EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Clumps as temporary storageResearchers at ETH have discovered that the formation of protein aggregates in yeast cells is reversible. This casts new light on human diseases that can be attributed to certain protein aggregates.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Patients' expectations influence the effectiveness of SSRI antidepressantsSelective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly prescribed for depression and anxiety but their superiority over placebo has been questioned, generating considerable debate among researchers and clinicians. In a new study, Uppsala University researchers show that the way in which the treatment is described to the patient can be as important as the treatment itself.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Finnish researchers discover what is on the menu for dragonfliesResearchers from the Universities of Turku and Helsinki, Finland, are the first in the world to discover which species adult dragonflies and damselflies prey upon, as modern laboratory techniques enabled the study of the insects' diet. In the study, prey DNA was extracted from the tiny dragonfly droppings and the researchers managed to identify dozens of prey species from the samples. The results
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Observations of red aurora over 1770 Kyoto help diagnose extreme magnetic stormResearchers used historic accounts of a rare red aurora over Kyoto, Japan, in the 18th century to support calculations of the strength of the associated magnetic storm. The September 1770 storm could be 3-10 percent stronger than the September 1859 storm, the greatest storm in the past 200 years. The research provides insights that could assist preparation for an unlikely, but possible, future int
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New targeted alpha therapy protocol for advanced prostate cancerTherapy options are limited for men with advanced-stage, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, but a new treatment protocol offers hope. In the featured article of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine's October issue, German researchers report on their novel dosing regimen for actinium-225-labeled targeted alpha therapy of patients with prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-positive tumo
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

House sparrow decline linked to air pollution and poor dietHouse sparrows are well-adapted to living in urban areas, so it is surprising their numbers have fallen significantly over the past decades. An investigation by Spanish researchers into this worrying trend, published in open-access journal Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, finds that sparrows living in urban areas are adversely affected by pollution and poor nutrition. The study also finds the b
1d
Ars Technica

Walmart buys Parcel in latest attempt to battle Amazon delivery machine Enlarge (credit: Walmart ) Walmart is trying to beat Amazon at its own game, and the company's latest acquisition will boost that effort, at least in the New York City area. Walmart announced that it has acquired Parcel, a Brooklyn-based delivery company that specializes in scheduled and same-day package delivery of traditional items as well as groceries, meal kits, and other perishables. The acq
1d
Futurity.org

Starting school early may up mental health risks for teens Teens who start school before 8:30 AM may be at higher risk for mental health issues stemming from poor sleep quality, new research suggests. “…earlier school start times seem to put more pressure on the sleep process and increase mental health symptoms…” The study not only reinforces the theorized link between sleep and adolescent mental health, but also demonstrates that school start times may
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Twitter banks on sport fans' passionTwitter is exploring new ways to engage sports fans, tapping into their passion as it fights its corner in the cutthroat world of social media.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

House sparrow decline linked to air pollution and poor dietDespite being well-adapted to urban life, house sparrow numbers are falling. A study in open-access journal Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution finds that compared to sparrows living in the country, urban-dwelling birds show clear signs of stress linked to the toxic effects of air pollution and an unhealthy diet. This could have health implications for people living in cities.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Good vibrations for the future of computingVibrating mechanical switches that can be cascaded to perform complex computational operations could take computing significantly further than today's technologies. KAUST researchers have demonstrated an alternative technology based on mechanical vibrations.
1d
New on MIT Technology Review

AI Definitely Didn’t Stop Las Vegas Fake News
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Red Sea gene pool follows water flowA collaboration between KAUST and several UK institutes has revealed that surface currents are important pathways for gene flow in the Red Sea, a finding which will help guide marine management programs.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A radical solution comes from mixing toolsThe molten surface of a sodium-based material could assist the direct conversion of methane to useful building blocks.
1d
The Atlantic

The Harrowing Personal Stories of Syrian Refugees, in Their Own Words “I don’t think the human mind is able to understand the suffering we’ve experienced,” says a man in Matthew K. Firpo’s short documentary, Refuge . Filmed on location in 2016 in four different refugee camps across Greece—outside Athens and on the islands of Lesvos and Leros—the film allows victims of the Syrian Civil War to share their experiences. One man describes how his sewing factory was comp
1d
Futurity.org

Stress makes us slower to perceive new threats Stress can diminish our ability to assess new threats, according to new research. The new finding runs counter to the conventional view that stress enhances our ability to detect and adjust to these changing sources of threat. “Stress does not always increase perceptions of danger in the environment, as is often assumed,” explains Candace Raio, a postdoctoral researcher at New York University and
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Good vibrations for the future of computingA vibration-driven logic gate could form the basis for the next generation of efficient, low-power computers.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Red Sea gene pool follows water flowSatellite imagery shows how currents shape the Red Sea ecosystem.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Comparing different information levels (U. Saint-Mont)In the present paper, the concept of 'situation' translates into one of a 'stochastic environment', and three levels of information are systematically studied (minimum, sequential, maximum).
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A radical solution comes from mixing toolsThe molten surface of a sodium-based material could assist the direct conversion of methane to useful building blocks.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Psychosocial factors, psychological disorders and violent crimeA low level of education is the variable that can most accurately predict this, according to a study carried out among inmates of Andalusian prisons. On the other hand, other classic factors, like alcoholism or personality disorders, do not appear in the equation that best predicts violent crimes.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Novel platform for investigating quiescence in dormancy-capable cancer cellsA team of researchers from the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities has reported a novel encapsulation approach to identify dormant cancer cells and maintain them in a quiescent state.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Random movements help color-detecting cells form the proper patternIn fish and other animals, the color detecting cone cells in the retina are arranged in specific patterns, and this is believed to be important for allowing animals to properly sense their surroundings. Now, in research published in Physical Review E, an interdisciplinary group of physicists and biologists have used a mathematical model to determine how the cone cells in zebrafish -- a common expe
1d
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Gravitational wave detection wins physics Nobel Rainer Weiss, Barry Barish and Kip Thorne share the 2017 prize for their work at LIGO to detect ripples in space-time. Nature 550 19 doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22737
1d
Gizmodo

Utah’s 911 Service for the Deaf Was Down for Days Because a Company Forgot to Renew Its Domain Getty For nearly three days, deaf people and residents with vocal disabilities in Utah were unable to place 911 video calls in the event of an emergency. That’s because a Utah telecommunications firm didn’t renew a domain name . According to the Federal Communications Commission, Sorenson Communications neglected to renew the domain connected to its video relay service, which provides individuals
1d
Dagens Medicin

Sundhedsminister: Meld overflødigt bureaukratiSundheds- og Ældreministeriet vil med den nye kampagne ‘Meld en regel’ have sundhedspersonale til at pege på regler, de vil have afskaffet.
1d
Dagens Medicin

Datatilsynet kritiserer to sundhedsmyndigheder for at bryde persondatalovenÆldre- og Sundhedsministeriet samt Sundhedsdatastyrelsen er blandt de syv statslige myndigheder, som Datatilsynet efter stikprøver revser for at bryde persondataloven.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists behind the discovery of gravitational waves win the 2017 Nobel Prize for PhysicsThe Swedish Academy of Sciences has announced that the 2017 Nobel prize in Physics goes to three scientists for their foundational work leading to the discovery of ripples in the fabric of space and time known as gravitational waves.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Plant-consuming microorganisms produce low-carbon, renewable natural gas(Phys.org)—A new study shows that plant-consuming microorganisms that reside in coalbeds can convert plant carbohydrates into natural gas, potentially offering a sustainable, clean method of energy generation.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ancient petrified salamander reveals its last mealA new study on an exceptionally preserved salamander from the Eocene of France reveals that its soft organs are conserved under its skin and bones. Organs preserved in three dimensions include the lung, nerves, gut, and within it, the last meal of the animal, according to a study published in the peer-reviewed journal PeerJ by a team of palaeontologists from France and Switzerland.
1d
New Scientist - News

Grass-fed beef is bad for the planet and causes climate changeSupporters like Prince Charles say raising cattle on pastures can be good for the environment, but the sums have been done and their claims don’t add up
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ancient petrified salamander reveals its last mealA new study on an exceptionally preserved salamander from the Eocene of France reveals that its soft organs are conserved under its skin and bones. Organs preserved in three dimensions include the lung, nerves, gut, and within it, the last meal of the animal, according to a study published in the peer-reviewed journal PeerJ by a team of palaeontologists from France and Switzerland.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bristol scientists pinpoint the singularity for quantum computersResearchers from the University of Bristol have discovered that super-powerful quantum computers, which scientists and engineers across the world are racing to build, need to be even more powerful than previously thought before they can beat today's ordinary PCs.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chemists teach computer program to model forces between atoms accuratelyThe researchers used machine learning to model the interactions between atoms in crystalline and liquid aluminum and uranium. To make sure that the data yielded by computer simulations is valid, they are compared to experimental results. The method used by the researchers was in good agreement with prior experiments. The information obtained with the approach based on machine learning had a lower
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Non-invasive imaging predicts cancer malignancyA new study by Osaka University scientists shows that non-labeling multiphoton microscopy (NL-MPM) can be used for quantitative imaging of cancer that is safe and requires no resection, fixation or staining of tissues.
1d
Ingeniøren

VIDEO: Fremtidens fabrik i miniformatMed en model af en ultrasimpel mobiltelefonfabrik demonstrerer professor Ole Madsen fra Aalborg Universitet på HI-messen i Herning, hvordan Industri 4.0 kan integreres i et produktionsmiljø.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Biosensor for heavy metalsA team of Empa scientists has developed a biosensor which allows them to detect elevated concentrations of copper in a simple, quick and economic way. Copper, like other heavy metals is problematic in high concentrations, both for the environment and for human health.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Confined within tiny carbon nanotubes, extremely cold water molecules line up in a highly ordered chainSingle-walled carbon nanotubes act like tiny straws that are so narrow that water confined within cannot freeze into its normal crystal-like structure. In particular, in very thin nanotubes, water molecules align in a single-file manner. At room temperature, each molecule remains orientated in a random direction, creating a disordered chain. For the first time, scientists observed that at a cool 1
1d
Futurity.org

Test shows promise for detecting pancreatic cancer Researchers have successfully shown that a new genetic test can, with high sensitivity, determine which pancreatic cysts are most likely to be associated with an aggressive form of pancreatic cancer. The successful results are a critical step toward a precision medicine approach to detecting and treating pancreatic cancer, which has one of the lowest survival rates of all cancers. “This rapid, se
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Space-based data are aiding Great Lakes communities as they combat an invaderLocated on the southern shore of Georgian Bay in Ontario, the idyllic Great Lakes town of Collingwood has been battling a growing problem—an invasive wetland reed called Phragmites australis. And the town is not alone in its fight.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists join forces to save Puerto Rico's 'Monkey Island'"00O made it!" There was some news to celebrate on Sept. 28 in the email chain of scientists who work at the Cayo Santiago Field Station. Cayo Santiago is a 38-acre tropical island off the coast of Puerto Rico and home to approximately 1,500 rhesus monkeys, earning it the local nickname "Monkey Island."
1d
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

How LIGO discovered gravitational waves -- and what might be next | Gabriela GonzálezMore than 100 years after Albert Einstein predicted gravitational waves -- ripples in space-time caused by violent cosmic collisions -- LIGO scientists confirmed their existence using large, extremely precise detectors in Louisiana and Washington. Astrophysicist Gabriela González of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration tells us how this incredible, Nobel-winning discovery happened -- and what it migh
1d
Gizmodo

It's Time For More Ridiculous Rumors About Superman's Resurrection in Justice League Peter Cullen, the voice of Optimus Prime, confirms his presence in the Bumblebee movie. Get a look at Tom Holland and Daisy Ridley in action together for the Chaos Walking movie. Plus, celebrate the return of the CW/DC shows with fast food ads, and what’s to come on Star Trek: Discovery . Spoilers now! Justice League Yes, it’s time for the internet to get itself flustered over more Superman merch
1d
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

South Korea cracks down on dirty air Despite huge clean-up effort, scientists say country’s pollution problem could get worse over next five years. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22448
1d
Inside Science

UPDATE: Three Share Nobel Prize in Physics for Gravitational Waves UPDATE: Three Share Nobel Prize in Physics for Gravitational Waves The 2017 Nobel Prize honors a discovery that Einstein predicted more than 100 years ago. nobel-prize-2017_physfinal.jpg Image credits: Abigail Malate , Staff Illustrator Rights information: Copyright American Institute of Physics ( reprinting information ) Physics Tuesday, October 3, 2017 - 09:00 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Sci
1d
Dagens Medicin

Regeringen vil komme med 12 lovforslag om sundhed i det kommende folketingsår Det nye lovkatalog fra regeringen, som blev offentliggjort i dag i forbindelse med Folketingets åbning, rummer 12 forslag til ændringer af lovgivningen på sundhedsområdet – fire af dem er knyttet til Sundhedsloven.
1d
Feed: All Latest

Candylab’s New Wooden Cars Swing Into the Prohibition EraThe company makes its toy hot rods by expertly carving wood.
1d
Feed: All Latest

Cardi B's Billboard Reign Isn't a Fluke—It's Streaming SupremacyThe New York rapper's smash "Bodak Yellow" holds on to its number-one Billboard spot, thanks in part to the rise of the playlist
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

After a disaster, contaminated floodwater can pose a threat for months to comeIn the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, reporters warned of a "stew of toxic chemicals, sewage, debris and waste" in Houston's floodwaters.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Biologists on the trail of 'brain-eating amoebae'MBARI researchers are used to braving gusty winds and choppy seas as they test their high-tech equipment in Monterey Bay. But a recent field experiment in Yellowstone National Park saw MBARI researchers Kevan Yamahara and Roman Marin III dodging hordes of tourists and herds of elk while searching for "brain-eating amoebae."
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers conduct more accurate chemical analysis of the star 68 Tauri(Phys.org)—French astronomers have recently presented a new abundance analysis of the star 68 Tauri (also known as HD 27962), which determines its chemical composition more precisely than previous studies. The results of the research are available in a paper published Sept. 28 on the arXiv pre-print repository.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bigger, more intensive dairy farms may also mean bigger milk footprintsA new study published in Global Change Biology challenges the idea that the trend towards larger, more intensive dairy farms mitigates climate change by shrinking the carbon footprint of milk production. A team of animal nutrition experts and environmental modellers from Bangor and Aberystwyth Universities looked beyond the farm-system boundaries of typical carbon footprint studies to account for
1d
Futurity.org

NFL re-invented itself as leader in concussion research The NFL’s initial response to player concussions in the 1990s—avoidance and superficial gestures to mollify critics—damaged its public image. Now, it has repositioned itself as a leader in concussion prevention and research. The league’s newly proactive stance shows how a large organization can wrest control of and shape the very issue that haunted it, a new study suggests. “They said, ‘We’ll cha
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genre may impact cognitive training using video gamesVideo games are quickly becoming a hot topic in cognitive training. Many see them as a potential tool to help patients improve their performance and memory, yet little is known about how different types of video games may affect white matter in the brain and cognition.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

An algorithm that explains how ants create and repair trail networksObserving ants in the trees of a tropical forest, Professor Deborah Gordon recorded how, without a plan, the ants make and maintain their networks -- and how they repair the network when it is ruptured.
1d
Scientific American Content: Global

A Fix for the Antiscience Attitude in CongressA group of objective expert advisers should counsel the Senate and House science committees -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d
Scientific American Content: Global

Lax U.S. Gun Controls Pose a Greater Threat Than TerrorismU.S.-made guns wreak havoc around the world as well as in the U.S. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First global pact backing indigenous land rights launchedIndigenous peoples could soon regain some control of their native forests with the creation of a new global institution dedicated to securing their land rights.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Earth's tectonic plates are weaker than once thoughtNo one can travel inside the earth to study what happens there. So scientists must do their best to replicate real-world conditions inside the lab.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Global warming doesn't stop when the emissions stopOur climate is out of balance: Increasing accumulation of CO2 in the atmosphere has caused the Earth's temperature to increase by 0.8° C since the beginning of the industrial revolution. According to a study by Thorsten Mauritsen from the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology in Hamburg and Robert Pincus of the University of Colorado, even if we stopped all emissions from fossil fuels tomorrow, the
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New research highlights the need to learn from past climate changesNew international research led by The University of Manchester has highlighted that learning from previous periods of climate change is essential if we are to understand the vulnerability of species and ecosystems to global warming.
1d
Ars Technica

Here’s the “due diligence” report Waymo hopes will win its case against Uber Enlarge / Former Uber engineer Anthony Levandowski, at right, at a transportation conference in 2016. (credit: John Sommers II for Transport Topics ) A report that has long been fought over by lawyers at Waymo and Uber has been made public. Levandowski's lawyers fought to keep the Stroz Friedberg "due diligence" report on Uber acquiring his startup secret, but it was ultimately acquired by Waymo
1d
Ingeniøren

Endelig rapport om MH370: Det forsvundne fly forbliver et mysteriumMalaysia Airlines-flyet forsvandt i 2014, og trods historiens største efterforskning med avanceret undervandsteknologi er det ikke lykkedes at finde det. Nu undskylder efterforskerne.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The most mysterious star in the cosmosRound 5 a.m. on a Tuesday this past May, Tabetha "Tabby" Boyajian sat staring at a laptop, cross-legged on her couch in the living room of her Baton Rouge, La., home. The coffee table was cluttered with the artifacts of an all-nighter: an empty wine glass to calm her nerves alongside an empty coffee mug to fuel her through the night.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Up to 50% fewer phytosanitary products required to treat vine diseasesThe FITOVID project, the results of which were presented recently, has managed to decrease the amount of phytosanitary products required in vineyards by up to 50 percent.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists pinpoint the singularity for quantum computersResearchers from the University of Bristol have discovered that super-powerful quantum computers, which scientists and engineers across the world are racing to build, need to be even more powerful than previously thought before they can beat today's ordinary PCs.
1d
Viden

Apples fjende tjener kassen på ny iPhoneSamsung står til at tjene mange milliarder kroner på blandt andet at levere skærmen til den kommende iPhone X.
1d
Futurity.org

Why certain cholesterol drugs are so hard to get A new study shows that fewer than one-third of patients prescribed a PCSK9 inhibitor—injectable drugs designed to lower cholesterol levels—actually got the drug. Fewer than half ever received approval for the drug by their insurer. But, even after approval, one in three patients didn’t fill their prescription. Why? Sticker shock. A quarter of patients had copays over $300 per month for therapies
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sharing the parenting duties could be key to marital bliss, study suggestsThe quality of women's relationships with their partner is diminished if they view their parenting division as unfair or want to spend more time working, our new study of employed parents in Canada has found.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gold nanoparticle used to replace virus in new CRISPR approach(Phys.org)—A team of researchers from the University of California and the University of Tokyo has found a way to use the CRISPR gene editing technique that does not rely on a virus for delivery. In their paper published in the journal Nature Biomedical Engineering, the group describes the new technique, how well it works and improvements that need to be made to make it a viable gene editing tool.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ultra-energy-efficient magnetic memory by controlling the shapes of atomsA research group led by Osaka University discovered a new principle to realize ultra-energy-efficient magnetic memory by electrically controlling the shapes of atoms.
1d
Ars Technica

Russian Facebook ads featured anti-immigrant messages, puppies, women with rifles Enlarge (credit: Photo by Sergei KonkovTASS via Getty Images) Monday, Facebook handed over some 3,000 ads, which it believes were bought by Russia, to congressional investigators. While they haven't been made public, more information is coming out about the ads, accounts, and pages that were said to be controlled by a Russian "troll farm" called the Internet Research Agency. Many of the ads weren
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Earth's tectonic plates are weaker than once thoughtResearch by University of Pennsylvania geophysicists and colleagues has resolved a long-standing question regarding the strength of olivine, the primary component of Earth's mantle. The results have implications for how tectonic plates form and move.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New method could help disrupt opioid crisisIn a collaborative effort, researchers at the FIU International Forensic Research Institute (IFRI) and the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science have zeroed in on a unique component of heroin that could help zero in on the locations of origin for individual batches.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Random movements help color-detecting cells form the proper patternIn fish and other animals, the color detecting cone cells in the retina are arranged in specific patterns, and this is believed to be important for allowing animals to properly sense their surroundings. Now, in research published in Physical Review E, an interdisciplinary group of physicists and biologists have used a mathematical model to determine how the cone cells in zebrafish—a common experim
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New efficient catalyst for key step in artificial photosynthesisChemists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have designed a new catalyst that speeds up the rate of a key step in "artificial photosynthesis"—an effort to mimic how plants, algae, and some bacteria harness sunlight to convert water and carbon dioxide into energy-rich fuels. This step—called water oxidation—releases protons and electrons from water molecules, producin
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bats and bugs do battle in the tropicsn the tropical rainforests of Panama, Dartmouth's Hannah ter Hofstede is witness to what Charles Darwin called a "struggle for existence." She studies a competition for survival that pits the cricket-like katydids rubbing their wings together to make their ultrasonic mating songs, and bats hearing that mating call as a dinner bell.
1d
Dagens Medicin

17 patienter døde på Rigets ventelisteMange patienter er døde på Rigshospitalet Karkirurgisk Klinik, mens hospitalet har indført Sundhedsplatformen og afdelingen har fået flere patienter.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Magpies can form friendships with people—here's howCan one form a friendship with a magpie? –even when adult males are protecting their nests during the swooping season? The short answer is:" Yes, one can" - although science has just begun to provide feasible explanations for friendship in animals, let alone for cross-species friendships between humans and wild birds.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How gender and stereotypes can shape our relationship with dogsThe relationship between people and their dogs can be a lasting and loving bond if the match is right. But when acquiring a dog, how do you know if that match will be a good one?
1d
BBC News - Science & Environment

Beaver kit spotted on recent survey in Knapdale ForestOnly one of four groups of Beavers in Argyll is showing signs of successful breeding.
1d
BBC News - Science & Environment

Leicester space scientist wins BBC Two astronaut showSuzie Imber, who beat 11 people to the prize, is "excited" she could "one day end up in space".
1d
BBC News - Science & Environment

Bali volcano: What is it like waiting for an eruption?More than 100,000 people have fled their homes as they wait for Bali's Mount Agung to erupt.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

European sea bass show chronic impairment after exposure to crude oilWe may be underestimating the long-term impact of oil spills on fish, particularly their ability to tolerate low oxygen environments, according to research from the University of British Columbia (UBC), the Université de Bretagne Occidentale (UBO) and L'Institut Français de Recherche pour l'Exploitation de la Mer (Ifremer).
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gravitational wave detectors could shed light on dark matterA global team of scientists, including two University of Mississippi physicists, has found that the same instruments used in the historic discovery of gravitational waves caused by colliding black holes could help unlock the secrets of dark matter, a mysterious and as-yet-unobserved component of the universe.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Clumps as temporary storageResearchers at ETH have discovered that the formation of protein aggregates in yeast cells is reversible. This casts new light on human diseases that can be attributed to certain protein aggregates.
1d
The Atlantic

'It Feels Like Someone Has Opened a Window Into Hell' “If comedy is tragedy plus time,” Jon Stewart said in 2014, responding to the death of Eric Garner, “I need more fucking time.” That was three years ago, and Stewart is long gone, but his legacy is the stable of comedians on late-night television who use the news not just to entertain, but to advocate. It’s gotten harder. Increasingly, over the last three years, Stephen Colbert, Trevor Noah, Seth
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chemists teach computer program to model forces between atoms accuratelyA team of researchers from MIPT, Skoltech, and Dukhov Research Institute of Automatics, led by Artem Oganov, used a machine learning technique to model the behavior of aluminum and uranium in the liquid and crystalline phases at various temperatures and pressures. Such simulations of chemical systems can predict their properties under a range of conditions before experiments are performed, enablin
1d
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

ALMA og Rosetta finder Freon-40 i rummetJagten på molekyler, som kan afsløre liv udenfor Jorden, har været i gang i lang tid....
1d
Science | The Guardian

Choirboys sing to impress girls? Music to my ears | Tom UsherI was a teenage choirboy – so it doesn’t surprise me that the timbre of their voices changes when girls are around. Love, or lust, makes peacocks of us all On the one hand, love is just a chemical reaction, an evolutionary necessity that fuels humanity’s moistly metronomic purpose of incessant reproduction. On the other hand, it is pretty much the sole reason our god-forsaken species has ever had
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Private companies are launching a new space race – here's what to expectThe space race between the USA and Russia started with a beep from the Sputnik satellite exactly 60 years ago (October 4, 1957) and ended with a handshake in space just 18 years later. The handshake was the start of many decades of international collaboration in space. But over the past decade there has been a huge change.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

European court asked to rule on Facebook data transfersIreland's High Court has asked the European Court of Justice to decide whether Facebook's Dublin-based subsidiary can legally transfer users' personal data to its U.S. parent, saying there are "well-founded concerns" the practice violates European law.
1d
The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Fragile BrainIn Fragile X syndrome-a genetic mishap that results in cognitive delays-the lack of a translation-repressing protein leads to the rampant accumulation of other proteins in the mouse brain.
1d
Dagens Medicin

DF og regeringen klar til forhandlinger om to-procentskrav Regeringen og Dansk Folkeparti går til forhandlinger om det forhadte produktivitetskrav i denne uge.
1d
Feed: All Latest

The 2018 Ford Mustang GT Features the Dashboard of the FutureThe classic car gets a new look.
1d
Feed: All Latest

California Wants to Ban Non-Electric Cars—Here's How It Can Do ItTo make an all-electric age plausible, the state must get to work, stat.
1d
Feed: All Latest

Nura Nuraphones: Price, Specs, and How They WorkThe new headphones from Nura measure inner-ear vibrations to figure out what sounds best to your ears.
1d
Scientific American Content: Global

Why Do Smart People Do Foolish Things?Intelligence is not the same as critical thinking and the difference matters -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d
The Atlantic

When Working From Home Doesn’t Work I n 1979, IBM was putting its stamp on the American landscape. For 20 years, it had been hiring the greats of modernism to erect buildings where scientists and salespeople could work shoulder-to-shoulder commanding the burgeoning computer industry. But that year, one of its new facilities—the Santa Teresa Laboratory, in Silicon Valley—tried an experiment. To ease a logjam at the office mainframe,
1d
Gizmodo

This Discounted Standing Desk Mat Is Basically a Fidget Toy For Your Feet TerraMat , $80 With the advent of affordable monitor risers, it’s never been easier to become a part-time or full-time standing desk user, but it’s important not to skimp on the anti-fatigue mat when you decide to make the transition. Most of these mats are flat slabs of foam, and that’s better than nothing. But what if you could do more with your feet than just balance on them? That’s the idea b
1d
Futurity.org

Mitochondria keep nutrient-starved cells alive Researchers have discovered a mechanism through which mitochondria, the energy factory of our body’s cells, play a role in preventing cells from dying when the cells are deprived of nutrients. The finding points to a potential target for next-generation cancer drugs. Cells in our body grow in size, mass, and numbers through a process governed by a master regulator known as mTOR (Mechanistic Targe
1d
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

3D-printet mad skal hjælpe hospitalspatienterInstitut for Fødevarevidenskab ved Københavns Universitet deltager i et nyt forskningssamarbejde,...
1d
Live Science

Do Animals Have Menopause?Female killer whales reproduce between the ages of 12 and 40 years but can survive into their 90s.
1d
Scientific American Content: Global

Nobel in Physics for Detecting Gravitational WavesThe Nobel Prize in Physics goes to Rainer Weiss, Barry C. Barish and Kip S. Thorne "for decisive contributions to the LIGO detector and the observation of gravitational waves". -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Keeping moving -- flat worms shed light on role of migrating stem cells in cancerA new study carried out by the University of Oxford has used flat worms to look at the role of migrating stem cells in cancer.Researchers from the Aboobaker lab in the Department of Zoology used the worms (planarians) which are known for their ability to regenerate their tissues and organs repeatedly. By understanding how stem cells are programmed to move, what activates them and how they follow a
1d
Viden

Jomfruhinden: Nu skal myterne aflivesFor der findes ingen hinde. Og det har heller intet med at være jomfru at gøre. Men hvad er "jomfruhinden" så?
1d
Ars Technica

2017 Porsche Cayenne S E-Hybrid: Not cheap but you get a lot for the money Enlarge (credit: Jonathan Gitlin) Porsche might be known for sports cars like the 911, but today it makes its money selling SUVs. Four doors and voluminous cargo space may not be attributes we traditionally associated with the brand, but the Cayenne has proven it can hold its own in a segment that's extremely important to the car industry. The third-generation Cayenne is due before too long, but
1d
Feed: All Latest

Gun Tech Couldn't Have Stopped the Las Vegas ShooterIn the wake of the Las Vegas mass shooting, a look at the tech that does—and doesn't—exist to make guns more secure.
1d
Feed: All Latest

Google Holds Its Big Pixel Event Tomorrow. Here's What's at StakeThe next generation of Pixel phones could set Google on a path to become a successful hardware company.
1d
Feed: All Latest

As Federal Data Disappears, New Tool Gives Power to CitiesOpenGov's new tool might free local governments from the tyranny of spreadsheets, while making government data more transparent.
1d
New Scientist - News

Gravitational wave discoverers win physics Nobel prizeRainer Weiss, Barry Barish and Kip Thorne share the Nobel prize for physics for their contributions to the LIGO gravitational wave detector
1d
Dagens Medicin

Forsøg med medicinfrit afsnit i psykiatrien Region Hovedstaden får 10 mio. kr. fra satspuljemidlerne til at etablere et medicinfrit psykiatrisk afsnit. Forsøget målrettes skizofrenipatienter med formålet at mindske brug af antipsykotika.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Keeping moving—flat worms shed light on role of migrating stem cells in cancerA new study carried out by the University of Oxford has used flat worms to look at the role of migrating stem cells in cancer.
1d
Scientific American Content: Global

Why a Physicist Is Running for City CouncilIt used to be that scientists were frowned on if they ran for public office, but the rampantly antiscience attitudes of many politicians are changing all that -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d
Ars Technica

Liveblog: Google Pixel 2 (and more) launch Droid Life View Liveblog On October 4 at noon ET (9am Pacific, 5pm UK), Google is having a major hardware event in San Francisco. Just like last year, the event will be headlined by a flagship smartphone launch—this year, it's the Google Pixel 2. This is an event for the whole Google Hardware division, though, so we should also see the launch of the Google Home Mini , a revision to the smartphone
1d
The Atlantic

Why Investors Bet on Gun Sales After a Mass Shooting In the hours after a mass shooting in America, there’s recently been a noticeable pattern: Gun companies’ stock prices go up. It happened after San Bernardino. It happened after the Pulse nightclub shooting in Orlando. And it happened again on Monday, after the massacre in Las Vegas. The spikes in share prices are now predictable enough that financiers bet on them happening again . What’s behind
1d
The Atlantic

This Is What a Real Middle-Class Tax Cut Would Look Like If one takes the White House’s word for it, tax reform is all about a single goal—helping the middle class, not the rich. Gary Cohn, the White House’s chief economic adviser, says the president’s tax cut is “purely aimed at middle-class families.” Steve Mnuchin, the Treasury secretary, promised Congress that tax reform wouldn’t benefit the rich . House Speaker Paul Ryan says the plan’s “entire pu
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Studies of 'amorphous ice' reveal hidden order in glassThe waves at the bottom of old window panes are a reminder that solid glass behaves like a very slow-moving liquid. Now a new study challenges the notion that the atomic structure of glass is indistinguishable from that of a liquid—at least for a certain kind of glass called "amorphous ice" that forms when water is cooled to very low temperatures.
1d
Scientific American Content: Global

Nobel Physics Prize Goes to Gravitational Wave ScientistsThree physicists who lead the LIGO experiment, which made the first detection of gravitational waves, will share this year's award -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d
Ingeniøren

Efter pres fra IDA: Nu fusionerer pensionskasserneDe seneste mere end 25 år har de to ingeniør-pensionskasser ISP og DIP været både tæt på og langt fra at slå sig sammen. Nu siger begge pensionskasser ja til en fusion – sammen med jurister og økonomer.
1d
Ingeniøren

Opdagelsen af gravitationsbølger udløser Nobelpris i fysikSom forudsagt af Ingeniøren i sidste uge går årets fysikpris til storfavoritterne Rainer Weiss, Kip S. Thorne og Barry Barish.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

California animal welfare laws led to higher egg prices, lower productionLaws that changed animal confinement standards in California raised the price of eggs dramatically upon adoption and have kept prices higher than had the laws not been enacted, according to a Purdue University study. An analysis of the laws' effects on egg production and prices in California could inform other states considering similar legislation.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Biologist's new book details a new era in the study of evolutionThree years ago, when Harvard biologist Jonathan Losos settled in at the Geological Lecture Hall for a talk by fellow scientist Richard Lenski, he was toying with the idea of writing a book on evolution. When the lecture was over, he was done toying.
1d
Live Science

Nobel Prize Awarded for Sensational Gravitational Waves DiscoveryThree scientists who were integral in detecting these so-called gravitational waves for the first time were awarded this year's Nobel Prize in physics this morning.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Goodbye to the dark side of SaturnStunning views like this image of Saturn's night side are only possible thanks to our robotic emissaries like Cassini. Until future missions are sent to Saturn, Cassini's image-rich legacy must suffice.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Recluse or not? Scientists use Twitter to tackle spider questionsRecluse spiders, especially the brown recluse (Loxosceles reclusa), are one of the world's most maligned groups of spiders. Everybody thinks they know someone who's been bitten by one, but bites are actually uncommon.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stranded cetacean? There's an app for thatCraig Harms has seen his share of stranded whales and dolphins as an NC State aquatic wildlife veterinarian based on the North Carolina coast. Now, thanks to a collaboration with the College of Charleston, Harms is enabling first responders to provide aid to these animals via iPhone.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Algorithm explains how ants create and repair trail networksImagine you're a member of the Cephalotes goniodontus species, an arboreal ant with a Darth Vader-like head that has inspired humans to call you "turtle ants." You're moving along a branch of the tangled tree canopy in Jalisco, Mexico, following a scent trail left by other ants from your colony, but you hit an abrupt end where the branch is broken. How do you know where to go?
1d
The Atlantic

The Humble Hugeness of Tom Petty In 2015, The Washington Post asked Tom Petty’s biographer Warren Zanes why Petty doesn’t get more respect. One reason, Zanes said, was that Petty had too many hits: “People go, ‘oh, it’s too commercial.’” The other reason was that this particular rock star emphasized music over personality. “He didn’t ever get a trampoline out and do a backflip,” Zanes said. “No, he goes out and plays the songs t
1d
Inside Science

Three Share Nobel Prize In Physics For Gravitational Waves Three Share Nobel Prize In Physics For Gravitational Waves The 2017 Nobel prize honors three for the first observation of gravitational waves. nobelprize_2017_phys.jpg Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Rights information: Copyright American Institute of Physics ( reprinting information ) Physics Tuesday, October 3, 2017 - 06:30 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- The 2017 No
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Writing the building blocks of solar technology with lasersMost of today's technology in solar energy, telecommunications and microchips is constructed using silicon-based materials. However, in recent years, a new family of semiconducting materials, perovskites, has burst onto the scene, offering promise for new and better technologies. The properties of these materials rival many of the well-established commercial options, while remaining far cheaper an
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research debunks beliefs around best way to manage emails at workDo you believe emailing gets in the way of more important tasks at work – or that checking your inbox only a few times a day is the most efficient approach?
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Statisticians develop efficient method for comparing multi-group, high-dimensional dataMANOVA (multivariate analysis of variance) is a commonly used statistical method in data analysis to determine if there is any difference in the means of different groups of data. However, the classical approach is not suitable for analysing high-dimensional data. High-dimensional data often make the traditional MANOVA methods invalid since in a traditional MANOVA, the dimension is assumed to be f
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Producing simple kits for safe water in RajasthanUniversity of Adelaide researchers are planning to produce simple, low-cost, self-assembly water purification kits to provide fresh drinking water in the Indian state of Rajasthan, South Australia's sister state.
1d
Ingeniøren

Ny type vinger skal give europæisk luftfart et løftLaminarstrøm-vinger kan reducere et flys brændstofforbrug betragteligt, og dermed kan teknologien blive et gennembrud for den europæiske luftsfartsindustri.
1d
Viden

Nobelpris til forskere, der fandt Einsteins tyngdebølgerDet er tre amerikanske forskere, der har bevist en af Albert Einsteins store teorier, som får årets nobelpris i fysik.
1d
NYT > Science

2017 Nobel Prize in Physics Awarded to LIGO Black Hole ResearchersRainer Weiss of M.I.T. and his Caltech collaborators Kip Thorne and Barry Barish discovered ripples in space-time known as gravitational waves.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The Latest: Three share Nobel physics prize for gravity wavesThe Latest on the Nobel Physics Prize (all times local):
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers explore implications of excess hydrogen bonding at the ice-vapor interfaceIt is at a temperature of −70 °C that water molecules at the surface of ice make the most bonds with each other. AMOLF researchers, together with an international team of colleagues, describe this in an article in Physical Review Letters published on September 28. Insights into the behavior of the top layer of ice is important for understanding how glaciers move, how avalanches arise, and why we c
1d
Latest Headlines | Science News

Trio wins physics Nobel Prize for gravitational wave detectionPioneers of LIGO collaboration win for finding spacetime ripples from two spiraling black holes.
1d
Dagens Medicin

Slagelse vil rette op på dårlig kommunikation til diabetespatienter Slagelse Kommune ringer til borgere med diabetes for at sikre, at de får de rigtige blodsukkermålere, efter Diabetesforeningens har kritiseret kommunen for dårlig forvaltningsskik.
1d
Science : NPR

They Proved Einstein Right; Now They've Won The 2017 Physics Nobel Prize For years, three physicists worked to prove Albert Einstein's idea that gravitational waves are rippling through space-time. In 2015, they made history as part of the LIGO Collaboration. (Image credit: Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP/Getty Images)
1d
Science | The Guardian

Nobel prize in physics awarded for discovery of gravitational waves £825,000 prize awarded to Rainer Weiss, Barry Barish and Kip Thorne for their work on Ligo experiment which was able to detect ripples in the fabric of spacetime Live reaction to the scientists from Ligo winning the physics Nobel Three American physicists have won the Nobel prize in physics for the first observations of gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric of spacetime that were anticipated
1d
New on MIT Technology Review

Serial Battery Entrepreneur’s New Venture Tackles Clean Energy’s Biggest ProblemMIT’s Yet-Ming Chiang has launched a flow battery startup aimed at making renewable energy competitive with fossil fuels.
1d
Quanta Magazine

LIGO Architects Win Nobel Prize in Physics To find the smallest of the small, it pays to dream big. The American physicists Rainer Weiss, Kip Thorne and Barry Barish shared the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics today for their leading roles in the discovery of “gravitational waves ,” tiny ripples in space-time set in motion by faraway cataclysms such as the collisions of black holes. The existence of gravitational waves was predicted a century
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nobel physics prize awards discovery in gravitational waves (Update)The Nobel Physics Prize 2017 has been awarded to three scientists for their discoveries in gravitational waves.
1d
BBC News - Science & Environment

Einstein's waves win Nobel Prize in physicsThe 2017 Nobel prize in physics has been awarded to three scientists for the detection of gravitational waves.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A prioritised list of invasive alien species threatening the UK's environmentMore species urgently need to be considered for inclusion on the EU's 'List of Invasive Alien Species of Union Concern', stresses a new study published on 3 October 2017 in the Journal of Applied Ecology.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genetic study investigates ways to increase productivity and tenderness of meatBrazil has the world's largest commercial beef herd, numbering over 225 million, yet only 20 percent of Brazil's production is intended for export. Because of this, beef ranks 10th on the list of products exported by Brazil, after soybeans, iron ore, oil, sugarcane, automobiles, chicken, cellulose, soybean meal and coffee.
1d
Ingeniøren

Ugens job: Sweco, MT Højgaard og Dong har flere ledige stillinger På dagens liste er der job for generalister, specialister, ledere og ikke mindst nyuddannede. Find dit drømmejob. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/ugens-job-sweco-mt-hoejgaard-dong-har-flere-ledige-stillinger-10310 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
1d
Ingeniøren

Overlæge: Sundhedsplatformen bringer potentielt patienter i livsfare Sundhedsplatformen hver dag potentielt bringer et ukendt antal patienter i livsfare på en måde, jeg som bruger ikke har nogen jordisk chance for at fange, skriver læge. https://www.version2.dk/blog/sundhedsplatformen-glade-ingenioer-1081250 Version2
1d
Ingeniøren

Halvdelen af Danmarks landbrugsarealer dyrkes ud fra GPS-dataDanske landmænd er for alvor kommet i gang med at bruge geodata i deres arbejde, og målsætningen er, at mange flere landmænd begynder at bruge data fra rummet.
1d
Dagens Medicin

Bent Hansen: Regeringen oversælger udflytning af behandlinger af kronisk syge Det vil ikke løfte udgifter for fire mia. kr., hvis behandlingen af borgere med kol og type 2-diabetes flyttes fra sygehusene, mener Bent Hansen. Beløbet er alt for højt.
1d
Science | The Guardian

'The body is a living archive': Wayne McGregor on turning his DNA into dance The brainbox of British dance is creating choreography from his own genetic code in an adventurous new show. It’s the latest experiment at his hi-tech dance HQ, where the lift changes colour and dancers rehearse in playful spaces In a shiny Airstream trailer, on the roof of his company’s new headquarters, Wayne McGregor looks across the Olympic Park in Stratford, east London. This is not your usu
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Magnetic electrodes increase solar cell efficiencyAn international research collaborative led by the Ikerbasque researcher Luis Hueso has developed a photovoltaic cell in which magnetic materials such as electrodes are used for the first time to provide current. The journal Science reports on the results of this research which, according to Luis Hueso, "is opening up a new channel for converting light into electrical power more efficiently."
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New CEO of Uber to meet with London transport officialsThe new CEO of Uber will meet with London transport officials, just days after they refused to renew the cab-hailing app's license to operate.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists describe the distribution of soil microorganismsScientists from RUDN University have classified the distribution of soil microorganisms at different latitudes from tropical to temperate forests. The results of the study were published in Functional Ecology.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tracking live brain activity with the new NeuBtracker open-source microscopeA team of scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has successfully developed a new type of microscope. The NeuBtracker is an open source microscope that can observe neuronal activities of zebrafish without perturbing their behavior. This is opening up completely new perspectives for science, because now it will be possible to track natural behavio
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China completes construction of steady high magnetic field facilityChina has completed construction of the Steady High Magnetic Field Facility, a project of China's National 11th Five-Year Major Science and Technology Infrastructure constructed by High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CHMFL). The project passed China's national acceptance on Sep. 27th, 2017 in Hefei, Anhui.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New method for tissue regeneration, inspired by nature, described by scientistsScientists have found a way of mimicking our body's natural healing process, using cell derived nano-sized particles called vesicles, to repair damaged tissue.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rare benign tumors hold the 'genetic recipe' to combat diabetesMount Sinai researchers discover that insulinomas contain novel molecular pathways and reveal the map to regenerate insulin-producing cells.
1d
BBC News - Science & Environment

Prehistoric reptile's last meal revealedThe fossil of a marine reptile from 199 million years ago gives clues to the diet of baby reptiles.
1d
Science : NPR

3 Americans Win 2017 Nobel Prize In Physics The prize in physics is being split between three physicists who are part of the LIGO/VIRGO Collaboration that detected gravitational waves for the first time.
1d
Dagens Medicin

App forbedrer kontrol af svangerskabsdiabetes Regionshospitalet Herning har udviklet en applikation, der gør det muligt for kvinder med svangerskabsdiabetes at indsende blodsukkerværdier elektronisk. Det kan spare kvinderne for mange unødvendige kontrolbesøg på hospitalet – og personalet for administrative udfordringer.
1d
Science | The Guardian

Rainer Weiss, Barry C Barish and Kip S Thorne win the 2017 Nobel prize in physics – as it happened The trio have been honoured for their work on constructing Ligo and the detection of gravitational waves – follow the live reaction here 12.41pm BST It was the result we expected: Kip Thorne, Rainer Weiss and Barry Barish have won the 2017 Nobel prize in physics for the Ligo instrument and its detection of gravitational waves, the ripples in spacetime first predicted by Einstein 100 years ago. Yo
1d
The Atlantic

The Gun Legislation With the Best Chance of Passing Congress The federal legislation likeliest to advance in Congress following the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history is not a measure strengthening background checks, banning the sale of assault weapons, or otherwise restricting access to firearms. Instead, the proposals that stand the best chance of passing are ones that would make it easier for gun owners to buy silencers for their weapons, loosen re
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Former Equifax CEO says response should have been betterThe former chairman and CEO of Equifax says the challenge of responding to the concerns of tens of millions of consumers in the wake of a massive data breach proved overwhelming, and regrettably, his company made mistakes.
1d
Ingeniøren

Finland og fortiden inspirerer cirkulært Aarhus-byggeriOp mod 90 procent af materialerne i et nyt alment byggeri skal kunne genbruges mere eller mindre direkte. Det kræver blandt andet betonelementer, der kan 'låses' sammen.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Explosive bursts of methane helped ancient Mars keep liquid water flowing, study findsIn a drying time, Mars may have been kept warm enough for liquid water to remain stable on the surface thanks to explosive bursts of methane gas, a new study finds.
1d
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Sundhedsplejersker bruger forskermetoder til tidlig opsporing af baby-mistrivselForskere på Københavns Universitet får videnskab til at virke i praksis, når...
1d
Science-Based Medicine

Amino Neuro Frequency: Just More “Embedded Frequencies” SillinessAmino neuro frequency treatment uses one-inch stick-on patches with embedded "frequencies" that the body recognizes and directs to the proper area to treat pain and inflammation. The concept of "embedded frequencies" is bogus and ANF is nothing but a theatrical placebo.
1d
Feed: All Latest

Why Tech Leadership May Have a Bigger Race Than Gender ProblemA new study from Ascend Leadership, a nonprofit group for Asian professionals, finds there may be an overrepresentation of Asians in tech—but not in leadership.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Equifax raises breach victim number to 145.5 millionEquifax said Monday an investigation into the massive data breach at the credit agency discovered 2.5 million additional potential victims, bringing the total to 145.5 million.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In hurricanes' aftermath, technology eases return to schoolSmartphone exchanges, social media, messaging apps and websites rendered students and their teachers at once disconnected and connected in the aftermath of hurricanes Harvey and Irma.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Vanuatu volcano eruption threat recedes: scientistsA Vanuatu volcano that sparked the evacuation of an entire island appeared to be stabilising, scientists said Tuesday, although aid workers said it was too early for villagers to return home.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nobel physics prize: A big award often for tiny materialsThe Nobel Physics Prize honors big discoveries involving materials often too small to be seen by the naked eye.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Monstrous crocodile fossil points to early rise of ancient reptilesA newly identified prehistoric marine predator has shed light on the origins of the distant relatives of modern crocodiles.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New report gives the lay of the land on grazing livestock's climate impactAn international research collaboration has shed light on the impact that grass-fed animals have on climate change. Its new study adds clarity to the debate around livestock farming and meat and dairy consumption.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Prehistoric squid was last meal of newborn ichthyosaur 200 million years agoScientists from the UK have identified the smallest and youngest specimen of Ichthyosaurus communis on record and found an additional surprise preserved in its stomach.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Prehistoric squid was last meal of newborn ichthyosaur 200 million years agoScientists from the UK have identified the smallest and youngest specimen of Ichthyosaurus communis on record and found an additional surprise preserved in its stomach.
1d
Latest Headlines | Science News

A baby ichthyosaur’s last meal revealedA new look at an old fossil shows that some species of baby ichthyosaurs may have dined on squid.
1d
Science | The Guardian

Smallest Ichthyosaurus ever found was squid-eating newborn, research reveals A museum specimen has revealed details of the early life of a marine reptile from the Age of Dinosaurs Not all new palaeontology discoveries are made on dramatic rocky outcrops. Sometimes dusty drawers in the back-rooms of museums are the source of exciting discoveries. A new study by Dean Lomax, a researcher at the University of Manchester, and colleagues on a previously neglected specimen in th
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Reduced exposure to bullying could reduce mental illness in extreme preemiesResearchers say meaningful interventions for extremely low birth weight survivors and their parents can improve the lives of preterm survivors and potentially prevent the development of depression and anxiety in adulthood. The study utilized the McMaster Extremely Low Birth Weight (ELBW) Cohort, which includes a group of 179 extremely low birth weight survivors and 145 normal birth weight controls
1d
Ingeniøren

Vagtcentral: Nye iOS og Android-versioner lammer hurtig indsats mod hjertestop I Region Syddanmark kan frivillige hjertestartere ikke rykke ud og redde liv på grund af it-knas. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/telefon-opdateringer-koster-dyrebare-hjertestops-minutter-1081280 Version2
1d
Ingeniøren

Drøje hug fra Datatilsynet til syv styrelsers behandling af data Det står sløjt til med efterlevelsen af persondataloven hos en stribe myndigheder, som Datatilsynet har kigget efter i sømmene. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/droeje-persondata-hug-syv-ud-otte-statslige-myndigheder-datatilsynet-1081279 Version2
1d
Science | The Guardian

Why do we feel so guilty all the time?Food, sex, money, work, family, friends, health, politics: there’s nothing we can’t feel guilty about, including our own feelings of guilt. By Devorah Baum I feel guilty about everything. Already today I’ve felt guilty about having said the wrong thing to a friend. Then I felt guilty about avoiding that friend because of the wrong thing I’d said. Plus, I haven’t called my mother yet today: guilty.
1d
Gizmodo

Do Please Enjoy This Clip of a Boy Who Inhaled a Whistle Whistling When He Inhales Image: Screengrab via YouTube Take it from a wise 20-something : you will, at some point, require medical attention for something entirely avoidable and at least somewhat embarrassing. Just how embarrassing it is may vary, but it’s OK. It happens to the best of us. Case in point: Per the New Zealand Herald , an eight-year-old patient recently showed up to a hospital in northwestern Argentina’s Tu
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Program for parents improves ADHD behaviors in young childrenEffective early intervention is crucial for young children with ADHD, due to the unfavorable short-term and long-term outcomes associated with the disorder.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New report gives the lay of the land on grazing livestock's climate impactAn international research collaboration has shed light on the impact that grass-fed animals have on climate change. Its new study adds clarity to the debate around livestock farming and meat and dairy consumption.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

One hour of exercise a week can prevent depressionA landmark study led by the Black Dog Institute has revealed that regular exercise of any intensity can prevent future depression -- and just one hour can help.
1d
Feed: All Latest

Remembering Tom Petty, Unlikely Video PioneerThe singer-songwriter began the '80s as an industry outsider, and ended the decade as a big-dreaming video star.
1d
New on MIT Technology Review

Constant Monitoring + AI = Rx for Personal HealthAn audacious Chinese entrepreneur wants to test your body for everything. But are computers really smart enough to make sense of all that data?
1d
Gizmodo

Supreme Court Declines to Hear Kim Dotcom's Civil Asset Forfeiture Appeal Photo: AP Former Megaupload chief Kim Dotcom’s long, wild ride through the courts crashed into another setback Monday, with the Supreme Court declining to hear an appeal in the 2012 seizure of his assets in New Zealand. US prosecutors had charged Dotcom with crimes including racketeering and money laundering related to Megaupload, the file-hosting service they said he operated as a thinly veiled
1d
Ingeniøren

Civilingeniør til studerende: Jobmesser kan sparke din karriere i gang Studerende på ingeniør- eller it-studier bør udnytte Jobtræf til at møde virksomheder i håb om studiearbejde eller praktik, mener civilingeniør og rådgiver hos Niras. Han drog ikke selv nytte af muligheden og fortryder i dag fravalget af praktik. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/civilingenioer-studerende-jobmesser-kan-sparke-din-karriere-gang-5399 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
1d
Ingeniøren

Hormonforstyrrende stoffer fundet i pizzabakke: »Vi mangler lovgivning«Forskere skulle teste en ny måde at screene emballager for sundhedsskadelige stoffer. I en pizzabakke fandt man flere stoffer fra EU's liste over hormonforstyrrende kemikalier.
1d
Gizmodo

The Due Diligence Report on Otto and Anthony Levandowski Is Finally Public Then-Uber CEO Travis Kalanick, left, and Anthony Levandowski, co-founder of Otto, pose for a photo in the lobby of Uber headquarters, in San Francisco. Photo: AP Waymo’s trade secret lawsuit against Uber has so many twists and turns, it’s hard to keep up with it all. But there’s one key document that both sides of the case have been fighting over for a long time—the due diligence report Uber comm
1d
Science : NPR

Can A Child Be Raised Free Of Gender Stereotypes? This Family Tried When Jessica and Royce James learned that they were going to have a daughter, they decided to raise her in as gender-neutral a way as possible. It was harder than they could have imagined. (Image credit: Renee Klahr/NPR)
1d
Gizmodo

Russian Ads Reached About 10 Million Americans, Facebook Says Photo: Getty Facebook turned over 3,000 ads to Congress on Monday that the company says were purchased by a now-defunct troll farm with known Kremlin ties. In a blog post, Facebook said the ads reached as many as 10 million Americans and there could be more Russian-funded political ads it hasn’t discovered yet. Although the ads reached 10 million people, they were relatively cheap. Facebook says
1d
NYT > Science

Arthur Janov, 93, Dies; Psychologist Caught World’s Attention With ‘Primal Scream’The father of primal scream therapy, Dr. Janov maintained, not without controversy, that it could cure an array of ills, from alcoholism to asthma.
1d
Gizmodo

Snap Screws Up Basic Website, Blows Lid Off Its Own Surprise AR Announcement Image: Screengrab via art.snapchat.com Snap, Inc., the social media giant behind Snapchat and Bitmoji, launched a countdown clock for a mystery announcement on Monday afternoon at https://art.snapchat.com . Unfortunately for Snap, which has been losing hundreds of millions of dollars a year , seen tanking stock and turned to bragging about its cool augmented-reality hot dog amid poor growth numbe
1d
Gizmodo

Anker's Absurdly Popular Copper String Lights Are Just $10 Per Strand Today Eufy String Lights , $10 Anker’s home goods brand, Eufy, put its uber-popular copper string lights back on sale today for $10 today, the best price we’ve seen since April. This particular set doesn’t include a remote, but at this price, it’s a fine option for indoor or outdoor decorating.
1d
Futurity.org

Scientists figure out how to ‘hotwire’ cells Scientists have developed a method for creating endocytosis, a cellular process vital for everything from cell growth to taking in nutrients, in the lab on demand. The researchers used a chemical rapamycin which diffuses in to the cell allowing them to trigger endocytosis to occur all over the cell. Endocytosis is very important to the cell. For example, it allows cells to import nutrients to liv
1d
Futurity.org

‘Spin mode’ for electrons could lead to new devices Scientists have discovered the “chiral spin mode”—a sea of electrons spinning in opposing circles. “We discovered a new collective spin mode that can be used to transport energy or information with very little energy dissipation, and it can be a platform for building novel electronic devices such as computers and processors,” says Girsh Blumberg, senior author of the study and a professor in the
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Monstrous crocodile fossil points to early rise of ancient reptilesA newly identified prehistoric marine predator has shed light on the origins of the distant relatives of modern crocodiles.
1d
The Atlantic

Did the Las Vegas Shooting Involve an Automatic Weapon? This story was updated on Monday, October 2 at 11:22 pm On Sunday night, authorities said a gunman opened fire on a crowd of music-festival attendees from a room on the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas. The suspect, 64-year-old Stephen Paddock, allegedly shot and killed 58 people in what has become the deadliest mass shooting in American history—firing at a rate that
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Man develops severe liver damage after taking epsom saltsA 38-year-old man developed serious liver damage after taking epsom salts to treat gallstones, reveal doctors in the journal BMJ Case Reports.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study estimates years of life that could be saved in US if smokers switched to e-cigarettesUp to 6.6 million premature deaths could be prevented over a ten year period in the US if smokers switched to e-cigarettes, suggests a study published in Tobacco Control, and those smokers who switched to vaping would live for a collective total of up to 86.7 million years.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Delayed hospital discharges could be linked to rise in population deathsGrowing numbers of adults experiencing delays from being discharged from hospital may have played a part in the sharp rise in deaths noted in England in 2015, suggests research published in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tobacco smokers could gain 86 million years of life if they switch to vaping, study findsUp to 6.6 million cigarette smokers will live substantially longer if cigarette smoking is replaced by vaping over a ten-year period, calculates a research team led by investigators from Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center. In all, cigarette smokers who switch to e-cigarettes could live 86.7 million more years with policies that encourage cigarette smokers to switch completely to e-cig
1d
Gizmodo

The Latest Discovery of Organics in Space Is Nothing to Get Excited About Image: JPL-Caltech/NASA Astronomers have detected traces of an organic compound known as methyl chloride around a group of young stars. The discovery comes as a complete surprise to scientists, but instead of signifying the presence of alien life, it’s forcing them to re-evaluate the source of this molecule and its role as a basic building block for habitability. Methyl chloride, also known as Fr
1d
Gizmodo

Why We're Fighting To Keep The Courtroom Open During The Waymo-Uber Trial Photo: AP Since Waymo sued Uber in February, alleging a massive theft of trade secrets related to its self-driving car technology, Gizmodo and our sister site Jalopnik have aggressively covered the case. Waymo’s claims are damning—the Google-incubated company says one of its leading engineers downloaded tens of thousands of confidential documents before quitting his job and then used those docume
1d
Ars Technica

We’re not on the Enterprise anymore—but where are we? CBS Last night's episode of Star Trek: Discovery was in some ways the true beginning of the series. We finally boarded the USS Discovery and met some of our series regulars, including the cynical Captain Lorca (Jason Isaacs), sunny Cadet Tilly (Mary Wiseman), and tough-as-nails security chief Landry (Rekha Sharma). We also found out what the Star Trek universe looks like when we leave the comfy w
1d
Feed: All Latest

How the Las Vegas Shooter Could Have Gotten an Automatic RifleThe killer shot his hundreds of victims with inhuman speed. That's likely because giving a semiautomatic weapon essentially automatic abilities is easier than you'd think.
1d
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: After Las Vegas What We’re Following Las Vegas: At least 58 people are dead and more than 500 are wounded after a shooter opened fire on the crowd at a country-music concert from the upper floors of a Las Vegas hotel. The motives of the suspected shooter, Stephen Paddock, are still unknown, and though the Islamic State claimed credit for the shooting, there’s no evidence he was connected with the group. He did,
1d
The Atlantic

The Impotence of Blaming 'Evil' For all its use, “thoughts and prayers” doesn’t appear to have produced a quantifiable reduction in the rates of gun violence. Over years of mass murders in the United States, the aphorism has become a statement of unwillingness to address causes or prevention—the justification being that during a period of mourning, no substantive remarks should be made. On Monday, after the country’s 273rd mass
1d
Gizmodo

Microsoft Gives Up on Its Groove Music Service, Says to Use Spotify Now Image: Microsoft Spotify inched a little closer to owning the whole music streaming market today. Microsoft announced that its own subscription streaming service, Groove, will be mothballed and that it’s arranged a partnership to move you Groove-lovers into a safe zone with all your tunes. According to a release from Microsoft, an update will be available in Windows 10 next week that will make it
1d
Gizmodo

Splinter Every Member of Congress Who Took Money From the NRA and Tweeted ‘Thoughts and Prayers’ to Splinter Every Member of Congress Who Took Money From the NRA and Tweeted ‘Thoughts and Prayers’ to Las Vegas | The Grapevine Shannon Sharpe Pulled Out a Black & Mild on National TV and We Have Questions | Deadspin Catalonia Explodes | Jezebel Tom Petty Is Close To Death [Updating] | Earther An Enormous Hole in Antarctica’s Sea Ice Could Help Solve a Climate Riddle |
1d
Ars Technica

Tesla misses Model 3 delivery goals but plans to exceed total vehicle numbers Enlarge / The Model 3 has a more rounded front than the Model S. (credit: Tesla ) On Monday afternoon Tesla sent out a press release detailing vehicle deliveries for the quarter, and the missive carried mixed news. The company only delivered 220 of its new, lower-priced Model 3 in the third quarter of 2017, a far cry from the 1,500 Model 3 deliveries the company projected for Q3 in August, accord
1d
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: ‘An Act of Pure Evil’ Today in 5 Lines At least 58 people have died and 515 have been injured after a gunman opened fire on a crowd of concertgoers in Las Vegas on Sunday night. The Las Vegas Police Department identified the suspected shooter as 64-year-old Stephen Paddock, who is dead. President Trump, who is expected to visit Las Vegas on Wednesday, condemned the massacre as “an act of pure evil.” In the wake of the
1d
Gizmodo

Senate Reconfirms FCC Chairman Ajit Pai for Five More Years, a Big Victory for Your ISP Photo: Getty In 52-to-41 vote on Monday, the US Senate reconfirmed Ajit Pai to another term on the Federal Communications Commission, all but ensuring that his efforts to deregulate the telecom industry and destroy net neutrality will carry on. The vote to reconfirm Pai, whom President Donald Trump elevated to the role of chairman this January, fell primarily along party lines. The confirmation o
1d
Ars Technica

As US launches DDoS attacks, N. Korea gets more bandwidth—from Russia Enlarge / The North Korean border post for the Friendship Bridge, the rail link connecting North Korea to Russia. It now carries an Internet connection for North Korea to the rest of the world as well. (credit: DPRK KCNA ) As the US reportedly conducts a denial-of-service attack against North Korea's access to the Internet, the regime of Kim Jong Un has gained another connection to help a select
1d
Ars Technica

Ajit Pai gets new term on FCC despite protest of anti-net neutrality plan Enlarge / Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai arrives for his confirmation hearing with the Senate Commerce Committee on July 19, 2017 in Washington, DC. (credit: Getty Images | Chip Somodevilla ) The US Senate today gave Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai another term on the FCC. Pai would have had to leave the FCC at the end of 2017 if the Senate hadn't approved
1d
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Watch Heavy D Get Some Serious Air In The Monster Truck Max D | Diesel Brothers #DieselBrothers | Mondays at 9p Heavy D gets behind the wheel of one of the baddest monster trucks at Thunder Alley in Las Vegas. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/diesel-brothers/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DieselBrothersTV https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twitter: https://twitt
1d
The Scientist RSS

Q&A with Michael Young, Nobel LaureateYoung talks with The Scientist about studying circadian rhythms in fruit flies, the applications of his work beyond Drosophila, and winning the prize.
2d
Ars Technica

Microsoft getting out of the music biz, moving Groove subs to Spotify Enlarge / Groove Music. (credit: Microsoft ) Microsoft announced today that it's getting out of the online music business. Music purchases in the Windows Store will cease, and the Groove Music Pass subscription service is also ending. The company says that it will continue to develop the Groove Music app ( formerly known as Xbox Music ) for playing local and owned music (including files stored on
2d
Big Think

Is There a Jerk at Work? Here Are 7 Tips for Staying Sane Stanford professor Robert Sutton offers a slew of suggestions for how to break up negative vibes in the office. Read More
2d
The Atlantic

Google and Facebook Failed Us In the crucial early hours after the Las Vegas mass shooting, it happened again: Hoaxes, completely unverified rumors, failed witch hunts, and blatant falsehoods spread across the internet. But they did not do so by themselves: They used the infrastructure that Google and Facebook and YouTube have built to achieve wide distribution. These companies are the most powerful information gatekeepers th
2d
Latest Headlines | Science News

Cracking the body clock code wins trio a Nobel PrizeCircadian clock researchers take home the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine.
2d
Gizmodo

Welp, There Are 2.5 Million More People in the Equifax Breach Than We Thought Photo: AP The massive Equifax hack just keeps getting worse. The company announced today that it lost personal information belonging to 2.5 million more people than it initially reported, bringing the total number of American consumers impacted by the breach to 145.5 million. Mandiant, the cybersecurity forensics firm hired by Equifax to investigate the hack, completed its analysis of the inciden
2d
Inside Science

BRIEF: A Nobel Laureate’s Historical Hats BRIEF: A Nobel Laureate’s Historical Hats The distinctive head toppers of medicine prize winner Jeffrey Hall are a testament to his keen interest in the Civil War. HallHat1_topNteaser.jpg Jeffrey Hall at the ceremony for the Canada Gairdner Awards. Image credits: Brian Summers Culture Monday, October 2, 2017 - 16:45 Catherine Meyers, Editor (Inside Science) -- When the Nobel Prize in physiology a
2d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tesla reports record 3Q deliveries, but Model 3 lagsTesla Inc. says it delivered a record number of vehicles in the third quarter even though it made fewer of its new Model 3 sedans than anticipated.
2d
Science : NPR

3 Americans Win Nobel In Medicine For Circadian Rhythm Research The work of Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young solved the mystery of how our bodies' inner clocks anticipate fluctuations between night and day to optimize behavior and physiology.
2d
New Scientist - News

Life may have begun millions of years earlier than we thoughtTwo major studies argue that life arose on Earth very soon after it formed, but both have already come in for heavy criticism
2d
The Scientist RSS

Q&A with Nobel Laureate Michael RosbashA basic curiosity about how life works led the Brandeis University molecular biologist to discover how our bodies keep time.
2d
Ars Technica

Overwatch director says it’s “scary” to be open with players Grrrrrr..... (credit: Blizzard Entertainment ) As both a journalist and someone who reads a lot about games, I can't tell you how many times I've wished a game developer could just be more open about their hopes and plans for a game. In a highly personal post over the weekend, though, Overwatch Director Jeff Kaplan lays out just how "scary" it is for game developers to be forthcoming about their
2d
Scientific American Content: Global

Circadian Rhythms, IllustratedA graphic from the Scientific American archive provides a look into the brain’s molecular clock—research that contributed to this year’s Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Equifax warned about vulnerability, didn't patch it: ex-CEOThe security team at Equifax failed to patch a vulnerability in March after getting a warning about the flaw, opening up the credit agency to a breach affecting 143 million people, the former chief executive said Monday.
2d
Ars Technica

Uber investors to former CEO: We’ll sue you if you don’t vote how we want Enlarge / Executive Chairman of Hyperloop One Shervin Pishevar speaks onstage during TechCrunch Disrupt SF 2016 at Pier 48 on September 14, 2016 in San Francisco. (credit: Steve Jennings/Getty Images for TechCrunch ) Two of Uber’s top investors, Shervin Pishevar and Steve Russell, are threatening to sue three board members—including former CEO Travis Kalanick—if they vote in favor of a pending pr
2d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook beefing up team to thwart election manipulationFacebook on Monday said it will hire more than 1,000 people to thwart deceptive ads crafted to knock elections off course.
2d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

9/11 tribute lights could be dangerous for birds, study saysTo humans, the twin blue beams shining upward from lower Manhattan each Sept. 11 evoke solemn memories of the 2001 terrorist attacks. But to migrating birds, they're a potentially fatal attraction, according to a scientific study published Monday.
2d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Insider Q&A: Uber human resources chief Liane HornseyThe revelation came just weeks after Liane Hornsey joined Uber as chief human resources officer.
2d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Securities regulator says personal info was leaked in breachThe Securities and Exchange Commission is now saying that at least two people had their personal information stolen in the breach that happened last year.
2d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study finds new program reduces absenteeism in primary schoolsA pilot program reduced absenteeism in elementary schools by an average of 10 percent, according to a new study by Duke researchers. Chronic absenteeism is linked to poor grades, low test scores and eventually, dropping out of high school.
2d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New Central Park fly species gets CCNY professor's monikerIntroducing Themira lohmanus, a fly like no other, and the most recently discovered species in the popular Manhattan urban oasis of Central Park! The immature insects subsist on duck droppings, and have a strong CCNY connection: Themira lohmanus is named after City College of New York entomologist, and Professor of Biology, David Lohman.
2d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Kinesins ignore weak forces as they carry heavy loadsIf you're the motor protein up front, be prepared to do the heavy pulling.
2d
Popular Science

The conditions to blame for 2017's wildly destructive hurricane season Environment A perfect storm. It’s been a bad year for hurricanes, and we’re only a little over halfway through with the season.
2d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Public health factors may have affected 2016 US presidential election resultsA study led by a Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigator - in collaboration with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Political Science - has identified community health as a possible contributor to the surprising results of the 2016 U.S. presidential election. In their analysis published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE, the researchers find an association between
2d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Balance forgiveness programs more effective at reducing credit card debt than lowering monthly minimAccording to data recently released by the Federal Reserve, the amount of outstanding debt that Americans hold—often in the form of credit card debt—hit a new high at $1.021 trillion in June 2017, topping the previous record set in April 2008 just before the financial crisis.
2d
Feed: All Latest

The Nobel Prize in Medicine Goes to Your Body's Circadian ClockAll organisms operate on a 24-hour rhythm. This year's winners of the Nobel Prize in Medicine discovered the molecular mechanisms that control it.
2d
Gizmodo

The New Flatliners Movie Should Have Stayed Dead Image: Sony Flatliners is a remarkable film. Specifically, it’s remarkable in that it takes an intriguing and ripe concept and does almost nothing with it. Instead, it fulfills the promise of its title by offering up a boring, lifeless story, fills it with dull, unsympathetic characters, and then keeps the thrills to an absolute minimum. Flatliners is, of course, a remake of the 1990 film of the
2d
Big Think

Your Birth Month Can Determine What Diseases You’ll Likely Develop This study may help us better understand how genes and the environment interact. Read More
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Breakthrough cancer treatment brings hope and challengesThe first gene therapy for cancer will transform approaches to cancer treatments, but it poses ethical challenges for policy-makers, as described by three Hastings Center scholars in the October issue of Health Affairs.
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds new program reduces absenteeism in primary schoolsA pilot program reduced absenteeism in elementary schools by an average of 10 percent, according to a new study by Duke researchers.
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Program reduces high ED use, increases primary care visits for most vulnerable patientsResearchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found that a community-based program aimed at high users of hospital emergency departments (EDs), reduced ED visits and hospital admissions, while increasing use of primary care providers.
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

As retirement age creeps up, the health of those close to retirement is getting worseTen years from now, Americans born in 1960 will be able to start collecting their full Social Security retirement check, at the age of 67. That's two years later than their parents, because of a change in the federal retirement age enacted in 1983. But a new study shows that today's pre-retirement generation already has more health issues and health-related limits on their lives than prior generat
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Millions of suburban residents in US lack health insuranceNearly 40 percent of the uninsured population in America lives in the suburbs and nearly one in seven suburban residents lacks health insurance.
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Firearm-related injuries account for $2.8 billion on emergency room and inpatient charges each yearA new Johns Hopkins study of more than 704,000 people who arrived alive at a United States emergency room for treatment of a firearm-related injury between 2006 and 2014 finds decreasing incidence of such injury in some age groups, increasing trends in others, and affirmation of the persistently high cost of gunshot wounds in dollars and human suffering.
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Many hospitals still not using digital patient health informationUS hospitals are making slow progress in ensuring that their providers have access to patients' complete electronic health records when those patients have also received care from outside providers, according to a new study in Health Affairs.
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

After medical error, apology goes a long wayNew research shows that discussing hospital errors with patients leads to better patient safety without spurring a barrage of malpractice claims.
2d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

When HIV drugs don't cooperateThe term "synergy" has gained a reputation as an overused buzzword, but it has a quantifiable definition in pharmacology. Two drugs are considered synergistic when their effectiveness when used together is greater than the sum of their effects alone. That is, a drug that is synergistic with another doesn't just perform a beneficial function itself, but makes the second drug perform its function be
2d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What a rare blood disease can teach us about blood clottingWhen a person is injured, blood clotting is essential. However, once the danger has passed, it is equally essential to stop the clotting response in order to prevent thrombosis, or the obstruction of blood flow by clots. A protein called antithrombin is responsible for stopping coagulation, but about one in two thousand people have a hereditary deficiency in antithrombin that puts them at much hig
2d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study highlights 'hidden figure' of sun-watchersFew people have heard of Hisako Koyama, but the dedicated female solar observer, born in Tokyo in 1916, created one of the most important sunspot records of the past 400 years, according to new research.
2d
Live Science

Tom Petty's Death: What Is Cardiac Arrest?Musician Tom Petty died last night (Oct. 2) at UCLA Santa Monica Hospital, where he had been put on life support following a cardiac arrest, according to news reports.
2d
Ars Technica

Google admits citing 4chan to spread fake Vegas shooter news (credit: Google News ) Google News took the unusual step of confirming its use of the imageboard site 4chan as a news source on Monday. The admission followed Google News' propagation of an incorrect name as a potential shooter in the tragic Las Vegas shooting on Sunday night. A reporter from tech-news site The Outline posted the full text of an e-mail he received from an unnamed Google represent
2d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

World's most advanced shipborne radar ready to set sailIn mid-October, Steven Rutledge will sail to the intertropical convergence zone near the Equator aboard a 300-foot vessel called the R/V Roger Revelle.
2d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New report details innovations in water reuseIn drought-prone states like California, Colorado and others, every drop of water is precious. A newly published national report provides comprehensive guidelines for innovative water-saving techniques, with Colorado State University expertise playing a key role.
2d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Most Americans want the government to combat climate change, some willing to pay a high amountSixty-one percent of Americans think climate change is a problem that the government needs to address, including 43 percent of Republicans and 80 percent of Democrats, according to a new survey from the Energy Policy Institute at the University of Chicago (EPIC) and The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.
2d
Inside Science

Nobel Watch: To Dream, Perchance to Sleep Nobel Watch: To Dream, Perchance to Sleep Research on fruit flies led to the discovery of the mechanisms behind "circadian" rhythms, and the 2017 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine. nobel-prize-2017_medfinal4.jpg Abigail Malate , Staff Illustrator Image credits: Copyright American Institute of Physics ( reprinting information ) Human Monday, October 2, 2017 - 15:45 Jason Socrates Bardi, Editor
2d
Gizmodo

It's Becoming Frightfully Easy to Make Untraceable Guns at Home All images: Defense Distributed Have a look at the gun above. It’s an M1911 pistol, the standard issue sidearm for the United States Armed Forces for nearly a century. The semi-automatic weapon can hold up to 11 rounds and fire as fast as one can pull the trigger. And that specific gun above, it was made with a machine you can buy on the internet. It is virtually untraceable. This and similar han
2d
Gizmodo

Catwoman Has Finally Decided Whether She's Going to Marry Batman or Not Image: DC Comics, Batman #24, art and lettering by Danny Miki, David Finch, Jordie Bellaire, and Clay Mann Certain people just can’t seem to stay apart for too long. Batman and Catwoman have been entangled in a romantic game of cat and mouse (bat?) for decades now, but in this week’s Batman #32 , penned by Tom King, Selina has finally decided whether she wants to marry Bruce. There was once a tim
2d
Ars Technica

A series of delays and major errors led to massive Equifax breach Enlarge / A monitor displays Equifax Inc. signage on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York on Friday, September 15, 2017. (credit: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images ) A series of costly delays and crucial errors caused Equifax to remain unprotected for months against one of the most severe Web application vulnerabilities in years, the former CEO for the credit reporti
2d
Gizmodo

Amazon's Discounting Their Entire Kindle Lineup For Prime Members, Including the Oasis Kindle Oasis , $310 for Prime Members Kindle Voyage , $170 for Prime Members Kindle Paperwhite , $90 for Prime Members Kindle , $50 for Prime Members $20 discounts on Kindle e-readers pop up fairly frequently, but for a limited time, Amazon’s taking at least $30 off every model in the lineup, for Prime members only . The most interesting deal here is the top-of-the-line Kindle Oasis for $310 , or
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Statin use appears to reduce risk of serious bacterial bloodstream infectionUsers of statins, widely prescribed for prevention of cardiac disease, have a 27% lower risk of contracting a Staphylococcus aureus (S aureus) bloodstream infection outside of a hospital, according to a new study in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Researchers report that statin use, especially among elderly patients with preexisting chronic conditions such as diabetes, kidney, or liver disease, may be pr
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New Central Park fly species gets CCNY professor's monikerIntroducing Themira lohmanus, a fly like no other, and the most recently discovered species in the popular Manhattan urban oasis of Central Park! The immature insects subsist on duck droppings, and have a strong CCNY connection: Themira lohmanus is named after City College of New York entomologist, and Professor of Biology, David Lohman.
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

University of Iowa researchers use CRISPR engineering to prevent certain glaucoma in miceA University of Iowa-led team of researchers has used the gene editing method called CRISPR-Cas9 to disrupt a mutant gene that is responsible for some forms of glaucoma, one of the most common causes of irreversible blindness.
2d
Latest Headlines | Science News

Radioactive material from Fukushima disaster turns up in a surprising placeRadioactive cesium is reaching the ocean through salty groundwater.
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New survey finds 21 percent of Americans report personal experience with medical errorsThe vast majority of Americans are having positive experiences with the health care system, but 21 percent of adults report having personally experienced a medical error, according to a new national survey released today by the IHI/NPSF Lucian Leape Institute and NORC at the University of Chicago. The survey further finds that, when errors do occur, they often have lasting impact on the patient's
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The 'myth' of language history: Languages do not share a single historyAn international team, led by scientists at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, has discovered that a language's grammatical structures change more quickly than vocabulary, overturning a long-held assumption in the field. The study, published in PNAS, analyzed 81 Austronesian languages based on a detailed database of grammatical structures and lexicon. By analyzing these lan
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tropical diversity takes root in relationships between fungi and seedsA team led by Smithsonian scientists in Panama exposed a key to understanding tropical tree diversity by studying how fungi interact with seeds that linger in the ground. Despite a smorgasbord of species available to choose from, tropical fungi and seeds are picky about associating with one another. Early pairings with a particular fungus may influence whether a seed survives and also may help exp
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gene therapy shows promise for reversing blindnessMost causes of untreatable blindness occur due to loss of the millions of light sensitive photoreceptor cells that line the retina, similar to the pixels in a digital camera.
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stress diminishes our capacity to sense new dangers, psychology research findsBeing under stress diminishes our abilities to predict new dangers that we face, a team of psychology researchers finds. Its work runs counter to the conventional view that stress enhances our ability to detect and adjust to these changing sources of threat.
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Strips of prairie plants slow loss of soil, nutrients and water from ag fields, double biodiversityA decade of research by the USDA Forest Service and partners is demonstrating that prairie strips integrated in rowcrops reduce soil and nutrient loss from steep ground, provide habitat for wildlife, and improve water infiltration.
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Evidence suggests life on Earth started after meteorites splashed into warm little pondsLife on Earth began somewhere between 3.7 and 4.5 billion years ago, after meteorites splashed down and leached essential elements into warm little ponds, say scientists at McMaster University and the Max Planck Institute in Germany. Their calculations suggest that wet and dry cycles bonded basic molecular building blocks in the ponds' nutrient-rich broth into self-replicating RNA molecules that c
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists find new source of radioactivity from Fukushima disasterScientists have found a previously unsuspected place where radioactive material from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant disaster has accumulated -- in sands and brackish groundwater beneath beaches up to 60 miles away. The sands took up and retained radioactive cesium originating from the disaster in 2011 and have been slowly releasing it back to the ocean.
2d
The Atlantic

What Canada Can Teach Spain About Secessionists “Against stupidity, the gods themselves contend in vain.” —Friedrich Schiller Heading into this weekend’s referendum on Catalan independence, the Spanish authorities had everything going for them. The Spanish Constitutional Court had pronounced the referendum illegal, a straightforward violation of the 1978 constitution’s commitment to an indissoluble union of Spain’s nationalities. A substantial
2d
The Atlantic

Photos From Catalonia's Independence Vote On Sunday, the Spanish region of Catalonia held a much-contested referendum on independence from Spain. The Spanish government had long ago declared any such vote illegal and unconstitutional, and has worked for weeks to try and shut it down. As many Catalan voters tried to go to the banned polling stations on Sunday, they were met by national police officers in riot gear. Hundreds were injured a
2d
Live Science

Why Don't Hippos Get Cholera?Here's why some animals are resistant to waterborne diseases.
2d
New Scientist - News

Artificial organs used in operations without approval for humansSeveral artificial tissues manufactured at University College London were not produced to accepted quality standards but were transplanted into people
2d
Ars Technica

Roku releases five new streaming devices and an OS update Enlarge (credit: Roku ) Roku refreshed its entire streaming device lineup today, updating devices with better processors and other improvements. The company is also rolling out Roku OS 8 to all of the new devices and many older ones. OS 8 adds search and voice control features and brings the over-the-air and over-the-top viewing and searching experiences closer together. The new devices include t
2d
Dana Foundation

Honoring Our Colleague Dr. Barbara Rich This week marks the one year anniversary of the loss of our colleague and friend, Barbara Rich, Ed.D., who led our communications department for more than twenty years. To honor her memory, we are pleased to announce that we are joining her daughter, Marla Hassner, in the endowment of a new “Barbara Rich Award for Social Justice” at her alma mater, the City College of New York (CCNY). This award
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Kinesins ignore weak forces as they carry heavy loadsSimulations detail the mechanisms of kinesins that carry cargo inside cells. Rice scientists determined the motor proteins respond best to strong forces and hardly at all to weak ones, even those applied by motors attached to the same cargo.
2d
NYT > Science

Trilobites: Yearly 9/11 Tribute Shows Light Pollution’s Effects on BirdsScientists used the annual memorial to the fallen Twin Towers to quantify the effects of urban nighttime light on migratory birds.
2d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists find new source of radioactivity from Fukushima disasterScientists have found a previously unsuspected place where radioactive material from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant disaster has accumulated—in sands and brackish groundwater beneath beaches up to 60 miles away. The sands took up and retained radioactive cesium originating from the disaster in 2011 and have been slowly releasing it back to the ocean.
2d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tropical diversity takes root in relationships between fungi and seedsA team led by Smithsonian scientists in Panama exposed a key to understanding tropical tree diversity by studying how fungi interact with seeds that linger in the ground. Despite a smorgasbord of species available to choose from, tropical fungi and seeds are picky about associating with one another. Early pairings with a particular fungus may influence whether a seed survives and also may help exp
2d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The 'myth' of language history: Languages do not share a single historyThe 'myth' of language history: languages do not share a single history but different components evolve along different trajectories and at different rates.A large-scale study of Pacific languages reveals that forces driving grammatical change are different to those driving lexical change. Grammar changes more rapidly and is especially influenced by contact with unrelated languages, while words ar
2d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Evidence suggests life on Earth started after meteorites splashed into warm little pondsLife on Earth began somewhere between 3.7 and 4.5 billion years ago, after meteorites splashed down and leached essential elements into warm little ponds, say scientists at McMaster University and the Max Planck Institute in Germany. Their calculations suggest that wet and dry cycles bonded basic molecular building blocks in the ponds' nutrient-rich broth into self-replicating RNA molecules that c
2d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Strips of prairie plants slow loss of soil, nutrients and water from ag fields, double biodiversityA clean white plastic flume in an Iowa soybean field is testimony to a novel and possibly heretical idea: prairie plants, once plowed under by farmers growing corn and soybeans in the Midwest, yield benefits for farmers as well as the environment when integrated with rowcrops.
2d
The Atlantic

A Presidential Speech Steeped in Hypocrisy Pre-presidential Trump was a man of many faults and vices, but one endearing quality: He was no hypocrite. He exaggerated his wealth, his success, his physical fitness, but he never pretended to religion or morality. Trump’s speech to the nation after the Las Vegas atrocity, however, was steeped in hypocrisy. He is the least outwardly religious president of modern times, the president least steep
2d
Gizmodo

Invasive Hippos, Camels, and Elephants Offer a Glimmer of Hope for Earth’s Megafauna Getty images. It’s standard news to hear about the rapid decline of wildlife these days: As humanity’s environmental impact has surged since the Industrial Revolution, animals have suffered the brunt of the consequences. But megafauna—i.e. very large animals—have been the target of human activity for much longer, and many of them went extinct thousands of years ago, often due to over-hunting. But
2d
BBC News - Science & Environment

Body clock scientists win Nobel PrizeUnderstanding how our bodies keep time has "vast implications" for health, say Nobel committee.
2d
BBC News - Science & Environment

Michael Gove suggests plastic bottle deposit schemeMichael Gove wants views on whether a "reward and return" system would improve recycling in England.
2d
BBC News - Science & Environment

UK's longest-lasting patch of snow melts awayThe UK's hardiest snow patch melts for what is thought to be only the seventh time in 300 years.
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genetic study investigates ways to increase productivity and tenderness of meatImprove the quality of beef produced in Brazil, which could increase industry revenue without expanding breeding area, is the goal of a research group.
2d
Gizmodo

An Earth-Sized Space Shield to Protect Us From Solar Storms Is Less Crazy Than It Sounds Image: NASA Every 100 years or so, our Sun gives off a great big belch that sends an intense wave of charged particles towards Earth. This wasn’t a problem in the past, but our high-tech civilization is now disturbingly vulnerable to these solar storms. A new study quantifies the economic risks posed by these extreme solar storms, while also proposing a super-futuristic solution to the problem: a
2d
Blog » Languages » English

Monthly Stats for Eyewire: September 2017 September, September! As folks went back to school this last month, we completed 61 cells, did an 18 hour 40 minute marathon, and rolled out a bunch of new features and methods of player engagement. We also promoted a lot more sponsored Scouts than usual… could this be the start of a trend? Check out those promos and the other stats below! New Scouts: nilsb Xnopyt muddart guygeva2311 Baraka New M
2d
Ars Technica

Nobel Prize goes to researchers who figured out how our cells tell time Enlarge (credit: Emmett Anderson ) Today, the Nobel Prize committee has honored three US biologists for their role in unravelling one of biology's earliest mysteries: how organisms tell time. Microbes, plants, and animals all run on a 24-hour cycle, one that's flexible enough to gradually reset itself, although it can take a few days after transcontinental travel. The biological systems responsib
2d
The Atlantic

Agnes Varda's Faces Places Is a Work of Art About Art Agnes Varda knows the value of a camera. The 89-year-old director was a pioneer of French New Wave filmmaking and has strived to find inventive forms of storytelling throughout her career. In her new documentary Faces Places , Varda teams up with the enigmatic photographer and visual artist JR to follow and participate in his Inside Out project, in which he takes portraits of regular people and p
2d
New on MIT Technology Review

Technology Could Help You Build an Untraceable Gun. Should It?
2d
Ars Technica

Dealmaster: Get a Dell 2-in-1 laptop with a 512GB SSD for $765 Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our friends at TechBargains , we have another round of deals to share. Today, we're bringing you more bargains for various Dell PCs, bundled deals for a fancy Samsung 4K TV and Amazon's Echo Dot speaker, and a smattering of other savings. Also, at least as of this writing, Nintendo's Switch console is actually available on Amazon. (Yes, it's amazing that we still h
2d
Gizmodo

Vets Are Having Problems Talking About Your Obese Cat Image: Steven Zolneczko /Flickr You probably spent a lot of time thinking about what you named your cat. Maybe you came up with Mr. Felidae Cat-stro, or Meow-gusto Pinocat. Or Meowbarak. Cat-dafi. Meow-losevic. But don’t let your teeny dictator’s charismatic meows fool you. You need to be the one in control of their diet because it’s possible your vet is going to be weird about the obesity conver
2d
New Scientist - News

Kids suing nations over climate change wildfire links are rightA group of children is aiming to take 47 nations to court over links between climate change and forest fires. Science is on their side, says Richard Schiffman
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Checkpoint blockade may be key for immunity to malariaA molecule that prevents the immune system from attacking cancer may play a similar role with malaria. A new study by researchers at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine shows that targeting the molecule at the right time during infection allows mice to quickly clear malaria. Importantly the treated mice also develop lasting immunity to malaria.
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

BU: Few South Africans receiving adequate diabetes careThe large number of South Africans with unmet diabetes care highlights the challenges the country faces with rising levels of chronic non-communicable diseases, says a new study led by a Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researcher.
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study highlights 'hidden figure' of sun-watchersFew people have heard of Hisako Koyama, but the dedicated female solar observer, born in Tokyo in 1916, created one of the most important sunspot records of the past 400 years, according to new research.
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Public health factors may have affected 2016 US presidential election resultsA study led by a Massachusetts General Hospital investigator -- in collaboration with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Political Science -- has identified community health as a possible contributor to the surprising results of the 2016 US presidential election.
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Skipping breakfast associated with hardening of the arteriesSkipping breakfast is associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis, or the hardening and narrowing of arteries due to a build-up of plaque, according to research published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Spanish research confirms the importance of breakfast in the prevention of cardiovascular diseaseThe PESA study shows that people who regularly eat a 'low energy' breakfast (supplying less than 5 percent of recommended daily calorie intake) double their risk of developing atherosclerosis independently of classical cardiovascular risk factors.
2d
Popular Science

Our best non-red-meat recipes for #NoRedOctober Environment Join us for an experimental month cutting out red meat, and do the planet a solid. Red meat is pretty undeniably bad for the environment, so what if we took a month off? These recipes won't leave you wanting.
2d
Ars Technica

WHO’s response to Philip Morris’ new $80M research foundation: Shove it Enlarge (credit: Getty | ullstein bild ) The World Health Organization (WHO) is fuming over Philip Morris International's (PMI) efforts to go smokeless—and the second-hand moves it's using to do it. As cigarette sales decline worldwide, the tobacco giant is scrambling to restructure and embrace potentially more profitable “smoke-free” products. The revamp involves setting up an $80 million founda
2d
Science | The Guardian

The Guardian view on the Nobel prize for medicine: about time | EditorialThe discovery of two interacting genes which make a body clock shared by all living things is a triumph that deserves its prize The nights are drawing in, and with them for many people a sense of darkness and of discontent. The rhythm of day and night affects our health , and our cognitive functioning . When it is disturbed, we are. But our sense of upset, or even jet lag, is just a minute part of
2d
Live Science

Most Important Meal? Heart Risks Linked to Skipping BreakfastSkipping breakfast on a regular basis may be harmful to your heart, a new study from Spain suggests.
2d
Ars Technica

At $50 a barrel, billions in tax breaks keep many oil projects profitable Enlarge / MIDLAND, TX - JANUARY 20: A pumpjack sits on the outskirts of town at dawn in the Permian Basin oil field on January 21, 2016 in the oil town of Midland, Texas. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images) (credit: Getty Images) At $50 a barrel, the low price of crude oil has slowed some of the oil production in the US, especially in regions that are costly to develop, like the Arctic . But US
2d
Feed: All Latest

Bose QC35 II Review: Still Great Sound, but the Addition of Google Assistant Falls ShortBose's best-in-class QC35 headphones get updated with a new button that summons Google Assistant.
2d
Science | The Guardian

Most important meal of the day? Skipping breakfast may be linked to poor heart health Study suggests those who miss breakfast have a greater buildup of fatty material in their arteries, likely to be down to indirectly linked lifestyle effects From the full English to a continental croissant, the importance of a hearty breakfast has long been debated – now scientists say skipping the morning meal could be linked to poorer cardiovascular health. The findings reveal that, compared wi
2d
cognitive science

Creative artificial intelligence that creates like humans do - writing songs and creating art submitted by /u/alexa_y [link] [comments]
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Most Americans want the government to combat climate change, some willing to pay a high amountSixty-one percent of Americans think climate change is a problem that the government needs to address, including 43 percent of Republicans and 80 percent of Democrats, according to a new survey from the Energy Policy Institute at the University of Chicago (EPIC) and The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.
2d
Feed: All Latest

After the Las Vegas Mass Shooting, Watch Out For Hoaxes and Bad InfoIn the wake of the Las Vegas mass shooting, misinformation and hoaxes flooded the internet. Be careful not to fall for it—or spread it yourself.
2d
Gizmodo

The Surveillance State Will Not Save Us David McNew/Getty On Sunday night, a gunman opened fire at a concert in Las Vegas near the Mandalay Bay Casino, where an estimated 22,000 people had gathered for a country music show. Early estimates have put the death toll at more than 58; an additional 515 were injured. When the SWAT team arrived on the hotel’s 32nd floor, they found 19 weapons stashed in the dead shooter’s room. At press time,
2d
Gizmodo

Anker Has a New Dash Cam, And You Can Get It For Just $68 Anker Roav DashCam C2 , $68 with code AKROAV4U Anker’s following up its incredibly popular dash cam with a new model, and you can race over to Amazon to snag one for $68 with code AKROAV4U, the first deal we’ve seen on this model. You can read my original Roav DashCam impressions here , but the C2 model has a few differences. Notably, it operates at a wider temperature range, so if you live in an
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Game time: To increase exercise, study shows gaming strategies and a buddy are keyNew research shows families who used activity trackers with specially designed gaming elements increased daily step counts by nearly one mile per day and achieved daily fitness goals 27 percent more than families who did not.
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When HIV drugs don't cooperateResearchers at Thomas Jefferson University studying combinations of drugs against HIV have discovered why some drugs sometimes act synergistically but sometimes do not.
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Preventing autoimmune disease after a viral infectionResearchers used mice to study regulatory mechanisms in the immune system that prevent autoimmune disease. Using an influenza infection model in mice, they have found that a particular population of immune cells developed during the later stages of the immune response to the influenza infection. These cells, called T follicular regulatory cells, subsequently prevented the generation of self-reacti
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What a rare blood disease can teach us about blood clottingNew research in the Journal of Biological Chemistry yields insight into how antithrombin works, which could lead to treatments not only for patients with antithrombin deficiency, but also to better-designed drugs for other blood disorders.
2d
Viden

Dansk iværksætter: Derfor bliver du fyret af en computerDansk regnskabs-app bruger kunstig intelligens til at erstatte bogholderen. Mange flere højtuddannede vil blive erstattet af kloge computere, mener ophavsmanden.
2d
Big Think

Empathy Can Be Hazardous to Your Health, Finds Study A new study shows how feelings of empathy can be potentially harmful to your health. Read More
2d
Gizmodo

Equifax Was Warned About Vulnerability But Failed To Patch It Screenshot: YouTube/ Equifax Equifax’s former CEO Richard Smith—who “retired” after a massive data breach at his company resulted in the theft of personal information for more than 143 million people—is set to testify before a Congressional subcommittee on consumer protection tomorrow. Smith will be expected to explain exactly how Equifax bungled its response to the hack, and his prepared testimo
2d
Scientific American Content: Global

Wild Dogs Sneeze to VoteWhen an African wild dog is ready to stop lazing about, it votes to go hunting by sneezing. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2d
Ars Technica

Supreme Court won’t hear Kim Dotcom’s civil forfeiture case Enlarge / Kim Dotcom, founder of Megaupload, seen here on Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. (credit: Brendon O'Hagan/Bloomberg via Getty Images) Kim Dotcom’s civil forfeiture case will not be heard before the Supreme Court this term , America’s highest court ruled on Monday. The civil forfeiture case was brought 18 months after 2012 American criminal charges related to alleged copyright infringement agains
2d
Popular Science

Last week in tech: Alexa, tell me about all the gadget news I missed Technology New devices from Amazon, a rolling robot, and our shameful musical history. Looking back on a week full of new gadgets and trips down Spotify's memory lane.
2d
Popular Science

What actually happens when you pull a muscle? Ask Us Anything To prevent weeks of ice and rest, make sure to stretch. Certain muscles are more likely to pull than others, and different physiological factors put them at risk.
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Balance forgiveness programs more effective at reducing credit card debt than lowering monthly minimNew research from Princeton University suggests that relief targeting longer-term debt, such as the partial forgiveness of account balances, has a greater effect on a borrower's overall financial health than strategies concentrating on short-term liquidity issues.
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Warnings on Anesthesia before age 3 -- plastic surgeons get update on evidenceThe evidence behind the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recent drug safety warning regarding prolonged anesthesia in infants and young children is discussed in the October issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Plastic surgeons get tips on managing opioid addiction riskOpioid medications prescribed for pain management after plastic surgery may contribute to the ongoing opioid epidemic, according to a special topic paper in the October issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Shared genetics in schizophrenia and bipolar disorderA genetic variant associated with multiple psychiatric disorders drives changes in a brain network that may increase an individual's risk of developing bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, finds a study published in JNeurosci.
2d
New Scientist - News

Dolphins that work with humans to catch fish have unique accentSome bottlenose dolphins cooperate with Brazilian fishers, probably for mutual benefit, and these animals don't whistle like others in their group
2d
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Risk of human-triggered earthquakes laid out in biggest-ever database Geologists track hundreds of quakes caused by people and the projects that set them off. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22693
2d
The Atlantic

A 1775 Map Reveals the Extent of Human Impact on Florida’s Coral Reefs More than 240 years ago, the mapmaker George Gauld put pen to paper and drew the Florida Keys. The scant frill of islands curls across the ocean, surrounded by minute notations of depth—and surprisingly detailed descriptions. “A great part of this extensive Bank is quite dry at low water,” reads one notation. “This bank is full of Coral Patches,” says another. Gauld’s intention was probably prima
2d
The Atlantic

Two Dark American Truths From Las Vegas Beyond the scores of people who have been killed and the hundreds who have been wounded in Las Vegas today, thousands of other people, though not visibly or directly injured, have had their lives changed forever. Children and parents. Husbands and wives. Brothers and sisters. Something is instantly and permanently gone from their lives. Co-workers and friends. Members of churches or sports league
2d
Gizmodo

Apple Watch Vs. Fitbit Ionic: What's the Best Smartwatch for You? After years of flailing mediocrity , smartwatches have gotten good enough to be mainstream. Two devices released in the last month, the Apple Watch Series 3 and the Fitbit Ionic , are the best we’ve seen. Not only are they both very, very good at telling time, they’re also capable of myriad other things your Rolex or Timex is not. I’ve worn the wristables for the last two weeks, testing their fun
2d
Gizmodo

An Enormous Hole in Antarctica’s Sea Ice Could Help Solve a Climate Riddle Aerial view of the Weddell Polynya in the Southern Ocean encircling Antarctica. Image: Jan Lieser, ACE CRC, Australia An enormous hole in the the wintertime sea ice surrounding Antarctica is attracting considerable scientific attention. Researchers think the so-called Weddell polynya is part of a natural cycle, but its present size—the biggest it’s been since it was first spotted in the 1970s—cou
2d
Scientific American Content: Global

U.S. States Clash Over Donated Liver PolicyThe comment period for a new federal proposal ends Monday -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2d
Gizmodo

Video Shows US Drone Shot Down by Houthi Rebels in Yemen Image: Twitter screengrab On Sunday, a United States-built MQ-9 Reaper drone was shot down in western Yemen, the Pentagon confirmed on Monday. The initial report came from the Houthi-controlled news outlet SABA, which stated that Houthi air defense forces destroyed the $16 million reconnaissance drone near Yemen’s capital city of Sanaa. A Reuter’s photographer said they saw the drone fall from th
2d
The Atlantic

Australia's Lessons on Gun Control On April 28, 1996, a 28-year-old Australian man named Martin Bryant ate lunch at Broad Arrow Cafe in Port Arthur, Tasmania, a historic penal colony that is a popular tourist resort. After his meal, he returned his tray, removed a semiautomatic rifle from his bag, and opened fire. By the time Bryant was caught a day later, 35 people were dead and 23 wounded in what became the worst mass shooting i
2d
The Atlantic

Did Manafort Use Trump to Curry Favor With a Putin Ally? On the evening of April 11, 2016, two weeks after Donald Trump hired the political consultant Paul Manafort to lead his campaign’s efforts to wrangle Republican delegates, Manafort emailed his old lieutenant Konstantin Kilimnik, who had worked for him for a decade in the Ukrainian capital, Kiev. “I assume you have shown our friends my media coverage, right?” Manafort wrote. “Absolutely,” Kilimnik
2d
The Atlantic

How Peer Mentorship Can Change Police Departments’ Cultures Geoffrey Alpert has, since 1975, been researching how police conduct themselves, and one finding borne out in his work is that many police officers see themselves as “ warriors ” against crime. He’s seen that dynamic on display as he’s studied studied racial profiling and the use of force in some of the nation’s most controversial departments, including in Miami and Los Angeles. Alpert, who is a
2d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Evolutionary crop research: Ego-plants give lower yieldSurvival of the fittest is a fundamental concept in Darwin's theory of natural selection which drives evolution.
2d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New insights into leading cause of miscarriage, birth defects discoveredTwo recent Northwestern University studies shed new light on the mystery of the leading cause of birth defects and miscarriage, laying the foundation for further research in an understudied but crucially important field of genetic study.
2d
New Scientist - News

The mysterious bright spots on Ceres may have a common originThe dwarf planet Ceres is dappled with mysterious bright splotches. Their make-up varies with location, but they may all come from the same process
2d
The Scientist RSS

Harald Janovjak Bends Cells and Receptors to His WillThe 38-year-old synthetic biologist comes from a long line of tinkerers and engineers.
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lower education and income linked to higher suicide risks for gay and bisexual menGay and bisexual men making less than $30,000 a year and without a university degree have more than five times the odds of attempting suicide compared with their more advantaged peers, according to new research from the University of British Columbia.
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New insights into leading cause of miscarriage, birth defects discoveredTen to 25 percent of human embryos contain the wrong number of chromosomes, resulting in miscarriage or birth defects such as Down syndrome. The incidence of these errors rises dramatically as women age. Two recent Northwestern University studies shed new light on the mystery of the leading cause of birth defects and miscarriage, laying the foundation for further research in an understudied but cr
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Evolutionary crop research: Ego-plants give lower yieldEvolutionary biologists are calling for a shift in the usual plant breeding paradigm, which is based on selecting the fittest plants to create new varieties. New research results show that a plants ability to be less competitive and behave according to the good of the group could be a key feature in the attempt to increase crop yields.
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Magnetic electrodes increase solar cell efficiencyAn international research group led by the Ikerbasque researcher Luis Hueso (leader of CIC nanoGUNE's Nanodevices Group), and which has had the participation of the China Academy of Sciences, the Max Planck Institute (Germany) and nanoGUNE itself, has developed a photovoltaic cell in which magnetic materials such as electrodes are used for the first time to provide current.
2d
The Atlantic

Why Did the Islamic State Claim the Las Vegas Shooting? This morning, the Islamic State’s semi-official news agency, Amaq, took credit for the Las Vegas massacre, which killed 58 and wounded another 515. The likely killer, identified by police as 64-year-old Stephen Paddock of Mesquite, Nevada, was not known to be a supporter of the Islamic State, or indeed a Muslim of any type. For now, the only evidence that the Islamic State was involved is its own
2d
Ars Technica

Female ex-Oracle engineers sue for gender discrimination Enlarge / Pedestrian at Oracle Corp. headquarters in Redwood City, California. (credit: Michael Short/Bloomberg via Getty Images) Oracle has been sued (PDF) for gender discrimination by three female former engineers who allege they were paid less than men in similar roles. The proposed class-action case was first reported on Friday by The Information , which said it was filed in August. Records f
2d
Science : NPR

How Messing With Our Body Clocks Can Raise Alarms With Health The scientists honored with a Nobel Prize in medicine helped discover that every cell in the body has its own clock. When we ignore those clocks, we increase the risk of weight gain and diabetes. (Image credit: Katherine Streeter for NPR)
2d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

GM to offer two more electric vehicles in next 18 monthsGeneral Motors is promising two new electric vehicles on Chevrolet Bolt underpinnings in the next 1 ½ years and more than 20 electric or hydrogen fuel cell vehicles by 2023.
2d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study highlights conservation needs of fish species recently discovered in Southwest VirginiaIn 1999, a routine study for a pipeline in Tazewell County, Virginia, led to a surprising discovery. Researchers spotted tiny minnows with a black stripe and yellow fins, similar in size and skeletal structure to the Laurel dace, a species native to Tennessee. Further sampling, however, revealed that these minnows were actually a separate species.
2d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Recently discovered phenomenon could provide a way to bypass the limits to Moore's LawNew research has shown that an exotic kind of magnetic behavior discovered just a few years ago holds great promise as a way of storing data—one that could overcome fundamental limits that might otherwise be signaling the end of "Moore's Law," which describes the ongoing improvements in computation and data storage over recent decades.
2d
Popular Science

Cow farts are an even bigger problem than we thought Animals Old data makes for bad burp estimates. It’s rare that an issue is both seriously impactful and genuinely giggle-inducing. And this one is a doozy.
2d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pressure between layers of stacked graphene oxide nanosheets increases with heatGraphene is a sheet of carbon that is only one atom thick, and it has drawn worldwide attention as a new material. A research group from Kumamoto University, Japan has discovered that pressure can be generated by simply stacking graphene oxide nanosheets, a material that closely resembles graphene. They also found that the pressure can be increased by reducing the interlayer distance through heat
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Virginia Tech study finds that healthy bacteria in yogurt may reduce lupus symptoms in miceResearchers at the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine at Virginia Tech have released findings that explain how a type of healthy bacteria in yogurt and other dairy products might reduce disease symptoms in certain patients with lupus.
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds differences in end-of-life care for recent immigrants in CanadaAmong deceased in Ontario, Canada, recent immigrants were significantly more likely to receive aggressive care and to die in an intensive care unit compared with other residents, according to a study published by JAMA. The study is being released to coincide with its presentation at the Critical Care Canada Forum.
2d
Gizmodo

Here's How The Body Keeps Time, Thanks to This Year's Nobel Winning Science Image: RBerteig /Flickr The human body is like a computer in a whole lot of ways. It’s got a processor, it’s got memory, it needs energy to run, it can solve problems, and, uh, it sees its fair share of porn. But it also has a clock—one whose mechanics have only been delved into fairly recently. The Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet awarded this year’s Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine
2d
Ars Technica

Twenty new electric vehicles are on the way, GM says Enlarge (credit: GM) DETROIT—General Motors is the latest car company to unveil plans for an emissions-free future. On Monday morning, the US' largest automaker announced that the next 18 months will see two new electric vehicles join the Bolt EV in showrooms, and 18 more are due by 2023. "GM believes in an all-electric future and a world free of automotive emissions," said Mark Reuss, GM's execu
2d
The Atlantic

If Trump Wants War, He Owes Americans an Explanation Secretary of State Rex Tillerson’s defenders argue that, while he may be an awkward public face for American diplomacy, behind the scenes he has been successfully building support among other countries for President Donald Trump’s policies. While U.S. Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley may be adroit in her negotiations in New York, and a more congenial public speaker, the heavy lifting of governmen
2d
The Atlantic

Trump: 'An Act of Pure Evil' in Las Vegas A somber President Trump mourned the victims of the Las Vegas attack and called it “an act of pure evil” during brief remarks at the White House late Monday morning. Speaking directly from a prepared statement, the president reached for unity and struck a religious tone that is unusual for him, though more common when he reads prepared remarks. He ordered flags around the nation lowered to half-s
2d
New Scientist - News

Methane burps on young Mars helped it keep its liquid waterThe mystery of how water on Mars lasted for millions of years may come down to methane explosions that warmed the planet enough to melt ice and make rivers flow
2d
New Scientist - News

We’re nearly ready to use CRISPR to target far more diseasesForget editing embryos. We’re nearly ready to use CRISPR to change DNA inside our own bodies to treat many disorders, from hepatitis B to muscular dystrophy
2d
Feed: All Latest

General Motors Announces an All-Electric FutureThe giant automaker will start with nine new all-electric models by 2023.
2d
Scientific American Content: Global

In a Time of Hurricanes, We Must Talk about Environmental ConservationIt protects lives and property, and makes places like Puerto Rico far more self-reliant when disaster strikes -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2d
Gizmodo

Uber Board to Vote on Stripping Travis Kalanick's Power Photo: Getty When Dara Khosrowshahi took over the role of Uber CEO from company founder Travis Kalanick, no one thought it was going to be an easy transition. In just over a month, the new CEO has had to deal with numerous major crises left in the wake of Kalanick’s tenure. Now even more trouble is rocking the company and the board is set to vote on limiting Kalanick’s influence. The latest inter
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fast-moving magnetic particles could enable new form of data storageResearchers from MIT and Germany have shown that virtual particles known as skyrmions, discovered just a few years ago, hold promise as a new way of storing data -- one that could overcome fundamental limits that might otherwise be signaling the end of 'Moore's Law.'
2d
Gizmodo

Monday's Top Deals: Instant Pot, Anker DashCam, Discounted Mattresses, and More We start off this week with deals on an Anker Dash Camera , GhostBed Mattresses , dog beds , a $70 Instant Pot , and a free popcorn to snack on . Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. TOP TECH DEALS FREE Wickedly Prime Sweet ‘n’ Cheesy Popcorn with $25 Amazon.com purchase If you spend $25 on products shipped and sold by Amazon.com today , you can add a bag of their S
2d
Live Science

Cloudy with a Chance of Seafood? Fish Fall from Sky in MexicoThe weather forecast for the coastal city of Tampico Mexico on Sept. 28 may have called for light rain; instead, it got light rain with a side of fish.
2d
The Scientist RSS

Nobel Laureate and Laser Scientist DiesNicolaas Bloembergen's research laid the groundwork for the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology.
2d
The Scientist RSS

Nonviral CRISPR Delivery a SuccessResearchers use gold nanoparticles to deliver CRISPR-Cas9 and correct a point mutation in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.
2d
The Scientist RSS

October 2017 TS Crossword Puzzle AnswersSee how well you did.
2d
Gizmodo

The 2018 Honda Accord Is Just A Damn Good Car The humble Honda Accord has not sprouted into a sports car or been reborn as a limousine. But the new-for-2018 10th generation of the car is ergonomically excellent, mechanically tight and did I mention you can have it with the Civic Type R’s engine and six-speed manual transmission? ( Full Disclosure : Honda flew me from California to New Hampshire, put me up in the opulent Mount Washington Hote
2d
Ars Technica

Nintendo no longer welcoming YouTube livestreams of its games Enlarge / Artist's conception of Nintendo's revenue sharing policy for Youtube livestreaming of its games. Nintendo's always-rocky relationship with those that create online videos of its games got worse this weekend, as the company is now barring livestreamed gameplay on YouTube Live from channels that take part in revenue sharing through its Nintendo Creators Program. "Live streaming on YouTube
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study highlights conservation needs of fish species recently discovered in Southwest VirginiaCurrently, the Clinch dace is in the highest tier of the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries' Tiers of Imperilment for all wildlife species found in the state.
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Transcranial direct current stimulation reduces fatigue associated with multiple sclerosisPeople with multiple sclerosis (MS) who underwent a non-invasive form of electrical brain stimulation, called transcranial direct current stimulation, or tDCS, experienced significant reductions in fatigue, a common and often debilitating symptom of the disease, according to new research from the Multiple Sclerosis Comprehensive Care Center at NYU Langone Health.
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pressure between layers of stacked graphene oxide nanosheets increases with heatGraphene is a sheet of carbon one atom thick, and it has drawn worldwide attention as a new material. A Japanese research group discovered that pressure is generated by simply stacking graphene oxide nanosheets. They also found that the pressure can be increased by reducing the interlayer distance through heat treatment. It is an innovative approach for applying high pressure without using an enor
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study from Harvard examines gender differences in obtaining first NIH research awardA study of more than 5,400 instructors and assistant professors at Harvard Medical School compared differences between males and females for receipt of their first National Institutes of Health research award.
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Large, crystalline lipid scaffolds bring new possibilities to protein, drug researchProteins and drugs are often attached to lipids to promote crystallization or ensure delivery to targeted tissues within the body, but only the smallest proteins and molecules fit within these fat structures. A new study reveals a lipid structure that can support much larger proteins and molecules than before, potentially increasing the variety of drugs that can be attached to these fat molecules.
2d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Family Medicine and Community Health Journal volume 5, issue number 2 publishesFamily Medicine and Community Health Journal Volume 5, Issue Number 2 publishes as a special issue entitled 'Primary care and cancer', guest editor: Professor Li Li, UH Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.
2d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gulf retailer Noon.com to ignite e-commerce raceDays after Amazon announced the launch of its first Middle East centres, online retailer Noon.com has gone live in the United Arab Emirates, boosting a rapidly nascent e-commerce sector in the Gulf.
2d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Large, crystalline lipid scaffolds bring new possibilities to protein, drug researchProteins and drugs are often attached to lipids to promote crystallization or ensure delivery to targeted tissues within the body, but only the smallest proteins and molecules fit within these fat structures. A new study reveals a lipid structure that can support much larger proteins and molecules than before, potentially increasing the variety of drugs that can be attached to these fat molecules.
2d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

International competition benchmarks metagenomics softwareCommunities of bacteria live everywhere: inside our bodies, on our bodies and all around us. The human gut alone contains hundreds of species of bacteria that help digest food and provide nutrients, but can also make us sick. To learn more about these groups of bacteria and how they impact our lives, scientists need to study them. But this task poses challenges, because taking the bacteria into th
2d
Ars Technica

T-Mobile agrees to stop claiming its network is faster than Verizon’s [Updated] Enlarge / A disputed T-Mobile advertising claim. (credit: T-Mobile USA ) T-Mobile USA has agreed to stop claiming its 4G LTE network is faster than Verizon Wireless', after the advertising industry's self-regulation body agreed with Verizon that T-Mobile's claim was unsupported. The National Advertising Division (NAD) "recommended T-Mobile discontinue claims that it has the fastest 4G LTE network
2d

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.