EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Broader gun restrictions lead to fewer intimate partner homicides IMAGE: A new study led by Michigan State University strongly suggests that firearm restrictions work to reduce intimate partner homicides. view more Credit: Photo by Nicolas Barbier Garreau on Unsplash EAST LANSING, Mich. - State laws that restrict gun ownership among domestic abusers and others with violent histories appear to significantly reduce intimate partner homicides, indicates
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists set new record with 10-qubit entanglement False-color circuit image showing 10 superconducting qubits (star shapes) interconnected by a central bus resonator B (gray). Credit: Song et al. ©2017 American Physical Society (Phys.org)—Physicists have experimentally demonstrated quantum entanglement with 10 qubits on a superconducting circuit, surpassing the previous record of nine entangled superconducting qubits. The 10-qubit state is the l
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Ingeniøren
Vestas overhalet: Konkurrent laver havets længste møllevingerSiemens Gamesa opgraderer sin gearløse havmølleplatform med ekstra lange vinger – nemlig 81,5 meter stykket – og overhaler dermed Vestas.
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LATEST

EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can a rude waiter make your food less tasty?A new study shows that an individual's social class influences his or her response to poor service. This is because lower class individuals are more likely to have a holistic view of thinking, while higher class individuals more often have an analytical thinking pattern.
14min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drone photos offer faster, cheaper data on key Antarctic speciesScientists flying drones in Antarctica have demonstrated a cheaper, faster and simpler way to gauge the condition of leopard seals, which can weigh more than a half ton and reflect the health of the Antarctic ecosystem that they and a variety of commercial fisheries rely on.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook pledges $50M a year to match relief donationsFacebook is pledging $50 million a year to match disaster-relief donations, part of a bevy of tools and efforts around charitable causes the social media giant announced on Wednesday.
17min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Snapchat seeks to attract more users by redesigning app Shares of Snapchat parent Snap Inc. plunged Tuesday, slipping below the price at the time of its stock offering, after a pessimistic outlook from a Wall Street analyst on the popular messaging service.
17min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is underground transit worse for your health? Credit: CC0 Public Domain According to the U.S. Census Bureau, nearly 90 percent of the 4.5 million workers in the Los Angeles area spend an average of 60 minutes each day commuting on a roadway or railway. When USC researchers from the Viterbi School of Engineering set out to study the environmental benefits of different modes of public transit in LA, they found some unexpected results: certain
17min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First-of-its-kind mummy study reveals clues to girl's story Portrait mummy of a girl, late 1st century CE, mummified remains of 5-year-old girl wrapped in linen, with a portrait in beeswax and pigments on wood. Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary, Evanston, Illinois. Credit: Northwestern University Who is she, this little mummy girl? Northwestern University scientists and students are working to unravel some of her mysteries, including how her body w
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How does chemotherapy among men affect the health of subsequent generations?How do cancer and cancer treatments affect the reproductive function of men? Can this affect the health of their direct descendants and subsequent generations?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Prehistoric women had stronger arms than today's elite rowing crewsThe first study to compare ancient and living female bones shows the routine manual labor of women during early agricultural eras was more grueling than the physical demands of rowing in Cambridge University's famously competitive boat clubs. Researchers say the findings suggest a 'hidden history' of women's work stretching across millennia.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Research could strip wine of sulfites — and health worries — for pennies per bottleA research drive is working toward the design and marketing of a low-cost, easy-to-use device that would filter up to 99 percent of sulfites from wine when it’s poured from the bottle.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Preventing psoriasis with vanillia extractSmall amounts of artificial vanilla extract, also known as vanillin, are in a wide range of products, from baked goods to perfumes. But vanillin's versatility doesn't stop there. In a recent mouse study researchers report that this compound could also prevent or reduce psoriatic skin inflammation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Getting a better handle on methane emissions from livestockCattle, swine and poultry contribute a hefty portion to the average American's diet, but raising all this livestock comes at a cost to the environment: The industry produces a lot of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Just how much gas the animals release, however, is the subject of debate. Now, one group reports that a new approach could shed light on how accurate current data are.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
To improve dipstick diagnostic and environmental tests, just add tapeSimple paper-strip testing has the potential to tell us quickly what's in water, and other liquid samples from food, the environment and bodies -- but current tests don't handle solid samples well. Now researchers have developed a way to make these low-cost devices more versatile and reliable for analyzing both liquid and solid samples using adhesive tape.
24min
Live Science
How Long Can a Person Survive Without Water? Imagine that the taps switched off tomorrow, the rivers and streams ran dry, and the oceans turned into dry valleys. How would you react? And more importantly, how long would you survive? There's no reliable predictor of how fast dehydration would kill a person. Many survival blogs suggest that an average person can survive for somewhere from two days to a week without liquids, but that's a
24min
Live Science
'Hallucination Machine' Takes You on a Drug-Free Psychedelic Trip Virtual-reality devices can transport users to magical realms from the comfort of their own homes, but a new device built by British engineers takes users on a different kind of trip: It lets people experience the trippy visuals brought on by psychedelic drugs in a completely drug-free way. But this "hallucination machine" isn't just for entertainment; it also opens new avenues into research on v
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Health agency reveals scourge of fake drugs in developing world Issouf Sanogo/AFP/Getty Fake medicines are removed from a shop during a police raid of a market in Côte d'Ivoire. One in ten medicines in developing countries is fake or substandard, data from the World Health Organization (WHO) suggest. Malaria drugs and antibiotics are among the most commonly reported, the agency found. But the problem extends to a variety of medications, including those for ca
29min
The Atlantic
Garrison Keillor, Settler of a Fallen Frontier On Wednesday, Minnesota Public Radio announced that it had fired Garrison Keillor, the creator and former host of A Prairie Home Companion, after “recently learning of allegations of his inappropriate behavior with an individual who worked with him.” The station, it said, will be cutting ties not only with Keillor, but also with his production company. It will be ending both the distribution and
29min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Debate over doubt Climate change is not a partisan issue, and a UC Santa Barbara researcher has the data to prove it. Matto Mildenberger, an assistant professor of political science, led a new study -- published in the journal Climatic Change -- that finds substantial differences in the climate change views of both Republicans and Democrats across different states and congressional districts. "While subsets of the
34min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First-of-its-kind mummy study reveals clues to girl's storyWho is she, this little mummy girl? Northwestern University scientists and students are working to unravel some of her mysteries, including how her body was prepared 1,900 years ago in Egypt, what items she may have been buried with and what material is in her brain cavity. As part of a comprehensive investigation, the mummy traveled from Evanston to Argonne National Laboratory on Nov. 27 for an X
34min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is underground transit worse for your health?When USC researchers from the Viterbi School of Engineering set out to study the environmental benefits of different modes of public transit in LA, they found some unexpected results: certain SoCal public transit routes that were entirely underground exposed passengers to greater concentrations of carcinogens in the air.
34min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Simple blood test may predict MRI disease activity in MS MINNEAPOLIS - A blood test to monitor a nerve protein in the blood of people with multiple sclerosis (MS) may help predict whether disease activity is flaring up, according to a study published in the November 29, 2017, online issue of Neurology® Neuroimmunology and Neuroinflammation , an official journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The nerve protein, called neurofilament light chai
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Semiconductor grab: Silicon Valley chip companies making tasty acquisitions Winter may be on the way, but Silicon Valley chipmakers are having their moment in the sun. Semiconductors are the brains, heart and guts of just about every electronic gadget you own, and the companies that make them are famous for roller-coaster highs and lows as they seek to stay relevant in a fast-changing market. But as chipmakers pursue an acquisition binge, the recent deal wrangling is gen
35min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cyber Monday: Adobe says online sales surged higher Did you go to Amazon.com Monday and pick up that Instant Pot countertop pressure cooker that you'd had your eye on for a while? Or, did you spend some time deciphering your kids' Christmas lists before scouring the internet and then paying up for those items they've been haranguing you about over the last several weeks? Well, if you did, congratulations. You helped set a record for Cyber Monday
35min
Gizmodo
Viagra Will Soon Be Available Over the Counter in the UK Image: Tim.Reckman n/Wikimedia Commons Let’s say you are a British penis-having sex-doer who has trouble with the whole erection thing but you don’t want to talk to a doctor about it. Good news: You’ll soon be able to buy Viagra over the counter. Incredible! The British Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) announced that anyone over the age of 18 with erectile dysfunction co
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Ars Technica
Websites use your CPU to mine cryptocurrency even when you close your browser reader comments 7 Researchers have discovered a new technique that lets hackers and unscrupulous websites perform in-browser, drive-by cryptomining even after a user has closed the window for the offending site. Over the past month or two, drive-by cryptomining has emerged as a way to generate the cryptocurrency known as Monero. Hackers harness the electricity and CPU resources of millions of uns
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nature's blueprint for fracture-resistant cementBased on the nanostructure of the sea urchin spines, scientists develop fracture-resistant cement.
52min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stem cell-derived intestine model mimics innate immune responsesA stem cell-derived in vitro model displays key small intestine characteristics including innate immune responses, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Big data tool begins new era for biology and personalized medicineResearchers have developed a novel series of systems genetics tools to identify new links between genes and phenotypes. The work brings biology to the cloud and sets the stage for the development of precision medicine.
52min
Live Science
Quantum Computers Bust Problem Conventional Computers Can't Solve Fifty-odd atoms buzz through a pocket of empty space. Invisible lines of force — quantum magnetism — chain them together. Jiggle one, the others jiggle in sympathy. Ring another like a bell and the others will pick up the song at a different pitch or a slower speed. Every action on any one atom impacts each other atom in the 50. It's a tiny world of unfolding subtlety and complexity. There
54min
Ars Technica
Dealmaster: Get an Echo Dot for $30 and more leftover Cyber Monday deals Staff — Dealmaster: Get an Echo Dot for $30 and more leftover Cyber Monday deals There are still deals on Sonos speakers, Destiny 2, 4K TVs, and more. Ars Staff - Nov 29, 2017 8:55 pm UTC reader comments 0 Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our friends at TechBargains , we have another round of deals to share. While Black Friday and Cyber Monday proper are gone, more than a few of the deals they bro
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Popular Science
Neolithic women were probably a lot stronger than you One would assume that many of the strongest members of our species are elite athletes . And if particularly strong arms are what you're after, collegiate rowers—who routinely exert many times their body weight in power to propel a boat forward as fast as humanly possible—are about as good as it gets. But according to a new study, even elite female rowers have nothing on the arms of prehistoric wo
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Gizmodo
Caught Again, Facebook Is (Still) Very Sorry for Letting Advertisers Exclude Black and Latino Users Photo: AP Facebook announced Wednesday that it would temporarily stop letting advertisers exclude users from seeing their ads based on race and ethnic group. The highly controversial (and legally dubious) practice was first uncovered during an investigation by Pro Publica in 2016. Though Facebook said it would end the practice when it came to ads for housing, credit, or employment following the s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UW students teach Alexa to have a little chat with us Credit: CC0 Public Domain We all know Amazon's Alexa can turn on your kitchen lights or order new dishwashing detergent. Now, a University of Washington team has taught the device a new trick: To have an engaging little conversation with us, the human race. Recently, the UW team won the Amazon-sponsored $500,000 Alexa Prize for developing the best socialbot, an algorithm that uses artificial in
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Feed: All Latest
What an Internet Analyst Got Wrong About Net Neutrality The Federal Communications Commission's plan to jettison its net-neutrality rules found a surprise supporter this week in respected technology industry analyst and blogger Ben Thompson. In a blog post Tuesday, Thompson argued that he supports net neutrality, but thinks the FCC is right to repeal rules that ban broadband providers like Comcast and Verizon from blocking, slowing down, or otherwise
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Would you opt to see the future or decipher the past? Wouldn’t it be brilliant if every scientist had a crystal ball? It’s a question that came to me while reading Alexandra Witze’s story “ What the Pliocene epoch can teach us about future warming on Earth .” Witze discusses how scientists are studying a warming period some 3 million years ago to try to understand how Earth will handle rising temperatures. The geologic epoch, known as the Pliocene,
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Readers debate ethics of resurrecting extinct species In the Dec. 9 SN : Lessons from the Pliocene, searching for new ways to fight MS , a supernova on repeat, the great gene drive debate, spider sleep secrets, an ailing boy gets new skin, kleptopredation and more.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Robust Bain distortion in the premartensite phase of a platinum-substituted Ni2MnGaThe premartensite phase of shape memory and magnetic shape memory alloys is believed to be a precursor state of the martensite phase with preserved austenite phase symmetry. The thermodynamic stability of the premartensite phase and its relation to the martensitic phase is still an unresolved issue, even though it is critical to the understanding of the functional properties of magnetic shape memo
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Soccer success is all about skillA new study used analytic techniques developed in evolutionary biology to determine the impact of a player's skill, athletic ability, and balance on their success during a game.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Theory of the evolution of sexes tested with algaeThe varied sex lives of a type of green algae have enabled a researcher to test a theory of why there are males and females.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New technique to model transplantation of the human liverA novel technology enables the modeling of human liver transplantation in an experimental setting.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New insights into control of cellular scaffoldMicrotubule cytoskeleton is a major cellular scaffold that is required for dynamic organization of the cytoplasm, and the cytoskeleton plays a key role in a variety of cellular events, ranging from cell proliferation to morphogenesis. How the organization of microtubule cytoskeleton is controlled in our cells, however, has remained unclear.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lack of communication puts older adults at risk of clashes between their medicinesMost older Americans take multiple medicines every day. But a new poll suggests they don't get -- or seek -- enough help to make sure those medicines actually mix safely. That lack of communication could be putting older adults at risk of health problems from interactions between their drugs, and between their prescription drugs and other substances such as over-the-counter medicines, supplements,
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
90 percent of senior drivers don't make vehicle adjustments that can improve safetyMore than 70 percent of senior drivers experience muscle and bone conditions that impact their driving. Inexpensive features like steering wheel covers help lessen the impact of these conditions, yet 90 percent of senior drivers do not make simple adjustments to their vehicle that can reduce crash risk. Crash prevention is critical since drivers 65+ are more than twice as likely as younger drivers
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple's MacOS High Sierra security bug: Do this now Apple pushed out a fix for a serious security bug in computers running its most recent operating system on Wednesday morning, less than a day after it was first widely reported. The bug in the Apple operating system allowed anyone with physical access to a Mac running the latest version of Apple's operating system to easily infiltrate the computer and gain full access to everything on it. It on
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Scientists are seeking new strategies to fight mutiple sclerosis James Davis used to be an avid outdoorsman. He surfed, hiked, skateboarded and rock climbed. Today, the 48-year-old from Albuquerque barely gets out of bed. He has the most severe form of multiple sclerosis, known as primary progressive MS, a worsening disease that destroys the central nervous system. Diagnosed in May 2011, Davis relied on a wheelchair within six months. He can no longer get up t
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Gizmodo
A Computer Error Let Every American Airlines Pilot Take Christmas Off and Now Who’s Gonna Fly Us Home Image: American Airlines Traveling during the holidays is already a nightmare, but for people flying American Airlines during the last two weeks in December, things may have just gotten a whole lot worse. That’s because according to the Allied Pilots Association union, a glitch in the system American Airlines uses to schedule time off for pilots was erroneously green-lighting every single PTO req
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New on MIT Technology Review
Artificial Intelligence Can Translate Languages Without a Dictionary This Robot Picks Up Groceries It’s Never Seen Before Using Its Little Suction Cup A cannister of oatmeal, a tube of chips, or a box of teabags—it’s all the same to this warehouse automaton. Developed by Ocado, the world’s largest online-only grocery retailer, the machine has been designed to pick individual items out of big crates… Read more A cannister of oatmeal, a tube of chips, or a box of te
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple Pay, Bitcoin for holiday shopping? 'Cash or check' feels obsolete Customers at Linda Files' Winter Park-based The Spice & Tea Exchange have some options: Golden Monkey Tea, 4 Peppercorn spice blend - and Apple Pay. The addition of the mobile-payment option allows the company to appeal to shoppers who no longer pay using traditional methods, she said. "A lot of younger people, that's all they carry," said Files, who also accepts credit cards, debit cards and P
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Big Think
We Need Ecstasy and Opioids in Place of Prozac and Xanax What can doctors do to ease emotional pain? The physicians of ancient and medieval times found many plants and plant-derived substances (ie, drugs) that soothed mental as well as physical ills. Rarely did they draw a line between the psychological and physiological benefits of their remedies. Modern medicine has confirmed the overlap of bodily and mental maladies through painstaking research, and
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The Atlantic
Marvel Studios' Biggest Gamble Yet When the Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige stood up in front of a crowd in 2014 and announced the company’s film plans for the next five years , he was aiming for show of commercial force while reassuring fans there was a strictly plotted path ahead. They would get an Avengers 3 in 2018 and an Avengers 4 in 2019. There’d also be a Black Panther movie and a Captain Marvel movie, and plenty of o
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Single-molecule DNA sequencing advances could enable faster, more cost-effective genetic screeningResearchers are developing new techniques for faster, more cost-effective single-molecule DNA sequencing that could have transformative impacts on genetic screening.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Protecting pigs from PRRS during reproductionNew research is helping to eradicate a devastating swine disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New synthethic protocol to form 3-D porous organic networkA team of researchers has presented a new synthetic protocol to produce three-dimensional porous organic materials in the blink of an eye, like firing bullets.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cyber Monday, fueled by smartphones, sets an online sales record of $6.6 billion Cyber Monday delivered as expected. Based on final online sales numbers released at 11 a.m. Tuesday, Cyber Monday became the biggest U.S. online shopping day in history, according to Adobe Analytics Data. The use of mobile devices, especially smartphones, accounted for nearly 40 percent of retail visits and 21.3 percent of revenue. Propelled by smartphones, mobile devices generated an all-time hi
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Scientific American Content: Global
SpaceX's Planned Giant Rocket Could Chase Down Interstellar Asteroid There may be yet another future use for SpaceX's huge Mars-colonization rocket. That rocket, called the BFR, could launch a probe toward 'Oumuamua, the interstellar asteroid that zoomed past Earth last month, a new study suggests. The 1,300-foot-long (400 meters) 'Oumuamua is currently speeding away from us at about 58,160 mph (93,600 km/h, or 26 km/s). That's far faster than any spacecra
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The Atlantic
The Insistent Cheeriness of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel Expecting realism from an Amy Sherman-Palladino show is like expecting Elmo to break into an Ibsen monologue in the middle of Sesame Street —it’s never going to happen. Sherman-Palladino’s universes are bright, zany, sparkly places, as cozy as hot chocolate, and as insulated from darkness as a casino at Christmastime. Her characters are whip-smart, mile-a-minute talkers with unshakable confidence
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sea-level rise predicted to threaten >13,000 archaeological sites in southeastern USSea-level rise may impact vast numbers of archaeological and historic sites, cemeteries, and landscapes on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the southeastern United States, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
With 'material robotics,' intelligent products won't even look like robotsRobots as inconspicuous as they are ubiquitous represent the vision of researchers in the new and burgeoning field of material robotics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why are there no sea snakes in the Atlantic?There is a glaring gap in sea snakes' near-global distribution: the Atlantic Ocean. Biologists chalk up the absence of sea snakes in the Atlantic to geography, climate and timing.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Unnecessary Tests and Treatment Explain Why Health Care Costs So Much This story was co-published with NPR’s Shots blog. Two years ago, Margaret O’Neill brought her 5-year-old daughter to Children’s Hospital Colorado because the band of tissue that connected her tongue to the floor of her mouth was too tight. The condition, literally called being “tongue-tied,” made it hard for the girl to make “th” sounds. It’s a common problem with a simple fix: an outpat
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New England shrimp fishing closed for at least one more year A new study led by UQ School of Biological Sciences Professor Robbie Wilson used analytic techniques developed in evolutionary biology to determine the impact of a player's skill, athletic ability, and balance on their success ...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Expanding DNA's alphabet lets cells produce novel proteins This undated photo provided by The Scripps Research Institute shows a semi-synthetic strain of E. coli bacteria that can churn out novel proteins. Scientists reported on Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2017, that they have expanded the genetic code of life and used man-made DNA to create this strain of bacteria. (Bill Kiosses/The Scripps Research Institute via AP) Scientists are expanding the genetic code of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows lower lung cancer rates in communities with strong smoke-free laws A recent study by University of Kentucky BREATHE (Bridging Research Efforts and Advocacy Toward Healthy Environments) researchers shows that fewer new cases of lung cancer were found in communities with strong smoke-free workplace laws. The study, "Lung Cancer Incidence and the Strength of Municipal Smoke-free Ordinances" was published in Cancer , an American Cancer Society journal dedicated to p
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Gizmodo
How to Install Kodi on Your 'Fire TV Edition' Amazon-Powered Television Wikimedia /NetEngine Amazon’s Fire TV streaming devices and Kodi ’s semi-legal media player software have been a popular combination for years. With that in mind, you may be eyeing one of those new “ Fire TV Edition ” television sets from Element or Westinghouse , which run the company’s TV operating system right out of the box. But before you make your purchase, it’s worth checking to see whethe
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: Storm Waves With the Power to Heave Massive Boulders Over Cliffs Photo A new study suggests that powerful storm surges are responsible for pushing giant boulders to the tops of cliffs in western Ireland. Credit Paul D. Ryan On a flat peninsula in western Ireland bordered by shallow cliffs that rise from the Atlantic Ocean sits a field of boulders. Some weigh nearly four times more than a school bus. Now scientists have figured out how these boulders reached th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Home-based activity program helps older veterans with Dementia maintain function People with dementia often have behavioral symptoms. These include problems with memory, language, and decision-making abilities. People with dementia can also experience changes in mood, such as increased irritability, depression , and anxiety . They often need assistance with their daily activities, such as feeding, dressing, using the toilet, and bathing themselves. These symptoms are often tr
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The Scientist RSS
Transgenerational Trauma Passed Down from WWII EvacueesThe daughters of Finnish women separated from their parents as children during World War II have higher rates of psychiatric hospitalization than those born to women who had not been evacuated.
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Science | The Guardian
Clockwise captions causing confusion | Brief letters Stephanie Lovett asks why “crippling private rent” is not being addressed by politicians ( Letters , 28 November). The answer could lie in reports following the Grenfell Tower disaster which showed that 123 MPs – almost one in five – are private landlords. They include the chancellor of the exchequer, the foreign secretary, the shadow foreign secretary and the Speaker. Eighty-seven of them are To
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Hidden history of prehistoric women's work revealed Image caption A 3D model created using a scan of an upper arm (humerus) bone from a prehistoric woman farmer Grinding grain for hours a day gave prehistoric women stronger arms than today's elite female rowers, a study suggests. The discovery points to a ''hidden history'' of gruelling manual labour performed by women over millennia, say University of Cambridge researchers. The physical demands o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook to give relief groups data on users' needsFacebook is giving disaster-relief organizations such as the Red Cross access to data on what users need and where they are as part of an expansion of tools available for relief and charitable giving.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Wearable computing ring allows users to write words and numbers with thumbWith the whirl of a thumb, researchers have created technology that allows people to trace letters and numbers on their fingers and see the figures appear on a nearby computer screen. The system is triggered by a thumb ring outfitted with a gyroscope and tiny microphone. As wearers strum their thumb across the fingers, the hardware detects the movement.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First-of-its-kind mummy study reveals clues to girl’s storyWho is she, this little mummy girl? Scientists and students are working to unravel some of her mysteries, including how her body was prepared 1,900 years ago in Egypt, what items she may have been buried with, the quality of her bones and what material is present in her brain cavity. As part of a comprehensive scientific investigation, the mummy traveled from Evanston to Argonne National Laborator
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sorry, Grumpy Cat -- Study finds dogs are brainier than catsThe first study to actually count the number of cortical neurons in the brains of a number of carnivores, including cats and dogs, has found that dogs possess significantly more of them than cats.
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Science : NPR
Science And The Mystery Of The Mind Last week, my 13.7 co-blogger Tania Lombrozo reported on a study she developed with graduate student Sara Gottlieb on whether science can explain the human mind. As Tania wrote, this was a survey-based study asking the participants "whether they thought it was possible for science to one day fully explain various aspects of the human mind, from depth perception and memory loss to spirituality and
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Poverty, ethics and discrimination: How culture plays into cognitive research Cognitive psychology examines how people view the world and what drives them to behave a certain way. These everyday decisions are shaped by countless factors. However, research on cognition often leaves out a key consideration—the cultural context. In a new paper, scientists look at how cognitive research on poverty, ethics and discrimination would be enriched by engaging more with cultural soci
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Stereotypes about race and responsibility persist in bankruptcy system Prior research has established that society appears to accord less forgiveness to African-Americans when they arrive in bankruptcy court: Proceedings take longer, cost more and typically lead to lower levels of debt relief. And according to new research co-written by an interdisciplinary team of University of Illinois experts in psychology and legal studies, practitioners inside the bankruptcy sy
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why are there no sea snakes in the Atlantic? The yellow-bellied sea snake has the broadest distribution of any snake or lizard. But geography, climate and timing have prevented it from populating the Atlantic. Credit: Coleman Sheehy Sea snakes are an evolutionary success story. With about 70 species, they're the most diverse reptile group in the ocean, outnumbering sea turtle species 10-to-1. They sport a range of physical adaptations for l
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The Atlantic
A Flurry of Newly Discovered Galaxies In astronomy, an observation method called spectroscopy extends humanity’s reach into the cosmos. Through spectroscopy, astronomers can study different wavelengths of light coming from very distant objects in the universe, from single stars to massive galaxies, and determine their chemical composition. The technology may, one day, uncover life-giving molecules in the atmosphere of an exoplanet. I
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The Atlantic
Using Elephants as Bulldozers to Preserve Wildlife Sanctuaries On Monday, Indian police and forestry officials began carrying out a series of forced evictions of illegally built houses inside the 30-square-mile Amchang Wildlife Sanctuary in northeastern India, a protected habitat for wild elephants. Hundreds of structures were demolished by a few construction vehicles and about a dozen elephants, which were able to navigate some of the steeper and narrower t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why are there no sea snakes in the Atlantic? IMAGE: A few yellow-bellied sea snakes have been reported on the coast of northern Colombia, but odds are stacked against them establishing a breeding population, says Florida Museum herpetologist Coleman Sheehy.... view more Credit: Florida Museum photo by Kristen Grace GAINESVILLE, Fla. --- Sea snakes are an evolutionary success story. With about 70 species, they're the most diver
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How does chemotherapy among men affect the health of subsequent generations? How do cancer and cancer treatments affect the reproductive function of men? Can this affect the health of their direct descendants and subsequent generations? To get a clear picture, INRS researchers evaluate the current state of knowledge on this public health issue in a review article appearing in the journal Gynécologie Obstétrique & Fertilité . They analyze the results of scientific studies
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Trial suggests way to personalize heart health in diabetes IMAGE: Allessandro Doria, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., is Investigator in the Section on Genetics & Epidemiology at Joslin Diabetes Center and Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. view more Credit: @John Soares BOSTON - (Nov. 29, 2017) - Scientists at Joslin Diabetes Center have taken another step toward solving a long-standing puzzle about heart health in type 2 diabetes, with
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Calif. survey finds physicians, pharmacists comply with prescription drug monitoring law (SACRAMENTO, Calif.) -- A state law that funded upgrades to California's prescription drug monitoring program and mandated physicians, pharmacists and controlled substance prescribers to register by July 2016 significantly increased registration rates, a new survey of 1,904 California physicians and pharmacists conducted by the UC Davis Violence Prevention Program has found. The online survey, co
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
SMU seismology research shows North Texas earthquakes occurring on 'dead' faults IMAGE: The post-2008 seismicity has occurred both in areas that were seismically active before 2008 (for example, the Mississippi embayment) and in regions with no pre-2008 historical or instrumental seismicity (for... view more Credit: Modified with permissions from Rubinstein and Mahani (13). DALLAS (SMU) - Recent earthquakes in the Fort Worth Basin - in the rural community of Venus and the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
With 'material robotics,' intelligent products won't even look like robots CORVALLIS, Ore. - Robots as inconspicuous as they are ubiquitous represent the vision of researchers in the new and burgeoning field of material robotics. In an invited perspective paper published today in Science Robotics , Oregon State University researcher Yi?it Mengüç and three co-authors argue against looking at robotics as a "dichotomy of brain versus body." Mengüç and collaborators fro
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bones show prehistoric women's intensive manual labor during advent of agriculture Comparisons of bone strength between prehistoric women and living female athletes demonstrate that prehistoric women performed rigorous manual labor for thousands of years in central Europe at levels exceeding those of modern women. Additionally, in contrast to men, manual labor was a more important component of prehistoric women's behavior than terrestrial mobility through the first 5,500 years
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Balancing dual identities: Hormone stabilizes blood volume Uncovering a surprising new function for a commonly studied hormone, Balázs Mayer and colleagues have determined that vasopressin does more than maintain fluid balance for the kidneys - it also stimulates red blood cell production. Mayer et al. speculate that drugs targeting one specific vasopressin receptor could offer a much-needed safe therapy to replenish red blood cells after traumatic injur
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nature's blueprint IMAGE: These are sea urchin spines. view more Credit: University of Konstanz The sea urchin spines are mostly made of calcite, usually a very brittle and fragile material. In the case of the sea urchin, however, the spines are much more durable than the raw material alone. The reason for its strength is the way that nature optimises materials using a brick wall-style architecture. T
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Prehistoric women had stronger arms than today's elite rowing crews IMAGE: Cambridge University Women's Boat Club openweight crew rowing during the 2017 Boat Race on the river Thames in London. The Cambridge women's crew beat Oxford in the race. The members... view more Credit: Alastair Fyfe for the University of Cambridge A new study comparing the bones of Central European women that lived during the first 6,000 years of farming with those of modern athletes
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Aerial drone photos can yield accurate measurements of leopard seals Leopard seal measurements derived from aerial drone photographs are as accurate as those taken manually, according to a study published November 29, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Douglas Krause from National Marine Fisheries Service, California, and colleagues. Body measurements are key to managing populations of pinnipeds, as their condition can reflect prey availability, habitat q
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sea-level rise predicted to threaten >13,000 archaeological sites in southeastern US 13,000 archaeological sites in southeastern US | EurekAlert! Science News"> IMAGE: Tens of thousands of known archaeological sites are threatened by sea level rise in the southeast, and far more currently unknown and unrecorded, as shown here at low spatial resolution. view more Credit: Anderson et al., 2017 Sea-level rise may impact vast numbers of archaeological and historic sites, cemete
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stem cell-derived intestine model mimics innate immune responses A stem cell-derived in vitro model displays key small intestine characteristics including innate immune responses, according to a study published November 29, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Ying Chen and David Kaplan from Tufts University, US, and colleagues. In vitro 3D cell systems, so-called 'organ-on-a-chip', are the focus of intense study, with the hope that they may one day rep
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Paired mutations: A new approach to discovering the shape of proteinsIt is a bit like business partners: if one of the two parties changes strategy to keep the business going, the other has to adapt in turn. The leap from business ventures to the structure of proteins might seem a little bold. Yet, this concept of 'balanced changes' is precisely the guiding principle of a new study. The study represents a significant advancement in the fascinating problem of how th
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New interpretation of the Red Queen's Hypothesis: It's about expansionEvolutionary scientists have developed a new interpretation of one of the classic theories of evolutionary theory, the Red Queen's Hypothesis, proposed by Leigh Van Valen in 1973.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scaling deep learning for scienceUsing the Titan supercomputer, a research team has developed an evolutionary algorithm capable of generating custom neural networks that match or exceed the performance of handcrafted artificial intelligence systems. The research team's algorithm, called MENNDL (Multinode Evolutionary Neural Networks for Deep Learning), is designed to evaluate, evolve, and optimize neural networks for unique datas
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fast flowing heat in graphene heterostructuresScientists have recently succeeded in observing and following, in real-time, the way in which heat transport occurs in van der Waals stacks, which consist of graphene encapsulated by the dielectric two-dimensional material hexagonal BN (hBN).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
injectable gel helps heart muscle regenerate after heart attackResearchers have used mouse models to demonstrate a new approach to restart cardiomyocyte replication after a heart attack: an injectable gel that slowly releases short gene sequences known as microRNAs into the heart muscle.
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Popular Science
Gifts for your friend who needs to chill out You know the type. They work 60 hours a week, have half a dozen side-hustles, and never, ever cancel plans. You love their natural ambition, but also are aware that sometimes they need a little encouragement to unwind, something that's especially crucial given the tumultuous world events of 2017. The gifts we showcase below appeal to all five senses, and will hopefully help your loved ones keep c
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
‘Alien’ DNA makes proteins in living cells for the first time Images by William B. Kiosses Bacterial cells used their expanded genetic code to make a modified version of a green fluorescent protein. Life has spent the past few billion years working with a narrow vocabulary. Now researchers have broken those rules, adding extra letters to biology's limited lexicon. Chemist Floyd Romesberg of the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, California, and his col
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Science | The Guardian
Prehistoric women's arms 'stronger than those of today's elite rowers' Prehistoric women had stronger arms than elite female rowing teams do today thanks to the daily grind of farming life, researchers have revealed, shedding light on their role in early communities. The study of ancient bones suggests that manual agricultural work had a profound effect on the bodies of women living in central Europe between about the early neolithic and late iron age, from about 5,
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lifespan prolonged by inhibiting common enzymeThe lifespans of flies and worms are prolonged by limiting the activity of an enzyme common to all animals, finds a new study. The enzyme -- RNA polymerase III (Pol III) -- is present in most cells across all animal species, including humans. While it is known to be essential for making proteins and for cell growth, its involvement in ageing was unexplored until now.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Largest genetic study of mosquitoes reveals spread of insecticide resistance across AfricaThe largest ever genetic study of mosquitoes reveals the movement of insecticide resistance between different regions of Africa and finds several rapidly evolving insecticide resistance genes. Malaria is transmitted by mosquitoes and rising resistance to insecticides is hampering efforts to control the disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Polar bear blogs reveal dangerous gap between climate-change facts and opinionsClimate-change discussions on social media are very influential. A new study shows that when it comes to iconic topics such as polar bears and retreating sea ice, climate blogs fall into two distinct camps. With little or no overlap between deniers and the available scientific facts.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Drone photos offer faster, cheaper data on key Antarctic species Adult leopard seal on a beach at Cape Shirreff, Antarctica. Credit: J.Hinke/NOAA; image collected pursuant toMMPA Permit No.16472. Leopard seal measurements derived from aerial drone photographs are as accurate as those taken manually, according to a study published November 29, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Douglas Krause from National Marine Fisheries Service, California, and coll
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sea-level rise predicted to threaten >13,000 archaeological sites in southeastern US Tens of thousands of known archaeological sites are threatened by sea level rise in the southeast, and far more currently unknown and unrecorded, as shown here at low spatial resolution. Credit: Anderson et al., 2017 Sea-level rise may impact vast numbers of archaeological and historic sites, cemeteries, and landscapes on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the southeastern United States, according t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Prehistoric women had stronger arms than today's elite rowing crews Cambridge University Women's Boat Club openweight crew rowing during the 2017 Boat Race on the river Thames in London. The Cambridge women's crew beat Oxford in the race. The members of this crew were among those analysed in the study. Credit: Alastair Fyfe for the University of Cambridge A new study comparing the bones of Central European women that lived during the first 6,000 years of farming
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Sea Level Rise Threatens Thousands of Archaeological Treasure Troves The modern human obsession with beachfront property is nothing new. For tens of thousands of years, our kind has been bonded to the coast and its bounty of food. Inland is alright, too, but nothing matches the productivity of the sea. The problem with coastal living is that while the food supply is relatively stable, sea levels are not. They've always risen and fallen as the climate changes over
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Stereotypes about race and responsibility persist in bankruptcy system IMAGE: Bankruptcy attorneys have little knowledge of the racial disparities that exist within the bankruptcy system, relying instead on common stereotypes about race, responsibility and debt, according to research co-written by... view more Credit: Photo by L. Brian Stauffer CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- Prior research has established that society appears to accord less forgiveness to African-Americans wh
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Science community considers approaches to climate disinformation Despite overwhelming scientific agreement on the question of human-caused global warming, a major gap exists between this consensus and the public's understanding of the issue. Writing in BioScience , Jeffrey A. Harvey, of the Netherlands Institute of Ecology, and his colleagues examine the causes of the consensus gap, focusing on climate-denier Internet blogs and the ways in which they use topic
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Gizmodo
A Popular Vitamin for Women Is Skewing Medical Tests Image: Pixabay As a science reporter, I’m a supplement skeptic. I know most supplements don’t work and that lax regulations mean that supplement makers sometimes put out products that are poor quality or even unsafe . And yet, ever since my hair stylist mentioned to me a few years ago that she’s noticed clients who take biotin really do see their hair grow faster and stronger, I’ve religiously po
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Ars Technica
The entire freaking gang is here in first Avengers: Infinity War trailer Marvel Studios reader comments 0 Unsurprisingly, this holiday season of movies has been met with the first-ever trailer for the most anticipated summer blockbuster of 2018: Avengers: Infinity War . If Wednesday's trailer is any indication, we'll have to wait for a continued trickle of information to see what the heck will happen in the movie, but for now, at least we know that roughly 40 gazillio
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The Atlantic
New York City Has Genetically Distinct ‘Uptown’ and ‘Downtown’ Rats New York City is a place where rats climb out of toilets , bite babies in their cribs , crawl on sleeping commuters , take over a Taco Bell restaurant , and drag an entire slice of pizza down the subway stairs. So as Matthew Combs puts it, “Rats in New York, where is there a better place to study them?” Combs is a graduate student at Fordham University and, like many young people, he came to New
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Strong-armed women helped power Europe’s ancient farming revolution Ancient farm women in Central Europe labored so vigorously at grinding grain, tilling soil and other daily tasks that the women’s average upper-arm strength surpassed that of top female rowers today, a new study finds. In the early stages of farming more than 7,000 years ago, women engaged in a wide array of physically intense activities that were crucial to village life but have gone largely unn
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Ars Technica
HDMI 2.1 spec released, ushering in new era of dynamic HDR video Enlarge / 10K is a lot of pixels. HDMI Forum reader comments 94 Back in January, the HDMI Forum—the trade association that develops the HDMI spec for video interconnects— outlined its plans for HDMI 2.1 . That specification has now been finalized, giving a definitive view of what's in store for our video hardware. In spite of a version number that suggests it's only a minor update, the spec repre
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Gizmodo
Where Did the Term 'Desktop Computer' Come From? The May 5, 1958 edition of Arthur Radebaugh ’s Sunday comic, Closer Than We Think , which featured the school of tomorrow Everybody knows that computers were huge and unwieldy in the middle of the 20th century. But a lot of the tech terminology that we take for granted today had to be invented at some point. Such is the case with the term “desktop computer,” which emerged long before “personal co
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Poverty, ethics and discrimination: How culture plays into cognitive research IMAGE: Michèle Lamont is Co-Director of the Successful Societies program at CIFAR (Canadian Institute for Advanced Research) and is Professor of Sociology and of African and African American Studies and the... view more Credit: Michèle Lamont Cognitive psychology examines how people view the world and what drives them to behave a certain way. These everyday decisions are shaped by countless facto
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The Scientist RSS
Six-Letter DNA Alphabet Produces Proteins in CellsTranscription and translation of DNA containing synthetic base pairs becomes a reality in living cells.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Axolotls: Saving a Strange Salamander Axolotls: Saving a Strange Salamander Axolotls are used to study cancer development and organ regeneration, but their numbers in the wild are dwindling. Conserving wild salamanders could be vital for research—and the future of this special species. This video was reproduced with permission and was first published on November 24, 2017. It is a Nature Video production. Axolotls are found in lab
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Gizmodo
Destiny 2 Just Dropped to $26, Even Lower Than Black Friday Destiny 2 [ PS4 / Xbox One / PC ] | $26 | Amazon Did you miss out on the $27-$30 deals on Destiny 2 over the holiday weekend? Congratulations, you now get a better price ! More Deals
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Quantum simulators wield control over more than 50 qubits, setting new recordScientists have used more than 50 interacting atomic qubits to mimic magnetic quantum matter, blowing past the complexity of previous demonstrations.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Big step forward for quantum computingResearchers have developed a specialized quantum computer, known as a quantum simulator, which could be used to shed new light on a host of complex quantum processes, from the connection between quantum mechanics and material properties to investigating new phases of matter and solving complex real-world optimization problems.
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Science | The Guardian
Alan Eddy obituary My father, Alan Eddy, who has died aged 90, was the founding professor of biochemistry at Umist - the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology – where he carried out groundbreaking work with yeast. He was appointed professor and head of the department of biochemistry in 1959, and was in the vanguard of Umist’s transformation into a leading university. Born in St Just, Cornwall
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Gizmodo
How to Fix That Very Bad Security Bug in macOS Image: Gizmodo Apple just released a patch that fixes a recently revealed security vulnerability in macOS High Sierra. This is the bug that let anyone gain admin access to Mac accounts without typing in a password. It’s a bad one. Good news is that Apple is making it very easy to update your software and squash the bug. Just click the “Update” box when you see it! Now I know software updates are
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New on MIT Technology Review
Snapchat Has a Plan to Fight Fake News: Ripping the ‘Social’ from the ‘Media’ This Robot Picks Up Groceries It’s Never Seen Before Using Its Little Suction Cup A cannister of oatmeal, a tube of chips, or a box of teabags—it’s all the same to this warehouse automaton. Developed by Ocado, the world’s largest online-only grocery retailer, the machine has been designed to pick individual items out of big crates… Read more A cannister of oatmeal, a tube of chips, or a box of te
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Wound healing or regeneration -- the environment decides?For humans, the loss of limbs is almost always an irreversible catastrophe. Many animals, however, are not only able to heal wounds but even to replace whole body parts. Biologists have now been able to prove for the first time that comb jellyfish can switch between two completely different self-healing processes depending on the environmental conditions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Innovative microscope poised to propel optogenetics studiesA newly developed microscope is providing scientists with a greatly enhanced tool to study how neurological disorders such as epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease affect neuron communication.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Thinner photodiode with higher stability and performanceA research team has increased the stability and performance of photodiodes using cubic perovskite nanocrystals. The result expected to be used for autonomous vehicles, military, space exploration and ubiquitous fields.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nerve cell findings may aid understanding of movement disordersFresh insights into the links between nerve and muscle cells could transform our understanding of the human nervous system and conditions relating to impaired movement.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Empowering workers can cause uncertainty and resentmentAttempts by managers to empower staff by delegating different work to them or asking for their opinions can be detrimental for employee productivity, research shows.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New interpretation of the Red Queen's Hypothesis: It's about expansion IMAGE: This is the Red Queen walking randomly. view more Credit: Ika Österblad In a new publication in the journal Nature , Indre Zliobaite and Mikael Fortelius from the University of Helsinki and Nils Christian Stenseth from the University of Oslo present a new interpretation of one of the classic theories of evolutionary theory, the Red Queen's Hypothesis, proposed by Leigh Van Valen
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Teaching life a new trick: Bacteria make boron-carbon bonds IMAGE: This is an artist's interpretation of a scientist introducing boron to the carbon-based chemistry of life. Jennifer Kan, Xiongyi Huang and their team from the Caltech laboratory of Frances Arnold... view more Credit: David Chen and Yan Liang (BeautyOfScience.com) for Caltech In another feat of bioengineering, Caltech's Frances Arnold, the Linus Pauling Professor of Chemical Engineeri
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A step forward for quantum computing Typically, programming a computer is a fairly arduous process, involving hours of coding work, not to mention the laborious work of debugging, testing and documentation to make sure it works properly. But for a team of physicists from Harvard-MIT Center for Ultracold Atoms and California Institute of Technology things are actually much tougher. Working in a Harvard Physics Department lab, a team
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Largest genetic study of mosquitoes reveals spread of insecticide resistance across Africa The largest ever genetic study of mosquitoes reveals the movement of insecticide resistance between different regions of Africa and finds several rapidly evolving insecticide resistance genes. Reported today (29 November) in Nature , this genetic resource will be used to develop new tools for monitoring resistance and managing insecticide use, and for designing novel control methods. Malaria is
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists demonstrate one of largest quantum simulators Physicists at MIT and Harvard University have demonstrated a new way to manipulate quantum bits of matter. In a paper published today in the journal Nature , they report using a system of finely tuned lasers to first trap and then tweak the interactions of 51 individual atoms, or quantum bits. The team's results represent one of the largest arrays of quantum bits, known as qubits, that scientists
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quantum simulators wield control over more than 50 qubits, setting new record IMAGE: Strings of atomic qubits are used to probe quantum magnetism. Each row of bright lights and dark spots is a fluorescence snapshot of the atom string. Physicists use lasers to... view more Credit: Data: J. Zhang et al.; graphic: E. Edwards Two independent teams of scientists, including one from the University of Maryland (UMD) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lifespan prolonged by inhibiting common enzymeThe lifespans of flies and worms are prolonged by limiting the activity of an enzyme common to all animals, finds a UCL-led study.The enzyme -- RNA polymerase III (Pol III) -- is present in most cells across all animal species, including humans. While it is known to be essential for making proteins and for cell growth, its involvement in ageing was unexplored until now.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First finding of China's DAMPE may shed light on dark matter research The Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE, also known as Wukong) mission published its first scientific results on Nov. 30 in Nature, presenting the precise measurement of cosmic ray electron flux, especially a spectral break at ~0.9 TeV. The data may shed light on the annihilation or decay of particle dark matter. DAMPE is a collaboration of more than a hundred scientists, technicians and student
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Viden
Apple lukker kritisk sikkerhedshul på Mac-computere Apple har for kort tid siden udsendt en opdatering til styresystemet MacOS, der kører på firmaets bærbare og stationære computere. Opdateringen gælder alle computere, der kører den nyeste udgave af MacOS High Sierra, som også kendes som version 10.13.1. Sikkerhedshullet var særdeles kritisk, da det principielt gjorde det muligt at komme ind på samtlige Mac-computere uden brug af adgangskode. Opda
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Science : NPR
Scientists Train Bacteria To Build Unnatural Proteins Bacterial cells can now read a synthetic genetic code and use it to assemble proteins containing manmade parts. Gary Bates/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Gary Bates/Ikon Images/Getty Images Bacterial cells can now read a synthetic genetic code and use it to assemble proteins containing manmade parts. Gary Bates/Ikon Images/Getty Images Scientists say they have created a part
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Digital media company BuzzFeed cutting jobs in US, UKDigital media company BuzzFeed is cutting 8 percent of U.S. employees, or 100 jobs, as changes its business model in a bid to boost revenue.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds dogs are brainier than cats The first study to actually count the number of cortical neurons in the brains of a number of carnivores, including cats and dogs, has found that dogs possess significantly more neurons than cats, raccoons have as many neurons as a primate packed into a brain the size of a cat's, and bears have the same number of neurons as a cat packed into a much larger brain. Credit: Jeremy Teaford, Vanderbilt
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New Scientist - News
The fashion industry can only go green by becoming unfashionable Ellen MacArthur and Stella McCartney at the report’s launch Darren Gerrish/Getty By Michael Le Page Green is the new black, if efforts to acknowledge the environmental harm caused by the fashion industry are to be believed. A report released yesterday by the Ellen MacArthur Foundation highlighted the damage done by our efforts to look absolutely fabulous, and they make for grim reading. The c
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New Scientist - News
Fertility clinics are fudging IVF stats to look more successful Not everyone is so lucky Gabriella Demczuk/The New York Times/Redux/Eyevine By Jessica Hamzelou IVF is more popular than ever. As the average age of first-time parents has increased , so has the. To help those who are choosing where to have a procedure, organisations in the UK and US collect data from all fertility clinics in those countries, providing success rates for each. Prospective pati
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New Scientist - News
A bacterium has been engineered to make ‘unnatural’ proteins Life but different Andrew Brookes/Plainpicture By Aylin Woodward THE genetic alphabet just got 50 per cent bigger. A bacterium has been engineered not only to have two more “letters” in its DNA, but to use them to make new proteins that have never existed in nature. The genes carried on DNA are instruction manuals for making proteins, which do essential jobs like digesting food and fighting i
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New Scientist - News
Malaria is no longer in decline and that should worry us all Finger-prick tests speed up diagnosis Global Warming Images/REX/Shutterstock By Azra Ghani Malaria – one of the world’s oldest killers – continues to plague large parts of the globe despite decades of effort to wipe it out. Sadly, as the World Malaria Report published by the World Health Organization today makes clear, progress on eliminating it has stagnated, with the number of cases and dea
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Gizmodo
It's Still Taking Too Long For Americans With HIV to Get Diagnosed A Health Education Specialist with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (right), counsels a participant after receiving a free HIV test from AID Atlanta as part of National HIV Testing Day. (Image: AP) A new report from the US Centers for Disease Control shows that, while detection rates are improving, a surprising number of Americans live with HIV for a protracted period of time before
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
China to roll back regulations for traditional medicine despite safety concerns David Gray/REUTERS The Chinese government is promoting traditional Chinese medicines as an alternative to expensive Western drugs. Support for traditional medicine in China goes right to the top. President Xi Jinping has called this type of medicine a “gem” of the country’s scientific heritage and promised to give alternative therapies and Western drugs equal government support. Now the country i
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The Atlantic
The 76ers' Great Basketball Experiment Is Paying Off It has been a season of precocity in the National Basketball Association. Seemingly everywhere, promising players are blooming into fully fledged, All-NBA-quality dynamos. For those interested in the shape of basketball to come, the 2017–18 campaign offers no shortage of thrilling case studies, such as the Milwaukee Bucks’ putty-limbed Giannis Antetokounmpo and the New York Knicks’ gigantic and s
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Live Science
North Korea's Latest Missile Test Suggests It Could Reach US East Coast This July 4, 2017, file photo distributed by the North Korean government shows what was said to be the launch of a Hwasong-14 intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) in North Korea's northwest. North Korea launched another ICBM on Nov. 28, 2017, showcasing the apparent ability to hit the U.S. East Coast. Credit: Korean Central News Agency/Korea News Service/AP, File North Korea's latest test
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Ars Technica
Comcast deleted net neutrality pledge the same day FCC announced repeal reader comments 0 We wrote earlier this week about how Comcast has changed its promises to uphold net neutrality by pulling back from previous statements that it won't charge websites or other online applications for fast lanes. Comcast spokesperson Sena Fitzmaurice has been claiming that we got the story wrong. But a further examination of how Comcast's net neutrality promises have changed over
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Gizmodo
Two Incredible New Quantum Machines Have Made Actual Science Discoveries Image: Jeff Keyzer/Wikimedia Commons There’s a nebulous concept that’s floating around the public conscious, called quantum advantage or quantum supremacy. One of these days, someone is going to boldly declare that they’ve created a quantum computer that can solve some complex problem that a regular computer can’t. That said, quantum supremacy probably won’t be a single event. More likely it will
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Universal signature fundamental to how glassy materials failTo find a link between seemingly disparate disordered materials and their behavior under stress, scientists studied an unprecedented range of disordered solids with constituent particles ranging from individual atoms to river rocks. Understanding materials failure on this fundamental level could be key for designing more shatter-resistant glasses or predicting geological phenomena like landslides.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A transistor of graphene nanoribbonsTransistors based on carbon nanostructures: what sounds like a futuristic dream could be reality in just a few years' time. Scientists have now produced nanotransistors from graphene ribbons that are only a few atoms wide.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Semi-Synthetic Life Form Now Fully Armed and Operational Every living thing on Earth stores the instructions for life as DNA, using the four genetic bases A, G, C, and T. All except one, that is. In the San Diego laboratory of Floyd Romesberg—and at a startup he founded—grow bacteria with an expanded genetic code. They have two more letters, an “unnatural” pair he calls X and Y. Romesberg, head of a laboratory at the Scripps Research Institute, first a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Norway to put up fence to stop reindeer slaughter More than 2,000 animals including deer were killed by trains in Norway last year Norway said Wednesday it would speed up the building of a fence along a railway in the far north of the country after scores of migrating reindeer were mowed down by trains. State-owned rail operator Bane NOR announced its plan after another 17 reindeer died on the track between Trondheim and Bodo, bringing to 127 th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Teaching life a new trick: Bacteria make boron-carbon bonds Artist's interpretation of a scientist introducing boron to the carbon-based chemistry of life. Jennifer Kan, Xiongyi Huang and their team from the Caltech laboratory of Frances Arnold have created bacteria that can make compounds with boron-carbon bonds for the first time. Credit: David Chen and Yan Liang (BeautyOfScience.com) for Caltech In another feat of bioengineering, Caltech's Frances Arno
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quantum simulators wield control over more than 50 qubits, setting new record Strings of atomic qubits are used to probe quantum magnetism. Each row of bright lights and dark spots is a fluorescence snapshot of the atom string. Physicists use lasers to measure the qubits during the quantum simulation. The result, either dark or bright, allows them to extract information about the magnetic state of the system. Credit: Data: J. Zhang et al.; graphic: E. Edwards Two independe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists demonstrate one of largest quantum simulators Credit: CC0 Public Domain Physicists at MIT and Harvard University have demonstrated a new way to manipulate quantum bits of matter. In a paper published today in the journal Nature , they report using a system of finely tuned lasers to first trap and then tweak the interactions of 51 individual atoms, or quantum bits. The team's results represent one of the largest arrays of quantum bits, known
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lifespan prolonged by inhibiting common enzyme Sacharomyces cerevisiae cells in DIC microscopy. Credit: Wikipedia. The lifespans of flies and worms are prolonged by limiting the activity of an enzyme common to all animals, finds a UCL-led study. The enzyme - RNA polymerase III (Pol III) - is present in most cells across all animal species, including humans. While it is known to be essential for making proteins and for cell growth, its involve
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Largest genetic study of mosquitoes reveals spread of insecticide resistance across Africa Mosquito that causes malaria, Anopheles gambiae . Credit: NIAID, CC BY The largest ever genetic study of mosquitoes reveals the movement of insecticide resistance between different regions of Africa and finds several rapidly evolving insecticide resistance genes. Reported today (29 November) in Nature , this genetic resource will be used to develop new tools for monitoring resistance and managing
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Robust Bain distortion in the premartensite phase of a platinum-substituted Ni2MnGa IMAGE: Temperature dependent phase diagram of Ni1.9Pt0.1MnGa magnetic shape memory alloy. Unit cells for different crystallographic phases (austenite, premartensite and martensite) are also shown. The T1 phase has 3M modulated structure... view more Credit: S. Singh /MPI CPfS In a recent study (public release on 18 Oct. 2017), scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of S
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sorry, Grumpy Cat -- Study finds dogs are brainier than cats There's a new twist to the perennial argument about which is smarter, cats or dogs. It has to do with their brains, specifically the number of neurons in their cerebral cortex: the "little gray cells" associated with thinking, planning and complex behavior --all considered hallmarks of intelligence. The first study to actually count the number of cortical neurons in the brains of a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scaling deep learning for science Deep neural networks--a form of artificial intelligence--have demonstrated mastery of tasks once thought uniquely human. Their triumphs have ranged from identifying animals in images, to recognizing human speech, to winning complex strategy games, among other successes. Now, researchers are eager to apply this computational technique--commonly referred to as deep learning--to some of science's mo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
That's cheating! Video-game companies suing crooked players (Update)Rogue online gamers have designed, sold or used computer code to crush competitors playing the popular "Fortnite" survival video game, spoiling the experience and the creator's profit potential, the game's maker charges in a series of lawsuits.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Could the fourth industrial revolution combat inequality? We need to make sure everyone benefits from new technologies so as not to widen inequality, a social innovation conference has heard. Credit: by École polytechnique - J.Barande, licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 New technologies like artificial intelligence, self-driving vehicles and the internet of things could be used to reduce the widening economic gulf that is emerging in modern societies. Experts
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Smartphone market seeing steady growth, as bigger screens rule A survey shows consumers increasingly buying large-screen smartphones or "phablets," fueling growth in the sector The global smartphone market is expected to see steady if unspectacular growth in the next few years, as consumers turn increasingly to large-screen handsets known as "phablets," a market tracker said Wednesday. A report by the research firm IDC said phablets—with displays larger than
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Moscow gives green light to Yamal gas super projectMoscow has given the green light to the first production line for liquefied natural gas project Yamal LNG in the Russian Arctic, the group said in a statement Wednesday.
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Gizmodo
When a Furby and Alexa Love Each Other Very Much, This Intelligent Talking Furball Is the Result GIF Almost 20 years after it was first introduced by Tiger Electronics, Furby has somehow found a way to remain on toy store shelves to this day, mostly by learning new tricks along the way . But Zach Levine’s Furby is extra special, because he hacked its guts with Amazon’s Alexa personal assistant , finally giving the bug-eyed toy some real smarts. If you’ve always wanted to put a friendlier fac
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US adopts recovery plan for Mexican wolves After decades of legal challenges and political battles that have pitted states against the federal government, U.S. wildlife managers on Wednesday finally adopted a plan to guide the recovery of a wolf that once roamed parts of the American Southwest and northern Mexico. The plan sets a goal of having an average of 320 Mexican gray wolves in the wild over an eight-year period before the predator
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
BuzzFeed to cut jobs, refocus advertising Buzzfeed CEO Jonah Peretti says a reorganization will seek to diversify revenue at the digital media startup BuzzFeed said Wednesday it was cutting an estimated 100 jobs as the news and entertainment website reorganizes its advertising efforts in the face of disappointing revenues. The cuts will be mainly in the business and advertising divisions in the US operations, with a number of editorial a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research creates way to protect pigs from PRRS during reproduction Raymond 'Bob' Rowland, Kansas State University professor of diagnostic medicine and pathobiology in the College of Veterinary Medicine, has created a way to protect swine offspring from the devastating PRRS virus during reproduction. Credit: Kansas State University In the words of Kansas State University researcher Raymond "Bob" Rowland, his latest work is helping to eradicate a devastating swine
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Ars Technica
New security update fixes macOS root bug Samuel Axon reader comments 44 Yesterday we learned that Apple had made a serious security error in macOS—a bug that, under certain conditions, allowed anyone to log in as a system administrator on a Mac running High Sierra by simply typing in "root" as the username and leaving the password field blank. Apple says that vulnerability has now been fixed with a security update that became available
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fast flowing heat in graphene heterostructures IMAGE: Schematic representation of the highly efficient out-of-plane heat transfer from graphene hot electrons (yellow glow), created by optical excitation (red beam), to hyperbolic phonon-polaritons in hBN (wave lines).... view more Credit: ICFO Nanoscale heat flow plays a crucial role in many modern electronic and optoelectronic applications, such as thermal management, photodetection,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Kansas State University research creates way to protect pigs from PRRS during reproduction MANHATTAN, KANSAS -- In the words of Kansas State University researcher Raymond "Bob" Rowland , his latest work is helping to eradicate a devastating swine disease. The disease is caused by the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome, or PRRS, virus. The virus costs the U.S. pork industry more than $600 million in losses every year. In his latest study, Rowland, professor of diagnostic medi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Magnetoelectric' material shows promise as memory for electronics IMAGE: Physics graduate student Julian Irwin checks equipment in the lab of materials science and engineering Professor Chang-Beom Eom, where researchers have produced a material that could exhibit the best qualities... view more Credit: Sarah Page/UW-Madison College of Engineering MADISON, Wis. -- Smartphones and computers wouldn't be nearly as useful without room for lots of apps, music
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Combinations of certain personality traits may guard against depression and anxietyPeople showing high levels of extraversion and conscientiousness may have protection against depression and anxiety, according to the results of a new study by a team of University at Buffalo psychologists. 'We know individually how these traits relate to symptoms, but now we are beginning to understand how the traits might impact one another,' says Kristin Naragon-Gainey, an assistant professor i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Penn researchers: An injectable gel that helps heart muscle regenerate after heart attack IMAGE: These are cardiomyocytes, green, proliferating in a mouse heart after gel injection. view more Credit: University of Pennsylvania In mammals, including humans, the cells that contract the heart muscle and enable it to beat do not regenerate after injury. After a heart attack, there is a dramatic loss of these heart muscle cells and those that survive cannot effectively replicate. Wit
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Live Science
Odd Red Meat Allergy May Be Behind Some Mysterious Allergic Reactions Some people who experience seemingly mysterious allergic reactions may have a rare type of allergy to red meat, a new study finds. The study evaluated 70 people who had "unexplained frequent anaphylaxis ," which means they had life-threatening allergic reactions that didn't have an apparent trigger. About 9 percent of these participants tested positive for an allergy to a molecule called galactos
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Parkfield segment of San Andreas fault may host occasional large earthquakes Although magnitude 6 earthquakes occur about every 25 years along the Parkfield Segment of the San Andreas Fault, geophysical data suggest that the seismic slip induced by those magnitude 6 earthquakes alone does not match the long-term slip rates on this part of the San Andreas fault, researchers report November 28 in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America ( BSSA ). The Parkfield s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Eruption clues: Researchers create snapshot of volcano plumbing Plinian column of the eruption of Sarychev (Russia) on 12 June 2009. Credit: NASA Much like a forensic team recreates a scene to determine how a crime was committed, researchers at the University of New Hampshire are using scientific sleuthing to better understand the journey of magma, or molten rock, in one of Europe's largest and most active volcanoes, Mount Etna. Researchers applied several te
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Empowering workers can cause uncertainty and resentment Attempts by managers to empower staff by delegating different work to them or asking for their opinions can be detrimental for employee productivity, research shows. Giving employees more authority can have a negative impact on their day to day performance and perhaps give the impression that their boss is just seeking to avoid doing their own work, according to the study. Managers have increas
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Getting a better handle on methane emissions from livestock Credit: American Chemical Society Cattle, swine and poultry contribute a hefty portion to the average American's diet, but raising all this livestock comes at a cost to the environment: The industry produces a lot of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Just how much gas the animals release, however, is the subject of debate. Now, one group reports in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology
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Ars Technica
Origami-inspired artificial muscles outperform human ones reader comments 33 Our robots manage some pretty impressive feats—including back flips —through the whirring of motors and hydraulic pumps. But all of life manages to perform far more impressive feats using muscles. Muscles allow incredibly fine control of movement, along with violent bursts of exertion. As a result, there has been a steady stream of attempts to craft artificial muscles. But a te
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers establish universal signature fundamental to how glassy materials fail Snapshots of softness fields and particle arrangements for the oligomer pillar simulation and the granular pillar experiment, two of the systems investigated in the paper. Credit: University of Pennsylvania Dropping a smartphone on its glass screen, which is made of atoms jammed together with no discernible order, could result in it shattering. Unlike metals and other crystalline material, glass
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
To improve dipstick diagnostic and environmental tests, just add tape The chemical symbols for heavy metals appear when a new low-cost, tape-based sensor detects them in water or powder. Credit: American Chemical Society Simple paper-strip testing has the potential to tell us quickly what's in water, and other liquid samples from food, the environment and bodies—but current tests don't handle solid samples well. Now researchers have developed a way to make these lo
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Low vitamin D levels at birth linked to higher autism riskLow vitamin D levels at birth are associated with an increased risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) at the age of 3 years.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Employee-job personality match linked with higher incomeAn employee whose personality traits closely match the traits that are ideal for her job is likely to earn more than an employee whose traits are less aligned, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A model explains effects like the formation of clouds from the seaAll liquids always contain gases in a greater or lesser concentration, depending on the pressure and temperature to which it is subjected. Almost always, these gases end up as more or less small bubbles on the surface of the liquid. When these bubbles explode, especially if they are microscopic, minuscule drops are expelled at great velocity, and these drops almost instantly travel notable distanc
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Jena Experiment: Loss of species destroys ecosystemsHow serious is the loss of species globally? Are material cycles in an ecosystem with few species changed? In order to find this out, the 'Jena Experiment' was established in 2002, one of the largest biodiversity experiments worldwide. Ecologists now report on two unexpected findings of the long-term study: Biodiversity influences almost half the processes in the ecosystem, and intensive grassland
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Watching a quantum material lose its stripesIn quantum materials, periodic stripe patterns can be formed by electrons coupled with lattice distortions. To capture the extremely fast dynamics of how such atomic-scale stripes melt and form, scientists used femtosecond-scale laser pulses at terahertz frequencies. Along the way, they found some unexpected behavior.
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Gizmodo
All the Hints and Details Hidden in Avengers: Infinity War's Cosmically Gigantic Trailer GIF A decade of movies has brought us to the end of a long road in the form of Avengers: Infinity War , an epic undertaking we finally got our first, glorious look at today . The trailer paints a grim future for our heroes as Thanos makes his long-awaited move, but it’s also jam-packed with hints at the war to come. GIF The trailer opens with a nostalgic, yet ominous recollection of how the Aveng
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: Tracking the Elusive Whale Shark The study is a collaboration of three dozen of the world’s top whale shark experts and thousands of citizen-scientists — mostly snorkeling ecotourists who snap photographs and video as they swim alongside the behemoths. Giving tourists the opportunity to participate in science is fun and empowering, and deepens their commitment to conservation, said Darcy Bradley, a postdoctoral researcher at Uni
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Polar bear blogs reveal dangerous gap between climate-change facts and opinions IMAGE: This is an adult polar bear on the look-out. view more Credit: Ian Sterling Climate-change discussions on social media are very influential. A new study in BioScience shows that when it comes to iconic topics such as polar bears and retreating sea ice, climate blogs fall into two distinct camps. With little or no overlap between deniers and the available scientific facts. The study's
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel Omics tool begins new era for biology and personalized medicine Most complex diseases, such as obesity, longevity, and diabetes, are largely influenced by genetic factors. But at the same time, they are also modulated by environmental stimuli, such as diet and physical activity. This interaction between the environment and genetic makeup makes every human unique, and underpins the need for personalized medicine. This custom-built medical approach is founded
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Space-inspired study unravels mysterious constellations of the oceans ATLANTA - Vital scientific information about whale shark behavior, biology and ecology is being uncovered by an unlikely source - ecotourists and other citizens. Thanks to modern advancements in technology and the burgeoning field of "citizen science," new information about gregarious and mysterious whale sharks is being revealed in a study slated to publish on November 29 in BioScience . Whale s
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Ars Technica
Internet-paralyzing Mirai botnet comes roaring back with new strain Enlarge / One of the modems targeted by a newly discovered strain of Mirai. CenturyLink reader comments 17 Mirai, the Internet-of-things malware that turns cameras, routers, and other household devices into potent distributed denial-of-service platforms, may be lying low, but it's certainly not dead. Last week, researchers identified a new outbreak that infected almost 100,000 devices in a matter
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Parkfield segment of San Andreas fault may host occasional large earthquakesAlthough magnitude 6 earthquakes occur about every 25 years along the Parkfield Segment of the San Andreas Fault, geophysical data suggest that the seismic slip induced by those magnitude 6 earthquakes alone does not match the long-term slip rates on this part of the San Andreas fault.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers reveal new insights into the control of cellular scaffold The immunofluorescence micrograph (left) of a human epithelial cell shows microtubules (green), centrosomes (2 adjacent yellow spots at the cell center), and nucleus (blue). The cartoons illustrate microtubules anchored by γTuRCs at centrosomes and the Golgi apparatus. At the Golgi, PolD1 interacts with γTuRCs to inhibit γTuRC-induced microtubule nucleation. Credit: Division of Life Science, HKUS
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How a biophysical simulation method might accelerate drug target discovery A new method improves yields of membrane proteins by predicting membrane insertion efficiency, a key step in membrane protein expression. Credit: Thomas F. Miller III and William M. Clemons Jr, California Institute of Technology Researchers at the California Institute of Technology have developed an approach to overcome a major stumbling block in testing new drug targets. The research is reported
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Toward safer, longer-lasting batteries for electronics and vehiclesThe rise of lithium-ion batteries over the past 25 years has enabled much of today's technology, but on occasion, they still catch fire. Recognizing this liability, carmakers and other private industry researchers are focusing on developing safer alternatives. Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, explores the latest strides and setbacks in b
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Innovative microscope poised to propel optogenetics studies The new Firefly microscope is optimized to perform optogenetic studies examining many neurons at once. Each bright spot here represents a neuron from a genetically modified mouse. Credit: Vaibhav Joshi, Harvard University A newly developed microscope is providing scientists with a greatly enhanced tool to study how neurological disorders such as epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease affect neuron comm
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study uses terahertz laser pulses to reveal ultrafast coupling of atomic-scale patterns Illustration of an ultrashort laser light striking a lanthanum strontium nickel oxide crystal, triggering the melting of atomic-scale stripes. The charges (yellow) quickly become mobile while the crystal distortions react only with delay, exposing the underlying interactions. Credit: Robert Kaindl/Berkeley Lab Stripes can be found everywhere, from zebras roaming in the wild to the latest fashion
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Preventing psoriasis with vanillin Credit: American Chemical Society Small amounts of artificial vanilla extract, also known as vanillin, are in a wide range of products, from baked goods to perfumes. But vanillin's versatility doesn't stop there. In a recent mouse study reported in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry , researchers report that this compound could also prevent or reduce psoriatic skin inflammation. Psor
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study, detailing 22-year-long global citizen science project sheds light on enigmatic endangered whale sharks Credit: Zac Wolf/Wikipedia Vital scientific information about whale shark behavior, biology and ecology is being uncovered by an unlikely source - ecotourists and other citizens. Thanks to modern advancements in technology and the burgeoning field of "citizen science," new information about gregarious and mysterious whale sharks is being revealed in a study slated to publish on November 29 in Bio
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Polar bear blogs reveal dangerous gap between climate change facts and opinions Adult polar bear on the look-out. Credit: Ian Sterling climate change discussions on social media are very influential. A new study in BioScience shows that when it comes to iconic topics such as polar bears and retreating sea ice, climate blogs fall into two distinct camps with little or no overlap between deniers and the available scientific facts. The study's first author, NIOO-KNAW researcher
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Jena Experiment: Loss of species destroys ecosystems How serious is the loss of species globally? Are material cycles in an ecosystem with few species changed? In order to find this out, the "Jena Experiment" was established in 2002, one of the largest biodiversity experiments worldwide. Professor Wolfgang Weisser from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) reports on two unexpected findings of the long-term study: Biodiversity influences almost
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Eruption clues: UNH researchers create snapshot of volcano plumbing DURHAM, N.H. - Much like a forensic team recreates a scene to determine how a crime was committed, researchers at the University of New Hampshire are using scientific sleuthing to better understand the journey of magma, or molten rock, in one of Europe's largest and most active volcanoes, Mount Etna. Researchers applied several techniques, in a new way, to create a more accurate picture of the vo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Modifying therapeutic DNA aptamers to keep them in the bloodstream longer IMAGE: Nucleic Acid Therapeutics is an authoritative peer-reviewed journal published bimonthly in print and online that focuses on cutting-edge basic research, therapeutic applications, and drug development using nucleic acids or related... view more Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers New Rochelle, NY, November 29, 2017--Designing new therapeutic DNA aptamers with diverse side chains
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Parkfield segment of San Andreas fault may host occasional large earthquakes Although magnitude 6 earthquakes occur about every 25 years along the Parkfield Segment of the San Andreas Fault, geophysical data suggest that the seismic slip induced by those magnitude 6 earthquakes alone does not match the long-term slip rates on this part of the San Andreas fault, researchers report November 28 in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America (BSSA). The Parkfield sec
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Scientific American Content: Global
Scientist Concedes His Controversial MS Therapy is "Largely Ineffective" What many hope will be the final chapter in an unfortunate saga in multiple sclerosis research appears to have been written by the scientist who started the affair in the first place. Italian physician Paolo Zamboni has publicly acknowledged that a therapy he developed and dubbed “the liberation treatment” does not cure or mitigate the symptoms of MS. A randomized controlled trial—the gold standa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mu­sic and nat­ive lan­guage in­ter­act in the brain The brain's auditory system can be shaped by exposure to different auditory environments, such as native language and musical training, A recent doctoral study by Caitlin Dawson from University of Helsinki focuses on interacting effects of native language patterns and musical experience on early auditory processing of basic sound features. Methods included electrophysiological brainstem recordi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Living in a 'war zone' linked to delivery of low birthweight babies Mums-to-be living in war zones/areas of armed conflict are at heightened risk of giving birth to low birthweight babies. However the evidence for any impact on the rate of other complications of pregnancy is less clear. That's the findings of a review of the available evidence conducted by the University of Warwick and published in the online journal BMJ Global Health . Lead author James Kearsley
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
HPV vaccine is effective, safe 10 years after it's given IMAGE: A decade of data on hundreds of boys and girls who received the HPV vaccine indicates the vaccine is safe and effective long term in protecting against the most virulent... view more Credit: Phil Jones, Senior Photographer, Augusta University AUGUSTA, Ga. (Nov. 29, 2017) - A decade of data on hundreds of boys and girls who received the HPV vaccine indicates the vaccine is safe and ef
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A model explains effects like the formation of clouds from the sea Everyday questions like what really causes clouds and rain, what gives sparkling wines their distinctive aroma and why do tyres generate so much smoke when they burn have answers that are intimately connected. The University of Seville teacher Alfonso Gañán has developed a particularly exact model to show the origin of all these phenomena from a universal microscopic mechanism that occurs on
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A transistor of graphene nanoribbons IMAGE: The microscopic ribbons lie criss-crossed on the gold substrate. view more Credit: EMPA Graphene ribbons that are only a few atoms wide, so-called graphene nanoribbons, have special electrical properties that make them promising candidates for the nanoelectronics of the future: While graphene - a one atom thin, honeycomb-shaped carbon layer - is a conductive material, it can become a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Preventing psoriasis with vanillin Small amounts of artificial vanilla extract, also known as vanillin, are in a wide range of products, from baked goods to perfumes. But vanillin's versatility doesn't stop there. In a recent mouse study reported in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry , researchers report that this compound could also prevent or reduce psoriatic skin inflammation. Psoriasis is an inflammatory skin diso
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Employee-job personality match linked with higher income An employee whose personality traits closely match the traits that are ideal for her job is likely to earn more than an employee whose traits are less aligned, according to new research published in Psychological Science , a journal of the Association for Psychological Science . "Our findings show that looking at the combination of personality traits and job demands is key to predict important
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Getting a better handle on methane emissions from livestock Cattle, swine and poultry contribute a hefty portion to the average American's diet, but raising all this livestock comes at a cost to the environment: The industry produces a lot of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Just how much gas the animals release, however, is the subject of debate. Now, one group reports in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology that a new approach could shed lig
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
To improve dipstick diagnostic and environmental tests, just add tape IMAGE: The chemical symbols for heavy metals appear when a new low-cost, tape-based sensor detects them in water or powder. view more Credit: American Chemical Society Simple paper-strip testing has the potential to tell us quickly what's in water, and other liquid samples from food, the environment and bodies -- but current tests don't handle solid samples well. Now researchers have develope
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How a biophysical simulation method might accelerate drug target discovery IMAGE: A new method improves yields of membrane proteins by predicting membrane insertion efficiency, a key step in membrane protein expression. view more Credit: Thomas F. Miller III and William M. Clemons Jr, California Institute of Technology Researchers at the California Institute of Technology have developed an approach to overcome a major stumbling block in testing new drug targets. T
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Store EU bevillinger til originale og banebrydende forskningsidéer 29. november 2017 Store EU bevillinger til originale og banebrydende forskningsidéer ERC bevillinger Fem forskere på Københavns Universitet har netop modtaget den glædelige nyhed om, at de er blandt de 329 topforskere fordelt over hele Europa, der får det prestigefulde ERC Consolidator Grant. De fem forskere får tilsammen omkring 70 mio. kr. Danmark får denne gang i alt ti ERC Consolidator Gr
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Live Science
'Hairy' Microbes Named for Rush Members Are Living in the Limelight The cascading 1970s-era locks of musicians in the progressive-rock group Rush recently inspired a team of researchers to lend the rockers' names to a trio of microbes with flowing flagella that resemble the band members' hair. Unlike the Canadian band, the microbes are found in the guts of termites, where they help the insects digest compounds found in woody plants. They belong to the genus
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Ars Technica
EA on cosmetic game items: “You probably don’t want Darth Vader in pink” Aurich / Gentle Giant reader comments 5 Earlier this month community furor over perceived "pay-to-win" elements in Star Wars: Battlefront 2 led EA to temporarily pull microtransactions from the game entirely . But those community complaints wouldn't apply to the kind of cosmetic mictrotransactions seen in many other online multiplayer games, which offer new costumes or visual flair without direct
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lichen that changes its reproductive strategy according to the climateSymbiosis between fungi and microalgae gives rise to lichen. Some lichen, however, such as Lobaria scrobiculata, have a unique feature: the fungus establishes a symbiosis with a cyanobacteria, thus requiring water in liquid form to activate photosynthesis. According to a new study, this forces the lichen to concentrate its resources on reproduction in places where water is scarce. For the first ti
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New 3-D printer is 10 times faster than commercial counterpartsA new desktop 3-D printer has been created that performs up to 10 times faster than existing commercial counterparts. Whereas the most common printers may fabricate a few Lego-sized bricks in one hour, the new design can print similarly sized objects in just a few minutes.
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The Atlantic
Hummingbirds Are Where Intuition Goes to Die When Margaret Rubega first read about how hummingbirds drink, she thought to herself: That can’t possibly be right. Hummingbirds drink nectar using tongues that are so long that, when retracted, they coil up inside the birds’ heads, around their skulls and eyes. At its tip, the tongue divides in two and its outer edges curve inward, creating two tubes running side by side. The tubes don’t close u
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Popular Science
Earthworms are thriving in Martian(ish) soil A Dutch scientist found two baby earthworms wriggling around in soil that is supposed to replicate the surface of Mars . But we're still pretty far away from gardening on the red planet. For now, scientists don’t have access to real Martian soil. So Wieger Wamelink, biologist at Wageningen University, bought a simulation from NASA at a hefty $2,500 for about 220 pounds (he created a crowdfunding
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Neurotoxin discovered in Lake WinnipegBMAA -- a toxin linked to several neurodegenerative diseases -- is present in high concentrations during cyanobacteria blooms in Lake Winnipeg, report scienitsts.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Time between world-changing volcanic super-eruptions less than previously thoughtAfter analyzing a database of geological records dated within the last 100,000 years, a team of scientists has discovered the average time between so-called volcanic super-eruptions is actually much less than previously thought.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why the future of clean energy storage lies in hydrogenAs renewable sources of energy like wind and solar gain traction, scientists and engineers are eyeing new ways to store that energy in a cost-efficient manner — laying the groundwork for a future in which renewables rival fossil fuels in powering our homes and vehicles.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Addition of tin boosts nanoparticle's photoluminescenceResearchers have developed germanium nanoparticles with improved photoluminescence, making them potentially better materials for solar cells and imaging probes. The research team found that by adding tin to the nanoparticle’s germanium core, its lattice structure better matched the lattice structure of the cadmium-sulfide coating which allows the particles to absorb more light.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Synthetic cannabis-like drug reduces sleep apneaA synthetic cannabis-like drug in a pill was safe and effective in treating obstructive sleep apnea in the first large multi-site study of a drug for apnea.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Innovative microscope poised to propel optogenetics studies WASHINGTON -- A newly developed microscope is providing scientists with a greatly enhanced tool to study how neurological disorders such as epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease affect neuron communication. The microscope is optimized to perform studies using optogenetic techniques, a relatively new technology that uses light to control and image neurons genetically modified with light-sensitive prote
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Penn researchers establish universal signature fundamental to how glassy materials fail Dropping a smartphone on its glass screen, which is made of atoms jammed together with no discernible order, could result in it shattering. Unlike metals and other crystalline material, glass and many other disordered solids cannot be deformed significantly before failing and, because of their lack of crystalline order, it is difficult to predict which atoms would change during failure. "In orde
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Low vitamin D levels at birth linked to higher autism risk Low vitamin D levels at birth were associated with an increased risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) at the age of 3 years in a recent Journal of Bone and Mineral Research study. In the study of 27,940 newborns in China, 310 were diagnosed with ASDs at 3 years of age, with a prevalence of 1.11 percent. When the 310 children with ASDs were compared with 1,240 control subjects, the risk of ASDs
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Wound healing or regeneration -- the environment decides? IMAGE: This is a microscopic view of a half jelly comb larvae. view more Credit: Photo: K. Bading. It may be a bit macabre. But surely most people at some point in their childhood watched fascinated, how an earthworm cut in two parts apparently lived on unimpressed by the severe wound. For humans, the loss of limbs is a severe problem which can only be treated - if at all - by complex surge
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Watching a quantum material lose its stripesIn quantum materials, periodic stripe patterns can be formed by electrons coupled with lattice distortions. To capture the extremely fast dynamics of how such atomic-scale stripes melt and form, Berkeley Lab scientists used femtosecond-scale laser pulses at terahertz frequencies. Along the way, they found some unexpected behavior.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NIH study of WWII evacuees suggests mental illness may be passed to offspring Mental illness associated with early childhood adversity may be passed from generation to generation, according to a study of adults whose parents evacuated Finland as children during World War II. The study was conducted by researchers at the National Institutes of Health, Uppsala University in Sweden, and Helsinki University in Finland. It appears in JAMA Psychiatry . The research team found th
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
Fashion has a pollution problem -- can biology fix it? | Natsai Audrey ChiezaNatsai Audrey Chieza is a designer on a mission -- to reduce pollution in the fashion industry while creating amazing new things to wear. In her lab, she noticed that the bacteria Streptomyces coelicolor makes a striking red-purple pigment, and now she's using it to develop bold, color-fast fabric dye that cuts down on water waste and chemical runoff, compared with traditional dyes. And she isn't
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Scientific American Content: Global
University Was Tipped Off to Possible Unauthorized Trials of Herpes Vaccine WASHINGTON—The university that employed a controversial herpes vaccine researcher has told the federal government it learned last summer of the possibility of his illegal experimentation on human subjects. But Southern Illinois University did not publicly disclose the tip or its findings about researcher William Halford’s misconduct for months, according to a memo obtained by Kaiser Health News.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Traces of life on nearest exoplanets may be hidden in equatorial trapNew simulations show that the search for life on other planets may well be more difficult than previously assumed. The study indicates that unusual air flow patterns could hide atmospheric components from telescopic observations, with direct consequences for formulating the optimal strategy for searching for (oxygen-producing) life such as bacteria or plants on exoplanets.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Eye contact with your baby helps synchronize your brainwavesMaking eye contact with an infant makes adults' and babies' brainwaves 'get in sync' with each other -- which is likely to support communication and learning.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Higher plant species richness may not be enough to protect ecosystems from the worst impacts of climate extremesStudies on mild fluctuations in weather have provided support for the idea that higher biodiversity results in more stable functioning of ecosystems, but critical appraisal of the evidence from extreme event studies is lacking.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Living in a 'war zone' linked to delivery of low birthweight babiesMoms-to-be living in war zones/areas of armed conflict are at heightened risk of giving birth to low birthweight babies, finds a review of the available evidence.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Marriage may help stave off dementiaMarriage may lower the risk of developing dementia, concludes a synthesis of the available evidence.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Alzheimer's: Second phase 3 study results for tau aggregation inhibitorFull results from a second Phase 3 clinical study of LMTX®, the first tau aggregation inhibitor in Alzheimer's disease, has been released by researchers.
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Feed: All Latest
What Is Angular Momentum, Anyway? It's almost always the last topic in the first semester of introductory physics—angular momentum. Best for last, or something? I've used this concept to describe everything from fidget spinners to standing double back flips to the movement of strange interstellar asteroids . But really, what the heck is angular momentum? Let me start with the following situation. Imagine that there are two balls
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cognitive science
Spatial Processing & Creativity in Students A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
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Blog » Languages » English
December Promotions are upon us! Hello Eyewirers! Our next round of open promotions for Scouts, Scythes , Mods , Mentors , and Mystics is approaching. During this time you can fill out the open promotion form here to be considered by HQ without requiring player sponsors. Scout, Scythe, and Mentor Qualifications: Have at least earned 50,000 points and completed 500 cubes Maintain at least 90% accuracy overall, with some flexibili
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Futurity.org
Watch: This robot swims like a manta ray Researchers have created an aquatic robot called MantaDroid that mimics the swimming locomotion of manta rays. The robotic manta ray, which swims at the speed of twice its body length per second and can operate for up to 10 hours, could potentially be employed for underwater surveillance in future. Manta rays are considered one of nature’s most graceful and efficient swimmers. Unlike most underwa
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Futurity.org
Why you shouldn’t play video games on mute New research suggests you’ll do better at a video game with the sound on. “We live in a multisensory world,” says Robert Sekuler, professor of psychology and of neuroscience at Brandeis University, who studies how the human senses, especially sight and hearing, work with and compete with one another. “How does the brain combine information from different senses? How does it decide when stimuli sh
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Scientific American Content: Global
Bosnian Croat General Dies After Drinking Poison in Courtroom ZAGREB, Nov 29 (Reuters) - The wartime commander of Bosnian Croat forces, Slobodan Praljak, died after he drank poison seconds after United Nations judges turned down his appeal against a 20-year sentence for war crimes against Bosnian Muslims, Croatian state television reported. The broadcaster quoted sources close to Praljak as saying he had died in a hospital in The Hague on Wednesday. Appeals
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New on MIT Technology Review
Snapchat’s Answer to Fake News: Rip the Social from the Media This Robot Picks Up Groceries It’s Never Seen Before Using Its Little Suction Cup A cannister of oatmeal, a tube of chips, or a box of teabags—it’s all the same to this warehouse automaton. Developed by Ocado, the world’s largest online-only grocery retailer, the machine has been designed to pick individual items out of big crates… Read more A cannister of oatmeal, a tube of chips, or a box of te
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Scientific American Content: Global
5 Ways to Be More Patient and Less Annoyed Paul from Australia wrote in and asked how he could cultivate his patience. Paul is visually impaired and often gets questions or offers of help from strangers. At first, the questions were welcome conversation starters and the offers of help were charming. But after years and years, as you might imagine, it’s all started to get annoying. Oblivious questions, miss-the-mark offers of help, and a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists make transparent materials absorb light IMAGE: This is a schematic of a virtual light absorption process: A layer of a transparent material is exposed to light beams from both sides, with the light intensity increasing in... view more Credit: MIPT Press Office A group of physicists from Russia, Sweden, and the U.S. has demonstrated a highly unusual optical effect: They managed to "virtually" absorb light using a material that
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The lichen that changes its reproductive strategy according to the climate Symbiosis between fungi and microalgae gives rise to lichen. Some lichen, however, such as Lobaria scrobiculata, have a unique feature: the fungus establishes a symbiosis with a cyanobacteria, thus requiring water in liquid form to activate photosynthesis. According to a new study, this forces the lichen to concentrate its resources on reproduction in places where water is scarce. For the fir
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Empowering workers can cause uncertainty and resentment Attempts by managers to empower staff by delegating different work to them or asking for their opinions can be detrimental for employee productivity, research shows. Giving employees more authority can have a negative impact on their day to day performance and perhaps give the impression that their boss is just seeking to avoid doing their own work, according to the study. Managers have increasin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Paired mutations: a new approach to discovering the shape of proteinsIt is a bit like business partners: if one of the two parties changes strategy to keep the business going, the other has to adapt in turn. The leap from business ventures to the structure of proteins might seem a little bold. Yet, this concept of 'balanced changes' is precisely the guiding principle of a new study just appeared in PNAS,. The study represents a significant advancement in the fascin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Relation of key determinants affecting mental health disorders in greater mekong subregionThis article is a literature review of the relationship of the determinants affecting GMS mental disorders conducted using the defined strategies
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nerve cell findings may aid understanding of movement disorders The findings relate to a type of cell connection that allows electrical and chemical messages to flow from nerve to muscle cells, enabling motion. The results shed light into conditions where these connections break down, such as motor neurone disease, which can lead to severe problems with walking and reflexes. Researchers used cutting-edge imaging to study 3000 of these cell connections - known
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New on MIT Technology Review
Snapchat’s Answer to Fake News: Tear the Social from the Media This Robot Picks Up Groceries It’s Never Seen Before Using Its Little Suction Cup A cannister of oatmeal, a tube of chips, or a box of teabags—it’s all the same to this warehouse automaton. Developed by Ocado, the world’s largest online-only grocery retailer, the machine has been designed to pick individual items out of big crates… Read more A cannister of oatmeal, a tube of chips, or a box of te
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Polecats sightings reported in EssexA wildlife trust has asked people to get in touch if they spot the creatures.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Eye contact with your baby helps synchronize your brainwaves IMAGE: This is Lucy Kivlin and her baby Ginny. view more Credit: University of Cambridge When a parent and infant interact, various aspects of their behaviour can synchronise, including their gaze, emotions and heartrate, but little is known about whether their brain activity also synchronises - and what the consequences of this might be. Brainwaves reflect the group-level activity of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Traces of life on nearest exoplanets may be hidden in equatorial trap IMAGE: This is an artist's impression of TRAPPIST 1d (right) and its host star TRAPPIST 1 (left). The new research shows how planets like this could hide traces of life from... view more Credit: Credit: MPIA Graphics Department New simulations show that the search for life on other planets may well be more difficult than previously assumed, in research published today in the journal Mon
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biologists taught infusoria to fight poisons IMAGE: Antioxidants counteract the negative effects of hydrogen peroxide on survival of infusorians Paramecium caudatum . It is seen that the antioxidants increase the survival rate of infusorianin the hydrogen peroxide solution... view more Credit: Anatoliy Inozemtsev A team of scientists from the Faculty of Biology of Lomonosov Moscow State University and Laboratory of Aerobic Metabolism
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Not all Republicans are climate change doubters The idea that all Republicans think climate change isn't happening is a myth. A new study published in Springer's journal Climatic Change finds substantial differences in the climate change views of both Republicans and Democrats across different states and congressional districts. The research is led by Matto Mildenberger of the University of California Santa Barbara together with colleagues at
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
HKUST researchers reveal new insights into the control of cellular scaffold IMAGE: The immunofluorescence micrograph (left) of a human epithelial cell shows microtubules (green), centrosomes (2 adjacent yellow spots at the cell center), and nucleus (blue). The cartoons illustrate microtubules anchored by... view more Credit: Division of Life Science, HKUST Microtubule cytoskeleton is a major cellular scaffold that is required for dynamic organization of the cytoplasm
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists developed a new sensor for future missions to the Moon and Mars A team of scientists from the Faculty of Physics of Lomonosov Moscow State University and their colleagues developed a compact spectral polarimeter for carrying outmineralogical investigations on the surface of astronomical bodies. The description of the device and the results of prototype testing were published in Optics Express . Spectral imaging, that is measuring spectral characteristics for
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Footage of Earth from the International Space StationAstronaut Randy Bresnik shares footage of a maintenance mission outside the International Space Station.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sometimes, it pays for the boss to be humbleIt’s good to be humble when you’re the boss – as long as that’s what your employees expect. Researchers studying workplaces in China found that some real-life teams showed more creativity if the employees rated their bosses as showing more humility.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Robots Could Force 375 Million People to Switch Occupations by 2030 This Robot Picks Up Groceries It’s Never Seen Before Using Its Little Suction Cup A cannister of oatmeal, a tube of chips, or a box of teabags—it’s all the same to this warehouse automaton. Developed by Ocado, the world’s largest online-only grocery retailer, the machine has been designed to pick individual items out of big crates… Read more A cannister of oatmeal, a tube of chips, or a box of te
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SUVs are main attraction at L.A. Auto Show The 2019 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1 convertible is revealed during the AutoMobility LA auto show Tuesday, Nov. 28, 2017, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson) The floor at this year's Los Angeles Auto Show will look a lot like America's roads: full of SUVs. Hyundai and Nissan will debut new small SUVs at the show, while Subaru will take the wraps off its new three-row SUV, the Ascent. Jeep will sh
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Big Think
Kansas is Rebuilding its Entire Educational System In August this year, Kansas officially launched an exciting educational reform with the goal to completely redesign the educational system in the state. It is called Kansas Can School Redesign Project and public officials are likening it to the NASA moon missions of the 1960s. They have even named the pilot school districts that will launch the new school designs in 2018 “the Mercury Seven.”
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Ingeniøren
Statens spillemyndighed: Lootboxes kan være gambling Den danske spillemyndighed mener, at lootboxes i digitale spil i visse tilfælde er omfattet af den danske spillelov og derfor skal have tilladelse fra myndigheden for at blive spillet i Danmark. »Loot boxes skal - ligesom andre former for spil - have en tilladelse, hvis følgende tre kriterier er opfyldt: Der skal være et indskud, der skal være et element af tilfældighed, og der skal være en gevin
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UGR researchers put a geophysical database of Antarctica at the disposal of the scientific community IMAGE: The TOMO-DEC experiment carried out studies on the geophysical activity on Antarctica. view more Credit: University of Granada An international group of scientists, led by Professor of Earth Physics Jesús M. Ibáñez Godoy from the University of Granada (UGR), has made available to the whole scientific community, through a public, free access database, the results of a geophysical rese
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers develop new technique to model transplantation of the human liver A team of scientists, physicians, and engineers from the Center for Engineering in Medicine (CEM) and the Transplant Center of the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) at the Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA reported the development of a new technology that enables researchers to better study liver transplantation in a pre-clinical setting. The model specifically examines the reperfusion stag
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New method maps chemicals in the skinA new method of examining the skin can reduce the number of animal experiments while providing new opportunities to develop pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. Chemical imaging allows all layers of the skin to be seen and the presence of virtually any substance in any part of the skin to be measured with a very high degree of precision.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The ultimate defense against hackers may be just a few atoms thickThe next generation of electronic hardware security may be at hand as researchers introduce a new class of unclonable cybersecurity security primitives made of a low-cost nanomaterial with the highest possible level of structural randomness. Randomness is highly desirable for constructing the security primitives that encrypt and thereby secure computer hardware and data physically, rather than by
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Ingeniøren
Svensk projekt vil fjerne problem med mikroplast fra tekstiler Når man dyrker sport, er svedtransporterende tøj fantastisk. Det leder sveden væk fra huden, så man ikke føler sig våd, og det tørrer hurtigt. Men tøjet består af kunststof med mikroplast, og når det ryger i vaskemaskinen, afgiver det små plastfibre til vandet. Gennem kloaksystemet havner spildevandet på renseanlægget og siden i havet, hvor mikroplast skader miljø og natur. Det kan f.eks. give be
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Science | The Guardian
Different dialects: tell us about the unusual American words you use I f you live or work in America, what do you call a fizzy drink you buy during your lunch break? Is it soda? Maybe it’s pop? Or perhaps it’s a soft drink, or a coke (even if it’s not actually Coca Cola)? British Library project discovers two new words – thanks to Guardian readers Eight months ago the Guardian ran a story on dialect from across the UK using the British Library’s Evolving English W
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop new technique to model transplantation of the human liver A team of scientists, physicians, and engineers from the Center for Engineering in Medicine (CEM) and the Transplant Center of the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) at the Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA reported the development of a new technology that enables researchers to better study liver transplantation in a pre-clinical setting. The model specifically examines the reperfusion stag
6h
Gizmodo
Here Is Snapchat's ‘Disruptive’ New Redesign Image: Snap Snapchat, the photo-sharing app the olds can’t seem to figure out, is getting a facelift this week in a do-or-die attempt to win over new users. Snap, the social app’s parent company, said this redesign was coming earlier this month. And today we get see their vision of an “easier to use” Snapchat. The new design is apparently so incredibly simple that CEO Evan Spiegel had to write an
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Futurity.org
Divers find methane-eating organisms deep in flooded cave Deep in an underwater cave in Mexico’s Yucatán Peninsula, researchers have discovered cave-adapted organisms existing off of methane gas and the bacteria near it. The discovery raises the possibility that other life forms are also living this way in similar caves around the world. The team examined flooded cave passages within the Ox Bel Ha cave network in the Yucatán where there is a mix of fres
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Soccer success is all about skill: study A new study finds skill -- not speed -- determines soccer performance. Credit: Nick Wiebe A new study led by UQ School of Biological Sciences Professor Robbie Wilson used analytic techniques developed in evolutionary biology to determine the impact of a player's skill, athletic ability, and balance on their success during a game. The researchers found it was their skill—not speed, strength, or fi
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Gizmodo
Razer's Powerhouse Phone for Gamers Is Delightfully Different All images: Sam Rutherford/Gizmodo While its original mission was to make high-end gaming mice, Razer’s line of products has grown over the years to include everything from keyboards and fitness bands to entire desktops, laptops, and pretty much anything else the company could put RGB lighting in. However, up until now, there was one glaring hole in Razer’s otherwise comprehensive lineup: phones.
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Gizmodo
Take Your Pick of Three Ultra-Popular White Noise Machines, All At All-Time Lows Commerce Content is independent of Editorial and Advertising, and if you buy something through our posts, we may get a small share of the sale. Click here for more. If you missed the white noise machine Gold Box yesterday, well you’re in luck, because Amazon has more white noise machines on sale today . These machines are the crazy-popular Marpac Dohm , Marpar Dohm-DS and travel-sized Rohm . Unli
6h
Live Science
Even a Kid Can Prove the Earth Is Round: Here's How This view of Earth's horizon was taken by an Expedition 7 crewmember onboard the International Space Station on June 13, 2003. Credit: NASA This article was originally published at The Conversation. The publication contributed the article to Live Science's Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights . Could 2,000 years of belief be wrong? Are we in fact living on a disc rather than a globe? One believe
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Invasive frogs give invasive birds a boost in HawaiiPuerto Rican coqui frogs were accidentally introduced to Hawaii in the 1980s, and today there are as many as 91,000 frogs per hectare in some locations. What does that mean for native wildlife? Concerns that ravenous coquis could reduce the food available for the islands' native insect-eating birds, many of which are already declining, spurred researchers to examine the relationship between frog a
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Gizmodo
Genetically Engineering Yourself Sounds Like a Horrible Idea—But This Guy Is Doing It Anyway “If something goes wrong, I can just chop off that part of the skin.” Josiah Zayner took a swig from his beer and squinted into the spotlight. He was already kind of drunk. He also hadn’t bothered to write a speech. Tattooed and heavily pierced with a shock of blue-gray hair, he shuffled around uneasily on stage. But 150-odd people had flown in from around the country to hear him speak—the mad pi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Theory of the evolution of sexes tested with algae IMAGE: Volvocine alga enabled a test of the theory of evolution of the sexes because of their varied differences in gamete size. This one is Gonium pectorale which has same-sized gametes.... view more Credit: Image credit: Environmental Protection Agency The varied sex lives of a type of green algae have enabled a University of Adelaide researcher to test a theory of why there are males and
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Soccer success is all about skill IMAGE: A new study finds skill -- not speed -- determines soccer performance. view more Credit: Nick Wiebe A new study led by UQ School of Biological Sciences Professor Robbie Wilson used analytic techniques developed in evolutionary biology to determine the impact of a player's skill, athletic ability, and balance on their success during a game. The researchers found it was their skill -
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Three UNIST researchers named world's most highly cited researchers IMAGE: Three UNIST researchers were named the world's most highly cited researchers by Clarivate Analytics. From left are Professor Jin Young Kim, Professor Jaephil Cho, and Professor Rodney S. Ruoff. view more Credit: UNIST Three UNIST researchers have distinguished themselves with inclusion in the 2017 list of Highly Cited Researchers, a yearly distinction released by Clarivate An
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New synthethic protocol to form 3-D porous organic network IMAGE: This is a solid-state explosion of bulk HEA crystals. view more Credit: UNIST A team of Korean researchers, affiliated with UNIST has recently announced the principle of producing porous organic materials in the blink of an eye, like firing bullets. This is similar to the mechanism of chemical reaction in explosives in which pulling the trigger causes the detonator to explode
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Thinner photodiode with higher stability and performance IMAGE: This is a new type of thin-film photodiode developed by DGIST research team. view more Credit: Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST) A research team of Energy Science and Engineering at DGIST has unveiled a new high-performance photodiode that reduces thickness to one-sixth of conventional silicon photodiodes. According to the researchers, the key is t
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Viden
Kan man dø af et knust hjerte? kl. 15.57 Takotsubo. Det kalder japanerne et knust hjerte, der svigter. Lidelsen har fået navn efter en blæksprutte-fælde, der er formet som vase. En form, der minder om den, som det knuste hjerte får, når dele af hjertet holder op med at slå, og dets venstre hovedkammer svulmer op. Herhjemme er fænomenet - fra især medierne - kendt som ‘broken heart syndrome’. De historier, vi hører, handler som
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Feed: All Latest
The FCC's Net Neutrality Comments Included Millions of Fake Emails and More Over a third of the nearly 22 million comments that poured into the Federal Communications Commission regarding its plan to repeal net neutrality protections included one of seven identical messages. More than half were associated with duplicate or temporary emails, including some 7,500 affiliated with the address "example@example.com." Dozens included references to the animated film Bee Movie, a
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Futurity.org
Prison release often disrupts HIV treatment While in jail or in prison, people receive treatment for HIV and other conditions such as substance use and psychiatric disorders. But after release, care is either disrupted or stops all together. For a new study in The Lancet HIV , researchers focused on people living with HIV who were released from jails and prisons in Connecticut between 2007 and 2014. By combining comprehensive databases fro
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Dagens Medicin
Lose bliver formand for Danske Regioner Stephanie Lose (V) bliver ny formand for Danske Regioner. Det står klart, efter De Radikale har besluttet at støtte Venstre-kvinden.
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New Scientist - News
Weird ‘underground’ flower has evolved to look like a mushroom Blooming complex Garden World Images Ltd/Alamy Stock Photo By Jake Buehler THERE is a plant whose flowers bloom almost underground – and that might be how it lures in its favourite pollinators, mushroom-eating flies. The cast-iron plant ( Aspidistra elatior ) has drab flowers that are often buried in leaf litter. Biologists have long been puzzled about how these subterranean flowers are polli
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Dagens Medicin
Usikkert om Heino Knudsen bliver formand for regionsrådKonstitueringen i Region Sjælland er kollapset efter diskussioner mellem Enhedslisten og Dansk Folkeparti.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers discover neurotoxin in Lake Winnipeg Stephanie Bishop, a graduate student in chemistry at UBC Okanagan, holds a sample from Lake Winnipeg. Credit: UBC Okanagan A new study from UBC's Okanagan campus has found that BMAA—a toxin linked to several neurodegenerative diseases—is present in high concentrations during cyanobacteria blooms in Lake Winnipeg. "Cyanobacteria blooms have become increasingly common in Lake Winnipeg since the 199
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UBC Okanagan researchers discover neurotoxin in Lake Winnipeg IMAGE: Susan Much is an associate professor of chemistry at UBC Okanagan. view more Credit: UBC Okanagan A new study from UBC's Okanagan campus has found that BMAA--a toxin linked to several neurodegenerative diseases--is present in high concentrations during cyanobacteria blooms in Lake Winnipeg. "Cyanobacteria blooms have become increasingly common in Lake Winnipeg since the 1990s,"
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Call for workers to rise up A James Cook University study has found nearly three quarters of office workers believe there is a negative relationship between sitting down all day at work and their health - and that bosses are crucial to helping solve the problem. PhD candidate Teneale McGuckin is a lecturer in Sport and Exercise Science at JCU. She surveyed 140 office workers on what they thought was the relationship between
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UTSW scientists take early step to personalized breast cancer care IMAGE: This is Dr. Yonghao Yu. view more Credit: UT Southwestern DALLAS - Nov. 28, 2017 - UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have developed a method to map protein changes that occur in different subtypes of breast cancer cells in response to DNA damage from a new class of chemotherapy drugs. The research could someday lead to a test to predict an individual patient's response to
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New on MIT Technology Review
This Robot Picks Up Groceries It’s Never Seen Before Using Its Little Suction Cup This Robot Picks Up Groceries It’s Never Seen Before Using Its Little Suction Cup A cannister of oatmeal, a tube of chips, or a box of teabags—it’s all the same to this warehouse automaton. Developed by Ocado, the world’s largest online-only grocery retailer, the machine has been designed to pick individual items out of big crates… Read more A cannister of oatmeal, a tube of chips, or a box of te
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Dana Foundation
Free Public Briefing on Neurotechnology and the Military In the Washington, DC area on Friday lunchtime? Come learn about cutting-edge, brain-related technologies that are particularly relevant to members of the military and their families. Come to a free public luncheon briefing, “ Neurotechnology and the Military ,” hosted by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), through the support of the Dana Foundation, and in conjunction
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Artifacts from King Tut's tomb set for international tourArtifacts from King Tut's tomb are going on tour next year to mark the upcoming 100th anniversary of the discovery of the Egyptian pharaoh's resting place.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microsoft plans to rebuild its suburban headquarters (Update) It's not a second headquarters, but Amazon.com says it will add about 2,000 employees in New York City during the next three years, more than doubling an outpost focused on the online retailer's advertising business.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Trophy hunting removes 'good genes' and raises extinction risk Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Cecil the lion, killed in 2015, was a major attraction at a national park in Zimbabwe. His black-fringed mane was an identifying characteristic Hunting animals that stand out from the crowd because of their impressive horns or lustrous manes could lead to extinction, according to a study. Research predicts that removing even 5% of high-quality males risk
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hip steroid injections associated with risky bone changesOsteoarthritis patients who received a steroid injection in the hip had a significantly greater incidence of bone death and collapse compared with control groups, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
CT shows enlarged aortas in former pro football playersFormer National Football League (NFL) players are more likely to have enlarged aortas, a condition that may put them at higher risk of aneurysms, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
No evidence that gadolinium causes neurologic harmThere is no evidence that accumulation in the brain of the element gadolinium speeds cognitive decline, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Minimally invasive treatment provides relief from back painThe majority of patients were pain free after receiving a new image-guided pulsed radiofrequency treatment for low back pain and sciatica, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Broader gun restrictions lead to fewer intimate partner homicidesState laws that restrict gun ownership among domestic abusers and others with violent histories appear to significantly reduce intimate partner homicides, indicates a groundbreaking American study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
MUSE probes uncharted depths of Hubble Ultra Deep FieldAstronomers using the MUSE instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile have conducted the deepest spectroscopic survey ever. They focused on the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, measuring distances and properties of 1600 very faint galaxies including 72 galaxies that have never been detected before. This wealth of new information is giving astronomers insight into star formation in the early Univers
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Defending the science of infant imitationAn expert argues that a recent study failed to use appropriate methods, and is highly flawed, and argues that there is overwhelming evidence that infant imitation is real.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stress during pregnancy affects the size of the babyBabies are physically affected by the stress level of their mother during pregnancy, new research indicates.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What is bitcoin? A look at the digital currency In this Monday, April 7, 2014 file photo, Bitcoin logos are displayed at the Inside Bitcoins conference and trade show, in New York. The price of bitcoin, the most widely used virtual currency, rose above $10,000 on Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2017 for the first time, breaking a symbolic threshold in what has been a vertiginous ascent this year. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File) One of them is worth over $1
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cranberry growers tart on phosphorus The cranberry harvest of Atwood Bog, Carver, Massachusetts. Credit: Casey Kennedy At Thanksgiving, many Americans look forward to eating roast turkey, pumpkin pie, and tangy red cranberries. To feed that appetite, cranberry farming is big business. In Massachusetts, cranberries are the most valuable food crop. The commonwealth's growers provides one-fourth of the U.S. cranberry supply. Water play
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Prototype atom interferometer Credit: RAL Space/IQO Hannover A prototype atom interferometer chip in a vacuum chamber, harnessing the quantum behaviour of atoms to perform ultra-precise measurements of gravity. "Quantum physics and space travel are two of the greatest scientific achievements of the last century," comments ESA's Bruno Leone, who this month organised the latest Agency workshop on quantum technologies. "We now
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Time between world-changing volcanic super-eruptions less than previously thought The Toba caldera – the site of a massive super-eruption 75,000 years ago. Credit: NASA/METI/AIST/Japan Space Systems, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team After analysing a database of geological records dated within the last 100,000 years, a team of scientists from the University of Bristol has discovered the average time between so-called volcanic super-eruptions is actually much less than previou
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New on MIT Technology Review
Robots Could Force 375 Million People to Switch Occupation by 2030 This Robot Picks Up Groceries It’s Never Seen Before Using Its Little Suction Cup A cannister of oatmeal, a tube of chips, or a box of teabags—it’s all the same to this warehouse automaton. Developed by Ocado, the world’s largest online-only grocery retailer, the machine has been designed to pick individual items out of big crates… Read more A cannister of oatmeal, a tube of chips, or a box of te
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bio-computer powered by jellyfish DNA plays Tetris and other retro videogames The bio-pixel display can play games Tetris. Credit: Imperial College London An Imperial alumus has developed a bio-pixel display that can play games such as Tetris, Snake or Pong using the protein that makes jellyfish glow Bixel is a creative, educational tool that helps the public learn about synthetic biology, biotechnology and its applications. It was created by Cell-Free Technology , a start
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Catastrophic failures in the NHS can be caused by basic communication breakdownsThe NHS sometimes struggles to manage basic communication systems that are often critical to the safety of patients. A new article reports that many communication processes in the NHS are still commonly viewed as mundane administrative tasks, instead of safety-critical processes that are essential to safe care.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Regulators should not consider 'lost pleasure' of quitting smokingFederal officials considering new regulations on tobacco products should give more weight to the fact that a majority of smokers are unhappy about feeling addicted to cigarettes, and should put less emphasis on the theory that smokers who quit are losing 'pleasure' in their lives, according to a recent study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Antibiotics administered during labor delay healthy gut bacteria in babiesAntibiotics administered during labour for Group B Streptococcus (GBS) affect the development of gut bacteria in babies, according to a study. The gut bacteria development of the infants was tested by researchers at four points over the first 12 weeks of life, including at three days, 10 days, six weeks and 12 weeks.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New technique reduces side-effects, improves delivery of chemotherapy nanodrugsA new method for delivering chemotherapy nanodrugs has been created that increases the drugs' bioavailability and reduces side-effects. Their study shows that administering an FDA-approved nutrition source prior to chemotherapy can reduce the amount of the toxic drugs that settle in the spleen, liver and kidneys.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Understanding a therapeutic paradox for treating thrombo-vascular complications in kidney diseaseA potential treatment target has been discovered to prevent chronic kidney disease patients from developing blood clots without causing bleeding complications - an unwanted and perplexing side effect. They say the strategy offers a much-needed therapeutic alternative to standard-of-care heparin, which throws off the finely-tuned balance between pro-clotting and anticoagulant factors in blood vesse
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Decoding the molecular mechanisms of ovarian cancer progressionResearchers identify several lncRNAs that are linked to the ovarian cancer in a cohort of patients. These lncRNAs were reproducibly altered and are responsible for a shift in cellular function that contributes to the metastatic properties of the cancer cells.
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Gizmodo
Andy Rubin Takes Leave of Absence From Essential Amid Report of ‘Inappropriate Relationship’ at Google [Updated] Photo: Getty Andy Rubin, the cofounder of Android, left Google in 2014 to launch a startup incubator in what was seemingly an amicable departure. “I want to wish Andy all the best with what’s next,” Google co-founder Larry Page said in a statement following the announcement of Rubin’s exit. But according to the Information , an investigation into an “inappropriate relationship” Rubin had with a w
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cranberry growers tart on phosphorus IMAGE: This is the cranberry harvest of Atwood Bog, Carver, Massachusetts. view more Credit: Casey Kennedy At Thanksgiving, many Americans look forward to eating roast turkey, pumpkin pie, and tangy red cranberries. To feed that appetite, cranberry farming is big business. In Massachusetts, cranberries are the most valuable food crop. The commonwealth's growers provides one-fourth of th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Synthetic cannabis-like drug reduces sleep apnea CHICAGO --- A synthetic cannabis-like drug in a pill was safe and effective in treating obstructive sleep apnea in the first large multi-site study of a drug for apnea funded by the National Institutes of Health. The study was conducted at Northwestern Medicine and the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). There is currently no drug treatment for sleep apnea, a sleep breathing disorder affecti
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The lichen that changes its reproductive strategy according to the climate Lobarina scrobiculata lives on trees. Credit: Sonia Merinero Symbiosis between fungi and microalgae gives rise to lichen. Some lichen, however, such as Lobaria scrobiculata, have a unique feature: The fungus establishes a symbiosis with a cyanobacteria, thus requiring water in liquid form to activate photosynthesis. According to a new study, this forces the lichen to concentrate its resources on
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
This is how perfluorinated substance pollution is distributed in Spain Map of the distribution by autonomous communities of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) concentrations, one of the alkyl perfluorinated substances found in a multitude of products and industrial processes and that may pose a risk to health. Credit: José Antonio Peñas / SINC Frying pans, pizza boxes, clothes and textiles are just some of the products which contain perfluoroalkyl compounds, used for
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Jellyfish on the menu Credit: University of East Anglia Squid, sole, dogfish, herring and cod all feed on baby jellyfish – according to new research from the University of East Anglia and the Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas). The moon jellyfish is commonly found around the coastlines of Britain. They're known for their translucent white colour and gentle swimming movements. Until now
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An Otherworldly Dive Into a Mexican Sinkhole For British photographer Tom St. George, diving is escape. But when he plunged into this underwater cave in Tulum, Mexico last month, he found himself on another planet entirely. Runoff stained with tannins from the forest had dyed the normally clear water a surreal, Martian shade of red. "It really did feel like being in outer space," he says The cave he visited is the Aktun Ha cenote, a submerg
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Traces of life on nearest exoplanets may be hidden in equatorial trap Artist's impression of TRAPPIST 1d (right) and its host star TRAPPIST 1 (left). The new research shows how planets like this could hide traces of life from astronomers' observations. Credit: MPIA Graphics Department New simulations show that the search for life on other planets may well be more difficult than previously assumed, in research published today in the journal Monthly Notices of the Ro
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA finds Virginia metro area is sinking unevenly Motorists crossing a flooded street in a low-lying Norfolk neighborhood called Colonial Place, which floods at every high tide. Credit: Chesapeake Bay Program/Will Parson A new NASA-led study shows that land in the Hampton Roads, Virginia, metropolitan area is sinking at highly uneven rates, with a few trouble spots subsiding 7 to 10 times faster than the area average. Whereas earlier estimates h
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Elastic incoherent neutron scattering at ILL challenge the Lindemann criterion in proteins An image of the Lysozyme protein while it undergoes melting Proteins are the nano-machines that Nature uses to perform most of the processes critical for the metabolism in cells. One of the key goals of life and physical sciences revolves around understanding the structural and dynamic properties of the native, transition, intermediate, and denatured states of proteins. The denaturation transitio
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Satellite data guided effort to help Nepal recover from a series of earthquakes Credit: NASA The Nepal earthquake disaster launched a global humanitarian effort in 2015. Even as the dust still settled, space-based information aided the nation's recovery… and watched for new hazards. "All of a sudden it seemed like as if the ground had dropped away and then everything around us started shaking… It was impossible to try to stand and escape from there." Selina Shakya, a nativ
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video: Ariane 6—a reality in Kourou At the center of our galaxy, in the immediate vicinity of its supermassive black hole, is a region wracked by powerful tidal forces and bathed in intense ultraviolet light and X-ray radiation. These harsh conditions, astronomers ...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Flexible impedance sensor can fit inside urinary catheters; monitor and treat biofilm Credit: A. James Clark School of Engineering, University of Maryland A long-term, interdisciplinary research collaboration at the University of Maryland's A. James Clark School of Engineering has made significant progress in detecting and treating bacterial biofilms by developing new chemical compounds, materials, and microsystems that can fight these sources of post-operative infections. In thei
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Addition of tin boosts nanoparticle's photoluminescence High-resolution and elemental mapping electron micrographs of near-infrared active GeSn/CdS nanocrystals. Credit: Ames Laboratory Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have developed germanium nanoparticles with improved photoluminescence, making them potentially better materials for solar cells and imaging probes. The research team found that by adding tin to the nanopar
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study discovers why global warming will accelerate as CO2 levels rise Credit: University of Reading Global warming is likely to speed up as the Earth becomes increasingly more sensitive to atmospheric CO₂ concentrations, scientists from the University of Reading have warned. In a new study, published this week in the prestigious journal PNAS , the scientists explain that the influence of increasing levels of atmospheric CO2 on global warming will become more severe
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Gizmodo
World's Deepest-Living Fish Found Five Miles Beneath the Sea Surface X-ray image (Image: Adam Summers/University of Washington) The oceans’s deepest point is Challenger Deep, a chasm almost 11000 meters ( 36,200 feet ) below the surface. Few fish species can stand this dark, hostile environment—but scientists have identified one that flourishes. Image: Mackenzie Gerringer/University of Washington Meet the Mariana snailfish or Pseudoliparis swirei, the deepest fish
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Dagens Medicin
Ny lov gør det lettere at drive flere praksis-klinikker Et enigt Folketing har vedtaget ny lov, der bl.a. giver læger mulighed for at sælge et ydernummer direkte til læger, der allerede har eget ydernummer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Manitoba's golden-winged warblers: world's last pure population touched by local and distant conservation problems Credit: Christian Artuso Manitoba offers a special home to golden-winged warblers and until recently we were thought to have the most genetically pure populations of these striking songbirds. But new research suggests this is changing. Golden-winged warblers across North America have been declining for many decades, as a result of habitat loss and interbreeding with a closely-related species, the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Detector dogs provide hope to save numbats Our much-loved, cute and furry West Aussie emblem has been fighting a losing battle against feral cats in the wild. But thanks to a group of volunteers, dogs will be trained to sniff out feral cats that are destroying the endangered numbat. The idea came from the Numbat Taskforce , which was started by four wildlife enthusiasts as a Facebook page nearly 3 years ago. Co-founder and volunteer Joh
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How gendered language shapes the way we see the world Indians see the Ganges river as female. Credit: Abir Roy Barman via Shutterstock.com "But ol' man river, He jes' keeps rollin' along!" Is water male or female – and does it really matter? Unlike languages such as French, Spanish and German, English does not allocate gender to words. Although some things, ships and countries for example, often have feminine associations, there are no grammatical
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fewer crops are feeding more people worldwide – and that's not good Peruvian potatoes and black corn. Credit: Shutterstock.com One day last March I talked with Juliana and Elisa, a mother and daughter who farmed just outside the city of Huánuco, Peru. Although they had only one acre of land in this mountainous landscape, they grew dozens of local varieties of potatoes and corn, along with other crops. And they knew each of their varieties by a common name – mostl
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Simulated computer network alters reality to mislead hackers Sandia National Laboratories cyber researcher Vince Urias helped develop the Sandia-originated HADES program that employs alternative realities to confuse hackers. HADES stands for High-fidelity Adaptive Deception & Emulation System. Credit: Randy Montoya The Russian novelist Fyodor Dostoevsky once postulated that the devil no longer uses fire and brimstone but instead simply tells you what you w
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Watch Marvel's Avengers: Infinity War First Full Trailer Right Here VIDEO If you’re merely a casual fan of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, the arrival of the first trailer for Avengers: Infinity War might not seem like a huge deal: After all, pretty much every Marvel movie now feels like an Avengers movie, with the team’s various heroes playing crucial supporting roles in such recent hits as Captain America: Civil War , Spider-Man: Homecoming , and Thor: Ragnarok
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Dagens Medicin
Sundhedsminister lover plan for det nære sundhedsvæsen inden sommerDer kommer en samlet plan for det nære sundhedsvæsen, og den kommer før sommerferien. Det fortalte sundhedsminister Ellen Trane Nørby (V) til samråd.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Higher plant species richness may not be enough to protect ecosystems from the worst impacts of climate extremes Studies on mild fluctuations in weather have provided support for the idea that higher biodiversity results in more stable functioning of ecosystems, but critical appraisal of the evidence from extreme event studies is lacking. Higher plant species richness is not always sufficient to reduce ecosystem vulnerability to climate extremes, as shown in a comprehensive literature analysis published tod
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A theoretical model will allow systematic study of a promising class of peculiar quantum states A universal theoretical framework will help guide research on exotic topological states, shown here in terms of the spatial distribution of electron states, which could be used to realize practical quantum computers. Credit: American Physical Society Research on the fragile states of matter that could give traction to the many promises of quantum computing has been given a boost by a comprehensiv
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study of whooping cranes reveals pairs bond even before reaching mating age Credit: CC0 Public Domain A team of researchers from the U.S. and Germany has found that many whooping cranes pair up even before they are old enough to mate. In their paper published in the journal Animal Behavior , the group describes their study of the rare birds and offers some opinions on why the birds pair up so early and become mates for life. Prior research has shown that whooping cranes,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Thin films of a lead-free piezoelectric finally match the performance of the lead-bearing standard An electron microscopy image of the KNN thin film showing the controlled formation of the crystalline domains responsible for the piezoelectric effect. Credit: A*STAR Institute of Materials Research and Engineering An advance in fabrication technology has greatly improved the material quality and performance of thin films of a lead-free 'piezoelectric' material. This development by A*STAR researc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Magnesium alloy as a lighter alternative to aluminum alloy Orthogonal groove strain pressing and fast annealing dramatically shrinks the grain size of AZ31 magnesium alloy, resulting in increased strength and room temperature ductility. Before processing (left), after processing (right). Credit: Elsevier Magnesium alloy can be made stronger and more workable by hot pressing under optimized conditions to produce an ultra-fine crystalline structure, A*STAR
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Dagens Medicin
Indisk svindelfirmas produkt er nu trukket tilbageEfter at Dagens Medicin i dag har skrevet om svindel bedrevet af den indiske lægemiddelproducent Evertogen, oplyser Lægemiddelstyrelsen, at den nu har trukket firmaets produkt af det danske marked.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The light chain subunits of therapeutic antibodies impact drug performance and yield Antibody-based drugs have long been a mainstay of treatment for many conditions, especially cancer and autoimmune diseases, but there may still be room for improving these therapies. An A*STAR study has found that changes to a part of the antibodies that's often overlooked by protein engineers and drug companies can have dramatic effects on target binding and manufacturing yield. An antibody is m
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Ice Age HorseScientists have identified a new genus of extinct horse that lived in North America during the last ice age.
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Gizmodo
Holy Crap, the First Avengers: Infinity War Trailer Is Here GIF The first trailer for the biggest, most anticipated Marvel movie ever is finally here. Directed by Joe and Anthony Russo, and starring basically everyone, here’s the trailer for Avengers: Infinity War . Four months ago, Marvel showed fans at the D23 Expo and San Diego Comic-Con the first footage from this highly anticipated film, but didn’t release the footage online. It drove people crazy, b
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
U.S. social policies helped keep child poverty rates from climbing during Great Recession Social policies enacted in the United States during the Great Recession appear to have kept child poverty rates stable during a critical period when such programs were most needed because of a struggling economy, an Oregon State University researcher has found in a new study. The 2008-09 recession offers a valuable window to study the impact of important safety net programs such as unemployment,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Balloon shaped micro-robot able to move through highly viscous fluid Going with the flow. A new swimmer design is a sphere that collapses and re-inflates with changes in the applied pressure. The swimmer takes on slightly different shapes during the two phases of the deflation–re-inflation cycle, which generates asymmetric flow in the surrounding fluid (arrows) that allows it to make forward progress. Credit: A. Djellouli/CNRS/Grenoble Alps Univ. (Phys.org)—A team
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researcher discusses the biological crosstalk between microbes and hosts Stavroula Hatzios listens in on dialogues between infectious bacteria and host cells. Trained in chemistry at MIT and Berkeley, she joined West Campus in January 2017 as a faculty member of the Microbial Sciences Institute and the Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology. Hatzios became interested in infectious disease as a graduate student and decided to focus on microbiology
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Scientific American Content: Global
Odd "Blobs" Beneath Earth's Surface Finally Explained The boundary between the Earth's outermost layer, the crust, and the underlying mantle is speckled with mysterious, blob-like regions. Scientists have long known about these odd pockets, which are called ultralow-velocity zones. They slow down the seismic waves caused by earthquakes and may be the culprit for deep mantle plumes , which can lead to volcanic hotspots like those that created Yellows
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Popular Science
Yetis are real, they just also happen to be Himalayan brown bears It would be easy to dismiss the myth of the yeti as just that: a myth. There’s no conclusive evidence that a giant, ape-like creature lives in the Himalayas (or anywhere else, for that matter). But the beauty of science is that we don’t just have to roll our eyes. We can test the hypothesis. And yetis, as it turns out, are real. That is, if you’re willing to accept "yeti" as the nickname of a rec
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Live Science
Photos: 1923 Sphinx from Movie Set Found Buried in Sandy Dune A remarkably well-preserved plaster-of-paris sphinx was uncovered in the dunes along the California coast, near Santa Barbara. The more than 90-year-old sphinx once graced the movie set of the famous 1923 black-and-white blockbuster "The Ten Commandments." After Hollywood director Cecil B. DeMille finished filming the movie, he had the set buried in the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes. Now, archaeologists
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Live Science
94-Year-Old 'Ten Commandments' Sphinx Unearthed in Coastal Dunes The newly discovered sphinx is brightly colored, with a deep terracotta hue. Credit: Dunes Center Archaeologists have unearthed a 94-year-old, brightly colored sphinx that once graced the set of the 1923 Hollywood blockbuster, "The Ten Commandments," according to an announcement released Monday (Nov. 27) from the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes Center. The 300-lb. (136 kilogram) plaster-of-paris sphinx is
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New tools aid hunt for life-extending chemicals Credit: Michael S. Helfenbein Yale researchers have discovered novel chemical compounds that extend the lifespan of a species of yeast by using a new technology that could also hunt for tools to combat aging in other species as well, they report Nov. 28 in the journal Cell Reports . "Research on human aging has been slowed by ethical concerns or time constraints of the research, but fortunately m
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sneaky males adopt female-like brains to fool big brutes Can you spot the sneaker male? Distinctive territorial males (top left) defend courtship territories visited by groups of females, which may also include cryptic “sneaker” males. Credit: Kevin Bryant In the ever-competitive mating scene, new University of Otago research has revealed how males of some species revert to deception and disguise in order to lure females. Lead author, Dr Erica Todd say
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Dagens Medicin
Svendborg-sagen kommer for Højesteret til martsTil foråret bliver det afgjort, hvad Højesteret mener om Svendborg-sagen.
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New Scientist - News
Cuts likely for one of NASA’s next big space-based telescopes Will it take off? TJT Photography/Goddard Space Flight Center/NASA ONE of NASA’s next big telescopes is facing cuts due to skyrocketing costs. The budget for the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) has ballooned from a projected $2 billion to at least $3.9 billion, according to a recent report by an independent review team. That is due to an upgraded 2.4-metre telescope and an added
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Futurity.org
To promote electronic medical records, focus on privacy Privacy concerns keep most patients from signing up to electronically share their medical records with health care providers, but education could make the difference, a new study suggests. “Physicians need to know how important their relationships are with the people who come to them for care…” The study found that while patient education has typically focused on the benefits of electronic record
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Release of the Dellingr CubeSat from the ISSDellingr, a shoebox-sized spacecraft built to show that CubeSat platforms could be cost-effective, reliable and capable of gathering highly robust science, was released from the International Space Station on Nov. 20, 2017. This image shows the release of Dellingr, which NASA specifically developed to provide high-quality science data on a small platform.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First forms of life on Earth unveiled in hot spring Steam rises from Great Boiling Spring, a nearly 200-degree natural pool where Lawrence Livermore scientists and colleagues from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, California State University, San Bernardino and Stanford University have found the most ancient single-celled bacteria and archaea. Credit: UNLV Terrestrial geothermal systems are like buried treasure when it comes to finding out the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Algorithm leverages Titan supercomputer to create high-performing deep neural networks Inspired by the brain’s web of neurons, deep neural networks consist of thousands or millions of simple computational units. Leveraging the GPU computing power of the Cray XK7 Titan, ORNL researchers were able to auto-generate custom neural networks for science problems in a matter of hours as opposed to the months needed using conventional methods. Credit: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Deep neur
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Medaka fish use faces to identify different individuals An illustration of right-side up and upside-down medaka fac. Credit: Eiji FUJIWARA Documentary Channel Co. Ltd. For many animals including humans, the ability to identify different individuals among their own kind is an essential ability for everyday living. Faces are the most important body part for individual recognition in many animals, and faces are special in many ways. For example, humans a
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Gizmodo
What Kind of Sorcery Lets People Swim In This Sand-Filled Hot Tub? GIF You can try as hard as you want, but you’ll never be as cool an uncle as ex-NASA JPL engineer Mark Rober. Using elaborate experiments, he makes learning about science even more entertaining than Bill Nye did, and his latest invention is a sand-filled hot tub that somehow still behaves like water you can swim in. The hot tub uses the same science as this story from a few months ago , where the
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cognitive science
Scientific method acting: Cross-disciplinary course explores role of neurobiology in performing arts A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
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My Herky-Jerky Ride in General Motors' Ultra-Cautious Self Driving Car Nothing will make you hate humans—capricious, volatile, unplanned, erratic humans—like sitting in the back of self-driving car. When I hitched a ride in one, a white and orange General Motors Cruise autonomous vehicle during a press event in San Francisco on Tuesday, every movement was a cause for alarm. Two walkers darted out in front of the car during my roughly 20-minute, 3-mile ride, blissful
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Ars Technica
Guns tend to empower white, financially unstable men—who oppose gun control Enlarge / Glocks as far as the eye can see. reader comments 11 In the wake of a mass shooting or fresh data on gun violence, pundits and the media often blame the US’ high rate of gun ownership and deaths on a deeply rooted “ gun culture .” For many—particularly advertisers—this culture conjures ideas of morally strong, empowered, self-reliant, American patriots bearing arms. And it grazes notion
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Ingeniøren
Falsk anmeldelse koster 35 kroner - Amazon slår ud med armenePolitikere og medier, som slås mod fake news, får næppe noget ud af at skæve til klodens største digitale købmand, der selv har sit hyr med at slå ned på falske anmeldelser.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Natural capital key to global prosperity, Oxford economists warn Credit: Abigail Keenan Oxford University economists have today issued an urgent international 'wake-up call' around nature's continued decline and the grave threat posed to global prosperity by ignoring it. New research by the Oxford Martin School, commissioned by the Green Economy Coalition, has revealed that governments can be ignorant to the economic value of nature, and the extent to which na
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Stem cells that generate fat tissue have circadian clock Brian Feldman and his colleagues found that stem cells that give rise to fat cells have a circadian clock. Credit: Norbert von der Groeben New discoveries about the circadian-clock machinery in the precursors to fat cells may explain why shift workers are prone to metabolic diseases, such as diabetes, a Stanford study finds. A circadian clock is embedded in the stem cells that give rise to fat an
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wolbachia bacterium density changes seasonally in butterflies Collection points (filled circles) of Z. maha in Japan. Credit: Okayama University The survival rate of Wolbachia—a common bacterium—decreases under high temperature in incubators. However, few studies have examined the density of Wolbachia in hosts in the field. Here, Takuto Sumi and colleagues at Okayama University focus on Wolbachia infection of the pale grass blue butterfly that is found thro
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Revolutionary microscope and labelling technique maps DNA mutations A typical 3D image collected by the nanomapping microscope showing a CRISPR-labelled DNA molecule. Credit: University of Bristol A team of scientists working at the University of Bristol have developed a new nanomapping microscope - powered by the laser and optics found in a typical DVD player. The new technology is being used to transform the way disease-causing genetic mutations are diagnosed a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hydrocarbon-degrading fungus yields its secrets Thanks to genes acquired from bacteria, a fungus can degrade an environmentally harmful hydrocarbon - and comes under considerable stress in the process. These remarkable research findings, which were published recently, were obtained by a group from the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna (BOKU). The results were made possible thanks to the very latest equipment for genome
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The function of NIMA-related kinase 6 in the straight growth of plant cellsPlants continuously generate various kinds of organs such as roots, leaves and flowers. The growth morphology of each organ is achieved by the directional growth of plant cells. Prior to cell growth, an intracellular cytoskeleton called a microtubule aligns perpendicularly to the growth axis to determine growth direction of plant cells (Fig. 1). Various proteins have been shown to regulate the dyn
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Aberrant hyphae triggered by host immune responses to plant pathogenic fungus Figure 1: Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of susceptible R108-1 leaves at 3 days after inoculation with M. pinodes. (A) Infection hyphae (arrows) that look like infection vesicles formed in the cell wall of the adaxial epidermal (ep) cell. Appressorium (Ap). Bar = 5 µm. (B) Adaxial epidermis and mesophyll cells (me) invaded by hyphae. Host cell organelles were degraded. Bar = 20 µm.
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Live Science
Feathered Jurassic Dinosaurs Were Fierce and … Fluffy? During the Jurassic period, some feathered dinosaurs — including the 160-million-year-old, crow-size Anchiornis huxleyi — were downright fluffy, unlike many of their sleek, modern bird relatives, a new study finds. The finding shows that the feathers of Anchiornis , and another feathered dinosaur known as Sinosauropteryx, were simpler — and fluffier — than previously thought. Moreover, the
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Science : NPR
North Korea Launches An Apparent ICBM It flew higher — and for longer — than previous tests, theoretically putting the entire continental U.S. within Pyongyang's reach — a capability that the North Korean regime has long sought.
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Science : NPR
Gene Therapy Shows Promise For A Growing List Of Diseases Pasieka/Science Photo Library/Getty Images Pasieka/Science Photo Library/Getty Images Eli Wheatley and Christian Guardino are among a growing number of patients whose lives are apparently being saved or radically improved by gene therapy. Wheatley, 3, of Lebanon, Ky., and Guardino, 17, of Patchogue, N.Y., were both diagnosed with what were long thought to be incurable genetic disorders. In the pa
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Gizmodo
Cowboy Bebop, Ghost in the Shell, and More Great Anime Is On Sale, Today Only Have any anime fans (including yourself) on your holiday shopping list? Amazon’s running a huge Blu-ray anime sale today , with great deals on the likes of Cowboy Bebop , Ghost in the Shell , Speed Racer , Evangelion , Steins;Gate , and a lot more. A few highlights are below, but head over to Amazon for the complete list . $20 From amazon 7698 purchased by readers Gizmodo Media Group may get a co
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How suspended particles influence liquid flow dynamics One of the most prominent publications in physics, Physical Review X , accepted an article by Sangwoo Shin, a University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa assistant professor in mechanical engineering. The article is titled Accumulation of Colloidal Particles in Flow Junctions Induced by Fluid Flow and Diffusiophoresis. Shin examines how underground aquifers, hydraulic fractures, coastal habitats and water fil
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Going green to the Red Planet New Norcia at night. Credit: European Space Agency ESA's ground station in Western Australia routinely communicates with spacecraft at far-away places like Mars. Now, it's using sunlight to generate electricity, significantly reducing energy costs. Whether orbiting a planet, following a comet or peering deep into our Universe, spacecraft have long used solar cells to generate electricity from sun
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA builds its next Mars rover mission This artist's rendition depicts NASA's Mars 2020 rover studying a Mars rock outrcrop. The mission will not only seek out and study an area likely to have been habitable in the distant past, but it will take the next, bold step in robotic exploration of the Red Planet by seeking signs of past microbial life itself. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech In just a few years, NASA's next Mars rover mission will b
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Economists develop decision-making method for lionfish management Richard Agraba hunts lionfish in the British West Indies. Credit: Oregon State University Lionfish are a prime example of damage caused by an invasive species brought into a new environment. With their venomous spines, aggressive behavior, and few natural enemies, these fish have the potential to harm reef ecosystems in the western Atlantic Ocean. Natural resource managers need to plan and budget
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Theory of the evolution of sexes tested with algae Credit: University of Adelaide The varied sex lives of a type of green algae have enabled a University of Adelaide researcher to test a theory of why there are males and females. The question of why different types of sex cells evolved, such as sperm and eggs (collectively known as gametes ), remains uncertain. "Why should there be males and females? Why would a situation evolve where some indi
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Ars Technica
“Completely unique” Iron Age party cauldrons and more unearthed in Leicestershire reader comments 5 11 cauldrons and several other fancy Iron Age party items were found in a small settlement in Leicestershire, England. You can see the circular walls of this enclosure, which was part of a long-lived settlement that goes back more than 2,000 years. ULAS The exterior of one of the cauldrons. Each was made with very thin iron rims and upper bands, copper-alloy bowls, and two iron
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Harnessing the rattling motion of oxygen ions to convert T-rays to visible light Top: A schematic representation of the nanoscale cages. The oxygen anions randomly occupy one sixth of the cages.Bottom: A photograph of the emission of visible light at a terahertz radiation level of 0.21 and output power of 50 W. Credit: ACS Nano A team of researchers led by Hideo Hosono at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) has shown that terahertz rays can be converted to light visibl
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why is massive star formation quenched in galaxy centers? Magnetic fields control the collapse of the molecular clouds in the nuclear ring of the galaxy NGC 1097. As a result, formation of massive stars is suppressed in zones of strong magnetic field (contours). Credit: Gabriel Pérez, SMM (IAC) The current cosmological model to explain the universe, the "Big Bang" model, aims to describe all observable phenomena, including the evolution of galaxies from
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Science-Based Medicine
SBM Progress Report In a month SBM will have been operating for a decade – 10 years and over 3000 posts. How has the SBM project been faring in the last decade, and where do we go from here? As a blog, SBM has been reasonably successful. Just surviving for 10 years is a milestone for any social media project, and SBM has done more than just survive. We have built a fantastic audience and have established ourselves a
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Scientific American Content: Global
How Much Air Pollution Is Produced by Rockets? Nobody knows the extent to which rocket launches and re-entering space debris affect Earth's atmosphere — but such ignorance could be remedied soon. The issue of rocket emissions—which deliver gases and particles directly into the middle and upper atmosphere—will be included in a forthcoming United Nations 2018 Quadrennial Global Ozone Assessment that delves into the substances responsible fo
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wait-and-see on e-cars is the wrong strategy If the electricity is clean, electric cars drive eco-friendly. Credit: yeremyiswild / iStock The last year has been a good one for electric cars. Their market share has jumped upward, pushed by new models that are affordable and offer longer ranges. Several countries – China, India, France, and the UK – have announced policies aiming for a complete switch from gasoline to electric. Years ago, as
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Dagens Medicin
Ytringsfrihed på OUH?Åbent brev til ledelsen på OUH: Vi vil på det kraftigste opfordre jer til at træde et skridt tilbage og gøre jer helt grundlæggende overvejelser om jeres egen ledelsesageren og den ageren, I har forledt til – har den været egnet til at (re-)etablere og/eller fastholde den tillid, der nødvendigvis må være mellem ‘maskinrum og kommandobro’.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Time between world-changing volcanic super-eruptions less than previously thought IMAGE: The Toba caldera was the site of a massive super-eruption 75,000 years ago. view more Credit: NASA/METI/AIST/Japan Space Systems, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team. After analysing a database of geological records dated within the last 100,000 years, a team of scientists from the University of Bristol has discovered the average time between so-called volcanic super-eruptions is actually mu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lack of communication puts older adults at risk of clashes between their medicines IMAGE: Key results from the National Poll on Healthy Aging. view more Credit: University of Michigan ANN ARBOR, MI - Most older Americans take multiple medicines every day. But a new poll suggests they don't get - or seek - enough help to make sure those medicines actually mix safely. That lack of communication could be putting older adults at risk of health problems from interactions betwe
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New Scientist - News
Weird tiny galaxies found hiding in Hubble’s Ultra Deep Field Galaxies’ blue glow gives them away ESO/MUSE HUDF collaboration By Leah Crane Hubble’s Ultra Deep Field just got even deeper. Astronomers have found 72 mysterious new galaxies in this tiny spot of the sky that were too faint for even the Hubble space telescope to see. The Hubble Ultra Deep Field is an image of a small region of relatively dark space next to the Fornax constellation. Though th
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Dagens Medicin
Lægemiddel fra svindelfirma fortsat på det danske markedSelv om den indiske lægemiddelproducent Evertogen har fået frataget sin ret til at producere lægemidler til det europæiske marked pga. fusk i fremstillingen, kan danskerne stadig få firmaets produkt på apotekerne herhjemme. Det bekræfter Lægemiddelstyrelsen.
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NYT > Science
The Times in Person: Clearing the Air on Climate Education: A Reporter Returns to the Scene of Her Story Others, though, excoriated the students, labeling them “stupid,” among other things. “Folks,” wrote one horrified reader, pushing back after a string of such comments on The Times’s Facebook page, “you’re talking about minors.” Some readers, especially in southeastern Ohio itself, had objected to the way I’d chosen to weave in information about the region’s socioeconomic troubles, such as the opi
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Latest Headlines | Science News
First controlled nuclear chain reaction achieved 75 years ago Some scientific anniversaries celebrate events so momentous that they capture the attention of many nonscientists as well — or even the entire world. One such anniversary is upon us. December 2 marks the semisesquicentennial (75th anniversary) of the first controlled and sustained nuclear fission chain reaction. Only four years after German scientists discovered nuclear fission, scientists in Ame
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The Impenetrable Program Transforming How Courts Treat DNA Evidence In the summer of 2013, Kern County law enforcement faced a serious problem. A series of women were reporting rapes in Bakersfield, California, a large industrial metropolis north of Los Angeles. The victims generally identified their attacker as a dark-skinned man wearing a ski mask and a hoodie. Despite a varied m.o., police believed a single perpetrator was responsible. He snuck into houses whi
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World War I Warships Were Protected By This Cubist Camouflage If you’re stuck in traffic along the I-5 near San Diego International Airport, and your attention wanders from the brake lights in front of you, your eyes might land on a low-slung leviathan of a building, a third of a mile long, resembling the upper deck of a buried cruise ship peeking above ground. Keep your gaze there long enough, and you will notice that the geometric black-and-white pattern
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Jocelyn Bell Burnell doesn't mind Nobel overlookThe astrophysicist says at the time students weren't awarded Nobel Prizes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MUSE probes uncharted depths of Hubble Ultra Deep Field IMAGE: This color image shows the Hubble Ultra Deep Field region, a tiny but much-studied region in the constellation of Fornax, as observed with the MUSE instrument on ESO's Very Large... view more Credit: ESO/MUSE HUDF collaboration The MUSE HUDF Survey team, led by Roland Bacon of the Centre de recherche astrophysique de Lyon (CNRS/Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1/ENS de Lyon), France, u
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The Guardian's Science Weekly
Cross Section: Sophie Scott - Science Weekly PodcastWhere did human language come from? What role does it serve? And how might emojis and GIFs enhance human interaction?
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Science | The Guardian
Cross Section: Sophie Scott - Science Weekly Podcast Where did human language come from? What role does it serve? And how might emojis and GIFs enhance human interaction? Subscribe & Review on Apple Podcasts , Soundcloud , Audioboom , Mixcloud & Acast , and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter Since beginning in 1825, the Royal Institution Christmas lectures have seen the likes of Michael Faraday, David Attenborough, and Monica Grady take ce
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Ingeniøren
#teknisktfel: Svenske ingeniørkvinder står frem med vidnesbyrd om sexchikane »Der eksisterer en sexistisk kultur, som er blevet normaliseret, og en tavshedskultur, hvor berørte kvinder ikke bliver hørt. Den, der hæver sin stemme mod sexchikane, kommer i mange tilfælde til at bøde for det, mens den, der udøver chikanen, går fri. Dette er en #teknisktfel (teknisk fejl, red.).« Sådan lyder det i opråbet, som en gruppe svenske kvinder i tekniske fag offentliggjorde i sidste u
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Ingeniøren
Stor mangel på ingeniører i Jylland og på Fyn Flere store virksomheder, organisationer og kommuner jagter kompetent arbejdskraft. Find drømmejobbet på Fyn eller i Jylland med Jobfinder månedlige liste. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/stor-mangel-paa-ingenioerer-it-folk-jylland-paa-fyn-11383 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
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The Atlantic
The Sumptuous Love Story of Call Me by Your Name “What do you do around here?” the tall, strapping Oliver (Armie Hammer) asks Elio (Timothée Chalamet), the 17-year-old giving him a tour of the charming Italian village where Oliver will be living for the next six weeks. “Wait for the summer to end,” the bored-seeming Elio says with a sigh. “And what do you do in the winter? Wait for the summer to come?” Oliver shoots back. That only gets a chuck
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The Atlantic
No Family Is Safe From This Epidemic The last photograph of my son Jonathan was taken at the end of a new-student barbecue on the campus green at the University of Denver. It was one of those bittersweet transitional moments. We were feeling the combination of apprehension and optimism that every parent feels when dropping off a kid at college for the first time, which amplified by the fact that we were coming off a rocky 16 months
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
MUSE probes uncharted depths of Hubble Ultra Deep Field This color image shows the Hubble Ultra Deep Field region, a tiny but much-studied region in the constellation of Fornax, as observed with the MUSE instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope. But this picture only gives a very partial view of the riches of the MUSE data, which also provide a spectrum for each pixel in the picture. This data set has allowed astronomers not only to measure distances
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Viden
Viden om millioner af sørgendes sundhed skal sikre bedre hjælp Vi kan sørge så meget og så længe, at vi bliver syge af det. Både psykisk og fysisk. Det konkluderer et af verdens største forskningsprojekter om sorg og folkesundhed efter at have fulgt 1,4 millioner danskere, der har mistet nære pårørende. Forskningen viser også, hvem der har særlig høj risiko for at blive ramt af den form for kompliceret sorg, som er på vej til at blive anerkendt som en egentl
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Feed: All Latest
Ajit Pai's Net Neutrality Shell Game I’ve got bad news for everyone who is working overtime to protest Federal Communications Commission chair Ajit Pai’s campaign to eliminate net neutrality: You are being tricked. Pai is running a kind of shell game, overreaching (“go ahead and run all the paid prioritization services you want, Comcast!”) so that we will focus our energies on the hard-to-pin-down concept of net neutrality—the princ
11h
Feed: All Latest
Can This Game-Like App Help Students Do Better in School? FRESNO, Calif. — A group of seventh- and eighth-grade girls sat around a lunch table discussing a new game-like app they use in school. Danna Rodriguez somewhat sullenly said she didn’t want to care about Strides, which tracks points students earn for attendance, grade-point average and using the app itself, among other things. But she can’t help herself. She does care. The pull of the points and
11h
Feed: All Latest
Promising New Cancer Immunotherapies Have Arrived—But Not For Everyone In 1891, a New York doctor named William B. Coley injected a mixture of beef broth and Streptococcus bacteria into the arm of a 40-year-old Italian man with an inoperable neck tumor. The patient got terribly sick—developing a fever, chills, and vomiting. But a month later, his cancer had shrunk drastically. Coley would go on to repeat the procedure in more than a thousand patients, with wildly va
11h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Julius Caesar's Britain invasion site 'found by archaeologists' Image copyright University of Leicester Image caption Archaeologists from the University of Leicester believe the ditch was part of a large fort in Kent Archaeologists believe they may have uncovered the first evidence of Julius Caesar's invasion of Britain in 54BC. The discovery of a defensive ditch and weapons have led them to identify Pegwell Bay in Thanet, Kent as where they believe the Roman
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Dagens Medicin
Politikere i Hovedstaden vil løse uenighederne om 1813 De faglige uenigheder om akuttelefonen skal løses, står der i den nye konstitueringsaftale i Region Hovedstaden. Succeskriteriet for Konservative er, at almen medicinere skal besvare borgernes opkald.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new strategy used by Helicobacter pylori to target mitochondria Gastric tissue infected by H. pylori . Nuclei are in blue (Hoechst) and mitochondria in red (Mitotracker labelling). Credit: Laurent Chatre - CNRS/Institut Pasteur Scientists from the Institut Pasteur and CNRS have recently identified new strategies used by Helicobacter pylori bacteria to infect cells. By specifically targeting mitochondria, these bacteria, despite being extracellular, can optimi
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The land of the Vega Granada area subsides up to one centimeter per year as a result of the drought Map overlapping decreases in the phreatic level, land deformation and clay percentage in the area. Credit: University of Granada The University of Granada (UGR) and the Geological Survey of Spain have analyzed the variations of ground subsidences and elevations in the Vega de Granada area in southeast Spain and proven that the region sinks up to one centimeter per year during dry periods. The res
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Ingeniøren
3D-kameraer forvandler tunge industrirobotter til cobotter Kollaborative robotter er det, alle snakker om i robotindustrien for øjeblikket. Små, fleksible robotter, der ikke kræver sikkerhedsafskærmninger af nogen art og i princippet kan monteres direkte på en produktionslinje og fungere som produktionsmedarbejderens mekaniske kollega. Prisen for disse såkaldte cobotters fleksibilitet er en ofte ikke imponerende løfteevne samt forholdsvis lave hastighede
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Minimally invasive treatment provides relief from back pain IMAGE: Lumbar spine MRI showing vertebra at baseline and three months after treatment. view more Credit: Radiological Society of North America CHICAGO - The majority of patients were pain free after receiving a new image-guided pulsed radiofrequency treatment for low back pain and sciatica, according to a study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RS
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CT shows enlarged aortas in former pro football players IMAGE: 3-D rendering from a cardiac CT dataset demonstrating mild dilation of the ascending aorta. view more Credit: Radiological Society of North America CHICAGO - Former National Football League (NFL) players are more likely to have enlarged aortas, a condition that may put them at higher risk of aneurysms, according to a study being presented today at the annual meeting of the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hip steroid injections associated with bone changes IMAGE: A 58-year-old woman with left hip pain. X-ray from one month prior to the steroid/anesthetic injection demonstrates moderate joint space narrowing (arrows) and bony proliferation (arrowheads). view more Credit: Radiological Society of North America CHICAGO - Osteoarthritis patients who received a steroid injection in the hip had a significantly greater incidence of bone death and
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds no evidence that gadolinium causes neurologic harm IMAGE: MR images through, A, C, E, basal ganglia and, B, D, F, posterior fossa at level of dentate nucleus. Images are shown for, A, B, control group patient 4, and... view more Credit: Radiological Society of North America CHICAGO - There is no evidence that accumulation in the brain of the element gadolinium speeds cognitive decline, according to a new study presented today at t
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Science : NPR
People Like People Who Ask Questions A new study says people who ask more questions, particularly follow-up questions, are liked better by their conversation partners.
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Science : NPR
The NHL And CTE The NFL has been more active than the NHL in addressing concerns about concussions and CTE. David Greene talks with neuroscientist Charles Tator talks about hockey's tepid response.
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Ingeniøren
Industrigiganter går sammen om hybridelektriske fly De første små elektrisk fly til undervisning og træning er for længst lettet, og nu ser det ud til at turen er kommet til markedet for mindre rutefly. I et nyt partnerskab mellem de tre teknologigiganter Airbus, Rolls-Royce og Siemens skal grunden til fremtidens helt eller delvist elektriske fly lægges. Flyet hedder E-Fan X, og målet er at flyet skal i luften i 2020. I første omgang vil selskaber
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hackers could get even nastier in 2018: researchers Report by the security firm McAfee said hackers will develop new strategies in 2018 and target connected devices which offer less security than computers and smartphones After a year marked by devastating cyber attacks and breaches, online attackers are expected to become even more destructive in 2018, security researchers said Wednesday. A report by the security firm McAfee said the ransomware o
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Toyota showcases humanoid robot that mirrors user Toyota's T-HR3 can be controlled by a wearable system that allows users to operate the entire robot in real-time by simply moving their own limbs Japanese auto giant Toyota Wednesday showcased a humanoid robot that can mirror its user's movements, a product it says has uses as varied as elderly care and disaster response. The T-HR3 can be controlled by a wearable system that allows users to opera
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Viden
Kæmpe sikkerhedshul i Apple-styresystem: Alle kan logge ind uden kodeord Der er sikkerhedshuller - og så er der gigantiske sikkerhedshuller. Et af de sidstnævnte har ramt den nyeste version af Apples styresystem MacOS High Sierra, der kører på firmaets bærbare og stationære computere. Fejlen betyder, at man kan logge ind på en Mac-computer blot ved at taste root ind som brugernavn og undlade at bruge et password. Apple bekræfter fejlen Apple bekræfter fejlen og har la
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Ingeniøren
VIDEO: Sådan får du admin-rettigheder til MacOS uden kodeord Kæmpebrøler: Ved at skrive 'root' som brugernavn behøver du intet kodeord for at åbne hoveddøren til MacOS. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/kaempe-sikkerhedsbroeler-macos-alle-kan-faa-admin-rettigheder-uden-kodeord-1083322 Version2
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Science | The Guardian
Why do good people suffer? You asked Google – here’s the answer | Eleanor Morgan W hy do good people suffer? Five words to take you into a dense maze of ideas philosophical, psychological and theological. Where to start? What suffering looks or feels like is probably one of the most subjective notions we can ponder. Even the way we usually categorise suffering – “physical” or “mental” – is blurry, because rarely does one come without the other. Our minds hurt when our bodies
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Viden
Forskere: Den afskyelige snemand er en bjørn Forskere har undersøgt dna fra ni prøver af hår, tænder, knogler, hud og afføring, der skulle stamme fra den afskyelige snemand - også kaldet en yeti. - Vores fund peger kraftigt på, at det biologiske grundlag for yeti-myten skal findes i de lokale bjørne, og studiet viser, hvordan genetik kan bruges til at opklare andre lignende mysterier, siger lederen af studiet, Charlotte Lindqvist, evolution
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Dagens Medicin
Modtager af legendepris: »Vi har glemt betydningen af den moderne generalist« »Vi skal have lavet et system, hvor vi langt mere dynamisk løbende prøver at lave udvikling.« Sådan siger praktiserende læge Frede Olesen, modtager af Dagens Medicins frimærkepris, om almen praksis' fremtid. Modtager af legendepris: »Vi har glemt betydningen af den moderne generalist« Efter ti års uforsonlig retorik ser både regioner og PLO ud til at erkende vigtigheden af et stærkt samlet sundhe
13h
Dagens Medicin
Ny PLO-repræsentant i Lægeforeningens bestyrelse På weekendens repræsentantskabsmøde har PLO indstillet en midtjysk kandidat til at repræsentere de praktiserende læger i Lægeforeningens bestyrelse.
13h
Dagens Medicin
Hovedstaden vil genansætte lægesekretærer Lægesekretærer skal overtage noget af det registreringsarbejde, som tager tid fra lægerne efter indførelsen af Sundhedsplatforman, lyder det nu fra Region Hovedstaden.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Food waste: Clearer label plan in bid to cut Image copyright PA A new attempt is being made to improve labelling to prevent edible food going to waste. The waste agency Wrap says food labels use too many different terms, prompting people to throw away usable produce. Milk labels, for instance, typically say milk keeps three days in the fridge after opening - whereas actually it can keep far longer. Wrap says a third of the UK's 2 million to
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Science | The Guardian
Gene discovery may reveal how scaly dinosaurs became feathery birds It is finally becoming common knowledge to the general public that birds really are dinosaurs . What’s more, an ever-increasing number of discoveries gives us incredible insight into the form and diversity of feathers in various non-avian dinosaurs and early birds . We have a growing understanding of how feathers spread and changed in various lineages, their functions, and why they might have evo
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Science | The Guardian
DNA sampling exposes nine 'yeti specimens' as eight bears and a dog Huge, ape-like and hairy, the yeti has roamed its way into legend, tantalising explorers, mountaineers and locals with curious footprints and fleeting appearances. Now researchers say the elusive inhabitant of the Himalayas and Tibetan plateau has been unmasked. Scientists studying nine samples – including hair and teeth – supposedly from yetis, say the samples are not from a huge hominin but in
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds drones more damaging than bird strikes to planes Credit: CC0 Public Domain Drones that collide with planes cause more damage than birds of the same size because of their solid motors, batteries and other parts, a study released by the Federal Aviation Administration on Tuesday found. The study's researchers say aircraft-manufacturing standards designed for bird strikes aren't appropriate for ensuring planes can withstand collisions with drones.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Istanbul anglers keep up tradition despite stocks alarm Anglers crammed shoulder-to-shoulder on the Galata Bridge and on the banks of the Bosphorus is one of the iconic images of Istanbul After half a century of fishing, 65-year-old Fuat, a retired Turkish civil servant, is nostalgic for the good old days when the Bosphorus Strait in Istanbul teemed with fish. Wearing a black woolly hat, Fuat is one of hundreds of amateur anglers passing their spare t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bubble or brave new world? Bitcoin breaks $10,000 barrier Value of bitcoin in 2017. Bitcoin broke through the $10,000 barrier for the first time on Wednesday as it continues a stratospheric rise that has delighted investors but sparked fears of a bubble. The virtual currency hit a high of $10,379 in Asia, according to Bloomberg News, more than 10 times higher than its value at the start of the year. The breakthrough is the latest in a spectacular run
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Hacker-for-hire' pleads guilty to Yahoo breach A Canadian man pleaded guilty Tuesday to charges stemming from a massive breach at Yahoo that authorities say was directed by two Russian intelligence agents and affected at least a half billion user accounts. Karim Baratov appeared in a jail jumpsuit before a federal judge and entered the pleas to one count of conspiracy to commit computer fraud and abuse and eight counts of aggravated identity
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
90 percent of senior drivers don't make vehicle adjustments that can improve safety Many older drivers experience a condition that impacts their joints. Credit: AAA Nearly 90 percent of older drivers do not make inexpensive adaptations to their vehicles that can improve safety and extend their time behind the wheel, according to new research from the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. Common vehicle adaptations like pedal extensions, seat cushions and steering wheel covers can h
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First evidence for Julius Caesar's invasion of Britain discovered 3 Lidar model of topography of Thanet showing Ebbsfleet. Credit: University of Leicester The first evidence for Julius Caesar's invasion of Britain has been discovered by archaeologists from the University of Leicester. The findings will be explored as part of the BBC Four's Digging For Britain on Wednesday 29 November. Based on new evidence, the team suggests that the first landing of Julius Cae
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New method maps chemicals in the skin 3-D imaging of a skin section in which the nickel content is being measured. The red area represents the presence of nickel. Credit: Per Malmberg A new method of examining the skin can reduce the number of animal experiments while providing new opportunities to develop pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. Chemical imaging allows all layers of the skin to be seen and the presence of virtually any substa
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Computer scientists are to explore how children can stay safe and retain their privacy as they engage with IoT Researchers are looking at how children can stay safe and retain their privacy as they engage with the Internet of Things. Credit: Micro:Bit Education Foundation Computer scientists are to explore how children can stay safe and retain their privacy as they engage with the 'Internet of Things' (IoT). Concerns about levels of computing literacy among young people, and the demands of future economie
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers discover big cryptographic potential in nanomaterial a) At monolayer thickness, this material has the optical properties of a semiconductor that emits light. At multilayer, the properties change and the material doesn't emit light. (b) Varying the thickness of each layer results in a thin film speckled with randomly occurring regions that alternately emit or block light. (c) Upon exposure to light, this pattern can be translated into a one-of-a-kin
14h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Geraldine Seydoux (Johns Hopkins / HHMI) 2: How to Polarize the Cytoplasm Part 1: From Egg to Worm: How to Create a Body Axis: In this video, Dr. Seydoux introduces how PAR proteins create a body axis and how her lab discovered that these proteins are regulated by sperm microtubules. Part 2: How to Polarize the Cytoplasm: In her second video, Dr. Seydoux describes how MEX-5 proteins diffuse across the embryo cytoplasm to create a gradient and influence body axis develo
15h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Geraldine Seydoux (Johns Hopkins / HHMI) 1: From Egg to Worm: How to Create a Body Axis Part 1: From Egg to Worm: How to Create a Body Axis: In this video, Dr. Seydoux introduces how PAR proteins create a body axis and how her lab discovered that these proteins are regulated by sperm microtubules. Part 2: How to Polarize the Cytoplasm: In her second video, Dr. Seydoux describes how MEX-5 proteins diffuse across the embryo cytoplasm to create a gradient and influence body axis develo
15h
Science | The Guardian
Caesar's invasion of Britain began from Pegwell Bay in Kent, say archaeologists Julius Caesar’s invasion of Britain was launched from the sandy shores of Pegwell Bay on the most easterly tip of Kent, according to fresh evidence unearthed by archaeologists. Researchers named the wide, shallow bay the most likely landing spot for the Roman fleet after excavators found the remains of a defensive base dating to the first century BC in the nearby hamlet of Ebbsfleet, near Ramsgat
15h
Ingeniøren
257 fejl og mangler på Sundhedsplatformen: voldgiftssag mod leverandør kan gøre det hurtigt Opdateret: Det fremgik tidligere af denne artikel, at tvisten mellem Epic og Region H sandsynligvis ender i voldgiftssag på baggrund af et interview med Sundhedsplatformens programchef. Efterfølgende er Version2 blevet kontaktet af Sundhedsplatformens ledelse, som oplyser, at dette alligevel ikke er korrekt. Region Hovedstaden og it-leverandøren Epic er i flere tilfælde uenige om, hvornår kravene
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists find natural mimetics of anti-cancer & anti-aging drugs metformin and rapamycin IMAGE: This is an AI-driven drug discovery. view more Credit: Insilico Medicine Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2017, London, UK: Researchers from the Biogerontology Research Foundation , Insilico Medicine , Life Extension and other institutions announce the publication of a landmark study in the journal Aging on the identification of natural mimetics of metformin and rapamycin. Metformin, a common typ
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The ultimate defense against hackers may be just a few atoms thick IMAGE: a) At monolayer thickness, this material has the optical properties of a semiconductor that emits light. At multilayer, the properties change and the material doesn't emit light. (b) Varying the... view more Credit: NYU Tandon: Althea Labre BROOKLYN, New York - The next generation of electronic hardware security may be at hand as researchers at New York University Tandon School of En
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New method maps chemicals in the skin IMAGE: This is a 3-D imaging of a skin section in which the nickel content is being measured. The red area represents the presence of nickel. view more Credit: Per Malmberg A new method of examining the skin can reduce the number of animal experiments while providing new opportunities to develop pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. Chemical imaging allows all layers of the skin to be seen
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
90 percent of senior drivers don't make vehicle adjustments that can improve safety WASHINGTON, D.C. (Nov. 29, 2017) - Nearly 90 percent of older drivers do not make inexpensive adaptations to their vehicles that can improve safety and extend their time behind the wheel, according to new research from the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. Common vehicle adaptations like pedal extensions, seat cushions and steering wheel covers can help to improve safety by reducing a senior dri
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Range of opioid prescribers play important role in epidemic, study finds A cross-section of opioid prescribers that typically do not prescribe large volumes of opioids, including primary care physicians, surgeons and non-physician health care providers, frequently prescribe opioids to high-risk patients, according to a new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The findings suggest that high-volume prescribers, including "pill mil
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Invasive frogs give invasive birds a boost in Hawaii Puerto Rican coqui frogs were accidentally introduced to Hawaii in the 1980s, and today there are as many as 91,000 frogs per hectare in some locations. What does that mean for native wildlife? Concerns that ravenous coquis could reduce the food available for the islands' native insect-eating birds, many of which are already declining, spurred researchers to examine the relationship between frog
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Urban American-Indian, Alaskan natives may have lower survival following invasive cancer Bottom Line: Compared with the non-Hispanic white (NHW) population, the urban American-Indian and Alaskan Native (AIAN) community was more likely to have lower survival rates following invasive prostate and breast cancer. Journal in Which the Study was Published: Cancer Research , a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research Authors: Lead author Marc A. Emerson, MPH, PhD candidate, D
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Gizmodo
Facebook May Soon Demand a Selfie if It Detects Suspicious Activity on Your Account Photo: AP Facebook appears to be preparing to launch a new kind of captcha which asks users to prove their identities by uploading photos of their faces, Wired reported on Tuesday. At least some users reported encountering a prompt asking them to “upload a photo of yourself that clearly shows your face,” accompanied by a guarantee that Facebook would “check it and then permanently delete it from
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Resilience of Great Barrier Reef offers opportunities for regenerationNew research has found that, despite the extensive damage to coral in recent events, there are still 100 reefs on the Great Barrier Reef that are well suited to promoting the regional recovery of the ecosystem after major disturbances.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Harnessing the rattling motion of oxygen ions to convert T-rays to visible lightScientists have shown that terahertz rays can be converted to light visible to the human eye. The finding is a breakthrough for functional materials research and could lead to the development of a new kind of terahertz detector.
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New on MIT Technology Review
AI Is Dreaming Up New Kinds of Video Games Michael Cook, a 30-year-old senior research fellow at the University of Falmouth, has built an AI capable of imagining new video games from scratch. Cook calls the machine Angelina, a recursive acronym that stands for “A Novel Game-Evolving Labrat I’ve Named Angelina” (a joke that Cook says got old pretty quickly). Since its earliest form, in 2011, it has created hundreds of experimental video ga
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Invasive frogs give invasive birds a boost in Hawaii Coquis were introduced to Hawaii from Puerto Rico in the 1980s and may be giving a boost to the islands' invasive birds. Credit: R. Choi Puerto Rican coqui frogs were accidentally introduced to Hawaii in the 1980s, and today there are as many as 91,000 frogs per hectare in some locations. What does that mean for native wildlife? Concerns that ravenous coquis could reduce the food available for th
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Gizmodo
This Time-Lapse Video of Disneyland Transforming for the Holidays Is Truly Magical Image: Disneyland In a rare peek behind the curtain, Disney just released a time-lapse video showing the holiday transformation of Sleeping Beauty’s Castle at Disneyland. That may sound like a small thing, but Disney is usually ultra careful about breaking the illusion of their parks. Anything that would make a child realize they aren’t in a special, magical place, is hidden as best it can be, wi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First evidence for Julius Caesar's invasion of Britain discoveredThe first evidence for Julius Caesar's invasion of Britain has been discovered by archaeologists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Child-proofing the Internet of ThingsAs many other current, and potentially future, devices can connect to the Internet researchers are keen to learn more about how so called IoT devices could affect the privacy and security of young people.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Abominable Snowman? Nope -- study ties DNA samples from purported Yetis to Asian bearsThe Yeti or Abominable Snowman -- a mysterious, ape-like creature said to inhabit the high mountains of Asia -- looms large in the mythology of Nepal and Tibet. Now, a new DNA study of purported Yeti samples from museums and private collections is providing insight into the origins of this Himalayan legend.
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Gizmodo
As North Korea Tests Longer-Range ICBMs, Hawaii Reactivates Nuclear Warning System Photo: AP It’s been hard to ignore the ominous game of nuclear chicken currently ongoing between the totalitarian government of North Korea, which successfully tested an upgraded intercontinental ballistic missile on Wednesday morning local time, and the U.S., which is currently led by a belligerent lightweight with an extremely limited understanding of nuclear strategy. That goes double for the
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Feathered dinosaurs were even fluffier than we thoughtScientists have revealed new details about dinosaur feathers and enabled scientists to further refine what is potentially the most accurate depiction of any dinosaur species to date.
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Ingeniøren
Projektchef: Sådan vil vi undgå at gentage fejlene fra Cityringen »Mere af det samme.« Sådan beskriver Metroselskabet den nye metrostrækning mod Københavns Sydhavn, som selskabet i går satte entreprenører på. Konstruktionsmæssigt, arkitektonisk og funktionelt skal strækningen ligne den eksisterende metro og Cityringen, som linjen går igennem på sin vej mod Nordhavn. Men der er en hel del problemer fra det oprindelige metrobyggeri og byggeriet af Cityringen, som
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Ars Technica
How bitcoins became worth $10,000 Aurich / Getty reader comments 101 On Tuesday evening, the value of one bitcoin shot above $10,000. It has been a remarkable run for a currency that was only worth about $12 five years ago. The run has been particularly remarkable because it's still not clear what Bitcoin is useful for. During its early years, the cryptocurrency garnered a lot of optimistic talk about how it would disrupt convent
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Gizmodo
A Couple of Cyber Monday's Best Philips Hue Deals Are Back Commerce Content is independent of Editorial and Advertising, and if you buy something through our posts, we may get a small share of the sale. Click here for more. A lot of Cyber Monday’s Philips Hue deals have burned out, but the two that remain are sure to brighten your day. If you already own a Philips Hue Bridge, $32 is far and away the best price we’ve ever seen on individual color bulbs ,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Harnessing the rattling motion of oxygen ions to convert T-rays to visible light IMAGE: Top: A schematic representation of the nanoscale cages. The oxygen anions randomly occupy one sixth of the cages. Bottom: A photograph of the emission of visible light at a terahertz radiation... view more Credit: ACS Nano Scientists have successfully visualized terahertz radiation, popularly known as T-rays, using a crystal called mayenite (Ca 12 Al 14 O 33 ). Their method cleverly u
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Feed: All Latest
Facebook’s New Captcha Test: 'Upload A Clear Photo of Your Face' Facebook may soon ask you to "upload a photo of yourself that clearly shows your face," to prove you're not a bot. The company is using a new kind of captcha to verify whether a user is a real person. According to a screenshot of the identity test shared on Twitter on Tuesday and verified by Facebook, the prompt says: “Please upload a photo of yourself that clearly shows your face. We’ll check it
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Gizmodo
Splinter Hey Idiots—You’re Gonna Lose All Your Money on Bitcoin, Idiots | Deadspin Giants Bench Eli Splinter Hey Idiots—You’re Gonna Lose All Your Money on Bitcoin, Idiots | Deadspin Giants Bench Eli Manning For Geno Smith | The Root Why Calling Elizabeth Warren ‘Pocahontas’ Is Racist, Explained | Jezebel Darren Aronofsky Would Not Shut Up About mother! On the Press Tour With Jennifer Lawrence | Earther Earth’s Heaviest Organism Could Be Eaten to Death…By Deer |
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Ars Technica
Hacker pleads guilty to huge Yahoo hack, admits helping Russia’s FSB Enlarge / Russian Federal Security Service (FSB) head Alexander Bortnikov (far left) meets with other Russian officials, including President Vladimir Putin (center) on November 24, 2017. reader comments 0 A Canadian man has pleaded guilty to hacking charges related to a 2014 spear-phishing operation of Yahoo employees. The hack ultimately compromised 500 million Yahoo accounts. The operative, Kar
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Gizmodo
Batman's Alfred Gets the (Fake) Trailer That Gotham Deserves Image: Warner Bros. The DC movie universe continues to expand, but one backstory has yet to be given its own cinematic introduction: Alfred Pennyworth, Bruce Wayne’s butler. A new parody trailer seeks to right this wrong, and the result is a surprisingly impactful glimpse into the history of Batman’s surrogate father. Funny Or Die has released a trailer for Alfred: Before Batman , a look into the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is breakfast the most important meal of the day -- for your fat cells? Regularly eating breakfast affects our body fat cells by decreasing the activity of genes involved in fat metabolism and increasing how much sugar they take up, according to new research from the Journal of Physiology . This may lower diabetes and cardiovascular risk. The team in Bath and Nottingham also found that fat in obese people responds less to insulin, which regulates blood sugar, than le
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Experts see dawn of environmental sustainability in technology-driven 'Age of Optimization' IMAGE: Professor Zakri is Science Advisor to the Prime Minister of Malaysia and Joint Chairman of MIGHT, co-organizer of the Global Innovation Summit 2017. view more Credit: MIGHT The world is entering "a technology-driven Age of Optimization" bringing about more sustainable production, consumption and work in many manifestations and at every scale. That's the message from international experts
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
EEG and MRI combined help shed light on ALSResearchers have been studying brain wave patterns in the neurodegenerative condition amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). They have made the surprising discovery that some specific parts of the brain are 'over-connected' in ALS, while other parts show reduced activity as the brain networks disintegrate.
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Popular Science
We are basically positive that the Russians did not find alien bacteria in space It will be a glorious day when we finally get definitive proof of alien life. It’s going to be absolutely amazing, whether we make contact with a species that rivals or exceeds us in intelligence or we accidentally squish an alien bug on a spaceship window. Today is not that day, though headlines from around the world invoked the ‘A’ word, claiming that ‘alien life’ in the form of bacteria had be
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Live Science
Augmentin: Uses & Side Effects Augmentin is a brand name for an antibiotic, called co-amoxiclav, that is used to treat a wide range of conditions, from bronchitis to Lyme disease. It is one of the most commonly prescribed antibiotics for children, frequently dispensed for ear infections. Benefits Antibiotics work by attacking the cell wall of bacteria that are harming the body, or they prevent the bacteria from repli
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
There's a deeper fish in the seaThe ocean's deepest fish doesn't look like it could survive in harsh conditions thousands of feet below the surface. Instead of giant teeth and a menacing frame, the fishes that roam in the deepest parts of the ocean are small, translucent, bereft of scales -- and highly adept at living where few other organisms can. A new fish species, the deepest in the ocean, was just discovered.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers trained neural networks to be fashion designers (sort of)Researchers have demonstrated how artificial intelligence and neural networks could one day create custom apparel designs to help retailers and apparel makers sell clothing to consumers based on what they learned from a buyer's preferences.
21h
Futurity.org
Climate change altered skulls of Canadian mice Over the last 50 years, milder winters have led to physical changes in two species of mice in southern Quebec, Canada, researchers report. The findings provide a textbook example of the consequences of climate change for small mammals. “We are talking about bones and teeth, hard structures that are not easy to bend…” The research also reveals a stark reversal in the proportions of the two mice po
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Gizmodo
Sounds Like Ant-Man and the Wasp May Have a Major Impact on the Marvel Cinematic Universe Image: Disney With Ant-Man and the Wasp coming out two months after Avengers: Infinity War , it’s pretty obvious the films will have some connections. But star Evangeline Lilly has an even bigger idea of how the events in her film could impact the Marvel Cinematic Universe for years to come. Lilly, who plays Hope Van Dyne, hinted to Vanity Fair about the plot of Ant-Man and the Wasp —and how it c
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Rise in malaria cases sparks fears of a resurgence Sukree Sukplang/Reuters A child is tested for malaria at a clinic in western Thailand. The number of malaria cases rose in many countries in 2016, suggesting that progress has halted in the global fight against the disease, the World Health Organization (WHO) said in a report on 29 November 1 . Globally, malaria infections increased by about 5 million from 2015 to 2016, for a total of 216 million
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Futurity.org
After E.U. ban, global wild bird trade dropped 90% Since the 2005 European Union ban on bird imports, trade of wild birds has dropped about 90 percent globally, a new study suggests. The study demonstrates how the EU’s ban decreased the number of birds traded annually from about 1.3 million to 130,000. International trade of wild birds is a root cause of exotic birds spreading worldwide. Birds are the most traded animals in the world and, histori
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Feed: All Latest
Robots Threaten Bigger Slice of Jobs in US, Other Rich Nations The world is commonly divided into industrialized and emerging economies. A new study of how technology will transform demand for workers suggests we might talk of the automated and automating worlds instead. Economic think tank McKinsey Global Institute forecast changes in demand for different kinds of labor across 45 countries as technologies improve to perform physical or office tasks. One key
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Breakthrough in coral restoration, say researchersCoral is growing on the Great Barrier Reef after first being grown in tanks, say researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Making a case for health literacyThe inability to understand and effectively use health information is linked to higher rates of hospitalization, reduced preventive care and increased health costs. A new report highlights the benefits of health literacy for both patients and providers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Low frequency brain stimulation improves cognition in Parkinson's diseaseA multidisciplinary neuroscience study using rare, intraoperative brain recordings suggests that low frequency stimulation of a deep brain region may be able to improve cognitive function in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). The study also hints at the broader potential of brain stimulation for treating other cognitive diseases.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First evidence for Julius Caesar's invasion of Britain discovered IMAGE: This is the Ebbsfleet excavation with Pegwell Bay & Ramsgate. view more Credit: University of Leicester The first evidence for Julius Caesar's invasion of Britain has been discovered by archaeologists from the University of Leicester. The findings will be explored as part of the BBC Four's Digging For Britain on Wednesday 29 November. Based on new evidence, the team sugge
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Child-proofing the Internet of Things Computer scientists are to explore how children can stay safe and retain their privacy as they engage with the 'Internet of Things' (IoT). Concerns about levels of computing literacy among young people, and the demands of future economies, has led to innovative programmes aimed at encouraging more children to explore and programme connected devices. Schemes to help ensure future generations o
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Catastrophic failures in the NHS can be caused by basic communication breakdowns The NHS sometimes struggles to manage basic communication systems that are often critical to the safety of patients. Writing in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine , Carl Macrae, of the University of Oxford, reports that many communication processes in the NHS are still commonly viewed as mundane administrative tasks, instead of safety-critical processes that are essential to safe care.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Trophy hunting may cause extinction in a changing environment Trophy hunting and other activities involving the targeting of high-quality male animals could lead to the extinction of certain species faced with changing environmental conditions, according to new research from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). Male animals with large secondary sexual traits, such as antelope horns, deer antlers and lions' manes are often targeted by hunters for recreati
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Feathered dinosaurs were even fluffier than we thought IMAGE: A new depiction of Anchoirnis and its contour feather. view more Credit: Rebecca Gelernter A University of Bristol-led study has revealed new details about dinosaur feathers and enabled scientists to further refine what is potentially the most accurate depiction of any dinosaur species to date. Birds are the direct descendants of a group of feathered, carnivorous dinosaurs that, along wit
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Abominable Snowman? Nope -- study ties DNA samples from purported Yetis to Asian bears IMAGE: A femur bone from the decayed body of a purported Yeti found in a cave in Tibet. Biologist Charlotte Lindqvist tested DNA from the bone for Icon Films' "YETI OR... view more Credit: Credit: Icon Films Ltd. BUFFALO, N.Y. -- The Yeti or Abominable Snowman -- a mysterious, ape-like creature said to inhabit the high mountains of Asia -- looms large in the mythology of Nepal and T
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Live Science
'Yeti' Hair? Nothing So Abominable, Scientists Find The abominable snowman, or yeti, reportedly created these footprints, captured in a photo taken during an expedition to Mount Everest more than 50 years ago. Credit: Popperfoto/Getty Images The yeti, also known as the " abominable snowman ," looms large in the folklore of Nepal, Bhutan and Tibet. Reported sightings of the mythic creature have persisted for centuries in the high mountains of Asi
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New Scientist - News
Married people are much less likely to get dementia Good for their health? Erich Hartmann/Magnum By New Scientist staff and Press Association An analysis of more than 800,000 people has concluded that people who remain single for life are 42 per cent more likely to get dementia than married couples. The study also found that people who have been widowed are 20 per cent more likely to develop the condition, but that divorcees don’t have an elev
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Gizmodo
DNA Evidence Shows Yeti Was Local Himalayan Bears All Along Photo: Zoo Hluboka /Wikimedia A host of DNA samples “strongly suggest” that yetis are, in fact, local Himalayan bears. Watch out, bigfoot. An international team of researchers took a look at bear and supposed yeti DNA samples to better pinpoint the origin of the mythological creature. The researcher’s results imply that yetis were hardly paranormal or even strange, but the results also helped pai
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Science | The Guardian
Marriage could help reduce risk of dementia, study suggests Being married could help stave off dementia, a new study has suggested. Levels of social interaction could explain the finding, experts have said, after the research showed that people who are single or widowed are more likely to develop the disease. Experts conducted an analysis of 15 studies which held data on dementia and marital status involving more than 800,000 people from Europe, North and
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Abominable Snowman? Nope—study ties DNA samples from purported Yetis to Asian bears A femur bone from the decayed body of a purported Yeti found in a cave in Tibet. Biologist Charlotte Lindqvist tested DNA from the bone for Icon Films' "YETI OR NOT" TV special, which aired on Animal Planet in 2016. Her analysis showed that the bone actually belonged to a Tibetan brown bear. Lindqvist is an associate professor of biological sciences at the University at Buffalo and a visiting ass
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Trophy hunting may cause extinction in a changing environment Credit: CC0 Public Domain Trophy hunting and other activities involving the targeting of high-quality male animals could lead to the extinction of certain species faced with changing environmental conditions, according to new research from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). Male animals with large secondary sexual traits, such as antelope horns, deer antlers and lions' manes are often target
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Here’s yet more evidence that the mythical yeti was probably a bear In the Nov. 25 SN : Charting lumpy space, Bronze Age movers and shakers, T. rex ’s slasher arms, gene editor corrects typos, the Great Pyramid hides a void, mosses chronicle Arctic warming, an itty-bitty insect-inspired robot and more.
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Live Science
Could the US Stop Nuclear Weapons? Editor's Note: This story was updated on Nov. 28 at 7:00 p.m. E.T. With tensions brewing between the United States and North Korea — highlighted by a flurry of nuclear missile tests and fighting words by both countries — the possibility of nuclear war seems closer than it has been in years, according to experts. Pentagon officials announced today (Nov. 28) that North Korea conducted a n
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