EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Leaders of Congenital Zika Virus Program at Children's National share lessons learned with peersThe multidisciplinary team at Children's National Health System has consulted on 90 dyads (mothers and their Zika-affected fetuses/infants). The lessons learned about when and how these women were infected and how their offspring were affected by Zika may be instructive to institutions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain damage caused by Zika exposure in utero can be detected by both fetal MRI and ultrasoundMagnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound provide complementary data needed to assess ongoing changes to the brains of fetuses exposed to Zika in utero.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Two intelligent vehicles are better than oneIntelligent vehicles get their intelligence from cameras, Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) sensors, and navigation and mapping systems. But there are ways to make them even smarter. Researchers at EPFL are working to improve the reliability and fault tolerance of these systems by combining the data they gather with that from other vehicles. This can, for example, extend the field of view of a c
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Benchmarking computational methods for metagenomesThey are everywhere, but invisible to the naked eye. Microbes are the unseen, influential forces behind the regulation of key environmental processes such as the carbon cycle, yet most of them remain unknown. For more than a decade, the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI), a DOE Office of Science User Facility, has been enabling researchers to study uncultured microbes unabl
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Surrounded by potential: New science in converting biomassIn every plant—from trees to crops—there exists a substance that makes up its wood or stems, fiber, and cell walls. This substance is a complex natural polymer called lignin, and it is the second largest renewable carbon source on the planet after cellulose.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Warming unlikely to have major impact on animal agriculture in NortheastClimate change will not significantly impair animal agriculture in the Northeast region of the United States, according to a multidisciplinary team of researchers, who point out there are many variables in the future scenario they envision.
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Science | The Guardian

The problem with Nobel prizes and the myth of the lone genius | Jenny Rohn Restricting Nobel prizes to three individuals has always been problematic, and increasingly glosses over the contributions of everyday scientists Yesterday, the Nobel prize in physics was awarded for the discovery of gravitational waves, following a massive group effort by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (Ligo) experiment. The announcement reignited the perennial discussio
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Neighborhood affluence linked to positive birth outcomesIt's not uncommon for new parents to relocate in search of neighborhoods with better schools, safer streets and healthier, more kid-friendly activities. But a new study has found that living in such neighborhoods before a baby is born protects against the risks of poor birth outcomes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Two agents deliver knockout punches to Ewing sarcomaWhen combined with an already FDA-approved chemotherapy, a novel agent appears to halt the ability of Ewing sarcoma to grow and progress.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gut bacteria metabolism may factor into hypertensionOne in three American adults suffers from high blood pressure, or hypertension. The disease can be passed down in families, and certain lifestyle factors such as smoking, high-sodium diets, and stress can increase the risk. In recent years, scientists have discovered that certain gut bacteria may contribute to hypertension, as well.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Women firefighters can improve safety, but department culture must changeA new study has discerned that gender may be a unique contributor to safety, but hypermasculine fire service culture creates barriers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New cardiac catheter combines light and ultrasound to measure plaquesBiomedical engineers have combined intravascular ultrasound with fluorescence lifetime imaging in a single catheter probe that can image the tiny arteries of a living heart. The new catheter can simultaneously retrieve structural and biochemical information about arterial plaque that could more reliably predict heart attacks.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Designer biosensor can detect antibiotic production by microbesResearchers from North Carolina State University have engineered designer biosensors that can detect antibiotic molecules of interest. The biosensors are a first step toward creating antibiotic-producing 'factories' within microbes such as E. coli.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New portable blood analyzer could improve anemia detection worldwideTo reduce the burden of anemia, health officials need a better picture of the disease's global impact, an understanding made viable by a portable and affordable way to analyze blood. Researchers have now developed a device smaller than a toaster that can detect the level of hemoglobin in whole blood samples using optical absorbance.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Microbial dispersal impacts animal gutsIn a novel experiment, zebrafish with defective immune systems swam and dined with counterparts with normal immune systems. In short order, their gut microbiomes became similar. The experiment was designed to test, at a fundamental level, the impact of microbial dispersal among individuals with different microbiomes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Livestock grazing harming giant panda habitatOne third of the giant panda habitat in China's Wanglang National Nature Reserve has been degraded and lost to livestock grazing, a new study finds. Livestock numbers in the park have increased ninefold in the last 15 years.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Computational study sheds doubt on latest theory of birds' mysterious magnetic compassThe European robin and other birds know where to migrate by sensing the direction of the Earth's magnetic field. Researchers have recently attributed this ability to a chemical reaction that takes place within the eye and whose success depends on the field direction. However, researchers now report that the current form of this 'radical-pair mechanism' is not sensitive enough to explain the disrup
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fecal transplant success for diabetes might depend on the recipient's gut microbesA small clinical trial in the Netherlands found that a fecal transplant from a lean donor can temporarily improve insulin resistance in obese men -- but only half of the recipients responded. Upon further investigation, the researchers discovered that they could predict the success of the treatment by analyzing each patient's fecal gut-bacterial makeup. This understanding could help shape the deve
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New key regulator of acquisition of immune tolerance to tumor cells in cancer patientsResearchers have identified a distinctive epigenetic event in immune cells that differentiate in the tumoral microenvironment and make them tolerant to cancer cells.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Online parent training helps young kids with ADHDResearchers have discovered that brief online or in-person behavioral therapy for parents is equally effective in improving children's behavior and parental knowledge -- a potential game changer for parents strapped for time and access.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Heat-tempered magnesium alloy a strong choice for implantsThrough in vivo testing, researchers have found that T-5 heat treatment of magnesium alloy confers titanium-like strength and resistance to degradation and resporption.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Neuroscientists find 'gatekeeper' in itching sensations plays no role in pain transmissionA neurotransmitter study in mice found that BNP is involved in relaying itching sensations but not pain. A better understanding of pain and itch pathways could help researchers develop targeted therapies for diseases with chronic itching, including multiple sclerosis and kidney failure.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Language gap in plant science now filledTo keep pace with the fast-evolving study of cellular plant science, an international team of researchers has created terminology and definitions likely to become everyday language in laboratories and university classrooms worldwide.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New light shed on Earth's historyNew research suggests that hydrogen, oxygen, water and carbon dioxide are being generated in the earth's mantle hundreds of kilometers below the earth's surface.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Morbidity and mortality of leprosy in the Middle AgesIn the Middle Ages, did contracting leprosy necessarily increase a person's chances of dying? Yes, says a new paper. But it's complicated.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mold contamination in sea salts could potentially spoil foodResearch from mycologists reveals varying levels of mold contamination in commercial sea salts. Among those molds were important food spoilage molds like Aspergillus and Penicillium, and even some notorious producers of mycotoxins.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Durian industry could suffer without the endangered fruit batScientists have discovered that Southeast Asia's endangered fruit bats -- commonly known as flying foxes -- play an important part in the pollination of the iconic and economically important durian tree.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Free-flowing aerosol particles identified using holograms, lasersHolographic images of free-flowing air particles may help climate change and biological weapons watchdogs better monitor the atmosphere, according to a recent study. The images are made by two overlapping lasers that could be mounted on an unmanned aircraft to monitor the atmosphere.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

High-intensity workouts won't work for most peopleAs high-intensity interval training has grown in popularity, so has the debate over whether it is an effective public health solution. A professor says the workouts are not sustainable for the majority of people trying to lose weight and move more.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cell signals that trigger wound healing are surprisingly complexScientists have taken an important step toward understanding the way in which injured cells trigger wound healing, an insight essential for improving treatments of all types of wounds.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What is on the menu for dragonfliesResearchers have discovered which species adult dragonflies and damselflies prey upon, as modern laboratory techniques have enabled the study of the insects' diet. In the study, prey DNA was extracted from the tiny dragonfly droppings and the researchers managed to identify dozens of prey species from the samples. The results shed light on dragonflies' position in natural food webs with an unprece
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Patients' expectations influence the effectiveness of SSRI antidepressantsSelective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly prescribed for depression and anxiety but their superiority over placebo has been questioned, generating considerable debate among researchers and clinicians. In a new study, researchers show that the way in which the treatment is described to the patient can be as important as the treatment itself.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New efficient catalyst for key step in artificial photosynthesisChemists have designed a new 'single-site' catalyst that speeds up the rate of a key step in artificial photosynthesis. It's the first to match the efficiency of the catalytic sites that drive this reaction in nature and could greatly improve the potential for making efficient solar-to-fuel conversion devices.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Studies of 'amorphous ice' reveal hidden order in glass'Amorphous ice' forms when water is rapidly cooled to form a disordered glass-like solid rather than the common form of ice, which is crystalline. Now researchers have found a surprising degree of order in this supposedly amorphous material.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Breaking the rules: Heavy chemical elements alter theory of quantum mechanicsThe theory of quantum mechanics does not adequately explain how the heaviest and rarest elements found at the end of the table function, say scientists. Instead, another well-known scientific theory -- Albert Einstein's famous Theory of Relativity -- helps govern the behavior of the last 21 elements of the Periodic Table.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tiny protein offers major insight into foot-and-mouth virusScientists have identified that a tiny protein, which plays a major role in the replication of foot-and-mouth disease virus, demonstrates a greater level of genetic economy than previously reported.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

First evidence of the body's waste system in the human brain discoveredBy scanning the brains of healthy volunteers, researchers saw the first, long-sought evidence that our brains may drain some waste out through lymphatic vessels, the body's sewer system. The results further suggest the vessels could act as a pipeline between the brain and the immune system.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Twitter a hotbed of anti-vaccine sentimentAnti-vaccine sentiment is alive and growing on social media, with California, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York and Pennsylvania showing the most negative tweets, according to a new 5-year study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bones reveal social differences between the people buried in dolmens and those in cavesArcheologists have measured stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes of the bones of individuals buried in dolmens and caves; the aim is to establish their diet and thus obtain information on their social structure and type of society in the Rioja Alavesa area during the late Neolithic and early Chalcolithic.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Social action may give youth a career edge, education faculty research suggestsWhen disadvantaged youth engage in social activism, they tend to have high-status occupations in adulthood, according to researchers. The findings also suggest there's a place for more discussion of social issues in our educational systems.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Large volcanic eruptions in Tropics can trigger El Niño eventsExplosive volcanic eruptions in the tropics can lead to El Niño events, those notorious warming periods in the Pacific Ocean with dramatic global impacts on the climate, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New method to quantify life cycle land use of natural gasA case study of the Barnett Shale region in Texas, where hydraulic fracturing was first implemented, for the first time provides quantifiable information on the life cycle land use of generating electricity from natural gas based on physical measurements instead of using assumptions and averages that were previously used for evaluation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

House sparrow decline linked to air pollution and poor dietHouse sparrows are well-adapted to living in urban areas, so it is surprising their numbers have fallen significantly over the past decades. An investigation into this worrying trend finds that sparrows living in urban areas are adversely affected by pollution and poor nutrition. The study also finds the birds suffer more during the breeding season, when resources are needed to produce healthy egg
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

U.S. breast cancer death rates dropped 39 percent between 1989 and 2015Breast cancer death rates dropped 39 percent between 1989 and 2015, averting 322,600 breast cancer deaths during those 26 years. Death rates in several states are now statistically equivalent, perhaps reflecting an elimination of disparities in those states.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New targeted alpha therapy protocol for advanced prostate cancerTherapy options are limited for men with advanced-stage, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, but a new treatment protocol offers hope. Researchers report on their novel dosing regimen for actinium-225-labeled targeted alpha therapy of patients with prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-positive tumors. The protocol balances treatment response with toxicity concerns to provide the
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New report gives the lay of the land on grazing livestock's climate impactAn international research collaboration has shed light on the impact that grass-fed animals have on climate change. Its new study adds clarity to the debate around livestock farming and meat and dairy consumption.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Extreme magnetic storm: Red aurora over Kyoto in 1770Researchers used historic accounts of a rare red aurora over Kyoto, Japan, in the 18th century to support calculations of the strength of the associated magnetic storm. The September 1770 storm could be 3-10% stronger than the September 1859 storm, the greatest storm in the past 200 years. The research provides insights that could assist preparation for an unlikely, but possible, future intense ma
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Clumps as temporary storageResearchers have discovered that the formation of protein aggregates in yeast cells is reversible. This casts new light on human diseases that can be attributed to certain protein aggregates.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

To breed or not to breed? Migratory female butterflies face a monsoonal dilemmaFemale butterflies make smart investments, finds a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Astronomers reveal evidence of dynamical dark energyAstronomers found that the nature of dark energy may not be the cosmological constant introduced by Albert Einstein 100 years ago. This is crucial for the study of dark energy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nobel Prize in Physics 2017: Gravitational wavesThe Nobel Prize in Physics 2017 goes to Rainer Weiss, Barry C. Barish, and Kip S. Thorne "for decisive contributions to the LIGO detector and the observation of gravitational waves."
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How tuberculosis hides in the bodyThe tuberculosis vaccine only works for children. BCG (bacille Calmette-Guerin) doesn’t protect you as an adult. Now we know more about how the bacterium avoids being detected, report scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Novel platform for investigating quiescence in dormancy-capable cancer cellsA team of researchers has reported a novel encapsulation approach to identify dormant cancer cells and maintain them in a quiescent state.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New method could help disrupt opioid crisisResearchers have zeroed in on a unique component of heroin that could help zero in on the locations of origin for individual batches.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Earth's tectonic plates are weaker than once thoughtA long-standing question regarding the strength of olivine, the primary component of Earth's mantle, has now been answered. This study has implications for how we understand now tectonic plates form and move.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

An algorithm that explains how ants create and repair trail networksObserving ants in the trees of a tropical forest, researchers recorded how, without a plan, the ants make and maintain their networks -- and how they repair the network when it is ruptured.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genre may impact cognitive training using video gamesVideo games are quickly becoming a hot topic in cognitive training. Many see them as a potential tool to help patients improve their performance and memory, yet little is known about how different types of video games may affect white matter in the brain and cognition.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Random movements help color-detecting cells form the proper patternIn fish and other animals, the color detecting cone cells in the retina are arranged in specific patterns, and this is believed to be important for allowing animals to properly sense their surroundings. Now physicists and biologists have used a mathematical model to determine how the cone cells in zebrafish -- a common experimental fish model -- are arranged in a specific pattern in all individual
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

One hour of exercise a week can prevent depressionRegular exercise of any intensity can prevent future depression -- and just one hour can help, a landmark study has revealed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Prehistoric squid was last meal of newborn ichthyosaur 200 million years agoScientists have identified the smallest and youngest specimen of Ichthyosaurus communis on record and found an additional surprise preserved in its stomach.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New method for tissue regeneration, inspired by natureScientists have found a way of mimicking our body's natural healing process, using cell derived nano-sized particles called vesicles, to repair damaged tissue.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Keeping moving: Flat worms shed light on role of migrating stem cells in cancerA new study has used flat worms to look at the role of migrating stem cells in cancer. Researchers used the worms (planarians) which are known for their ability to regenerate their tissues and organs repeatedly. By understanding how stem cells are programmed to move, what activates them and how they follow a correct path, researchers may be able to design new treatments for cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists pinpoint the singularity for quantum computersSuper-powerful quantum computers, which scientists and engineers across the world are racing to build, need to be even more powerful than previously thought before they can beat today's ordinary PCs, researchers have discovered.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ancient petrified salamander reveals its last mealA new study on an exceptionally preserved salamander from the Eocene of France reveals that its soft organs are conserved under its skin and bones. Organs preserved in three dimensions include the lung, nerves, gut, and within it, the last meal of the animal, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cutting absenteeism in primary schoolsA pilot program reduced absenteeism in elementary schools by an average of 10 percent, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Breakthrough cancer treatment brings hope and challengesThe first gene therapy for cancer will transform approaches to cancer treatments, but it poses ethical challenges for policy-makers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Delayed hospital discharges could be linked to rise in population deathsGrowing numbers of adults experiencing delays from being discharged from hospital may have played a part in the sharp rise in deaths noted in England in 2015, suggests research.
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Science | The Guardian

From zero to infinity: a brief history of counting – Science Weekly podcast Nicola Davis is joined by mathematician Marcus du Sautoy to explore zero, infinity and everything in between Subscribe & Review on Apple Podcasts , Soundcloud , Audioboom , Mixcloud & Acast , and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter Take a moment and think about a space that is infinite. A space with no boundary and extending forever. Having trouble? That’s probably because it’s near impos
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Science | The Guardian

The Earth Gazers by Christopher Potter review – the missions to the moonA new telling of the story of the Apollo astronauts between 1968 and 1972 involves nervous breakdowns, a former Nazi and an atheist church As he approached the moon in 1971 the Apollo 14 astronaut Stuart Roosa played the hymn “How Great Thou Art”. When Michael Collins first went into space in 1966 – he was the one who stayed on board the command module while Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin took the
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Science | The Guardian

Without visa reform, universities could lose vital technical staff after Brexit Universities need technicians from abroad, but the current immigration regime makes them difficult to recruit – and it will get harder after Brexit Dr Hollie Chandler is a senior policy analyst at the Russell Group The case for why UK universities need to be able attract and retain talented overseas academics has been made loud and clear by many in the sector and outside it. But what about the ot
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The Guardian's Science Weekly

From zero to infinity: a brief history of counting – Science Weekly podcastNicola Davis is joined by mathematician Marcus du Sautoy to explore zero, infinity and everything in between
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Ingeniøren

It-direktør: Selv dybt private data om dit surferi bliver lækket før eller siden Lad vær med at stole på internetselskaber, siger CEO Marc Al-Hames. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/ceo-privacy-browseren-cliqz-ingen-burde-have-lov-at-opsnappe-data-opsamles-1081213 Version2
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Gizmodo

An Ancient Evil Is the Ultimate Party Crasher in This Halloween-Themed Short Image: Lockbridge Productions It’s Halloween season—the time of year for costumes, candy, and paying your respects to easily angered ancient gods. Er... well, that last one might only apply to the characters in horror short Root of All Evil —whose careless disregard of tradition earns them a hard lesson in the true meaning of Halloween. Considering it was made in just 48 hours as part of Providen
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Science | The Guardian

'The enemy within': Mars crews could be at risk from onboard microbes – study Mocked-up Mars spacecraft inhabited for 17 months full of microbial life despite adequate cleaning, raising issues for craft design and human health Of the many potential hazards astronauts might ponder on a trip to Mars, radiation poisoning, weightlessness and the foibles of crewmates might top the list. But according to scientists, there’s another potential problem. Researchers examining a mock
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Science | The Guardian

Goodbye – and good riddance – to livestock farming | George MonbiotThe suffering inherent in mass meat production can’t be justified. And as the artificial meat industry grows, the last argument for farming animals has now collapsed What will future generations, looking back on our age, see as its monstrosities? We think of slavery, the subjugation of women, judicial torture, the murder of heretics, imperial conquest and genocide, the first world war and the rise
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Science | The Guardian

Country diary: huge jellyfish shipwrecked on the sands Morfa Harlech, Gwynedd They have drifted on ocean currents for 500m years, pulsing gently towards landfall The wave smudges out something written in the sand with a stick. I imagine it as a spell cast to charm ashore those lost at sea. And so it does, as tides ebb and flow, stranding the barrel jellyfish. These extraordinary creatures, also known as dustbin-lid jellyfish because of their size and
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Gizmodo

Hmm, I Wonder Why Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump Moved Their Personal Emails to the Trump Org Photo: AP As criticism was mounting on President Donald Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner—as well as several other White House officials including his wife, Ivanka Trump —for using personal email addresses in the course of their official duties, the couple was busy moving the emails to a Trump Org. server. According to USA Today , Kushner and Trump “re-routed their personal email accounts to compu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Black tea may help with weight loss, tooUCLA researchers have demonstrated for the first time that black tea may promote weight loss and other health benefits by changing bacteria in the gut.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Two intelligent vehicles are better than oneResearchers at EPFL are working to improve the reliability and fault tolerance of intelligent vehicle systems by combining the data they gather with that from other vehicles. This can, for example, extend the field of view of a car that is behind another car. Using simulators and road tests, the team has developed a flexible software framework for networking intelligent vehicles so that they can i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Health care professional's recommendation important factor for chemoprevention decisionsA health care professional's recommendation was the most important factor driving decisions by women at high risk for breast cancer on whether to take selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Trends, benefits, and costs of working remotelyA new assessment indicates that working remotely is a growing trend, and while it is associated with higher organizational commitment, job satisfaction, and job-related well-being, these benefits come at the cost of work intensification and a greater inability to switch off.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Trophy hunting is unlikely to affect evolutionIn recent years, there has been growing controversy surrounding the evolutionary effects of trophy hunting in big game animals worldwide.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study examines home health care in Medicare beneficiariesAccording to an analysis published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Medicare beneficiaries receiving home health services who are dually enrolled in Medicaid, live in a low-income neighborhood, or are Black tend to receive care from lower-quality home health agencies and have higher rates of hospital admissions and visits to the emergency department than other Medicare beneficiar
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Analysis highlights the importance of pharmacology measures in early clinical trialsA new analysis published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology indicates that 'first-in-man' clinical trial protocols in the Netherlands often lack a consistent consideration of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic aspects in establishing drug doses.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Febuxostat prevents gout flares in recent clinical trialAs reported in the journal Arthritis & Rheumatology, the drug febuxostat reduced gout flares in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 314 adults with early gout.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Virtual reality videos may help alleviate pre-surgical anxiety in childrenA virtual reality tour of the operating room prior to anesthesia helped reduce preoperative anxiety in children scheduled to undergo surgery who took part in a clinical trial published in the BJS (British Journal of Surgery).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Intense strength training benefits postmenopausal women with low bone massExercise is known to be beneficial to bone health but there is reluctance to use high intensity programs in older women with low bone mass because of the risk of fracture or other injury.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Night shift work linked to an increased risk of obesityIn an analysis of 28 published studies, night shift work was associated with a 29 percent increased risk of becoming obese or overweight.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Avoiding meat during pregnancy linked with later substance misuse by childrenLower meat consumption by women during pregnancy was linked with an increased risk of substance misuse by their children during adolescence.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Older-adult patients more likely to disclose suicidal thoughts as they ageSuicide among older adults is a growing public health issue. Conditions associated with aging -- chronic pain, diagnosed or perceived terminal illness, social isolation, and the death of friends and family -- can push older Americans towards ending their own lives. A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine shows that 23 percent of individuals aged 50 and older who died by suicide
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New on MIT Technology Review

Colleges Are Marketing Drone Pilot Courses, but the Career Opportunities Are MurkyAt least 15 community colleges offer them, but it’s not clear how many students parlay their new skills into jobs.
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Ingeniøren

Fire psykologiske tricks til at blive mere populær på arbejdspladsen Jobfinder giver dig fire råd til at skabe tættere bånd med dine kolleger. Det kan løfte både din hverdag og muligvis din karriere. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/fire-psykologiske-tricks-at-blive-mere-populaer-paa-arbejdspladsen-10361 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
18h
Ingeniøren

Minister: Bæredygtighed kan få plads i bygningsreglementetI nye huse belaster produktionen af byggematerialer klimaet mere end bygningernes energiforbrug i hele deres levetid. Nu åbner Ole Birk Olesen for at indfører en frivillig klasse i lovgivningen, hvor disse forhold medregnes.
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Science | The Guardian

Arthur Janov, psychologist behind 'primal scream' therapy, dies aged 93 Janov achieved celebrity with the idea that repressed childhood trauma leads to mood disorders, addiction and even epilepsy Arthur Janov, a psychotherapist whose “primal therapy” had celebrities screaming to release their childhood traumas and spawned a bestselling book in the 1970s, has died. He was 93. Janov died on 1 October at his Malibu home from respiratory arrest following a stroke, said h
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Gizmodo

The FDA Concludes 'Love,' Despite Being Extremely Toxic, Is Not an Ingredient Photo: A Love is infamously hard to define. But according to the man, it is absolutely not an ingredient. The Food and Drug Administration has come down on West Concord, Massachusetts-based Nashoba Brook Bakery, warning it to remove “Love” from the ingredients list on Nashoba Granola, Bloomberg reported . Advertisement In a letter to the bakery, the FDA wrote that it had seen “serious violations”
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BBC News - Science & Environment

The team that tracked Sputnik - and the world's first intercontinental ballistic missileHow a British observatory played a crucial part in the Cold War.
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Gizmodo

Adequate Man What Is The True Home Run Record? Adequate Man What Is The True Home Run Record? | The Slot Trump to Puerto Rico: Fuck You (More or Less) | The Root Las Vegas Is Only the Deadliest Shooting in US History Because They Don’t Count Black Lives | Splinter This Is What It Looks Like When the President Asks People to Snitch on Their Neighbors | Earther Two Looming Volcanic Eruptions Could Slow Climate Change, But They Aren’t Going to S
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Monitoring microbes to keep Marsonauts healthyTo guarantee a safe environment for astronauts on long-duration space missions such as a journey to Mars, it is important to monitor how microorganisms such as bacteria adapt to the confined conditions onboard spacecraft, according to a study published in the open access journal Microbiome.
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Gizmodo

Ongoing Uber Power Struggle Is... Still Ongoing Photo: Getty Travis Kalanick, the Uber co-founder who lost his CEO throne in June but remains on its board of directors, saw his grip on the direction of the company bludgeoned this afternoon following a vote to eliminate the special voting powers of stock owned by early shareholders. Fulfilling some earlier rumors , the Uber board voted to strip certain shareholders, including Kalanick and early
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Gizmodo

President Trump Announces Order For Hundreds Of Millions Of Dollars Worth Of Invisible F-35s Photo via 375th Airlift Wing Public Affairs After distastefully joking to a crowd of Puerto Ricans devastated by Hurricane Maria that they were taking up too much of the budget, Trump later proudly announced in a military briefing that he would be rewarding the armed forces for their relief efforts on the island by ordering “hundreds of millions of dollars” in F-35s that you “literally can’t see.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Monitoring microbes to keep Marsonauts healthyTo guarantee a safe environment for astronauts on long-duration space missions such as a journey to Mars, it is important to monitor how microorganisms such as bacteria adapt to the confined conditions onboard spacecraft, according to a study published in the open access journal Microbiome.
21h
Blog » Languages » English

Mystic Mode Temporary Database Corruption Dear Mystic Players, We are temporarily halting zebrafish reconstruction. Please play on normal Eyewire cells for the time being. While attempting to repair the “seg grenade” defect in the Zebrafish dataset, we accidentally corrupted the parent-child relationships of some of those 421 cells. The accident happened due to insufficient testing of the update script. We have two options. The first wou
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Gizmodo

OXO Simplifies Cold Brew as Only OXO Can OXO Cold Brew Coffee Maker Using OXO’s cold brewer is as easy as adding coffee, adding water, and walking away. The OXO is larger than competitors, but has a 32 ounce concentrated yield to match, and more importantly, the result tastes better than the competition. Cold brewers are a pretty ugly category, and OXO’s take isn’t exactly an Apple product, not to mention the amount of plastic involved.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Bird deaths: Pheasants 'most likely species' to die on UK roadsPheasants are the bird species most likely to be run over on UK roads, according to new research.
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Feed: All Latest

The Yahoo Breach Was Actually Three Billion AccountsTen months ago, Yahoo disclosed the biggest breach in history. As it turns out, the company severely underestimated the impact. Think a billion users is bad? Try three billion.
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Futurity.org

Microneedle patches may one day dissolve ‘love handles’ A new medicated skin patch turns energy-storing white fat into energy-burning brown fat and raises the body’s overall metabolism, report researchers. The patch, so far only tested in mice, may one day burn off pockets of unwanted fat and treat metabolic disorders like obesity and diabetes in people. An up-close view of the micro patch. (Credit: UNC Chapel Hill) Humans have two types of fat. White
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Crash in sea-turtle births stumps ecologists Leading suspect — climate change — doesn’t fully explain what is happening to leatherback turtles in the US Virgin Islands. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22748
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Futurity.org

Oxytocin amps up good and bad social experiences A new study suggests that oxytocin doesn’t just promote positive social experiences, but instead may amplify our reactions to experiences both good and bad. “Understanding how this works in a mouse gives us new ideas on how we could use drugs targeting oxytocin to reduce social anxiety.” Sometimes called the “love hormone,” oxytocin is a hormone released in the brain that plays a major role in so
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pheasant roadkill peaks in autumn and late winterChickens' motives for crossing the road are often questioned -- but pheasants should probably avoid it altogether, new research suggests.
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Futurity.org

Tropical volcanoes can lead to El Niño events Volcanic eruptions that occur in the tropics can cause El Niño events, warming periods in the Pacific Ocean with dramatic global impacts on the climate, according to new research. Enormous eruptions trigger El Niño events by pumping millions of tons of sulfur dioxide into the stratosphere, which form a sulfuric acid cloud, reflecting solar radiation and reducing the average global surface tempera
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pheasant roadkill peaks in autumn and late winterChickens' motives for crossing the road are often questioned - but pheasants should probably avoid it altogether, new research suggests. Researchers from the universities of Exeter and Cardiff compared roadkill figures from the 1960s and 2010s - before and after the start of mass release programmes of pheasants for shooting - and found pheasants remain disproportionately likely to be run over comp
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Live Science

Life on Earth May Have Started with a Cosmic SplashCould the building blocks for life on Earth have been delivered by meteorites crashing into ponds of water 4 billion years ago?
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Futurity.org

Chronic bronchitis has been mysterious until now Researchers have found that people with chronic bronchitis have an abnormally high concentration of mucins—the proteins that make mucus thick. They’ve also found that high mucin concentrations are also associated with disease severity in patients with chronic bronchitis. The findings could become the first-ever objective marker of chronic bronchitis and lead to the creation of diagnostic and prog
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Ars Technica

iOS 11.0.2 arrives to address the crackling iPhone 8 audio problem Enlarge / The glass back of the iPhone 8. (credit: Samuel Axon) Apple has made iOS 11.0.2 available on supported iPhones, iPads and iPods. It's the second update since the launch of iOS 11 on September 19. Like 11.0.1, it aims to fix some problems that users have complained about. Among them is the iPhone 8 crackling audio problem. If that's something you've been experiencing, you can download th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vitamin D protects against severe asthma attacksTaking oral vitamin D supplements in addition to standard asthma medication could halve the risk of asthma attacks requiring hospital attendance, according to research led by Queen Mary University of London.
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Gizmodo

Okay, Maybe This Microsoft VR Thing Won't Suck All images: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo VR, like that one cousin on Facebook, can be hard to love. The potential is there, and you have all these fond memories—mainly rooted in cool science fiction books you’ve read, but in reality VR is pricey, buggy, and kind of limited to one experience: games. Yet Microsoft has been making a lot of low key noise about VR, AR, and the mixed reality recently, and how it
23h
Big Think

Einstein’s Gravitational Theory Leads to Nobel Prize Win for Scientists Who Proved It These scientists scooped up the Nobel by detecting a ripple in space-time. Read More
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Ars Technica

After Kushner’s private e-mail became known, it moved to Trump Org servers Enlarge / Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner on the South Lawn of the White House. (credit: Win McNamee/Getty Images ) Days after recent revelations that Jared Kushner, a presidential advisor and the president's son-in-law, had set up a personal e-mail account to conduct White House business, someone with access to that domain (ijkfamily.com) changed the domain’s mail exchange (MX) records so that th
23h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Atrocity's Aftermath What We’re Following Las Vegas: As the investigation of Sunday’s massacre continues, the possible motives of the shooter remain unclear. He wasn’t known to belong to extremist groups, and had no criminal record or diagnosed mental illnesses. Late-night hosts struggled to make sense of the tragedy with despairing monologues , while Las Vegas schools sought to comfort kids by bringing them back to
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Ars Technica

Every Yahoo account that existed—all 3 billion—was compromised in 2013 hack (credit: Photograph by Randy Stewart ) Yahoo said a major security breach in 2013 compromised all three billion accounts the company maintained, a three-fold increase over the estimate it disclosed previously. The revelation, contained in an updated page about the 2013 hack , is the result of new information and the forensic analysis of an unnamed security consultant. Previously, Yahoo officials
23h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

The Kellys Don't Fight... They Just Have An Unusual Way Of Debating. #BeringSeaGold | Fridays at 9p Kris Kelly has a favorite F-word, but you can bet it's not "family" or "father." Full Episodes Streaming FREE: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/bering-sea-gold/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BeringSeaGold https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery Fr
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Gizmodo

IRS Awards Equifax $7.25 Million No-Bid Contract to Help 'Verify Taxpayer Identities' [Updated] Former Equifax CEO Richard Smith testifying before the House Energy and Commerce subcommittee on Tuesday. (Photo: AP) EFF co-founder John Perry Barlow once said that asking the government to protect your privacy is like asking a peeping tom to install your window blinds. The Internal Revenue Service, it seems, has taken this warning as a recommendation. With no apparent sense of irony, the nation
23h
Ars Technica

Another Windows VR headset enters the fray with Samsung Odyssey Enlarge / Samsung Odyssey headset and motion controllers. (credit: Samsung ) Microsoft announced Tuesday that yet another company is going to build a virtual reality headset for its Windows Mixed Reality platform: Samsung. The Odyssey headset looks to be a cut above the other headsets from Acer, Asus, Dell, HP, and Lenovo: its dual-AMOLED screens are slightly higher resolution, at 1400×1600 rathe
23h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Trump's Puerto Rico Visit Today in 5 Lines President Trump visited hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico, where he compared the island’s death toll to that of “a real catastrophe like Katrina.” During a press conference addressing Sunday night’s massacre in Las Vegas, House Speaker Paul Ryan said “mental health reform is a critical ingredient” to preventing future mass shootings. The House voted on a bill banning abortions after
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Gizmodo

Watching a VHS Tape Melt Is Like Seeing Obsolescence Happen in Real Time GIF GIF Source: Amazing Timelapse According to the folks who made this video of a melting VHS tape , it took 160 hours in an acetone vapor bath to liquify the relic of the Blockbuster age. 20,000 photos later, we have a visual record of the process. And while it starts out a little slow, the footage eventually hit all of my internet video pleasure zones. VHS tape nostalgia? Check. Gloopy transfor
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Feed: All Latest

6 Fresh Horrors From Equifax CEO Richard Smith's Congressional HearingWith each new revelation about the devastating Equifax breach, the company's defenses and response appear increasingly inadequate.
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Ars Technica

IRS awards Equifax no-bid, $7.25 million contract after hack Enlarge (credit: Smith Collection Gado/Getty Images) Just because your resume says you exposed the personal data, including Social Security numbers, of some 143 million Americans while practicing unsafe security, it doesn't mean you can't score a multi-million dollar contract with the Internal Revenue Service. That's the case even if your name is Equifax and you're being contracted by the IRS to
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Live Science

Facts About TitaniumProperties, uses and sources of the element titanium.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists bring new insights into the heritability of HIV infection severityUsing a population of HIV-1 infected individuals (the 2014 Swiss HIV Cohort Study data), an international research team of 17 institutions, led by ETH Zurich's Roland Regoes of the Institute of Integrative Biology, has now examined all aspects of HIV virulence, with a particular focus on how it ravages the human immune system.
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Popular Science

Deep dive: How exactly the Apple Watch tracks swimming Technology Measuring motion in the water is complex. This is how Apple’s wearable does it. We spoke with an Apple executive and an engineer for an inside look at how the Apple Watch tracks swimming.
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Gizmodo

How to Find Your Lost Phone Using Amazon Echo or Google Home NBD Photos / Flickr If you have either the Echo from Amazon or the Google Home device, you likely already use it to play music, get news updates, and ask for information about the weather, but thanks to integration with the If This Then That (IFTTT) platform, you can do much more—including finding your phone when it’s lost. Setting up either device to ring your phone when it’s fallen into the Ber
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Inside Science

The Past, Present and Future of Gravitational Waves The Past, Present and Future of Gravitational Waves A 100-year-old theory helped open up a brand-new world of astronomy. LIGO2_topNteaser.jpg An artist's rendering of the LISA satellite. Image credits: AEI/Milde Marketing/Exozet Space Tuesday, October 3, 2017 - 16:45 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- The 2017 Nobel Prize in physics recognized three scientists for paving the way to the fi
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Live Science

Diet of Lamb and Cheerios Leads to Boy's Vision LossOne boy's vision problems and odd changes to his eyes turned out to be caused by a highly restrictive diet, according to a new report of the boy's case from Canada.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists bring new insights into the heritability of HIV infection severityHIV's pernicious persistence in human populations—despite more than 25 years of heroic HIV research efforts —owes in part to its particular abilities to exploit its human hosts, constantly adapting and mutating to enhance its infectiousness and virulence.
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Ars Technica

White House wants to end Social Security numbers as a national ID Enlarge (credit: DonkeyHotey ) Rob Joyce, the White House cybersecurity czar, said on Tuesday that the government should end using the Social Security number as a national identification method. "I believe the Social Security number has outlived its usefulness," said Joyce, while speaking at The Washington Post 's Cybersecurity Summit. "Every time we use the Social Security number, you put it at
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Science : NPR

Brain's Link To Immune System Might Help Explain Alzheimer's For centuries, scientists thought the human brain had no direct connection to the body's immune system. Now researchers seem to have found one, and say it may offer clues to multiple sclerosis, too. (Image credit: Alfred Pasieka/Science Source)
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Gizmodo

All 3 Billion Yahoo Accounts Affected in Catastrophic Breach Image: Getty The Yahoo breach was already considered to be the largest known hack of user data when it was counted at 1 billion affected accounts . Now, that record-breaking breach has tripled in size. All Yahoo accounts were affected by a catastrophic breach in 2013, the company confirmed today . Yahoo had previously placed the total at over one billion and has now updated it to a stunning three
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Science : NPR

Nobel Prize Came Quickly For 3 Physicists Who Discovered Gravitational Waves Three scientists won this year's Nobel Prize in Physics for their discovery of gravitational waves. These ripples in space and time are generated when really big things, like black holes, collide.
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The Atlantic

Mass Shootings Don't Lead to Inaction—They Lead to Loosening Gun Restrictions “After Newtown, nothing changed, so don’t expect anything to change after Las Vegas.” How often have you heard that said? Yet it’s not true. The five years since a gunman killed 26 at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, have seen one of the most intense bursts of gun legislation in U.S. history—almost all of it intended to ensure that more guns can be carried into more places. I
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Dana Foundation

BraiNY Neuroscience in Downtown NYC On Friday, one of NYC’s newest venues in the Lower East Side opened its doors to science enthusiasts and curious bystanders for an evening of happy hour and brain-related activities. The aptly titled event, “Pregame Your BraiNY,” took place at CAVEAT , which launched just over a month ago as an event space devoted to intellectual nightlife and “oddball programming.” Photo credit: Kate Downey With
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Gizmodo

Puerto Rico Is on the Brink of a Terrifying Public Health Crisis Image: AP When Hurricane Maria struck Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands as a Category 4 storm this past month, it immediately brought devastation from winds, flooding, and storm surge to many Americans. The entire island lost electricity. While there’s been some recovery to the power grid and shorter gas lines, the next concern is more sinister. News agencies report that patients are dying pr
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Ars Technica

Total War: Warhammer 2 Review: The weight of the New World Enlarge / The Lizardmen's "Geomantic Web" bonuses make them into fantasy landlords. (credit: Creative Assembly ) At release, Total War: Warhammer seriously benefitted from untying the strategy series from its historical roots. The wildly varied Warhammer fantasy universe allowed each of the game's factions to be unique—not just in terms of starting map location and slight differences to cavalry c
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Scientific American Content: Global

Biological Clock Prize Shows Much "Nobel-Quality" Work Goes UncreditedFor all their good intentions, the current Nobel Prize rules fall short in honoring scientists whose work underpins and expands that of those designated as laureates -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Do mothers favor daughters and fathers favor sons?New research shows that mothers are more likely to spend money on daughters and fathers are more likely to spend on sons -- despite the fact that parents think they are spending equally.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Benchmarking computational methods for metagenomesTo tackle assembling metagenomes, then binning these consensus regions into genome bins, and finally conducting taxonomic profiling, analysts around the world have developed an array of different computational tools, but until now there was a lack of consensus on how to evaluate their performance. In Nature Methods, a team including DOE JGI researchers described the results of the Critical Assessm
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Warming unlikely to have major impact on animal agriculture in NortheastClimate change will not significantly impair animal agriculture in the Northeast region of the United States, according to a multidisciplinary team of researchers, who point out there are many variables in the future scenario they envision.
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The Atlantic

Civil-Rights Protests Have Never Been Popular One common response to the national anthem protests originated by Colin Kaepernick is to disparage them as polarizing. Joe Scarborough, host of Morning Joe , summed up this particular critique in a tweet last weekend: This may be unpopular but it is a political reality: Every NFL player refusing to stand for the national anthem helps Trump politically. — Joe Scarborough (@JoeNBC) September 24, 20
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Live Science

Psychokinesis: Facts About Mind Over MatterScientific evidence for the psychic ability to move objects or bend spoons remains elusive.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Surrounded by potential: New science in converting biomassTo take full advantage of biomass, lignin needs to be processed into usable components along with the plant cellulose. Currently, that process requires an acid plus high heat, or pyrolysis -- treating with high heat in the absence of oxygen. Besides being energy-consuming processing methods, the results are less than optimal. Ames Laboratory scientists are working to develop a method to deconstruc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ammonia emissions unlikely to be causing extreme China hazeAs China struggles to find ways to remedy the noxious haze that lingers over Beijing and other cities in the winter, researchers from Georgia Institute of Technology have cast serious doubt on one proposed cause: high levels of ammonia in the air.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists think public opinion important before human gene editingThe public should be consulted before gene editing is used to treat human embryos, a survey of 300 cardiovascular researchers finds. The majority of respondents support gene editing to treat diseases but not for human enhancement.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Adverse events spike after blood pressure meds go generic in CanadaOne month after generic versions of three widely-used blood pressure drugs became available in Canada, hospital visits for adverse events spiked in generic drug users. The findings suggest that generic versions of the drugs may not be exactly equivalent to their brand-name counterparts, but more research is necessary, researchers said.
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Viden

Microsoft går all-in på rejser i tid og stedFirmaet bag Windows vil ikke risikere igen at blive sat af ræset, som de gjorde i den mobile æra. Nu satser Microsoft på at blive førende inden for VR og AR.
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Ars Technica

Judge blasts Waymo v. Uber lawyers, delays trial until December Enlarge / Uber CEO Travis Kalanick delivering a speech last year in Beijing. Kalanick is likely to be on the stand if Waymo v. Uber goes to trial. (credit: Wang K'aichicn/VCG/VCG via Getty Images ) SAN FRANCISCO—The federal judge presiding in the Waymo v. Uber lawsuit has delayed trial for another two months after castigating lawyers on both sides of the case for being dishonest and telling "half
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

The magic of Khmer classical dance | Prumsodun OkFor more than 1,000 years, Khmer dancers in Cambodia have been seen as living bridges between heaven and earth. In this graceful dance-talk hybrid, artist Prumsodun Ok -- founder of Cambodia's first all-male and gay-identified dance company -- details the rich history of Khmer classical dance and its current revival, playing the ancient and ageless role of artist as messenger.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sputnik, the tiny sphere that launched the space race (Update)When the Soviet Union launched the first artificial satellite 60 years ago, it marked both the beginning of space exploration and the start of a race between Moscow and Washington.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Seeing double: Scientists find elusive giant black hole pairsAstronomers have identified a bumper crop of dual supermassive black holes in the centers of galaxies. This discovery could help astronomers better understand how giant black holes grow and how they may produce the strongest gravitational wave signals in the Universe.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New information on a major player in chronic visceral leishmaniasisIn an article in the latest issue of PLOS Pathogens, INRS professor Simona Stäger and her team show how the parasite Leishmania donovani uses a physiological response to low oxygen levels (hypoxia) to establish a chronic infection.
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Ars Technica

Code-execution flaws threaten users of routers, Linux, and other OSes Enlarge (credit: Christiaan Colen ) Google researchers have discovered at least three software bugs in a widely used software package that may allow hackers to execute malicious code on vulnerable devices running Linux, FreeBSD, OpenBSD, NetBSD, and macOS, as well as proprietary firmware. Dnsmasq , as the package is known, provides code that makes it easier for networked devices to communicate us
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Live Science

Einstein Would Be 'Flabbergasted' by Gravitational Wave NobelEinstein would be pleased — but flabbergasted — to hear the details of humanity's first direct detection of gravitational waves, according to one of three new Nobel winners for the discovery.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A growing problem: Lightening the carbon footprint of cannabis farmsConsider a typical cannabis farmer, growing an indoor crop.
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The Atlantic

Returning to Class the Morning After a Massacre Clark County School District, which serves Las Vegas and surrounding cities, held classes the day after the deadliest mass shooting in modern American history. The attack killed 59 people at a country-music festival in the city, and injured more than 520 others. “Law enforcement has cleared us to have school today, but students & employees directly affected by the tragedy on The Strip will be exc
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The Atlantic

One Year After Its Fake-Accounts Scandal, Wells Fargo Isn't 'A Better Bank' On Tuesday, Wells Fargo’s CEO, Tim Sloan, was summoned by the Senate Banking Committee to report changes the bank has made in the aftermath of a fake-accounts scandal that saddled customers with unauthorized fees and charges. * Sloan told the committee that the bank was “a better bank today than it was a year ago.” Sloan’s claim about the progress that Wells Fargo has made is in many ways at odds
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The Atlantic

Tom Petty's Psychedelic Curveball Triumph Tom Petty, fairly or not, is often talked about as a voice for the center, someone whose music is like the point where all the tangled roads on the map of rock-and-roll history meet. His signature song is a vision of universal American feeling, and so are many of his other hits. He didn’t provoke, he didn’t confuse, he didn’t alienate. As the wave of remembrances following his death at 66 have at
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Gizmodo

There's a Pro Version of the Insanely Popular Philips OneBlade, and It's $10 Off Right Now Philips OneBlade Pro , $70 The Philips OneBlade is the shaver of choice for all the men on our staff , and one of the most popular products we’ve ever listed , but Philips recently raised the bar with the release of the OneBlade Pro . First, let’s talk about what’s unchanged from the original OneBlade. The Pro still uses the same blades which last for four months (I’m going on six months with my
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Explainer: Why gravitational wave researchers won a NobelThree U.S.-based astrophysicists won the Nobel prize in physics Tuesday for their discovery of gravitational waves, a phenomenon Albert Einstein predicted a century ago in his theory of general relativity. Here's what their discovery means and why they won the prize worth $1.1 million (9 million kronor).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'CRISPR-Gold' fixes Duchenne muscular dystrophy mutation in miceScientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have engineered a new way to deliver CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing technology inside cells and have demonstrated in mice that the technology can repair the mutation that causes Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a severe muscle-wasting disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Got a picky eater? How 'nature and nurture' may be influencing eating behavior in young childrenNutrition and family studies researchers at the University of Illinois have collaborated for the last 10 years to understand the characteristics of picky eaters and to identify possible correlations of the behavior. In a new study, they wanted to see if chemosensory genes might have a possible relationship to picky eating behavior in young children. They found that certain genes related to taste p
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New on MIT Technology Review

Human Legacies When Robots Rule the EarthMachines have been displacing humans on job tasks for several centuries, and for seventy years many of these machines have been controlled by computers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microsoft touts VR headsets that pair with Windows 10Microsoft is touting virtual reality headsets made by other companies in hopes of establishing personal computers running on its Windows 10 operating system as the best way for people to experience artificial worlds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Saudi Arabia opens bid for 'utility scale' solar projectSaudi Arabia invited bids on Tuesday for a "utility-scale" 300-megawatt solar project, a first for the world's top oil exporter.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Former Intel chief Paul Otellini diesIntel on Tuesday announced that former chief executive Paul Otellini died in his sleep a day earlier, at the age of 66.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Designer biosensor can detect antibiotic production by microbesResearchers from North Carolina State University have engineered designer biosensors that can detect antibiotic molecules of interest. The biosensors are a first step toward creating antibiotic-producing "factories" within microbes such as E. coli.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Trastuzumab treatment need not delay breast reconstruction following mastectomyTreatment with trastuzumab (Herceptin/Genentech) of breast cancers that express the HER-2 protein does not increase the risk for complications at the surgical site for women who undergo immediate breast reconstruction after mastectomy. The first study to assess the effect of trastuzumab on surgical wound complications indicates that breast reconstruction need not be delayed because of the type or
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Health researchers visualize a life in silicoProgramming a molecular biology experiment can be similar to playing Sudoku; both are simple if you're working with only a few molecules or a small grid, but they explode in complexity as they grow. Now, in a paper published on Oct. 3 in the Biophysical Journal, researchers at UConn Health's Virtual Cell Project (vcell.org) have made it far easier for cell biologists to build complex biological mo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Women firefighters can improve safety, but department culture must changeIncorporating new ideas from women can improve safety in traditionally male fire departments, but the hypermasculine culture in some can make female firefighters feel unwelcome and less likely to share their ideas, according to a new qualitative study from Drexel University.
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The Scientist RSS

Artificial Tissues Implanted Without Regulatory Approval, Investigation ReportsTissue recipients were treated as 'guinea pigs,' says investigation leader.
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Popular Science

When a hurricane finally passes, it spreads deadly disease in its wake Environment The end of a storm can spell the beginning of a disaster. The destruction can continue long after the storm has passed.
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The Atlantic

The Uses and Misuses of Historical Analogy for North Korea Amid a steady fusillade of ever more capable rockets from North Korea, and an escalating volley of threats and insults flying between Washington and Pyongyang, the crisis in Northeast Asia shows no sign of slackening. On the contrary, as North Korea’s drive for a nuclear-armed ballistic missile accelerates, Washington is racing to innovate creative new sanctions to strangle the Hermit Kingdom’s e
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genetic targets to chemo-resistant breast cancer identifiedResearch led by Dr. Carlos Arteaga, Director of the Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, has identified potential targets for treatment of triple negative breast cancer, the most aggressive form of breast cancer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Reducing bullying the Finnish way—in the United StatesBullying is a pervasive problem for U.S. kids. Recent studies show that between one in four to one in three children have been bullied at school. About one in 10 are victimized regularly.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Designer biosensor can detect antibiotic production by microbesResearchers from North Carolina State University have engineered designer biosensors that can detect antibiotic molecules of interest. The biosensors are a first step toward creating antibiotic-producing 'factories' within microbes such as E. coli.
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The Atlantic

Mourning the Victims in Las Vegas In an attack in Las Vegas on Sunday, a lone gunman is believed to have fired automatic weapons into a gathering of 22,000 fans enjoying a country music festival. 59 people were killed, and hundreds more were wounded. The crowd scattered, seeking safety. Then, people gathered together again—to protect, to carry the wounded, to donate blood, to heal, to pray, and to care for one another. Memorials
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The Atlantic

Trump's Puerto Rico Visit Is a Political Disaster Updated on October 3 at 2:36 p.m. Making his first appearance in hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico since Maria’s landfall, President Trump offered a hearty round of congratulations to federal relief efforts and thanked the island’s governor. But the president also suggested Maria was not a “real catastrophe,” made an odd and misleading comparison to the death toll from Hurricane Katrina, and joked ab
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Ars Technica

LIGO’s gravitational wave detection takes home a Nobel A 4km arm of the LIGO interferometer stretches into the foggy distance. (credit: Eric Berger ) From almost the moment their discovery was announced, everyone agreed that the first sighting of gravitational waves was going to win a Nobel Prize. The only questions were when and who would receive the honor. Both of those questions have now been answered. When is now, and who turned out to be three i
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Gizmodo

Two Looming Volcanic Eruptions Could Slow Climate Change, But They Aren't Going to Stop It An aerial view of the volcanic cone that has formed in Lake Vui near the summit of Ambae Island, Vanuatu. Photo: AP Following a pattern of everything being terrible in 2017, two volcanoes are primed to erupt along the western edge of the Ring of Fire. Mt. Agung in Bali, Indonesia has forced 144,000 into shelters beyond the 7.5 mile exclusion zone, while the volcano on Ambae Island in Vanuatu has
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Big Think

This Is How You Can Become a Damn Good Writer When novelists and poets reveal their writing process we learn a great deal about our own development. Read More
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Science | The Guardian

Could the theory which predicted gravitational waves be wrong? The detection of gravitational waves scooped the 2017 Nobel physics prize. But in a Perimeter Institute lecture Erik Verlinde proposes a rather different theory of gravity One of those big open questions that we have in physics goes like this. Einstein’s theory of General Relativity is elegant and accurate. It makes many correct predictions, including the prediction of gravitational waves, the ob
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New cardiac catheter combines light and ultrasound to measure plaquesBiomedical engineers at UC Davis have combined intravascular ultrasound with fluorescence lifetime imaging in a single catheter probe that can image the tiny arteries of a living heart. The new catheter can simultaneously retrieve structural and biochemical information about arterial plaque that could more reliably predict heart attacks.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Women firefighters can improve safety, but department culture must changeA new study by Drexel's Center for Firefighter Injury Research & Safety Trends discerned that gender may be a unique contributor to safety, but hypermasculine fire service culture creates barriers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gabapentin co-use may increase risk of fatal opioid overdoseCo-prescription of the anticonvulsant gabapentin is associated with an increased risk of opioid-related death in people who are prescribed opioid painkillers, according to a new study published in PLOS Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Two agents deliver knockout punches to Ewing sarcomaWhen combined with an already FDA-approved chemotherapy, a novel agent developed by researchers at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, appears to halt the ability of Ewing sarcoma to grow and progress.
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Gizmodo

Cult of Chucky Is a Fitting Step Forward For the Wackiest Slasher Series Ever All images: Universal Pictures Home Entertainment Freddy Krueger’s been dormant since the 2010 Nightmare on Elm Street remake. The 13th Friday the 13th film appears to be on hold indefinitely. The upcoming Halloween do-over sounds promising—but that won’t be in theaters for at least a year. But guess which 1980s slasher villain’s got a brand-new movie out? Hint: he’s the shortest one. Unlike the
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

No case against scattering theory [Physical Sciences]In a series of papers, Frauenfelder et al. (1–3) propose a radical reinterpretation of incoherent neutron scattering by complex systems, specifically by protein hydration water, drawing into doubt the “currently accepted model, used for >50 y” (3). Under this model they subsume not only assumptions about the scattering target (sample)...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Wuttke: Our reinterpretation of QENS does not violate scattering theory [Physical Sciences]Dr. Wuttke claims in his Letter (1) that our “radical reinterpretation of incoherent neutron scattering” (2) reverses scattering theory and is false. His main assertion is that we overlook the experimental apparatus as a means to break the isotropy of n-p scattering, claimed to occur because the beam direction and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Need for speed in accurate whole-genome data analysis: GENALICE MAP challenges BWA/GATK more than PEMapper/PECaller and Isaac [Biological Sciences]In the current high-throughput genomics era, efficient and accurate analysis of large-scale whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data constitutes a computational bottleneck. Johnston et al. (1) introduce the PEMapper/PECaller software package for short-read WGS alignment and variant calling, promising faster analyses with reduced output file sizes and “nearly identical (or better)” variant...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Pluss et al.: The strength of PEMapper/PECaller lies in unbiased calling using large sample sizes [Biological Sciences]In a recent Letter in PNAS (1), Plüss et al. compare the speed and accuracy of the Burrows–Wheeler aligner (BWA) (2)/Genome Analysis Toolkit (GATK) (3) best-practices pipeline (4), against our PEMapper/PECaller pipeline (5), as well as against a commercially available, but un–peer-reviewed method called GENALICEMAP (genalice.com). This test was conducted...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Lipid topology and electrostatic interactions underpin lytic activity of linear cationic antimicrobial peptides in membranes [Biochemistry]Linear cationic antimicrobial peptides are a diverse class of molecules that interact with a wide range of cell membranes. Many of these peptides disrupt cell integrity by forming membrane-spanning pores that ultimately lead to their death. Despite these peptides high potency and ability to evade acquired bacterial drug resistance, there...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Evolutionary diversification of protein-protein interactions by interface add-ons [Biochemistry]Cells contain a multitude of protein complexes whose subunits interact with high specificity. However, the number of different protein folds and interface geometries found in nature is limited. This raises the question of how protein–protein interaction specificity is achieved on the structural level and how the formation of nonphysiological complexes...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Asymmetric mechanosensitivity in a eukaryotic ion channel [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Living organisms perceive and respond to a diverse range of mechanical stimuli. A variety of mechanosensitive ion channels have evolved to facilitate these responses, but the molecular mechanisms underlying their exquisite sensitivity to different forces within the membrane remains unclear. TREK-2 is a mammalian two-pore domain (K2P) K+ channel important...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Sirt7 promotes adipogenesis in the mouse by inhibiting autocatalytic activation of Sirt1 [Cell Biology]Sirtuins (Sirt1–Sirt7) are NAD+-dependent protein deacetylases/ADP ribosyltransferases, which play decisive roles in chromatin silencing, cell cycle regulation, cellular differentiation, and metabolism. Different sirtuins control similar cellular processes, suggesting a coordinated mode of action but information about potential cross-regulatory interactions within the sirtuin family is still limit
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Comparative analysis reveals genomic features of stress-induced transcriptional readthrough [Cell Biology]Transcription is a highly regulated process, and stress-induced changes in gene transcription have been shown to play a major role in stress responses and adaptation. Genome-wide studies reveal prevalent transcription beyond known protein-coding gene loci, generating a variety of RNA classes, most of unknown function. One such class, termed downstream...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Functional screening in human cardiac organoids reveals a metabolic mechanism for cardiomyocyte cell cycle arrest [Developmental Biology]The mammalian heart undergoes maturation during postnatal life to meet the increased functional requirements of an adult. However, the key drivers of this process remain poorly defined. We are currently unable to recapitulate postnatal maturation in human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs), limiting their potential as a model system to...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Small genome symbiont underlies cuticle hardness in beetles [Evolution]Beetles, representing the majority of the insect species diversity, are characterized by thick and hard cuticle, which plays important roles for their environmental adaptation and underpins their inordinate diversity and prosperity. Here, we report a bacterial endosymbiont extremely specialized for sustaining beetle’s cuticle formation. Many weevils are associated with a...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Cytosine deamination and base excision repair cause R-loop-induced CAG repeat fragility and instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae [Genetics]CAG/CTG repeats are structure-forming repetitive DNA sequences, and expansion beyond a threshold of ∼35 CAG repeats is the cause of several human diseases. Expanded CAG repeats are prone to breakage, and repair of the breaks can cause repeat contractions and expansions. In this study, we found that cotranscriptional R-loops formed...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

[PSI+] prion propagation is controlled by inositol polyphosphates [Genetics]The yeast prions [PSI+] and [URE3] are folded in-register parallel β-sheet amyloids of Sup35p and Ure2p, respectively. In a screen for antiprion systems curing [PSI+] without protein overproduction, we detected Siw14p as an antiprion element. An array of genetic tests confirmed that many variants of [PSI+] arising in the absence...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

IgH isotype-specific B cell receptor expression influences B cell fate [Immunology and Inflammation]Ig heavy chain (IgH) isotypes (e.g., IgM, IgG, and IgE) are generated as secreted/soluble antibodies (sIg) or as membrane-bound (mIg) B cell receptors (BCRs) through alternative RNA splicing. IgH isotype dictates soluble antibody function, but how mIg isotype influences B cell behavior is not well defined. We examined IgH isotype-specific...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

MIF and D-DT are potential disease severity modifiers in male MS subjects [Immunology and Inflammation]Little is known about mechanisms that drive the development of progressive multiple sclerosis (MS), although inflammatory factors, such as macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), its homolog D-dopachrome tautomerase (D-DT), and their common receptor CD74 may contribute to disease worsening. Our findings demonstrate elevated MIF and D-DT levels in males with...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

IL-4-producing B cells regulate T helper cell dichotomy in type 1- and type 2-controlled diseases [Immunology and Inflammation]Interleukin-4 (IL-4)–induced T helper (Th) 2 cells promote susceptibility to the protozoan parasite Leishmania major, while conferring immunity to the intestinal trematode Schistosoma mansoni. Here, we report that abrogation of IL-4 receptor alpha (IL-4Rα) signaling on B cells in BALB/c mice (mb1creIL-4Rα–/lox) transformed nonhealer BALB/c to a healer phenotype with...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif-dependent functions of an MHC class I-specific NK cell receptor [Immunology and Inflammation]Natural killer (NK) cells express MHC class I (MHC-I)-specific receptors, such as Ly49A, that inhibit killing of cells expressing self–MHC-I. Self–MHC-I also “licenses” NK cells to become responsive to activating stimuli and regulates the surface level of NK-cell inhibitory receptors. However, the mechanisms of action resulting from these interactions of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Direct engagement of the PI3K pathway by mutant KIT dominates oncogenic signaling in gastrointestinal stromal tumor [Medical Sciences]Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) predominantly harbor activating mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase KIT. To genetically dissect in vivo the requirement of different signal transduction pathways emanating from KIT for tumorigenesis, the oncogenic KitV558Δ mutation was combined with point mutations abrogating specific phosphorylation sites on KIT. Compared with single-mutant KitV558Δ/+
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

NCoR1-independent mechanism plays a role in the action of the unliganded thyroid hormone receptor [Medical Sciences]Nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCoR1) is considered to be the major corepressor that mediates ligand-independent actions of the thyroid hormone receptor (TR) during development and in hypothyroidism. We tested this by expressing a hypomorphic NCoR1 allele (NCoR1ΔID), which cannot interact with the TR, in Pax8-KO mice, which make no thyroid...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Defective decidualization during and after severe preeclampsia reveals a possible maternal contribution to the etiology [Medical Sciences]In preeclampsia (PE), cytotrophoblast (CTB) invasion of the uterus and spiral arteries is often shallow. Thus, the placenta’s role has been a focus. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that decidual defects are an important determinant of the placental phenotype. We isolated human endometrial stromal cells from nonpregnant donors...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Endothelial insulin receptors differentially control insulin signaling kinetics in peripheral tissues and brain of mice [Medical Sciences]Insulin receptors (IRs) on endothelial cells may have a role in the regulation of transport of circulating insulin to its target tissues; however, how this impacts on insulin action in vivo is unclear. Using mice with endothelial-specific inactivation of the IR gene (EndoIRKO), we find that in response to systemic...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Host modification of a bacterial quorum-sensing signal induces a phenotypic switch in bacterial symbionts [Microbiology]Bacterial communities colonize epithelial surfaces of most animals. Several factors, including the innate immune system, mucus composition, and diet, have been identified as determinants of host-associated bacterial communities. Here we show that the early branching metazoan Hydra is able to modify bacterial quorum-sensing signals. We identified a eukaryotic mechanism that...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Leaderless secreted peptide signaling molecule alters global gene expression and increases virulence of a human bacterial pathogen [Microbiology]Successful pathogens use complex signaling mechanisms to monitor their environment and reprogram global gene expression during specific stages of infection. Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a major human pathogen that causes significant disease burden worldwide. A secreted cysteine protease known as streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SpeB) is a key virulence...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Identification of sialic acid-binding function for the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus spike glycoprotein [Microbiology]Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) targets the epithelial cells of the respiratory tract both in humans and in its natural host, the dromedary camel. Virion attachment to host cells is mediated by 20-nm-long homotrimers of spike envelope protein S. The N-terminal subunit of each S protomer, called S1, folds...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Exceptionally tight membrane-binding may explain the key role of the synaptotagmin-7 C2A domain in asynchronous neurotransmitter release [Neuroscience]Synaptotagmins (Syts) act as Ca2+ sensors in neurotransmitter release by virtue of Ca2+-binding to their two C2 domains, but their mechanisms of action remain unclear. Puzzlingly, Ca2+-binding to the C2B domain appears to dominate Syt1 function in synchronous release, whereas Ca2+-binding to the C2A domain mediates Syt7 function in asynchronous...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

BPM-CUL3 E3 ligase modulates thermotolerance by facilitating negative regulatory domain-mediated degradation of DREB2A in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]DEHYDRATION-RESPONSIVE ELEMENT BINDING PROTEIN 2A (DREB2A) acts as a key transcription factor in both drought and heat stress tolerance in Arabidopsis and induces the expression of many drought- and heat stress-inducible genes. Although DREB2A expression itself is induced by stress, the posttranslational regulation of DREB2A, including protein stabilization, is required...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Exposure to seismic air gun signals causes physiological harm and alters behavior in the scallop Pecten fumatus [Sustainability Science]Seismic surveys map the seabed using intense, low-frequency sound signals that penetrate kilometers into the Earth’s crust. Little is known regarding how invertebrates, including economically and ecologically important bivalves, are affected by exposure to seismic signals. In a series of field-based experiments, we investigate the impact of exposure to seismic...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Cross-scale effects of neural interactions during human neocortical seizure activity [Applied Mathematics]Small-scale neuronal networks may impose widespread effects on large network dynamics. To unravel this relationship, we analyzed eight multiscale recordings of spontaneous seizures from four patients with epilepsy. During seizures, multiunit spike activity organizes into a submillimeter-sized wavefront, and this activity correlates significantly with low-frequency rhythms from electrocorticographi
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Evolution of the 3-hydroxypropionate bicycle and recent transfer of anoxygenic photosynthesis into the Chloroflexi [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Various lines of evidence from both comparative biology and the geologic record make it clear that the biochemical machinery for anoxygenic photosynthesis was present on early Earth and provided the evolutionary stock from which oxygenic photosynthesis evolved ca. 2.3 billion years ago. However, the taxonomic identity of these early anoxygenic...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Benefits and risks of diversification for individual fishers [Economic Sciences]Individuals relying on natural resource extraction for their livelihood face high income variability driven by a mix of environmental, biological, management, and economic factors. Key to managing these industries is identifying how regulatory actions and individual behavior affect income variability, financial risk, and, by extension, the economic stability and the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Clonal expansion and epigenetic reprogramming following deletion or amplification of mutant IDH1 [Medical Sciences]IDH1 mutation is the earliest genetic alteration in low-grade gliomas (LGGs), but its role in tumor recurrence is unclear. Mutant IDH1 drives overproduction of the oncometabolite d-2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG) and a CpG island (CGI) hypermethylation phenotype (G-CIMP). To investigate the role of mutant IDH1 at recurrence, we performed a longitudinal analysis...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Arabidopsis m6A demethylase activity modulates viral infection of a plant virus and the m6A abundance in its genomic RNAs [Microbiology]N6-methyladenosine (m6A) is an internal, reversible nucleotide modification that constitutes an important regulatory mechanism in RNA biology. Unlike mammals and yeast, no component of the m6A cellular machinery has been described in plants at present. m6A has been identified in the genomic RNAs of diverse mammalian viruses and, additionally, viral...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Longitudinal identification of clinically distinct neurophenotypes in young children with fragile X syndrome [Neuroscience]Fragile X syndrome (FXS), due to mutations of the FMR1 gene, is the most common known inherited cause of developmental disability. The cognitive, behavioral, and neurological phenotypes observed in affected individuals can vary considerably, making it difficult to predict outcomes and determine the need for interventions. We sought to examine...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

TrkB neurotrophic activities are blocked by {alpha}-synuclein, triggering dopaminergic cell death in Parkinson’s disease [Neuroscience]BDNF/TrkB neurotrophic signaling is essential for dopaminergic neuronal survival, and the activities are reduced in the substantial nigra (SN) of Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, whether α-Syn (alpha-synuclein) aggregation, a hallmark in the remaining SN neurons in PD, accounts for the neurotrophic inhibition remains elusive. Here we show that α-Syn selectively...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Prolactin action in the medial preoptic area is necessary for postpartum maternal nursing behavior [Neuroscience]Pregnancy hormones, such as prolactin, sensitize neural circuits controlling parental interactions to induce timely activation of maternal behaviors immediately after parturition. While the medial preoptic area (MPOA) is known to be critical for maternal behavior, the specific role of prolactin in this brain region has remained elusive. Here, we evaluated...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Mistiming of thought and perception predicts delusionality [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]The timing of thoughts and perceptions plays an essential role in belief formation. Just as people can experience in-the-moment perceptual illusions, however, they can also be deceived about how events unfold in time. Here, we consider how a particular type of temporal distortion, in which the apparent future influences “earlier”...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Color naming across languages reflects color use [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]What determines how languages categorize colors? We analyzed results of the World Color Survey (WCS) of 110 languages to show that despite gross differences across languages, communication of chromatic chips is always better for warm colors (yellows/reds) than cool colors (blues/greens). We present an analysis of color statistics in a...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Hanna et al., TFG facilitates outer coat disassembly on COPII transport carriers to promote tethering and fusion with ER-Golgi intermediate compartments [Correction]CELL BIOLOGY Correction for “TFG facilitates outer coat disassembly on COPII transport carriers to promote tethering and fusion with ER–Golgi intermediate compartments,” by Michael G. Hanna IV, Samuel Block, E. B. Frankel, Feng Hou, Adam Johnson, Lin Yuan, Gavin Knight, James J. Moresco, John R. Yates III, Randolph Ashton, Randy...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Reichenberg et al., Discontinuity in the genetic and environmental causes of the intellectual disability spectrum [Correction]PSYCHOLOGICAL AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES Correction for “Discontinuity in the genetic and environmental causes of the intellectual disability spectrum,” by Abraham Reichenberg, Martin Cederlöf, Andrew McMillan, Maciej Trzaskowski, Ori Kapara, Eyal Fruchter, Karen Ginat, Michael Davidson, Mark Weiser, Henrik Larsson, Robert Plomin, and Paul Lichtenstein, which was first published December 28,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Multiple sclerosis and microbiome Acinetobacter. Image courtesy of CDC/Janice Carr. Previous work has shown that mice engineered to develop experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE), a model for multiple sclerosis (MS), remain disease-free when raised in a germ-free environment, suggesting that commensal microbiota mediate brain autoimmunity. To understand the role of human...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

QnAs with Nancy A. Lynch [QnAs]In computer science, distributed systems involve many processors cooperating to complete a certain task—a field with significance for the current age of wireless communications and cloud computing. Nancy Lynch, the NEC Professor of Software Science and Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, literally wrote the book on distributed computing....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Profile of Bob B. Buchanan [Profile]On a clear June day in 1975, Bob Buchanan and two Oslo colleagues pulled up water samples from a lake in Norway, examining the microorganisms growing at various depths. “When we got to 6 meters,” Buchanan recalls, “there was a band of Chlorobium growing,” referring to a genus of green...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Profile of Charles D. Gilbert [Profile]Neuroscientists once thought that the brain’s wiring was fixed in early life, but the pioneering research of National Academy of Sciences member Charles Gilbert continues to show that the adult brain is remarkably dynamic. Evidence supporting that view is presented in Gilbert and colleagues’ studies of the neural mechanisms underlying...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The last Neanderthal [Anthropology]The mechanism of the Neanderthal extinction and their replacement by modern humans of African origin is one of the most discussed issues in paleoanthropology. Central to this discussion are the questions of the chronological overlap between Neanderthal populations and modern humans in Western Eurasia and the precise geographical circumstances of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Integrating macroecology through a statistical mechanics of adaptive matter [Ecology]Science advances through synthesis and integration by identifying common processes and principles from disparate observations and highlighting the unity underlying diversity. This process is exemplified by advancements in astronomy and physics in the 17th century, when Tycho Brahe’s catalog of the positions of stars, moons, planets, and comets provided the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Animal seed dispersal and the diversity of tropical forest trees [Ecology]For those who have admired the astonishing diversity of wet tropical forests, it is a near-universal experience to have seen an interesting tree and then not encountered another of the same species for quite some distance. Indeed, this striking tendency of tropical trees to be widely separated from their own...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

A gut feeling about multiple sclerosis [Immunology and Inflammation]Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that constitutes the leading cause of neurologic disability in young adults (1). Th1 and Th17 effector T cells (Teffs) are thought to play a central role in the pathogenesis of MS (2, 3). Thus, the study...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Science and Culture: Vegetable breeders turn to chefs for flavor boost [Agricultural Sciences]Last August, four chefs sat around a table in a Madison, WI, restaurant, each with small samples of 10 tomato varieties. With nary a word spoken, the chefs tasted each morsel, then rated the flavor along dimensions represented by axes drawn on paper. Tomatoes high in sweetness and acidity fell...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Manipulation of ionized impurity scattering for achieving high thermoelectric performance in n-type Mg3Sb2-based materials [Applied Physical Sciences]Achieving higher carrier mobility plays a pivotal role for obtaining potentially high thermoelectric performance. In principle, the carrier mobility is governed by the band structure as well as by the carrier scattering mechanism. Here, we demonstrate that by manipulating the carrier scattering mechanism in n-type Mg3Sb2-based materials, a substantial improvement...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Transparent, conformable, active multielectrode array using organic electrochemical transistors [Applied Physical Sciences]Mechanically flexible active multielectrode arrays (MEA) have been developed for local signal amplification and high spatial resolution. However, their opaqueness limited optical observation and light stimulation during use. Here, we show a transparent, ultraflexible, and active MEA, which consists of transparent organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) and transparent Au grid wirings....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Diverse p53/DNA binding modes expand the repertoire of p53 response elements [Biochemistry]The tumor suppressor protein p53 acts as a transcription factor, binding sequence-specifically to defined DNA sites, thereby activating the expression of genes leading to diverse cellular outcomes. Canonical p53 response elements (REs) are made of two decameric half-sites separated by a variable number of base pairs (spacers). Fifty percent of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Multiscale characterization of the mineral phase at skeletal sites of breast cancer metastasis [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Skeletal metastases, the leading cause of death in advanced breast cancer patients, depend on tumor cell interactions with the mineralized bone extracellular matrix. Bone mineral is largely composed of hydroxyapatite (HA) nanocrystals with physicochemical properties that vary significantly by anatomical location, age, and pathology. However, it remains unclear whether bone...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Single-molecule visualization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae leading-strand synthesis reveals dynamic interaction between MTC and the replisome [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The replisome, the multiprotein system responsible for genome duplication, is a highly dynamic complex displaying a large number of different enzyme activities. Recently, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae minimal replication reaction has been successfully reconstituted in vitro. This provided an opportunity to uncover the enzymatic activities of many of the components in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Near-atomic structure of jasplakinolide-stabilized malaria parasite F-actin reveals the structural basis of filament instability [Biophysics and Computational Biology]During their life cycle, apicomplexan parasites, such as the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, use actomyosin-driven gliding motility to move and invade host cells. For this process, actin filament length and stability are temporally and spatially controlled. In contrast to canonical actin, P. falciparum actin 1 (PfAct1) does not readily polymerize...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structure insight of GSDMD reveals the basis of GSDMD autoinhibition in cell pyroptosis [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Recent findings have revealed that the protein gasdermin D (GSDMD) plays key roles in cell pyroptosis. GSDMD binds lipids and forms pore structures to induce pyroptosis upon microbial infection and associated danger signals. However, detailed structural information for GSDMD remains unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of the C-terminal...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Actin retrograde flow actively aligns and orients ligand-engaged integrins in focal adhesions [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Integrins are transmembrane receptors that, upon activation, bind extracellular ligands and link them to the actin filament (F-actin) cytoskeleton to mediate cell adhesion and migration. Cytoskeletal forces in migrating cells generated by polymerization- or contractility-driven “retrograde flow” of F-actin from the cell leading edge have been hypothesized to mediate integrin...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Interaction networks, ecological stability, and collective antibiotic tolerance in polymicrobial infections [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Polymicrobial infections constitute small ecosystems that accommodate several bacterial species. Commonly, these bacteria are investigated in isolation. However, it is unknown to what extent the isolates interact and whether their interactions alter bacterial growth and ecosystem resilience in the presence and absence of antibiotics. We quantified the complete ecological interaction...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Core Concepts: How diversity-generating retroelements promote mutation and adaptation in myriad microbes [Cell Biology]Adaptation, a cornerstone of evolutionary change, is rarely straightforward. Acquiring a random mutation that promotes survival can take generations. Prokaryotes such as bacteria and Archaea, along with the viruses they harbor, have compact genomes, leaving them with a limited repertoire of DNA to respond to environmental change. Fig. 1. After...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Isolation of exosomes from whole blood by integrating acoustics and microfluidics [Cell Biology]Exosomes are nanoscale extracellular vesicles that play an important role in many biological processes, including intercellular communications, antigen presentation, and the transport of proteins, RNA, and other molecules. Recently there has been significant interest in exosome-related fundamental research, seeking new exosome-based biomarkers for health monitoring and disease diagnoses. Here, we.
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Repeat E anchors Xist RNA to the inactive X chromosomal compartment through CDKN1A-interacting protein (CIZ1) [Cell Biology]X chromosome inactivation is an epigenetic dosage compensation mechanism in female mammals driven by the long noncoding RNA, Xist. Although recent genomic and proteomic approaches have provided a more global view of Xist’s function, how Xist RNA localizes to the inactive X chromosome (Xi) and spreads in cis remains unclear....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Copper nanoparticle ensembles for selective electroreduction of CO2 to C2-C3 products [Chemistry]Direct conversion of carbon dioxide to multicarbon products remains as a grand challenge in electrochemical CO2 reduction. Various forms of oxidized copper have been demonstrated as electrocatalysts that still require large overpotentials. Here, we show that an ensemble of Cu nanoparticles (NPs) enables selective formation of C2–C3 products at low...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Intermittent photocatalytic activity of single CdS nanoparticles [Chemistry]Semiconductor photocatalysis holds promising keys to address various energy and environmental challenges. Most studies to date are based on ensemble analysis, which may mask critical photocatalytic kinetics in single nanocatalysts. Here we report a study of imaging photocatalytic hydrogen production of single CdS nanoparticles with a plasmonic microscopy in an...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Cell cycle-targeting microRNAs promote differentiation by enforcing cell-cycle exit [Developmental Biology]MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been known to affect various biological processes by repressing expression of specific genes. Here we describe an essential function of the miR-34/449 family during differentiation of epithelial cells. We found that miR-34/449 suppresses the cell-cycle machinery in vivo and promotes cell-cycle exit, thereby allowing epithelial cell differentiation....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Network approach to patterns in stratocumulus clouds [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Stratocumulus clouds (Sc) have a significant impact on the amount of sunlight reflected back to space, with important implications for Earth’s climate. Representing Sc and their radiative impact is one of the largest challenges for global climate models. Sc fields self-organize into cellular patterns and thus lend themselves to analysis...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Hydrologic regulation of plant rooting depth [Ecology]Plant rooting depth affects ecosystem resilience to environmental stress such as drought. Deep roots connect deep soil/groundwater to the atmosphere, thus influencing the hydrologic cycle and climate. Deep roots enhance bedrock weathering, thus regulating the long-term carbon cycle. However, we know little about how deep roots go and why. Here,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Covariations in ecological scaling laws fostered by community dynamics [Ecology]Scaling laws in ecology, intended both as functional relationships among ecologically relevant quantities and the probability distributions that characterize their occurrence, have long attracted the interest of empiricists and theoreticians. Empirical evidence exists of power laws associated with the number of species inhabiting an ecosystem, their abundances, and traits. Although...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Extinction risk is most acute for the world’s largest and smallest vertebrates [Ecology]Extinction risk in vertebrates has been linked to large body size, but this putative relationship has only been explored for select taxa, with variable results. Using a newly assembled and taxonomically expansive database, we analyzed the relationships between extinction risk and body mass (27,647 species) and between extinction risk and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Antagonism correlates with metabolic similarity in diverse bacteria [Ecology]In the Origin of Species, Charles R. Darwin [Darwin C (1859) On the Origin of Species] proposed that the struggle for existence must be most intense among closely related species by means of their functional similarity. It has been hypothesized that this similarity, which results in resource competition, is the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Seed dispersal increases local species richness and reduces spatial turnover of tropical tree seedlings [Ecology]Dispersal is thought to be a key process underlying the high spatial diversity of tropical forests. Just how important dispersal is in structuring plant communities is nevertheless an open question because it is very difficult to isolate dispersal from other processes, and thereby measure its effect. Using a unique situation,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Amazon plant diversity revealed by a taxonomically verified species list [Ecology]Recent debates on the number of plant species in the vast lowland rain forests of the Amazon have been based largely on model estimates, neglecting published checklists based on verified voucher data. Here we collate taxonomically verified checklists to present a list of seed plant species from lowland Amazon rain...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Greater Internet use is not associated with faster growth in political polarization among US demographic groups [Economic Sciences]We combine eight previously proposed measures to construct an index of political polarization among US adults. We find that polarization has increased the most among the demographic groups least likely to use the Internet and social media. Our overall index and all but one of the individual measures show greater...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Soft tubular microfluidics for 2D and 3D applications [Engineering]Microfluidics has been the key component for many applications, including biomedical devices, chemical processors, microactuators, and even wearable devices. This technology relies on soft lithography fabrication which requires cleanroom facilities. Although popular, this method is expensive and labor-intensive. Furthermore, current conventional microfluidic chips precludes reconfiguration, making
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Macroevolutionary shifts of WntA function potentiate butterfly wing-pattern diversity [Evolution]Butterfly wing patterns provide a rich comparative framework to study how morphological complexity develops and evolves. Here we used CRISPR/Cas9 somatic mutagenesis to test a patterning role for WntA, a signaling ligand gene previously identified as a hotspot of shape-tuning alleles involved in wing mimicry. We show that WntA loss-of-function...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Single master regulatory gene coordinates the evolution and development of butterfly color and iridescence [Evolution]The optix gene has been implicated in butterfly wing pattern adaptation by genetic association, mapping, and expression studies. The actual developmental function of this gene has remained unclear, however. Here we used CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to show that optix plays a fundamental role in nymphalid butterfly wing pattern development, where...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Direct dating of Neanderthal remains from the site of Vindija Cave and implications for the Middle to Upper Paleolithic transition [Genetics]Previous dating of the Vi-207 and Vi-208 Neanderthal remains from Vindija Cave (Croatia) led to the suggestion that Neanderthals survived there as recently as 28,000–29,000 B.P. Subsequent dating yielded older dates, interpreted as ages of at least ∼32,500 B.P. We have redated these same specimens using an approach based on...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Gut bacteria from multiple sclerosis patients modulate human T cells and exacerbate symptoms in mouse models [Immunology and Inflammation]The gut microbiota regulates T cell functions throughout the body. We hypothesized that intestinal bacteria impact the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), an autoimmune disorder of the CNS and thus analyzed the microbiomes of 71 MS patients not undergoing treatment and 71 healthy controls. Although no major shifts in microbial...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Gut microbiota from multiple sclerosis patients enables spontaneous autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice [Immunology and Inflammation]There is emerging evidence that the commensal microbiota has a role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), a putative autoimmune disease of the CNS. Here, we compared the gut microbial composition of 34 monozygotic twin pairs discordant for MS. While there were no major differences in the overall microbial...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Retinoid X receptor suppresses a metastasis-promoting transcriptional program in myeloid cells via a ligand-insensitive mechanism [Immunology and Inflammation]Retinoid X receptor (RXR) regulates several key functions in myeloid cells, including inflammatory responses, phagocytosis, chemokine secretion, and proangiogenic activity. Its importance, however, in tumor-associated myeloid cells is unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that deletion of RXR in myeloid cells enhances lung metastasis formation while not affecting primary tumor...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

MicroRNA dysregulation to identify therapeutic target combinations for chronic lymphocytic leukemia [Medical Sciences]Loss of miR-15/16 is the most common genetic lesion in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), promoting overexpression of BCL2, which factors in leukemia pathogenesis. Indeed, an inhibitor of Bcl2, venetoclcax, is highly active in the treatment of patients with CLL. However, single-agent venetoclcax fails to eradicate minimal residual disease in most...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Critical role of caveolin-1 in ocular neovascularization and multitargeted antiangiogenic effects of cavtratin via JNK [Medical Sciences]Ocular neovascularization is a devastating pathology of numerous ocular diseases and is a major cause of blindness. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) plays important roles in the vascular system. However, little is known regarding its function and mechanisms in ocular neovascularization. Here, using comprehensive model systems and a cell permeable peptide of Cav-1,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Topological semimetal in honeycomb lattice LnSI [Physics]Recognized as elementary particles in the standard model, Weyl fermions in condensed matter have received growing attention. However, most of the previously reported Weyl semimetals exhibit rather complicated electronic structures that, in turn, may have raised questions regarding the underlying physics. Here, we report promising topological phases that can be...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Disconnecting structure and dynamics in glassy thin films [Physics]Nanometrically thin glassy films depart strikingly from the behavior of their bulk counterparts. We investigate whether the dynamical differences between a bulk and thin film polymeric glass former can be understood by differences in local microscopic structure. Machine learning methods have shown that local structure can serve as the foundation...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Continuous track paths reveal additive evidence integration in multistep decision making [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Multistep decision making pervades daily life, but its underlying mechanisms remain obscure. We distinguish four prominent models of multistep decision making, namely serial stage, hierarchical evidence integration, hierarchical leaky competing accumulation (HLCA), and probabilistic evidence integration (PEI). To empirically disentangle these models, we design a two-step reward-based decision para
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Ant-inspired density estimation via random walks [Systems Biology]Many ant species use distributed population density estimation in applications ranging from quorum sensing, to task allocation, to appraisal of enemy colony strength. It has been shown that ants estimate local population density by tracking encounter rates: The higher the density, the more often the ants bump into each other....
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Ars Technica

Fully driverless cars could be months away Enlarge / Waymo is using a fleet of Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid minivans to develop its self-driving technology. (credit: Waymo) Real driverless cars could come to the Phoenix area this year, according to a Monday report from The Information's Amir Efrati. Two anonymous sources have told Efrati that Google's self-driving car unit, Waymo, is preparing to launch "a commercial ride-sharing service powe
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The Atlantic

Jalal Talabani: 'The Rare Politician Who Could Talk to Anybody' Jalal Talabani, who dominated Kurdish politics for decades, ascended to the Iraqi presidency in the post-Saddam Hussein era, and yet remained Mam (“uncle”) Jalal to his people, has died in Berlin. He was 83. No cause was given by Rudaw, the Kurdish news agency, but it said that Talabani had slipped into a coma earlier Tuesday. The former Iraqi president had been ailing since 2012 when he suffered
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The Atlantic

The Catalonia Referendum: 'It's a Constitutional Crisis' Thousands of people filled the streets of Spain’s northeastern region of Catalonia Tuesday to protest the violent police crackdown on the autonomous region’s contested independence referendum, which left more than 800 people injured. Called by pro-independence groups and Catalan trade unions, the strike is occurring as the Catalan government’s anticipated declaration of independence—and Madrid’s
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Latest Headlines | Science News

The rise of agricultural states came at a big cost, a new book arguesIn ‘Against the Grain,’ a political scientist claims early states took a toll on formerly mobile groups’ health and happiness.
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Inside Science

Gravitational Waves—Why Is This A Big Deal? Gravitational Waves—Why Is This A Big Deal? The experiment behind this year’s winner for the Nobel Prize in Physics. Gravitational Waves -- Why Is This A Big Deal? Video of Gravitational Waves -- Why Is This A Big Deal? Physics Tuesday, October 3, 2017 - 13:30 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer Our staff writer Yuen Yiu travels to Livingston, Louisiana to learn about the science behind this year’s winner for
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Live Science

Forget Me Not: History's 17 Most Bizarre Amnesia CasesAmnesia is a popular plot device in movies and television, but real-life instances of memory loss are arguably more bizarre than anything seen on the screen.
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cognitive science

Human The Film: The Incredible Documentary That Found Humanity By interviewing 2000 People About Life submitted by /u/FAQFunny [link] [comments]
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The Atlantic

Are Trump's Tweets Undercutting U.S. Diplomacy? President Trump’s tweets Sunday, declaring it a waste of time to try to negotiate with North Korea, appeared to contradict the sentiments of his own chief diplomat, who is at least formally taking the lead on the administration’s North Korea policy. It wasn’t the first time the two men seemed to express different positions on significant foreign-policy issues. But there’s a deeper story beyond wh
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Gizmodo

Embossed Lines Are the Best Lines: Get the Ghost Paper Notebook For $5 Off [Exclusive] Ghost Paper Notebook , $20 with code KINJA003 Even (or perhaps, especially) in the age of laptops and tablets, many people prefer the tactile experience of jotting down notes with an actual pen and paper, and the most tactile experience of all comes from the Ghost Paper Notebook . Rather than simply printing lines on the sheet to keep your letters straight, Ghost Paper’s lines are very slightly e
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gut bacteria metabolism may factor into hypertensionOne in three American adults suffers from high blood pressure, or hypertension. The disease can be passed down in families, and certain lifestyle factors such as smoking, high-sodium diets, and stress can increase the risk. In recent years, scientists have discovered that certain gut bacteria may contribute to hypertension, as well.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pesticide use during pregnancy linked to increased risk of childhood brain tumorsPrevious epidemiological studies have suggested that exposure to pesticides during pregnancy may have a possible role in the development of childhood brain tumors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Visualizing life in silicoProgramming a molecular biology experiment can be similar to playing Sudoku; both are simple if you're working with only a few molecules or a small grid, but explode in complexity as they grow. Now, researchers at UConn Health have made it far easier for molecular biologists to make complex biological models.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Medical scribes reduce hospital wait time, study showsA new study from the University of Colorado Denver finds that medical scribes, or specialists who prepare patient medical charts, significantly decrease physician overtime and patient wait time in emergency room settings.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Nobel Prize Explainer: Gravitational Waves and the LIGO DetectorThe Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded today to Rainer Weiss, Barry C. Barish and Kip S. Thorne for their contributions to the LIGO detector and the observation of gravitational waves. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US reviewing better tech identifiers after hacks: Trump aideUS officials are studying ways to end the use of social security numbers for identification following a series of data breaches compromising the data for millions of Americans, a Trump administration official said Tuesday.
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Popular Science

No matter how you're affected by a tragedy, help is available Health Experts weigh in on the psychological reverberations of violence. At least 58 people were killed in a mass shooting on Sunday night. Experts weigh in on the steps that victims and their families can take.
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Live Science

Why Cholera Isn't Likely in Puerto Rico, But Other Diseases AreIt all comes down to what pathogens are present.
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The Atlantic

The Absurdity of the Nobel Prizes in Science This morning, physicists Rainer Weiss, Kip Thorne, and Barry Barish received the Nobel Prize for Physics, for their discovery of gravitational waves—distortions in the fabric of space and time. The trio, who led the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) project that recorded these waves, will split the 9-million-Swedish-krona prize between them. Perhaps more importantly, they
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The Atlantic

What a Forgotten Kids' Book Reveals About U.S. Publishing In 1927, the author Dhan Gopal Mukerji published a slim novel, Gay Neck: The Story of a Pigeon , which follows the adventures of the titular Calcutta carrier bird, and the bird’s young owner, Ghond. Gay Neck (referring to the bird’s Bengali name, Chitra Griva) sympathetically portrays a bond between a young boy and his beloved pigeon as they encounter hawks and tigers in the jungles of Bengal and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Reducing bullying the Finnish way -- in the United StatesA Finnish program transplanted to the United States accomplished its goals of significantly reducing bullying and victimization, but its success hinged on the instructional 'dose' students received, says Marissa Smith, Ph.D.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New portable blood analyzer could improve anemia detection worldwideTo reduce the burden of anemia, health officials need a better picture of the disease's global impact, an understanding made viable by a portable and affordable way to analyze blood. Researchers at the University of Washington developed a device smaller than a toaster that can detect the level of hemoglobin in whole blood samples using optical absorbance. The work is published this week in AIP Adv
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Oregon study finds that microbial dispersal impacts animal gutsIn a novel experiment, zebrafish with defective immune systems swam and dined with counterparts with normal immune systems. In short order, their gut microbiomes became similar. The experiment at the University of Oregon was designed to test, at a fundamental level, the impact of microbial dispersal among individuals with different microbiomes.
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Live Science

Scientists Race to Save Puerto Rico's 'Monkey Island'Puerto Rico's Cayo Santiago Research Station has been a world-famous site for primate studies since 1938. Now scientists are working to save its staff and rhesus monkey colony after Hurricane Maria.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

EU to decide Amazon tax break case: sourcesThe EU will on Wednesday decide a landmark case against Luxembourg, which stands accused of giving illegal tax breaks to internet shopping giant Amazon, according to two sources familiar with the matter.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New portable blood analyzer could improve anemia detection worldwideAbout one quarter of the world's population suffers from anemia, a disease caused by a concentration deficiency of hemoglobin in red blood cells. To reduce the burden of anemia, health officials need a better picture of the disease's global impact, an understanding made viable by a portable and affordable way to analyze blood.
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New on MIT Technology Review

DeepMind’s New Way to Think About the Brain Could Improve How AI Makes Plans
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US orders divestment in CenturyLink-Level 3 dealThe US Department of Justice said Tuesday that Level 3 Communications will have to sell networks in three American cities ahead of its planned acquisition by telecoms giant CenturyLink.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Central Indian floods have tripled: studyViolent floods in central India have tripled since 1950, according to researchers who warned Tuesday of worse to come while offering hope for predicting them better in future.
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The Scientist RSS

DNA-Delivered Antibodies Fight Off Lethal Bacterial InfectionMice receiving the treatment produced their own monoclonal antibodies and survived infection with the life-threatening pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa.
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The Atlantic

What America Taught the Nazis There was no more extravagant site for Third Reich political theater than the spectacular parade grounds, two large stadiums, and congress hall in Nuremberg, a project masterminded by Albert Speer. From 1933 to 1938, he choreographed massive rallies associated with the annual conference of the Nazi Party, assemblies made famous by Leni Riefenstahl’s stunning documentaries of 1933 and 1935, The Vi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

IBD patients may stay healthier when doctors monitor medications before they lose efficacyProactive monitoring of blood levels of the therapeutic drug infliximab was associated with improved outcomes including lower risk of surgery and hospitalization.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Web giants allowed fake news to flow on Las Vegas shootingUS online giants acknowledged Tuesday they failed to prevent rumors and misinformation from being circulated during and after the deadly mass shooting in Las Vegas.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lawmakers grill former Equifax chairman over data breachHouse Republicans and Democrats on Tuesday grilled Equifax's former chief executive over the massive data hack of the personal information of 145 million Americans, calling the company's response inadequate as consumers struggle to deal with the breach.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Heat-tempered magnesium alloy a strong choice for implantsTitanium is the preferred material for surgical fixation procedures ranging from knee replacement to jaw implants. However, since this super-strong metal is not absorbed by the body over time, it can cause complications like infection, fistulization (particularly following radiation therapy), interference with skeletal growth, intolerance, thermal sensitivity, and interference with MRI and other i
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Scientific American Content: Global

Shunning Fossil Fuels, 40 Catholic Groups Seek Climate ActionThe coalition is the largest number of Catholic institutions to team up for a shift to green energy -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Blog » Languages » English

Future Tech: Hoverboard vs. Jetpack The future is now! There’s some tech that we always seem to dream about without having invented yet; but lately we’re living on the bleeding edge of certain transportation dreams. It’s pretty exciting for anyone who’d like their own personal flight accessories. What would you like to see on the mass market first? Hoverboard Yeah, you can already buy “hoverboards,” but we all know that a real hove
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Gizmodo

Fukushima’s Radioactive Waste Is Leaking From an Unexpected Source Wearing protective clothing and masks, a husband and wife walk along the coast damaged by the 2011 tsunami, with the Fukushima plant in the background. (Photo: AP) A new and unexpected source of radioactive material left over from the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster has been found up to 60 miles away along coastlines near the beleaguered plant. The discovery shows that damaged nuclear reactors ar
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers identify free-flowing aerosol particles using holograms, lasersHolographic images of free-flowing air particles may help climate change and biological weapons watchdogs better monitor the atmosphere, according to a recent Kansas State University study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Durian industry could suffer without the endangered fruit batScientists have discovered that Southeast Asia's endangered fruit bats - commonly known as flying foxes - play an important part in the pollination of the iconic and economically important durian tree.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study suggests hydrogen, oxygen, water and carbon dioxide generated in Earth's mantleResearch from the University of Texas at Arlington and the Wadia Institute of Himalayan Geology suggests that hydrogen, oxygen, water and carbon dioxide are being generated in the earth's mantle hundreds of kilometers below the earth's surface.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Global research team fills language gap in plant scienceTo keep pace with the fast-evolving study of cellular plant science, an international team of researchers has created terminology and definitions likely to become everyday language in laboratories and university classrooms worldwide.
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New on MIT Technology Review

A New Way to Think About the Brain Could Improve How AI Makes Plans
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Morbidity and mortality of leprosy in the Middle AgesDuring the Middle Ages, nearly everyone in Europe was exposed to the disfiguring, painful and ostracizing disease of leprosy. But did contracting the disease necessarily increase a person's chances of dying?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How to regulate e-sports gambling debated in Gaming Law ReviewThe new and rapidly evolving esports industry, while currently enjoying minimal regulatory oversight, would benefit in the long-term from a solid regulatory structure that embodies consumer protections. Lessons can be learned from the rush to regulate daily fantasy sports in the U.S., and how best to move adopting regulations for the fast-moving esports industry is the focus of a special issue of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mold contamination in sea salts could potentially spoil foodLike fine wines, sea salts are artisanal products that inspire talk of terroir, texture and provenance. Now there's evidence that they can also be sources of spoilage molds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ninety-eight scientists launch a 2,000-year global temperature databaseA team of 98 scientists from 22 countries has compiled the most comprehensive database of past global temperature records to date, spanning 1 CE to the present.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nrl receives patent for carbon capture device—a key step in synthetic fuel production from seawaterThe world's oceans cover approximately 70 percent of Earth's surface and contain roughly 93 percent of the planet's carbon dioxide (CO2). With around 38,000 gigatons (Gt) of carbon, our world's oceans contain 16 times as much carbon as that found on land or in the atmosphere combined.
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Viden

Amerikansk bilgigant dropper fossile brændslerGeneral Motors vil nu arbejde for at gøre alle virksomhedens biler elektriske i fremtiden.
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The Atlantic

The Frightening Enigma of the Las Vegas Shooter Even before the victims are counted and the blood dried after mass shootings, the public, press, and politicians all begin searching to understand what drove the perpetrators. This is important as a matter of law enforcement— Did they work alone? Is there a remaining threat? —and to make sense of the senseless. But it also serves an important psychological purpose: If the killer can be fit into a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Online parent training helps young kids with ADHDResearchers at Lehigh University have discovered that brief online or in-person behavioral therapy for parents is equally effective in improving children's behavior and parental knowledge -- a potential game changer for parents strapped for time and access. They report these findings in a new paper published in The Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, 'Face-to-Face vs. Online Behavio
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Protein identified that drives initiation and growth of aggressive form of leukemiaA team led by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has identified a new cancer-causing pathway behind most cases of an aggressive type of leukemia, findings that could lead to new targeted treatment approaches.
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Ars Technica

Original Star Fox staffer tells story of sequel’s shelving, surprise launch Enlarge / Dylan Cuthbert, in a goofy photo sent to Ars by his current company Q Games. (credit: Q Games) There's a chance—albeit a slim one, thanks to launch-week sellouts—that you've gotten your hands on Nintendo's brand-new Super NES Classic Edition hardware . If you did get one, there's a significant chance you made a beeline for its most interesting game: Star Fox 2 , the company's canceled 1
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Feed: All Latest

Uber Knew Its Self-Driving Guru Had Taken Google Trade SecretsA newly revealed Uber report says Anthony Levandowski left Google with valuable IP.
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Feed: All Latest

The Physics Nobel Goes to the Detection of Ripples in Space and TimeAmerican physicists Rainer Weiss, Barry Barish, and Kip Thorne have won the Nobel Prize in Physics for the detection of gravitational waves.
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Gizmodo

Unexplained 'Sonic Weapon Attacks' Are Blowing Up Relations Between the US and Cuba Photo: Getty Following a report on Monday that claimed US spies working under diplomatic cover were the primary target of mysterious “ sonic device ” attacks on US embassy personnel in Havana, American authorities have expelled 15 members of Cuba’s diplomatic staff from its embassy in Washington. In what’s shaping up to be one of the strangest diplomatic incidents in recent history, the State Dep
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Science | The Guardian

'A new way to study our universe': what gravitational waves mean for future science The 2017 physics Nobel prize was awarded for the detection of gravitational waves . But what else could be revealed now that this discovery has been made? You wait 100 years for a gravitational wave and then four come along at once. Or so it must seem to those who spent decades designing and building the exquisite instruments needed to sense the minuscule ripples in spacetime that Albert Einstein
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Live Science

Should People Who Can't Quit Smoking Switch to E-Cigarettes?Switching to e-cigarettes won't solve all the health problems smokers face, but how do they stack up compared to regular cigarettes?
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Gizmodo

Walmart Just Leaked Google's Shit a Day Early Image: Screenshot via Walmart For a brief shining moment Walmart allowed anyone with a quick clicker finger to pre-order Google’s next smart speaker, the Google Home Mini. Unfortunately, that speaker isn’t expected to actually be announced until tomorrow. Oops. The speaker was available online for a glorious few minutes starting at 12pm EST/9am PST, which suggests someone maybe hit the publish bu
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Ars Technica

Why some Senate Democrats voted to give Ajit Pai another term on FCC Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Nerthuz) The Senate vote to give Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai another term on the FCC yesterday went mostly along party lines, but four Democrats joined with Republicans to approve Pai's re-nomination. Three of those Democrats explained why to Politico in a report this morning . "I disagree with [Pai] on net neutrality, but the president has
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Heat-tempered magnesium alloy a strong choice for implantsIn a study published in the Journal of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, researchers at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering, NYU School of Medicine, and NYU Dentistry found, through in vivo testing, that T-5 heat treatment of magnesium alloy confers titanium-like strength and resistance to degradation and resporption.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Durian industry could suffer without the endangered fruit batScientists have discovered that Southeast Asia's endangered fruit bats -- commonly known as flying foxes -- play an important part in the pollination of the iconic and economically important durian tree.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers identify free-flowing aerosol particles using holograms, lasersHolographic images of free-flowing air particles may help climate change and biological weapons watchdogs better monitor the atmosphere, according to a recent Kansas State University study published in Nature's Scientific Reports. The images are made by two overlapping lasers that could be mounted on an unmanned aircraft to monitor the atmosphere.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Livestock grazing harming giant panda habitatOne third of the giant panda habitat in China's Wanglang National Nature Reserve has been degraded and lost to livestock grazing, a new Duke Kunshan University-led study finds. Livestock numbers in the park have increased ninefold in the last 15 years. Scientists from Duke Kunshan, Duke University, Peking University and Wanglang National Nature Reserve contributed to the study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cell signals that trigger wound healing are surprisingly complexVanderbilt scientists have taken an important step toward understanding the way in which injured cells trigger wound healing, an insight essential for improving treatments of all types of wounds.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Computational study sheds doubt on latest theory of birds' mysterious magnetic compassThe European robin and other birds know where to migrate by sensing the direction of the Earth's magnetic field. Researchers have recently attributed this ability to a chemical reaction that takes place within the eye and whose success depends on the field direction. However, researchers report in Biophysical Journal that the current form of this 'radical-pair mechanism' is not sensitive enough to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New key regulator of acquisition of immune tolerance to tumor cells in cancer patientsResearchers of the Chromatin and Disease Group from the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL) in Barcelona have identified a distinctive epigenetic event in immune cells that differentiate in the tumoral microenvironment and make them tolerant to cancer cells.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fecal transplant success for diabetes might depend on the recipient's gut microbesA small clinical trial in the Netherlands found that a fecal transplant from a lean donor can temporarily improve insulin resistance in obese men -- but only half of the recipients responded. Upon further investigation, the researchers discovered that they could predict the success of the treatment by analyzing each patient's fecal gut-bacterial makeup. This understanding could help shape the deve
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Big Think

3 Americans Awarded Nobel Prize for Unlocking the Body Clock They proved how the biological mechanism works inside our cells. Read More
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Big Think

Time To Update Science's Mobile Army of Metaphors? “Scientists should think like poets,” says E.O. Wilson, because new metaphors mobilize new thinking. Read More
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Popular Science

The detection of ripples in the fabric of spacetime just won a Nobel Prize Science Making waves in the physics community. There was speculation that gravitational waves would win last year, though the prize probably would have gone to a slightly different trio.
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New Scientist - News

Build an AI god? Beware the downsides of this weird tech planWhat pitfalls or rewards might await the Silicon Valley whiz kid apparently intent on creating a benign superintelligent digital deity, wonders Jamais Cascio
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Gizmodo

This Might Be Our First Look At Tesla's All-Electric Semi-Truck Photo: Twitter There’s little known about the all-electric semi truck that Tesla CEO Elon Musk wants to unveil later this month. But now we have an apparent snapshot of what it’ll look like. The image surfaced yesterday on Reddit. The initial post was deleted, but another Reddit user captured it in time and reposted it. Advertisement What can we tell? It’s a clear shot of the silver’s truck’s pas
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New on MIT Technology Review

AI Definitely Didn’t Stop Fake News about the Las Vegas Shooting
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New on MIT Technology Review

How AI Will Keep You HealthyAn audacious Chinese entrepreneur wants to test your body for everything. But are computers really smart enough to make sense of all that data?
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The Atlantic

How a 130-Year-Old Technology Led to a Nobel Prize In 1887, Albert Michelson built an experiment that he hoped would lead to the detection of luminiferous ether. At the time, physicists believed that the ether permeated the universe and served as the medium through which light waves moved, like the way waves traveled across the ocean. * The experiment turned out to be a failure . The mystical ether didn’t exist. But the instrument that Michelson
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Ars Technica

Naturopath teaches real doctors something—a new way to cause liver damage (credit: Champagne Suki ) In a medical first, a 38-year-old man with gallstones developed severe liver damage and jaundice after following the delusional advice of a practitioner of naturopathy, a pseudoscientific system that eschews evidence-based medicine . Writing in BMJ Case Reports , doctors report that the naturopath told the man to take an excessive amount of Epsom salt for "stone dissolut
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Computational study sheds doubt on latest theory of birds' mysterious magnetic compassThe European robin and other birds know where to migrate by sensing the direction of the Earth's magnetic field. Researchers have recently attributed this ability to a chemical reaction that takes place within the eye and whose success depends on the field direction. However, University of Oxford researchers report October 3 in Biophysical Journal that the current form of this "radical-pair mechan
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cell signals that trigger wound healing are surprisingly complexIn a sharp and pointy world, wound healing is a critical and marvelous process. Despite a tremendous amount of scientific study, many outstanding mysteries still surround the way in which cells in living tissue respond to and repair physical damage.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Livestock grazing harming giant panda habitatIncreased livestock grazing in China's Wanglang National Nature Preserve has damaged one third of all giant panda habitat in the park, a new study by Chinese and U.S. scientists finds.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Six in seven contact lens wearers take unnecessary risks with their eyesA lot of contact wearers are not practicing healthy habits with their lenses, a national survey finds.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mold contamination in sea salts could potentially spoil foodResearch from Cornell University mycologist Kathie Hodge and doctoral candidate Megan Biango-Daniels reveals varying levels of mold contamination in commercial sea salts. Among those molds were important food spoilage molds like Aspergillus and Penicillium, and even some notorious producers of mycotoxins.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Morbidity and mortality of leprosy in the Middle AgesIn the Middle Ages, did contracting leprosy necessarily increase a person's chances of dying? Yes, says a new paper. But it's complicated.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How to regulate e-sports gambling debated in Gaming Law ReviewThe new and rapidly evolving esports industry, while currently enjoying minimal regulatory oversight, would benefit in the long-term from a solid regulatory structure that embodies consumer protections.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tiny poisonous Brazilian frogs are 'deaf' to their own callTiny Brazilian frogs still 'sing' despite not being able to hear themselves -- this is the surprising discovery of new scientific research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

High-deductible health care plans curb both cost and usage, including preventive careA team of researchers based at IUPUI has conducted the first systematic review of studies examining the relationship between high-deductible health care plans and the use of health care services. They found these plans reduce both the cost and the use of health care services, according to an article published in the October issue of the journal Health Affairs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ninety-eight scientists launch a 2,000-year global temperature databaseA team of 98 scientists from 22 countries has compiled the most comprehensive database of past global temperature records to date, spanning 1 CE to the present.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UTA study sheds new light on evolutionResearch from the University of Texas at Arlington and the Wadia Institute of Himalayan Geology suggests that hydrogen, oxygen, water and carbon dioxide are being generated in the earth's mantle hundreds of kilometers below the Earth's surface.
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Ars Technica

NASA tries an inflatable room on the space station, likes it NASA NASA has tried Bigelow's expandable habitat on its International Space Station, and the agency likes it. Installed now for more than a year on the station, the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module has passed key structural tests, and engineers now believe it will be capable of surviving in low Earth orbit for a longer period of time. So this week, NASA announced that it intends to extend the l
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Gizmodo

Tuesday's Top Deals: Arduino Starter Kit, Mattress Pad Gold Box, Anker PowerCore II, and More Check today’s top deals including an Arduino Starter Kit , mattress pad Gold Box, Ghost paper notebook , anti-fatigue mat , Anker battery , Game of Thrones prequel and much more! Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. TOP TECH DEALS FREE Wickedly Prime Sweet ‘n’ Cheesy Popcorn with $25 Amazon.com purchase If you spend $25 on products shipped and sold by Amazon.com tod
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Viden

EU-domstolen kan forbyde Facebook at lagre dine data i USADen irske højesteret beder EU-domstolen om at overtage sag om overførsel af Facebook-data rejst af østrigsk aktivist.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cooling treatment reduces epilepsy in childrenCooling babies deprived of oxygen at birth (perinatal asphyxia) can reduce the number of children who develop epilepsy later in childhood, according to a new study published in the journal Epilepsia.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study: Sepsis care initiatives may lead to higher C. difficile infection rates, antibiotic resistanceHealthcare experts have long known the benefits of integrated sepsis care programs, yet less information has been published on potential unintended consequences of these programs. That's changed with a new study that suggests that electronic sepsis screenings and treatment protocols could, in fact, lead to increased use of certain broad-spectrum antibiotics and healthcare facility-onset (HCFO) C.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Global research team fills language gap in plant scienceTo keep pace with the fast-evolving study of cellular plant science, an international team of researchers has created terminology and definitions likely to become everyday language in laboratories and university classrooms worldwide.
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The Atlantic

Will Florida Banish the Ghost of Jim Crow? Next year, Florida voters may finally right a wrong first perpetrated 150 years ago by racist state legislators who were desperate to deny equality to African Americans. Voters may enfranchise almost 1.6 million fellow Floridians; or they may retain an approach that long-dead white supremacists conceived to disenfranchise blacks, an approach that is still spectacularly successful at diluting thei
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The Atlantic

A New History of the First Peoples in the Americas Europeans arriving in the New World met people all the way from the frozen north to the frozen south. All had rich and mature cultures and established languages. The Skraeling were probably a people we now call Thule, who were the ancestors of the Inuit in Greenland and Canada and the Iñupiat in Alaska. The Taíno were a people spread across multiple chiefdoms around the Caribbean and Florida. B
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Live Science

Doctors Remove More Than 100 Pieces of Metal from a Man's StomachSurgeons removed more than 100 pieces of metal of various shapes and sizes from the stomach of a man in France, according to a new report of the man's case.
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Ars Technica

Disney brings multiplayer back to classic Star Wars: Battlefront 2 Enlarge / Hey guys, long time no see! Here at Ars, we often have the sad duty report on online gameplay servers being shut down by publishers once the games themselves have become too old or unprofitable. So it's nice to be able to write about a game seeing online support reinstated after years in the offline wilderness. Today, that game is Star Wars: Battlefront 2 , the 2005 PC/console third-per
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Science : NPR

Nobel Winners' Work In Physics Began With Albert Einstein Three scientists won the prize after a 25-year-long search of the cosmos for gravitational waves — the waving of space — the one test missing for Einstein, says astrophysicist Marcelo Gleiser. (Image credit: traveler1116/Getty Images)
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Popular Science

Three people won a Nobel Prize for the work of more than a thousand Science 1 experiment. 1,011 people. 3 Nobel Prize winners. 1 experiment. 1,011 people. 3 Nobel Prize winners.
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Ars Technica

“NSFW” doesn’t begin to describe Bluetooth security in sex toys Enlarge (credit: Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images) Technologies such as Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) have allowed an increasing number of devices to be controlled by mobile devices. But as Ars has reported in the past, BLE devices also can be a privacy and security risk. And as Alex Lomas of Pentest Partners found recently, some of these vulnerable devices are of a very personal nature. Lomas dis
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Neuroscientists find 'gatekeeper' in itching sensations plays no role in pain transmissionA neurotransmitter study in mice found that BNP is involved in relaying itching sensations but not pain. A better understanding of pain and itch pathways could help researchers develop targeted therapies for diseases with chronic itching, including multiple sclerosis and kidney failure.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blood-thinning medications associated with increased risk of complications from having blood in urineUse of blood-thinning medications among older adults was significantly associated with higher rates of hematuria (the presence of blood in urine)-related complications, including emergency department visits, hospitalizations and urologic procedures to manage visible hematuria, according to a study published by JAMA.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Use of non-vitamin K blood-thinners with certain medications associated with increased risk of major bleedingAmong patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, concurrent use of certain commonly prescribed medications with non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants was associated with an increased risk of major bleeding, according to a study published by JAMA.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Incidence of measles in the United StatesFrom 2001 to 2015, the overall annual incidence of measles in the United States remained extremely low (less than 1 case/million population) compared with incidence worldwide (40 cases/million population); relative increases in measles rates were observed over the period, and the findings suggest that failure to vaccinate may be the main driver of measles transmission, according to a study publish
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The Atlantic

For Women Seeking Pop Hits in 2017, It's a Climb Until recently, a mystery loomed over the 2017 pop landscape: Where have all the female blockbusters gone ? When Taylor Swift’s “Look What You Made Me Do” took the No. 1 spot on the September 16 Billboard Hot 100, it marked the first song featuring a female singer to top the charts since November 19, 2016, the first song released by a female artist to do so since August 27, 2016, and the first No
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Ingeniøren

Forsinkede tog-signaler: Minister går tilbage i skjulTransportminister Ole Birk Olesen talte for blot tre måneder siden om en realistisk plan for at indføre nye signaler på den danske jernbane. Nu er udsigten mere dyster og han nægter igen at svare på spørgsmål.
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Gizmodo

Your Password Manager Can Tell You If Your Passwords Suck If you’re worried about protecting your online identity from hackers a password manager like 1Password is a good place to start, but setting up an account is only half the battle. Most of these services feature extra security features that you may not be taking advantage of. Here’s what you need to know to get the most out of the password manager you’re already using. 1Password 1Password and Watc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scotland says no to frackingFracking will be banned in Scotland following a widespread public backlash against onshore drilling, the government said on Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New machine evaluates soybean at harvest for qualityWhen a field of soybeans is ready to harvest, speed is of the essence. But harvesting grinds to a halt every time the combine operator has to climb down out of the cab to manually check for quality—whole, un-split beans without stray husk material. Researchers from Kyoto University and University of Illinois recently developed a machine to automate the process, evaluating bean quality on the fly,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research suggests social action may give youth a career edgeWhen disadvantaged youth engage in social activism, they tend to have high-status occupations in adulthood, according to Clemson University and University of Michigan researchers. The findings also suggest there's a place for more discussion of social issues in our educational systems.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Large volcanic eruptions in tropics can trigger El Nino eventsExplosive volcanic eruptions in the tropics can lead to El Niño events, those notorious warming periods in the Pacific Ocean with dramatic global impacts on the climate, according to a new study.
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Gizmodo

This 10-Foot-Long Jurassic Crocodile Once Menaced Britain's Seas Image: Fabio Manucci A reanalysis of a heavily damaged fossil found nearly 150 years ago has revealed the existence of an absolute monster of the ancient seas. And the discovery of the new species, nicknamed the “Melksham Monster,” shows that an extinct group of ancient reptiles appeared on Earth millions of years earlier than previously thought. Meet Leldraan melkshamensi s, a 10-foot-long marin
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Feed: All Latest

Is it OK For Me to Ask Customer Service Reps if They're Robots?Gather round for a tale of a modern art exhibit, a deafening thwack, and a mass abandonment of civility.
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Feed: All Latest

The iPhone Didn't Emerge From Nothing. Here's What Came Before ItRead an excerpt from the book, "The Runaway Species."
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Xenon view, butterfly wings and a strange squid September’s sharpest science shots, selected by Nature ’s photo team. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22741
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The Atlantic

What Would Flying From New York to Shanghai in 39 Minutes Feel Like? It’s just after sunrise in New York City. The sky is bathed in pinks and orange as people walk along a long dock toward a white ship. They board the vessel and it sails out to a launchpad further out in the water, where a spaceship strapped to a giant rocket awaits. After they pile in, the rocket blasts off into the atmosphere. About 39 minutes later, they land halfway around the world, in Shangh
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Does the titanium dioxide in food and nanomaterials affect the gut microbiome?A new study has shown that the titanium dioxide (TiO2) frequently used in foods, coatings, pigments, and paints that is ingested can affect both the types of bacteria present in the human gut and the pH of the colon. The physical and chemical properties of two forms of TiO2 studied appear to produce different microbial responses, according to an article published in Environmental Engineering Scien
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

To breed or not to breed? Migratory female butterflies face a monsoonal dilemmaWhat do CPUs, stockbrokers, and butterflies have in common? They are good at investing their resources in the right place at the right time so as to maximize their returns! Trade-offs are a way of life for butterflies and other small insects that must budget their energy between numerous morphological features and activities during their short lifespans. Time, food, and space are always at a premi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NREL, Johns Hopkins develop method to quantify life cycle land use of natural gasA case study of the Barnett Shale region in Texas, where hydraulic fracturing was first implemented, for the first time provides quantifiable information on the life cycle land use of generating electricity from natural gas based on physical measurements instead of using assumptions and averages that were previously used for evaluation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Large volcanic eruptions in Tropics can trigger El Niño eventsExplosive volcanic eruptions in the tropics can lead to El Niño events, those notorious warming periods in the Pacific Ocean with dramatic global impacts on the climate, according to a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Education faculty research suggests social action may give youth a career edgeWhen disadvantaged youth engage in social activism, they tend to have high-status occupations in adulthood, according to Clemson University and University of Michigan researchers. The findings also suggest there's a place for more discussion of social issues in our educational systems.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bones reveal social differences between the people buried in dolmens and those in cavesA study by the UPV/EHU's Department of Genetics, Physical Anthropology and Animal Physiology and the School of Archaeology of the University of Oxford has measured stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes of the bones of individuals buried in dolmens and caves; the aim is to establish their diet and thus obtain information on their social structure and type of society in the Rioja Alavesa area during t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Twitter a hotbed of anti-vaccine sentiment, study findsAnti-vaccine sentiment is alive and growing on social media, with California, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York and Pennsylvania showing the most negative tweets, according to a new five-year study by a CU Boulder researcher.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Astronomers reveal evidence of dynamical dark energyAn international research team, including astronomers from the University of Portsmouth, has revealed evidence of dynamical dark energy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New machine evaluates soybean at harvest for qualityWhen a field of soybeans is ready to harvest, speed is of the essence. But harvesting grinds to a halt every time the combine operator has to climb down out of the cab to manually check for quality -- whole, un-split beans without stray husk material. Researchers from Kyoto University and University of Illinois recently developed a machine to automate the process, evaluating bean quality on the fl
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New in the Hastings Center Report, September-October 2017The ethics of providing cheaper, less effective treatments in resource-poor countries; physician-assisted death and severe depression; and more in the September-October 2017 issue.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NIH researchers uncover drain pipes in our brainsBy scanning the brains of healthy volunteers, researchers at the National Institutes of Health saw the first, long-sought evidence that our brains may drain some waste out through lymphatic vessels, the body's sewer system. The results further suggest the vessels could act as a pipeline between the brain and the immune system.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Most Americans Want Climate Change PoliciesBut in a new poll, half say they would not pay more on their electric bill to help lower emissions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Breaking the rules: Heavy chemical elements alter theory of quantum mechanicsA series of complicated experiments involving one of the least understood elements of the Periodic Table has turned some long-held tenets of the scientific world upside down.
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Futurity.org

Hormones may contribute to ‘leash aggression’ in dogs Hormones may be partly to blame for dogs’ “leash aggression,” new research suggests. Dogs with what is known as “leash aggression” may bark, growl, or lunge at other dogs during walks, setting the scene for a tense and potentially dangerous interaction. So why do some dogs lash out on the leash while others don’t? Although a number of studies have looked at the role of testosterone and serotonin
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Gizmodo

Huge Gravitational Waves Discovery Gets the Nobel Prize It Deserves Image: NASA/CXC/A.Hobart /Wikimedia Commons The Nobel Prizes are important and all. But if you’ve been paying attention to physics for the past two years, this year’s prize is akin to saying “my beautiful dog has won the Good Boy prize.” We’re very excited, but we aren’t surprised. Today, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has awarded the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics half to Rainer Weiss and ha
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Gizmodo

Jezebel Megyn Kelly Today, Today: In Which Tom Brokaw Gets Cut Off While Speaking Out Against the NR Jezebel Megyn Kelly Today , Today: In Which Tom Brokaw Gets Cut Off While Speaking Out Against the NRA | Deadspin Colorado Springs Police Beg Us To Stop Calling About The Mad Pooper, Who Is Still At Large | The Root After Slamming Former Tennis Star James Blake to the Ground, This NYPD Officer Has Now Decided to Sue the Athlete | Earther Invasive Hippos, Camels, and Elephants Offer a Glimmer of H
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Gizmodo

The Gifted Isn't Trying to Be an X-Men TV Series and That's What Makes It Good Image: Fox One of the more curious things about The Gifted was how little about the show Fox revealed in the months leading up to last night’s premiere. We knew it would feature a family on the run from the mutant-hating government and a handful of classic X-Men characters, but not much else aside from that. Details about The Gifted were vague and for ages, the only footage of the show that Fox w
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Futurity.org

Parenting program eases ADHD symptoms in kids A program that focuses on strengthening parenting skills also improves symptoms of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in 3-8 year-olds, according to new research. “Prior research already has shown that this program improves behavior difficulties in young children,” says Desiree W. Murray, associate director of research at the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute at the Uni
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Five plants and animals we don't want any more ofThey may not be household names, but, according to experts, they pose risks to the environment.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Risk of Human-Triggered Earthquakes Laid Out in Biggest-Ever DatabaseGeologists track hundreds of quakes caused by people and the projects that set them off -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

The Fight for Abortions in Ireland Tens of thousands of people gathered in Dublin Saturday for the annual March for Choice, a demonstration calling on Ireland’s government to ease its near-total abortion ban. It was the first major rally organized by pro-choice advocates since the government announced an upcoming referendum: Next summer, the country will vote on whether it should change its abortion laws. The advocates told me tha
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Popular Science

The detection of ripples in the fabric of spacetime just won a Nobel Prize Science Making waves in the physics community. There was speculation that gravitational waves would win last year, though the prize probably would have gone to a slightly different trio.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Make plans to eliminate cholera outbreaks Governments must stop denying the occurrence of cholera and unite in long-term prevention strategies, says Anita Zaidi. Nature 550 9 doi: 10.1038/550009a
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Ethics of Internet research trigger scrutiny Concern over the use of public data spurs guideline update. Nature 550 16 doi: 10.1038/550016a
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New on MIT Technology Review

This Disaster Robot Would Climb Ladders in the Pouring Rain to Rescue You
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Gizmodo

Polaroid's New Instant Camera Takes Terrible Retro Photos Very Well Photo: Adam Clark Estes/Gizmodo The night that Polaroid announced its first all-new instant camera since the mid-aughts, there was a party in the Bowery. A small gallery space was filled with sweaty art school types, and a row Polaroid cameras lined one wall showcasing a timeline of the company’s design. The famous Polaroid photographer Ryan McGinley announced the new camera: the OneStep 2, the h
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New on MIT Technology Review

This Disaster Robot Would Climb Ladders in the Rain to Help You
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New on MIT Technology Review

Gene-Edited Skin Could Be Its Own Blood-Sugar SensorDiabetics might ultimately have glucose sensors built into their bodies.
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Ingeniøren

Automationsprisen 2017: Robotten trækker stregenOpstribningsrobot fra lille nordjysk iværksætter er klar til at tegne striber på alverdens sportsbaner. I dag fik grundlæggerne Automationsprisen 2017.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tiny protein offers major insight into foot-and-mouth virusScientists have identified that a tiny protein, which plays a major role in the replication of foot-and-mouth disease virus, demonstrates a greater level of genetic economy than previously reported.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Does the titanium dioxide in food and nanomaterials affect the gut microbiome?A new study has shown that the titanium dioxide (TiO2) frequently used in foods, coatings, pigments, and paints that is ingested can affect both the types of bacteria present in the human gut and the pH of the colon.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

To breed or not to breed? Migratory female butterflies face a monsoonal dilemmaFemale butterflies make smart investments, finds a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Breaking the rules: Heavy chemical elements alter theory of quantum mechanicsFlorida State University researchers found that the theory of quantum mechanics does not adequately explain how the heaviest and rarest elements found at the end of the table function. Instead, another well-known scientific theory -- Albert Einstein's famous Theory of Relativity -- helps govern the behavior of the last 21 elements of the Periodic Table.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Link between childhood in care and mums who have babies removed by the courtsA study has found a high number of women, who repeatedly appear before the family courts and lose many children into public care or adoption because of child protection concerns, have been in care themselves. 40% of the mothers had been in foster care or children's homes with a further 14% living in private or informal relationships away from their parents.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Up to 50 percent fewer phytosanitary products required to treat vine diseasesThe FITOVID project, the results of which were presented recently, has managed to decrease by up to 50 percent the amount of phytosanitary products required in vineyards.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study identifies factors linked to dying comfortably for the very oldVery old people are more likely to die comfortably if they die in a care home or at home, compared with dying in a hospital, suggests a new study from the University of Cambridge. Yet while the overwhelming majority of very old people reported symptoms at the end of life such as distress, pain and depression, the study found that these were not always treated effectively.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Studies of 'amorphous ice' reveal hidden order in glass'Amorphous ice' forms when water is rapidly cooled to form a disordered glass-like solid rather than the common form of ice, which is crystalline. Now researchers have found a surprising degree of order in this supposedly amorphous material.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New efficient catalyst for key step in artificial photosynthesisChemists have designed a new 'single-site' catalyst that speeds up the rate of a key step in artificial photosynthesis. It's the first to match the efficiency of the catalytic sites that drive this reaction in nature and could greatly improve the potential for making efficient solar-to-fuel conversion devices.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Breast cancer statistics, 2017Breast cancer death rates dropped 39 percent between 1989 and 2015, averting 322,600 breast cancer deaths during those 26 years. Death rates in several states are now statistically equivalent, perhaps reflecting an elimination of disparities in those states.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Ideal biomarker' detects Alzheimer's disease before the onset of symptomsAbsence of a prefrontal activation during sensory gating of simple tones detects the Alzheimer's disease (AD) before the occurrence of the first symptoms. Sanja Josef Golubic Ph.D., physicists at the Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, reveals the high potential, absolutely non-invasive biomarker of AD pathology in a new study published in the journal Human Brain Mappi
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Viden

Én times motion om ugen nedsætter risiko for depression markantBare en til to timers motion om ugen nedsatte risikoen for depression blandt nordmænd med 44 procent, ifølge en ny stor undersøgelse.
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Gizmodo

What’s Going on With the Rumored, Not Good T-Mobile and Sprint Merger Image Sources: Sprint, T-Mobile For weeks, reports have steadily confirmed that Sprint and T-Mobile are in negotiations to merge their businesses into a telecom behemoth as soon as the end of October . Previous merger attempts have been thwarted by regulators but analysts are predicting this time around that things could be different. Here’s everything you need to know about what’s going on, and
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Science | The Guardian

Why discovering gravitational waves was a big deal – video Gravitational waves are ripples in the fabric of spacetime and were anticipated by Albert Einstein a century ago. Three American physicists have won the Nobel prize in physics for the discovery. We explain why it is so important Nobel prize in physics awarded for discovery of gravitational waves Continue reading...
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New on MIT Technology Review

Forget Killer Robots—Bias Is the Real AI DangerJohn Giannandrea, who leads AI at Google, is worried about intelligent systems learning human prejudices.
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Gizmodo

Here's the First Ever Deal On Anker's Faster-Charging PowerCore II 10000 Battery [Exclusive] Anker PowerCore II 10000 , $25 Anker’s not-too-big and not-too-small PowerCore 10000 has been one of the most popular USB battery packs on the market since its debut, and we have the first ever discount on its brand new sequel, the PowerCore II 10000 . Cosmetically, it looks very similar to the original, but with the PowerCore+ line’s eight-dot charge indicator, which is a very good thing. But in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Irish court refers landmark EU-US data transfer case to EUIreland's High Court on Tuesday asked the EU's Court of Justice of the European Union to decide on rules on the transfer of data from Europe to the US in a case with far-reaching implications for industry.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A geochemist from MSU has assessed the oxidative environment inside asteroidsA postgraduate of the Faculty of Geology at Moscow State University working as a part of an international team has assessed the oxidative environment and its changes inside asteroids from the core to the surface. This gives the authors of the study a better understanding of how the planets were formed. The paper was published in Meteoritics and Planetary Science.
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