Internet lit up with the remarkable video of Boston Dynamics' robot Atlas doing a backflip. It was pretty amazing to see a humanoid-shaped machine doing things that would be hard for most humans. Given all the interest in Atlas, I thought it was a good time to remind everyone about the other non-humanoid robots Boston Dynamics is building. These are the ones that hav
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
ALMA discovers infant stars surprisingly near galaxy's supermassive black hole An ALMA image of the center of the Milky Way galaxy showing the location of 11 young protostars within about 3 light-years of our galaxy's supermassive black hole. The lines indicate the direction of the bipolar lobes created by high-velocity jets from the protostars. The illustrated star in the middle of the image indicates the location of Sagittarius A*, the 4 million solar mass supermassive bl
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dyslexia: When spelling problems impair writing acquisitionDyslexia is a learning difficulty which affects the ability to adopt the automatic reflexes needed to read and write. Several studies have sought to identify the source of the problems encountered by individuals with dyslexia when they read. Little attention, however, has been paid to the mechanisms involved in writing. Researchers have recently looked at the purely motor aspects of writing in chi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How Himalayan rivers influenced ancient Indus civilization settlementsMuch of the Indus civilization developed around an extinct river, challenging ideas about how urbanization in ancient cultures developed, scientists have discovered.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
In populations of microbes, bioengineers find a balance of opposing genomic forcesRecent study examines the dynamics that govern the genomic diversity of microbes by modeling the effects of several different factors on evolution of the genome sequence.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A fear of getting dumped kills romance and commitmentCan the fear of a relationship ending actually lessen love and cause a break-up? If yes, how does it happen? These were the questions that researchers set out to answer. Their research complements what is already known about how obstacles to a romantic relationship affect attraction and commitment towards a partner.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genetic mutation could, if altered, boost flumist vaccine effectiveness, research suggestsA genetic mutation has been discovered in the FluMist intranasal flu vaccine that has the potential to be altered to enhance the vaccine's protective effect.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mixing cultures and nationalities in rugby teams changes the way they playThe cultural identity of rugby players in a team changes the way the team plays, according to a new study. The research shows that a team of players who share the same cultural heritage are more playful and spontaneous and take more risks than a team which has a mix of nationalities.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Winter wheat feasible cover crop for Rolling Plains cottonInterest in using cover crops to improve soil health continues to grow in the Texas Rolling Plains region, but the nagging concern of reductions in soil moisture and effects on yields of subsequent cash crops still exists. A research team is releasing the results of a recent simulation study that builds on field research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Molecular profiling of melanoma tumors explains differences in survival after T cell therapyThe more times metastasized melanoma has mutated and the patient’s immune system has been activated against the tumor – the better the chances of survival after immunotherapy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Largest study of opioid deaths reveals who is at most riskA new study of 13,000 people who died of an opioid overdose found that more than half had been diagnosed with chronic pain; many had psychiatric disorders.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Fractions: Where It All Goes Wrong Many children never master fractions. When asked whether 12/13 + 7/8 was closest to 1, 2, 19, or 21, only 24% of a nationally representative sample of more than 20,000 US 8th graders answered correctly. This test was given almost 40 years ago, which gave Hugo Lortie-Forgues and me hope that the work of innumerable teachers, mathematics coaches, researchers, and government commissions had made a p
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New on MIT Technology Review
Is 3-D Printing Finally Becoming the Manufacturing Tool It Was Hyped Up to Be? Join us on Thursday, November 30, at 2 p.m. EST for an interactive online discussion with Greg Mark, a 3-D-printing entrepreneur and founder and CEO of Markforged. The conversation will look beyond prototyping, exploring 3-D printing’s role in manufacturing and the expanding capabilities of 3-D printing for the factory of the future. Greg Mark, founder and CEO of 3-D printing company Markforged,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
One in two people living with HIV in Europe is diagnosed late The WHO European Region is the only Region worldwide where the number of new HIV infections is rising. With more than 160 000 people newly diagnosed with HIV across the Region, including more than 29 000 new cases from the European Union and European Economic Area (EU/EEA), this trend continued in 2016. One reason for this worrying trend: over half (51%) of the reported HIV diagnoses happen in a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
DIY: Scientists release a how-to for building a smartphone microscope IMAGE: Fig. 1. (a) Slide-launched TIR-guided illumination: elastically scattered photons are blocked by the filter, while fluorescent photons can reach the smartphone camera. (b) Photorealistic cut-out rendering (c) Assembly procedure: inkjet-printed lens attached... view more Credit: University of Houston Add one more thing to the list of tasks your smartphone can perform. University of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NIAID scientists link cases of unexplained anaphylaxis to red meat allergy IMAGE: This is an adult female Lone Star tick climbs on a plant. Bites from the juvenile form of this species, sometimes called seed ticks, are linked to the development of... view more Credit: NIAID While rare, some people experience recurrent episodes of anaphylaxis--a life-threatening allergic reaction that causes symptoms such as the constriction of airways and a dangerous drop in blood
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Quanta Magazine
A Physicist’s Physicist Ponders the Nature of Reality Among the brilliant theorists cloistered in the quiet woodside campus of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, Edward Witten stands out as a kind of high priest. The sole physicist ever to win the Fields Medal , mathematics’ premier prize, Witten is also known for discovering M-theory, the only candidate for a unified physical “ theory of everything .” A genius’s genius, Witt
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Teenage brains 'not wired for high stakes' Image copyright Getty Images Image caption During the teenage years, there are important changes going on inside the brain Brain immaturity during adolescence could explain why some teenagers fail to respond to incentives such as cash rewards. Adults are good at putting maximum mental effort into the things that matter most. But, brain circuits are still developing in teenagers, making it harder
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cognitive science
A new meta-analysis in Psychological Science looks at factors that influence the persistence of false beliefs. A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Atomistic calculations predict that boron incorporation increases the efficiency of LEDsRecent computational work on BInGaN alloys for efficient LEDs in the visible range has brought about some new discoveries, report researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Expression of certain genes may be key to more youthful looking skinSome individuals' skin appears more youthful than their chronologic age. Although many people try to achieve this with creams, lotions, injections, and surgeries, new research indicates that increased expression of certain genes may be the key to intrinsically younger looking -- and younger behaving -- skin.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New way to do metabolic engineeringA novel metabolic engineering method has been created that combines transcriptional activation, transcriptional interference, and gene deletion, and executes them simultaneously, making the process faster and easier.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Trisomy 21: Research breaks new groundDown's syndrome, also known as trisomy 21, is one of the most common genetic diseases. Researchers have recently analyzed the proteins of individuals with trisomy 21 for the first time: the goal was to improve our understanding of how a supernumerary copy of chromosome 21 could affect human development. The research shows that trisomy 21, far from only affecting the proteins encoded by the chromos
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cardiovascular disease: The immune response to heart attacks The damage caused by a heart attack triggers an inflammatory reaction which degrades the affected tissue. This response is orchestrated by immune cells that reside in the nearby pericardial adipose tissue, as a study by a team of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich shows. Following a heart attack, the innate immune system must kick in fast in order to limit the damage and stimulate ti
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dogs mouth-lick to communicate with angry humans Animal behaviour researchers in the UK and Brazil have found that dogs lick their mouths as a response to angry human faces, according to new study. Scientists examined the behaviour of dogs in response to emotionally significant images and sounds, and found that mouth licking in domestic dogs is not simply a response to food or uncertainty, but appears to be used as a signal to try to communicat
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dual virtual reality/treadmill exercises promote brain plasticity in Parkinson's patients A new Tel Aviv University study suggests that a therapy that combines Virtual Reality and treadmill exercise dramatically lowers the incidence of falling among Parkinson's patients by changing the brain's behavior and promoting beneficial brain plasticity, even in patients with neurodegenerative disease. Patients with Parkinson's disease experience gradual neuronal loss, leading to cognitive and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NREL develops switchable solar window Thermochromic windows capable of converting sunlight into electricity at a high efficiency have been developed by scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Relying on such advanced materials as perovskites and single-walled carbon nanotubes, the new technology responds to heat by transforming from transparent to tinted. As the window darkens, it ge
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Gizmodo
Can We Talk About Kickstarter's New Squishy, Podgy Blob? Image: Kickstarter/Gizmodo Kickstarter revealed the Amorphous Blob responsible for eating its old logo eight days ago. Eight! And hardly anybody has noticed. The Globby Thing, dark greenish-blue and oozy, was created by New York design studio Order and type designer Jesse Ragan , and it has perched atop the crowdfunding site for more than a week, seemingly overlooked by Kickstarter’s millions of
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Ars Technica
Report: Nintendo to start offering in-game power-ups via cereal boxes Enlarge / Delicious power-ups for your mouth AND your game. reader comments 50 We very rarely cover news in the exciting world of cereal marketing here at Ars Technica, so we were unaware until recently that cereal news and review blogs like Cerealously even existed. That said, we were intrigued to find the blog reporting a credible rumor that Kellogg's is planning to launch a Super Mario-themed
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers inadvertently boost surface area of nickel nanoparticles for catalysis Researchers from North Carolina State University and the Air Force Research Laboratory have discovered that a technique designed to coat nickel nanoparticles with silica shells actually fragments the material - creating a small core of oxidized nickel surrounded by smaller satellites embedded in a silica shell. The surprising result may prove useful by increasing the surface area of nickel availa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What helps international students to adapt Conscious decision-making and internalized intentions, as opposed to extrinsic influencing factors, are the key to a student's successful adaption to life in a foreign country. This was confirmed by research carried out by a group of scientists which included Ken Sheldon, Academic Supervisor and Head of the International Laboratory of Positive Psychology of Personality and Motivation at the Highe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In populations of microbes, bioengineers find a balance of opposing genomic forces IMAGE: Sergei Maslov is a Professor of Bioengineering and Physics Sergei Maslov of the Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois. view more Credit: L. Brian Stauffer Sergei Maslov, a professor of bioengineering and physics at the University of Illinois, sees a "universe in a grain of sand." His research seeks to explore that universe by focusing on the genomic dive
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Capsule research paves way for simpler C. difficile treatment EDMONTON -- An Alberta-led clinical trial has shown Fecal Microbiota Transplant (FMT) is as effective in treating clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infections whether delivered by colonoscopy or by swallowing capsules. The finding, published Nov. 28 in the Journal of the American Medical Association , could revolutionize and broaden the use of FMT, which restores the healthy balance of bacteri
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Performance-enhancing drugs sold via the Internet are inaccurately labeled Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are an increasingly popular form of appearance- and performance-enhancing drugs that are sold online and sometimes used by bodybuilders, athletes and soldiers. Compared to more commonly used anabolic steroids, SARMs are more selective, making them an attractive target for use in the development of drugs to treat aging and muscle wasting disorders. Ho
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Delaying surgery for hip fracture for more than one day associated with small increased risk of death Bottom Line: Waiting more than 24 hours to undergo hip fracture surgery may be associated with an increased risk of death and complications. Why The Research Is Interesting: Disagreements remain about acceptable delay for surgical repair of hip fracture. Guidelines in the U.S. and Canada recommend surgery within 48 hours. Who and When : 42,230 adults who had hip fracture surgery between April
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Comparison of fecal transplant using capsule vs. colonoscopy to prevent Clostridium difficile infection Why The Research Is Interesting: Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) causes inflammation of the colon and severe diarrhea. The infection occurs when normal gut bacteria are disrupted. Fecal transplants to re-establish normal gut bacteria are the most effective treatment for preventing CDI in people who have already had the infection. Giving the treatment by a pill would save time and cost relat
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More doctors are becoming 'nursing home specialists' PHILADELPHIA--The number of doctors and advance practitioners in the United States who focus on nursing home care rose by more than a third between 2012 and 2015, according to a new study published today in JAMA from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Of all physicians and advance practitioners who do any work in nursing homes, 21 percent now special
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists show how Himalayan rivers influenced ancient Indus civilization settlements The Indus or Harappan Civilisation was a Bronze Age society that developed mainly in the northwestern regions of South Asia from 5300 to 3300 years ago, at about the same time as urban civilisations developed in Mesopotamia and Egypt. Archaeological evidence shows that many of the settlements in the Indus Civilisation developed along the banks of a river called the Ghaggar-Hakra in northwest Indi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quantum-emitting answer might lie in the solution IMAGE: The coupled device between the photonic crystal nanobeam cavity and perovskite nanocrystals, which overlays with the cavity mode profile. The arrows indicate that the excitation and generated signal are coupled... view more Credit: Zhili Yang, University of Maryland WASHINGTON, D.C., Nov. 28, 2017 -- Tapping into the quantum properties of photons for optoelectronics requires highly eff
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Ingeniøren
Spørg Læserne: Hvad koster det, at vinduet står på klem i kulden? Da jeg boede til leje og varme var inkluderet i min husleje, kunne jeg finde på det samme. Men nu, da jeg har en andelslejlighed og selv betaler for varmen, så har jeg fundet ud af, at det er dyrt! Altså ca. 2000.- ekstra om året. Tricket er, at lufte ud uden at nedkøle alt inventaret (møbler osv.) og murene. Det gør man ved at slukke for varmen - åbne vinduerne HELT op i ca. 15 minutter. Lukke v
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Devos: Mobile app coming for federal student aid application The laws of nature are what drive wealth inequality within a given society – unless society takes action to counteract their effect, such as by adopting laws on taxation. The larger the scale, the greater the inequality. ...
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Ars Technica
Google Finance gets redesigned, finally dumps Adobe Flash reader comments 32 The new Google Finance exists as a tab in search. Here's the old Google Finance page, along with the sad "Please turn on Adobe Flash Player" message. You still get relevant news about stocks. And there's still graphs, hopefully without Adobe Flash. The "Your Stocks" section. Google has announced that the Web version of Google Finance is getting a redesign. The new stock-trackin
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Popular Science
Gifts for people who love to go camping (and their, uh, less enthusiastic friends) Car camping is the best. The thrill of sleeping outdoors—the chill in the air at night, the warmth of a fire, the chit-chat around it—is still yours to enjoy, but unlike backpacking, you don’t need to test your physical limits by carrying a ton of gear. By bringing a car to a campsite, you can invest in heavier, more durable supplies that will keep you comfortable. Plus! You can construct a good
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Scientific American Content: Global
Melting Ice Could Mess Up Deep Sea Chemistry Melting glaciers might be making ocean water more acidic, an unexpected finding that's given scientists new cause for concern. A new study published yesterday in the journal Nature Climate Change suggests surprising ways that climate change is drastically altering the water chemistry in deep seas—a process that may happen faster than researchers anticipated. The threat of ocean acidificat
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nationalism from international sports may increase international conflict Example of the final standings from a 1994 Qualification Round in Europe for the World Cup. Credit: Andrew Bertoli Nationalism associated with international sporting events like the World Cup may increase state aggression according to a study published in International Studies Quarterly . "The findings from my research indicate that countries tend to behave more aggressively in international affa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mixing cultures and nationalities in rugby teams changes the way they play Credit: CC0 Public Domain The cultural identity of rugby players in a team changes the way the team plays, according to a new study published in Heliyon . The research shows that the Māori All Blacks, a team of players who share the same cultural heritage, are more playful and spontaneous and take more risks than the Japanese National Team, which has a mix of nationalities. The authors of the stu
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Live Science
The True Story Behind Turkey's Ancient 'Underwater Castle' Last week, a story about a 3,000-year-old castle discovered beneath the waters of Lake Van, in Turkey, went viral. But what's the real story behind this Atlantis-like discovery? It turns out that the story is more complicated and mysterious than recent news reports suggest, Live Science found after speaking with several archaeologists as well as the leader of the photography team who discov
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Live Science
In Photos: Ancient Castle Discovered Beneath Turkey's Lake VanA diving team has discovered the remains of an underwater castle, or fortress, beneath Lake Van in Turkey.
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Gizmodo
Report: Sensitive US Army Intelligence Data Was Stored Online Without a Password Photo: AP A trove of US military data, described by security researchers as being “highly sensitive,” was reportedly unearthed on a publicly accessible Amazon server two months ago. The data apparently lacked even the basic protection offered by a password. The leak, a portion of which is said to have exposed internal data and virtual systems pertaining to “classified communications,” includes ro
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists show how Himalayan rivers influenced ancient Indus civilization settlements Topographic map showing northwestern India and Pakistan, major Himalayan rivers and the distribution of Indus Civilisation urban settlements. Of interest is how the most prominent clusters of Indus urban settlements are not located adjacent to modern active large Himalayan rivers. Credit: P.J. Mason/S. Gupta (Imperial College London) (Data for map courtesy of NASA and U.S. Geological Survey) The
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quantum-emitting answer might lie in the solution The coupled device between the photonic crystal nanobeam cavity and perovskite nanocrystals, which overlays with the cavity mode profile. The arrows indicate that the excitation and generated signal are coupled in and out of the device vertically. Credit: Zhili Yang, University of Maryland Tapping into the quantum properties of photons for optoelectronics requires highly efficient light sources.
7h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
How we're using drones to deliver blood and save lives | Keller RinaudoKeller Rinaudo wants everyone on earth to have access to basic health care, no matter how hard it is to reach them. With his start-up Zipline, he has created the world's first drone delivery system to operate at national scale, transporting blood and plasma to remote clinics in East Africa with a fleet of electric autonomous aircraft. Find out how Rinaudo and his team are working to transform heal
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Latest Headlines | Science News
In the deep ocean, these bacteria play a key role in trapping carbon A mysterious group of microbes may be controlling the fate of carbon in the dark depths of the world’s oceans. Nitrospinae bacteria, which use the nitrogen compound nitrite to “fix” inorganic carbon dioxide into sugars and other compounds for food and reproduction, are responsible for 15 to 45 percent of such carbon fixation in the western North Atlantic Ocean , researchers report in the Nov. 24
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Beating heart patch is large enough to repair the human heart DURHAM, N.C. -- Biomedical engineers at Duke University have created a fully functioning artificial human heart muscle large enough to patch over damage typically seen in patients who have suffered a heart attack. The advance takes a major step toward the end goal of repairing dead heart muscle in human patients. The study appears online in Nature Communications on November 28, 2017. "Right now,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A fear of getting dumped kills romance and commitment Can the fear of a relationship ending actually lessen love and cause a break-up? If yes, how does it happen? These were the questions that Simona Sciara and Giuseppe Pantaleo of the Vita-Salute San Raffaele University in Italy set out to answer in an article published in Springer's journal Motivation and Emotion . Their research complements what is already known about how obstacles to a romantic
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mixing cultures and nationalities in rugby teams changes the way they play London, November 28, 2017 - The cultural identity of rugby players in a team changes the way the team plays, according to a new study published in Heliyon . The research shows that the Māori All Blacks, a team of players who share the same cultural heritage, are more playful and spontaneous and take more risks than the Japanese National Team, which has a mix of nationalities. The authors of the
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nationalism from international sports may increase international conflict IMAGE: This is an example of the final standings from a 1994 Qualification Round in Europe for the World Cup. view more Credit: Andrew Bertoli Nationalism associated with international sporting events like the World Cup may increase state aggression according to a study published in International Studies Quarterly . "The findings from my research indicate that countries tend to behave
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetic mutation could, if altered, boost FluMist vaccine effectiveness, research suggestsResearchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have discovered a genetic mutation in the FluMist intranasal flu vaccine that has the potential to be altered to enhance the vaccine's protective effect.
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Gizmodo
Watch Amputee Monkeys Control Robotic Arms by Changing Brains GIF Image: Balasubramanian et al, Nat. Comm (2017) These days, it’s no surprise to hear about primates controlling a robotic arm with their brains—even paralyzed humans have done it. But how would a brain need to adapt if one of the limbs was missing? New research from scientists at several US universities hooked some rhesus monkeys up to a robot arm-controlling brain-machine interface. All of th
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Ingeniøren
IDA: Ny aftale kan presse ambitioner om flere ingeniørerRegeringen og folketinget er enige om et nyt bevillingssystem, der ifølge IDA kan ende med at presse naturvidenskabelige og tekniske uddannelser økonomisk, hvis de skal opfylde ambitionerne om løbende at uddanne flere.
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The Atlantic
The Surprising Evolution of Dinosaur Drawings Many people visit the fossil hall at Chicago’s Field Museum for the dinosaurs; but a certain kind of art lover goes for the murals. Originally painted by the famed wildlife artist Charles R. Knight in the late 1920s, each of the hall’s 28 murals presents an elegantly composed moment in time: armored squid tossed onto a desolate Ordovician beach, a duel between Tyrannosaurus and Triceratops , sabe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video: How hand sanitizers workAlcohol-based hand sanitizers are the ubiquitous little squeeze-bottle heroes of airports and hospitals, our allies during cold and flu season, and supposedly effective against a huge variety of disease-causing viruses and bacteria. But what's really in hand sanitizers? And is it true that they kill 99.99% of germs, as popular brands claim?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
In the Grand Canyon, people consistently value their recreational timeThe economic value that private boaters of the Grand Canyon assigned to their recreational experience remained relatively stable between 1985 and 2015 when adjusted for inflation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How hand sanitizers work (video) IMAGE: Alcohol-based hand sanitizers are the ubiquitous little squeeze-bottle heroes of airports and hospitals, our allies during cold and flu season, and supposedly effective against a huge variety of disease-causing viruses... view more Credit: The American Chemical Society WASHINGTON, Nov. 28, 2017 -- Alcohol-based hand sanitizers are the ubiquitous little squeeze-bottle heroes of airpor
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Gizmodo
Google Has Figured Out a Way to Detect When Strangers Are Sneaking a Peek at Your Phone Image: Hee Jung Ryu via YouTube With all the data that’s constantly sent and received by our phones, there’s been an ever-increasing focus on combating viruses, malware, and other online attacks, to the point that we sometimes forget what’s going on in the real world. But good physical security is still one of the most important things when it comes to protecting your devices, and thanks to a cou
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Futurity.org
New ‘Big Birds’ in Galápagos arose super fast The process of speciation usually takes a long time. But for a new species of Darwin’s finches, it happened in just two generations. And scientists were able to watch. The new lineage that lives in the Galápagos archipelago comes from the hybridization of two different species of Darwin’s finches. Darwin’s finches provide an iconic model for the evolution of biodiversity on Earth due to natural s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new way to do metabolic engineering Professor Huimin Zhao, Steven L. Miller Chair of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, of the Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois. Credit: L. Brian Stauffer A novel method developed by a group of researchers at the Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology (IGB) at the University of Illinois could change the way metabolic engineering is done. Researchers from th
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Scientific American Content: Global
Scarlet Fever, a Disease of Yore, is Making a Comeback Scarlet fever, a disease that struck fear into the heart of parents when cases surged in the days of yore, appears to be making an unexpected and puzzling comeback in parts of the world. England and Wales have seen a substantial rise in scarlet fever cases starting in 2014. The number of cases tripled from 2013 and continued to increase in 2015 and 2016, with England and Wales last year rec
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Complications at birth associated with lasting chemical changes in the brainNew research shows that adults born prematurely -- who also suffered small brain injuries around the time of birth - have lower levels of dopamine in the brain.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Opioid antidote naloxone: Gaps in knowledgeA new systematic review of evidence by clinicians and researchers reveals important gaps in knowledge about the safety and effectiveness of widespread off-label use of naloxone among patients, families, friends and emergency responders. Naloxone rapidly reverses the effects of opioid overdose.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Reimagining autonomy in reproductive medicineA new report examines what 'just reproduction' looks like in light of increasingly complex and costly reproductive technologies and other factors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
In harm's way: About half of hydraulically fractured wells exist within 2 to 3 kilometers of domestic groundwater systemsAbout half of hydraulically fractured wells exist within 2 to 3 kilometers of domestic groundwater systems, warn researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mycobacteria can sense presence of proteins that cause disease, new study findsA new study could help researchers identify how to tone down the ability of mycobacteria to cause disease and help them in treating infection.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mothers of teens with autism report higher levels of stress, but optimism can be a bufferResearchers found that mothers of teenagers with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or intellectual disability (ID) reported higher levels of stress and other negative psychological symptoms -- think depression or anxiety -- than mothers of teenagers with typical development (TD). Those levels climbed even higher when teenagers with ASD or ID also showed signs of clinical-level disruptive behavior dis
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
When physics gives evolution a leg up by breaking oneWith no biological program to drive it, nascent multicellular clusters adopt a lifecycle thanks to the physics of their stresses. The accidental reproduction drives them to evolve as multicellular life.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
US companies are investing less in scienceA new article reveals that large corporations are investing less in science. From 1980 to 2006, publications by company scientists have declined in a range of industries. The result holds across a range of industries.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new way to do metabolic engineering IMAGE: This is professor Huimin Zhao, Steven L. Miller Chair of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, of the Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois. view more Credit: L. Brian Stauffer A novel method developed by a group of researchers at the Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology (IGB) at the University of Illinois could change the way metabolic engineeri
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quantum systems correct themselves An international team of researchers from Innsbruck, Harvard, Copenhagen and Waterloo put forward a new method to protect quantum information stored in trapped ions. In their new proposal, the authors use dissipation (i.e. the interaction of a quantum system with its environment) to correct quantum states. Dissipation is typically considered harmful, but as demonstrated by Florentin Reiter and co
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers combine EEG and MRI to find improved ways of understanding ALS Our brains function by electrical and chemical signalling. Recording brain wave patterns can be very helpful in conditions like epilepsy, but the potential of this inexpensive and easily applied technology has not been fully recognised. Researchers in the Academic Unit of Neurology at Trinity College Dublin in Ireland have been studying brain wave patterns in the neurodegenerative condition amyot
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gastric cancer: A new strategy used by Helicobacter pylori to target mitochondria IMAGE: Gastric tissue infected by H. pylori . Nuclei are in blue (Hoechst) and mitochondria in red (Mitotracker labelling). view more Credit: © Laurent Chatre - CNRS/Institut Pasteur Helicobacter pylori is a bacterial pathogen that colonizes the stomach of approximately half of the world's population. Infection with H. pylori is acquired in childhood and lasts for decades. H. pylori is the ma
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Gizmodo
Clear Your Driveway With Ease With These Huge Snow Thrower Discounts GreenWorks Snow Thrower Sale | $92 | Amazon Winter will be here before you know it, if it hasn’t arrived in your corner of the country already, but you can fight back with a well-reviewed GreenWorks snow thrower from this one-day Amazon sale. There are two corded models available, and the only real difference between them seems to be that one model has built-in headlights to help you clear a path
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New Scientist - News
Hey, Flat Earther, no need to launch a rocket to test your ideas Rocket man: Mike Hughes Paul Buck/EPA-EFE/REX/Shutterstock Could 2000 years of belief be wrong? Are we in fact living on a disc rather than a globe? One believer from the Flat Earth Society is determined to find out. Mike Hughes is aiming to launch his own steam-powered rocket in California to see for himself if the Earth is flat . For the last 50 years, we’ve been able to view pictures of ou
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New Scientist - News
NHS turns to ethical hackers to defend it from malicious attacks Is it secret? Is it safe? DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/Getty By Chris Baraniuk THE UK’s National Health Service on Monday announced a £20m project to improve cyber-security across its trusts, with the help of a newly created central Security Operations Centre. To monitor for potential threats, the Centre will probe the integrity of in-house systems through “ethical hacking”. This is the practice of
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New Scientist - News
Madagascar’s lemurs close to extinction after population crash Ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) Santiago Urquijo/Getty By Andy Coghlan Cute they may be, but ring-tailed lemurs are in deep trouble in Madagascar, according to a report listing the world’s 25 most endangered primates. According to rough estimates two decades ago, ring-tailed lemurs once numbered “several hundred thousand” throughout the island. But according to a recent census included in th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
IU-based startup launches high-tech system for virtual, augmented reality developers The cy.PIPES system could help virtual reality/augmented reality developers synchronize tools that create environmental conditions like heat or wind. CyUtil LLC, a startup launched by Chauncey Frend of IU's Advanced Visualization Lab, is commercializing the system. Credit: Indiana University A high-tech startup founded by an Indiana University information technology programmer/analyst allows deve
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
African business schools must change tack to combat corruption Business schools in Africa must equip future business leaders with political skills, if business education is to play a significant role in combating systemic corruption, says research from the University of Bath. Dr Tahiru Azaaviele Liedong, Assistant Professor of Strategy in the School of Management, says that business schools cannot solely rely on developing an individual's ethical outlook to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How much should a victim be compensated for emotional suffering? If a company sends one of its workers to a crime-ridden neighborhood to repair a leaking roof and the worker is held up by gunpoint, has his wallet stolen and is so terrified that he can't return to work, how much should that crime victim receive for his emotional suffering? If the worker had no money in his wallet when it was stolen, chances are people would say he deserves a lot more financial
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Atomistic calculations predict that boron incorporation increases the efficiency of LEDs Crystal structure of a BInGaN alloy. Credit: Michael Waters and Logan Williams High-power white LEDs face the same problem that Michigan Stadium faces on game day—too many people in too small of a space. Of course, there are no people inside of an LED. But there are many electrons that need to avoid each other and minimize their collisions to keep the LED efficiency high. Using predictive atomist
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New on MIT Technology Review
The U.K. Is Clamping Down on Drones This Robot Picks Up Unseen Groceries Using Its Little Suction Cup A tub of oatmeal, a tube of chips, or a box of teabags—it’s all the same to this warehouse robot. Developed by Ocado, the world’s largest online-only grocery retailer, the machine has been designed to pick individual items out of big crates of groceries,… Read more A tub of oatmeal, a tube of chips, or a box of teabags—it’s all the
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Futurity.org
‘Harmless’ fungicides may actually hurt bumblebees Commonly thought to have no impact on insects, fungicides—particularly chlorothalonil, a general-use fungicide often found in bumblebee and honeybee hives—may negatively affect bee health, researchers report. “…fungicides may not be quite as benign—toward bumblebees—as we once thought…” The researchers analyzed two dozen environmental factors to understand bumblebee population declines and range
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Molecular profiling of melanoma tumours explains survival differences after T cell therapy The more times metastasised melanoma has mutated and the patient's immune system has been activated against the tumour - the better the chances of survival after immunotherapy. This is what emerges from a research collaboration between Lund University in Sweden and Herlev university hospital in Denmark. The findings are now published in the scientific journal Nature Communications . Using the b
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Trisomy 21: Research breaks new ground Down's syndrome, also known as trisomy 21, is one of the most common genetic diseases. Researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and ETH Zurich (ETHZ), Switzerland, have recently analysed the proteins of individuals with trisomy 21 for the first time: the goal was to improve our understanding of how a supernumerary copy of chromosome 21 could affect human development. Published in the jou
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Comparison of the health determinants of the people in the greater mekong subregion (GMS) The health of the population and the health service system are influenced by many factors, known as health determinants. Dahlgren and Whitehead's (1992) model of the determinants of health describe the conditions that function within the individual and in society. Thus, understanding the determinants of the health service system and the health status of the people is essential in order to develop
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The land of the Vega Granada area subsides up to one centimeter per year as a result of the drought IMAGE: This is a map overlapping decreases in the phreatic level, land deformation and clay percentage in the area. view more Credit: University of Granada The University of Granada (UGR) and the Geological Survey of Spain have proven, thanks to an analysis of the variations of the ground (subsidences and elevations), that the Vega de Granada area (Granada basin, SE Spain) sinks up to one c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NUS researchers achieve significant breakthrough in topological insulator based devices IMAGE: Figure: (a) Schematic diagram illustrating the Dirac cone of topological insulator and spin-momentum locking. (b) Topological insulator/ferromagnet (Bi2Se3/NiFe) spin-orbit torque devices. (c-e) Magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE) images of highly efficient... view more Credit: National University of Singapore The current induced magnetisation switching by spin-orbit torque (SOT) is
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
6% of cancers are attributable to diabetes and high BMIDiabetes and high BMI (a BMI over 25 kg/m2) were the cause of 5.6% of new cancer cases worldwide in 2012 - equivalent to 792600 cases, according to the first study to quantify the proportion of cancers attributable to diabetes and high BMI. When considered individually, 544300 cases of cases were attributable to high BMI (equivalent to 3.9% of all cancers), and 280100 were attributable to diabetes
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
This 'sweet spot' could improve Melanoma diagnosisToo much, too little, just right. It might seem like a line from 'Goldilocks and the Three Bears,' but actually describes an important finding that will enhance computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) of melanoma. Thanks to a new algorithm -- which can be used in mobile apps that are being developed to diagnose suspicious moles -- researchers were able to determine the 'sweet spot' in classifying images o
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Biology, chemistry combine to generate new antibioticsCombining the innovations of synthetic biology with biology and chemistry, a team of scientists has generated a brand-new platform that will allow the production of desperately needed brand-new antibiotics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Severity of post-operative delirium relates to severity of cognitive declineThere is increasing evidence that the level of delirium in post-surgical patients is associated with the level of later cognitive decline in those same patients.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pay-for-performance fails to performThe first large Medicare pay-for-performance program for doctors and medical practices, which ran between 2013 and 2016, failed to deliver on its central promise to increase value of care for patients. The program may have also exacerbated health disparities by inadvertently shifting payments from physicians caring for sicker, poorer patients to those caring for healthier, richer ones. Important s
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Increased oral pathogens, decreased bacterial diversity predict precancerous stomach cancer lesionsElevated pathogen colonization and a lack of bacterial diversity in the mouth were identified in people with precancerous lesions that could precede stomach cancer, finds a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Link between immune function, osteoarthritic pain and progressionMonocytes, the white blood cells necessary to regulate immune responses, were more activated and pro-inflammatory in women with osteoarthritis, and that elevated inflammation and body mass index were associated with this increased activation, report investigators.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Winter wheat feasible cover crop for Rolling Plains cotton Interest in using cover crops to improve soil health continues to grow in the Texas Rolling Plains region, but the nagging concern of reductions in soil moisture and effects on yields of subsequent cash crops still exists. A Texas A&M AgriLife Research-led team is releasing the results of a recent simulation study that builds on field research in the December issue of Transactions of the American
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Gizmodo
Watch a Blacksmith Turn Old Batteries Into a Beautifully-Detailed Knife GIF If you don’t have access to a proper recycling facility, a talented blacksmith who goes by shurap on YouTube has found another way to recycle old batteries by turning them into a gorgeous Damascus-steel knife that also uses a recycled Maglite flashlight for its handle. A word of caution, however. When foraging for metal inside old batteries [Editor’s note: Don’t.] it might not be a bad idea t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Crossing drones with satellites—ESA eyes high-altitude aerial platforms Thales Alenia Space’s Stratobus is topped with solar panels, powering its propellers to fly against the wind at 20 km for prolonged periods of service, able to carry payloads of up to 250 kg. Credit: Thales Alenia Space/Briot ESA is considering extending its activities to a new region of the sky via a novel type of aerial vehicle, a 'missing link' between drones and satellites. High Altitude Pseu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Should we fear the rise of drone assassins? Two experts debate Credit: shutterstock A new short film from the Campaign Against Killer Robots warns of a future where weaponised flying drones target and assassinate certain members of the public, using facial recognition technology to identify them. Is this a realistic threat that could rightly spur an effective ban on the technology? Or is it an overblown portrayal designed to scare governments into taking sim
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quantum systems correct themselvesQuantum devices allow us to accomplish computing and sensing tasks that go beyond the capabilities of their classical counterparts. However, protecting quantum information from being corrupted by errors is difficult.
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Live Science
Oddly Behaving Blobs Beneath Earth's Surface Finally Explained Ultralow-Velocity Zones can give rise to volcanic hotspots, like Wyoming's Yellowstone National Park. Credit: Shutterstock/SL-Photography The boundary between the Earth's outermost layer, the crust, and the underlying mantle is speckled with mysterious, blob-like regions. Scientists have long known about these odd pockets, which are called ultralow-velocity zones. They slow down the seismic wav
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A horse is a horse, of course, of course -- except when it isn'tScientists have discovered a previously unrecognized genus of extinct horses that roamed North America during the last ice age. The new findings are based on an analysis of ancient DNA from fossils of the enigmatic 'New World stilt-legged horse' excavated from sites such as Natural Trap Cave in Wyoming, Gypsum Cave in Nevada, and the Klondike goldfields of Canada's Yukon Territory.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula reveals a cryptic methane-fueled ecosystem in flooded cavesIn the underground rivers and flooded caves of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, where Mayan lore described a fantastical underworld, scientists have found a cryptic world in its own right.
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Futurity.org
Why young men have sex they don’t actually want Heterosexual men have unwanted sex with women for two reasons, interviews with 39 college men suggest: in order to conform to gender expectations and to avoid uncomfortable interactions. “Although women experience a higher burden of sexual assault and harassment, heterosexual men also report unwanted sex,” says study author Jessie Ford, a doctoral candidate in New York University’s sociology depa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
African business schools must change tack to combat corruption Business schools in Africa must equip future business leaders with political skills, if business education is to play a significant role in combating systemic corruption, says research from the University of Bath. Dr Tahiru Azaaviele Liedong, Assistant Professor of Strategy in the School of Management, says that business schools cannot solely rely on developing an individual's ethical outlook to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How much should a victim be compensated for emotional suffering? If a company sends one of its workers to a crime-ridden neighborhood to repair a leaking roof and the worker is held up by gunpoint, has his wallet stolen and is so terrified that he can't return to work, how much should that crime victim receive for his emotional suffering? If the worker had no money in his wallet when it was stolen, chances are people would say he deserves a lot more financial
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Expression of certain genes may be key to more youthful looking skin IMAGE: This is the lead author Alexa B. Kimball, MD, MPH, a dermatologist and President and CEO of Harvard Medical Faculty Physicians at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. view more Credit: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center BOSTON - Some individuals' skin appears more youthful than their chronologic age. Although many people try to achieve this with creams, lotions, injections, and surg
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Critical link between obesity and diabetes has been identified IMAGE: Dr. Philip Shaul and Dr. Chieko Mineo lead a team that discovered a major mechanism by which obesity causes type 2 diabetes. view more Credit: UT Southwestern DALLAS - Nov. 28, 2017 - UT Southwestern researchers have identified a major mechanism by which obesity causes type 2 diabetes, which is a common complication of being overweight that afflicts more than 30 million Americans and o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
AgriLife Research study: Winter wheat feasible cover crop for Rolling Plains cotton VERNON - Interest in using cover crops to improve soil health continues to grow in the Texas Rolling Plains region, but the nagging concern of reductions in soil moisture and effects on yields of subsequent cash crops still exists. A Texas A&M AgriLife Research-led team is releasing the results of a recent simulation study that builds on field research in the December issue of Transactions of the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Key component for quantum computing invented A team at the University of Sydney and Microsoft, in collaboration with Stanford University in the US, has miniaturised a component that is essential for the scale-up of quantum computing. The work constitutes the first practical application of a new phase of matter, first discovered in 2006, the so-called topological insulators . Beyond the familiar phases of matter - solid, liquid, or gas - top
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Atomistic calculations predict that boron incorporation increases the efficiency of LEDs IMAGE: This is the crystal structure of a BInGaN alloy. Using atomistic calculations and high-performance supercomputers at the NERSC facility, Logan Williams and Emmanouil Kioupakis at the University of Michigan predicted... view more Credit: Michael Waters and Logan Williams High-power white LEDs face the same problem that Michigan Stadium faces on game day -- too many people in too small
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Taming charybdis: Controlling a vortex using polymers IMAGE: Researchers used a 3-D printer to create a glass microfluidic device to generate vortices. view more Credit: Photo: Simon Haward. A vortex in the atmosphere can churn with enough power to create a typhoon. But more subtle vortices form constantly in nature. Many of them are too small to be seen with the naked eye. When simple, or "Newtonian," fluids (like water) flow very f
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Clean sweep for agriculture IMAGE: The Field Scanalyzer's digital array of cameras, laser scanners and sensors provide continuous data on performances of experimental crops view more Credit: Rothamsted Research Achim Doberman , Director and Chief Executive of Rothamsted Research, welcomed the white paper's focus on agriculture, and called for concerted action now so that UK can see the benefits of "Clean Growth" o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Keeping score of 'friends' on Facebook and Instagram may be harmful to your health Who needs ‘friends’? Credit: Ditty_about_summer/Shutterstock.com Ever felt like your peers have more pals than you do? These days, with the rise of social media apps like Facebook and Instagram, it is easier than ever to benchmark the number of "friends" you have against your peers. So, if you find yourself wondering how your social networks compare with other people's, our latest research, pub
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Parole violations are driving prison's revolving door Rapper Meek Mill is back in prison in Pennsylvania for violating the terms of his probation. According to officials, Mill left the state without permission, did not meet with his probation officer, tested positive for Percocet, failed to complete community service and got into a fight at an airport. Mill's case has drawn new attention to how probation and parole violations contribute to extreme
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
High-performance computing cuts particle collision data prep time This animation shows a series of collision events at STAR, each with thousands of particle tracks and the signals registered as some of those particles strike various detector components. It should give you an idea of how complex the challenge is to reconstruct a complete record of every single particle and the conditions under which it was created so scientists can compare hundreds of millions o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study of attitudes on digital disruption yields reform call Experts say social media platforms need to be more involved in content moderation and to work on better complaints reporting. Credit: Rami Al-Zayat/Unsplash Most Australians are concerned about their privacy online and are worried about privacy violations by corporations, according a new University of Sydney report. Nearly half of the respondents to a major survey are also concerned about governm
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Key component to scale up quantum computing Lead author of the study, PhD candidate Alice Mahoney, in the quantum science laboratories at the Sydney Nanoscience Hub. Credit: University of Sydney A team at the University of Sydney and Microsoft, in collaboration with Stanford University in the US, has miniaturised a component that is essential for the scale-up of quantum computing. The work constitutes the first practical application of a n
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Dagens Medicin
Erfaringer fra meningitis-dødsfald skal bruges til læring Region Hovedstaden og Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed har drøftet de handleplaner, regionen er ved at iværksætte efter tre meningitis-dødsfald inden for de senere år. Styrelsen håber, at regionens læringsindsats også kan bidrage på nationalt plan til at forbedre bl.a. visitationen af patienter med symptomer på meningitis.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Neutrophil-inspired propulsion Inspired by white blood cells rolling on endovascular walls before transmigrating to the disease site, scientists at ETH Zurich have succeeded in getting particles to move along the walls of microscopic, three-dimensional vessels. This method could be used in targeted cancer therapeutics. When white blood cells are summoned to combat invasive bacteria, they move along blood vessels in a specific
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers transform tomatoes into fluorescent carbon dots Researchers transform fresh tomatoes into three types of carbon nanoparticles. Credit: Liu et al. ©2017 IOP Publishing (Phys.org)—Researchers have shown that tomato pulp dissolved in water can eventually be turned into a powder of nanoparticles containing carbon dots with diameters of less than 5 nm. Like all carbon dots, one of the main characteristics of the tomato-sourced carbon dots is an int
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Gizmodo
YouTube's Creepy Kid Problem Was Worse Than We Thought Image: YouTube / Pexels / Gizmodo YouTube says that it’s removed ads from some 2 million videos and over 50,000 channels that featured disturbing content aimed at kids. Some of that content actually exploited children in videos . And while we’ve long known that YouTube struggles to keep bad stuff off of its platform, the fact that tens of thousands of channels involved doing bad things to childre
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Ingeniøren
Nyt studie: Luftforurening fra NO2 har toppet i EuropaEt engelsk studie har undersøgt indholdet af kvælstofdioxid i trafikken rundt om i Europa. Alt tyder på, at den sundhedsskadelige forurening har toppet, og at udviklingen kan være nedadgående.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astronomers discover 21 changing-look active galactic nuclei An example of the light curves (left panel), and spectra (right panel) of a new CL AGN J0831+3646. Credit: Yang et al., 2017. (Phys.org)—A group of astronomers led by Qian Yang of the Peking University in Beijing, China, has detected 21 active galactic nuclei (AGN) of a rare type known as changing-look AGNs. The finding, reported November 22 in a paper published on arXiv.org, doubles the number o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Abbreviated breast MRI may be additional screening option for dense breasts CHICAGO -- Among women with dense breast tissue, for whom traditional mammograms are less effective at detecting cancer, who request additional screening after a negative mammogram, abbreviated breast MRI (AB-MR) may be a valuable cancer detection tool. In a study of 195 asymptomatic women with dense breast tissue who had a negative mammogram within the previous 11 months, AB-MR detected five add
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
This 'sweet spot' could improve Melanoma diagnosis IMAGE: Confusion matrix, with true (and false) positives and negatives (as well as usual artifacts, e.g., hair). view more Credit: Florida Atlantic University Too much, too little, just right. It might seem like a line from "Goldilocks and the Three Bears," but actually describes an important finding from researchers in Florida Atlantic University's College of Engineering and Computer Sci
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pay-for-performance fails to perform A prototype Medicare program designed to improve value of care by paying more to physicians who perform better on measures of health care quality and spending has failed to deliver on its central promise and, in the process, likely exacerbated disparities in health care delivery, according to findings of a study published Nov. 27 in Annals of Internal Medicine . The Value-Based Payment Modifier p
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Severity of post-operative delirium relates to severity of cognitive decline BOSTON--Researchers from the Harvard affiliated Hebrew SeniorLife Institute for Aging Research (IFAR), in collaboration with scientists from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), Harvard Medical School (HMS), and Brown University, have found increasing evidence that the level of delirium in post-surgical patients is associated with the level of later cognitive decline in those same patien
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Ingeniøren
Facebook-aktivist starter NGO til at håndhæve privacylove med massesøgsmål Den østrigske privacy-aktivist Max Schrems har grundlagt en organisation, der vil bruge civile søgsmål til at håndhæve EU’s dataregler. Organisationen Noyb bliver i dag præsenteret på pressemøder i Wien og Bruselles. Samtidig har organisationen lanceret en crowdfunding-kampagne, der satser på at finde medlemmer, som årligt kan bidrage med mindst 250.000 euro og helst 500.000 euro inden udgangen a
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Ingeniøren
Unge forskere opfinder mikrochip til at måle gasmolekyler i væske To unge forskere fra DTU har udviklet en mikrochip, der gør det muligt at måle på indholdet af gasmolekyler i væske. Sammen med energiselskabet E.ON skal teknologien anvendes til at digitalisere biogasproduktion, men opfindelsen har også stort et potentiale inden for batterier og katalyse, lyder det fra iværksætterne. For at kunne identificere indholdet af gasser som brint eller ilt i en væske, a
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Dagens Medicin
Læger efterlyser præcise regler for journalføring I kølvandet på Svendborg-sagen er der opstået usikkerhed om, hvad der skal journalføres. Lægeforeningen opfordrer sundhedsministeren til at sikre mere enkle og præcise regler.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Burning chilli will keep elephants at bay, new study finds Credit: University of Stirling Burning chillies can deter elephants from ravaging crops in African and Asian communities, according to a new study involving a University of Stirling researcher. Crop foraging by elephants can destroy a year's supply of food in just one night and, as a result, many of the highly endangered animals are killed in retaliation on a daily basis. It is the main source of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Merkel raps farm minister over EU weedkiller vote German Chancellor Angela Merkel on Tuesday rapped her agriculture minister for violating the government line by voting in favour of approving a controversial weedkiller at a key EU meeting, angering allies. The European Union on Monday renewed the licence for the weedkiller glyphosate for five years after Germany surprisingly voted in favour despite environmental concerns . Agriculture Minister C
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Ars Technica
The second launch from Russia’s new spaceport has failed Enlarge / A Soyuz 2.1b rocket booster with a Frigate upper stage block, the Meteor-M 2-1 meteorological satellite and 18 small satellites launched from the Vostochny Cosmodrome. Yuri Smityuk/TASS reader comments 0 On Tuesday morning, a Russian Soyuz 2.1b rocket lifted off on schedule from a new spaceport, carrying the the Meteor M2-1 weather and climate satellite, as well as more than a dozen sec
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Gizmodo
More Details on Kate Winslet's Mysterious Avatar 2 Character James Franco confirms his involvement in the Multiple Man movie. Get a look at the stars of Avengers: Infinity War . Daredevil casts a major supporting character for the next season. Plus, see Lennie James’ arrival on Fear the Walking Dead , more pictures from Agents of SHIELD ’s return, and a tease for the Doctor Who Christmas special. Spoilers! Avatar 2-5 In a recent interview with Vanity Fair
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Dagens Medicin
Regionerne skal betale efteruddannelse til habilitetstruede lægerRegionerne skal påtage sig udgiften til efteruddannelse for de læger, der har ansvarsområder eller deltagelse i råd og nævn, hvor habilitet er afgørende.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Easily synthesized compound found to be useful for removing fluoride and metal ions from drinking water Credit: ACS (Phys.org)—A pair of researchers at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Kolkata has found that an easily synthesized compound can be used to remove fluoride and metal ions from drinking water. In their paper published in the journal ACS Omega , Tanmay Das and Debasish Haldar describe how the compound was synthesized and how well it performed under various testing re
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New weather radar technology can spot hailstones lurking in thunderstorms UQ mobile radar deployed for thunderstorm monitoring. Credit: Kathryn Turner An Australian spring wouldn't be complete without thunderstorms and a visit to the Australian Bureau of Meteorology's weather radar website. But a new type of radar technology is aiming to make weather radar even more useful, by helping to identify those storms that are packing hailstones. Most storms just bring rain, li
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Feed: All Latest
The Facilities Where Scientists Breed Plants to Survive the Future Imagine a world without grapes. Someday greenhouses like the one above may be our last defense against such a fate. Beneath the glow of high-voltage lamps, dozens of crop samples grow at the Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, New York. Here, Cornell University scientists crossbreed domesticated crops with their wild ancestors to propagate superhardy strains that better withstand droughts,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Denying patient requests lowers physician ratings Patients who ask for specialist referrals, laboratory tests or certain medications and don't get them tend to be less satisfied with their doctors than those whose requests are fulfilled, new research from UC Davis Health shows. Based on the results, published today in JAMA Internal Medicine , the study authors recommend communications training for physicians that fosters positive experiences for
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Analysis of ancient DNA reveals a previously unrecognized genus of extinct horses that once roamed North America This illustration depicts a family of stilt-legged horses ( Haringtonhippus francisci ) in Yukon, Canada, during the last ice age. Credit: Jorge Blanco An international team of researchers has discovered a previously unrecognized genus of extinct horses that roamed North America during the last ice age. The new findings, published November 28 in the journal eLife , are based on an analysis of anc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
On the wings of Lepidoptera Credit: University of Manitoba The Shirley Richardson Butterfly Garden at Assiniboine Park is testament to our fascination with the colourful insects that bring delight to so many. The beautiful patterns and pleasing textures of their wings attract not only park visitors but also play a role in butterflies' own mating and courting rituals, and warn predators of a foul taste should they partake of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why some people see 'dumpster diving' as the ethical way to eat One person’s trash is another person’s breakfast. Credit: Sascha Kohlmann/Wikimedia Commons Each year, Australian households throw out some A$8 billion worth of edible food , with those aged 18 to 24 reported as the biggest wasters. However, this household figure is likely far outweighed by the value of food waste generated by commercial retailers. In truth, our youth are but one contributor to w
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers achieve significant breakthrough in topological insulator-based devices for modern spintronic applications Figure: (a) Schematic diagram illustrating the Dirac cone of topological insulator and spin-momentum locking. (b) Topological insulator/ferromagnet (Bi2Se3/NiFe) spin-orbit torque devices. (c-e) Magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE) images of highly efficient spin-orbit torque driven magnetization switching in Bi2Se3/NiFe by a pulsed current at room temperature and zero assistive magnetic field. Credi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Controlling a vortex using polymers Vortices measured in a simple Newtonian fluid (left), and in the same fluid but with just one part-per-million of added polymer (right). The color bar indicates the strength of the vortex. Credit: Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology A vortex in the atmosphere can churn with enough power to create a typhoon. But more subtle vortices form constantly in nature. Many of them are too small to
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Futurity.org
Schizophrenia may start in the womb Schizophrenia likely begins very early in development, toward the end of the first trimester of pregnancy, new research suggests. “This disease has been mischaracterized for 4,000 years…” The finding opens up a new understanding of this devastating disease and the potential for new treatment possibilities in utero. “This disease has been mischaracterized for 4,000 years,” says Michal K. Stachowia
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Ingeniøren
Kinesere anklaget for hackerangreb på Siemens Anklagere i USA har rejst tiltale mod tre kinesiske statsborgere for at have skaffet sig ulovlig adgang til følsomme data og forretningshemmeligheder fra de tre virksomheder Siemens AG, Trimble Inc og Moody’s Analytics. Mellem 2011 og 2017 har Wu Yingzhuo, Dong Hao, og Xia Lei fra cybersikkerhedsfirmaet 'Guangzhou Bo Yu Information Technology Company' - også kaldet Boyusec - ifølge anklagen udfør
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astronomers create most detailed radio image of nearby dwarf galaxy The Small Magellanic Cloud. Credit: Australian National University Astronomers at ANU have created the most detailed radio image of nearby dwarf galaxy, the Small Magellanic Cloud, revealing secrets of how it formed and how it is likely to evolve. This image was taken by CSIRO's powerful new radio telescope, the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP), and its innovative radio camera
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fifty years ago, Jocelyn Bell discovered pulsars and changed our view of the universe CSIRO Parkes radio telescope has discovered around half of all known pulsars. Credit: Wayne England, Author provided A pulsar is a small, spinning star – a giant ball of neutrons, left behind after a normal star has died in a fiery explosion. With a diameter of only 30 km, the star spins up to hundreds of times a second, while sending out a beam of radio waves (and sometimes other radiation, such
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study of European historical data suggests proportion of NO2 in NOx emissions smaller than thought Credit: CC0 Public Domain (Phys.org)—A team of researchers at the University of York in the U.K. has found that the proportion of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in nitrogen oxides in European traffic emissions is smaller than has been thought. In their paper published in the journal Nature Geoscience , the group describes analyzing data from roadside monitors over the course of many years and what they f
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Live Science
2,000-Year-Old Killer Whale Geoglyph Found in Peru Desert Archaeologists rediscovered a giant geoglyph of a killer whale, etched into a desert hillside in the remote Palpa region of southern Peru, after it had been lost to science for more than 50 years. The 230-foot-long (70 meters) figure of an orca — considered a powerful, semimythical creature in ancient Peruvian lore — may be more than 2,000 years old, according to the researchers. They s
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Live Science
In Photos: Ancient Killer Whale Geoglyph in Peru A rediscovery Credit: Johny Isla Popular regions Credit: Johny Isla/Markus Reindel/Andean Past Take a close look Credit: Johny Isla Time and nature Credit: Johny Isla Restoration in progress Credit: Johny Isla An ancient piece Credit: Johny Isla Bits and parts Credit: Johny Isla/Markus Reindel/Andean Past Several discoveries Credit: Johny Isla/Ministerio de Cultura del Perú/German Archaeological
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Futurity.org
These common chemicals stunt tadpoles A series of synthetic chemicals in household products, food packaging, and clothing has a significant effect on the development of frogs, even at low doses, report researchers. Per/polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are human-made chemicals for making products stain resistant, waterproof, and nonstick, and are present in foams used to fight fires. A US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (
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Ingeniøren
Forskere forbedrer WiFi-signal med sølvpapirshat Hvis dit WiFi fordeler sig helt forkert i hjemmet er der måske håb endnu. Forskere har ved hjælp af en 3D-printer, en rulle sølvpapir og en nyudviklet algoritme fremstillet reflektorer, der er tilpasset det enkelte hjem. Med disse 'sølvpapirshatte' i hånden – eller på routeren – er tanken, at WiFi-signalet ikke længere skal række ud på vejen og ind til naboerne, men i stedet kan koncentreres om a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Agrophotovoltaics increases land use efficiency by over 60 percent The first grain harvest of the APV system being gathered. Credit: Hofgemeinschaft Heggelbach / Olivia Schmid Until now, acreage was designated for either photovoltaics or photosynthesis, that is, to generate electricity or grow crops. An agrophotovoltaics (APV) pilot project near Lake Constance, however, has now demonstrated that both uses are compatible. Dual use of land is resource efficient, r
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How insights into 'supercritical fluids' could help us understand the interior of the giant gas planets Jupiter seen by Juno. Credit: Justin Cowart/Flickr, CC BY-SA The temperature and pressure inside Jupiter range from about -100°C near the edge to about 15,000°C and 50m times the Earth's atmospheric pressure in the middle. Saturn, Uranus and Neptune are similar pressure cookers. As we descend into Jupiter, we may see matter in the gas state, in the liquid state and in another, less well-known sta
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dogs get the Hollywood treatment to make animal animations more realistic Motion data from the dogs will help create more realistic animal animations for games and films. Credit: University of Bath Researchers are creating a library of movement data from different dog breeds, to make animal animations in films and video games more realistic. Films such as the Planet of the Apes used motion capture techniques extensively to transform their human actors into apes, howeve
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Antarctic selfie's journey to space via disruption tolerant networking Taken at the National Science Foundation’s McMurdo Station in Antarctica, this selfie made its way to the space station on Nov. 20 using a technology called Disruption Tolerant Networking (DTN). NASA engineers Mark Sinkiat, Peter Fetterer and Salem El-nimri held up a picture of Vint Cerf, a distinguished visiting scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory who helped develop the technology. Cre
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What role do judges play in employment harassment cases? Suja Thomas is the Peer and Sarah Pedersen Professor of Law at Illinois and co-author of the book "Unequal: How America's Courts Undermine Discrimination Law." Thomas spoke with News Bureau business and law editor Phil Ciciora about why judges tend to dismiss employment harassment cases. Your book argues that federal judges play a role in allowing sexual and racial harassment to persist in the wo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New pathways, better biofuels An engineering team at Washington University in St. Louis is using e. coli to manufacture biofuel. New research from the lab further refines the process. Credit: Washington University in St. Louis The mass manufacture of biofuels could hold the key to greener, more environmentally sound energy, transportation and product options. Scientists have previously engineered metabolic pathways of microbe
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Dagens Medicin
Nyt studie skal undersøge spisetiders indflydelse på diabetesudviklingSeniorforsker Kristine Færch ved Steno Diabetes Centeret i København har fået et grant på knap 9 mio. kr. af Novo Nordisk Fonden til at udforske, om overvægtige med prædiabetes kan undgå at udvikle diabetes ved at spise inden for faste tidsintervaller.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
The Mad Science of Creativity The Mad Science of Creativity On October 17, Scientific American hosted a special event on creativity at The Bell House in Brooklyn, New York, in collaboration with Springer Nature and The Story Collider. Watch scientists and others tell their favorite stories about the nature of imagination, intuition, inventiveness and other sparks of brilliance. Advertisement Related Video Every Issue. Every Y
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A horse is a horse, of course, of course -- except when it isn't An international team of researchers has discovered a previously unrecognized genus of extinct horses that roamed North America during the last ice age. The new findings, published November 28 in the journal eLife , are based on an analysis of ancient DNA from fossils of the enigmatic "New World stilt-legged horse" excavated from sites such as Natural Trap Cave in Wyoming, Gypsum Cave in Nevada,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Simple two-component mixtures are good surrogates for studying the ignition properties of next-generation gasolines Students test fuel ignition chemistry using two shock tubes at the KAUST Clean Combustion Research Center. Credit: KAUST A collaboration between KAUST and Saudi Aramco scientists to test future fuels could bring a new era of highly efficient gasoline engines. Gasoline compression ignition (GCI) is an experimental engine technology that could consume 25 percent less energy than a conventional auto
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Turbulence and nutrient availability drive changes in Red Sea microbes At specific depths, bottles of the CTD rosette are closed and water is collected for the analysis of microbial communities and potential explanatory variables (e.g. nutrient concentrations). Credit: KAUST Seasonal changes in turbulence and nutrient availability are shown to shape microbial communities in the Red Sea. "A lot of the marine ecosystem is ultimately based on how microbes live and what
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tiny speakers break a barrier for sound Schematic and photo of the enclosure designed to change the environment around a sound source. Made by 3D printing out of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) plastic, the encloser greatly enhances the power of low-frequency sounds. Credit: Jiajun Zhao In any orchestra, the lowest notes are made by the largest instruments; for example, in the string family, the double bass resonates much lower n
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Big Think
Researchers Figure Out What's Causing Mystery Earthquakes in Texas and It's Not Nature Scientists have discovered another piece of the puzzle in the mystery of the earthquakes that have been happening in such states as Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas since 2008. The researchers are certain the quakes are a result of fracking practices of the oil and gas industry. In the past decade, Oklahoma, which used to have just one or two earthquakes per year, saw their number rise to more than 8
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
World's smallest fidget spinner showcases access to serious science facility One drop of liquid, a cutting-edge laser 3-D-printer and a few hours are all it takes to make a fidget spinner smaller than the width of a human hair. The tiny whirligig was created by researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences to illustrate the facility's unique resources and expertise available to scientists across the world. The microscale fidget spi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study finds timing is key in keeping organic matter in wet soils Periodically wet soils, such as farm fields that flood for a few days or weeks at a time, may not retain organic matter as well as once believed, according to new research. Credit: Steven Hall When it comes to keeping organic matter contained in wet soils, timing is everything. At least, that's what a new study led by an Iowa State University ecologist suggests. The findings, published recently i
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Popular Science
You'd be surprised how often space junk falls out of the sky While Americans celebrated Black Friday last week, a few lucky Canadians got a rare glimpse of … an incredibly common event. A rocket booster from the recently launched Cygnus spacecraft fell back down to Earth over Saskatchewan, creating a spectacular plume of light in its wake. Videos of the event spread across the interwebs, and for good reason. Witnessing a re-entry like that is uncommon. But
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Dagens Medicin
Over fire ud af ti sendt til lægen efter diabetestest Da Diabetesforeningen tilbød risikotest for diabetes på Verdens Diabetesdag fik mange besked på at gå til lægen.
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Skate YoungstersScientists study the development of scales in skate embryos.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How interfaith marriages affect holiday celebrations and traditions American families blend a mix of religious identities and traditions today more than ever. The interfaith dynamics are reflected in day-to-day life, but they can become even more apparent during the holidays. Keren McGinity, adjunct assistant professor of American Studies and research associate at the Hadassah-Brandeis Institute, has written two books on the subject of interfaith marriages: "Stil
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers inadvertently boost surface area of nickel nanoparticles for catalysis During deposition of a silica shell onto Ni nanoparticles, they are etched, oxidized, and embedded in the silica, which stabilizes the structure during oxidation and reduction. Credit: Brian Lynch. Reproduced by permission of The Royal Society of Chemistry. Researchers from North Carolina State University and the Air Force Research Laboratory have discovered that a technique designed to coat nick
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Latest Headlines | Science News
What the Pliocene epoch can teach us about future warming on Earth Imagine a world where the polar ice sheets are melting, sea level is rising and the atmosphere is stuffed with about 400 parts per million of carbon dioxide. Sound familiar? It should. We’re living it . But the description also matches Earth a little over 3 million years ago, in the middle of the geologic epoch known as the Pliocene. To understand how our planet might respond as global temperatur
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Lockheed Martin Is Making Laser Cannons for Fighter Jets It’s been just a few months since Lockheed Martin gave the US Army the most powerful laser weapon ever developed, a ground vehicle–mounted system that can burn through tanks and knock mortars out of the sky. Now the US Air Force wants its own toy, so Lockheed’s engineers are back in the lab, crafting the kind of weapon Poe Dameron could get down with. They’re making a laser blaster for a fighter
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The Tricks Pixar Used to Make the Super Slick Skeletons of 'Coco' Pixar’s new movie Coco is heartwarming, gorgeous, and—based on its $71 million opening weekend in the US—very popular. But it wouldn’t be any of those things without its skeletons. Like the toys, monsters, and robots Pixar has dreamed up before, the bags of bones are awfully charismatic. Unlike those creations, their phalanges took a little more finagling to get right. Coco , out now, is the stor
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Scientific American Content: Global
Mexico Designates North America's Largest Ocean Reserve Mexico President Enrique Peña Nieto designated an ocean region near the southwestern coast of Mexico as a protected area. Uniquely rich in marine biodiversity, the area is North America's largest marine reserve, at nearly 58,000 square miles (150,000 square kilometers). On Friday (Nov. 24), President Nieto signed a decree to create the Revillagigedo Archipelago National Park in a region of th
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Dagens Medicin
Forskning for folketHvis man beskar den administrative stab med en tredjedel ville de resterende få travl med at passe deres arbejde fremfor at hitte på nye administrative procedurer. Vi ville få mere tid til patienterne og større arbejdsglæde.
11h
Dagens Medicin
Forskning for folketHvis man beskar den administrative stab med en tredjedel ville de resterende få travl med at passe deres arbejde fremfor at hitte på nye administrative procedurer. Vi ville få mere tid til patienterne og større arbejdsglæde.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bioengineers discover mechanism that regulates cells' 'powerhouses' In this artist’s rendering, Dnm1 proteins surrounding a mitochondrion are breaking it up into two. Credit: Jaime de Anda/ACS Central Science UCLA bioengineers and their colleagues have discovered a new perspective on how cells regulate the sizes of mitochondria, the parts of cells that provide energy, by cutting them into smaller units. The researchers wrote that this finding, demonstrated with y
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The new ticketing technology that may make scalping a thing of the past Credit: Blair Hughes As new anti-scalping laws are introduced in Victoria, our research suggests that frustrations with current ticketing systems may be a contributing factor to the continued success of scalpers. But new technologies are on the horizon that will help. Scalping is the practice of buying event tickets and then on-selling them at a higher price. Our research found that one in five f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new way of plotting turbulent air movement illustrates the beauty in fluid dynamics These paired images depict a computer simulation of turbulence within 100 cubic meters of air. In the image on the left, the black space represents air movement and the color is the still space between each eddy. The blue and green image highlights the bodies of moving air. Credit: Stanford University Stir a vat of any liquid or gas and you get complex whirls of movement. Fluid dynamics, the stud
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Cassini's arrival and departure Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute These two images illustrate just how far Cassini traveled to get to Saturn. On the left is one of the earliest images Cassini took of the ringed planet, captured during the long voyage from the inner solar system. On the right is one of Cassini's final images of Saturn, showing the site where the spacecraft would enter the atmosphere on the followi
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Gizmodo
This Discounted FoodSaver Vacuum Sealer Will Pay For Itself FoodSaver 2-in-1 Vacuum Sealing System | $126 | Amazon We’ve all had to throw away leftovers or cuts of meat and cheese that spent a little too much time in the fridge or freezer, but vacuum sealing your foods can keep them safe from freezer burn pretty much indefinitely, and dramatically extend their shelf life everywhere else. It sounds like an expensive proposition, but today, Amazon’s selling
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Dagens Medicin
Diabetespatienter med åreforsnævring kan reducere risikoen for at dø af hjertekarsygdomBoehringer Ingelheims lægemiddel Jardiance kan mindske risikoen for at dø af hjertesygdomme hos diabetespatienter med åreforsnævring.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nano-sensor measures tension of tissue fibres The bacterial peptide (blue) attaches to a fibronectin fibre (white) over several binding sites. Credit: Samuel Hertig Bacteria are able to attach themselves to tissue fibres with the aid of a 'nano-adhesive'. Just how they achieve this was investigated a few years ago by Viola Vogel, Professor of Applied Mechanobiology at ETH Zurich, using computer simulations at CSCS. The researchers simulated
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Upscaling is a catalyst for inequality The laws of nature are what drive wealth inequality within a given society – unless society takes action to counteract their effect, such as by adopting laws on taxation. The larger the scale, the greater the inequality. Today's globalisation trend is thus a process that naturally reinforces inequality. At the same time, globalisation also makes it more difficult to provide societal counterbalanc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Maternal stress affects offspring growth in complicated ways The unborn and the mammalian infant are highly dependent on maternal investment. The more independence the offspring gains, the weaker the effects of maternal stress on the offspring if such stress occurred late during pregnancy only. Credit: Kittisak Srithorn A new comparative analysis across mammals brings order to previously ambiguous results on the effects that maternal stress has on the deve
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Recycling air pollution to make art Graviky Labs has developed technology that attaches to exhaust systems of diesel generator chimneys to capture particulate matter (PM). Scientists at Graviky then treat the soot to turn it into ink, called Air-Ink, for artists around the world. Credit: Christine Daniloff/MIT On a break from his studies in the MIT Media Lab, Anirudh Sharma SM '14 traveled home to Mumbai, India. While there, he not
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Airbag prevents tanker trucks from tipping over Credit: University of Twente Dr Erik Eenkhoorn has designed a system that can secure liquid loads, making the transport of bulk liquids much safer. Inflatable components prevent tanker trucks from tipping over, and reduce fuel consumption, as well. Erik Eenkhoorn recently graduated from the University of Twente with a thesis on this design. According to the graduate, the existing legislation is p
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microquasar study reveals the structure of faraway radio galaxies Picture of the GRS 1758-258 microquasar, obtained with the Jansky Very Large Array radiotelescope at 5 GHz frequency radio waves. The white line shows the Z-shape path formed by the relativistic plasma produced in the core region, where the black hole is located. Credit: Universidad de Barcelona Researchers from the Institute of Cosmos Sciences of the University of Barcelona (ICCUB) and the Unive
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The Atlantic
'Giving Tuesday' Is No Match for Black Friday First, there was Thanksgiving. Then, a few decades ago, Black Friday came along. Next came Cyber Monday, which debuted in the ‘00s. Then, a few years ago, came a day decidedly not about consumption: Giving Tuesday, a “global day of giving” that is celebrated (mostly on social media) the Tuesday after Thanksgiving. Allison Janney celebrates it . So do Bill Gates , Jill Biden , and a host of other
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Converse Urban Utility Uses Gore-Tex to Keep the Water Out The rain is drenching Darryl "Curtains" Jackson. It's coming down in sheets from a machine overhead that's been programmed to dump water droplets at the rate of 3.25 inches an hour. "This is a nice, steady rain," he says, as drops fall from the ceiling and drain into the grated floor below. Curtains, Converse's apparel director, is standing in the middle of the rain tower, a silvery box inside th
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How Bored Panda Survived Facebook's Clickbait Purge For a year or two in the early 2010s, a certain genre of cheesy, irresistibly uplifting headline was unavoidable on Facebook. You know the trope – someone died in an inspiring way, a potentially bad situation led to an unlikely friendship, a dog saved someone’s life. Followed, almost always, by “You’ll never believe what happened next.” It was a sure bet to make content go viral, and traffic-hung
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Structure of primary optogenetic tool revealed Attempts to solve the structure of ChR2 go right back to the time of its discovery in 2003. But despite the efforts of numerous research groups from across the world, the structure of the protein in its natural state has remained unknown. Now that researchers have the structure, meaningful mutations can be introduced into the protein to adjust its properties to the requirements of a specific expe
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Parents may one day be morally obligated to edit their baby’s genes A doctor explains to a young couple that he has screened the pair’s in vitro fertilized embryos and selected those that had no major inheritable diseases. The couple had specified they want a son with hazel eyes, dark hair and fair skin. Then the doctor announces that he has also taken the liberty of eliminating the “burden” of genetic propensities for baldness, nearsightedness, alcoholism, obesi
12h

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