Gizmodo
The Kinja Deals Gift Guide: 100 Genuinely Useful Stocking Stuffers For Under $20 The further you get down your holiday shopping list, the harder it is to find good gifts. But these stocking stuffer ideas are all around $20 or less, and would be actually useful gifts for nearly anyone. Everything you see here is either a Kinja Deals bestseller, a reader-favorite from Kinja Co-Op , something we’ve written about on Gear , or a product that our friends from other GMG sites have r
28min
Science | The Guardian
Cancer drug offers tantalising hope for HIV cure A new generation cancer drug has raised hopes for those living with HIV after it was found to reduce the reservoir of dormant HIV cells in the body and boost the immune response of a patient. Doctors say the effect the cancer drug nivolumab appeared to have on the patient offers a tantalising hope that it might provide a way to eradicate the virus from patients. “This first report of a successful
37min
Big Think
Why This Nobel Prize-Winning Economist Thinks Bitcoin Should Be “Outlawed" As the cryptocurrency Bitcoin reached new heights in market trading, surpassing for the first time ever the price of $11,000 per bitcoin, some are not quite as bullish on its prospects and question its very nature. In an interview with Bloomberg television, Nobel-Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz said that bitcoin creates no value for society and only works by getting around the role of t
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Futurity.org
This fix could bring back FluMist vaccine Exploiting a previously unnoticed genetic mutation may restore the effectiveness of the popular nasal spray version of the flu vaccine. That would be a boon to the millions of people who want protection from influenza’s fever, chills, and sore throats without a shot. This is the second straight flu season that a federal government panel recommended against using the spray vaccine, known as FluMis
15min
Futurity.org
Climate could cut output of Chinese factories Climate change will dramatically lower output for the Chinese manufacturing sector, research shows. To date, most empirical evidence on climate change impacts has focused on the agricultural sector. In a new paper published in the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management , researchers use detailed production data from a half-million Chinese manufacturing plants in the period 1998-2007. T
19min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cannabis linked to bipolar symptoms in young adults Adolescent cannabis use is an independent risk factor for future hypomania - often experienced as part of bipolar disorder - finds new research led by University of Warwick First research to robustly test the association between adolescent cannabis use and hypomania (periods of elated mood, over-active and excited behaviour, reduced need for sleep) in early adulthood Teenage cannabis use at least
28min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cancer drug leads to 'drastic decrease' in HIV infection in lung cancer patient Doctors in France have found the first evidence that a cancer drug may be able to eradicate HIV-infected cells in humans. In a letter published in the leading cancer journal Annals of Oncology [1] today (Friday), researchers led by Professor Jean-Philippe Spano, head of the medical oncology department at Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital AP-HP in Paris, France, report that while treating an HIV-infect
28min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New laser technology could reduce accidents on icy roads Researchers have proposed an innovative new solution to dealing with dangerous icy roads in winter, putting forward an improved, safer method in a paper published today in Applied Spectroscopy Reviews . Experts have detected a problematic substance known as 'hydrohalite', which forms on icy roads that have already been treated. Hydrohalite is normally left unremoved, as it does not respond to the
28min
Science | The Guardian
Doctors 'wrong to assume type 1 diabetes is childhood illness' Doctors are wrong to assume that type 1 diabetes mainly affects children, according to a new study that shows it is equally prevalent in adults. The findings, published in the journal Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology , overturn previous thinking that the form of diabetes, an auto-immune condition, is primarily a childhood illness. Scientists from Exeter University found that in a lot of cases it w
37min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Human vaccines project presents initial findings from first clinical trials Scientists leading the clinical programs for the Human Vaccines Project reported today high-level outcomes from two concurrent clinical studies aimed at deciphering the components and mechanisms used by the human immune system to prevent and control disease at the World Vaccine and Immunotherapy Congress in San Diego, Calif. The findings from the studies may provide important new insights on huma
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rising levels of HIV drug resistance HIV drug resistance is approaching and exceeding 10% in people living with HIV who are about to initiate or reinitiate first-line antiretroviral therapy, according to the largest meta-analysis to date on HIV drug resistance, led by researchers at UCL and the World Health Organization (WHO) and funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the WHO. The study, published today in The Lancet Infe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Response to Ebola outbreak leads to improved mental health services in Sierra Leone A new report highlighting how vital mental health services were developed in Sierra Leone during the response to the 2014 Ebola outbreak is published today in the WHO Bulletin . The report, which the WHO hopes will act as a blueprint on how to address such emergencies in the future, was written jointly by Sierra Leonean health workers and the King's Sierra Leone Partnership (KSLP). KSLP brings
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The Atlantic
About That Secret Button in Matt Lauer's Office Perhaps the single most horrifying detail from the litany of stories alleging sexual harassment and inappropriate behavior by Matt Lauer is his secret button. “His office was in a secluded space, and he had a button under his desk that allowed him to lock his door from the inside without getting up,” according to a Variety story published Wednesday, only hours after NBC fired him, citing a detail
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Big Think
There's a Dark Side to Mindfulness Meditation Four years ago I attended a Prison Yoga Project (PYP) training. James Fox is a valuable outlier in the yoga world. In 2002 he decided to devote his life to bringing yoga to at-risk communities, leading programs in juvenile detention facilities and inner-city community programs in Chicago. After moving to the Bay Area he started donating his time teaching prisoners yoga in San Quentin, which eve
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Live Science
Don't Blink: Striking Image Shows Bullet in Man's Eye Socket This CT scan shows a bullet that came to rest in a man's eye socket. Credit: Reproduced with permission from JAMA Ophthalmology. 2017. doi: 10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2017.40502017. Copyright© 2017 American Medical Association. All rights reserved. A striking new image shows a bullet lodged in a man's eye socket. The 45-year-old man went to the emergency room after he was shot with a 0.22 calib
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Futurity.org
How cell ‘house cleaners’ boost prostate cancer New research identifies the pathway by which the body’s natural process for removing dead and dying cells can actually fuel tumor growth, a little understood paradox of certain cancers. The finding could help researchers develop drugs to block the harmful tumor acceleration, while still allowing the body to clear out the dying cells, says study lead author Hernan Roca, associate research scientis
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel transcriptomic signature of type 2 diabetic islets identified Type 2 diabetes, which affects >0.5 billion people worldwide, results from the inability of beta cells in the pancreatic islets to provide the body with enough insulin to maintain blood glucose levels within the range for a healthy life. A collaborative study led by Prof. Michele Solimena at the Technische Universität in Dresden, Dr. Anke M Schulte at Sanofi in Frankfurt, Dr. Mark Ibberson at t
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Gizmodo
The White House Has a Vermin Problem Image: AP, steve lodefink/Flickr Early today, NBC 4 in Washington published several dozen pages of White House work orders it had obtained. Within the long, mundane requests (“please turn temperature up 1.5 degrees higher”) and repairs one expects with a building over 200 years old were orders which suggest there are several types of infestations—mice, cockroaches, and ants—in one of our nation’s
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Live Science
A Magnitude-4.4 Earthquake Just Hit Delaware The epicenter of a magnitude 4.4 earthquake hit near Dover, Delaware today (Nov. 30). Credit: U.S. Geological Survey A magnitude-4.4 earthquake just hit Delaware Bay, Delaware, surprising people in the First State, a place typically unaccustomed to tremblers. The earthquake hit 4.3 miles (7 kilometers) underground at 4:47 p.m. EST today (Nov. 30), according to the U.S. Geological Survey (US
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Gizmodo
6,000 Convictions Tied to Chemist Who 'Smoked Crack Every Day' to Be Thrown Out Photo:AP On Thursday, Massachusetts prosecutors announced that they will move to dismiss more than 6,000 convictions tied to lab results from a chemist caught stealing and using drugs from the University of Massachusetts Amherst crime lab. In 2014, Sonja Farak pleaded guilty to stealing drugs and tampering with evidence after admitting she ran lab tests while high on an assortment of drugs she’d
1h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Zip Down the World’s Longest Zipline | Yerevan, Armenia 360 VR Video | Discovery TRVLR Subscribe to Discovery VR for NEW EPISODES Every Friday - Tuesday: https://goo.gl/bnzvkQ Meet Tigran Chibukhchyan, an adrenaline junkie in Yerevan, Armenia whose created the longest, most magnificent zipline in the world. His dream is to build the most extreme sports amusement park in the world and you'll learn his philosophy behind wanting to give people the greatest thrill of their lives. For t
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Inside Science
November's Stellar Space Pictures November's Stellar Space Pictures Explore the stars that surround us in this month's slideshow. 5_sdss5-sphere_crop.jpg This month, the new Sloan Digital Sky Survey was announced. This cutaway illustration shows the parts of our universe that the survey intends to observe. Image credits: Robin Dienel/Carnegie Institution for Science/SDSS Space Thursday, November 30, 2017 - 17:30 Abigail Malate, S
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New on MIT Technology Review
Progress in AI isn’t as Impressive as You Might Think With so much excitement about progress in artificial intelligence, you may wonder why intelligent machines aren’t already running our lives. Key advances have the capacity to dazzle the public, policymakers, and investors into believing that human-level machine intelligence may be just around the corner. But a new report , which tries to gauge actual progress being made, attests that this is far
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: Hundreds of Fossilized Pterosaur Eggs Uncovered in China The cache of well-preserved two-inch eggs stunned his colleague Dr. Kellner. “If you were to tell me a year before that someone would find hundreds of pterosaur eggs at one spot I would have said ‘Yeah, yeah get out of here. Not even in your dreams,’” Dr. Kellner said. “But here we are.” Pterosaurs laid soft eggs like snakes or lizards, not brittle ones like birds. The fossilized eggs found at th
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Nasa footage shows lightning from ISSNasa releases footage captured over China, Korea and Japan of "lightning, city lights and fishing boats".
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NeuWrite San Diego
CRISPR and the Real World CRISPR and the Real World Posted by Caroline Sferrazza on November 30, 2017 in Developmental Neuroscience , Methods , Philosophy | Leave a comment “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal…” So begins our country’s Declaration of Independence. While we have learned that this preamble is all too simple in the context of wider society, consider the most basic interpre
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Live Science
Photos: Gorgeous Shots of the Adorable Horned Lizard Across the continent Credit: Linda & Dr. Dick Buscher Currently, there are eight known families of lizards found across North America, with 155 identified species. These squamate reptiles first appear in the fossil record during the Triassic period some 251 million to 199 million years ago. Found on all continents except Antarctica, lizards thrive in arid regions at elevations from sea level to 1
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Gizmodo
The 10 Best Deals Of November 30, 2017 We see a lot of deals around the web over on Kinja Deals , but these were our ten favorites today. Head over to our main post for more deals, and follow us on Twitter and Facebook to never miss a chance to save. You can also join our Kinja Deals Community Facebook group to connect with your fellow deal hunters. Delta’s Amazing $15 Shower Head Delta 75152 Shower Head | $15 | Amazon Update : This i
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Big Think
Did Modern Humans Come from China as Much as from Africa? A nearly complete human skull was found in Dali County of Shaanxi Province, China in 1978. A recent reappraisal of the skull has led some scientists to a hypothesis which, if proven true, turns the accepted history of early homo sapiens upside-down. The Dali skull (WU, ATHREYA, ET AL) Anthropologists largely agree that H omo sapiens first emerged about 200,000 years ago in Africa. It was orig
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NYT > Science
Jerry A. Fodor, Philosopher Who Plumbed the Mind’s Depths, Dies at 82 Known for his buoyant, puckish, at times pugnacious writing style, Dr. Fodor was the author of more than a dozen books, several intended for the general reader. Among the best known of these is “ The Modularity of Mind ,” published in 1983. In it, he argued that the human mind, rather than being a unitary system as was often supposed, comprises a set of inborn, compartmentalized, purpose-built su
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Ars Technica
The state of video journalism on Ars Technica—and its future Enlarge / Watch the birdie! reader comments 154 Ars Technica will soon be celebrating its 20th birthday—an eternity online. In those two decades, we've experimented with different formats of reporting and blogging, with each experiment aimed at better serving our readers. It has been a fun and wild ride: those 20 years have spanned some of the most turbulent and fast-paced years in the entire his
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Fossilised eggs shed light on reign of pterosaurs Image copyright Alexander Kellner/Museu Nacional/UFRJ Image caption Pterosaur eggs had soft parchment-like shells The largest clutch of pterosaurs eggs ever discovered suggests that the extinct flying reptiles may have gathered together in vast colonies to lay their eggs. More than 200 eggs were discovered at one location in China. Little is known about how the pterosaurs reproduced. The find sug
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers find link between excessive screen time and suicide risk IMAGE: This is Thomas Joiner, professor of psychology at Florida State University. view more Credit: FSU Photography Services New research presents compelling evidence that the more time teenagers spend on smartphones and other electronic screens, the more likely they are to feel depressed and think about, or attempt, suicide. Florida State University Robert O. Lawton Distinguished Professo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Targeted treatment could prevent spread of pancreatic cancer, heart damage IMAGE: Pancreatic cancer cells, under a microscope. view more Credit: University of Cincinnati Researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine have shown that a new targeted treatment could benefit patients with certain pancreatic tumors by preventing spread of the cancer and protecting their heart from damage--a direct result of the tumor. Higher levels of serotonin amon
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers funded by Morris Animal Foundation make breakthrough in fatal cat disease DENVER/November 30, 2017 - A new clinical trial funded in part by Morris Animal Foundation has resulted in a critical veterinary breakthrough - cats with feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) in remission following treatment with a novel antiviral drug. This fatal viral disease previously had no effective treatment or cure. Researchers from Kansas State University and the University of California,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Kent State research group publishes analysis of primate brains in top science journal How different are human brains compared to the brains of other primates such as chimpanzees, gorillas and monkeys? It's one of many important questions that scientists have asked for years while pursuing a better understanding of human evolution. Researchers in Kent State University's College of Arts and Sciences recently co-authored an article with more than 30 scientists, led by Yale University
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Ars Technica
Real wish or drunken regret? A “Do Not Resuscitate” tattoo throws doctors reader comments 0 It’s well known that patients struggle to clearly communicate their end-of-life wishes to those calling the shots at critical moments—generally doctors and family members. But, in case anyone was wondering, tattooing your wishes onto your body does not clear things up. Emergency medicine doctors in Florida struggled to figure out how to respectfully care for an unconscious 70-ye
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Science : NPR
Rare And Mysterious Vomiting Illness Linked To Heavy Marijuana Use Chalfonte LeNee Queen of San Diego grappled with violent vomiting episodes for 17 years until she found out her illness was related to her marijuana use. Pauline Bartolone/California Healthline hide caption toggle caption Pauline Bartolone/California Healthline Chalfonte LeNee Queen of San Diego grappled with violent vomiting episodes for 17 years until she found out her illness was related to he
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Big Think
The Interstellar Object Passing By Is Not Like Anything We’ve Seen The Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS) telescope is located near the summit of the Haleakala volcano on Maui, and on October 19, 2017, post-doctoral researcher Rob Weryk noticed something odd moving west at an unusual 6.2° angle. Not sure what it was, he checked the observatory’s backlog and discovered an image of it from the night before. A team led by Karen Meech
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Big Think
Human Speech, Music, and Bird Song Share a Common Origin Every time I hear that song "Talk to the Animals," I role my eyes. Now it seems the concept behind Dr. Doolittle may not be so far-fetched, after all. Take human languages for instance. There are 6,906 of them, and around 250 language families. Each one contains grammar and syntax. But in many instances linguists tell us, they're surprisingly similar. What's more, ours aren’t the only sounds in
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Live Science
Photos: Baby Pterosaurs Couldn't Fly as Hatchlings An analysis of 16 baby pterosaur embryos found in northwestern China shows that these little reptiles likely couldn't fly once they hatched. That is, they could probably walk after breaking through their eggs, but couldn't immediately take to the skies. The discovery comes from a site with 215 pterosaur eggs and the fossilized remains of older pterosaurs. The finding suggests that this species of
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Live Science
Julius Caesar's Invasion of Britain (Photos) Attack Credit: William Linnell & Edward Armitage/Wellcome Collection Julius Caesar wrote about leading two Roman invasions of Britain, in AD 55 and AD 54, in his Commentaries on the Gallic Wars, which can still be read today. To the Romans of the 1 st Century BC, Britain was a semi-mythical land beyond the seas, populated by barbarous, war-like tribespeople known as the Pretani or Britons.
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Live Science
Roman Fort Is the 'First Evidence' of Julius Caesar's Invasions of Britain An ancient fort near a beach in southeast England is the first solid archaeological evidence of Julius Caesar's invasions of Britain in 54 and 55 B.C., according to researchers. Caesar himself wrote about his invasions of Britain, which have long been regarded as the first historical events ever recorded in the British Isles. But there was no direct archaeological evidence of Caesar's i
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Science | The Guardian
Weatherwatch: Solar flares have safety implications for aircraft S pace weather, determined mainly by solar activity, rarely troubles us on Earth. We are not bothered if satellites are buffeted by solar winds, unless they stop working. However, extreme solar events may cause real problems down here. Giant, once-a-century solar storms are a known threat to power grids, but aircraft may be at risk from far more frequent events according to a new study of data fr
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The Atlantic
The Pierced Piety of Russell Simmons There’s an unsettling thing you can do when it comes to men accused of sexual misconduct in recent days. Go through their past work, read their memoirs, and often you will see hints of the behavior that’s gotten them in trouble. “It was funny that I became known as a ladies’ man, but I think it was because I was very obsessive about women,” Russell Simmons wrote in his 2002 autobiography Life and
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hot, sunny days could slow 5G networks, but research offers solutions Future 5G cellular systems, including backhaul links and device-to-device connections, could be affected by solar ray emissions, Embry-Riddle research suggests. Credit: Ahmed Sulyman/Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Hot, sunny weather could degrade future fifth-generation or "5G" cellular transmissions by more than 15%—which could mean more dropped calls in places like Florida and the Middle
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scallops have 200 eyes, which function like a telescope: study Whole Pecten Maximus with eyes. Credit: Ceri Jones, Haven Diving Services Scallops may look like simple creatures, but the seafood delicacy has 200 eyes which function remarkably like a telescope, using mirrors to focus light, researchers said Thursday. The report in the journal Science relied on microscopic imaging to uncover how scallops see through each of their small poppy seed-like black eye
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lewd comments cause YouTube to pull videos of children Google-owned YouTube said it deleted videos with children and teens, not because the content was offensive, but because of inappropriate comments made about the images YouTube pulled 150,000 videos of children after lewd comments about them were posted by viewers, as the Google-owned platform sought to reassure advertisers their messages would be kept out of compromising situations. The online vi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Southern Ocean drives massive bloom of tiny phytoplankton A phytoplankton bloom in the Southern Ocean reflects light back toward a NASA satellite. An international team of scientists recently determined the ocean conditions that support the massive summertime bloom, which spans 16 percent of the global ocean. Credit: NASA Scientists have uncovered the ocean conditions that support a massive summertime bloom of algae that spans 16 percent of the global o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
American College of Physicians urges Senate to vote no on tax bill Washington (November 30, 2017)-- Provisions in the Senate tax bill that would eliminate the Affordable Care Act's (ACA) requirement that persons purchase qualified health insurance coverage (individual mandate) and lead to deep cuts to Medicare and other federal health programs will do great harm to tens of millions of the most vulnerable patients including seniors, said the American College of P
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Some chemicals in smoke may be even more dangerous than previously thought IMAGE: Alison Bauer, PhD, and colleagues show that while single chemicals in combustion may not cause cancer, combinations can be dangerous. view more Credit: University of Colorado Cancer Center It's no surprise that chemicals in smoke cause cancer, but a new study published in the Archives of Toxicology shows that some chemicals in cigarette smoke and industrial processes may be more danger
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hot, sunny days could slow 5G networks, but research offers solutions IMAGE: Future 5G cellular systems, including backhaul links and device-to-device connections, could be affected by solar ray emissions, Embry-Riddle research suggests. view more Credit: Ahmed Sulyman/Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Hot, sunny weather could degrade future fifth-generation or "5G" cellular transmissions by more than 15% -- which could mean more dropped calls in places like
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
An anti-aging protein could be targeted to rejuvenate immune cells San Francisco, CA -- Anti-aging proteins have long been shown to protect against age-related diseases, such as cancer, neurodegeneration, and cardiovascular disease. A study by researchers at the Gladstone Institutes now reveals that one such protein could also be targeted to rejuvenate cells in the immune system. The protein in question is called SIRT1, more commonly known for being activated by
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nutrition may play a key role in early psychosis treatment: New research Early psychosis is associated with nutritional deficiencies, new research from Australia has found, potentially presenting new avenues for improving health among the millions of people affected worldwide. International research led by NICM Health Research Institute at Western Sydney University systematically reviewed evidence examining nutritional deficiencies in people being treated for psychoti
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The Scientist RSS
Hundreds of Pterosaur Eggs Discovered in ChinaThe fossil booty includes some eggs with embryo remains inside, and points to group nests involving long-term parental care.
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Live Science
Fossilized Pterosaur Eggs Hold Perfectly Preserved Embryos Inside An artist's interpretation of Hamipterus tianshanensis with its young. Credit: Zhao Chuang The discovery of 215 fossilized pterosaur eggs has revealed a new finding about the young of these ancient reptiles: Pterosaur babies likely couldn't fly after hatching and probably needed their parents to take care of them. An examination of 16 embryos within these eggs shows that the little pterosau
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Live Science
This Flu Season Could Be a Whopper, Officials Warn U.S. health officials said they are concerned the upcoming flu season could be a bad one, based on reports from the Southern Hemisphere, where the flu season recently ended for the year. In Australia, for example, there were record-high numbers of laboratory-confirmed flu cases this year — more than 2.5 times the number last year, according to the Australian Government Department of Health.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Blowing in the stellar wind: Scientists reduce the chances of life on exoplanets in so-called habitable zones Image of starlight on exoplanet, courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech. Is there life beyond Earth in the cosmos? Astronomers looking for signs have found that our Milky Way galaxy teems with exoplanets, some with conditions that could be right for extraterrestrial life. Such worlds orbit stars in so-called "habitable zones," regions where planets could hold liquid water that is necessary for life as we k
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Giant black hole pair photobombs Andromeda galaxy Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/Univ. of Washington/T.Dorn-Wallenstein et al.; Optical: NASA/ESA/J. Dalcanton, et al. & R. Gendler It seems like even black holes can't resist the temptation to insert themselves unannounced into photographs. A cosmic photobomb found as a background object in images of the nearby Andromeda galaxy has revealed what could be the most tightly coupled pair of supermassive blac
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google's phones and other gadgets have had a bumpy ride In this Wednesday, Oct. 4, 2017, file photo, a woman holds up the Google Pixel 2 phone, left, next to the Pixel 2 XL phone at a Google event at the SFJAZZ Center in San Francisco. Google prides itself on the intelligence of its search engine and other services, but it's discovering that even companies brimming with brainpower face a tough learning curve when venturing into new markets. The hard l
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Viden
Julemanden får flere hjælpende robothænder Julen sig nærmer og dermed også gaveræset, der i højere og højere grad foretages med klik bag skærmene, i stedet for at man kæmper sig gennem menneskemylderet i det lokale storcenter. Den selvsamme digitalisering ændrer faktisk hele varens rejse fra produktion til dørtrin. På de lagre, hvor julegaverne allerede ligger klar på paller fra gulv til loft, har robotterne gjort deres indtog. Her arbejd
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Southern Ocean drives massive bloom of tiny phytoplankton Scientists have uncovered the ocean conditions that support a massive summertime bloom of algae that spans 16 percent of the global ocean. Known as the Great Calcite Belt, this dense group of a microscopic phytoplankton, coccolithophores, can be seen in satellite images as turquoise swirls in the dark blue water of the Southern Ocean. "Satellites see the light reflected by the coccolithophores,"
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Residents of major Pakistan city are exposed to harmful pesticides Residents and workers in a major Pakistan city are exposed to harmful levels of pesticides, new research reveals. Scientists from Pakistan's F Quaid-i-Azam University and Lancaster University have evaluated the organophosphate pesticide concentration in dust from farms and also from pesticide manufacturing plants in the megacity of Lahore. Researchers tested 50 dust samples as well as blood and u
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Versatile cancer drugs Medications which block enzymes belonging to the kinase family, are among the most effective pharmaceuticals for targeted cancer therapies. Scientists at the German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) at the Technical University of Munich have examined 243 kinase inhibitors which are either approved drugs or have been tested in clinical trials. According to results published in Science , some of these may h
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fish oil component preconditions vision cells to survive future injury or disease New Orleans, LA - A team of LSU Health New Orleans scientists discovered that a component of fish oil not only protects cells critical to vision from potentially lethal initial insults, but also from those that occur in the future. The study showed that the omega-3 fatty acid, DHA, and its derivatives "precondition" photoreceptor and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells to survive. The results
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Double-edged sword: Killing cancer cells can also drive tumor growth IMAGE: This is Dipak Panigrahy, MD, senior author and assistant professor of pathology in the Department of Pathology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center view more Credit: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center BOSTON - Cancer therapies including radiation and chemotherapy seek to treat the disease by killing tumor cells. Now a team including researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Cen
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Postsurgery guideline could reduce opioid prescriptions by as much as 40 percent CHICAGO (November 30, 2017): Rising rates of opioid prescriptions have been linked to the opioid epidemic, and a significant number of opioid deaths have been linked to prescriptions written by surgeons. However, new study results suggest that a more vigilant prescribing guideline for surgeons could reduce by as much as 40 percent the number of opioid pills prescribed after operations, and still
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Diet success may depend on your DNA IMAGE: Diet success may depend on your DNA. view more Credit: Texas A&M University Health Science Cener We can add one more thing to the list of traits affected by genetics: how our bodies respond to a particular diet. Research in animal models with different genetics shows that one diet really doesn't fit all, and what works for some may not be best for others, according to a Texas A&M stu
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
More mammoth bones recovered from Michigan farm where skull, tusks and dozens of intact bones of an ice age mammoth were foundPaleontologists conducted a second excavation this week at the Chelsea-area farm where the skull, tusks and dozens of intact bones of an ice age mammoth were pulled from the ground in late 2015.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hundreds of pterosaur eggs reveal early life insights Hundreds of pterosaur bones laying on the surface, demonstrating the richness of these sites. Credit: Alexander Kellner (Museu Nacional/UFRJ) Scientists have peered inside the largest collection of fossilized pterosaur eggs ever found, using 3D scans to reveal new insights into these flying cousins of dinosaurs, researchers said Thursday. Pterosaurs were reptiles, and the first creatures—after in
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Science : NPR
Hundreds Of Eggs From Ancient Flying Reptile Are Found In China Artist's rendition of a family of pterosaurs, which had massive wingspans of up to 13 feet and likely ate fish with their large teeth-filled jaws. Illustrated by Zhao Chuang hide caption toggle caption Illustrated by Zhao Chuang Artist's rendition of a family of pterosaurs, which had massive wingspans of up to 13 feet and likely ate fish with their large teeth-filled jaws. Illustrated by Zhao Chu
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NYT > Science
Energy Idea for Mars Yields a Clue for Powering Data Centers Energy Idea for Mars Yields a Clue for Powering Data Centers Oliver Cruz, a technician, on the manufacturing floor at Bloom Energy, a producer of fuel cells in Sunnyvale, Calif. Credit Peter Prato for The New York Times SUNNYVALE, Calif. — As a scientist working for NASA in the 1990s, K. R. Sridhar developed a contraption that could use energy from the sun to transform the elements of the Martian
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon brings Alexa from the home to the office in a new AI push Amazon is launching a new Alexa for Business service using its speakers powered by artificial intelligence Amazon announced Thursday it is bringing its Alexa digital assistant to the workplace, expanding artificial intelligence efforts that have gained traction in the home market. "Alexa for Business brings the Alexa you know and love into the workplace to help all types of workers to be more pro
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google data-saving tool aims to help manage smartphone bills Google says a new mobile application will help smartphone users conserve data, enabling them to better manage their wireless costs, responding to demands in many parts of the world Google is taking aim at the "next billion" internet users with a way to stop smartphone apps from needlessly burning through costly mobile data allowances. A newly release application dubbed Datally made available free
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers use fluorescent carbon nanotube probes to detect ovarian cancer Rice University and MD Anderson researchers have developed a technique that uses fluorescent nanotube-based probes to locate specific tumors in the body. Credit: Weisman Lab/Rice University Researchers at Rice University and the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have refined and, for the first time, run in vivo tests of a method that may allow nanotube-based probes to locate specific
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
A Republican mayor's plan to replace partisanship with policy | G.T. BynumConventional wisdom says that to win an election, you need to play to your constituencies' basest, most divisive instincts. But as a candidate for mayor of Tulsa, Oklahoma, G.T. Bynum decided to skip the smear campaigns and trash talk and instead focus on results. He told Tulsa's voters exactly what he wanted to accomplish if elected and gave them transparent ways to measure his success, and it le
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New on MIT Technology Review
Global Mosquito-Sensing Network Being Built Using Smartphones Malaria is a killer. Up to 600 million people suffer from the disease, and each year, one million die from it. According to UNICEF, most of them are children less than five years old living in sub-Saharan Africa. So preventing the spread of malaria is a major goal. Health experts have various ways to control the spread of the disease. Some of these interventions have been hugely successful but ot
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Deducing the properties of a new form of diamond Earlier this year, amorphous diamond was synthesized for the first time using a technique involving high pressures, moderately high temperatures and a tiny amount of glassy carbon as starting material. A father-son team at Clemson University has now successfully calculated a number of basic physical properties for this new substance, including elastic constants and related quantities. The results
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers recover more mammoth bones from Chelsea-area farm The search for more mammoth bones begins at James Bristle’s farm near Chelsea on Tuesday morning, Nov. 28, 2017. Credit: Daryl Marshke, Michigan Photography University of Michigan paleontologists conducted a second excavation this week at the Chelsea-area farm where the skull, tusks and dozens of intact bones of an ice age mammoth were pulled from the ground in late 2015. A U-M news video (see be
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Conspiracy thinking less likely with greater news media literacy, study suggestsThe more you know about the news media and how it works, the less likely you are to believe conspiracy theories - even ones you might find politically tempting. The connection held true overall even where conspiracy theories resonated with an individual's political beliefs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
People with disabilities more likely to be arrestedPeople with disabilities face all sorts of discrimination every day. New Cornell University research suggests they may also face it while interacting with the police.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Deducing the properties of a new form of diamondEarlier this year, amorphous diamond was synthesized for the first time using a technique involving high pressures, moderately high temperatures and a tiny amount of glassy carbon as starting material. A father-son team at Clemson University has now successfully calculated a number of basic physical properties for this new substance, including elastic constants and related quantities.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Interrupted reprogramming converts adult cells into high yields of progenitor-like cellsA modified version of iPS methodology, called interrupted reprogramming, allows for a highly controlled, safer, and more cost-effective strategy for generating progenitor-like cells from adult cells. Researchers converted adult mouse respiratory tract cells called Club cells into large, pure populations of induced progenitor-like cells, which retained a residual memory of their parental cell linea
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Invasive cells in head and neck tumors predict cancer spreadHead and neck tumors that contain cells undergoing a partial epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition -- which transforms them from neatly organized blocks into irregular structures that extrude into the surrounding environment -- are more likely to invade and spread to other parts of the body, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Consumption is the bottleneck for sustainable developmentFrom ending poverty to improving wellbeing, gender equality, cities' resilience or climate action -- while synergies among most of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) foster progress in sustainable development, there are some key conflicts or bottlenecks that could hamper achieving the SDG objectives for 2030. Responsible consumption and production seems to be such a bottleneck
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Phase III immunotherapy trial for migraine shows positive resultsAn antibody therapy against a key inflammatory molecule involved in migraines reduces the number of headaches that chronic migraine patients experience per month in a phase III trial.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How blood-sucking insects find dark-coated cattle in the darkDark-coated horses suffer more from blood-sucking horseflies compared to their white counterparts, research shows. Now, investigators know why animals with a dark, smooth coat are particularly vulnerable - even in a dark environment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Patients with post-traumatic stress disorder respond differently to certain sounds, research findsA new neurobiological marker have have just been found to help recognize patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The future of electronics: New catalytic effect discovered for producing gallium oxideSemiconducting oxides are a new class of materials that are currently enjoying great attention in the field of semiconductor technology. Gallium oxide is the archetypal example for its ability to handle extremely high voltages and its optical transparency in the deep ultraviolet region. Such components are based on very thin, ultrapure semiconductor layers produced by special deposition methods. P
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Popular Science
Rats have been in New York City since the 1700s and they're never leaving Since the late 1700s, Norwegian rats have haunted New York City’s alleys, parks, and basements. They came on ships from France and England, and then they never left. Matthew Combs , a graduate student at Fordham University, didn’t just want to learn about the history of those rats. He also investigated how their families move around the city, and found that certain areas had more genetic diversit
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Suomi NPP catches birth of northern Indian Ocean Tropical Cyclone OckhiShortly after Tropical Cyclone Ockhi formed in the Northern Indian Ocean to the west of Sri Lanka, NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the storm and saw powerful bands of thunderstorms wrapping into its center from the northern quadrant.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers advance technique to detect ovarian cancer IMAGE: Rice University and MD Anderson researchers have developed a technique that uses fluorescent nanotube-based probes to locate specific tumors in the body. view more Credit: Weisman Lab/Rice University Researchers at Rice University and the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have refined and, for the first time, run in vivo tests of a method that may allow nanotube-based probe
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The Atlantic
A High-Scoring Revolution Has the Rockets Soaring For a basketball team obsessed with data and analytics, the Houston Rockets have a lot of numbers working in their favor thus far this season. Through their first 21 games, they’ve made 340 three-pointers, more than any team in NBA history over a similar season-opening span. (The previous record was 292, which Houston set last season.) Their shooting percentage on threes is around league average,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA finds newly formed Tropical Storm Dahlia battling wind shearTropical Storm Dahlia formed under the conditions of vertical wind shear, which displaced the bulk of its clouds north of the center. Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed that Tropical Storm Dahlia showed strongest thunderstorms north of its center of circulation as the storm moved through the Southern Indian Ocean.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Going swimmingly: Biotemplates breakthrough paves way for cheaper nanobots Trajectory of a templated helical silica nanoswimmer manually controlled to move in an approximate figure-eight pattern; scale bar is 5 μm. Credit: Jamel Ali A feature of science fiction stories for decades, nanorobot potential ranges from cancer diagnosis and drug delivery to tissue repair and more. A major hurdle to these endeavors, however, is finding a way to cheaply make a propulsion system
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gravitational waves could shed light on the origin of black holes The LIGO experiment has made several detections of colliding black holes. Future gravitational wave experiments might detect such events much further back in time, which could shed light on how black holes form. Credit: The SXS (Simulating eXtreme Spacetimes) Project A new study published in Physical Review Letters outlines how scientists could use gravitational wave experiments to test the exist
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cognitive science
Explaining Cognitive Distortions in 60 Seconds A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
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Ars Technica
North Korea can hit all of US with its new ICBM. Deal with it Korean Central News Service / Sean Gallagher reader comments 27 North Korea's latest intercontinental ballistic missile test demonstrates a number of things that are not good news for anyone hoping to prevent the country from becoming a global nuclear power. The missile, called the Hwasong-15, flew high enough (more than 4,400 kilometers, or 2,700 miles—more than 10 times the altitude of the Inte
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Popular Science
AI can figure out a place's politics by analyzing cars on Google Street View Google Street View images are filled with cars. That is a simple and pedestrian truth, and one which artificial intelligence researchers have taken advantage of to do something surprising. By analyzing car type, they were able to make predictions about the demographic information of the people in the cities they studied. For example, the team, largely from Stanford University, analyzed whether th
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Big Think
Can Psychedelics Make Us More Content? Among the many professed life goals hash-tagged on social media—beauty (205.2 million on Instagram), success (25.5 million), money (26.1 million), power (19.7 million), and handstands (4.3 million)—contentment (240k) doesn’t fare well. We generally want more than we have, which doesn’t promote a content life. Yet many common psychological disorders, including anxiety and depression, are rooted,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Designing a golden nanopill Geometric features of gold-coated liposomes based on random (A-D) and uniform (E-H) arrangements of gold nanoparticles on the core surface. Credit: Jaona Randrianalisoa, Xiuying Li, Maud Serre, Zhenpeng Qin Imagine a microscopic gold pill that could travel to a specific location in your body and deliver a drug just where it is needed. This is the promise of plasmonic nanovesicles. These minute ca
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Gravity signals could speedily warn of big quakes and save lives Chris McGrath/Getty A man stands amidst the debris of his house, which was destroyed by the magnitude-9.1 Tohoku earthquake that hit Japan in 2011. Gravity signals that race through the ground at the speed of light could help seismologists get a better handle on the size of large, devastating quakes soon after they hit, a study suggests. The tiny changes in Earth's gravitational field, created wh
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The Atlantic
Delighting in Holiday Light Shows Scenes of people getting into the holiday spirit—Christmas markets opening, festive lights adorning buildings and trees, light shows and holiday events taking place—all to make the most of the shorter winter days in the north, and to bring a little color, brightness, and wonder into the season.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What gives poetry its aesthetic appeal? New research has well-versed answer New psychology research points to the factors that explain why we find particular poems aesthetically pleasing--results that enhance our understanding of "why we like what we like." "People disagree on what they like, of course," explains Amy Belfi, a postdoctoral fellow in New York University's Department of Psychology at the time of the study and the study's lead author. "While it may seem obvi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Going swimmingly: Biotemplates breakthrough paves way for cheaper nanobotsNew developments may now propel nanoswimmers from science fiction to reality thanks to unexpected help from bacteria. Engineers have demonstrated a new technique for plating silica onto flagella, the helix-shaped tails found on many bacteria, to produce nanoscale swimming robots. The group's biotemplated nanoswimmers spin their flagella thanks to rotating magnetic fields and can perform nearly as
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hundreds of fossilized eggs shed light on pterosaur developmentAn invaluable collection of more than 200 eggs is providing new insights into the development and nesting habits of pterosaurs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Speaking up against bigotry can reduce bad behaviorIf you're sitting around the holiday table and one of your curmudgeonly uncles says something unintentionally bigoted, your inclination may be to ask for more mashed potatoes and get on with the feast. But researchers say that might be a mistake.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Obesity increases dementia riskPeople who have a high body mass index (BMI) are more likely to develop dementia than those with a normal weight, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Humble sponges are our deepest ancestors: Dispute in evolutionary biology solvedNew research has resolved evolutionary biology's most-heated debate, revealing it is the morphologically simple sponges, rather than the anatomically complex comb jellies, which represent the oldest lineage of living animals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Computer analysis fills gaps in antibody blueprintAntibodies defend our bodies against intruders. These molecules consist of proteins with attached sugars. However, the blueprint directing the processing of these sugars on the protein was not well understood until now. Scientists have now used computer analysis to complete this blueprint and confirmed their findings in the laboratory.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Visible signals from brain and heartKey processes in the body are controlled by the concentration of calcium in and around cells. Scientists have now developed the first sensor molecule that is able to visualize calcium in living animals with the help of a radiation-free imaging technique known as optoacoustics. The method does not require the cells to be genetically modified and involves no radiation exposure.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Amazon Imagines a Lucrative Future in VR and AR Apps Amazon is many things: online retailer, grocery store owner, provider of cloud computing services. And this week it added another title to its list: helper for companies that want to make virtual- and augmented-reality apps. In Las Vegas at its annual Amazon Web Services conference, the company unveiled Sumerian , a Web-based service that makes it easier to create VR and AR experiences without sp
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New on MIT Technology Review
A Quantum Boost for a Different Kind of Computer Quantum computers capable of mind-boggling computations are finally on the horizon. But what will the first useful machines look like? Industry heavy hitters including IBM , Google , Microsoft , and Intel , as well as a few startups like Rigetti Computing and Quantum Circuits Incorporated , are all making steady advances toward more capable quantum computers by using superconducting circuits cool
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Huge haul of rare pterosaur eggs excites palaeontologists Zhao Chuang Artist's concept of the Hampiterus pterosaur with eggs and embryos. A remarkable fossil slab containing hundreds of pterosaur eggs and some embryos has been discovered in China 1 . The find looks set to transform palaeontologists’ understanding of these enigmatic creatures. The early life of pterosaurs — the first vertebrates to evolve powered flight — has been a mystery. It was only
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bat cave study sheds new light on origin of SARS virusGenetic recombination between viral strains in bats may have produced the direct evolutionary ancestor of the strain that caused a deadly outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in humans, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Butterfly pattern emerges from quantum simulationAn international team demonstrates on Google's quantum chip a novel method to study quantum phases of matter.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New research agenda to accelerate malaria elimination, eradicationOver 180 scientists, malaria program managers and policy makers from around the world have come together through a consultative process to update the research agenda for malaria elimination and eradication, first produced in 2011. The outcome is a series of seven 'malERA Refresh' papers. This forward-looking research and development agenda should help accelerate progress towards a malaria-free wor
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Antibiotics may reduce the ability of immune cells to kill bacteriaA new study has shown that antibiotics can reduce the ability of mouse immune cells to kill bacteria, and that changes to the biochemical environment directly elicited by treatment can protect the bacterial pathogen.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Public resource boosts drug discovery, offers insights into protein functionResearchers have taken the Connectivity Map -- a widely used resource of tools and data -- to new heights with a massively scaled-up version. This expanded 'connectivity map' creates more than 1.3 million gene expression profiles of drug treatment and genetic perturbation, accelerating research on small molecules and gene function. For this new platform, the researchers have improved its accessibi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New early gravity signals to quantify the magnitude of strong earthquakesAfter an earthquake, there is a disturbance in the field of gravity almost instantaneously. This could be recorded before the seismic waves. Researchers have managed to observe these weak signals and to understand where they come from. Because they are sensitive to the magnitude of earthquakes, these signals may play an important role in the early identification of the occurrence of a major earthq
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gravitational waves could shed light on the origin of black holesThe detection of gravitational waves has given astronomers a new way of looking at the universe, and a new study shows how these ripples in the fabric of spacetime might confirm or rule out the existence of a certain type of black hole.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Designing a golden nanopillResearchers have investigated the optical properties of complex plasmonic vesicles, which can navigate the bloodstream, and, when hit with a quick pulse of laser light, change shape to release their contents. The researchers used supercomputers to gain insights into the how plasmonic nanoparticles can be optimally designed and activated.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cigarette smokers are 10 times more likely to be daily marijuana usersDaily marijuana use has been on the rise over the past decade. Now, a new study found that cigarette smokers are 10 times more likely to use marijuana on a daily basis. Marijuana use occurred nearly exclusively among current cigarette smokers, daily or non-daily smokers, compared with former smokers and those who have never smoked. However, even among non-smokers, daily marijuana use is increasing
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What leads certain people to seek vengeance? SadismPeople who enjoy hurting others and seeing them in pain are more likely to seek revenge against those who have wronged them, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Under stress, newborn babies show greater brain response to painWhen newborn babies are under stress, their brains show a heightened response to pain, a new study has found. However, you'd never know it from the way those infants act. The findings show that stress leads to an apparent disconnect between babies' brain activity and their behavior. Stressed babies may not seem to respond to pain, even as their brain is still processing it.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New software can verify someone's identity by their DNA in minutesResearchers have developed a method to quickly and accurately identify people and cell lines from their DNA. The technology has a wide range of applications, but its most immediate use could be to flag mislabeled or contaminated cell lines in cancer experiments.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lighting the way to switch chemical reaction pathwaysResearchers have pioneered a system that modulates visible, colored light to change the reactions of a powerful chemical coupling agent.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Is underground transit worse for your health?When researchers set out to study the environmental benefits of different modes of public transit in LA, they found some unexpected results: certain SoCal public transit routes that were entirely underground exposed passengers to greater concentrations of carcinogens in the air.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lower lung cancer rates in communities with strong smoke-free laws, study showsResearchers studied the correlation between communities with strong smoke-free workplace laws and the number of new lung cancer diagnoses. Those communities have 8% fewer new cases than communities with weak or no workplace laws.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
North Texas earthquakes occurring on 'dead' faults, seismology research showsRecent earthquakes in Texas' Fort Worth Basin - in the community of Venus and the Dallas suburb of Irving - occurred on faults not active for at least 300 million years, according to research. The research supports the assertion that recent North Texas earthquakes were induced, rather than natural. The conclusion is entirely independent of previous analyses correlating seismicity to the timing of
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Gizmodo
It's Your Last Chance to Save 20% On Xenoblade Chronicles II With Prime Commerce Content is independent of Editorial and Advertising, and if you buy something through our posts, we may get a small share of the sale. Click here for more. Xenoblade Chronicles II finally comes out on the Switch tomorrow, which means today is your last chance to save 20% by preordering with Prime. Just add the game to your cart, and you should see the $12 discount taken automatically. $6
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Scientific American Content: Global
It's Wet Down Here Imagine doing research in a place where you can’t talk, you can’t breathe, and there’s no gravity. Researching animals anywhere is hard. Researching animals underwater is harder. Science is often portrayed as a series of meticulously planned, methodically executed experiments. But fieldwork can be disastrous; things rarely go as planned. Murphy’s Law is the only law, and if there are scientis
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
U-M researchers recover more mammoth bones from Chelsea-area farmUniversity of Michigan paleontologists conducted a second excavation this week at the Chelsea-area farm where the skull, tusks and dozens of intact bones of an ice age mammoth were pulled from the ground in late 2015.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Deducing the properties of a new form of diamond WASHINGTON, D.C., November 30, 2017 -- Earlier this year, amorphous diamond was synthesized for the first time using a technique involving high pressures, moderately high temperatures and a tiny amount of glassy carbon as starting material. A father-son team at Clemson University has now successfully calculated a number of basic physical properties for this new substance, including elastic consta
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The Atlantic
Budget-Managing Tips, but for Space Telescopes Sometime in the mid-2020s, the United States plans to launch a new member of its fleet of space observatories, one with a field of view 100 times more powerful than the Hubble Space Telescope. The Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope, or WFIRST, will spend six years scanning the universe. It will scour the Milky Way in search of hundreds of more exoplanets, and it will soak up the light from dist
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The Atlantic
Bitcoin Is a Delusion That Could Conquer the World A bar of gold. A disk of iron. A chain of beads. A card of plastic. A slip of cotton-linen paper. These things are worthless. One cannot eat them, or drink them, or use them as a blanket. But they are valuable, too. Their value comes from the simplest thing. People believe they are money, and so they are. If every currency is a consensual delusion , then bitcoin, a digital cryptocurrency that cha
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Big Think
To Be Happier, Focus on What’s within Your Control God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, Courage to change the things I can, And wisdom to know the difference. This is the Serenity Prayer, originally written by the American theologian Reinhold Niebuhr around 1934, and commonly used by Alcoholics Anonymous and similar organisations. It is not just a key step toward recovery from addiction, it is a recipe for a happy li
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Ars Technica
Historical diarrhea bacteria blasted past antibiotics, scooped pre-resistance Color-enhanced scanning electron micrograph showing Salmonella Typhimurium (red) invading cultured human cells. reader comments 26 As soon as scientists figured out how to harness the power of antibiotic drugs, bacteria hit back. Following clinical trials of penicillin around 1941, doctors documented the spread of penicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among hospital patients in 1942. By the
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Gizmodo
Asshole Causes Emergency Landing After Naming Wi-Fi Network 'Bomb On Board' Photo: Getty While it’s magnificent that you can connect to the internet while you’re soaring in a metal tube miles above ground, there are still shitheads who are going to use this modern wonder for evil. Most recently, a passenger aboard a flight from Nairobi to Istanbul created a Wi-Fi hotspot and named the network “bomb on board,” which prompted an emergency landing. The Turkish Airlines flig
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sonic Kayaks: Environmental monitoring and experimental music by citizensResearchers have rigged kayaks with underwater environmental sensors and speakers to create an environmental monitoring tool suitable for citizen scientists. Instructions for the hardware and open-source software for making the 'Sonic Kayak' are available.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New treatment investigated for brain tapeworm infectionTreating neurocysticercosis (NCC), an infection of the brain with tapeworm larvae, often leads to inflammation and seizures when the parasites in the brain die. Now, researchers have reported that pretreatment with the anti-tumor necrosis factor drug etanercept (ETN) is a viable strategy to manage this post-treatment inflammation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Do your ears hang low? The complex genetics behind earlobe attachmentA common, hands-on method for teaching genetics in grade school encourages students to compare their earlobes with those of their parents: are they attached and smoothly mesh with the jawline? Or are they detached and dangly? The answer is meant to teach students about dominant and recessive genes. Simple, right? Not so fast.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Squeezing light into a tiny channel brings optical computing a step closerBy forcing light to go through a smaller gap than ever before, researchers have paved the way for computers based on light instead of electronics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Simple blood test may predict MRI disease activity in MSA blood test to monitor a nerve protein in the blood of people with multiple sclerosis (MS) may help predict whether disease activity is flaring up, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Trial suggests way to personalize heart health in diabetesPeople with diabetes and high risk of CVD who achieved extremely tight glycemic control showed higher risks of fatal heart attacks, a new study has found. Now scientists have identified two genetic variants associated with a threefold increase in CVD in this group. This discovery could lead to easy identification of individuals at risk and treatment using currently approved medications.
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New Scientist - News
Baby pterosaurs were cute, defenceless and unable to fly The largest ever collection of pterosaur eggs and embryos has been found in north-west China. It includes 215 eggs, some with intact embryos. The “Pterosaur Park” is evidence that these pterosaur babies were born flightless and needed looking after, and that their parents nested in huge shared colonies. The first flying vertebrates and the biggest animals to ever get off the ground , pterosau
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA finds newly formed Tropical Storm Dahlia battling wind shear IMAGE: NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Dahlia on Nov. 30 at 1:17 a.m. EST (0617 UTC) and saw coldest cloud top temperatures (purple) north of the storm's center.... view more Credit: Credits: NASA JPL/Ed Olsen Tropical Storm Dahlia formed under the conditions of vertical wind shear, which displaced the bulk of its clouds north of the center. Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New in the Hastings Center report, November-December 2017 Stemming the Standard-of-Care Sprawl: Clinician Self-Interest and the Case of Electronic Fetal Monitoring Kayte Spector-Bagdady, Raymond De Vries, Lisa Hope Harris, and Lisa Kane Low Continuous electronic fetal monitoring is often used during labor to monitor fetal heart rates, but in most pregnancies, the practice may increase risks to mother and baby. Despite strong evidence and professional gu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers map brain activity to improve prosthetic design High-tech prosthetics allow amputees to engage more fully in everyday life, even to compete in sporting events. Researchers from the University of Houston have demonstrated how brain activity is used to identify different terrains - level ground and stairs, for example - a key step in developing prosthetics that allow the user's prosthesis to automatically adjust to changing ground conditions in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discovery puts the brakes on HIV's ability to infectIn a study led by the University of Delaware and the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, researchers discovered a 'brake' that interferes with HIV's development into an infectious agent. This mechanism prevents the capsid -- the protein shell covering the virus -- from forming.
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Live Science
World's Smallest Tape Recorder Is Alive Scientists have converted a bunch of microbes into what they've dubbed the "world's smallest tape recorder:" By tinkering with the genes of an ordinary laboratory strain of Escherichia coli bacteria , researchers say they've been able to coax the bacteria into not only logging their interactions with the environment but time-stamping these occurrences, as well. These tiny "tape recorders" —
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cognitive science
Are questions about what research in neuroscience has been done welcome to the Cognitive Sciences SE? A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
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Feed: All Latest
Jeep's New Wrangler Is More Capable Than Ever—Wherever You're Headed A Jeep is for the off-roader warrior. It's the chariot inspired by military muscle, exactly the vehicle you need when you’re in a mood to conquer the land beyond the asphalt. That may be the line from the marketing department, but the engineering and design folks clearly take it seriously. The new Jeep Wrangler, which debuted this week at the Los Angeles Auto Show, comes with a suite of upgrades
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Live Science
Now, That's Deep! Mariana Trench Fish Lives 5 Miles Down The dark and chilly depths of the ocean's so-called "midnight zone" thousands of feet below the surface are home to numerous species of bizarre-looking and fearsome fish. Many of these creatures have oversized jaws filled with massive teeth. But a deceptively vulnerable-looking fish is not only right at home in the very deepest ocean environment on Earth — where few creatures can survive —
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Science | The Guardian
The daily grind could do us a power of good | Brief letters Following this research ( Pounding grain gave Neolithic women bones to beat athletes , it would be interesting to study the difference, if any, between the bones of women before, say, the 1970s and today. Before most households possessed automatic washing machines, washing clothes, scrubbing floors etc must have contributed to healthier bones; even if, before rubber gloves, knuckles, hands and kn
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Inside Science
Understanding How Scallops View the World Understanding How Scallops View the World Using tools from many scientific disciplines, researchers gain detailed insights into how the many-eyed mollusk sees its watery home. ScallopEyes_topNteaser.jpg Three eyes of Pecten maximus. Image credits: Dan-Eric Nilsson, Lund University Rights information: This image may be used by news outlets to accompany this Inside Science story. Creature Thursday,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Going swimmingly: Biotemplates breakthrough paves way for cheaper nanobots IMAGE: Trajectory of a templated helical silica nanoswimmer manually controlled to move in an approximate figure-eight pattern; scale bar is 5 μm. view more Credit: Jamel Ali WASHINGTON, D.C., Nov. 30, 2017 -- A feature of science fiction stories for decades, nanorobot potential ranges from cancer diagnosis and drug delivery to tissue repair and more. A major hurdle to these endeavors, ho
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
People with disabilities more likely to be arrested ITHACA, N.Y. - People with disabilities face all sorts of discrimination every day. New Cornell University research suggests they may also face it while interacting with the police. People with disabilities in the study - including emotional, physical, cognitive or sensory disabilities - were nearly 44 percent more likely to be arrested by age 28, while those without had a lower probability of ar
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mindfulness training and therapy can reverse jail time's negative psychological effects Just four months in prison can negatively affect a person's cognitive abilities and impulse control, according to findings published in Criminal Justice and Behavior from University of Pennsylvania criminologists Adrian Raine and Rebecca Umbach. The good news is, some combination of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and mindfulness training can reverse the damage. "We have known for decades that
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Conspiracy thinking less likely with greater news media literacy, study suggests IMAGE: University of Illinois journalism professor Stephanie Craft has focused much of her recent work on news media literacy, trying to understand what people know about the news media and how... view more Credit: Photo by L. Brian Stauffer CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- The more you know about the news media and how it works, the less likely you are to believe conspiracy theories - even ones you might
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP catches birth of northern Indian Ocean Tropical Cyclone Ockhi IMAGE: On Nov. 30 at 3:24 a.m. EST (0824 UTC) NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone 3B and saw the storm west of Sri Lanka in the Southern Indian... view more Credit: Credits: NASA/NOAA/NRL Shortly after Tropical Cyclone Ockhi formed in the Northern Indian Ocean to the west of Sri Lanka, NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the storm and saw powerful bands of t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Vulnerability identified for subtypes of glioblastoma Glioblastoma, the most common and aggressive form of brain cancer, typically fails to respond to treatment or rapidly becomes drug resistant. In a paper published online in the journal Cancer Cell on November 30, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers identified a strategy that pinpoints a genetically distinct subpopulation of patients with glioblastoma that is particul
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cigarette smokers are 10 times more likely to be daily marijuana users November 30, 2017--Daily marijuana use has been on the rise over the past decade. Now, a new study by researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and the Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy, City University of New York, found that cigarette smokers are 10 times more likely to use marijuana on a daily basis. Marijuana use occurred nearly exclusively among cu
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Designing a golden nanopill IMAGE: Cross-plane view of near-field electrical enhancement in plasmonic vesicles. Shown are 10 nm gold nanoparticles around 75 nm vesicle core. view more Credit: Jaona Randrianalisoa, Xiuying Li, Maud Serre, Zhenpeng Qin Imagine a microscopic gold pill that could travel to a specific location in your body and deliver a drug just where it is needed. This is the promise of plasmonic n
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Caught in the act: Papillomaviruses promote non-melanoma skin cancer UV radiation has been known for a long time to be a risk factor for the development of skin cancer. Simultaneous infection with human papillomaviruses (HPV) has also been suspected to promote skin cancer, particularly in organ transplant recipients. Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have now been able to show for the first time in a natural system that papillomaviruses asso
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New early signals to quantify the magnitude of strong earthquakes After an earthquake, there is a disturbance in the field of gravity almost instantaneously. This could be recorded before the seismic waves that seismologists usually analyze. In a study published in Science on December 1, 2017, a team formed of researchers from CNRS, IPGP, the Université Paris Diderot[1] and Caltech has managed to observe these weak signals related to gravity and to understand w
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Squeezing light into a tiny channel brings optical computing a step closer IMAGE: These are nanofocusing and optical mode properties of the organic hybrid gap plasmon waveguide on the silicon platform used for degenerate four-wave mixing. The insets depict the scaled electromagnetic mode... view more Credit: Nielsen et al., 2017/Imperial College London By forcing light to go through a smaller gap than ever before, researchers have paved the way for computers b
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A new research agenda to accelerate malaria elimination and eradication IMAGE: These are P. falciparum merozoites. Glasswork by L. Jerram. view more Credit: Credit: Malaria glasswork by Luke Jerram. Graphic Design by Rachel Papernick More than 180 scientists, malaria programme leaders and policy makers from around the world have come together through a consultative process to update the research agenda for malaria elimination and eradication, first published in
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Designer molecule points to treatment for diseases caused by DNA repeats MADISON, Wis. -- Using a molecule designed to overcome a roadblock formed by a common type of genetic flaw, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have made progress towards novel molecular treatments for Friedreich's ataxia -- a rare but fatal disorder -- in the laboratory dish and in animals. Friedreich's, like at least 40 other genetic diseases, is caused by stretches of repetitive
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Global health committee issues report on heart disease burden IMAGE: The Committee identified 4 priority areas for actions: achieving global security, maintaining a sustained response to the continuous threats of communicable diseases, saving and improving the lives of women and... view more Credit: Journal of the American College of Cardiology The United States must prioritize its health resources toward detecting and treating noncommunicable diseases,
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Butterfly emerges from quantum simulation IMAGE: The computational processing power of quantum bits (qubits) is poised to have profound impacts on diverse fields of science and engineering. Using 9 superconducting qubits, researchers at Google and the... view more Credit: Visual Science/Google Quantum simulators, which are special-purpose quantum computers, will help researchers identify materials with new and useful proper
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How bone cells promote lung cancer growth A certain type of cell in the bone marrow can help promote tumor growth in mice with early stage lung cancer, a new study finds. Bone marrow derived cells have been shown to contribute to tumor progression, though many of the specific mechanisms through which this occurs remain unknown. Here, Camilla Engblom et al. found that mice with lung tumors had a significantly higher bone mass than their h
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Scallop eyes mirror reflecting telescopes, with sophisticated optical properties IMAGE: Whole Pecten Maximus with eyes. This material relates to a paper that appeared in the 1 December 2017, issue of Science , published by AAAS. The paper, by B.A. Palmer at... view more Credit: Ceri Jones, Haven Diving Services Researchers have obtained a detailed view of a scallop's visual system - a sophisticated arrangement of up to 200 eyes they say is strikingly similar to a reflec
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Gravity: A faster method for gauging the size of great quakes IMAGE: Observation and origin of the elastogravity signal preceding direct seismic waves. The map shows the location of the seismometers (triangles) detecting the prompt signals just after the beginning of the... view more Credit: IPGP, 2017 Immediately following Japan's 2011 Tohoku earthquake, while seismic waves still traveled to seismic stations to offer insight into the event's magnitud
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Hundreds of fossilized eggs sheds light on pterosaur development IMAGE: Hundreds of pterosaur bones laying on the surface, demonstrating the richness of these sites. This material relates to a paper that appeared in the 1 December 2017, issue of Science ,... view more Credit: Alexander Kellner (Museu Nacional/UFRJ) An invaluable collection of more than 200 eggs is providing new insights into the development and nesting habits of pterosaurs. To date, only
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Shifting protein networks in breast cancer may alter gene function A given gene may perform a different function in breast cancer cells than in healthy cells due to changes in networks of interacting proteins, according to a new study published in PLOS Computational Biology . Previous research has shown that a protein produced by a single gene can potentially have different functions in a cell depending on the proteins with which it interacts. Protein interactio
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Further advances in HIV prevention, treatment and cure from PLOS Medicine's special issue This week, guest editors Steven G. Deeks of the University of California San Francisco, USA; Sharon Lewin of the Peter Doherty Institute of Infection and Immunity, University of Melbourne and Royal Melbourne Hospital, Australia; and Linda-Gail Bekker of the Desmond Tutu HIV Centre, University of Cape Town, South Africa sum up PLOS Medicine 's special issue on Advances in HIV Prevention, Treatment
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New research agenda announced for malaria elimination and eradication A new research agenda for malaria elimination and eradication is laid out in a collection of review articles, led by Regina Rabinovich and colleagues of the Malaria Eradication Scientific Alliance (MESA), in this week's PLOS Medicine . This Malaria Eradication Research Agenda (malERA) Refresh Collection includes seven articles outlining a broad interdisciplinary research agenda with the goal of a
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Parasitic worms don't just wait to be swallowed by new hosts IMAGE: This is a model for host-seeking behavior in H. polygyrus . view more Credit: Ruiz F, et al. (2017) Contrary to widespread assumptions, parasitic nematodes that spread among mice via food may not wait passively to be swallowed. Instead, according to new research published in PLOS Pathogens , these tiny worms may use odors from host mice as cues to position themselves where they have a
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Bat cave study sheds new light on origin of SARS virus IMAGE: This is the side face of a Chinese horseshoe bat ( Rhinolophus sinicus ). view more Credit: Photo by Dr. Libiao Zhang from Guangdong Institute of Applied Biological Resource, China Genetic recombination between viral strains in bats may have produced the direct evolutionary ancestor of the strain that caused a deadly outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in humans, accor
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Scientists visualize structure of key DNA repair component with 'near-atomic resolution' IMAGE: Three-dimensional structure of the yeast Mec1-Ddc2 complex, a homolog of human ATR-ATRIP. The genomes of eukaryotic cells are under continuous assault by external and internal factors. All cells have elaborate... view more Credit: ©University of Science & Technology of China,Illustration: Guoyan Wang and Yanbing Ma;structure based on the cryo-EM map of a yeast Mec1-Ddc2 complex (EMDB ID EM
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Communication between lung tumors and bones contributes to tumor progression Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators have identified a way in which a type of lung cancer co-opts a portion of the immune system to increase tumor progression. In the Dec. 1 issue of Science , the team from the MGH Center for Systems Biology describes a "crosstalk" between lung tumors and bone marrow, which leads to the generation of a type of immune cell that travels to the tumor a
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Judging a 'clean face' for trachomaPart of the control strategy for trachoma -- repeated eye infections caused by the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis -- is facial cleanliness. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have shown that properly trained graders can reliably reproduce assessments of facial cleanliness. The findings suggest that measures of facial cleanliness can be added to trachoma surveys in the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New treatment investigated for brain tapeworm infection IMAGE: Pig brain naturally infected with Taenia solium five days after praziquantel treatment and infused Evans blue prior to necropsy. The black arrows point to blue cysts with increased vascular permeability... view more Credit: Dr. Cristina Guerra-Giraldez, 2015 Treating neurocysticercosis (NCC), an infection of the brain with tapeworm larvae, often leads to inflammation and seizures when the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sonic Kayaks: Environmental monitoring and experimental music by citizens IMAGE: The sonic kayak system in action. view more Credit: Amber Griffiths Researchers have rigged kayaks with underwater environmental sensors and speakers to create an environmental monitoring tool suitable for citizen scientists. Instructions for the hardware and open-source software for making the "Sonic Kayak" are presented in a paper publishing 30 November in the open access journal PLO
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Science : NPR
New North Korean Missile Is A 'Monster' A view of Wednesday's successful test launch of the newly developed intercontinental ballistic rocket Hwasong-15 is seen in this undated photo released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency in Pyongyang. KCNA via Reuters hide caption toggle caption KCNA via Reuters A view of Wednesday's successful test launch of the newly developed intercontinental ballistic rocket Hwasong-15 is seen in thi
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The Atlantic
Scallops Have Eyes, and Each One Builds a Beautiful Living Mirror In 2019, if everything goes according to plan, the much-delayed James Webb Space Telescope will finally launch into orbit. Once assembled, it will use an array of 18 hexagonal mirrors to collect and focus the light from distant galaxies. This segmented-mirror design was developed in the 1980s, and it has been so successful that it will feature in almost all the large telescopes to be built in the
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Scallops’ amazing eyes use millions of tiny, square crystals to see There’s stiff competition for the most elaborate eyeballs in the animal kingdom, but a mollusk that turns up on dinner plates might be a finalist. Each of a scallop’s eyes — it has up to 200 of them, each about a millimeter in diameter — contains millions of perfectly square, flat crystals that build up into a mirrored mosaic, new research shows. And that shiny surface is curved in a way that let
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Despite forest loss, African protected area can support 10s of thousands of elephantsDespite some forest loss, Mozambique's sprawling Niassa National Reserve has the potential to support tens of thousands of elephants and 1,000 lions according to a new land-use study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Neutrophil-inspired propulsionInspired by white blood cells rolling on endovascular walls before transmigrating to the disease site, scientists have succeeded in getting particles to move along the walls of microscopic, three-dimensional vessels. This method could be used in targeted cancer therapeutics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Migration makes breeding harder for seabirdsThe key drivers of seabird migration have now been revealed for the first time in a new study. The research suggests that puffin colonies that travel great distances during the winter often find it more difficult to breed than others, and that escaping your habitat with far flung migration therefore carries a cost.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
HIV directly impacts the brain in the early stages of the infection, report researchersThe human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) directly impacts the brain in the early stages of the infection, researchers have found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The origin of rain and smellsEveryday questions like what really causes clouds and rain, what gives sparkling wines their distinctive aroma and why do tires generate so much smoke when they burn have answers that are intimately connected. Now researchers have developed a particularly exact model to show the origin of all these phenomena from a universal microscopic mechanism that occurs on the surface of liquids, independentl
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Magnetoelectric' material shows promise as memory for electronicsSmartphones and computers wouldn't be nearly as useful without room for lots of apps, music and videos. Devices tend to store that information in two ways: through electric fields (think of a flash drive) or through magnetic fields (like a computer's spinning hard disk). Each method has advantages and disadvantages. However, in the future, our electronics could benefit from the best of each, say r
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Eruption clues: Researchers create snapshot of volcano plumbingResearchers have studied the journey of magma, or molten rock, in one of Europe's largest and most active volcanoes, Mount Etna. They applied several techniques to create a more accurate picture of the volcano's plumbing system and how quickly the magma rises to the top to cause an eruption. Their findings contribute to our understanding of how and when volcanoes erupt.
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Science | The Guardian
Doctor wins 2017 John Maddox prize for countering HPV vaccine misinformation A Japanese doctor who has stood up to a campaign of misinformation around a common anti-cancer vaccine has won a prestigious prize for championing evidence in the face of hostility and personal threats. Riko Muranaka at Kyoto University was awarded the 2017 John Maddox prize on Thursday for her efforts to explain the safety of the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine amid strong opposition from an
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: How a Giant Tortoise Gets Off Its Back The giant tortoises of the Galápagos Islands have no natural predators, but their shells represent a mortal danger of their own. When flipped over, the animals — who regularly weigh in at more than 90 pounds — often struggle to find their feet. If they fail, they eventually die. And for a giant tortoise with one shell type, the saddleback, big spills are a regular part of life. “The saddlebacks l
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NYT > Science
Matter: The Scallop Sees With Space-Age Eyes — Hundreds of Them “For me, Newton and Darwin come together in these eyes,” said Gáspár Jékely, a neuroscientist at the University of Exeter who was not involved in the new study. Earlier studies had given scientists hints that the scallop eye was weirdly complex. Each has a lens, a pair of retinas, and a mirror-like structure at the back. Scientists suspected that light passed through the lenses and the retinas, w
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Squeezing light into a tiny channel brings optical computing a step closer Nanofocusing and optical mode properties of the organic hybrid gap plasmon waveguide on the silicon platform used for degenerate four-wave mixing. The insets depict the scaled electromagnetic mode distributions for a wide metal gap of 500 nm and a narrow metal gap of 25 nm, along with the chemical formula for MEH-PPV. Credit: Nielsen et al., 2017/Imperial College London By forcing light to go thr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Designer molecule points to treatment for diseases caused by DNA repeats A depiction of the double helical structure of DNA. Its four coding units (A, T, C, G) are color-coded in pink, orange, purple and yellow. Credit: NHGRI Using a molecule designed to overcome a roadblock formed by a common type of genetic flaw, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have made progress towards novel molecular treatments for Friedreich's ataxia—a rare but fatal disorder—
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sonic Kayaks: Environmental monitoring and experimental music by citizens The sonic kayak system in action. Credit: Amber Griffiths Researchers have rigged kayaks with underwater environmental sensors and speakers to create an environmental monitoring tool suitable for citizen scientists. Instructions for the hardware and open-source software for making the "Sonic Kayak" are presented in a paper publishing 30 November in the open access journal PLOS Biology . The syste
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Parasitic worms don't just wait to be swallowed by new hosts Model for host-seeking behavior in H. polygyrus . Credit: Ruiz F, et al. (2017) Contrary to widespread assumptions, parasitic nematodes that spread among mice via food may not wait passively to be swallowed. Instead, according to new research published in PLOS Pathogens , these tiny worms may use odors from host mice as cues to position themselves where they have a higher chance of being eaten. S
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Butterfly emerges from quantum simulation The computational processing power of quantum bits (qubits) is poised to have profound impacts on diverse fields of science and engineering. The picture is a photograph of a superconducting chip (area of entire chip: 1 cm2) consisting of 9 qubits in a 1-D array. Microwave pulses are applied to control the states of the qubits and their interaction and control the dynamics in the system. Such Jose
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Ars Technica
Destiny 2’s Ghost is actually an Amazon Alexa speaker and skill now Enlarge / A Ghost, but IRL. Amazon reader comments 19 From the Power Glove to Fallout 4 's real-life Pip Boy , gamers have been pitched a lot of ridiculous hardware over the years. The Destiny 2 Ghost Alexa speaker and accompanying Alexa skill are no less ridiculous. The skill , which also works on other Alexa-enabled speakers, allows Destiny 2 players to ask questions like, "Who are the Red Legi
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Science : NPR
Silence It’s a noisy world , inside and out. Whether it’s the barrage of sounds that surrounds us or the constant droning of our own thoughts, finding peace and quiet can be difficult, and some people go to great lengths to get a break from the noise. Quiet moments might feel good, but is there really any benefit to them?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Making medicines affordable WASHINGTON -- Consumer access to effective and affordable medicines is an imperative for public health, social equity, and economic development, but this need is not being served adequately by the biopharmaceutical sector, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The report offers eight recommendations with 27 actions for their implementation (a sample
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Speaking up against bigotry can reduce bad behavior IMAGE: This is Diana Sanchez, associate professor of psychology at Rutgers University-New Brunswick. view more Credit: Rutgers University If you're sitting around the holiday table and one of your curmudgeonly uncles says something unintentionally bigoted, your inclination may be to ask for more mashed potatoes and get on with the feast. But Rutgers University-New Brunswick researchers say th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gravitational waves could shed light on the origin of black holes PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] -- A new study published in Physical Review Letters outlines how scientists could use gravitational wave experiments to test the existence of primordial black holes, gravity wells formed just moments after the Big Bang that some scientists have posited could be an explanation for dark matter. "We know very well that black holes can be formed by the collapse of
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Bats in China carry all the ingredients to make a new SARS virus Viruses in bats may have mixed and matched genes to create the virus that gave rise to the deadly SARS outbreak in 2003, a new study suggests. And it could happen again. All of the ingredients needed to create a new SARS virus are found among viruses currently infecting horseshoe bats, researchers report November 30 in PLOS Pathogens . The viruses “are poised to cause future outbreaks,” says viro
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Jackpot of fossilized pterosaur eggs unearthed in China Hundreds of eggs belonging to a species of flying reptile that lived alongside dinosaurs are giving scientists a peek into the earliest development of the animals. The find includes at least 16 partial embryos , several still preserved in 3-D. Those embryos suggest that the animals were able to walk, but not fly, soon after hatching, researchers report in the Dec. 1 Science . Led by vertebrate pa
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Breakthrough process for directly converting methane to methanolThe direct oxidation of methane -- found in natural gas -- into methanol at low temperatures has long been a holy grail. Now, researchers have found a breakthrough way to accomplish the feat using a heterogeneous catalyst and cheap molecular oxygen, according to a new article.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Copy of 'Jesus' secret revelations to his brother' discovered by biblical scholarsThe first-known original Greek copy of a heretical Christian writing describing Jesus' secret teachings to his brother James has been discovered by biblical scholars. The original manuscript was probably a teacher's model used to help students learn to read and write.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Microscopy: A space-time sensor for light-matter interactionsPhysicists have developed an attosecond electron microscope that allows them to visualize the dispersion of light in time and space, and observe the motions of electrons in atoms.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Eggs in 1 Basket: China Fossil Find Opens Up Lost World of Pterosaurs Thanks in part to an abundance of fossil discoveries in recent decades, scientists now recognize more than 200 species of pterosaur—the winged reptiles that dominated the world’s skies for 160 million years. But almost nothing is known about how they bred or how their young developed. As recently as 2014 the available scientific evidence on those topics added up to a grand total of just three pte
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Gizmodo
For the First Time in Decades, a Drug for Migraines Shows Promise Image: AP A new drug, called Erenumab, has shown promise in preventing migraine attacks, the intense headaches that chronically plague millions of adults each year in the US alone. Erenumab is a lab-made antibody that works by blocking a neural pathway called CGRP. Data from a recent phase three reported Thursday in the New England Journal of Medicine found that it cut the number of “migraine day
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wisconsin county settles suit over augmented-reality gamesMilwaukee County plans to settle a lawsuit from an augmented-reality game developer that challenged an ordinance requiring companies to get local permits for apps like Pokemon Go to be played in parks.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Despite forest loss, an African protected area still has potential to support tens of thousands of elephants, 1K lions There are very few places remaining on the planet which can hold populations of large wildlife in the tens of thousands, and Niassa Reserve, with its connection to Selous Game Reserve in southern Tanzania, is one of these places. Credit: Jean-Baptiste Deffontaines Despite some forest loss, Mozambique's sprawling Niassa National Reserve has the potential to support tens of thousands of elephants a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mass of warm rock rising beneath New England, study suggests In the figure, measurements of the strength of mantle flow are shown along with the colored map of seismic wave speed at 195 kilometers (121 miles) beneath the Earth's surface, under the North American tectonic plate. The warm colors indicate lower speed, implying that rock in those regions is less dense, likely warmer and rising toward the surface. The key finding is that mantle flow indicators
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Popular Science
Hospitals are scrambling to solve their air pollution issue A sk Jodi Sherman to identify a culprit in global climate change, and you’ll get an unexpected answer. The anesthesiologist from Yale University doesn’t name the usual suspects—carbon dioxide, like the kind that spews out of our cars, or methane, the gas packed into every cow burp. Instead, she points a finger at anesthesia, the tool most essential to her trade. “And it’s just being released into
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Professors discover copy of Jesus' secret revelations to his brother A piece of the Coptic translation of the First Apocalypse of James from the Nag Hammadi Codex V. Credit: Nag Hammadi Library, Oxford University. The first-known original Greek copy of a heretical Christian writing describing Jesus' secret teachings to his brother James has been discovered at Oxford University by biblical scholars at The University of Texas at Austin. To date, only a small number
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Army researchers seek better batteries Army researchers are exploring how to create more efficient batteries by studying optimized geometries from calculations. (US Army illustration) Credit: US Army A team of Army scientists working on more efficient batteries recently published new findings in a peer-reviewed publication from the American Chemical Society. In an invited paper published in the special issue of the Accounts of Chemica
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Global longitudinal study confirms obesity increases dementia risk People who have a high body mass index (BMI) are more likely to develop dementia than those with a normal weight, according to a new UCL-led study. The study, published in the Alzheimer's & Dementia journal, analysed data from 1.3 million adults living in the United States and Europe. The researchers also found that people near dementia onset, who then go on to develop dementia, tend to have lo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Neutrophil-inspired propulsion When white blood cells are summoned to combat invasive bacteria, they move along blood vessels in a specific fashion, i.e., like a ball propelled by the wind, they roll along the vascular wall to reach their point of deployment. Since white blood cells can anchor themselves to the vasculature, they are capable of moving against the direction of the blood flow. This type of behaviour of the whit
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The Atlantic
The Tax Bill Is a Health Bill For the first time in U.S. history, the leading association of psychiatrists has condemned a tax bill. They are not alone among doctors. In a joint statement this month, the American Psychiatric Association, American College of Physicians, American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, American Academy of Pediatrics—among others, you get the idea—voiced stern opposition to the Republican t
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Gizmodo
Study Says Most Redditors Won't Read This Story Before Voting on It Image Source: Reddit Most people are guilty of sharing a story on Facebook or Twitter that they didn’t read. And according to a new study, users are no different when it comes to performatively upvoting articles on Reddit. What’s most surprising is just how often those votes are impulse clicks. According to Motherboard , a new paper by a team at Notre Dame University has tracked 309 users’ Reddit
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Big Think
Graphene May Someday Power the World Graphene is a sheet of individual carbon atoms arranged in a chicken-wire-like pattern. It’s weird stuff, a two-dimensional object. Just that simple statement alone is mind-bending: How can something with only length and width — and no thickness — exist as an object in our three-dimensional world? It can’t, really. Graphene achieves its requisite third dimension with a little trick: Brownian moti
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Science current issue
Comment on "Water harvesting from air with metal-organic frameworks powered by natural sunlight" Kim et al . (Reports, 28 April 2017, p. 430) presented results for the solar-driven harvesting of water from air via metal-organic frameworks as a prodigious potential advance toward remedying global water shortages. Basic thermodynamics and a survey of multiple off-the-shelf technologies show that their approach is vastly inferior in efficiency (and thereby in feasibility) to available alternati
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Relativity survives drop test AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Lighting the way to drug labeling AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Science current issue
Putting photons to work AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Science current issue
A plasmonic route for mixing waves AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Science current issue
Going with the grain boundaries AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Science current issue
Channeling Ca2+ for cancer AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Science current issue
Coping with invasion and warming Invasive Rudbeckia triloba is less affected by climate warming than native European species. PHOTO: CLARE GAINEY/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO Native plant communities worldwide face the challenges of anthropogenic changes, among them climate warming and invasion by introduced species. Haeuser et al. investigated the synergy between these two processes in a field experiment in native grassland in Germany. Th
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Science current issue
An enzymatic route to alkenes Conversion of fatty acids to fully deoxygenated hydrocarbons is a challenging reaction for which few biological routes are known. Christenson et al. have characterized a bacterial enzyme, OleB, that catalyzes decarboxylation of fatty acid-derived β-lactones to form cis-olefins. OleB is a member of an enzyme family that typically uses a nucleophilic carboxylate in hydrolysis reactions. Sequence an
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Science current issue
Putting an old law to the test Most superfluids, liquids, and gases that flow without viscosity owe their exotic properties to Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC), the formation of a macroscopic wave function at low temperatures. However, not all particles in a superfluid condense; a fundamental limit is set by the interactions in the system. Lopes et al. studied the dependence of the superfluid fraction in a homogeneous BEC of p
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Science current issue
Designed to stand the heat Enzymes are valued as catalysts in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, fine chemicals, and biofuels. A limitation is that most enzymes are unstable under the reaction conditions used in chemical manufacturing. Moore et al. describe a strategy for stabilization based on designing covalent protein staples into an enzyme scaffold. They used Rosetta design software to identify optimal sites for introdu
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Science current issue
Seeing microlensing from multiple angles The Spitzer Space Telescope helped characterize gravitational microlensing of a brown dwarf star. ILLUSTRATION; NASA/JPL-CALTECH/R. HURT (SSC) General relativity shows that massive objects deflect light. If a background star and a moving foreground object line up with Earth, the system acts as a lens that appears to temporarily increase the brightness of the star, an effect known as gravitational
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Science current issue
Surviving heart attack inflammation Heart attack (myocardial infarction) causes cell death and inflammation of cardiac tissue. It is not yet clear what mechanisms specifically cause fatality. King et al. show that ischemia (restricted blood flow to the heart muscles) caused by infarction results in cell death. Debris from the dead cells is taken up by macrophages (a type of immune cell). This results in an interferon regulatory fac
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Science current issue
Signaling an extended health span Research on aging increasingly emphasizes the importance of health span rather than life span itself. Yin et al. found that in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans , genetic variation in some (but not all) measures of health span was influenced by variation in genes encoding a neuropeptide and its corresponding receptor. The peptide is made in glial cells and activates a receptor on neurons t
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Science current issue
Ocean biogeochemistry modeled with emergent trait-based genomics Marine ecosystem models have advanced to incorporate metabolic pathways discovered with genomic sequencing, but direct comparisons between models and "omics" data are lacking. We developed a model that directly simulates metagenomes and metatranscriptomes for comparison with observations. Model microbes were randomly assigned genes for specialized functions, and communities of 68 species were sim
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Science current issue
Stripe order in the underdoped region of the two-dimensional Hubbard model Competing inhomogeneous orders are a central feature of correlated electron materials, including the high-temperature superconductors. The two-dimensional Hubbard model serves as the canonical microscopic physical model for such systems. Multiple orders have been proposed in the underdoped part of the phase diagram, which corresponds to a regime of maximum numerical difficulty. By combining the l
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Science current issue
Numerical evidence of fluctuating stripes in the normal state of high-Tc cuprate superconductors Upon doping, Mott insulators often exhibit symmetry breaking where charge carriers and their spins organize into patterns known as stripes. For high–transition temperature cuprate superconductors, stripes are widely suspected to exist in a fluctuating form. We used numerically exact determinant quantum Monte Carlo calculations to demonstrate dynamical stripe correlations in the three-band Hubbard
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Science current issue
Observations and modeling of the elastogravity signals preceding direct seismic waves After an earthquake, the earliest deformation signals are not expected to be carried by the fastest ( P ) elastic waves but by the speed-of-light changes of the gravitational field. However, these perturbations are weak and, so far, their detection has not been accurate enough to fully understand their origins and to use them for a highly valuable rapid estimate of the earthquake magnitude. We sh
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Science current issue
Organocalcium-mediated nucleophilic alkylation of benzene The electrophilic aromatic substitution of a C–H bond of benzene is one of the archetypal transformations of organic chemistry. In contrast, the electron-rich -system of benzene is highly resistant to reactions with electron-rich and negatively charged organic nucleophiles. Here, we report that this previously insurmountable electronic repulsion may be overcome through the use of sufficiently pot
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Science current issue
The image-forming mirror in the eye of the scallop Scallops possess a visual system comprising up to 200 eyes, each containing a concave mirror rather than a lens to focus light. The hierarchical organization of the multilayered mirror is controlled for image formation, from the component guanine crystals at the nanoscale to the complex three-dimensional morphology at the millimeter level. The layered structure of the mirror is tuned to reflect t
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Science current issue
Spectroscopic signatures of localization with interacting photons in superconducting qubits Quantized eigenenergies and their associated wave functions provide extensive information for predicting the physics of quantum many-body systems. Using a chain of nine superconducting qubits, we implement a technique for resolving the energy levels of interacting photons. We benchmark this method by capturing the main features of the intricate energy spectrum predicted for two-dimensional electr
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Science current issue
Giant nonlinear response at a plasmonic nanofocus drives efficient four-wave mixing Efficient optical frequency mixing typically must accumulate over large interaction lengths because nonlinear responses in natural materials are inherently weak. This limits the efficiency of mixing processes owing to the requirement of phase matching. Here, we report efficient four-wave mixing (FWM) over micrometer-scale interaction lengths at telecommunications wavelengths on silicon. We used a
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Science current issue
Photoredox-catalyzed deuteration and tritiation of pharmaceutical compounds Deuterium- and tritium-labeled pharmaceutical compounds are pivotal diagnostic tools in drug discovery research, providing vital information about the biological fate of drugs and drug metabolites. Herein we demonstrate that a photoredox-mediated hydrogen atom transfer protocol can efficiently and selectively install deuterium (D) and tritium (T) at α-amino sp 3 carbon-hydrogen bonds in a single
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Science current issue
Selective increase in CO2 electroreduction activity at grain-boundary surface terminations Altering a material’s catalytic properties requires identifying structural features that give rise to active surfaces. Grain boundaries create strained regions in polycrystalline materials by stabilizing dislocations and may provide a way to create high-energy surfaces for catalysis that are kinetically trapped. Although grain-boundary density has previously been correlated with catalytic activit
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Science current issue
A generic interface to reduce the efficiency-stability-cost gap of perovskite solar cells A major bottleneck delaying the further commercialization of thin-film solar cells based on hybrid organohalide lead perovskites is interface loss in state-of-the-art devices. We present a generic interface architecture that combines solution-processed, reliable, and cost-efficient hole-transporting materials without compromising efficiency, stability, or scalability of perovskite solar cells. Ta
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Science current issue
Egg accumulation with 3D embryos provides insight into the life history of a pterosaur Fossil eggs and embryos that provide unique information about the reproduction and early growth of vertebrates are exceedingly rare, particularly for pterosaurs. Here we report on hundreds of three-dimensional (3D) eggs of the species Hamipterus tianshanensis from a Lower Cretaceous site in China, 16 of which contain embryonic remains. Computed tomography scanning, osteohistology, and microprepar
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Science current issue
Host DNases prevent vascular occlusion by neutrophil extracellular traps Platelet and fibrin clots occlude blood vessels in hemostasis and thrombosis. Here we report a noncanonical mechanism for vascular occlusion based on neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), DNA fibers released by neutrophils during inflammation. We investigated which host factors control NETs in vivo and found that two deoxyribonucleases (DNases), DNase1 and DNase1-like 3, degraded NETs in circula
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Science current issue
3.9 A structure of the yeast Mec1-Ddc2 complex, a homolog of human ATR-ATRIP The ataxia telangiectasia–mutated and Rad3-related (ATR) kinase is a master regulator of DNA damage response and replication stress in humans, but the mechanism of its activation remains unclear. ATR acts together with its partner ATRIP. Using cryo–electron microscopy, we determined the structure of intact Mec1-Ddc2 (the yeast homolog of ATR-ATRIP), which is poised for catalysis, at a resolution
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Science current issue
New Products Summary A weekly roundup of information on newly offered instrumentation, apparatus, and laboratory materials of potential interest to researchers.
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Science current issue
Being out in STEM “I was really excited to be able to start fresh and establish my identity right away,” Elise Wantling says about starting college. “Instead of people seeing me as who I used to be—this very religious and quiet girl who from one day to the next turned into a really loud queer person—people would finally just see me as who I am, which is I'm Elise and I'm queer and I really like science.” Meeting o
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Science current issue
Response to Comment on "Water harvesting from air with metal-organic frameworks powered by natural sunlight" In their comment, Bui et al . argue that the approach we described in our report is vastly inferior in efficiency to alternative off-the-shelf technologies. Their conclusion is invalid, as they compare efficiencies in completely different operating conditions. Here, using heat transfer and thermodynamics principles, we show how Bui et al .’s conclusions about the efficiencies of off-the-shelf tec
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Science current issue
The target landscape of clinical kinase drugs Kinase inhibitors are important cancer therapeutics. Polypharmacology is commonly observed, requiring thorough target deconvolution to understand drug mechanism of action. Using chemical proteomics, we analyzed the target spectrum of 243 clinically evaluated kinase drugs. The data revealed previously unknown targets for established drugs, offered a perspective on the "druggable" kinome, highlight
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Science current issue
Osteoblasts remotely supply lung tumors with cancer-promoting SiglecFhigh neutrophils Bone marrow–derived myeloid cells can accumulate within tumors and foster cancer outgrowth. Local immune-neoplastic interactions have been intensively investigated, but the contribution of the systemic host environment to tumor growth remains poorly understood. Here, we show in mice and cancer patients ( n = 70) that lung adenocarcinomas increase bone stromal activity in the absence of bone metas
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Science current issue
Metalenses: Versatile multifunctional photonic components Looking sharp with metalenses High-end imaging lenses have tended to be based on bulk optical components. Advances in fabrication techniques have enabled the development of ultrathin, lightweight, and planar lenses (metalenses) that have unprecedented functionalities. These metalenses have the potential to replace or complement their conventional bulk counterparts. Khorasaninejad and Capasso revi
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Science current issue
Quake warnings, seismic culture Summary Since 1990, nearly one million people have died from the impacts of earthquakes. Reducing those impacts requires building a local seismic culture in which residents are aware of earthquake risks and value efforts to mitigate harm. Such efforts include earthquake early warning (EEW) systems that provide seconds to minutes notice of pending shaking. Recent events in Mexico provide an opport
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Science current issue
News at a glance AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Science current issue
Boston University geologist fights for his job AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Science current issue
Political chill reverses thaw in U.S.-Cuban science AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Science current issue
Poachers threaten Balkans' underground biodiversity AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Ars Technica
Windows 10 now on 600 million machines, not all of them PCs Everywhere Windows 10 can be. And on the server, too, though there it gets a different branding. Microsoft reader comments 46 Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella told shareholders that Windows 10 has now passed 600 million monthly active users, picking up 100 million since May of this year. This number counts all Windows 10 devices used over a 28-day period. While most of these will be PCs, there are oth
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Gizmodo
Get An Echo Dot For Just $5-$10 When You Bundle It With Smart Lights Echo Dot + Light Rhapsody Holiday String Lights | $50 | Amazon Echo Dot + Philips Hue White Starter Kit | $80 | Amazon The Echo Dot for $30 is still one of the best deals out there right now, but you can also bundle it with a lighting product today to save even more. First up, $50 gets you a Dot plus a 24.5' strand of Light Rhapsody’s holiday string lights . These lights are Alexa compatible,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers discover breakthrough process for directly converting methane to methanol IMAGE: Aberration-corrected HAADF/STEM images of as-synthesized Rh-ZSM-5. Single rhodium cations are circled in white with proposed ball-stick model of the structure. view more Credit: Lawrence F. Allard, co-author and researcher at Oak Ridge National Laboratory MEDFORD/SOMERVILLE (Nov. 30, 2017) - The direct oxidation of methane--found in natural gas--into methanol at low temperatures has
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Climate-friendly architecture thanks to natural folding mechanismsMobile components on buildings whose design was copied from naturally occurring solutions -- that is the subject of new research. The aim is to outfit them with drive elements that can move without energy input. Serving as a model here are pine cones, which utilize the varying swelling behaviors of their tissue to open when moist or close when dry.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Helping the brain prune bad habitsFasudil, a drug that stimulates neuron pruning, can nudge mice away from habit-driven behaviors when combined with retraining. A potential tool for facilitating the treatment of drug abuse and preventing relapse.
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Quanta Magazine
How Bacteria Help Regulate Blood Pressure Some years ago, when Jennifer Pluznick was nearing the end of her training in physiology and sensory systems, she was startled to discover something in the kidneys that seemed weirdly out of place. It was a smell receptor , a protein that would have looked more at home in the nose. Given that the kidneys filter waste into urine and maintain the right salt content in the blood, it was hard to see
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New Scientist - News
No, aliens aren’t lurking on the International Space Station A life form of earthly origin NASA Unexplained bacteria have been found on the outer hull of the International Space Station (ISS), according to Russian Anton Shkaplerov . The cosmonaut, who has spent a year in orbit across two missions and is about to embark on a third, says they were found in swabs taken of the station’s exterior. Shkaplerov thinks these bacteria couldn’t have simply hitche
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New Scientist - News
Tasty tomatoes could be sacrificed in drive to cut food waste Out in the cold age fotostock/Alamy By Sam Wong Tomayto, tomahto – we’ve long agreed to disagree on pronunciation, but the debate on where to store them is just heating up. Yesterday, new guidelines on food labelling aimed at reducing waste were published in the UK. The most eye-catching recommendation was that consumers should be advised to keep fruit and vegetables refrigerated below 5°C. P
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The Atlantic
The Tax-Bill Provision That Would Cost Harvard Millions Many of America’s elite colleges sit on massive pots of money, some worth billions of dollars. These endowments have grown significantly in recent years, the result of philanthropy and savvy investment techniques —and all the while they’re completely untaxed. That’s poised to change, though, if GOP lawmakers succeed in enacting their tax-overhaul bill, which is now inching closer to becoming law:
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Futurity.org
Young poplars could be next biofuel source New research indicates that poplar trees could be an economically viable biofuel material. In the quest to produce affordable biofuels, poplars are one of the Pacific Northwest’s best bets—the trees are abundant, fast-growing, adaptable to many terrains, and their wood can become substances used in biofuel and high-value chemicals that we rely on in our daily lives. But even as researchers test p
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Gizmodo
Unconscious Patient With 'Do Not Resuscitate' Tattoo Causes Ethical Conundrum at Hospital Image: NEJM/University of Miami When an unresponsive patient arrived at a Florida hospital ER, the medical staff was taken aback upon discovering the words “DO NOT RESUSCITATE” tattooed onto the man’s chest—with the word “NOT” underlined and with his signature beneath it. Confused and alarmed, the medical staff chose to ignore the apparent DNR request—but not without alerting the hospital’s ethic
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Ingeniøren
Verden skruer op for lyset om natten, men dagslyset styrer alligevel vores hverdag Jorden er blevet lysere de senere år – om natten. En international forskergruppe beretter i Science Advances , at størrelsen af nat-oplyste områder på Jorden i perioden fra 2012 til 2016 voksede med 2,2 procent om året, og at den samlede lysmængde i samme periode voksede med 1,8 procent om året. Til deres analyser har forskerne anvendt data fra et radiometer på den amerikanske satellit Suomi-NPP
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why are genetically identical individuals different? Ask your mum!Does the age of a mother influence the traits and characteristics of her progeny, and how? A team of scientists have addressed these questions by studying tiny, genetically identical C. elegans worms.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Aggressive' surgery is best treatment option for early stage lung cancerPatients with early stage lung cancer live longer when they receive a lobectomy -- the most common type of operation for the disease -- rather than a less extensive operation or radiation treatment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Reading between the lines in children's vocabulary differencesA new study has found that differences in vocabulary growth among grade school children of different socioeconomic statuses are likely related to differences in the process of word learning.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Despite forest loss, African protected area can support 10s of thousands of elephantsDespite some forest loss, Mozambique's sprawling Niassa National Reserve has the potential to support tens of thousands of elephants and 1,000 lions according to a new land-use study published in the journal Parks.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Microscopy: A space-time sensor for light-matter interactions Physicists from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have developed an attosecond electron microscope that allows them to visualize the dispersion of light in time and space, and observe the motions of electrons in atoms. The most basic of all physical interactions in nature is that between light and matter. This interaction takes place in attosecond times (i.e. billionths of a billion
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Science for the AU-EU partnership Already the hottest continent, parts of Africa may warm by up to 6 °C by the end of the century, even though its greenhouse gas emissions of 4 tonnes per person per year are way below the global average of 7.3 tonnes. As an estimated one in 4 people on Earth may live in Africa by 2050, infrastructure and services will come under increased pressure, and detailed up-to-date information on settlemen
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mass of warm rock rising beneath New England, Rutgers study suggests IMAGE: Professor Vadim Levin (front) and Rutgers Geology major Michael Klaser recover a portable seismic observatory in the woods in central Quebec. view more Credit: Courtesy of Vadim Levin/Rutgers University-New Brunswick Slowly but steadily, an enormous mass of warm rock is rising beneath part of New England, although a major volcanic eruption isn't likely for millions of years, a
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Gizmodo
You Should Look at The Moon Image: NASA This weekend, for the several billionth or so time in Earth’s history, the Moon will be in the part of its orbit around Earth where it’s a little closer, 16,000 miles closer than usual, and it looks a teeny amount larger. By this point, this so-called “supermoon” is a fairly cliched but certainly hyped piece of science news. But honestly, you should look at the moon. Not just today, b
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Gizmodo
Google Home Finally Smart Enough to Do Two Things at Once Despite all the time and energy companies like Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Amazon, and others have spent stressing the importance of AI, actual progress doesn’t always feel that swift. That’s because after about a year on the market, the Google Home has just gotten the ability to do two things at once. Instead of having to say one command at a time, you can now bundle two requests into the same
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What leads certain people to seek vengeance? Sadism, according to a new VCU-led study IMAGE: This is David Chester, Ph.D. view more Credit: VCU People who enjoy hurting others and seeing them in pain are more likely to seek revenge against those who have wronged them, according to a new study led by a Virginia Commonwealth University psychology professor. The study, "Personality Correlates of Revenge-Seeking: Multidimensional Links to Physical Aggression, Impulsivity, and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
T Austin professors discover copy of Jesus' secret revelations to his brother IMAGE: A piece of the Coptic translation of the First Apocalypse of James from the Nag Hammadi Codex V. view more Credit: Image of artifact from the Nag Hammadi Library, Oxford University. AUSTIN, Texas -- The first-known original Greek copy of a heretical Christian writing describing Jesus' secret teachings to his brother James has been discovered at Oxford University by biblical scholars at
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Army researchers seek better batteries IMAGE: US Army Research, Development and Engineering Command Commanding General Maj. Gen. Cedric T. Wins (left) presides at a ceremony honoring US Army Research Laboratory battery researchers (from left to right)... view more Credit: US Army Photo by Jhi Scott A team of Army scientists working on more efficient batteries recently published new findings in a peer-reviewed publication from
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers report altered brain functional connectivity in autism spectrum disorder IMAGE: Brain Connectivity is the essential peer-reviewed journal covering groundbreaking findings in the rapidly advancing field of connectivity research at the systems and network levels. view more Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers New Rochelle, NY, November 30, 2017--A new study in adolescent and young adult males with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) showed significant differences i
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Ars Technica
Get ready for a wave of Bitcoin forks Aurich Lawson reader comments 86 On August 1, a dissident faction of the Bitcoin community created a new payment network called Bitcoin Cash. There are lots of Bitcoin-derived spinoff currencies, of course, but this was unusual because it branched off from the existing Bitcoin blockchain. The result was the cryptocurrency equivalent of a stock split: everyone who owned one bitcoin before the spli
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UN dishes up prickly pear cactus in answer to food security The cactus was considered sacred by the ancient Aztecs, and modern-day Mexicans eat it, drink it, and even use it in medicines and shampoos The prickly pear cactus, considered an essential food in Mexico, could be the answer to much of the world's food security woes, the UN's Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) said Thursday. "While most cacti are inedible, the Opuntia species has much to off
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
GM to launch self-driving vehicles in big US cities in 2019General Motors Co. expects to carry passengers and deliver goods with self-driving vehicles in big cities sometime in 2019, telling investors it's moving quickly and plans to be ahead of other automakers and tech companies.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Brewery makes algae beer to spotlight threat to Lake Erie Much like a forensic team recreates a scene to determine how a crime was committed, researchers at the University of New Hampshire are using scientific sleuthing to better understand the journey of magma, or molten rock, ...
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The Atlantic
Perfect Grades Don't Always Matter Most American students strive for a 4.0 GPA and the highest test scores, but research shows that this quest for perfection actually discourages creativity and reduces academic risk-taking. In this episode of “School Myths” by The Atlantic , we investigate why grades aren’t everything when it comes to education.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research uncovers new weed control options for strawberry growers Since the 2005 ban of methyl bromide by federal regulators, winter strawberry growers have had limited options for managing broadleaf weeds, grasses and nutsedge species. But new research featured in the journal Weed Technology shows drip-applied herbicides may help to fill the gap. Scientists at the University of Florida's Gulf Coast Research and Education Center conducted field experiments to e
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Gizmodo
Volvo's Car Subscription Program Starts At $600 And Seems To Cover Pretty Much Everything More and more carmakers are turning to subscription services as an alternative way to get people into their cars. Cadillac has a program, as does Ford . And now Volvo does, too: Care by Volvo. And after reading through the official description, I’m really struggling to find a downside to it. With Care by Volvo, subscribers be able to order an XC40 , Volvo’s newest compact SUV and currently the on
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Gizmodo
Deadspin The Giants Really Screwed Up Eli Manning’s Exit | Jezebel Here’s Bette Midler in 1991 Talki Deadspin The Giants Really Screwed Up Eli Manning’s Exit | Jezebel Here’s Bette Midler in 1991 Talking About Geraldo Rivera Drugging and Groping Her Without Consent | The Root Cue the Violins, It’s Time for Matt Lauer’s Apology | Earther Super Volcanoes Are a Bigger Threat Than We Thought—But Don’t Freak Out | Splinter Roy Moore Goes on Unhinged Rant Blaming Pedophilia Allegations on an LGBTQ Con
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Helping the brain prune bad habits A drug that stimulates neuron pruning can nudge mice away from habit-driven behaviors when combined with retraining, neuroscientists have found. The results were published online on November 30 by Nature Communications . The drug fasudil, approved in Japan for cerebral vasospasm and stroke, inhibits an enzyme that stabilizes cells' internal skeletons. The researchers suggest that fasudil or simil
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Skin pigmentation far more complex than previously known AURORA, Colo. (Nov. 30, 2017) - Researchers examining understudied populations in Africa have found that skin pigmentation is far more varied and complex than previously understood. And that complexity increases nearer the equator. "Previous studies have focused on more homogeneous European and Eurasian populations and concluded that pigmentation was governed by just a handful of genes," said stu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Migration makes breeding harder for seabirds An international collaboration has for the first time revealed the key drivers of seabird migration. The new study suggests that puffin colonies that travel great distances during the winter often find it more difficult to breed than others, and that escaping your habitat with far flung migration therefore carries a cost. Published in Current Biology , the work was led by researchers from the D
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Two-drug combination may boost immunotherapy responses in lung cancer patients IMAGE: Combination therapy attracts immune cells to fight tumors and blocks cancer gene MYC Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers and colleagues have identified a novel drug combination therapy that could... view more Credit: Credit: Michael Topper and Michelle Vaz Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers and colleagues have identified a novel drug combination therapy that co
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New research robustly resolves one of evolutionary biology's most heated disputes IMAGE: This research challenges earlier evidence that Ctenophore is the earliest branching animal lineage first and puts sponges in that position. view more Credit: Monterrey Bay Aquarium New research led by the University of Bristol has resolved evolutionary biology's most-heated debate, revealing it is the morphologically simple sponges, rather than the anatomically complex comb jellies
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Immune-boosting antibody combination could improve lymphoma survival Combining two different immunotherapy treatments could dramatically improve lymphoma survival, according to a Cancer Research UK funded study published in Cancer Cell today (Thursday). Researchers from the University of Southampton tested different combinations of antibodies* in the lab to see how they interact with each other and what effect this has on how the immune system fights cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Public resource boosts drug discovery and offers insights into protein function Researchers at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard have taken the Connectivity Map -- a widely used resource of tools and data -- to new heights with a massively scaled-up version. For this new platform, the researchers have also improved its accessibility for the scientific community, enabling studies of small molecule and gene function and informing clinical trials. The Connectivity Map, or
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Antibiotics may reduce the ability of immune cells to kill bacteria Antibiotics normally act in concert with an organism's immune system to eliminate an infection. However, the drugs can have broad side effects, including eliminating "good" bacteria in the course of fighting off a pathogen. A new study led by researchers from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, MIT, and the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering has shown that antibiotics can al
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Skin pigmentation is far more genetically complex than previously thoughtResearchers report that while skin pigmentation is nearly 100 percent heritable, it is hardly a straightforward, Mendelian trait. By working closely with the KhoeSan, a group of populations indigenous to southern Africa, the researchers have found that the genetics of skin pigmentation become progressively complex as populations reside closer to the equator, with an increasing number of genes -- k
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Behavior not indicative of pain in stressed babies In stressed newborn babies, behaviour alone is not a reliable way of assessing pain, according to new UCL and UCLH research. The study, published today in Current Biology and funded by the Medical Research Council UK, found that hospitalised newborns, who are already stressed by their environment have a much larger pain response in their brain following a routine clinical skin lance than non-stre
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Do your ears hang low? The complex genetics behind earlobe attachment PITTSBURGH, Nov. 30, 2017 - A common, hands-on method for teaching genetics in grade school encourages students to compare their earlobes with those of their parents: Are they attached and smoothly mesh with the jawline? Or are they detached and dangly? The answer is meant to teach students about dominant and recessive genes. Simple, right? Not so fast. New research led by the Uni
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
To proliferate or not to proliferate? A cellular spring replies IMAGE: Cells forming an epithelium. The nuclei are marked in blue and ZO-1 in green. view more Credit: © UNIGE The epithelium, a tissue made up of closely juxtaposed cells, forms the glands and covers the outer surface of the human body as well as its internal cavities, such as the lungs or intestines. There are different types of epithelia, depending on the surfaces they cover and the functions
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Interrupted reprogramming converts adult cells into high yields of progenitor-like cells A modified version of iPS methodology, called interrupted reprogramming, allows for a highly controlled, potentially safer, and more cost-effective strategy for generating progenitor-like cells from adult cells. As demonstrated November 30 in the journal Stem Cell Reports , researchers in Canada converted adult mouse respiratory tract cells called Club cells into large, pure populations of induce
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Under stress, newborn babies show greater brain response to pain When newborn babies are under stress, their brains show a heightened response to pain, a new study has found. However, you'd never know it from the way those infants act. The findings reported in Current Biology on November 30 show that stress leads to an apparent disconnect between babies' brain activity and their behavior. "When newborn babies experience a painful procedure, there is a reasonab
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Invasive cells in head and neck tumors predict cancer spread IMAGE: A head and neck tumor (squamous cell carcinoma) stained for markers of cancer (p63; brown) and partial epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (LAMB3; red) demonstrates cells having undergone a unique transition at the... view more Credit: Massachusetts Eye and Ear (BOSTON) - Head and neck tumors that contain cells undergoing a partial epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition -- which transfo
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The Atlantic
Prepare for the New Paywall Era If the recent numbers are any indication, there is a bloodbath in digital media this year. Publishers big and small are coming up short on advertising revenue , even if they are long on traffic. The theory of digital publishing has long been that because people are spending more time reading and watching stories on the internet than other places, eventually the ad revenue would follow them from o
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The Atlantic
One Hundred Poems That Capture the Meaning of Joy In his new anthology, Joy: 100 Poems , the writer Christian Wiman takes readers through the ostensible ordinariness of life and reveals the extraordinary. “We ate, and talked, and went to bed, / And slept. It was a miracle,” Donald Hall writes in “Summer Kitchen.” Through a luminous array of poetry and prose, Wiman captures joy in contemporary contexts. These works span from the 20th century to t
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Science | The Guardian
Evolution row ends as scientists declare sponges to be sister of all other animals A longstanding row in animal evolution has come to a head, with a team of scientists claiming they have ended the debate over which type of creature is the sister of all other animals. Researchers have been torn for years over whether sponges or marine invertebrates known as comb jellies were the first type of creature to branch off the evolutionary tree from the common ancestor of all animals. N
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Popular Science
The best tech for people who appreciate practical gifts When you’re a kid, practical gifts are the worst. Sure, you needed those pens for school, but you asked Santa for Nintendo or a Ninja Turtle, not office supplies. They might as well be vegetables. But, things are different when you’re an adult. Practical gifts become pretty great. You get useful gadgets that improve your life without having to shell out your own hard-earned cash. This carefully c
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Gizmodo
How the Genetics of Skin Color Challenges Antiquated Ideas About Race South African people from a household that exemplifies the substantial skin pigmentation variability in Africa’s Khomani and Nama populations. Image: Brenna Henn For much of recorded history, skin color has been loaded with powerful social meaning. Skin color plays a major part in how we define race. It also plays a significant role in racism. New studies of the genetics of skin color, though, ha
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The Scientist RSS
Partial Reprogramming Offers a Way to Generate High Volumes of Progenitor-Like CellsActivating genes for reprogramming factors for a short time transforms large numbers of differentiated cells into multipotent forms that could be useful for cell-based therapies.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Interrupted reprogramming converts adult cells into high yields of progenitor-like cells Hollow-luminal iPL colony. Credit: Lily Guo A modified version of iPS methodology, called interrupted reprogramming, allows for a highly controlled, potentially safer, and more cost-effective strategy for generating progenitor-like cells from adult cells. As demonstrated November 30 in the journal Stem Cell Reports , researchers in Canada converted adult mouse respiratory tract cells called Club
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Public resource boosts drug discovery and offers insights into protein function Credit: CC0 Public Domain Researchers at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard have taken the Connectivity Map—a widely used resource of tools and data—to new heights with a massively scaled-up version. For this new platform, the researchers have also improved its accessibility for the scientific community, enabling studies of small molecule and gene function and informing clinical trials. The C
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research robustly resolves one of evolutionary biology's most heated disputes This research challenges earlier evidence that Ctenophore is the earliest branching animal lineage first and puts sponges in that position. Credit: Monterrey Bay Aquarium New research led by the University of Bristol has resolved evolutionary biology's most-heated debate, revealing it is the morphologically simple sponges, rather than the anatomically complex comb jellies, which represent the old
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
To proliferate or not to proliferate? A cellular spring replies Cells forming an epithelium. The nuclei are marked in blue and ZO-1 in green. Credit: UNIGE The epithelium, a tissue made up of closely juxtaposed cells, forms the glands and covers the outer surface of the human body as well as its internal cavities, such as the lungs or intestines. There are different types of epithelia, depending on the surfaces they cover and the functions they carry out. The
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Migration makes breeding harder for seabirds Credit: Tycho Anker-Nilssen An international collaboration has for the first time revealed the key drivers of seabird migration. The new study suggests that puffin colonies that travel great distances during the winter often find it more difficult to breed than others, and that escaping your habitat with far flung migration therefore carries a cost. Published in Current Biology , the work was led
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Antibiotics may reduce the ability of immune cells to kill bacteria Mitochondria. Credit: Wikipedia commons Antibiotics normally act in concert with an organism's immune system to eliminate an infection. However, the drugs can have broad side effects, including eliminating "good" bacteria in the course of fighting off a pathogen. A new study led by researchers from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, MIT, and the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engin
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New on MIT Technology Review
Blockchains Are Poised to End the Password Era The massive password heists keeping coming, and one thing is certain: the way we prove our identities online is in need of a major upgrade. A growing chorus of technologists and entrepreneurs is convinced that the key to revolutionizing digital identity can be found in the same technology that runs cryptocurrencies. This piece first appeared in our new twice-weekly newsletter, Chain Letter, which
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Scientific American Content: Global
New Vaccine and Drug Trials Could Buoy Fight Against HIV LONDON (Reuters)—Researchers announced the launch of two big studies in Africa on Thursday to test a new HIV vaccine and a long-acting injectable drug, fuelling hopes for better ways to protect against the virus that causes AIDS. The start of the three-year vaccine trial involving 2,600 women in southern Africa means that for the first time in more than a decade there are now two big HIV vacc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Uncertainty surrounds US livestock methane emission estimatesA new study of methane emissions from livestock in the United States -- led by a researcher in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences -- has challenged previous top-down estimates.
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Gizmodo
Cloudflare CEO on Policing Nazis Online: We Never Considered 'People Could Just Be Really Evil' Photo: Getty For the sake of an open internet, it’s generally believed that objectionable and offensive content is acceptable—and perhaps even necessary—up to a certain point. Internet companies still haven’t charted exactly where that point is. During an event this week, Cloudflare CEO Matthew Prince argued that they probably shouldn’t. “It’s very important for a deep infrastructure company like
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Inside Science
Revealing the Methods of Climate-Doubting Blogs Revealing the Methods of Climate-Doubting Blogs Study shows that climate-skeptic bloggers often use limited disagreements to cast doubt on the big picture. PolarBearUSGS_cropped.jpg Image credits: Mike Lockhart, USGS Earth Thursday, November 30, 2017 - 11:15 Gabriel Popkin, Contributor Thousands of scientific papers about climate change are published in journals each year. Far fewer discuss how s
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Ars Technica
Report: Nest might be folded into Google’s hardware team Nest reader comments 55 A report from The Wall Street Journal claims that Google's parent company, Alphabet, is "considering" folding Nest into the Google hardware team. The report says the move would allow Google to "more tightly integrate its services with Nest," which would let Google compete better in the connected home market. The report doesn't go into much more detail than that. Questions
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why are genetically identical individuals different? Ask your mum! IMAGE: Caenorhabditis elegans embryo showing yolk and intestinal fluorescence. view more Credit: Lola Davey, Marcos Francisco Perez, CRG. Does the age of a mother influence the traits and characteristics of her progeny, and how? A team of scientists at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona have addressed these questions by studying tiny, genetically identical C. elegans
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Type 1 diabetes as common in adults as children, but many adults misdiagnosed Type 1 diabetes is not predominantly a 'disease of childhood' as previously believed, but is similarly prevalent in adults, new research published in the Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology shows. Research by the University of Exeter Medical School using UK Biobank found that adults are as likely to develop type 1 diabetes as children, with more than 40 per cent of type 1 diabetes cases occurring aft
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research uncovers new weed control options for strawberry growers Since the 2005 ban of methyl bromide by federal regulators, winter strawberry growers have had limited options for managing broadleaf weeds, grasses and nutsedge species. But new research featured in the journal Weed Technology shows drip-applied herbicides may help to fill the gap. Scientists at the University of Florida's Gulf Coast Research and Education Center conducted field experiments to e
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Aggressive' surgery is best treatment option for early stage lung cancer Chicago, November 30, 2017 - Patients with early stage lung cancer live longer when they receive a lobectomy -- the most common type of operation for the disease -- rather than a less extensive operation or radiation treatment, according to a study published online today in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery . "Our data suggest that the more aggressively we treat early lung cancer, the better the out
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Length of stay in neonatal ICU can affect behavior of premature babies A study conducted by researchers at the University of São Paulo's Ribeirão Preto School of Medicine (FMRP-USP) in Brazil, with support from the Sao Paulo Research Foundation - FAPESP , indicates that length of stay in the ICU is the factor that best explains some preterm babies' behavioral problems relating to emotional regulation, regardless of the degree of prematurity and the presence of bronc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study reads between the lines in children's vocabulary differences IMAGE: Dr. Mandy Maguire, associate professor in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, is an author on the study. view more Credit: UT Dallas The nation's 31 million children growing up in homes with low socioeconomic status have, on average, significantly smaller vocabularies compared with their peers. A new study from the Callier Center for Communication Disorders at The University
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Futurity.org
Volcano in New England? Maybe, but not for millions of years Slowly but steadily, an enormous mass of warm rock is rising beneath part of New England. But don’t worry—a major volcanic eruption isn’t likely for millions of years. “The upwelling we detected is like a hot air balloon, and we infer that something is rising up through the deeper part of our planet under New England,” says Vadim Levin, a geophysicist and professor of earth and planetary sciences
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate-friendly architecture thanks to natural folding mechanisms Mobile components on buildings such as blinds whose design was copied from naturally occurring solutions -- that is the subject of the research conducted by a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM), the University of Freiburg, and the University of Stuttgart. The aim is to outfit them with drive elements that can move without any energy input. Serving as a model here are p
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Phase III Immunotherapy trial for migraine shows positive results (PHILADELPHIA) - A new study of fremanezumab, an immunotherapy that counteracts one of the molecules released during migraine, was found successful in reducing the number of days that chronic migraine sufferers experienced headaches. The results of the phase III clinical trial were published November 29, 2017 in the New England Journal of Medicine. The World Health Organization estimates that bet
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CRF1 stress receptor is regulator of mast cell activity during stress A new study published online in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology provides new insight into how stress, through signaling of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), interacts with cells in the immune system to cause disease. Specifically, the study identified a new role for the stress receptor CRF1, which is expressed on mast cells (critical immune cells implicated in many stress-related gastrointes
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Secure information transmission over 500m fiber links based on quantum technologies IMAGE: Experimental system of quantum secure direct communication over optical fibers. view more Credit: ©Science China Press Quantum secret communication realizes secure information transmission based on principles of quantum mechanism, which is an important field in quantum information sciences and technologies. At present, the most developed quantum secret communication schemes are based o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Molecule plays dual role in bowel health and disease A molecule that controls intestinal cell growth plays a dual role maintaining gut health and promoting diseases such as cancer, says a study in eLife . The discovery in mice sheds light on the intricate mechanisms that control cell turnover in the gut, and provides a potential new therapeutic target for intestinal diseases such as bowel cancer. The lining of our intestine renews rapidly, replacin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research finds patients with post-traumatic stress disorder respond differently to certain sounds Scientists at the Universities of Birmingham and Amsterdam hope to have found a new neurobiological marker to help recognise patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Using an electroencephalogram (EEG) - a test that detects electrical activity in a person's brain via electrodes attached to their scalp - researchers studied the brain activity of a group of thirteen patients with PTSD.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Adornments told about the culture of prehistoric people IMAGE: This is bone jewelry found at Sungir in the burial of children (1-3) and in the cultural layer (4). view more Credit: Vladislav Zhitenev Vladislav Zhitenev, a Russian archaeologist from MSU, studied bone jewelry found at Sungir Upper Paleolithic site. A group led by Vladislav Zhitenev found out that many items were crafted specifically for burial purposes, while others were worn on
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Visible signals from brain and heart IMAGE: Calcium waves -- a new sensor converts light to sound to visualize calcium fluxes in the body. view more Credit: (Image: B. van Rossum, G. Westmeyer / Technical University of Munich) Key processes in the body are controlled by the concentration of calcium in and around cells. A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Helmholtz Zentrum München have developed the first
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How blood-sucking insects find dark-coated cattle in the dark When the sun shines on horses and cows with black or dark-brown coats, polarised light is reflected -- a light to which horseflies ( tabanidae ) are both sensitive and attracted. White-coated animals are largely protected by the fact that their coats reflect unpolarised light. For these discoveries, which were published for the first time in 2010, the researchers were awarded the Ig Nobel Prize l
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Recurring nightmares could reflect your daily frustrations People who are frustrated because their basic psychological needs for autonomy, relatedness and feeling competent are not met are more likely to have a recurring bad dream and to analyze their dreams negatively. This is according to Netta Weinstein of the University of Cardiff in the UK, who is lead author of an article on dreams published in Springer's journal Motivation and Emotion . Dreams and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New vaccine technique effectively fights breast cancer in mice A new vaccine technique can fight a certain type of breast cancer in mice. So-called HER2-positive breast cancer accounts for between 20 and 30 per cent of all cases of breast cancer in humans. Researchers from the University of Copenhagen and the University of Bologna now show that the same type of cancer can be fought in mice with help of their new vaccine. In cases of breast cancer, the immune
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Does physician age influence the likelihood of patient complaints? Bottom Line: Older ophthalmologists were less likely than younger colleagues to be associated with patient complaints. Why The Research Is Interesting: Unsolicited patient complaints (UPCs) are a chance for physicians and health care systems to learn what patients perceive to be wrong in their health care encounter.. Understanding factors associated with complaints might point to ways to improv
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Teaching life a new trick: Bacteria make boron-carbon bondsFor the first time, scientists have created bacteria that can make compounds with boron-carbon bonds.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
NIH study of WWII evacuees suggests mental illness may be passed to offspringMental illness associated with early childhood adversity may be passed from generation to generation, according to a new study of adults whose parents evacuated Finland as children during World War II.
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Scientific American Content: Global
How Much CO2 Will the World Need to Remove from the Air? Scientists increasingly agree that it might be impossible to cap global temperatures at 1.5 degrees Celsius over preindustrial levels—without first overshooting it and then using technology to siphon carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere, causing temperatures to fall again. The problem is there are no rules under the Paris climate accord, or anywhere else, for how badly the target can be misse
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New on MIT Technology Review
How Do You Get a House in a Steep Valley Forest Online? With a Drone The U.S. Risks Falling Behind Russia and China in Its Use of AI in the Military America's military budget, at $615 billion, dwarfs those of its closest competitors, China ($211 billion) and Russia ($69 billion). Even with that advantage, a new report finds that the U.S. is at risk of falling behind in the race to find and create… Read more America's military budget, at $615 billion, dwarfs those
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The Scientist RSS
Opinion: Taxable Tuition = Trouble for Graduate StudentsOur calculations find troubling increases in taxes if a US House-led tax plan succeeds, but tuition waivers, as the Senate bill has proposed, could actually reduce students' tax burdens.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
The new generation of computers is programming itself | Sebastian Thrun and Chris AndersonEducator and entrepreneur Sebastian Thrun wants us to use AI to free humanity of repetitive work and unleash our creativity. In an inspiring, informative conversation with TED Curator Chris Anderson, Thrun discusses the progress of deep learning, why we shouldn't fear runaway AI and how society will be better off if dull, tedious work is done with the help of machines. "Only one percent of interes
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The Economist: The world this week
KAL's cartoon The war the world ignores How—and why—to end the war in Yemen A pointless conflict has caused the worst humanitarian crisis in the world
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New on MIT Technology Review
Blink and You’ll Miss How Fast This Souped-Up 3-D Printer Makes Prototypes The U.S. Risks Falling Behind Russia and China in Its Use of AI in the Military America's military budget, at $615 billion, dwarfs those of its closest competitors, China ($211 billion) and Russia ($69 billion). Even with that advantage, a new report finds that the U.S. is at risk of falling behind in the race to find and create… Read more America's military budget, at $615 billion, dwarfs those
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Gizmodo
China’s ‘Monkey King’ Dark Matter Satellite Has Produced Some Unusual Results A pulsar in the Crab Nebula (Image: Chandra X-Ray Telescope) The Earth happens to be located in one of the weirdest places imaginable: the Universe. Like, whatever this Universe is and whatever rules it follows, we puny humans still struggle to understand it. But we’re really trying to—and we can’t seem to agree. China’s Dark Matter Particle Explorer satellite (DAMPE or “Wukong” in China) is repo
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Superconducting qubit 3-D integration prospects bolstered by new researchResearchers have taken an important step towards the goal of building a large-scale quantum computer. They have presented a new process for creating superconducting interconnects, which are compatible with existing superconducting qubit technology.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fighting the flu, year after yearThe process of preparing seasonal influenza vaccines in eggs may contribute to their limited effectiveness. The authors offer research strategies that might yield more protective vaccine candidates.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Feces from entangled North Atlantic right whales reveals 'sky-high' stress levelsNorth Atlantic right whale scientists found that whales who undergo prolonged entanglements in fishing gear endure 'sky-high hormone levels,' indicating severe stress, which researchers discovered using a pioneering technique of examining scat from live, entangled, and dead whales over 15 years.
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Viden
Ukendt smittefarlig sygdom - sådan bliver du reddet hjem Du er ude at rejse. Du bliver syg. Måske dødeligt syg. Og måske syg af en meget smitsom sygdom. Heldigvis er det danske beredskab klar til at redde dig sikkert hjem, uden du smitter nogen på vejen. DR Viden har været med på en beredskabsøvelse. Her fik vi lov at være figurant med en luftbåren sygdom. Lungepest smitter via luften og er et eksempel på en luftbåren sygdom. Derfor kan sygdomme som pe
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Ingeniøren
EU giver ny milliard-støtte til at køre hurtige eltog til Rødby En appelsin af de store dumpede torsdag ned i turbanen hos transportminister Ole Birk Olesen (LA) og hans statslige projektselskab Femern A/S, som planlægger byggeriet af verdens længste sænketunnel til Puttgarden. Det skete, da Europa-Kommissionen tildelte jernbanen fra Ringsted til Rødby yderligere næsten en milliard kroner i støtte. Pengene skal ifølge en meddelelse fra kommissionens repræsent
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Futurity.org
Physicists get closer to directly measuring Berry curvature Physicists have opened the door to the first direct measurement of Berry curvature in solid matter—something of a holy grail among physicists. A powerful unifying principle in several branches of classical and quantum physics, Berry curvature is a strange and elusive quantum mechanical property of solids. It governs the dynamics of the motion of charges in semiconductors yet itself cannot be dire
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Bohr-forskere sætter kvantebits i bakgear 30. november 2017 Bohr-forskere sætter kvantebits i bakgear Kvantecomputer: Forskere ved Niels Bohr Institutet (NBI) på Københavns Universitet har regnet ud, hvordan man kan få kvantebits til at rotere baglæns på kommando – og i forsøg vist, at det faktisk kan lade sig gøre. Det er aldrig tidligere vist. Opdagelsen er netop offentliggjort i det videnskabelige tidsskrift Physical Review Letters.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Blink and You’ll Miss How Fast This Souped Up 3D Printer Makes Prototypes The U.S. Risks Falling Behind Russia and China in Its Use of AI in the Military America's military budget, at $615 billion, dwarfs those of its closest competitors, China ($211 billion) and Russia ($69 billion). Even with that advantage, a new report finds that the U.S. is at risk of falling behind in the race to find and create… Read more America's military budget, at $615 billion, dwarfs those
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Big Think
Massive New Study Shows How Dogs Boost Human Health We’ll never know the first human to call a dog his best friend. Nearly 15,000 years ago dogs were buried next to humans; our canine pals were on the hunting-gathering circuit with us. By the time we settled into cities they were willing allies, given the bonds forged by then. As in any relationship, we give a little and take a little. Apparently we’re taking even more than we thought, accordi
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Scientific American Content: Global
"Alien" DNA Makes Proteins in Living Cells for The First Time Life has spent the past few billion years working with a narrow vocabulary. Now researchers have broken those rules, adding extra letters to biology's limited lexicon. Chemist Floyd Romesberg of the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, California, and his colleagues manipulated Escherichia coli bacterial cells to incorporate two types of foreign chemical bases, or letters, into their DNA.
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Science : NPR
Health Insurers Are Still Skimping On Mental Health Coverage A coalition of mental health advocacy groups is calling on federal regulators, state agencies and employers to conduct random audits of insurers to make sure they are in compliance with the federal Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008. Roy Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption toggle caption Roy Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images A coalition of mental health advocacy groups is
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Ars Technica
Big invasive snails are driving birds of prey to get bigger Enlarge / A snail kite with its prey of choice. reader comments 0 The term “Anthropocene” was coined to connote humanity’s recent and indelible impact on the Earth. But it is not only geology and the climate that we have altered; our shuffling of species around the globe has thrown wrenches into many an ecosystem. The invasive species we import have been shown to change rapidly upon entering new
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Holiday shopping: Desire for deals, but some impulse buying In this Thursday, Nov. 23, 2017, file photo, people wait to pay for televisions as they shop a sale at a Best Buy store on Thanksgiving Day, in Overland Park, Kan. For the five-day period that ended the Monday after Thanksgiving, shoppers seemed to spend more in 2017 compared to a year earlier. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File) As shoppers have bought TVs and toys so far this holiday season, they'v
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mass of warm rock rising beneath New EnglandSlowly but steadily, an enormous mass of warm rock is rising beneath part of New England, although a major volcanic eruption isn't likely for millions of years, a new study suggests. The research is unprecedented in its scope and challenges textbook concepts of geology.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New UK map of air pollution provides insights into nitrogen dioxide levels across the country and within towns and citiesResearchers have created the first ever high resolution map of air pollution in the UK. The map shows how air pollution, specifically nitrogen dioxide, changes across the country and within towns and cities, highlighting likely sources and potential clean-air refuge areas.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Competition in the AI Cloud Is Heating Up, and Amazon Just Made a Big Move Competition in the AI Cloud is Heating Up, and Amazon Just Made a Big Move The cloud is no longer just a data dump—it’s an AI battleground, and Amazon wants to beat all comers into submission. The ethereal digital realm that we know as the cloud started as a remote space to store files and run some code. Put the two together—data… Read more The cloud is no longer just a data dump—it’s an AI bat
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The Atlantic
A Veteran Wonders: How Will My PTSD Affect My Kids? Bowen screamed, “You’re dead.” The boys were in the backyard. I had consented to let them play with their Nerf guns. Bowen was chasing Zachary. The bullets whizzed out in automatic fire. Bowen’s finger was mashed down on the trigger. Zachary was running frantically side to side trying to dodge the foam bullets. They bounced off his back and neck. One deflected off the Murcott tree. Bowen kept fir
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Futurity.org
These fracking sites are close to drinking water wells Around half of all US hydraulically fractured wells stimulated in 2014 exist within 2 to 3 kilometers of a domestic groundwater well, researchers report. “Our results underscore the importance of increased water monitoring efforts…” About 45 million Americans get their drinking water from private groundwater wells rather than a public utility. The Environmental Protection Agency regulations that
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Science : NPR
A Cultural Project In Polynesia Has The Power To Teach Us All This image on a panel along the Archaeological Nature Trail in the Opunoho Valley on the island Mo'orea shows a taro farmer at work. Diana Izdebski/Courtesy of Jennifer Kahn hide caption toggle caption Diana Izdebski/Courtesy of Jennifer Kahn This image on a panel along the Archaeological Nature Trail in the Opunoho Valley on the island Mo'orea shows a taro farmer at work. Diana Izdebski/Courtesy
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Live Science
Rising Seas Could Submerge the Oldest English Settlement in the Americas Tens of thousands of known archaeological sites are threatened by sea level rise in the southeast, and far more currently unknown and unrecorded, as shown here at low spatial resolution. Credit: Anderson et al., 2017 Sea-level rise this century may threaten Jamestown in Virginia, the first permanent English settlement in the Americas; the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, which launches all of N
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Computer analysis fills gaps in antibody blueprint Antibodies defend our bodies against intruders. These molecules consist of proteins with attached sugars. However, the blueprint directing the processing of these sugars on the protein was not well understood until now. In a paper published in the journal Nature Communications , scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum München used computer analysis to complete this blueprint and confirmed their fin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
HIV also targets the brain Stellenbosch University (SU) researchers have discovered that the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) directly impacts the brain in the early stages of the infection. It has long been known that many people with HIV also experience negative cognitive symptoms, such as depression, forgetfulness, etc. However, it was unclear whether it was caused by such patients' physical illness, or whether the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New document guides hospitals in responding to infectious disease outbreaks NEW YORK (Nov. 30, 2017) -- A new expert guidance document for hospitals to use in preparing for and containing outbreaks was published today by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America, with the support of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The guide was published in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology . "This guidance details the role of the healthcare epidemiolog
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Regional breast cancer guidelines needed in the Middle East and North Africa Researchers surveying breast cancer management in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region have identified significant barriers to applying international guidelines in this area, and are calling for localised best practice. MedicalSurveys-17 Research Group, a group of young oncologists working in different institutes across the Middle East, have established the Middle East and North Africa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Consumption is the bottleneck for sustainable development From ending poverty to improving wellbeing, gender equality, cities' resilience or climate action - while synergies among most of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) foster progress in sustainable development, there are some key conflicts or bottlenecks that could hamper achieving the SDG objectives for 2030. This is the result of a new comprehensive analysis by a team of scie
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Ars Technica
Bungie opens up about Destiny 2 changes after hidden “scaling” debacle Enlarge / Bigger weapons and clearer XP gains are coming to Destiny 2 , along with private competitive matches. reader comments 49 Over the Thanksgiving weekend, intrepid player-investigators caught Bungie misleading players about how much experience they were actually getting for repeated quests in the game. In the wake of that embarrassing revelation, Bungie last night posted a lengthy "State o
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cognitive science
Jerry Fodor, prominent Cognitive Scientist and Philosopher of Mind, died yesterday. A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
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Futurity.org
Pitch discovery could lead to better cochlear implants For decades, scientists have debated how, exactly, humans perceive pitch, and how the ear and the brain transmit pitch information in a sound. There are two prevalent theories: place and time. The “time code” theory argues that pitch is a matter of auditory nerve fiber firing rate, while the “place code” theory focuses on where in the inner ear a sound activates. A new study in the Journal of Neu
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Gizmodo
The IRS Has Come Knocking at Bitcoin's Door At a time when regulations , glitches , price swings , forks , hacks , and fraud can’t seem to keep the cryptocurrency-mania down, there’s a new hurdle for it to overcome: the taxman. Coinbase is one the largest cryptocurrency exchanges in the world and its backing by high profile investors like Union Square Ventures and Andreessen Horowitz has given it a certain amount of respectability. But it’
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Alleged UK hacker fights extradition to the USAn alleged computer hacker appealed to British judges on Thursday to block his extradition to the United States, arguing that he'd be subjected to inhuman conditions in the American justice system.
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Ingeniøren
Ros til Vattenfall for valg af vindmøller til nye havmølleparker Energiselskabet Vattenfall har været på storshopping og indkøbt ikke mindre end 113 vindmøller til tre danske mølleparker – to kystmølleparker og én havmøllepark – på tilsammen 950 MW. Som tidligere omtalt er valget faldet på Siemens Gamesas nye gearløse havmøllemodel med ekstra lange vingeblade på 81,5 meter, hvilket sammen med et nav på cirka 4 meter giver en total rotordiameter på 167 meter. M
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Popular Science
These Gmail searches will dig up stuff you never knew you missed Gmail dominates the email landscape. It provides gigabytes of storage, works at super-fast speeds in any browser, and automatically sorts messages into specialized sections depending on their content and importance. But perhaps its greatest strength—as you might expect from a Google product—is its search abilities. You're probably comfortable typing a few words or contact names into the search bo
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Blog » Languages » English
A Cortex Mural at Princeton by Kfay! Cortical neurons by Eyewirer @kfay, Anthony Hernandez. Everything you think and feel is manifested in the brain as electrical and chemical activity within an extraordinarily complex network of neurons. If you were to map all the circuits, you would have a connectome. Deciphering the tiny, intricate branches of neurons and synapses that join them is an extremely challenging and time consuming chal
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Science : NPR
Working Moms Have Been A 'Thing' Since Ancient History A woman farmer makes hay bales in Kashmir, India. In India, women comprise about a third of the agricultural labor in developing countries. NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption toggle caption NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images A woman farmer makes hay bales in Kashmir, India. In India, women comprise about a third of the agricultural labor in developing countries. NurPhoto/NurPhoto via
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The Genesis of Kuri the Companion Robot Over the course of thousands of years, dogs have evolved alongside humans to be awesome. Unlike their wild ancestors, they don't gnaw on us (usually). They stick up for us. They go to the bathroom in designated areas. They're unrivaled companions. Looking at you disappointingly, cats. Now, though, they have competition. The companion robots that science fiction has promised us for so long have fi
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New on MIT Technology Review
Amazon Plans to Rule the AI Cloud Amazon Plans to Rule the AI Cloud The cloud is no longer just a data dump— it’s an AI battleground, and Amazon wants to beat all comers into submission. The ethereal digital realm that we know as the cloud started as a remote space to store files and run some code. Put the two together—data… Read more The cloud is no longer just a data dump— it’s an AI battleground, and Amazon wants to beat all
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Global risk of Madagascar's pneumonic plague epidemic is limited IMAGE: This is the expected number of pneumonic plague cases travelling from Madagascar between Aug. 1 and Oct. 17. view more Credit: Tsuzuki S., et al., Eurosurveillance, Nov. 16, 2017 Mathematical models have proven the risk of the on-going pneumonic plague epidemic in Madagascar spreading elsewhere in the world is limited, with the estimated number of exported cases staying below 0.1 perso
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dancing Zumba for five weeks improves the emotional health of inactive university workers IMAGE: One of the Zumba sessions the researchers carried out during 5 weeks for the university staff. view more Credit: University of Granada Scientists from the University of Granada (UGR) have proven that a five-week exercise program based on the Zumba Fitness® discipline improves the quality of life of inactive university workers, especially the emotional aspect, and most of those improvem
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Gizmodo
Pick Up a New Set of Wiper Blades For 15% Off, Courtesy of Amazon 15% off Michelin Stealth Wiper Blades | Amazon If your wiper blades have seen better days, Amazon will sell you Michelin Stealth replacements today for 15% off today . The catch is that you can only use the coupon on one blade per order, though I personally was able to use it twice on the same account with the following process. Complete your order as usual for one blade with the 15% coupon. Add
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
People born premature have smaller airways causing respiratory problemsPeople born prematurely may have smaller airways than those born at full term, which can cause respiratory problems.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain's appetite regulator disrupted in obese teensResearchers using advanced MRI to study obese adolescents found disrupted connectivity in the complex regions of the brain involved in regulating appetite, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Smartphone addiction creates imbalance in brain, study suggestsResearchers have found an imbalance in the brain chemistry of young people addicted to smartphones and the internet.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Studies examine the effects of weight on patients with rheumatoid arthritisNew research provides insights on the potential effects of weight on the health of individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gene variant that protects against Alzheimer's disease identifiedResearch details a novel and promising approach in the effort to treat Alzheimer's disease. Medical researchers have discovered a rare genetic variant that provides a protective effect for high-risk individuals -- elderly people who carry known genetic risk factors for Alzheimer's-- who never acquired the disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Male-pattern baldness and premature graying associated with risk of early heart diseaseMale-pattern baldness and premature greying are associated with a more than fivefold risk of heart disease before the age of 40 years, according to new research. Obesity was associated with a fourfold risk of early heart disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
More than half of US children will have obesity as adults if current trends continueIf current trends in child obesity continue, more than 57 percent of today's children in the US will have obesity at age 35, according to a new study.
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Live Science
How Do Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles Work? How do intercontinental ballistic missiles — including the one North Korea launched Tuesday (Nov. 28) that flew more than 10 times higher than the International Space Station — work? The answer depends on the type of intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM), but most of these rockets launch from a device on the ground, travel into outer space and finally re-enter Earth's atmosphere, plumme
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Live Science
Prehistoric Women Were Stronger than Elite Rowing Teams Today When humans gave up hunting and gathering to settle down in villages and start farming, they didn't sign up for a life of leisure. Prehistoric women who lived through those early days of agriculture in Central Europe performed demanding manual labor, according to a new analysis of their skeletons. All that tilling, planting, harvesting and grinding gave these women buff upper arms. In f
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Dagens Medicin
Lægeforening til møde med minister om Svendborg-sagen Formand for Lægeforeningen Andreas Rudkjøbing har været til møde med sundhedsministeren, hvor emnet bl.a. var Svendborg-sagen. Han plæderede bl.a. for klarere regler for journalføring.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New software can verify someone's identity by their DNA in minutes To demonstrate the portability of the technology, researchers packed the MinION and all cell-preparation materials needed into a handbag. Credit: Sophie Zaaijer In the science-fiction movie Gattaca, visitors only clear security if a blood test and readout of their genetic profile matches the sample on file. Now, cheap DNA sequencers and custom software could make real-time DNA-authentication a re
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lighting the way to switch chemical reaction pathways Researchers used green laser to modulated the reactivity of triazolinediones (TADs), powerful chemical coupling agents. Credit: QUT Could the manufacture of the integrated circuits and chips for our everyday electronic devices be made simpler, safer and cheaper simply by being able to switch coloured light on and off? Researchers from Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Karlsruhe Institute
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Breakthrough in clean diesel research Credit: University of St Andrews A breakthrough in catalysis research by academics at the Universities of St Andrews and Newcastle could lead to the development of clean diesel engine technology and help combat air pollution. Catalysis is an important process that underpins the chemical industry allowing us to efficiently produce the chemicals that we need. It also allows us to clean-up the pollu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Negative piezoelectric effect is not so rare after all A comparison of ferroelectric materials, some of which exhibit the negative longitudinal piezoelectric effect. Materials with pressure-enhanced ferroelectricity are underlined. Credit: Liu et al. ©2017 American Physical Society (Phys.org)—The piezoelectric effect, which causes a material to expand along the direction of an applied electric field, is common in many materials and used in a variety
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Dagens Medicin
Astman undrer sig over Radikales valg af Lose Radikale Venstre har forhandlet på skrømt, mener Ulla Astman. Hun mener ikke, at Radikale har været ordentlige i forløbet, og at valget af Lose er mangel af respekt for valgresultatet.
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Ars Technica
FDA clears first medical accessory for the Apple Watch—an EKG sensor reader comments 28 Plenty of studies boast about the medical possibilities of the Apple Watch, but Apple's wearable is a consumer device, not a medical one. However, the FDA just announced the clearing of the first medical Apple Watch accessory, AliveCor's KardiaBand, which uses the wearable's heart rate technology and an attached sensor to provide EKG readings on the fly. An Apple Watch paired w
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A very special run for the LHCb experiment The LHCb detector in open configuration. Credit: Anna Pantelia/CERN For the first time, the LHCb experiment at CERN has collected data simultaneously in collider and in fixed-target modes. With this, the LHCb special run is even more special. The past two weeks have been devoted to special runs of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), at the end of the LHC 2017 proton run and before the winter shutdow
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Computer analysis fills gaps in antibody blueprint Antibodies defend our bodies against intruders. These molecules consist of proteins with attached sugars. However, the blueprint directing the processing of these sugars on the protein was not well understood until now. In a paper published in the journal Nature Communications , scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum München used computer analysis to complete this blueprint and confirmed their fin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New catalytic effect discovered for producing gallium oxide Metal-exchange catalysis, as described, can produce this gallium oxide-indium oxide heterostructure for novel electronics based on gallium oxide. Credit: PDI Semiconducting oxides are a new class of materials that are currently enjoying great attention in the field of semiconductor technology. Gallium oxide is the archetypal example for its ability to handle extremely high voltages and its optica
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New nationwide map of air pollution provides insights into nitrogen dioxide levels The nationwide map of air pollution by EarthSense. Credit: University of Leicester EarthSense Systems, a joint venture between the University of Leicester and aerial mapping company BlueSky, has published MappAir, the first ever high resolution nationwide map of air pollution. Combining data from satellites and its own air quality monitoring sensors together with open source data, EarthSense has
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A space-time sensor for light-matter interactions By using trains of extremely short electron pulses, LAP researchers have obtained time-resolved diffraction patterns from crystalline samples. In this image, patterns captured at attosecond intervals have been superimposed, thus revealing, in real time, the kind of electron motions that underlie atomic and subatomic phenomena. Credit: Baum/Marimoto Physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Phys
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How blood-sucking insects find dark-coated cattle in the dark Last year, biologist Susanne Åkesson at Lund University in Sweden, together with researchers in Hungary, received the Ig Nobel Prize in Physics. The prize was awarded to them for their research showing that dark-coated horses suffer more from blood-sucking horseflies compared to their white counterparts. Now, the researchers know why animals with a dark, smooth coat are particularly vulnerable -
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Ars Technica
This week’s failed Russian rocket had a pretty bad programming error Enlarge / A Soyuz 2.1b rocket booster carrying the Meteor M2-1 meteorological satellite and 18 small satellites launched from the Vostochny Cosmodrome on Tuesday. (credit: Yuri SmityukTASS via Getty Images) On Tuesday morning, a Russian rocket failed to properly deploy the 19 satellites it was carrying into orbit. Instead of boosting its payload, the Soyuz 2.1b rocket's Fregat upper stage fired i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New software can verify someone's identity by their DNA in minutes IMAGE: Researcher Sophie Zaaijer uses the MinION, a portable DNA sequencer, to get a quick genetic readout of a sample of cells. view more Credit: New York Genome Center In the science-fiction movie Gattaca, visitors only clear security if a blood test and readout of their genetic profile matches the sample on file. Now, cheap DNA sequencers and custom software could make real-time DNA-au
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lighting the way to switch chemical reaction pathways Could the manufacture of the integrated circuits and chips for our everyday electronic devices be made simpler, safer and cheaper simply by being able to switch coloured light on and off? Researchers from Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and Ghent University have stepped towards this by pioneering a system that modulates visible, coloured light to
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study reveals cancer therapy's double-edged sword ... and how to blunt it Researchers from Harvard Medical School and the Institute of Systems Biology have discovered that the remains of tumor cells killed by chemotherapy or other cancer treatments can actually stimulate tumor growth by inducing an inflammatory reaction. The study, which will be published November 30 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine , also reveals that a family of molecules called resolvins can
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How local ecological knowledge can save endangered and rare animals The graceful Dugong. Credit: Jin Kemoole/Flickr, CC BY-ND From knowing where animals live, to which plants provide what medicinal benefits, communities around the world hold expert levels of knowledge on their local environments. In general, scientific investigations provide precise and measurable information, collected over short amounts of time. But this "local ecological knowledge" is made up
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Neutrons reveal fast methane translational diffusion at the interface of two clathrate structures Unit cells of clathrate structure I and clathrate structure II. Different types of polyhedral cages are represented in different colours. Credit: Ranieri et al., Nature Comm . Gas clathrate hydrates are ice-like solids, in which gas molecules or atoms are trapped inside crystalline frameworks formed by water molecules. They have attracted considerable attention over the last decade for their pote
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Dagens Medicin
OUH-direktion giver uforbeholden undskyldning i sag om ytringsfrihed Direktionen på OUH giver en uforbeholden undskyldning efter en kammeratlig samtale med en overlæge, der har afstedkommet kritik fra godt 400 læger i et åbent brev til direktionen.
10h
Ingeniøren
Kronik: Er elnettet klar til grøn energi uden støtte? Energi-infrastruktur Solceller Vindmøller
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lawsuit accuses Google of stealing data of 5m UK users A lawsuit in Britain has accused Google of illegally collecting data from more than five million iPhone users. A consumer activist launched Thursday a lawsuit accusing Google of illegally collecting data on more than five million British iPhone users, who could possibly see a payout reaching into the hundreds of millions. A campaign group dubbed 'Google You Owe us' says the tech giant owes consum
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Indonesian city to citizens: stop using free WiFi for drugs, prostitution Red-faced officials in Solo, Indonesia, have now cut back on free WiFi access An Indonesian city thought it was doing half a million citizens a good turn by making wireless internet free in government offices. But red-faced officials in Solo—where President Joko Widodo was once mayor—have now cut back on access after it found some were using it to deal drugs, watch illegal pornography or engage i
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The Colorful Soviet Mosaics Decorating Ukraine's Streets Ukraine gained independence from the Soviet Union more than 25 years ago, but vestiges of communism remain. On streets across the country, the faces of industrious peasants, inventive engineers, and pioneering astronauts still beam from propaganda mosaics adorning everything from apartment blocks to movie theaters. Yevgen Nikiforov documents more than 1,000 mosaics and other monumental public art
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Studying giant tortoise flips without tipping the animals over is a delicate business It would be a memorable sight. But it would also be so wrong to tip over Galápagos giant tortoises to see how shell shape affects their efforts to leg-pump, neck-stretch and rock right-side up again. Shell shape matters, says evolutionary biologist Ylenia Chiari, though not the way she expected. It’s taken years, plus special insights from a coauthor who more typically studies scorpions, for Chia
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ambassadors of Western nuclear powers to snub Nobel ceremony The Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to activists fighting for the abolition of nuclear weapons Breaking with tradition, nearly all ambassadors of the world's nuclear powers will not attend this year's Nobel Peace Prize ceremony which honours efforts to ban atomic weapons, the Nobel Institute said Thursday. Russia and Israel will be the only exceptions, with their ambassadors due to attend. "
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The future of retail technology—health data, hyper-personalized purchasing Devices like these could become an even bigger part of shopping in the near future. Credit: University of South Carolina Imagine going shopping and having your phone or fitness tracker make product recommendations for you based on your breath or the current physical state of your body. It is not science fiction. It's the future of retailing and health care digitization, according to researchers a
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Blog » Languages » English
Featured Eyewirer: Xnopyt A behind the scenes look at the Eyewire community. Meet the Eyewirers who are mapping the brain. Today’s featured Eyewirer is @Xnopyt. Introduce yourself! My name is Andrej, and I’m a 15-year old high school student from Macedonia. Why do you play Eyewire? I first got into Eyewire because I wanted something to do in my spare time, that was also productive. Eyewire is excellent for that because it
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Ars Technica
Essential CEO Andy Rubin goes on leave for “personal reasons” reader comments 1 Andy Rubin, the founder of Google’s Android and current CEO of Essential , is taking a month-long leave from Essential for “personal reasons.” At the same time, a report of an “inappropriate relationship” at Google has surfaced. A report from The Information claims that Google’s HR division conducted an investigation into Rubin after a complaint and found that he maintained an “
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Technologically enhanced humans—a look behind the myth Augmented warrior. Credit: U.S. Army/Flickr, CC BY What exactly do we mean by an "enhanced" human? When this possibility is brought up, what is generally being referred to is the addition of human and machine-based performances (expanding on the figure of the cyborg popularised by science fiction). But enhanced in relation to what? According to which reference values and criteria? How, for exampl
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Dagens Medicin
Lose vil give samarbejde i Danske Regioner et serviceeftersyn Stephanie Lose (V) er som formand for Danske Regioner klar til at gribe fat i de mange udfordringer, der er i sundhedsvæsenet. Det vil hun gøre ved at være en inddragende formand og ændre samarbejdet internt.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New research provides insights into the skin microbiome ADA, MICH. (Nov. 30, 2017) - Today, Amway Corporation, in collaboration with Microbiome Insights, Inc. presented results from two independent epidemiology studies at Happi's Anti-Aging Conference & Tabletop Exhibition, an annual conference that attracts anti-aging industry experts and suppliers. The research team comprised of scientists from both companies has identified two Corynebacteria specie
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study uncovers economic impact of natural disasters New research from Deakin Business School has revealed the impact of natural disasters on Australia's economy. A Deakin University analysis of the consequences of natural disasters has found floods are more likely to impact the Australian economy than bushfires. Professor Mehmet Ulubasoglu, from Deakin Business School, said while it was well known that natural disasters such as floods and bushfi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why do floods sometimes happen on sunny days? A flood on a sunny day. Credit: debs-eye via Flickr CC In recent years, near-biblical floods have become a constant feature of the global news: Hurricane Katrina stranding grandmas on their roofs in New Orleans, monsoon floods devastating Nepal, or Hurricane Maria unleashing its deadly deluge on Puerto Rico, for instance. But a quieter, more insidious breed of inundation is increasingly consuming
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Viruses and malware—are we protecting ourselves adequately? Bad news on the doorstep. How to stay safe? Credit: Shutterstock Cybersecurity incidents are increasingly gaining public attention. They are frequently mentioned in the media and discussed by specialists, such as Guillame Poupard, Director General of the French Information Security Agency . This attests to the fact that these digital incidents have an increasingly significant impact on our daily
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Our exposure to electromagnetic waves—beware of commonly held beliefs A base station or GSM relay antenna on a roof in Paris. Credit: Pyb/Wikimedia, CC BY For over 10 years, controlling exposure to electromagnetic waves and to radio frequencies in particular has fuelled many debates, which have often been quite heated. An analysis of reports and scientific publications devoted to this topic shows that researchers are mainly studying the possible impact of mobile ph
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research finds cause of alloy weakness Binghamton University materials science and engineering professor Guangwen Zhou was one of the scientists working on the project. Credit: Binghamton University Sometimes calculations don't match reality. That's the problem that has faced materials scientists for years when trying to determine the strength of alloys. There has been a disconnect between the theoretical strength of alloys and how st
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Antidepressants from urine are making fish less afraid of predators Credit: Freshscience Antidepressants are making their way into our lakes and rivers—and they're making freshwater fish less fazed by predators. Jake Martin, a PhD candidate at Monash University, looked at how the eastern mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) responded to the threat of a predator when they had been exposed to the antidepressant fluoxetine (using levels similar to those already found i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A way to convert methane directly to methanol or acetic acid under mild conditions Ball and stick model of methane. Credit: Ben Mills/Public Domain (Phys.org)—A team of researchers with affiliations to Tufts University, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory has developed a way to convert methane directly to methanol or acetic acid under mild conditions. In their paper published in the journal Nature , the group describes the procedure and suggests their
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Futurity.org
War zones may boost risk of lower birth weight Women who live in war zones or areas of armed conflict are at heightened risk of giving birth to low birth weight babies, report researchers. “People living in war zones are under constant threat of attack, which has a detrimental effect on their mental and physical health,” says James Kearsley of the University of Warwick. “Their food and water supplies are often disrupted, and healthcare provis
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Age of mothers influences genetic similarity between twins Caenorhabditis elegans worm with fluorescent yolk and embryos inside. Credit: Lola Davey, Marcos Francisco Perez, CRG Does the age of a mother influence the traits and characteristics of her progeny, and how? A team of scientists at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona have addressed these questions by studying tiny, genetically identical C. elegans worms. Their results have been
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Leuphana scientists develop environmentally friendlier antibiotics Credit: Leuphana Universität Lüneburg The team led by Professor Dr. Klaus Kümmerer has now succeeded in developing antibiotics of this class of substances that become innocuous in the environment by natural degradation. Ciprofloxacin is a widely used broad-spectrum antibiotic. In Germany alone, 33 tons of them are prescribed in human and veterinary medicine. Both improper disposal and incomplete
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Conspiracy thinking less likely with greater news media literacy, study suggests The more you know about the news media and how it works, the less likely you are to believe conspiracy theories – even ones you might find politically tempting. That's the conclusion University of Illinois journalism professor Stephanie Craft and her research colleagues reached in a study being published next month in the journal Communication and the Public. The researchers surveyed nearly 400
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Reaching for neutron stars: Research group finds predictive framework, thick skin of atomic nucleus Crab Nebula in the constellation Taurus contains a pulsar at its core that is a younger neutron star, the very type brought into clearer focus by a Physics Review Letters study by researchers at Washington University in St. Louis. Elements of this image are furnished by NASA. Credit: Shutterstock For more than a decade, a cross-disciplinary team of chemists and physicists in Arts & Sciences at Wa
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Popular Science
Does apple cider vinegar actually do anything? If something claims to be a miracle cure—for cancer , for overeating, for run-of-the-mill acne—you should start by assuming it isn’t. Life is hard and long and there are no easy shortcuts, especially when it comes to your health. That includes the internet darling that is apple cider vinegar. Proponents of the fermented liquid seem to think it can cure just about any ailment, and sometimes advise
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Monitoring activity in the geosynchronous belt An engineer installs SensorSat, developed at the MIT Lincoln Laboratory, in the thermal-vacuum chamber used for testing the satellite's tolerance of conditions in space. Credit: Glen Cooper In the darkness of 2 a.m. on Aug. 26, the sky over Cape Canaveral, Florida, lit up with the bright plume of a Minotaur rocket lifting off from its launch pad. Aboard the rocket, a satellite developed by the MI
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video: Lightbulb moment leads to wearable technology for performance danceFascinated by innovations in wearable technology and driven by a passion for dance, undergraduate Emily Daub developed integrated, responsive lighting systems for costumes that expand the creative possibilities for performance dance.
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Dagens Medicin
Lægeforeningen kræver uafhængig ankeinstans til tilsynssager Som læge kan du få frataget din autorisation eller får et forbud mod at arbejde uden varsel – også selv om det kan tage op til to år, før Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed går videre med sagen ved retten. Det er urimeligt, at læger kan få ødelagt deres arbejdsliv uden at være dømt for noget, mener Lægeforeningen, som foreslår, at regeringen etablerer en uafhængig ankeinstans, der hurtigt kan afgøre
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Viden
NASA vælger genbrugsraket til december-mission Når Den Internationale Rumstation ISS skal have nye forsyninger til december, vil lasten blive sendt op med en løfteraket fra SpaceX, der tidligere har været i brug. Nærmere bestemt er der tale om den Falcon 9, som fløj sin første tur, da den i juni sendte materialer til ISS. Det oplyser NASA på Twitter. Datagrundlaget er i orden Til mediet The Verge forklarer NASA, at man inden beslutningen blev
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day:SnowflakeScientists take a close look at metal alloys that form snowflake-like structures called crystalline dendrites.
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Ars Technica
Inside the mechanics of building 8,000lb human-powered robo-athletes Enlarge / Meet Prosthesis, just your ho-hum giant mech racing thing. Jonathan Tippett / Furrion reader comments 35 If Jonathan Tippett had his way, the Olympics of the future would showcase more than mere humans—he foresees human-powered robot athletes, too. And at a Toronto tech event this July, the Canadian mechanical engineer asked us to imagine racing events where pilots would embed themselve
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The Colorado School of Mines Wants to Launch the First-Ever Space Mining Program Hunter Williams used to be an English teacher. Then, three years into that job, he started reading the book The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress . The 1966 novel by Robert Heinlein takes place in the 2070s, on the moon, which, in this future, hosts a subterranean penal colony. Like all good sci-fi, the plot hinges on a rebellion and a computer that gains self-awareness. But more important to Williams wer
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Live Science
No Shimmer: Why Scientists Want to Ban Glitter Kids' crafts may have to find another way to shimmer. Credit: Dragon Images/Shutterstock It's sparkly, it's festive and some scientists want to see it swept from the face of the Earth. Glitter should be banned, researcher Trisia Farrelly, a senior lecturer in environment and planning at Massey University in New Zealand, told CBS . The reason? Glitter is made of microplastic, a piece of plas
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Exoplanet has smothering stratosphere without water A NASA-led team of scientists determined that WASP-18b, a "hot Jupiter" located 325 light-years from Earth, has a stratosphere that's loaded with carbon monoxide, but has no signs of water. Credit: NASA A NASA-led team has found evidence that the oversized exoplanet WASP-18b is wrapped in a smothering stratosphere loaded with carbon monoxide and devoid of water. The findings come from a new analy
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ash clouds of Antarctic volcanoes may disrupt air traffic in the southern hemisphere Ash clouds emitted during the eruption of an Antarctic volcano may disrupt air traffic in the southern hemisphere, according to a study made by researchers from the Institute of Earth Sciences Jaume Almera of the CSIC (ICTJA-CSIC) and the Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC). The authors have analyzed for the first time the effects and dispersion patterns of ash clouds released during a hypothet
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Gizmodo
Both the Philips OneBlade and Philips OneBlade Pro Are Cheaper Than Ever Today Commerce Content is independent of Editorial and Advertising, and if you buy something through our posts, we may get a small share of the sale. Click here for more. The Philips OneBlade is the electric shaver of choice for pretty much every man on our staff (and tens of thousands of our readers as well ), and both the original and the upgraded Pro model are on sale right now for their best price
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Scientific American Content: Global
Doom-and-Gloom Scenarios on Climate Change Won't Solve Our Problem The latest Hollywood natural disaster movie, Geostorm , is tanking in theaters this fall. We are once again invited to explore a cinematic vision of a self-inflicted catastrophe, complete with volcanic magma flowing through downtown areas, hailstorms tearing through city buses, and monsoons toppling skyscrapers like sand castles. As unbelievable as this movie might seem, those of us who watch it
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Live Science
Forget Cyborgs — Biohybrid Robots Are Almost Here There may come a day when humans take on the form of cyborgs with integrated, robotic parts to enhance our abilities. But long before then, a seemingly opposite type of integration may take place, with robots being equipped with human tissue or other living cells to make them more lifelike. These "biohybrid" robots could be endowed with muscle cells to help them perform subtle movements. An
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Scientific American Content: Global
Brain Scans Reveal Why Rewards and Punishments Don't Seem to Work on Teenagers The following essay is reprinted with permission from The Conversation , an online publication covering the latest research. Parents and teachers are painfully aware that it’s nearly impossible to get a teenager to focus on what you think is important. Even offering them a bribe or issuing a stern warning will typically fail. There may be many reasons for that, including the teenager’s develo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rapid, cost-effective genetic screening within reach Assistant Professor Prashant Nagpal is researching new ways to create efficient, low-cost DNA sequencing that can provide important genetic information. Credit: Casey A. Cass / University of Colorado Boulder CU Boulder researchers are developing new techniques for faster, more cost-effective single-molecule DNA sequencing that could have transformative impacts on genetic screening, paving the way
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Dagens Medicin
Flere får kræftbehandling til tidenDer har været en positiv udvikling i andelen af kræftpatienter, der får behandling til tiden, viser nye tal. Danske Regioners formand roser regionernes hurtige reaktion på tidligere dårlige tal.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wearable computing ring allows users to write words and numbers with thumb FingerSound uses wearable ring technology to detect numbers and letters drawn on fingers. Credit: Georgia Institute of Technology With the whirl of a thumb, Georgia Tech researchers have created technology that allows people to trace letters and numbers on their fingers and see the figures appear on a nearby computer screen. The system is triggered by a thumb ring outfitted with a gyroscope and t
12h
Science-Based Medicine
Go ahead, have that coffee Would it be ethical to conduct a clinical trial where you could be randomly assigned to drink coffee, or to abstain from it? Notwithstanding any of your personal feelings about the beverage, it would be ethically appropriate to verify that, at minimum, coffee consumption wasn’t harmful. Given coffee’s massive, world-wide popularity, its safety may seem self-evident. Yet it’s not impossible that c
12h
The Atlantic
What SUVs Reveal About the Erosion of American Society Millennials don’t always buy cars . But when they do, they apparently buy SUVs. “The floor at this year’s Los Angeles Auto Show will look a lot like America's roads: full of SUVs,” the AP wrote this week . Car sales overall are actually slightly down this year, but SUV sales are up 6 percent. The AP speculated that the boom in Wranglers and Explorers is the result of “a combination of low gas pri
12h
Latest Headlines | Science News
50 years ago, folate deficiency was linked to birth defects In the Dec. 9 SN : Lessons from the Pliocene, searching for new ways to fight MS , a supernova on repeat, the great gene drive debate, spider sleep secrets, an ailing boy gets new skin, kleptopredation and more.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Radar satellites able to measure water stress in trees Credit: Delft University of Technology Radar technology in space can be used to measure how 'thirsty' plants and crops are. This could play a key role in improving our understanding of how ecosystems and the water and carbon cycles interrelate. In theory, we have the technology to monitor crops on a global scale and identify where remedial action is needed. On Friday 1 December, Tim van Emmerik w
12h
Scientific American Content: Global
Alaska's Coast Is Vanishing, 1 Storm at a Time As storms go, the one that struck northwest Alaska in mid-November was not remarkable. Its pressure was not particularly low, nor its 30-mile-per-hour winds particularly strong. Still, it sent several feet of rough seas surging into the beleaguered coastal communities that dot Alaska’s northern and western shores. In Deering, a village of 126 people perched on a sandy spit on the northern coast o
12h
Science : NPR
Women's Role In The European Agricultural Revolution Revealed Studies of ancient bones show that women's physical labor was crucial to driving the agricultural revolution in Europe. These women's upper bodies were stronger than that of elite athletes today.
13h
Dagens Medicin
Urimelig lukning af lægepraksisPludselig lukkede Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed en klinik i Sæby og efterlod helt urimeligt 1.800 patienter uden læge.
13h
Dagens Medicin
Svenske patienter i udredningsforløb får oftere handlingsplanDet er vigtigt for kræftpatientens tryghed, at den praktiserende læge laver en konkret plan for opfølgning, hvis patienten har uklare symptomer. Det viser nyt internationalt studie af kræftpatienters oplevelse af deres eget udredningsforløb.
13h
Scientific American Content: Global
Ultrasound Could Offer Noninvasive Treatment for Parkinson's and Depression A macaque monkey sat in front of a computer. A yellow square—the target—appeared in the periphery on the left side of the screen. After a few seconds delay, a second target appeared on the right. The question was: Which target would the monkey look at first? So far so routine as neuroscience experiments go, but the next step was unusual. By non-invasively directing bursts of inaudible acoustic en
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Based on the nanostructure of the sea urchin spines, team develops cement that is significantly more fracture-resistant Sea urchin spines. Credit: University of Konstanz Sea urchin spines are made mostly of calcite, but the spines are much more durable than this raw material alone. The reason for their strength is the way that nature optimises materials using a brick wall-style architecture. A research team headed by Professor Helmut Cölfen successfully synthesised cement at the nano-level according to this "brick
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Reconciling taxon senescence with the Red Queen's hypothesis The Red Queen walking randomly. Credit: Ika Österblad In a new publication in the journal Nature , Indre Zliobaite and Mikael Fortelius from the University of Helsinki and Nils Christian Stenseth from the University of Oslo present a new interpretation of one of the classic hypotheses of evolutionary theory, the Red Queen's Hypothesis, proposed by Leigh Van Valen in 1973. A search for 'Red Queen'
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Robust Bain distortion in the premartensite phase of a platinum-substituted Ni2MnGa Temperature dependent phase diagram of Ni1.9Pt0.1MnGa magnetic shape memory alloy. Unit cells for different crystallographic phases (austenite, premartensite and martensite) are also shown. The T1 phase has 3M modulated structure with preserved cubic symmetry while T2 phase has 3M modulated structure with orthorhombic symmetry (Bain distorted phase). Credit: S. Singh /MPI CPfS The premartensite p
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fast flowing heat in graphene heterostructures Schematic representation of the highly efficient out-of-plane heat transfer from graphene hot electrons (yellow glow), created by optical excitation (red beam), to hyperbolic phonon-polaritons in hBN (wave lines). Credit: ICFO Nanoscale heat flow plays a crucial role in many modern electronic and optoelectronic applications, such as thermal management, photodetection, thermoelectrics and data com
13h
Dagens Medicin
Det er ikke vores skyld … eller?Jeg stiller mig totalt uforstående over for opbakningen til lægerne i de forskellige sager, som har været oppe for nylig – Svendborg, meningitis og den formodede svampeforgiftning. Danske læger skyder skylden på ledelsen og travlhed, men hvor er deres eget ansvar?
13h
New Scientist - News
Addicted to tech? A brain chemical imbalance may be to blame Brains off-balance? PeopleImages/Getty Glued to your phone? A chemical imbalance in your brain may be to blame – a finding that may lead to new treatments for people who believe they are addicted to technology. A study of teenagers who are “addicted” to their smartphones or the internet has found that people who struggle with so-called tech addiction seem to have more of a chemical that slows
13h
The Atlantic
An 11th-Hour Raid by the Wealthiest Baby Boomers The baby boom is being evicted from the penthouse of American politics. And on the way out, it has decided to trash the place. That’s probably the best way to understand the generational implications of the tax legislation Republicans are driving through Congress. The House and Senate measures shower enormous benefits on households at the top of the economic ladder, a group that by all indication
13h
The Atlantic
The 'Softer' Side of Jihadists “Yes,” wrote Elie Wiesel, “it is possible to defile life and creation and feel no remorse. To tend one’s garden and water one’s flowers but two steps away from barbed wire. … To go on vacation, be enthralled by the beauty of a landscape, make children laugh—and still fulfill regularly, day in and day out, the duties of [a] killer.” Wiesel , a Holocaust survivor, was referring to the ordinary Germ
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wound healing or regeneration—the environment decides? Microscopic view of a half jelly comb larvae. Credit: K. Bading. An earthworm cut in two parts can survive and regenerate. For humans, the loss of limbs is a severe problem that can only be treated by complex surgery. However, among animals, there are numerous examples of self-healing mechanisms, especially among invertebrates. How these regeneration mechanisms function genetically and biochemica
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biologists taught infusoria to fight poisons Antioxidants counteract the negative effects of hydrogen peroxide on survival of infusorians Paramecium caudatum . It is seen that the antioxidants increase the survival rate of infusorianin the hydrogen peroxide solution (ICA - isocitric acid, 'control' - cells, which were in the hydrogen peroxide solution without antioxidants) Credit: Anatoliy Inozemtsev A team of scientists from Lomonosov Mosc
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A model explains effects like the formation of clouds from the sea Drop ejecting. Credit: University of Seville / Shutterstock All liquids always contain gases in a greater or lesser concentration depending on the pressure and temperature to which it is subjected. These gases almost always end up as more or less small bubbles on the surface of the liquid. When these bubbles explode, especially if they are microscopic, minuscule drops are expelled at great veloci
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists develop a new sensor for future missions to the moon and Mars A team of scientists from the Faculty of Physics of Lomonosov Moscow State University and their colleagues developed a compact spectral polarimeter for carrying out mineralogical investigations on the surfaces of astronomical bodies. The description of the device and the results of prototype testing were published in Optics Express . Spectral imaging, measuring spectral characteristics for each s
13h
Ingeniøren
Her er de tre største fejl, vi begik, da vi printede en hel bygning 3D-printning af hele bygninger ofte blevet betegnet som fremtidens byggemetode. Men der er stadig en hel del praktiske og meget præsente problemer med teknologien, fortæller holdet fra virksomheden 3D Printhuset, der over de seneste par måneder har printet fundamentet og væggene i et mindre kontorhus i Nordhavn i København. Torsdag præsenterer direktør Henrik Lund-Nielsen erfaringerne på en konfe
13h
Ingeniøren
Tre måder at stoppe kollegabrok De fleste har oplevet at lægge øre til en kollega, som fylder ens øregange med galde i form af brok. Nye jobtilbud hver uge. Tjek Jobfinder. Nogle gange er du enig i udsagnene, mens du andre gange bare må ryste på hovedet af vedkommende, som altid deler glædeligt ud af sine sure betragtninger. Men heldigvis er der flere måder at håndtere en brokkende kollega. Spørg, hvorfor de brokker sig til dig
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Startup event in Finland puts spotlight on European techOne of Europe's largest startup events opened Thursday in Finland, with 2,600 companies and 1,500 investors networking and negotiating funding, as the region looks to ramp up an industry that has long struggled to compete with the tech giants of the U.S.
13h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Huge weather rescue project under way Image copyright MET OFFICE It is shaping up to be a mammoth citizen science project. Volunteers are wanted to digitise early 20th Century weather records covering the UK and other parts of Europe. The temperature, pressure, rainfall and wind observations are in handwritten tables and need to be converted to a form that computers can analyse. The data comes from the Met Office's "Daily Weather Rep
13h
Ingeniøren
Apple-opdatering sætter stopper for root-fidus i MacOS Apple har frigivet en sikkerhedsopdatering til MacOS 10.13, også kaldet High Sierra. Opdateringen lukker ned for muligheden for at opnå admin-rettigheder i styresystemet ved at skrive root i en dialogboks. Et sikkerhedsproblem, som blandt andet Version2 fortalte om i går. Opdateringen blev frigivet klokken 17 dansk tid i går eftermiddags, oplyser Apples danske pr-samarbejdspartner i via mail. Ver
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists make transparent materials absorb light Schematic of a virtual light absorption process: A layer of a transparent material is exposed to light beams from both sides, with the light intensity increasing in time. Image courtesy of the researchers. Credit: MIPT A group of physicists from Russia, Sweden and the U.S. has demonstrated a highly unusual optical effect. They managed to "virtually" absorb light using a material that has no light
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A nanotransistor made of graphene nanoribbons The microscopic ribbons lie criss-crossed on the gold substrate. Credit: EMPA Graphene ribbons that are only a few atoms wide, so-called graphene nanoribbons, have special electrical properties that make them promising candidates for the nanoelectronics of the future. While graphene, a one-dimensional carbon layer, is a conductive material, it can become a semiconductor in the form of nanoribbons
14h
Ingeniøren
Læserne kastede sig over matematikopgave: Her er løsningen på kasseproblemetDer var overvældende respons på ing.dks matematiske tidsfordriv, som kunne løses på mange måder. Her er opgavestillerens svar.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Smartphone addiction creates imbalance in brain IMAGE: Teen using a smartphone. view more Credit: Radiological Society of North America CHICAGO - Researchers have found an imbalance in the brain chemistry of young people addicted to smartphones and the internet, according to a study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). According to a recent Pew Research Center study, 46 percent of America
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain's appetite regulator disrupted in obese teens IMAGE: Reduction of functional anisotropy (FA) in obese patients compared to control group (clusters in red), and FA skeleton (green), superimposed on the mean of FA images in the sample. At... view more Credit: Radiological Society of North America CHICAGO - Researchers using advanced MRI to study obese adolescents found disrupted connectivity in the complex regions of the brain involved in regu
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Emergency radiologists see inner toll of opioid use disorders IMAGE: A 37-year-old man with history of broken needle proximal to the right elbow while injecting heroin. Anterior-posterior X-ray view of the right humerus shows three linear hyperdensities in the soft... view more Credit: Radiological Society of North America CHICAGO - Emergency radiologists are seeing a high prevalence of patients with complications related to opioid use disorders, according
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Thinner photodiode with higher stability and performance New type of thin-film photodiode developed by DGIST research team. Credit: Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST) A research team of at DGIST has unveiled a new high-performance photodiode that reduces thickness to one-sixth of conventional silicon photodiodes. According to the researchers, they worked to develop a technology to increase the stability and performance of photo
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New synthethic protocol to form 3-D porous organic network Solid-state explosion of bulk HEA crystals. Credit: UNIST A team of Korean researchers affiliated with UNIST has recently announced the principle of producing porous organic materials in the blink of an eye, like firing bullets. This is similar to the mechanism of chemical reaction in explosives in which pulling the trigger causes the detonator to explode. This breakthrough has been led by Profes
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First finding of China's DAMPE may shed light on dark matter research The electron plus positron spectrum measured by DAMPE. Credit: DAMPE collaboration The Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE, also known as Wukong) mission published its first scientific results on Nov. 30 in Nature , presenting the precise measurement of cosmic ray electron flux, especially a spectral break at ~0.9 TeV. The data may shed light on the annihilation or decay of particle dark matter.
14h
Ingeniøren
IDA om sexchikane blandt ingeniører: Der er sikkert et stort mørketal Den seneste uge har svenske kvinder i tekniske fag delt oplevelser og episoder om sexchikane og kønsdiskrimination på jobbet under hashtag som #teknisktfel (teknisk fejl, red.) og #sistaspikenikistan (sidste søm i kisten, red.) De mange eksempler på sexchikane i ingeniørverdenen giver stof til eftertanke for Juliane Marie Neiiendam, formand for Ansattes Råd (AR) i IDA, der har fulgt kampagnen med
14h
Dagens Medicin
Svendborg-sagen afgøres ikke i HøjesteretVi vil ikke dømmes som kriminelle, fordi vi begår en utilsigtet hændelse. Hospitalernes ledelser må bakke os op, og så vil det være på sin plads med en ankeinstans for de afgørelser, som Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed træffer.
14h
Science : NPR
The Tree That Rocked The Music Industry Cellos are lined up backstage at the Chicago Symphony Orchestra before a Nov. 8 rehearsal of Schubert's Ninth Symphony. The CITES Rosewood regulations have made some musicians apprehensive about taking instruments containing the wood across international borders. Meg Anderson/NPR hide caption toggle caption Meg Anderson/NPR Cellos are lined up backstage at the Chicago Symphony Orchestra before a
14h
Ingeniøren
VIDEO: Nu svæver de norske brødres hydrofoil-board på vandet Her kan du se hydrofoil-boardet i aktion ved Aker Brygge i Oslo. (Video: Adventures by A Himitsu https://soundcloud.com/a-himitsu Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported— CC BY 3.0) I september skrev vi om brødrene Hiorth fra Norge, som havde udviklet deres eget elektriske hydrofoil-board. Ved hjælp af en hydrofoil – en propeldrevet vinge monteret under et bræt – løftes brættet fremad og hen
15h
Ingeniøren
Nyt laboratorium til seruminstitut kan blive presset på tid Om bare to år og en måned skal et helt nyt sikret laboratoriebyggeri stå klar på Amager på Statens Serum Institut, SSI. Institutionen overtager sammen med Københavns Universitet, KU, det veterinære beredskab fra DTU, der i dag holder øje med risikoen for smittefarlige husdyrsygdomme, blandt andet afrikansk svinepest, der lige nu breder sig i Østeuropa, især i Polen, og den nærmer sig grænsen til
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Science | The Guardian
Migraine drug could halve the length of attacks, study shows A new migraine drug that can halve the length of attacks has been hailed as “the start of real change” in how the condition is treated . Erenumab, a laboratory-made antibody that blocks a neural brain pathway called CGRP, is the first drug in 20 years proven to prevent migraine attacks. Phase three trial data on nearly 1,000 patients showed that it typically cut between three and four “migraine d
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Peruvian farmer presses climate claim on German polluter Peruvian farmer Saul Luciano Lliuya claims energy giant RWE must share the cost of protecting his hometown from a swollen glacier A German court will decide Thursday whether to hear a Peruvian farmer's case against energy giant RWE over climate change damage in the Andes. Saul Luciano Lliuya argues that RWE, as one of the world's top emitters of climate-altering carbon dioxide, must share in the
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Alibaba betting on long-term gain from eSports investment "We are prepared to lose money. We can accept the losses now as we hope to promote this sport," Alisports CEO Zhang Dazhong told AFP in an interview at the European final of the second edition of Alisports' World Electronic Sports Games in Barcelona The booming eSports industry may not yet attract the sponsors and television rights of real life sports, but Chinese e-commerce conglomerate Alibaba
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
When brands tempt us to lie, cheat and steal While many people consider themselves generally moral and honest, even the most upstanding citizens will likely become willing to lie, cheat and steal under certain circumstances, according to evidence from a new study in the Journal of Consumer Psychology . If consumers believe that a company is harmful in some way—to the environment or to people—then they feel justified participating in illegal
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Feces from entangled North Atlantic right whales reveals 'sky-high' stress levels In a new study published this week in Endangered Species Research , North Atlantic right whale scientists found that whales who undergo prolonged entanglements in fishing gear endure "sky-high hormone levels," indicating severe stress, which researchers discovered using a pioneering technique of examining scat from live, entangled, and dead whales over 15 years. "For the first time, we can get ho
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Science | The Guardian
Seven signs that you might be a mammal | Liam Drew You likely know that you’re a mammal. You have neither feathers nor a shell, you cannot breathe underwater and you only have to look at an ant to feel the vast spans of evolutionary time that lie between you and insects. But are you absolutely sure? Are you 100% confident that you’re a mammal, and not some exotic form of mollusc? Well, now you can be, with this easy-to-use guide! Hair, there, eve
17h
Ingeniøren
Overvågning: Danske hjemmesider filmer, hvordan du bruger dem Omkring 315 danske hjemmesider optager alt, hvad du laver på dem. Det lader ejerne se din færden klik-for-klik rundt på hjemmesiden. Inklusiv hvad du skriver i tekstfelter, om du kommer ting i indkøbskurven uden at købe dem og i nogle tilfælde dine kreditkortinformationer. »Det her er ikke bare tracking, men totalovervågning af alt, hvad du laver på det pågældende website. Jeg har meget svært ved
18h
Gizmodo
Trader Joe's Swears It's Not Dealing Those Drugs From Riverdale Image: Trader Joe’s Riverdale has a bit of a drug problem. First, there was the maple syrup racket that actually turned out to be a racket of a more illegal nature. Now, we’ve got Jingle Jangle, the Pixie Stix-eque concoction that’s found its way into many a teenager’s bloodstream. However, Riverdale isn’t the only spot for Jingle Jangle, it’s also at Trader Joe’s. Is the hipster grocery outlet s
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Program for offenders with mental health or addiction issues produces positive results INDIANAPOLIS -- A review of a state program launched two years ago to improve recovery and reduce recidivism among felony offenders who have mental health or addiction issues shows the program is producing positive results. "There are a lot of individuals in the criminal justice system who have a mental health or substance-abuse problem who are now getting the additional services they need," said
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers identify gene variant that protects against Alzheimer's disease Research published Wednesday in Genome Medicine details a novel and promising approach in the effort to treat Alzheimer's disease. Brigham Young University professors Perry Ridge and John Kauwe led the discovery of a rare genetic variant that provides a protective effect for high-risk individuals -- elderly people who carry known genetic risk factors for Alzheimer's-- who never acquired the disea
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study suggests measurable impact of colorectal cancer screening program IMAGE: This is the percentage of patients aged 51-74 years with appropriate CRC screening in 2013-2015 for matched funded and nonfunded FQHCs. view more Credit: American Cancer Society A new study suggests that an American Cancer Society (ACS) program has been effective in promoting improvements in colorectal cancer screening rates in federally qualified health centers (FQHCs). The study ap
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Studies examine the effects of weight on patients with rheumatoid arthritis New research provides insights on the potential effects of weight on the health of individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A study published in Arthritis Care & Research examines how overweight and obesity may affect the likelihood of achieving remission in early RA. A separate study in Arthritis & Rheumatology focuses on weight change in early RA and patients' subsequent risk of early death.
19h
Big Think
We Now Know Definitively What Yeti Are The legend of the yeti, or "abominable snowman," has been one of our more durable cryptozoological mysteries. The image of an primeval, solitary humanoid glimpsed through the swirling snows of the Himalayas has made its way into many a tale, and even into a Saul Bass movie or two. In Monsters, Inc (PIXAR) What are believed to be yeti remains have been found from time to time by mountain vil
20h
Ingeniøren
Konsulent om nye Viking-link-tal: For skrøbeligt at gevinsten ligger i 2040 Efter kraftig pres fremlagde Energinet og Energi- forsynings, og klimaministeriet for to uger siden nye og tidligere mørkelagte tal omkring et omdiskuteret kabel-projekt til 11 mia. kroner, som Energinet netop har fået godkendt af ministeriet. Konsulent Paul-Frederik Bach med 40 års erfaring fra el-sektoren har i et notat på sin hjemmeside regnet på de nye tal. Han føler sig stadig usikker på, at
20h
Ingeniøren
Skriv en indledning, der vinder virksomhedernes gunst Selvom dit CV stråler af professionalisme skal din ansøgning være mindst lige så skarp, hvis du vil have forhåbninger om at komme til jobsamtale. En velskrevet ansøgning skal vise arbejdsgiver, hvorfor han eller hun bør ansætte dig. Det handler om din motivation, dine drømme og hvorfor netop dette firma har fanget din interesse. Nye jobtilbud hver uge. Tjek Jobfinder. Når du skal skrible en ansøg
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Male-pattern baldness and premature graying associated with risk of early heart disease Kolkata, India 30 Nov 2017: Male-pattern baldness and premature greying are associated with a more than fivefold risk of heart disease before the age of 40 years, according to research presented at the 69th Annual Conference of the Cardiological Society of India (CSI). Obesity was associated with a fourfold risk of early heart disease. The congress is being held in Kolkata, India, from 30 Novembe
21h
Gizmodo
This 25th Anniversary Spawn Art Show Is Kind of Terrifying All Images: Hyaena Gallery Here’s something that’ll make you feel old if you grew up reading comics. Todd McFarlane’s Spawn (and the rest of Image Comics, to be fair) is 25 years old this year. And to celebrate, 25 artists have created 25 unique pieces of art based on the demonic character. The exhibit will go on display at the Hyaena Gallery in Burbank, CA, starting at 7pm on November 30. But if
21h
Gizmodo
A Vice Short Story About a Viral Ghost Is Becoming a Movie Pictured: A ghost. Image: Creepyhalloweenimages.com Last month, writer Geoff Manaugh published Ernest , a short story about a ghost, for Vice . Today, that story has been optioned by Hollywood and is being turned into a movie. Deadline reports that Legendary Pictures has secured the rights to Ernest , and set Christopher Landon ( Happy Death Day , the Paranormal Activity series) to adapt the stor
21h
Scientific American Content: Global
Bumper Stickers Make Highways More Social “You know how it is when you’re driving behind a car and you notice the bumper sticker, and you think to yourself ‘ Oh, it’s that kind of person ’ or, ‘Why would somebody put that on their car?’” Walter Goettlich, a sociology graduate student at the University of Kansas. “I was coming back from a vacation with my family…and I was behind a car and the bumper sticker on the car was almost i
22h
Gizmodo
This Flask Will Get Through Security, but We Didn't Tell You That Rabbit Discrete Flask Drink responsibly, and also discreetly. Rabbit’s great-looking, $10, no metal flask is dishwasher safe and holds 7.25 ounces. The quality is really surprising relative to the price- perfect for those music festivals you kids are all going to these days.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
People born premature have smaller airways causing respiratory problems People born prematurely may have smaller airways than those born at full term, which can cause respiratory problems. That's according to research published in Experimental Physiology today. It is known that cardiovascular and respiratory system function is affected by premature birth, but the exact causes are still not completely known. Recent research suggests that the impaired lung (respiratory
23h
Popular Science
Yes, you are probably descended from royalty. So is everyone else. The following is an excerpt from A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived by Adam Rutherford. We are all special, which also means that none of us is. This is merely a numbers game. You have two parents, four grandparents, eight great-grandparents, and so on. Each generation back the number of ancestors you have doubles. But this ancestral expansion is not borne back ceaselessly into the past.
23h
Futurity.org
Badly timed fishing seasons mess with fish The timing of fishing seasons can hamper the ability of fish to reproduce and even alter their population and reproductive cycles, new research suggests. The paper, which appears in the journal Fish and Fisheries , considers how the timing of fishing efforts might disproportionately target certain fish and change the life history patterns of entire populations. “The more you think about it, the m
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New Scientist - News
Would you let a company see your text messages to get a loan? By Abigail Beall You might think that your text message and phone calls have no bearing on your financial future, but you could be wrong. Some companies are using their customers’ smartphone habits to decide whether or not they should be granted a loan, according to a report by campaign group Privacy International . The report looked at the way tech-savvy loan companies work in India and Keny
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New Scientist - News
Migraine drug makes people have fewer ‘migraine days’ Migraines can last up to three days Getty By New Scientist staff and Press Association A drug can halve the amount of time that people are laid low by migraines . Erenumab is an antibody that blocks a brain pathway involving a molecule called CGRP, which becomes more abundant during migraine attacks. In a trial of nearly 1,000 people, the drug was found to typically reduce the number of “migr
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Futurity.org
A.I. uses cars to predict neighborhood’s politics New computer algorithms can use publicly available images from Google Street view to determine the political leanings of a given neighborhood just by looking at the cars on the streets. Using these algorithms that can see and learn, researchers analyzed millions of images for a new study, which appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences . “Using easily obtainable visual data,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bet you don't have this (very) early Apple product Apple fans are known to hold onto the company's products long after they've been eclipsed by new models. But it's unlikely these two very early Apple touchstones are sitting in anyone's collection: Steve Wozniak's fabled "Blue Box," and the very first Apple 1 computer produced by Woz and his younger buddy Steve Jobs. Both Apple artifacts are up for sale Dec. 6 at Bonhams' New York auction. The
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Superconducting qubit 3-D integration prospects bolstered by new research Researchers from Google and the University of California Santa Barbara have taken an important step towards the goal of building a large-scale quantum computer. Writing in the journal Quantum Science and Technology , they present a new process for creating superconducting interconnects, which are compatible with existing superconducting qubit technology. The race to develop the first large-scale
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Urgent need to address long-term health effects of extreme weather Extreme weather. Credit: Taylor & Francis As climate change makes extreme weather events more frequent and severe, understanding how they affect human health in the long-term is essential to developing more effective approaches for planning and response, says research paper published in the Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association . In recent decades, there has been a large increase in t
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Futurity.org
Ocean’s deepest fish thrives 26,000 feet below surface The ocean’s deepest fish doesn’t look like it could survive in harsh conditions thousands of feet below the surface. Instead of giant teeth and a menacing frame, the fishes that roam in the deepest parts of the ocean are small, translucent, bereft of scales—and highly adept at living where few other organisms can. These fish live under water pressure that can be as intense as an elephant standing
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Gizmodo
Jeff Bezos Is Tragically No Longer Worth $100 Billion Photo: Getty Images On Black Friday, Amazon CEO and richest man in the world Jeff Bezos—famous for both his dominance of the entire online retail market and pivot to rock-hard biceps —hit a net worth of $100 billion , according to a Bloomberg analysis . Alas, the brightest stars burn shortest, and this tale of hubris has collided with a tragic end. Also per Bloomberg , a Wednesday wipeout saw Bez
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New Scientist - News
Exercise hormone protects against bad complications in surgery Restricted blood supplies can damage organs PeopleImages/Getty A hormone released by muscles during exercise can be used to prevent complications from surgery, research in mice suggests. Surgical procedures often need to restrict blood flow to organs to make them easier to operate on. But this can cause long-lasting organ damage because it cuts off oxygen and nutrients. One way to limit this
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New Scientist - News
Best-yet quantum simulator with 53 qubits could really be useful Trapped ions are closer to doing our quantum calculations University of Maryland We’re two qubits closer to useful quantum computers. That might not sound like much, but in the quantum computing arms race, several groups are edging past one another as they aim to eventually make a universal quantum computer. A group of researchers at the Joint Quantum Institute has created a quantum simulator
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Futurity.org
Sorry, cat lovers: Dogs are smarter Dogs have significantly more neurons in their cerebral cortex—”little gray cells” associated with thinking, planning, and complex behavior considered hallmarks of intelligence—than cats, researchers report. “…dogs have the biological capability of doing much more complex and flexible things with their lives than cats can.” “In this study, we were interested in comparing different species of carni
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Futurity.org
Neurotic? Two other traits may shield your mental health Though high levels of neuroticism put people at risk for depression and anxiety, extraversion and conscientiousness could offer a measure of protection against those disorders. The findings, published in the Journal of Research in Personality , point to the importance of stepping away from focusing on single personality traits in clinical settings in favor of looking at how combinations of traits
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Futurity.org
How interfaith families solve the ‘December dilemma’ American families blend a mix of religious identities and traditions today more than ever. These interfaith dynamics appear in day-to-day life, but the holidays can add extra emphasis. “There is no one cookie-cutter correct way for interfaith couples to navigate holidays…” Keren McGinity, adjunct assistant professor of American studies and research associate at the Hadassah-Brandeis Institute, ha
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Superconducting qubit 3-D integration prospects bolstered by new research Credit: CC0 Public Domain Researchers from Google and the University of California Santa Barbara have taken an important step towards the goal of building a large-scale quantum computer. Writing in the journal Quantum Science and Technology , they present a new process for creating superconducting interconnects, which are compatible with existing superconducting qubit technology . The race to dev
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Antibiotic resistance: An unexpected chronology IMAGE: Salmonella typhimurium is a bacterium responsible of serious food poisoning. view more Credit: © Institut Pasteur Researchers from the Institut Pasteur have shed light on the rise of ampicillin resistance back in the 60s. Through the genome sampling of historical Salmonella strains, they proved that antibiotic resistance can be traced back prior to the release of ampicillin on the UK m
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Insufficient evidence to guide recommendations on vitamin D in pregnancy There is currently insufficient evidence to guide recommendations on the use of vitamin D supplements in pregnancy, conclude researchers in The BMJ today. A team led by Dr Daniel Roth at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, say some of the most critical questions about the effectiveness of taking vitamin D supplements during pregnancy "will probably remain unanswered in the foreseeable futu
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Feed: All Latest
American Airlines' Computer Glitch Leaves It Without Pilots Over Christmas Traveling during the holidays is, by definition, no fun. If you caught a flight over Thanksgiving this year, you got lucky—everything ran more or less to plan. No freak winter storms, no striking baggage handlers, no collapsing computer systems. Expecting the Christmas travel rush to go just as smoothly is a bit like expecting lightning to hit twice. Indeed, trouble has already arisen. Today, Ame
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Gizmodo
Jezebel Matt Lauer Reportedly Had a Button Under His Desk to Lock His Door for ‘Privacy’ | The Grape Jezebel Matt Lauer Reportedly Had a Button Under His Desk to Lock His Door for ‘Privacy’ | The Grapevine Who the Hell at NBC Approved Matt Lauer’s In-Office Sex Dungeon? | Deadspin Bret Boone Will Slide Into Your DMs To Mock Sexual Harassment | Earther Earth’s Heaviest Organism Could Be Eaten to Death…By Deer | Splinter Jimmy Fallon’s Apolitical Mush Is Costing His Show Dearly in the Ratings |
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BBC News - Science & Environment
'Unnatural' microbe can make proteins Image caption The bacteria were made to express a fluorescent protein to confirm that the unnatural code had been incorporated An altered microbe with an "unnatural" genetic code has been shown to assemble proteins - a key step towards designing new drugs and materials. Scientists modified the bacterium's DNA to incorporate six "letters" rather than the four found in nature. They previously found
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Live Science
Many Vietnam Vets May Have Cancer-Causing Parasites: What Are Liver Flukes? An image showing an egg of the parasitic worm Clonorchis sinensis, which is a type of liver fluke. Credit: CDC Hundreds of Vietnam War veterans may be infected with parasites called liver flukes, which can sometimes lead to cancer, recent research suggests. A recent study from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) found that, out of 50 blood samples submitted from Vietnam veterans, more th
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Gizmodo
Nissan May Have Just Revealed New Droids From The Last Jedi Nissan’s booth at the LA Auto Show is essentially a big display of their current line-up of cars in Star Wars cosplay. In the back of their booth, though, they’ve got this fun but strikingly un-car-related VR experience where you get to repair droids in a droid repair shop. What makes this really interesting, at least to hardcore Star Wars droid-geeks, is that a number of new, never-before-seen B
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Climax Moonshine Is A 3-Generation Operation #Moonshiners | Tuesdays 9p Tim has always wanted to pass down his moonshining legacy to his son. Thanks to a partnership with Chuck, he will be able to do that legally. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/moonshiners/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/MoonshinersTV Foll
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: Shy Elk and Bold Birds Become Partners in the Wilderness To study the magpies, he attracted the birds to 20 experimental sites with peanuts on tree stumps. During more than 20 separate trials with different magpies, he judged each bird’s behavior relative to the other magpies in a trial. Like the elk, he measured flight response, social structure and willingness to approach items they hadn’t previously encountered (a bike decorated with a boa and Chris
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Gizmodo
The 10 Best Deals of November 29, 2017 We see a lot of deals around the web over on Kinja Deals , but these were our ten favorites today. Head over to our main post for more deals, and follow us on Twitter and Facebook to never miss a chance to save. You can also join our Kinja Deals Community Facebook group to connect with your fellow deal hunters. #1: Anime Amazon Anime Sale Have any anime fans (including yourself) on your holiday s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How to know when it's safe to click 'unsubscribe' on spam emai Credit: CC0 Public Domain I had a reader write in to ask about spam. He wanted to know if using the unsubscribe link on spam emails was a good idea. We've all received spam, and the eternal question is, "Do I click the unsubscribe link or not?" In the old days, spammers made using email quite annoying. I know I still get way more spam than actual messages . In 2003, President George W. Bush
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Gizmodo
Comcast Changed Its Net Neutrality Pledge the Day After the FCC Moved to Kill the Open Web Photo: Getty Net neutrality protections have not yet been repealed, but it seems that ISPs are already taking their sheep costumes off to reveal the wolves beneath. In a move that will make everyone say, “of course they did,” it seems that Comcast deleted its pledge to protect the open internet the day after the FCC announced its plan to kill the open internet this spring. You might recall the em
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fighting the flu, year after year IMAGE: A person receives the seasonal influenza vaccine (flu shot). view more Credit: NIAID WHAT: In a New England Journal of Medicine perspective, experts from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, and the World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza in Melbourne discuss
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Combination HIV prevention reduces new infections by 42 percent in Ugandan district IMAGE: A research assistant draws blood for HIV testing from a participant in the Rakai Community Cohort Study. view more Credit: Rakai Health Sciences Program A study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine provides real-world evidence that implementing a combination of proven HIV prevention measures across communities can substantially reduce new HIV infections in a populat
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More than half of US children will have obesity as adults if current trends continue Boston, MA - If current trends in child obesity continue, more than 57% of today's children in the U.S. will have obesity at age 35, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The study also found that excess weight in childhood is predictive of adult obesity, even among young children, and that only children currently at a healthy weight have less than a 50% chance
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Male circumcision and antiviral drugs appear to sharply reduce HIV infection rate A steep drop in the local incidence of new HIV infections accompanied the rollout of a U.S.-funded anti-HIV program in a large East-African population, according to a study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. The study, published Nov. 29 in the New England Journal of Medicine , is the first to track a large group of people be
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Live Science
Your Dog Might Be Licking Its Mouth Because It Thinks You’re a Jerk When your best friend catches you in a bad mood, does she try to console you, give you space to cool off or lick her own face in an uncontrollable slobber? If your best friend is a dog, this third reaction may be familiar to you. Dogs lick their own mouths, noses and jowls all the time. Certain cuteness-obsessed Internet communities call it a "mlem" ; some animal behavior researchers prefer
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Big Think
Did Russian Cosmonauts Find Alien Bacteria Outside the ISS? Cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov lit a wildfire recently when he announced his team had found alien bacteria clinging to the outside of the International Space Station (ISS). It took place during a spacewalk several years ago. Those samples were returned to Earth and have been analyzed recently by Roscosmos—the Russian space agency. He claims Roscosmos scientists conclude the bacteria isn’t from Earth.
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Big Think
Why Do Some of Our Best Minds Speak "Higher Twaddle"? 1. We teach "higher twaddle ” to our best minds, says the ever insightful Marilynne Robinson. I think she has a point—many smart folk are now educated into error—but the problem is worse than she fears. 2. Robinson’s complaint that colleges teach students to “master… twaddle” and thereby “to think... badly,” focus mainly on the humanities , but worse twaddle is taught in fields whose ideas ar
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Caesar's invasion site 'found': Is this where the Romans landed?Archaeologists believe they may have uncovered the first evidence of Julius Caesar's invasion of Britain.
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New on MIT Technology Review
The U.S. Risks Falling Behind Russia and China in Its Use of AI in the Military The U.S. Risks Falling Behind Russia and China in Its Use of AI in the Military The U.S. military budget, at $615 billion, dwarfs its closest competitors of China’s ($211 billion) and Russia’s ($69 billion). Even with that advantage, a new report finds that the U.S. is at risk of falling behind in the race to find and create AI… Read more The U.S. military budget, at $615 billion, dwarfs its clos
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New on MIT Technology Review
Bitcoin Hype is Ushering in Demand for Cryptocurrency Education The U.S. Risks Falling Behind Russia and China in Its Use of AI in the Military The U.S. military budget, at $615 billion, dwarfs its closest competitors of China’s ($211 billion) and Russia’s ($69 billion). Even with that advantage, a new report finds that the U.S. is at risk of falling behind in the race to find and create AI… Read more The U.S. military budget, at $615 billion, dwarfs its clos
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When brands tempt us to lie, cheat and steal While many people consider themselves generally moral and honest, even the most upstanding citizens will likely become willing to lie, cheat and steal under certain circumstances, according to evidence from a new study in the Journal of Consumer Psychology . If consumers believe that a company is harmful in some way--to the environment or to people -- then they feel justified participating in ill
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Feces from entangled North Atlantic right whales reveals 'sky-high' stress levels BOSTON, MA (Nov. 30, 2017) - In a new study published this week in Endangered Species Research , North Atlantic right whale scientists found that whales who undergo prolonged entanglements in fishing gear endure "sky-high hormone levels," indicating severe stress, which researchers discovered using a pioneering technique of examining scat from live, entangled, and dead whales over 15 years. "For
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