Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New nanomaterial can extract hydrogen fuel from seawaterIt's possible to produce hydrogen to power fuel cells by extracting the gas from seawater, but the electricity required to do it makes the process costly. UCF researcher Yang Yang has come up with a new hybrid nanomaterial that harnesses solar energy and uses it to generate hydrogen from seawater more cheaply and efficiently than current materials.
1h
The Scientist RSS
Scientists Who Developed Cryo-Electron Microscopy Win Nobel PrizeChemistry Nobel goes to Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank, and Richard Henderson.
6h
Ingeniøren
Elbiler overbelaster det norske elnetDet norske elnet er mange steder for svagt til de mange nye elbiler. Det bliver nødvendigt med nye kabler, transformere og sandsynligvis også batterilagre for at klare efterspørgslen
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Gizmodo
Google's Pixel 2 Has a Lot to Prove and Everything to Lose All images: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo The Google Pixel 2 might not have as vibrant a blue color scheme, but this is a different phone from last year’s model, with a sharper design (that colorful camera button) and some new features that could inspire hope in Google fans who were less than stoked after last year’s outing. The Google Pixel was not an outstanding and world changing phone, despite how much
3min
NYT > Science
Hurricane Damage in Puerto Rico Leads to Fears of Drug Shortages NationwideTwo weeks after Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico, manufacturers are scrambling to get their plants back on line and avoid production problems.
5min
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Rex Post Facto Today in 5 Lines During his visit to Las Vegas to honor the victims of Sunday’s mass shooting, Trump offered a message of unity, but refused to discuss gun policy. The FBI questioned Marilou Danley, the girlfriend of the Las Vegas gunman, Stephen Paddock. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson denied that he had ever considered resigning from his position, but stopped short of explicitly refuting a rep
7min
Big Think
Early Science Education Is Suffering a Crisis of Confidence—That's a Big Problem Early childhood science education can have significant positive effects on the achievement gap and on students’ educational outcomes later on. Read More
10min
Gizmodo
Mice Are Evolving to Survive Life in New York City Image: D. Gordon E. Robertson /Wikimedia Commons Spend enough time in New York City, and there won’t be much that can surprise you. Two-hour lines to get a donut? Yeah, that makes sense. Mummified bat corpses in the alley behind the local church? Of course, that’s where mummified bat corpses belong. Human feces inside a Chinese takeout box on the floor of the subway station? Not my first choice,
14min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Inside a Silicon Valley startup's explosive demiseBehind Kanoa's slick promotional photos and videos, lofty promises to revolutionize music listening, and countless reassurances to customers, the warning signs were there - the startup was in trouble.
18min
Ars Technica
SEC hack came as internal security team begged for funding Somebody didn't hear that whistle blowing. (credit: Securities and Exchange Commission Office of the Whistleblower ) Last month, the Securities and Exchange Commission revealed a 2016 breach of a test system that allowed an unknown party to get access to unpublished corporate information in the SEC's Electronic Data Gathering, Analysis, and Retrieval (EDGAR) system. The breach potentially allowed
21min
Popular Science
When a hurricane finally passes, it spreads deadly disease in its wake Environment The end of a storm can spell the beginning of a disaster. Long after the eye of the storm has passed, big storms can continue to spread disaster.
26min
Ars Technica
Judge: Barrett Brown donors can sue government over subpoenaed records Enlarge (credit: Free Barrett Brown ) A federal judge in San Francisco has denied the FBI’s attempt to dismiss a lawsuit brought by a local activist who raised money for Barrett Brown. Brown is a journalist who was released from prison last year. As Ars reported previously, in April 2014 Brown took a plea deal admitting guilt on three charges: “transmitting a threat in interstate commerce," inter
27min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
DNA-based Zika vaccine candidate found safe and effective at inducing immune responseA new generation DNA-based Zika vaccine is the first to demonstrate both safety and the ability to elicit an immune response against Zika in humans, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, conducted in partnership with The Wistar Institute, Inovio Pharmaceuticals, and GeneOne Life Science, Inc.
27min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
DNA-based Zika vaccine is safe and effective at inducing immune responseA new generation DNA-based Zika vaccine demonstrated both safety and ability to elicit an immune response against Zika in humans in a phase 1 clinical trial conducted through a partnership among the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Inovio Pharmaceuticals, GeneOne Life Science, and The Wistar Institute.
27min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Impacts of ride-hailing on crashes differ from city to cityRide-hailing services reduce drunk-driving crashes in some cities, reports a new study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania this month in the American Journal of Epidemiology. The research is the first to look at the specific effects of ride-hailing, or 'ride-sharing,' within specific cities, rather than averaging data across multiple cities.
27min
New on MIT Technology Review
OK Google, Get Out of My FaceUbiquitous computing is starting to get (really) real and I’m kind of afraid of it.
32min
Gizmodo
What Does Twitter's Biz Stone Think His Job Is? Image: AP “I definitely spend way more time reading tweets than writing tweets,” Twitter co-founder Biz Stone told Fresh Air ’s Terry Gross in 2011 . Back then, his company was enjoying praise for its (largely accidental) role in helping to organize the Arab Spring, with Stone describing himself as “an infrequent tweeter” and a “consumer of the information that’s coursing through the system.” Muc
38min
Live Science
Tiny Acrobat: Louse Photographed Flipping and TwirlingDoctors in Mexico snapped a stunning photo of an acrobatic arthropod flipping and twirling. But the critter was far from a medical marvel — rather, the crab-shaped parasite was a lowly pubic louse.
43min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sunlight and 'right' microbes convert Arctic carbon into carbon dioxideA new study outlines the mechanisms and points to the importance of both sunlight and the right microbial community as keys to converting permafrost carbon to CO2.
43min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Climate change, population growth may lead to open ocean aquacultureA new analysis suggests that open-ocean aquaculture for three species of finfish is a viable option for industry expansion under most climate change scenarios -- an option that may provide a new source of protein for the world's growing population.
43min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Milky Way's 'most-mysterious star' continues to confoundIn 2015, a star called KIC 8462852 caused quite a stir in and beyond the astronomy community due to a series of rapid, unexplained dimming events. The latest findings from Carnegie astronomers and collaborators take a longer look at the star, going back to 2006 -- before its strange behavior was detected by Kepler.
48min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Are we at a tipping point with weed control?Imagine walking the cereal aisle at your favorite grocery store. Are you reading labels? Scanning prices? Thinking about weeds? If you're like most American consumers, weeds probably aren't at the forefront of your mind when buying food. But if farmers could no longer control weeds with existing herbicides, Americans would take notice pretty quickly.
57min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New nanomaterial can extract hydrogen fuel from seawaterA new hybrid nanomaterial harvests solar energy and uses it to extract hydrogen from seawater, cheaply and efficiently. Future commercialization could mean a new source of environmentally friendly fuel and less dependence on fossil fuels.
57min
Science : NPR
Nobel Prize In Chemistry Awarded To Researchers Who Improved 'Imaging Of Biomolecules' They were honored for developing a new way to generate 3-D images of biological molecules. Researchers are using the technique to study everything from the Zika virus to Alzheimer's disease.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate change, population growth may lead to open ocean aquacultureA new analysis suggests that open-ocean aquaculture for three species of finfish is a viable option for industry expansion under most climate change scenarios -- an option that may provide a new source of protein for the world's growing population.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Sunlight and the right microbes convert Arctic carbon into carbon dioxideA new study published this week in Nature Communications outlines the mechanisms and points to the importance of both sunlight and the right microbial community as keys to converting permafrost carbon to CO2.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Scientists plead with Brazilian government to restore funding If officials don't act soon, research institutions could start shutting down next year. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22757
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Amazon Prime Members Save $30 on a Kindle Right NowIf you've been holding off on that new Kindle, now's your chance.
1h
The Atlantic
Mass Shootings in the United States: 'This Is Who We Are' In a recent article for The Atlantic , writer James Fallows argues that no other society has allowed gun massacres to keep happening . For example, in the wake of a mass shooting in Australia in 1996, the country introduced a swift overhaul of gun legislation. Although Fallows acknowledges that stricter gun laws aren’t a panacea for every possible attack in America, he believes that gun control c
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New nanomaterial can extract hydrogen fuel from seawaterA new hybrid nanomaterial harvests solar energy and uses it to extract hydrogen from seawater, cheaply and efficiently. Future commercialization could mean a new source of environmentally friendly fuel and less dependence on fossil fuels.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
To kickstart creativity, offer money, not plaudits, study findsThe best way to reward creativity is not with social-recognition awards such as plaques or other plaudits. According to published research co-written by Ravi Mehta, a professor of business administration at Illinois, it's all about the money.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Are we at a tipping point with weed control?Imagine walking the cereal aisle at your favorite grocery store. Are you reading labels? Scanning prices? Thinking about weeds? If you're like most American consumers, weeds probably aren't at the forefront of your mind when buying food. But if farmers could no longer control weeds with existing herbicides, Americans would take notice pretty quickly.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study reveals staggering economic burden of dementia in younger peopleWhile the social and economic cost of Alzheimer's is well documented, a new study shows that frontotemporal degeneration (FTD) -- the most common dementia for people under age 60 -- inflicts a significantly higher economic burden on both patients and their caregivers. It found that the average annual costs associated with FTD to total $119,654, nearly two times the reported annual cost of Alzheime
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sperm banking is underutilized by adolescent and young adult cancer patientsResearch led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital found meeting with fertility specialists and parental recommendations play key roles in decisions at-risk male cancer patients make about fertility preservation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
For women, high blood pressure in your 40s may be tied to increased risk of DementiaWomen who develop high blood pressure in their 40s may be more likely to develop dementia years later, according to a study published in the Oct. 4, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Are we at a tipping point with weed control?Imagine walking the cereal aisle at your favorite grocery store. Are you reading labels? Scanning prices? Thinking about weeds? If you're like most American consumers, weeds probably aren't at the forefront of your mind when buying food. But if farmers could no longer control weeds with existing herbicides, Americans would take notice pretty quickly.
1h
Popular Science
Another hurricane could threaten the Gulf Coast this weekend Environment The season isn't over yet. A developing tropical depression in the Caribbean could threaten the Gulf Coast as a hurricane this weekend, but the storm's future is far from certain.
1h
Big Think
Six Apps That Combat Depression and Anxiety Our phones often help promote depression and anxiety. These apps are fighting back. Read More
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Big Think
Study: Your Eyes Are Drawn to Meaning, Not to What “Sticks Out” A new study overturns the conventional thinking about how we focus our visual attention. Read More
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Gizmodo
Scientists Genetically Engineered Moss to Smell Like Patchouli and It's Amazing Taxa’s GMO moss. Photo: Kristen V. Brown/Gizmodo Moss, in case you were not already aware, is a pretty freaking amazing plant. It does not have roots, allowing it to grow in unlikely places like bits of rock at the top of a glacier or on lifeless, barren fields of lava . It provides a habitat for an entire community of microscopic critters. Its leaves are only one cell thick! And it must have the
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New Scientist - News
Your ‘risk intelligence’ decides how much of a daredevil you areThe most comprehensive study yet into how people respond to risk has found that there is a common factor that drives all types of risk-taking
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New Scientist - News
Different meditation types train distinct parts of your brainJust like physical exercise, the kind of improvements you get with meditation depend on exactly how you train
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Viden
Ny række af Google-dimser: Lægger pres på Apple og MicrosoftGoogle lancerer en ny perlerække af hardware. Firmaets produktportefølje minder nu i høj grad om Apples.
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Gizmodo
Cozy Up to This Faux Fireplace Heater for $117 Duraflame Infrared Quartz Fireplace Stove with 3D Flame Effect , $117 Save some money on your heating bill while adding some fireplace charm this fall with this faux fire infrared heater . It heats the room while the outside of the heater stays cool to the touch. It even comes with a remote control that allows you to set a time for when you’d like it to turn it on and off. Advertisement Yeah mayb
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ancient humans left Africa to escape drying climateHumans migrated out of Africa as the climate shifted from wet to dry about 60,000 years ago, according to new paleoclimate research. What the northeast Africa climate was like when people migrated from Africa into Eurasia between 70,000 and 55,000 years ago is still uncertain. The new research shows around 70,000 years ago, the Horn of Africa climate shifted from a wet phase called 'Green Sahara'
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Gizmodo
Yellowstone Supervolcano Is Experiencing Its Longest Earthquake Swarm on Record (But Calm Down) Image: AP Do not lose sleep tonight, the world will not end as the result of some enormous supervolcano eruption in Yellowstone National Park any time soon. But there is a whole lot of other interesting stuff going on there—so maybe it’s worth losing sleep by getting excited about science. Nerd . A swarm of earthquakes rumbling since June has begun to die down, according to an update from the Yel
2h
Live Science
These Microbes May Hitch a Ride with Humans to Mars: Why That MattersExamining how bacteria grow in confined conditions on board spacecraft will help keep astronauts healthy during long-term space missions, such as a trip to Mars.
2h
Feed: All Latest
Here’s the Leaked Anti-Leak Training Email That Just Went Out to the Department of EnergyEmployees at the Department of Energy are the latest to undergo government-wide training sessions on "the importance of protecting classified and controlled unclassified information."
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Feed: All Latest
Pixel 2, Google Home Mini, and Everything Else Google Announced at Its 2017 EventPlus: Pixel Buds, two new Google Homes, an upgraded Daydream View, and more.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Discrimination more likely when resources are scarceAt the height of the Great Recession, psychologist Amy Krosch noticed a troubling trend: people of color seemed to be getting much harder hit than the white population on a number of socioeconomic indicators. She wondered whether something about the psychological effects of economic scarcity might be making pre-recession racial disparities even worse.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How philosophy can solve your midlife crisisA few years ago, a man experienced a midlife crisis. He was professionally successful and had a rewarding family life, but still had a "hollow" feeling. Could he grind away at the same job indefinitely? Would he have to abandon his older hopes and dreams? And wasn't it disheartening to think his life might be halfway over?
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers 'get rough' with nanomaterials to eliminate problematic stickiness caused by smooth surfacesThe smaller the object, especially at the atomic or subatomic level, the stranger it behaves. For example, as technological devices become smaller and smaller, the even smaller parts are more prone to adhesion or "stickiness." When small-size parts come into contact, they spontaneously stick together and cannot easily be pulled apart. However, recent research at the University of Pittsburgh may "u
2h
Ars Technica
SpaceX and OneWeb broadband satellites raise fears about space debris (credit: OneWeb ) Thousands of new satellites are expected to be launched into low-Earth orbit in the coming years to provide high-speed broadband, and the projects have caused concern for experts and government officials who worry about a worsening space debris problem. As the Federal Communications Commission considers satellite applications from SpaceX , OneWeb, Boeing, and others, two US sena
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The Atlantic
When Do We Get to Call Someone a Terrorist? Police say the Las Vegas killer was a white American named Steve. Two days later, we still know almost nothing else about him. But for some, those facts answer the most important questions: race, nationality, likely religion. For some, those are the most important questions about anyone. The top priority, as soon as blood spills, is to open the ledger, and see whether to add to the column of whit
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The Atlantic
Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed to Headline The Atlantic’s Second Annual Future of Work Summit on October 5 in Atlanta Washington, D.C. (October 2, 2017) -- The Atlantic will convene experts and thought leaders on October 5 in Atlanta for the second annual Future of Work Summit . The half-day event, which will take place at Biltmore Ballrooms ( 817 West Peachtree Street ), will explore the roles that the government, educational institutions, and the private sector can play to better equip the American workforce w
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The Atlantic
How Sputnik Launched an Era of Technological Fragility On October 4, 1957, a beach ball-shaped satellite launched into space from the Kazakh desert. The satellite joined Earth’s journey around the sun, which is why its creators named it Sputnik, Russian for “traveling companion.” Sputnik circled the planet about every hour-and-a-half, traveling at 18,000 miles per hour as it emitted a steady beep, beep, beep. On the ground, people watched Sputnik thr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ancient humans left Africa to escape drying climateHumans migrated out of Africa as the climate shifted from wet to very dry about 60,000 years ago, according to research led by a University of Arizona geoscientist.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Officials: GMO mosquitoes aren't 'drugs,' need EPA oversightU.S. Food and Drug Administration officials say genetically modified mosquitoes are not "drugs" and should be regulated by environmental authorities.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
DOJ's Rosenstein takes aim at Silicon Valley encryptionA high-ranking Department of Justice official is taking aim at Silicon Valley's methods for protecting privacy, saying there should be a public debate about whether companies should create digital lock boxes that cannot be opened by police and judges.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pixel smartphone upgrade highlights Google push into hardwareGoogle on Wednesday unveiled newly designed versions of its Pixel smartphone, the highlight of a refreshed line of devices which are part of the tech giant's efforts to boost its presence against hardware rivals.
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Gizmodo
Everything Google Announced Today All images: Google Google announced some new hardware at a characteristically low key event in San Francisco on Wednesday. Nearly everything had been leaked ahead of the event, but there were a few surprises—some more exciting than others. Inevitably, one thing seemed clear: Google wants to be a gadget company, too. The gadgets aren’t bad, either! There’s a little smart speaker, a big smart speak
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Gizmodo
A Razor Blade-Covered Yo-Yo Is the Most Dangerous Toy Since Lawn Darts GIF We’re all guilty of performing stupid stunts as kids, but most of us tend to avoid risking life and limb as we grow older. YouTube’s Giaco Whatever has done just the opposite. Using his machining skills, he attached a bunch of razor blades to a high performance yo-yo , creating a toy that’s possibly even more dangerous than lawn darts. As dangerous as the yo-yo is spinning at the end of a lon
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Ars Technica
Apple releases watchOS 4.0.1 with fix for Series 3 LTE/Wi-Fi bug Enlarge / Call options in the Phone app. (credit: Valentina Palladino) Apple released a software update for its Series 3 watches today that will upgrade watchOS 4 to watchOS 4.0.1. This is the first software update to watchOS 4 since it became available for all Apple Watch models on September 19. The watchOS 4.0.1 update focuses on fixing a peculiar Wi-Fi issue some Series 3 with LTE models exper
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discrimination more likely when resources are scarceAt the height of the Great Recession, psychologist Amy Krosch noticed a troubling trend: people of color seemed to be getting much harder hit than the white population on a number of socioeconomic indicators. She wondered whether something about the psychological effects of economic scarcity might be making pre-recession racial disparities even worse.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gene therapy halts progression of cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy in clinical trialIn a recent clinical trial, a gene therapy to treat cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy (CALD) -- a neurodegenerative disease that typically claims young boys' lives within 10 years of diagnosis -- effectively stabilized the disease's progression in 88 percent of patients.
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Gizmodo
Puerto Rico Has a Once In a Lifetime Opportunity to Rethink How It Gets Electricity Photo: AP Alina Saenz’s house on the outskirts of San Juan glows warmly in the pitch black nights that have plagued Puerto Rico in the two weeks since Category 4 Hurricane Maria devastated the island . The imperceptible hum of the refrigerator, fans to circulate the humid tropical air and nightly news on the television were all afterthoughts of modern life before the storm but are now godsends in
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Science : NPR
Parents Lobby States To Expand Newborn Screening Test For Rare Brain Disorder There's a genetic test for ALD, the inherited disorder portrayed in the movie Lorenzo's Oil, and the federal government recommends it for all newborns. But only a handful of states offer it routinely. (Image credit: Anna Gorman/KHN)
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Feed: All Latest
Russia's Facebook Ads Will Remain Secret, for NowNeither lawmakers investigating election meddling nor social-media companies will release the controversial ads.
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Live Science
Antarctic Iceberg's Split Reveals Ecosystem Hidden for Thousands of YearsA giant iceberg that broke away from an ice shelf in the Antarctic Peninsula in July is slowly revealing a vast undersea ecosystem that has been hidden for thousands of years.
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Live Science
Crying for Power? Your Tears Could Generate ElectricityWhat do egg whites and human tears have in common? According to a new study from Ireland, both materials can generate electricity, thanks to an enzyme they contain.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Nobel Prize Explainer: Catching Proteins in the ActThe 2017 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded jointly to Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson for developing cryo-electron microscopy that can determine high-resolution structures of... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The super-Earth that came home for dinnerIt might be lingering bashfully on the icy outer edges of our solar system, hiding in the dark, but subtly pulling strings behind the scenes: stretching out the orbits of distant bodies, perhaps even tilting the entire solar system to one side. It is a possible "Planet Nine" -- a world perhaps 10 times the mass of Earth and 20 times farther from the sun than Neptune.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Parole violations, not new crimes, help drive prison's revolving doorFailing a drug test, associating with felons and other technical parole violations are among the key drivers of prison's 'revolving door,' according to new American research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Problems with senses may predict older adults' overall health, ability to functionResearchers have mainly focused on what happens after people lose one or two of their senses. However, we know that losing more than two senses occurs frequently for older adults. Until now, no studies have examined how losing multiple senses affects older adults. To learn more, a team of researchers designed a study to focus on just that.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mental training changes brain structure and reduces social stressMeditation can have positive effects on our health and well-being. However it has been unclear which mental practice has which effect, and what the underlying processes are. Researchers have discovered that different trainings affect either our attention or our social competencies and modify different brain networks. One mental technique was able to reduce the stress hormone cortisol. These result
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Light-activated nanoparticles can supercharge current antibioticsLight-activated nanoparticles, also known as quantum dots, can provide a crucial boost in effectiveness for antibiotic treatments used to combat drug-resistant superbugs such as E. coli and Salmonella, new research shows.
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Gizmodo
Aerial Footage of a Trucker's Masterful Parking Skills Is the Most Satisfying Thing to Watch GIF Have you ever felt like you deserved the Nobel Prize in trigonometry after successfully parallel parking your compact car? Sadly, your skills can’t hold a candle to this truck-driving Jedi who squeezes a full tractor trailer into an impossibly narrow spot without a scratch. The drone’s eye view of the maneuver makes the driver’s skills seem all the more impressive when you consider he can onl
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why does divorce run in families? The answer may be geneticsChildren of divorced parents are more likely to get divorced when compared to those who grew up in two-parent families -- and genetic factors are the primary explanation, according to a new study by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University and Lund University in Sweden.
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Science : NPR
Sheer Number Of Casualties Makes Las Vegas Count Difficult Doctors and emergency officials are still trying to figure out exactly how many people were shot in Las Vegas. The wide range of injuries and the sheer number of people injured are challenges. (Image credit: Marcus Yam/LA Times via Getty Images)
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Gizmodo
The Most Intriguing and Important Details the New Star Wars Anthology Revealed About a Galaxy Far, Far Away Image: Lucasfilm/Del Rey. From a Certain Point of View , the new Star Wars anthology novel released to celebrate 40 years of the beloved franchise, is unlike any other book we’ve seen so far in Disney’s Star Wars canon. It’s all about the little details rather than the major events of the movies—but that doesn’t there aren’t a few interesting secrets in there, too. Set directly in and around the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research proves bioengineering as viable alternative to open fetal repair for spina bifidaResearchers from Children's Hospital Colorado and the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus recently discovered a promising alternative to open fetal surgery for spina bifida repair. The team, led by Ahmed Marwan, MD, has developed an alternative approach to current in utero treatment for spina bifida: a minimally-invasive repair using a bioengineered material -- a reverse thermal gel (RT
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ancient humans left Africa to escape drying climateHumans migrated out of Africa as the climate shifted from wet to dry about 60,000 years ago, according to new paleoclimate research. What the northeast Africa climate was like when people migrated from Africa into Eurasia between 70,000 and 55,000 years ago is still uncertain. The new research shows around 70,000 years ago, the Horn of Africa climate shifted from a wet phase called 'Green Sahara'
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Gizmodo
Out-of-Control Plastic Surgeons' Snapchat Hijinks Are Putting Patients at Risk Plastic surgeons can get a lot of business through social media , but some surgeons take the entertainment aspect to extremes: dancing on camera during surgery, for example, or cradling someone’s excised tissue like a baby. The American Society of Plastic Surgeons wants to crack down. Take this doctor , for example. On the webpage of New York City’s Cameo Surgery Center, he’s Scott M. Blyer, MD.
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Scientific American Content: Global
The 2017 Best Illusion of the Year Contest!The world’s best new illusions are available for your vote! Read about the science behind them here! -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
Google Just Invented... Lifelogging? Image: Google Lifelogging—the act of recording your every waking moment— has been declared dead numerous times. But now it looks like Google is trying to resuscitate the movement with a new camera it introduced at its Pixel 2 event on Wednesday. Google Clips is a portable camera that takes photos and videos for you. According to Google, the AI-powered camera will learn to capture photos of the pe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Teleoperating robots with virtual realityMany manufacturing jobs require a physical presence to operate machinery. But what if such jobs could be done remotely? This week researchers from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) presented a virtual-reality (VR) system that lets you teleoperate a robot using an Oculus Rift headset.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA satellite finds powerful storms in Tropical Storm Ramon's centerNASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite looked at Tropical Storm Ramon in infrared light, revealing powerful storms around the center. Ramon formed close to the southwestern coast of Mexico and has already generated a tropical storm watch.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Test reveals antibiotic-resistant bacteria in a half hourA new test developed at Caltech can identify whether bacteria are resistant to antibiotics in a mere half hour, giving medical professionals a new tool for fighting infections and superbug bacteria.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Teleoperating robots with virtual realityMany manufacturing jobs require a physical presence to operate machinery. But what if such jobs could be done remotely? This week researchers from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) presented a virtual-reality (VR) system that lets you teleoperate a robot using an Oculus Rift headset.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Problems with senses may predict older adults' overall health, ability to functionResearchers have mainly focused on what happens after people lose one or two of their senses. However, we know that losing more than two senses occurs frequently for older adults. Until now, no studies have examined how losing multiple senses affects older adults. To learn more, a team of researchers from the University of Chicago designed a study to focus on just that. Their study was published i
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA satellite finds powerful storms in Tropical Storm Ramon's centerNASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite looked at Tropical Storm Ramon in infrared light, revealing powerful storms around the center. Ramon formed close to the southwestern coast of Mexico and has already generated a tropical storm watch.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Squirtable' elastic surgical glue seals wounds in 60 secondsUniversity of Sydney media release about MeTro: A highly elastic and adhesive surgical glue that quickly seals wounds without the need for common staples or sutures could transform how surgeries are performed. Biomedical engineers from the University of Sydney and the United States collaborated on the development of the potentially life-saving surgical glue.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: therapists lack knowledge to prevent transmission of CMVResults from a new health-risk knowledge survey indicate that physical and occupational therapists are at increased risk of contracting cytomegalovirus (CMV), a leading cause of prenatal infection and lifelong disabilities, but that they lack sufficient knowledge to prevent its transmission.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers demonstrate engineering approach to combine drugs, control parasitic wormsAn international research team that includes engineers from Iowa State University has demonstrated that an engineering technology that's been used in cell studies can also be used for drug testing on parasitic roundworms used as a model whole organism. In this case, the technology quickly developed a cocktail of four drugs that was effective in paralyzing the roundworms. The discovery is reported
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Monoclonal antibody 'cocktail' halts Zika infection, according to new Miller School studyA collaborative study led by a University of Miami Miller School of Medicine researcher has found that a "cocktail" of monoclonal antibodies prevented Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in primates. 'This is a promising intervention to prevent and treat ZIKV infection during pregnancy,' said David Watkins, Ph.D., professor and vice chair for research, Department of Pathology. 'We would like to develop th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Your brain on mental training: Structural changes and stress reductionTwo studies based on a nine-month investigation (called the ReSource Project) report long-term mental exercises may induce exercise-specific restructuring in the brain and reduce some indicators of stress.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Antibiotic susceptibility testing in 30 minutes or less may help doctorsScientists have pioneered a method to detect antibiotic susceptibility for urinary tract infections in less than 30 minutes -- potentially enabling patients to be diagnosed and prescribed effective treatments during a single clinical visit.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mental training changes brain structure and reduces social stressMeditation can have positive effects on our health and well-being. However it has been unclear which mental practice has which effect, and what the underlying processes are. Researchers at MPI CBS in Leipzig, Germany discovered that different trainings affect either our attention or our social competencies and modify different brain networks. One mental technique was able to reduce the stress horm
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Light-activated nanoparticles can supercharge current antibioticsLight-activated nanoparticles, also known as quantum dots, can provide a crucial boost in effectiveness for antibiotic treatments used to combat drug-resistant superbugs such as E. coli and Salmonella, new University of Colorado Boulder research shows.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Healing and sealing: New surgical sealant derived from human protein seals without suturesA newly engineered material could become the first suture-less sealant for wound closure. In laboratory tests of the material, known as a MeTro sealant, the team demonstrated complete sealing of severely leaking lung tissue, as well as evidence that the material could help promote wound healing. Their results are published this week in Science Translational Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A super-elastic surgical glue that sticks and seals in vivo, even when tissues are movingA study presents a robust solution for the efficient repair of wounds in mechanically challenging body areas. The researchers demonstrated that a sealant, based on elastin -- a human, resilience-imparting protein present in all elastic tissues such as the wall of arteries, skin, and lungs -- can be photochemically tuned to effectively seal incisions in arteries and lungs of rats and to repair woun
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dutch children bereaved by domestic homicides 'more burdened than expected'The majority of Dutch children who lost a parent to intimate partner homicide had already experienced violence, often without professional support, according to a study published Oct. 4, 2017, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Eva Alisic from Monash University, Australia, and colleagues.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ornamented artifact may indicate long-distance exchange between Mesolithic communitiesAn ornamented bâton percé found in Central Poland may provide evidence of exchange between Mesolithic communities, according to a study published Oct. 4, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Grzegorz Osipowicz from Nicolaus Copernicus University, Poland, and colleagues.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nobel-winning technique like "Google Earth for molecules"Three researchers won a Nobel Prize on Wednesday for developing a microscope technique that lets scientists see exquisite details of the molecules that drive life—basically providing a front-row seat to study these tiny performers in their biological dance.
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The Atlantic
The Things People Say Right Before They Leave the Trump Administration Rex Tillerson’s forceful defense of President Trump, after an NBC News report said the secretary of state had called the commander-in-chief a “moron” and seriously considered quitting his job, offered few clues about his eventual fate. From Sean Spicer to Steve Bannon and Reince Priebus, it’s not uncommon for Trump’s aides to defend the president—right before being shown the door. Tillerson, the
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The Atlantic
The Trouble With Rex Tillerson's Message of Unity In response to an NBC News report on Wednesday that he had called the president of the United States a “moron” and considered resigning over numerous personal and policy disagreements with Donald Trump, Rex Tillerson projected a united front. The secretary of state praised the Trump administration’s “team” effort to confront North Korea’s nuclear-weapons program, singling out the defense secretar
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The Atlantic
Black-ish Embraces the Urgency of History This post contains spoilers for Season 4, Episode 1 of Black-ish . The sitcom, traditionally, is a form that revels in insularity. The small collection of close-knit characters; the settings—the office, the kitchen, the living-room couch—that remain relatively unchanged over weeks and months and years; the repeating jokes; the knowing call-backs. The familiarity, the reliability, the stasis. The
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Popular Science
60 years ago, Sputnik shocked the world and started the space race Space Here’s how it all began. A sharp, insistent beep sang out over short-wave radios, filling up our ears with the knowledge that humans had succeeded in the impossible.
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Gizmodo
Turkish Archeologists Think They May Have Discovered the Grave of 'Santa Claus' What was believed to be the desecrated sarcophagus of St. Nicholas Photo: Wikimedia Archeologists in Turkey think they may have reason to rewrite Christian history. Saint Nicholas , the inspiration for Santa Claus, is believed to have been born in the Demre district in Antalya , and new research at a church that bears his name there has uncovered a tomb that could house his undisturbed remains. O
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Meet Madagascar's oldest animal lineage, a whirligig beetle with 206-million-year-old originsA new study suggests the Malagasy striped whirligig beetle Heterogyrus milloti boasts a genetic pedigree stretching back to the late Triassic period.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A new way to produce clean hydrogen fuel from water using sunlightResearchers combined graphitic carbon nitride and black phosphorous to make a new metal-free composite photocatalyst capable of producing hydrogen from water. The photocatalyst featured good photocatalytic production of hydrogen, even when powered by low-energy near infrared light.
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New Scientist - News
Mexico City quake: A few seconds’ warning can still save livesThe recent earthquake in Mexico City shows even the best tremor alarms sometimes only go off seconds before – but clever planning can mean those few seconds save many people
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New Scientist - News
DNA testing firms are cashing in our genes. Should we get a cut?Companies like 23andMe that offer to reveal your genetic secrets from a spit test can also sell your data to drug developers for big sums
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How Gunsplaining Could Lead to Better Gun LawsSecond-amendment defenders get super-nerdy. That's how to fix America's gun problem
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees Tropical Depression 16 develop in southwestern Caribbean SeaInfrared imagery from NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites showed powerful thunderstorms around the center of Tropical Depression 16 as it developed early on Oct. 4 in the southwestern Caribbean Sea.
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New on MIT Technology Review
This Startup Wants to Bring Face Recognition to All Kinds of SmartphonesMost of us aren’t going to shell out for an iPhone X, but we can still log in with our faces.
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Big Think
Someone You Know May Be a Victim of Sextortion A new organization, Thorn, has been launched to help victims of a new crime called "sexploitation" in which abusers extort victims over the publication of intimate images. Read More
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NYT > Science
Trump Takes a First Step Toward Scrapping Obama’s Global Warming PolicyThe White House will repeal the Clean Power Plan, the centerpiece of President Obama’s effort to fight global warming, but will keep the door open to a replacement, according to an E.P.A. memo.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A win-win for spotted owls and forest managementRemote sensing technology has detected what could be a win for both spotted owls and forestry management, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis, the USDA Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station and the University of Washington.
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Ars Technica
Google unveils a $249 smart camera that decides what’s worth photographing Enlarge / Google Clips (credit: Google ) At today's hardware event, Google has announced a surprise new product: Clips. It's a little standalone camera that changes how pictures are taken. The Clips device itself figures out when something exciting is happening—happy faces, good lighting, interesting framing—and, when it thinks the time is right, it records (silent) video captures. This transform
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Latest Headlines | Science News
The SN 10: Meet the scientists ready to transform their fieldsIn this year’s SN 10, meet early- and mid-career research stars who are coming up with and testing new ideas in astronomy, archaeology, artificial intelligence and more.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Parole violations, not new crimes, help drive prison's revolving doorFailing a drug test, associating with felons and other technical parole violations are among the key drivers of prison's 'revolving door,' according to new UC Berkeley research.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A win-win for spotted owls and forest managementRemote sensing technology has detected what could be a win for both spotted owls and forestry management, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis, the USDA Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station and the University of Washington.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees Tropical Depression 16 develop in southwestern Caribbean SeaInfrared imagery from NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites showed powerful thunderstorms around the center of Tropical Depression 16 as it developed early on Oct. 4 in the southwestern Caribbean Sea.
3h
Scientific American Content: Global
Watch Live Today: A Bold New View of GravityPhysicist Erik Verlinde will discuss his and others’ groundbreaking gravitational theories during a live webcast tonight at 7 P.M. Eastern time -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Accurately transcribing DNA overrides DNA repair, researchers findResearchers found that in the model organism E. coli, the fidelity of transcribing DNA comes at the expense of DNA repair.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A tubular structure to stop cell growthTORC1 is an enzyme complex that controls the normal growth of our cells; but, when too active, it can promote diseases such as cancer. A new study describes how sugar regulates the activity of TORC1, through a surprising mechanism. In the absence of sugar, TORC1s assemble into a tubular structure, rendering them inactive and thus cell growth stops.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
High BMI and blood pressure create a heavy heartNew research uses UK Biobank data to reveal -- for the first time -- the direct damage that carrying extra weight has on the heart's weight and size, and implicates a range of other modifiable risk factors including high blood pressure.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers demonstrate engineering approach to combine drugs, control parasitic wormsLaboratory video tells the story: tiny, parasitic worms swimming freely in a nutrient solution are active and mobile; expose the same kind of worms to a mixture of four drugs optimized by an engineering technique and they're partially paralyzed, struggling in place.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Light-activated nanoparticles can supercharge current antibioticsLight-activated nanoparticles, also known as quantum dots, can provide a crucial boost in effectiveness for antibiotic treatments used to combat drug-resistant superbugs such as E. coli and Salmonella, new University of Colorado Boulder research shows.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ornamented artifact may indicate long-distance exchange between Mesolithic communitiesAn ornamented bâton percé found in Central Poland may provide evidence of exchange between Mesolithic communities, according to a study published October 4, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Grzegorz Osipowicz from Nicolaus Copernicus University, Poland, and colleagues.
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The Atlantic
Hanged, Burned, Shot, Drowned, Beaten O n the corner of Washington and Decatur streets in Montgomery, Alabama, a visitor can feel history pressing in from every side. Just down the street is the church where Martin Luther King Jr. and others planned the Montgomery bus boycott. Two blocks away sits the First White House of the Confederacy, where Jefferson Davis once lived. But although the city is crowded with historical markers—inclu
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Latest Headlines | Science News
José Dinneny rethinks how plants hunt for waterPlant biologist José Dinneny probes the very beginnings of root development, which may have important implications for growing food in a changing climate.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Jennifer Dionne harnesses light to illuminate nano landscapesNanophotonics research by materials scientist Jennifer Dionne could lead to improved drugs, cancer tests or invisibility cloaks.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
M. Ehsan Hoque develops digital helpers that teach social skillsComputer scientist M. Ehsan Hoque programs emotionally attuned assistants that bring people together.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
KC Huang probes basic questions of bacterial lifeA physicist by training, Kerwyn Casey Huang tries to understand cell shape, movement and growth.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
David Kipping seeks new and unexpected worldsAstronomer David Kipping became “the moon guy” by deciding no idea is too crazy.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Chong Liu one-ups plant photosynthesisChong Liu mixes bacteria and inorganics into systems that can generate clean energy better than a leaf.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Elite Hungarian university may be saved Hungary-New York agreement could allow Central European University to sidestep law change. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22761
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Gizmodo
Kick Off Your Philips Hue Obsession With a Deeply Discounted Starter Kit Philips Hue Third Generation Starter Kit , $141 If you’re ready to dive into the Philips Hue ecosystem, the third generation starter kit is down to $141 right now , one of the best prices we’ve seen, complete with three bulbs and a hub. If you have an Echo voice assistant already, this is one of the coolest accessories out there that it works with. Once you start controlling your lights with your
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Ars Technica
Dimming of Tabby’s Star likely caused by something less sexy than aliens Enlarge / This illustration depicts a hypothetical uneven ring of dust orbiting KIC 8462852, also known as Boyajian's Star or Tabby's Star. (credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech) In recent years, a distant star in the constellation Cygnus, known officially as KIC 8462852 and unofficially as Tabby's Star, has intrigued astronomers due to its irregular but significant dimming. As the star has faded by as much
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Nobel Prize in Chemistry Goes to Cryo-Electron MicroscopyThe winners developed a technique for imaging the 3-D shape of proteins, a crucial step in studying the molecules' function.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Lena Pernas sees parasitic infection as a kind of Hunger GamesIn studies of Toxoplasma, parasitologist Lena Pernas has reframed infection as a battle between invader and a cell’s mitochondria.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Kay Tye improvises to understand our inner livesTo figure out how rich mental lives are created by the brain, neuroscientist Kay Tye applies “a new level of neurobiological sophistication.”
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Christina Warinner uncovers ancient tales in dental plaqueMolecular biologist Christina Warinner studies calculus, or fossilized dental plaque, which contains a trove of genetic clues to past human diet and disease.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Luhan Yang strives to make pig organs safe for human transplantsA bold approach to genome editing by biologist Luhan Yang could alleviate the shortage of organs and ease human suffering.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Success in science depends on luck, plus much moreActing Editor in Chief Elizabeth Quill says luck is only one determinant of an individual's success in science.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bumblebees shed light on why some individuals are smarter than othersBy examining the brains of bees trained to different tasks, the researchers found that the number of connections between nerve cells may hold the answer to questions about individual cognitive differences. Bees with a greater density of nerve connections (known as synaptic complexes) in a specific part of their brains had better memories and learned faster than bees with fewer connections in these
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study pokes holes in fetal alcohol hypothesisA new study appears to challenge the theory that cells in the brain's immune system are the culprit behind the neurological damage that occurs in children exposed to alcohol while in the womb.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nanoscale islands dot light-driven catalystScientists have combined aluminum nanoparticles and smaller metal particles to create a versatile nanostructure that could lead to new applications for plasmonics. The technique allows for customizable surface chemistry and reactivity in one material.
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The Scientist RSS
Santa Fe School Board Opposes State Science Education StandardsCritics of the proposed curriculum say it leaves out important information relating to climate change and evolution.
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The Scientist RSS
CRISPR System Targets RNA in Mammalian CellsResearchers engineer bacterial CRISPR-Cas13 to knockdown RNA in mammalian cells.
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Pixel Buds: Specs, Price, Release DateThe wireless earbuds are connected by a rope-like cable that goes behind your head and give you a direct line to Google Assistant.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The Latest: A Google hands-free camera snaps pics by itselfThe Latest on Google's new-product showcase (all times local):
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Ars Technica
Hands-on: The Sonos One is a smarter Play:1 with Alexa support Enlarge / The Sonos One looks a whole lot like the Sonos Play:1. There's an all-black model, too. (credit: Jeff Dunn) Sonos on Wednesday announced the Sonos One , its latest wireless home speaker. As the company suggested earlier this year, the One is the first Sonos speaker to natively support voice assistants. The device will work with Amazon’s Alexa platform to start; the company says an updat
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Ars Technica
Google Pixel Buds are wireless earbuds that translate conversations in real time Enlarge SAN FRANCISCO—To accompany the new Pixel smartphones announced Wednesday, Google debuted new wireless earbuds, dubbed "Pixel Buds." These are Google's first wireless earbuds that are built to be used with Pixel smartphones, but they also give users access to Google Translate so they can have conversations with people who speak a different language. Unlike Apple's AirPods , the Pixel Buds
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Dagens Medicin
To pct.-kravet suspenderes i 2018Regeringen og Dansk Folkeparti er enige om at fritage regionerne for det forhadte krav om 2 procents produktivitetsstigninger i 2018.
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The Atlantic
What Puerto Rico Looked Like When Trump Came to Visit Two weeks after Hurricane Maria smashed Puerto Rico, President Donald Trump flew to San Juan to assess the situation and meet with local officials, aid workers, and residents. The situation in Puerto Rico remains grim . The task of recovery and rebuilding homes and infrastructure on the island—home to 3.4 million people—is daunting. As federal agencies continue to ramp up aid efforts across Puert
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Feed: All Latest
Google Pixel 2: Price, Specs, and Release DateThe Pixel 2 arrives this month starting at $649. It's faster, has a super-sharp OLED screen, and wow that camera.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Supercomputer redesign of aeroplane wing mirrors bird anatomy Bird-bone structures emerge from an evolution-like algorithm. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22759
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Battling the forces of darkness: Cybersecurity firm CEO talks Equifax, moreFor millions of Americans, the cybersecurity problem plaguing U.S. businesses just hit home in about the worst way possible. The failure of one business, Equifax, to keep its data secure will lead to a decades-long threat to the finances of more than half the nation's adults.
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Gizmodo
Tech Companies Will Testify at Senate Hearing on Russian Election Interference [Updated] Chairman Sen. Richard Burr (R-NC) (2nd R) and Vice Chairman Sen. Mark Warner (D-VA) (L) arrive at a hearing before the Senate (Select) Intelligence Committee June 21, 2017 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. Photo: Getty Facebook and Twitter will send representatives to testify at a Senate hearing next month on Russian interference in the US presidential election, sources at the companies told Giz
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Gizmodo
Senate Panel Approves Legislation That Would Put a Hell of A Lot More Self-Driving Cars on US Roads Image: Getty The US Senate Commerce Committee has unanimously approved a bill that would prevent states from creating laws that regulate development and performance of self-driving cars and help put more autonomous vehicles on public roads. Within three years, the bill would allow auto manufacturers to sell 80,000 autonomous vehicles annually as long as they are demonstrably as safe as regular ca
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Gizmodo
Google’s DeepMind Launches Ethics Group to Steer AI Image: AP The company responsible for AlphaGo—the first AI program to defeat a grandmaster at Go—has launched an ethics group to oversee the responsible development of artificial intelligence. It’s a smooth PR move given recent concerns about super-smart technology, but Google, who owns DeepMind, will need to support and listen to its new group if it truly wants to build safe AI. The new group, c
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New Scientist - News
Hoovering up immigrants’ social media data won’t make US saferA plan to grab immigrants' digital profiles in the US is just another case of the misguided idea that mass surveillance is effective, says Ray Corrigan
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Ars Technica
Trump administration to announce repeal of the Clean Power Plan Enlarge (credit: NOAA ) You'd be forgiven for thinking that the Obama administration's Clean Power Plan was already dead. After all, President Trump thinks that the problem it was intended to address—climate change—is a hoax, and he signed an executive order directing the Environmental Protection Agency to kill the plan back in March. But the situation is substantially more complicated than that,
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Surface helium detonation spells end for white dwarfAn international team of researchers has found evidence that the brightest stellar explosions in our Universe could be triggered by helium nuclear detonation near the surface of a white dwarf star. Using Hyper Suprime-Cam mounted on the Subaru Telescope, the team detected a type Ia supernova within a day after the explosion, and explained its behavior through a model calculated using the supercomp
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists reverse advanced heart failure in an animal modelResearchers have discovered a previously unrecognized healing capacity of the heart. In a mouse model, they were able to reverse severe heart failure by silencing the activity of Hippo, a signaling pathway that can prevent the regeneration of heart muscle. The study appears in the journal Nature.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers find that accurately transcribing DNA overrides DNA repairResearchers found that in the model organism E. coli, the fidelity of transcribing DNA comes at the expense of DNA repair.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cell stress response sheds light on treating inflammation-related cancer, agingStress -- defined broadly -- can have a profoundly deleterious effect on the human body. Even individual cells have their own way of dealing with environmental strains such as ultraviolet radiation from the sun or germs. One response to stress -- called senescence -- can trigger cells to stop dividing in cases of cancer and aging. This may hold promise for treating inflammation-related disorders.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In warmer climates, Greenlandic deltas have grownUnlike most other deltas worldwide, Greenland's are growing.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mystery of breast cancer risk gene solved, 20 years after its discoveryMore than 20 years after scientists revealed that mutations in the BRCA1 gene predispose women to breast cancer, Yale scientists have pinpointed the molecular mechanism that allows those mutations to wreak their havoc.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tubules to stop cell growthTORC1 is an enzyme complex that controls the normal growth of our cells; but, when too active, it can promote diseases such as cancer. A study led by biologists from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland describes how sugar regulates the activity of TORC1, through a surprising mechanism. In the absence of sugar, TORC1s assemble into a tubular structure, rendering them inactive and thus cel
4h
The Atlantic
The Unknowable Joni Mitchell From certain angles, it seems entirely remarkable that Joni Mitchell—one of the most cerebral songwriters in modern pop and a woman whose relationship to the spotlight has always been deeply ambivalent—ever became a massive star. From other angles, her ascension seems inevitable. She was so precociously talented that she composed hits in spite of herself, first gaining renown when “Both Sides Now
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
That's cool! Flash-frozen pictures reveal molecular worldA groundbreaking technique awarded the Nobel Chemistry Prize on Wednesday has allowed scientists, using unearthly cold temperatures, to produce exquisitely detailed images of the tiniest structures in cells.
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Google Pixelbook: Price, Specs, and Release DateGoogle Assistant and Chrome OS in a two-pound hybrid laptop.
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Gizmodo
Pixel 2: What You Need to Know About Google's New Top Android Phones All images: Google When it announced the iPhone X , Apple pushed the expectations (and price tags) for flagships phones higher than they’ve ever been before. Now, Google gets a chance to hit back with its own homegrown handsets that will not only show how Google has matured as a hardware maker, but also what’s coming soon on Android Oreo. And with a full year of experience and development ( inclu
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New on MIT Technology Review
Google Reveals Blueprint for Quantum SupremacyThe ability of quantum machines to outperform classical computers is called quantum supremacy. Now Google says it has this goal firmly in its sights.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fish shrinking as ocean temperatures riseOne of the most economically important fish is shrinking in body weight, length and overall physical size as ocean temperatures rise, according to new research by LSU Boyd Professor R. Eugene Turner published today. The average body size of Menhaden—a small, silver fish—caught off the coasts from Maine to Texas—has shrunk by about 15 percent over the past 65 years.
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Gizmodo
Tinder Thinks 'Sassy' Emoji Are the Answer to Shitty Men Online Photo: Tinder On Wednesday, Tinder introduced a new “Reactions” feature which lets users send each other a range of animated emoji. And in support of this feature, the dating app has launched a bizarre new campaign to explain how these cutesy animations are the solution to skeezy behavior online. The Reactions are emoji responses—ranging from hearts and laughs to a digital eye roll—that splash ac
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Gizmodo
Google Wants to Sell You a $1,000 Chromebook Called 'Pixelbook' At today’s big event in San Francisco, Google confirmed what we’ve all known for the last two weeks: It has a slick looking new Chromebook, and it costs $1,000. However Google crucially expanded on those early details and has revealed a Chromebook that might actually be worth its sky high price tag, unlike the last $1,000-plus Chromebook . This laptop, which starts at $1,000, has a 12.3-inch mult
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Big Think
A New Study Looks at the Logic Behind Colors A new study examines how and why the world’s cultures identify and name colors. Read More
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Scientific American Content: Global
Construction of Thirty Meter Telescope Gets Go-AheadThe ruling could allow the project to move forward after years of delays and opposition -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica
The Google Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL are official at $649 and $849 Enlarge SAN FRANCISCO—Google's second generation flagship smartphone is official. Today, the company announced the 5-inch Google Pixel 2 and 6-inch Google Pixel 2 XL. The specs are pretty much the same as every other 2017 Android phone: both phones have a Snapdragon 835 SoC, 4GB of RAM, and a base 64GB storage option. Both have 12.2MP, single-lens rear cameras with f/18 apertures. The smaller Pix
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NYT > Science
Matter: Ancient Viruses Are Buried in Your DNAEndogenous retroviruses wormed into the human genome eons ago. Today viral genes continue to produce a variety of mysterious proteins in the body.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Federal government: No threatened species listing for walrusThe Trump administration announced Wednesday it will not list the Pacific walrus as a threatened species based on diminished Arctic Ocean sea ice, concluding that the marine mammals have adapted to the loss.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google unveils new phones, speakers to counter Amazon, Apple (Update)Google on Wednesday unveiled new phones, smart speakers and other devices infused with artificial intelligence in its bid to claim the high ground against rivals Amazon and Apple.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Foxconn to locate plant in Mount Pleasant, WisconsinTaiwanese electronics manufacturer Foxconn Technology Group says it plans to locate a display screen factory in the southeastern Wisconsin village of Mount Pleasant.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Surface helium detonation spells end for white dwarfAn international team of researchers has found evidence that the brightest stellar explosions in our Universe could be triggered by helium nuclear detonation near the surface of a white dwarf star. Using Hyper Suprime-Cam mounted on the Subaru Telescope, the team detected a type Ia supernova within a day after the explosion, and explained its behavior through a model calculated using the supercomp
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
In warmer climates, Greenlandic deltas have grown, new analysis of 75-year-old aerial photos confirmsDeltas are important ecosystems, where freshwater meets the sea, and where people for centuries have been engaged in agriculture and fishing. Today, most of the deltas in the world are drowning because of increased human exploitation and a rise in the global sea level. In an article just published in Nature, a research team led by researchers at the University of Copenhagen has shown that deltas i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tubules to stop cell growthTORC1 is an enzyme complex that controls the normal growth of cells. However, when it is too active, it can promote diseases such as cancer. A study led by biologists from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, and published in the journal Nature describes how sugar regulates the activity of TORC1 through a surprising mechanism. In the presence of sugar, individual TORC1s stimulate the var
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers find that accurately transcribing DNA overrides DNA repairA groundbreaking and surprising discovery provides a major conceptual change of what is most important to cells: the fidelity of the DNA transcription process - accurately copying the DNA message into RNA, the precursor to proteins - or DNA repair, which saves broken chromosomes from being lost. As reported in the journal Nature, researchers found that in the model organism E. coli, the fidelity o
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Popular Science
A super chill microscopy method just nabbed a Nobel prize Science This new way of looking at cells is revolutionizing biochemistry. This new way of looking at cells is revolutionizing biochemistry.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fish shrinking as ocean temperatures riseOne of the most economically important fish is shrinking in body weight, length and overall physical size as ocean temperatures rise, according to new research by LSU Boyd Professor R. Eugene Turner published today. The average body size of Menhaden -- a small, silver fish -- caught off the coasts from Maine to Texas -- has shrunk by about 15 percent over the past 65 years.
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Ingeniøren
Aarhus-professor forudser flere nobelpriser baseret på elektronmikroskopiNobelkomiteen hylder pionererne, og teknologien vil føre til banebrydende opdagelser de kommende år, mener professor Poul Nissen.
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Ars Technica
Congress will investigate drug company that gave its patents to Mohawk tribe Enlarge / Allergan CEO Brenton Saunders addresses employees at a production facility in Pringy, France. (credit: JEAN-PIERRE CLATOT/AFP/Getty Images) Members of Congress want answers about a multinational drug company's deal to save its patents by handing them off to a Native American tribe. Last month, Allergan gave the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe six patents that protect Restasis, the company's bloc
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New Scientist - News
The US will not ban guns so must learn how to live with themThe political reality is that the US will never be rid of its weapons. The country must realise its gun epidemic is a public health crisis, and treat it as such
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New Scientist - News
Early farmers may have polluted the sea 4000 years agoHeavy metals including cadmium and lead are unusually common in sediments from the South China Sea, hinting that run-off from farms was spilling into the ocean 4000 years ago
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New on MIT Technology Review
Robo-Taxis Are Driving Around a Retirement Community, and That’s a Savvy Idea
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Ars Technica
The Google Pixelbook brings back the $1,000 Chrome OS halo device Enlarge SAN FRANCISCO—After a year of hibernation , Google's flagship Chromebook offering is back. At the company's hardware event in San Francisco Wednesday, Google announced the " Google Pixelbook ," representing a new generation of Chrome OS devices. The Pixelbook is full of "firsts" for a Chrome OS laptop. It's the first Chromebook with a seventh-gen Intel Kaby Lake processor. It's the first
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Gizmodo
Google's Home Max Goes After HomePod With a Big Ass Sonos Clone Most people thought Google’s big event would be sort of lame, since all of the new products got leaked. And then, at the tail end of the Google Home announcement, the thump of a bass showed up. Meet the Google Home Max. Google Home Max is a smart speaker with better sound than the standard Google Home. The company really emphasized the new hardware’s bass, while also highlighting some neat softwa
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Anxiety and depression caused by childhood bullying decline over timeA new study has provided the strongest evidence to date that exposure to bullying causes mental health issues such as anxiety years later.
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cognitive science
What songbirds could teach us about constructive tweeting submitted by /u/OestlundMartin [link] [comments]
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cognitive science
Gut Brain Connection | Does Your Gut Hold the Key to Better Brain Health? submitted by /u/LizMeyers [link] [comments]
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fitbit-style prosthetics? Navy developing 'smart' artificial limbsTraditional leg prosthetics enable amputees to maintain mobility and lead more active lives. But these prosthetics depend on soft limb tissue to function and can be painful to wear, resulting in awkward walking motion and possible skin infection.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Imaging agents developed to better monitor growth of tumoursUAlberta researchers have created two new imaging agents that could help physicians visualize the formation of tumour-associated blood vessels, keep track of tumour growth and possibly generate new therapies.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanoscale islands dot light-driven catalystIndividual nanoscale nuggets of gold, copper, aluminum, silver and other metals that capture light's energy and put it to work are being employed by Rice University scientists who have discovered a way to build multifunctional nanoscale structures.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Assessing regional earthquake risk and hazards in the age of exascaleWith emerging exascale supercomputers, researchers will soon be able to accurately simulate the ground motions of regional earthquakes quickly and in unprecedented detail, as well as predict how these movements will impact energy infrastructure—from the electric grid to local power plants—and scientific research facilities.
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Popular Science
Let's watch Google announce the Pixel 2, the Home Mini, and other stuff Technology Spend your lunch break watching the Google livestream as the new products debut. Meet the Google Pixel 2 smartphone, as well as the new Home speaker.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Delays for melanoma surgeries linked to insurance typeResearchers report in JAMA Dermatology that surgical treatment delays - defined as surgery that occurred more than six weeks after diagnosis - were common. Medicaid patients were 36 percent more likely than private insurance patients to experience delays.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mysterious dimming of Tabby's Star may be caused by dustOne of the most mysterious stellar objects may be revealing some of its secrets at last.
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Feed: All Latest
Google Home Mini: Specs, Price, Release DatePlus, the huge Google Home Max.
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The Atlantic
How the Equifax Hack Could Hurt Anyone Applying for a Job A data breach at the credit-reporting firm Equifax disclosed last month—a hack that affected an estimated 145.5 million Americans— cost the company’s CEO, Richard Smith, his job . And, because of many American employers’ hiring practices, the hack could cost many others jobs as well. The consequences of the hack will probably be felt by its victims for years: With this trove of sensitive personal
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The Atlantic
The World Needs a Terrestrial Sputnik Moment The Space Age began on October 4, 1957, exactly 60 years ago. On that date, the Soviet Union used a rocket originally intended for use with ballistic missiles to launch Sputnik 1, a small polished metal sphere weighing 184 pounds. Upon reaching its orbit, it became Earth’s first artificial satellite. Traveling at five miles per second, with an altitude that ranged between about 140 miles at its l
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Gizmodo
The Google Home Mini Is a Google Home But Mini Image: Google Google just announced a lovely hockey puck of a gadget called the Google Home Mini. As the name implies, the device does everything a Google Home does in a much smaller package. It’s also cheap! The Google Home Mini is four inches across, covered in fabric, available in three colors (coral, chalk, and charcoal), and generally elegant-looking. There are four LED lights on top that in
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Ars Technica
The Google Home Mini is Google’s $49 answer to the Echo Dot SAN FRANCISCO—We're live from Google's big hardware event, and the latest item to be announced is the Google Home Mini. If Google's Home hardware strategy is "copy whatever Amazon is doing, but with Google software," then the Google Home is the Amazon Echo, and the Mini is Google's answer to the Echo Dot. The original $129 Google Home combined Google Assistant smarts with a speaker system good en
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Milky way's 'most-mysterious star' continues to confoundIn 2015, a star called KIC 8462852 caused quite a stir in and beyond the astronomy community due to a series of rapid, unexplained dimming events seen while it was being monitored by NASA's Kepler Space Telescope. And the star has continued to foil scientists' efforts to understand it ever since.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
White House adviser: Phase out Social Security number as IDA cybersecurity adviser to President Donald Trump is pushing to phase out the use of Social Security numbers as a form of identification.
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New Scientist - News
Phone calls can be beamed right into your central nervous systemApple has upgraded next-generation cochlear implants to work with iPhones, allowing users to stream audio directly into the device
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Different sugars, different risks to your liverMice on a fatty diet who were given high levels of fructose in their diet suffered much worse metabolic effects than those given similar calories of glucose.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study pokes holes in fetal alcohol hypothesisA new study published in the journal Brain Behavior and Immunity appears to challenge the theory that cells in the brain's immune system are the culprit behind the neurological damage that occurs in children exposed to alcohol while in the womb.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nebraska discovery offers clues to why Zika became more dangerousVirus with a certain sugar in its protein envelope more readily passes to the brain in infected mice, causing inflammation and death.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Antidote to synthetic cannabis 'Spice' intoxication could be found in slimming drugEarly research from Queen Mary University of London has potentially found an antidote that can rapidly stop the intoxicating effects of cannabis and synthetic cannabinoids.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nanoscale islands dot light-driven catalystRice University scientists have combined aluminum nanoparticles and smaller metal particles to create a versatile nanostructure that could lead to new applications for plasmonics. The Rice technique allows for customizable surface chemistry and reactivity in one material.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Imaging agents developed to better monitor growth of tumoursUAlberta researchers have created two new imaging agents that could help physicians visualize the formation of tumour-associated blood vessels, keep track of tumour growth and possibly generate new therapies.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Assessing regional earthquake risk and hazards in the age of exascaleResearchers from Berkeley Lab, Lawrence Livermore Lab and UC Davis are building the first-ever end-to-end simulation code to precisely capture the geology and physics of regional earthquakes, and how the shaking impacts buildings.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research rethinks the evolutionary importance of variability in a populationIt's been long thought that variability within a population is key to population's growth and survival but new research questions that assumption. Harvard researchers found that variability can actually lower population growth in single-cell organisms. This insight is important for characterizing the fitness of a population, which is useful, for instance, in understanding how bacteria respond to a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Antifungals and probiotics may play a key role in the development of treatment for Crohn's diseaseScientists have determined that fungus may play a key role in chronic intestinal inflammation disorders. They found that patients with Crohn's disease tend to have much higher levels of the fungus Candida tropicalis compared to their healthy family members. A new review published in Digestive and Liver Disease looks at these findings and provides insights into potential new therapeutic approaches
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Gizmodo
Black Panther's Origins Will Be Explored in a New Comic by io9's Evan Narcisse, a Guy We Know Image: Marvel. Art by Brian Stelfreeze. io9 senior writer Evan Narcisse has been writing about comics for over a decade, but over the past several months, you may have noticed his thoughtful essays on the Big Two comics publishers are missing. That’s because Evan has gone from writing about comics to writing one himself—namely, Rise of the Black Panther , a new series looking at the formative yea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Will your job be automated? 70 percent of Americans say noMost Americans believe their jobs are safe from the spread of automation and robotics, at least during their lifetimes, and only a handful says automation has cost them a job or loss of income.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rich ancient shipwreck off Greece yields more bronze statuesGreece's Culture Ministry says archaeologists revisiting one of the most famous shipwrecks of ancient times off southern Greece have found fragments of bronze statues and a section of the wooden hull.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Sputnik Moments: Trio of Spaceflight Events Shook U.S. in 1957The Soviet Union launched the world’s first artificial satellite 60 years ago -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic
How the Benzene Tree Polluted the World Deep in the Mariana Trench, at depths lower than the Rockies are high, rests a tin of reduced-sodium Spam . NOAA scientists caught sight of it last year near the mouth of the Mariana’s Sirena Deep. It isn’t an isolated incursion, but it was nevertheless startling, the sight of those timeless golden letters bright against the deep ocean bottom. Shortly after came news from another team of scientis
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The Atlantic
What's Happening With the Relief Effort in Puerto Rico? What is happening in Puerto Rico? Since the storm made landfall on September 20, Hurricane Maria has wreaked havoc on the island, causing a level of widespread destruction and disorganization paralleled by few storms in American history. Almost two weeks after the storm abated, most of the island’s residents still lack access to electricity and clean water. From a meteorological standpoint, Maria
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The Atlantic
Latino Republicans Place Their Bets on DACA After the 2012 presidential election, Republicans came to a conclusion: They needed to make inroads with Hispanic voters. Four years later, the party chose Donald Trump—whose controversial rhetoric and hardline stance on immigration alienated many Hispanic voters—as its nominee, intensifying tensions between the GOP and Hispanics. Despite that history, Republican strategists now see an opportunit
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New Scientist - News
Our braininess may have evolved thanks to less sticky neuronsWe don’t know much about the genetic evolution of the human brain. Now experiments suggest genes involved in cell stickiness may have given our brain its folds
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Meet Madagascar's oldest animal lineage, a whirligig beetle with 206-million-year-old originsThere are precious few species today in the biodiversity hotspot of Madagascar that scientists can trace directly back to when all of Earth's continents were joined together as part of the primeval supercontinent Pangea.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hurricane exposes and washes away thousands of sea turtle nestsHurricane Irma took a devastating toll on incubating sea turtle nests in the Archie Carr National Wildlife Refuge, one of the most important loggerhead and green turtle nesting sites in the world, according to new estimates from the UCF Marine Turtle Research Group.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA's Webb Telescope to witness galactic infancyScientists will use NASA's James Webb Space Telescope to study sections of the sky previously observed by NASA's Great Observatories, including the Hubble Space Telescope and the Spitzer Space Telescope, to understand the creation of the universe's first galaxies and stars.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How disliked classes affect college student cheatingOne of the tactics that discourages student cheating may not work as well in courses that college students particularly dislike, a new study has found.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rampant consumption of hippo teeth combined with incomplete trade records imperil threatened hippo populationsGlobal wildlife trade is pushing many species to the brink of extinction. The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) was established to regulate this trade, but inadequate monitoring may facilitate or lead to unsustainable levels of exploitation. A recent study by the School of Biological Sciences of the University of Hong Kong (HKU) examined the ca
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Ars Technica
Formula 1 says goodbye to NBC, hello to ESPN in 2018 Enlarge / If you want to see this on TV next year, you'll need ESPN. (credit: Peter J Fox | Getty Images) On Wednesday morning, the sports network ESPN announced that starting next year, it will be the new broadcaster of Formula 1 racing here in the US. It's a return of sorts, as ESPN's parent company ABC was the first US network to televise the sport back in 1962. ESPN said that it will air more
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Gizmodo
There May Be Seven Incredibly Rare Bronze Statues Buried At the Antikythera Shipwreck A sediment-encrusted bronze arm recovered from the Antikythera wreck. (Brett Seymour/EUA/ARGO 2017) A trove of new artifacts have been recovered from the Roman-era wreck that yielded the mysterious Antikythera Mechanism, including an arm made of bronze and a strange metal disc. But most intriguing of all, the latest survey suggests that seven bronze statues are still waiting to be discovered. The
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Albatross feces show diet of fishery discardsAlbatross feed on several fish species that are not easy for the birds to access in nature, but which are caught by commercial fisheries, finds a study in open-access journal Frontiers in Marine Science. This indicates a high level of interaction between albatross and fisheries in some areas, and so an ongoing risk of the birds being killed in fishing gear.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Female fish like males who singNoisier seas seem to hamper fish reproduction. A new doctoral thesis from the University of Gothenburg shows that noise pollution impedes reproduction in sand and common gobies, both of which are important food sources for juvenile cod.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Plants become more tolerant when living in symbiosis with fungiBy developing a symbiotic relationship with fungi, plants not only become more tolerant to diseases but can also help contribute to more sustainable agricultural practices. This is the conclusion of a new study from the University of Gothenburg.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pay-it-forward college financing policies examined in new studyPay-it-forward college financing programs that enable students to pay tuition upon departure rather than entry may make college more accessible to greater numbers of students in the U.S., a new analysis suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research rethinks the evolutionary importance of variability in a populationIt's been long thought that variability within a population is key to population's growth and survival but new research questions that assumption.
5h
Gizmodo
Jezebel Gun Enthusiast With Many Instagram Followers Experiences Backlash for Fleeing the Las Vegas Jezebel Gun Enthusiast With Many Instagram Followers Experiences Backlash for Fleeing the Las Vegas Shooting | Deadspin This Is How The Yankees Are Built To Win | The Root Why We Never Talk About Black-on-Black Crime: An Answer to White America’s Most Pressing Question | Earther After Irma, Pummeled Everglades Shows Signs of Resilience | Splinter Rex Tillerson Reportedly Called Trump a ‘Moron’ an
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study investigates the presence of contaminants on drinking waterComparative analysis between sanitation systems in Brazil and the USA shows the need to apply new technologies for the treatment of chemical compounds created by men, some of them endocrine deregulators. The project is a result of a joint effort from chemistry scientists from both countries, who developed research and scientific articles thanks to São Paulo Research Foundation's SPRINT program, th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hurricane exposes and washes away thousands of sea turtle nestsThe University of Central Florida Marine Turtle Research Group today released estimates of sea turtle nests lost to Hurricane Irma, finding that 56 percent of green turtle nests and 24 percent of loggerhead nests were lost within Archie Carr National Wildlife Refuge. Both are endangered species. The losses put a damper on what had been a record year for green turtle nesting.
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Scientific American Content: Global
It's Time to Rethink the Nobel PrizesThey can go to a maximum of three people, and they can't be awarded posthumously, but that wasn't part of Alfred Nobel's original vision -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic
Why Better Mental-Health Care Won't Stop Mass Shootings Fifty-nine people are dead from the worst mass shooting in recent U.S. history. As happened after Omar Mateen killed 49 people at a nightclub with a gun, or after Dylann Roof killed nine African Americans with a gun, or after Adam Lanza killed 26 children and teachers with a gun, or after James Holmes killed 12 moviegoers with a gun, the call for action from some policy makers has centered on one
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Ars Technica
Search of “Rocket” Madsen’s space lab finds footage of woman’s decapitation Enlarge / The UC3 Nautilus in early sea trials in 2008. (credit: Frumperino ) Copenhagen prosecutor Jakob Buch-Jepsen announced in a court hearing Wednesday that "images" of the torture, decapitation, and burning of a woman were found on a computer hard drive at RML Spacelab, the organization devoted to building a manned suborbital rocket led by Danish aerospace engineer Peter Madsen. The BBC rep
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Gizmodo
Wednesday's Top Deals: Refurbished Dyson, Anker PowerPort, Bones Box Set, Kershaw Tactical Knife, and More Your mid-week deals start off with a refurbished cordless Dyson V6 , an Anker USB-C Charger , Studio Ghibli pre-orders , Bones box set , and more. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. TOP TECH DEALS FREE Wickedly Prime Sweet ‘n’ Cheesy Popcorn with $25 Amazon.com purchase If you spend $25 on products shipped and sold by Amazon.com today , you can add a bag of their
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Ars Technica
Police raid Merck pharmaceutical plant amid mysterious drug crisis Enlarge / Demonstrators gather near the National Assembly as they protest against the new chemical formula of the Levothyrox, a manufactured form of the thyroid hormone, in Paris on September 8, 2017. (credit: Getty | CHRISTOPHE ARCHAMBAULT ) In the six months since pharmaceutical giant Merck KGaA reformulated a thyroid hormone replacement drug distributed in France, patients there have filed doz
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Meet Madagascar's oldest animal lineage, a whirligig beetle with 206-million-year-old originsA new study in Scientific Reports suggests the Malagasy striped whirligig beetle Heterogyrus milloti boasts a genetic pedigree stretching back to the late Triassic period.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
University of Guelph researchers discover why females have heart health advantageUniversity of Guelph Prof. Tami Martino has revealed in a first-ever study the biological reasons why females have a heart health advantage over men and it's tied to ovarian hormones. Essentially the interplay between female ovarian hormones and a circadian 'clock' molecule protects the heart health of women until they reach menopause.
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Science | The Guardian
What is cryo-electron microscopy, the Nobel prize-winning technique? The 2017 chemistry laureates were recognised for developing cryo-electron microscopy. But what is it, why is it exciting and where will it take us next? A trio of scientists share this year’s Nobel prize for chemistry: Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson. Their win is for work on a technique known as cryo-electron microscopy that has allowed scientists to study biological molecu
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Science | The Guardian
Santa Claus's tomb may have been uncovered beneath Turkish church Archaeologists say they have found almost fully intact temple and burial grounds of Saint Nicholas in Antalya Turkish archaeologists have dashed the hopes of millions of children by claiming to have uncovered the likely burial place of Saint Nicholas. Surveys have uncovered an intact temple and burial grounds below St Nicholas church in the province of Antalya, where he is believed to have been b
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Why it’s good news that Pluto doesn’t have ringsThe New Horizons team searched for rings around Pluto, and found nothing. That suggests the spacecraft’s next destination might be ring-free too.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Russia Has Been Hacking Western Soldiers’ Smartphones
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Science : NPR
Would Aliens Look Like Us? Though natural selection might have sculpted a well-adapted species on another planet, they wouldn't look like us, says guest blogger Jonathan Losos. (Image credit: Adventure Photo/Getty Images)
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Gizmodo
Watching Strings Vibrate While This Guitarist Plays Is Delightfully Calming GIF By mounting a small camera looking out the sound hole of his guitar, musician Alan Gogoll was able to capture the oscillating wave patterns as each string was plucked. The result is a performance that’s as captivating to watch as it is to hear. Cramming a camera inside a musical instrument will almost certainly reduce its ability to produce rich, clear tones, but Gogoll is clearly a talented
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Ars Technica
How hitting a game cartridge unlocks gaming’s weirdest Easter egg Here at Ars, we have a minor obsession with modern discoveries of Easter eggs from relatively ancient games. That includes a timing cue in Punch-Out!! , debug menus hidden in Mortal Kombat cabinets , and the first-ever Easter egg found in a game from 1977 . But a Level Select Easter egg that involves physically hitting a Sonic 3D Blast Genesis cartridge —and the story behind it—is probably the we
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
60 years after Sputnik, Russian space program faces troublesSix decades after Sputnik, a refined version of the rocket that put the first artificial satellite in orbit remains the mainstay of Russia's space program—a stunning tribute to the country's technological prowess, but also a sign it has failed to build upon its achievements.
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Live Science
Nobel Prize in Chemistry: 1901-PresentA list of the winners of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry, including Marie Curie, Roger Kornberg and Otto Hahn.
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Live Science
Nobel Prize in Physics: 1901-PresentHere's a look at all winners of the Nobel Prize in physics, including Steven Chu, Aage Niels Bohr and Enrico Fermi.
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Viden
GRAFIK 579 nobelpriser i talDe nordiske lande har fået flere nobelpriser end Japan, Kina og Indien til sammen, siden den første pris blev uddelt i 1901.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Do delays in surgery for melanoma vary by insurance?Timely treatment for cancer is important and a new article published by JAMA Dermatology examines how delays of surgery for melanoma vary by insurance type.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exposure to childhood bullying and mental healthTo what degree does childhood exposure to bullying contribute to mental health difficulties and do the direct contributions of exposure to bullying persist over time?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Poorer health literacy associated with longer hospital stay after surgeryAmong more than 1,200 patients who underwent major abdominal surgery, a lower health literacy level was associated with a longer hospital length of stay, according to a study published by JAMA Surgery.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Anxiety and depression caused by childhood bullying decline over timeA new UCL-led study has provided the strongest evidence to date that exposure to bullying causes mental health issues such as anxiety years later.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Use of CPR, defibrillators improves after public health initiativesAfter coordinated and comprehensive public health initiatives in North Carolina, more patients received bystander CPR and first-responder defibrillation at home and in public, which was associated with improved survival, according to a study published by JAMA Cardiology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Women use gossip to compete for a man's attentionAlthough both men and women gossip, women may be more likely to use gossiping and rumour-mongering as tactics to badmouth a potential rival who is competing for a man's attention. Women also gossip more about other women's looks, whereas men talk about cues to resource holding (e.g., wealth) and the athleticism of their competitors. According to Adam Davis of the University of Ottawa in Canada, go
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The Atlantic
Is The Mayor the Future of Politics? The Mayor , ABC’s new Tuesday-night comedy, has a cynical premise. Like “The Waldo Moment,” the episode of Black Mirror that some have compared to the current dystopian reality, it’s set up around a stunt, where a failing entertainer stages a political campaign to boost his flagging career, assuming there’s no way he’ll actually get elected. But, whether out of nihilism or disillusionment or for
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google to unveil new Pixel phones and other gadgetsA year to the day after first unveiling the Pixel smartphone, Google will launch the next generation of the would-be iPhone killers in San Francisco.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New approach may hold the key to treating antibiotic-resistant bacteriaA new study published online in The FASEB Journal highlights the therapeutic potential of a simple chemical mimic of host defense peptides (C10OOc12O) to cure bacterial infections both on its own, as well as in combination with otherwise inefficient antibiotics.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tungsten offers nano-interconnects a path of least resistanceAs microchips become ever smaller and therefore faster, the shrinking size of their copper interconnects leads to increased electrical resistivity at the nanoscale. Finding a solution to this impending technical bottleneck is a major problem for the semiconductor industry.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nobel Chemistry laureate says first hurdle was fear of darkLong before Jacques Dubochet embarked on the research that earned him a Nobel Chemistry Prize on Wednesday, he made a discovery at age five that helped him overcome a common, yet powerful fear.
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New Scientist - News
We’ve finally seen how the sleeping brain stores memoriesFor the first time, scans of sleeping people have shown how memories are moved in the brain, and suggest that the first hours of shut-eye are key for memory
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Gizmodo
Here Are Some Incredible Images Made Possible by This Year's Chemistry Nobel Prize Today’s resolution of cryo microscopy illustrated by this glutamate dehydrogenase molecule (Image: Martin Högbom/The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences) Science, at its core, is a process. New advances in technology are as important as new discoveries they lead to. How can you understand a molecule, for example, if you can’t see it? Like yesterday’s physics prize, today, the Royal Swedish Academy
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Katherine Thompson-Peer (UCSF): Neuronal Regeneration After Dendrite Injury Katherine Thompson-Peer examines neuronal regeneration, focusing on the ability of dendrites to regrow after injury. https://www.ibiology.org/ibioseminars/neuronal-regeneration-dendrite-injury.html Talk Overview: When it comes to neuronal regeneration, very little is known about the ability of dendrites to regrow following trauma. In this lecture, Dr. Thompson-Peer describes her discovery of fund
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Aaron Pomerantz (UC Berkeley): Decoding Butterfly Color Aaron Pomerantz goes on a journey to the Amazon rainforest to decode butterfly color. https://www.ibiology.org/ibioseminars/decoding-butterfly-color.html Talk Overview: How is butterfly color created? In this lecture, Aaron Pomerantz takes us on a journey through the Amazon rainforest, where interesting observations about butterfly color and patterns lead him to use imaging and genetics to decode
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Eleanor Bath (Oxford): Understanding Female Aggression in Fruit Flies Eleanor Bath uses fruit flies to understand female aggression. https://www.ibiology.org/ibioseminars/understanding-female-aggression.html Talk Overview: Why do females fight? For over a century, biologists thought that female aggression was uncommon in the animal kingdom. In this lecture, Dr. Eleanor Bath dispels that notion and shows that female aggression in fruit flies increases after mating.
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Tyler Allen (NC State U.): How Circulating Stem Cells Exit Blood Vessels Tyler Allen describes a new way for circulating stem cells to exit blood vessels when injected into the blood for therapies. https://www.ibiology.org/ibioseminars/circulating-stem-cells-exit-blood-vessels.html Talk Overview: Injecting adult stem cells into the bloodstream could help regenerate tissue damaged by heart attacks. For this to happen, circulating stem cells need to exit blood vessels a
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Quanta Magazine
Supercool Protein Imaging Gets the Nobel Prize Seeing is believing, but for creatures as visually oriented as humans, seeing is also understanding. Much of the past century’s progress in biology has come from scientists being able to picture what DNA helices, protein channels and other biomolecules look like within the milieu of the cell. This year’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry celebrates three scientists for their role in developing cryo-electr
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Feed: All Latest
How Sonos Made Amazon's Alexa Sound AmazingThe new Sonos One shows what you can do when you marry amazing speakers with a great virtual assistant.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Alphabet's DeepMind forms ethics unit for artificial intelligenceDeepMind, the Google sibling focusing on artificial intelligence, has announced the launch of an "ethics and society" unit to study the impact of new technologies on society.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EU's Vestager, Silicon Valley's nemesisWhen Silicon Valley's critics need a leader, they turn to Denmark's Margrethe Vestager, the EU's top anti-trust regulator.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Rampant consumption of hippo teethInvestigators have examined the case of hippo teeth and revealed discordance in trade volumes declared between importers and exporters -- a scenario that could threaten the survival of the species.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How disliked classes affect college student cheatingOne of the tactics that discourages student cheating may not work as well in courses that college students particularly dislike, a new study has found.
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Gizmodo
The Sonos Smart Speaker Is Finally Here The new Sonos One. Photo: Sam Rutherford for Gizmodo At long last, Sonos is ready for small talk. The wireless speaker company—whose gloss has dulled as Amazon, Google, and soon Apple, have released increasingly decent “smart” speakers over the last couple of years—is finally releasing a speaker with built-in voice commands. It’s called the Sonos One and it comes with Amazon’s Alexa assistant bui
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Dana Foundation
Neuroscience and Society: The Meditating Brain Many people who meditate, practice yoga, or pray report a sense of calm and well-being that extends beyond the time spent in each practice. Using modern neuroscience techniques, researchers have sought to quantify effects of these practices. What do we know so far? “You can think of meditation as a form of attention training,” said Sara Lazar of Harvard during a panel at the American Association
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
Mind-blowing, magnified portraits of insects | Levon BissPhotographer Levon Biss was looking for a new, extraordinary subject when one afternoon he and his young son popped a ground beetle under a microscope and discovered the wondrous world of insects. Applying his knowledge of photography to subjects just five millimeters long, Biss created a process for shooting insects in unbelievable microscopic detail. He shares the resulting portraits -- each com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The vitamin ergothioneine: an antioxidant for oxygen-free areas?Chemists at the University of Basel have been able to show for the first time that anaerobic bacteria can produce the vitamin ergothioneine in the absence of oxygen. This suggests that bacteria were forming this compound even before there was oxygen in the Earth's atmosphere. The vitamin's function therefore remains a mystery, as it was previously ascribed a role in oxygen-dependent processes.
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The Atlantic
Does Technology Need to Be Ethical? “The average citizen is starting to feel more and more like, ‘I’m not sure that I feel good about the way technology is interacting with my life,’” says Anil Dash , an entrepreneur, activist, and the CEO of Fog Creek Software, in an interview recorded at the Aspen Ideas Festival. As trust in the tech world continues to erode due to increased vulnerability to hacking and the proliferation of misin
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Too little is known about wildfire smokeHow do fire-suppression chemicals and pesticides affect wildfire smoke and the health of those who breathe it? New research has discovered that this question cannot be answered based on current scientific evidence, say investigators.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Safe motherhood campaign associated with more prenatal visits, birth planning, study findsIn Tanzania, pregnant women who were exposed to a national safe motherhood campaign designed to get them to visit health facilities for prenatal care and delivery were more likely to create birth plans and to attend more prenatal appointments.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pay-it-forward college financing policies examined in new studyPay-it-forward college financing programs that enable students to pay tuition upon departure rather than entry may make college more accessible to greater numbers of students in the US, a new analysis by University of Illinois higher education finance expert Jennifer Delaney and University of Chicago law professor Dhammika Dharmapala suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Plants become more tolerant when living in symbiosis with fungiBy developing a symbiotic relationship with fungi, plants not only become more tolerant to diseases but can also help contribute to more sustainable agricultural practices. This is the conclusion of a new study from the University of Gothenburg.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can census data better predict lead exposure in children?Researchers have developed a computational model based on available childhood blood-lead level records and nationwide census data to predict the risk of lead exposure for children in the US.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Albatross feces show diet of fishery discardsThe first-ever analysis of fish DNA in albatross scat indicates a high level of interaction between seabirds and commercial fisheries. This non-invasive method could be used to assess whether fisheries are complying with discard policies. Extending the analysis to other marine predators could help monitor marine biodiversity and broader marine ecosystem changes.
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The Scientist RSS
Scientists Who Developed Cyro-Electron Microscopy Win Nobel PrizeChemistry Nobel goes to Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank, and Richard Henderson.
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Inside Science
UPDATE: Three Share Chemistry Nobel Prize for Developing New Technique to Image the Molecules of Life UPDATE: Three Share Chemistry Nobel Prize for Developing New Technique to Image the Molecules of Life Cryo-electron microscopy helps scientists see the structure of biomolecules down to each individual atom. nobel-prize-2017_chem_final.jpg Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Rights information: Copyright American Institute of Physics ( reprinting information ) Technology Wednesday, O
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Futurity.org
Deepest sleep may be vital for visual learning Certain visual learning takes hold in the brain during sleep, new research suggests. Remember those “Magic Eye” posters from the 1990s? You let your eyes relax, and out of the tessellating structures, a 3D image of a dolphin or a yin yang or a shark would emerge. Getting good at seeing those 3D images is an example of visual perceptual learning. Researchers working with mice have found this learn
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Gizmodo
How to Watch the Google Pixel 2 Event Today’s the day the world meets the Pixel 2, Made by Google. We’re also expecting a new Google Home device, a new Chromebook, some Android updates, and more. It will be a thing to behold. We’ll be liveblogging the event here, but if you want to watch the livestream it’s easy. Google put it on YouTube. Watch below!
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The Atlantic
Sears Was the Amazon of Its Time—Until It Made Preventable Mistakes Shortly after the turn of century, America’s largest virtual retailer, famously founded to sell one product, made an extraordinary shift. After years of only mailing goods to home shoppers, it started operating dozens of physical stores throughout the country. A model of operational efficiency, the company was light-years ahead of its peers in both technology and strategy, with a devotion to low
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New on MIT Technology Review
DeepMind’s New Ethics Team Wants to Solve AI’s Problems Before They Happen
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Ars Technica
HP updates Spectre systems for Kaby Lake R, and they’re rather attractive We've been fans of HP's sleek Spectre 13 conventional laptop and x360 convertible laptop for a while now. Both systems received a refresh on Wednesday to add Intel's so-called 8th-generation processors , which is to say, quad-core versions of the Kaby Lake processors that they used to have, and HP has taken the opportunity to further refine the devices. The Spectre 13 has the biggest changes. The
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apps help college graduates with jobs, finances, housing and moreThose first months after leaving college can bewilder many graduates, but some apps may help to ease the transition from the sheltered halls of academia to the harsh realities of the business world.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Flights worldwide face increased risk of severe turbulence due to climate changeFlights all around the world could be encountering lots more turbulence in the future, according to the first ever global projections of in-flight bumpiness.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA's Webb Telescope to witness galactic infancyScientists will use NASA's James Webb Space Telescope to study sections of the sky previously observed by NASA's Great Observatories, including the Hubble Space Telescope and the Spitzer Space Telescope, to understand the creation of the universe's first galaxies and stars.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New approach may hold the key to treating antibiotic-resistant bacteriaA new study published online in The FASEB Journal highlights the therapeutic potential of a simple chemical mimic of host defense peptides (C10OOc12O) to cure bacterial infections both on its own, as well as in combination with otherwise inefficient antibiotics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Resistance training prevents age-related tendon damageA study published online in The FASEB Journal suggests that resistance training may prevent age-related tendon problems, such as ruptures and tendinopathies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rampant consumption of hippo teethA recent study by the School of Biological Sciences of the University of Hong Kong (HKU) examined the case of hippo teeth and revealed discordance in trade volumes declared between importers and exporters -- a scenario that could threaten the survival of the species.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What's next for nuclear medicine training?The 'Hot Topic' article in the October issue of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine, titled Nuclear Medicine Training: What Now?, examines the role of nuclear medicine in the era of precision medicine and the need for training to evolve with the practice. An associated editorial presents an alternative view, questioning whether 16 months of specialized nuclear medicine training is enough. The two pers
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists identify a possible therapeutic target for regulating body weightA new study published online in The FASEB Journal (http://www.fasebj.org) reveals a novel gene involved in maintaining body weight.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Blood test for HPV may help predict risk in cancer patientsPreliminary findings presented at this year's American Society of Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting suggest a genetic test for HPV16 in the blood could be useful to help assess risk for patients, and could help identify patients suitable for lower treatment doses.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How disliked classes affect college student cheatingOne of the tactics that discourages student cheating may not work as well in courses that college students particularly dislike, a new study has found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tungsten offers nano-interconnects a path of least resistanceAs microchips become smaller, the shrinking size of their copper interconnects leads to increased electrical resistivity at the nanoscale. Finding a solution to this technical bottleneck is a problem for the semiconductor industry; one possibility involves reducing the resistivity size effect by altering the crystalline orientation of interconnect materials. Researchers conducted electron transpor
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Air pollution and poverty stack the deck for ADHDScientists at the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health (CCCEH) at the Mailman School of Public Health report the first evidence that prenatal exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) -- carcinogenic and neurotoxic combustion byproducts commonly found in urban air -- combines with material hardship to significantly increase ADHD symptoms in children. Results are online in t
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Nobel prizes, giant telescope and buried treasure The week in science: 29 September–5 October 2017. Nature 550 12 doi: 10.1038/550012a
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Ars Technica
Here’s what to expect from Trump’s space council meeting this week Enlarge / Mike Pence, center, will have the most important role in setting US space policy under the Trump administration. He leads the National Space Council. Vice President Mike Pence will convene the first meeting of the reconstituted National Space Council on Thursday, which will begin its deliberations at 10am EDT in Chantilly, Virginia. Titled "Leading the Next Frontier," the event will all
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Sputnik's influenceFor the Soviet Union, the launch of the satellite was a triumph not just for science. but socialism.
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Gizmodo
Our Google Pixel 2 Liveblog Is Right Here Image: Google / Gizmodo Are you ready for some surprises?! Just kidding. Leaks on top of leaks on top of leaks suggest that Google will announce the Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL smartphones as well as a new Google Home Mini, a new Chromebook, and a new Daydream headset at Wednesday’s big Made by Google event. Even though we have a good idea of what Google is up to, this huge hardware reveal stands to g
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Gizmodo
Why We'll Eventually Want Our Robots to Deceive Us Image: Futurama, 20th Century Fox As robots and AI start to play an increasing role in our lives, the question of how we want them to behave gets more pressing with each passing breakthrough. In the new book, Robot Ethics 2.0: From Autonomous Cars to Artificial Intelligence , robo-ethicists Will Bridewell and Alistair M. C. Isaac make the surprising case for deceptive robots. We asked the authors
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
City of Amazon proposed to attract company's HQ2 to GeorgiaThe latest pitch to attract Amazon's second headquarters? Create a city named Amazon for the company's planned expansion site.
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The Atlantic
Announcing The Masthead, a Membership Program From The Atlantic Last month, we told subscribers about a major project we are, today, launching to the public: The Atlantic’s first-ever membership program. This morning, as the project—called The Masthead—goes live, I wanted to write you to explain why I think this is so important, and why I hope that you become a founding member of this endeavor. I have several main goals as The Atlantic’s editor in chief. The
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The Atlantic
Down the Rabbit Hole: The Surprising Tale of the Bunny Suit From its first issue in 1953, Playboy’s publisher Hugh Hefner sought to distinguish it from the sleazy sex magazines stored under the newsstand counter and sold in brown paper bags. He once explained that he chose a rabbit as the magazine’s mascot “because of the humorous sexual connotation,” but dressed him in a tuxedo “to add the idea of sophistication.” The models may have been nude, but the a
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Popular Science
Participating in #NoRedOctober is good. Meatless Mondays are better. Environment It's just basic math. This month, people are celebrating #NoRedOctober by avoiding meats like beef. While this is a good idea in theory, there's a better option: Meatless Mondays.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
DirecTV Now wins, YouTube TV loses in channel battleWould-be cord-cutters weighing their options often ask me: Which digital bundle should I get instead of cable?
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Futurity.org
To get yourself to exercise, enjoy it. Here’s how The allure of high-intensity interval training is simple—go all-out for as little as one minute and reap the benefits of a 45 or 60-minute workout. With a promise like that, it is easy to understand why people are willing to try it. But the promise comes with a catch. The entire premise of high-intensity training guarantees a level of displeasure. “The message of ‘squeezing it in’ perpetuates the
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Feed: All Latest
Meet the Guy Bringing 'Dumb Data' Movie Math to RedditWant to know how far Matthew McConaughey jumped in 'Reign of Fire'? Mark Hofmeyer is the quant you're looking for.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Why fake islands might be a real boon for science The seasteading movement is getting close to building its first prototype, an artificial archipelago where people will live, play and do research. Nature 550 22 doi: 10.1038/550022a
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Gizmodo
After Irma, Pummeled Everglades Shows Signs of Resilience A battered ‘mangrove island’ spotted in Florida Bay after Hurricane Irma tore through. Image: Steve Davis When Hurricane Irma plowed into Florida’s southwestern coast as a powerful Category 4 storm last month, it tore up seagrass beds, stripped mangrove forests of their leaves, and overall, left what looked like a trail of ecological apocalypse in its wake. But it’s now been a few weeks since the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discrimination on the grounds of political ideas prevails over any otherFollowing the gradual retreat of other stereotypes, political ideas are becoming established as a significant reason for arousing trust or mistrust between people. This is one of the main conclusions in an article ('The tie that divides: Cross-national evidence of the primacy of partyism') recently published in the prestigious European Journal of Political Research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Healing molecule discovery could reduce limb amputations for diabetes patientsScientists have discovered new insights into a molecule which is part of the body's tissue repair system, in a finding which could help treat non-healing wounds and injuries, such as diabetic foot.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Asthma increases risk of complications during pregnancy and deliveryWomen with asthma suffer more often from preeclampsia (PE) and run a higher risk of giving birth to underweight babies. These and other complications during pregnancy and delivery can not be explained by hereditary or environmental factors, according to a study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ALMA and Rosetta detect freon-40 in spaceObservations made with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and ESA's Rosetta mission by an international team, including researchers from the Niels Bohr Institute, have revealed the presence of the organohalogen Freon-40 in gas around both an infant star and a comet. This discovery suggests that organohalogens may not be as good markers of life as had been hoped, but that they
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New use for alcohol aversion drug in treatment of chemo resistant lung cancer foundScientists have had positive results from a laboratory-based study using a well-known alcohol aversion drug to try to combat chemotherapy resistance in the most common type of lung cancer, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
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Ingeniøren
Spørg Scientariet: Hvor langt væk fra huset skal mit dræn ligge?En læser vil gerne vide, hvor et dræn bør ligge i forhold til, hvor regnen fordeler sig i jorden. Det svarer kloakmester Jens Ladefoged på.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Samsung announces new Windows-based virtual-reality headset at Microsoft eventSamsung is joining Microsoft's virtual reality push, announcing an immersive headset that pairs with Windows computers.
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Futurity.org
How European languages got words like ‘pea’ Not all words in the European languages are of Proto-Indo-European origin, linguists say; there are words for plants and animals that must have come from local cultures. But where and when could this cultural exchange have taken place? According to a new study, the answer is southern Scandinavia around 2,800 BCE. 5,000 years ago, the Yamnaya culture migrated into Europe from the Caspian steppe. I
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Ars Technica
Body Labs, a 3D human body modeling startup, is now part of Amazon YouTube, Body Labs Amazon wants to know your body better, so the online retailer bought Body Labs, a New York-based startup that specializes in 3D body scanning and modeling software for fashion and gaming applications. Body Labs confirmed the deal on its website , but details of the acquisition have not been disclosed. A TechCrunch report estimates that Amazon bought the startup for anywhere bet
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Gizmodo
Save $10 On Your First Prime Now Order, Now With A Bunch of Whole Foods Favorites $10 off your first Prime Now order with code 10PRIMENOW If you live in a city with Amazon Prime Now, but haven’t yet tried it, you can save $10 on your first order with promo code 10PRIMENOW . All you have to do is build a cart with at least $20 worth of eligible goods from Amazon, and enter that code at checkout to get the deal. I’ve literally built Prime Now orders in the past that consisted of
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
ESA’s nyeste generation af satellitter kan afsløre fremtidige havvandsstigningerDen nordøstlige Grønlandske isstrøm (NEGIS), der deler sig i tre enorme gletsjere,...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The enduring power of print for learning in a digital worldToday's students see themselves as digital natives, the first generation to grow up surrounded by technology like smartphones, tablets and e-readers.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Nobel Chemistry Prize Won for Capturing Proteins in ActionThree scientists developed microscope methods that use electrons and cold temperature to reveal tiny details of life’s machinery -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Toxic cocktail: Okinawan pit viper genome reveals evolution of snake venomFor the first time, researchers have sequenced a habu genome, that of the Taiwan habu, and compared it to that of its sister species.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Women use gossip to compete for a man's attentionAlthough both men and women gossip, women may be more likely to use gossiping and rumour-mongering as tactics to badmouth a potential rival who is competing for a man's attention. Women also gossip more about other women's looks, whereas men talk about cues to resource holding (e.g., wealth) and the athleticism of their competitors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Indicator of extraterrestrial life?An international research team has discovered traces of the chemical compound Freon-40 around both an infant star and a comet in our solar system. In the past, researchers have believed this compound to be a possible indicator of life. But the newest research findings cast doubt on this presumption.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Forty years after Prince went pro a special issue celebrates his achievementsPrince turned pro in 1977, signing a six figure contract with Warner Bros. Forty years later, this special issue of the Journal of African American Studies, devoted to one of the world's most talented artists, coincides with that anniversary.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new way to produce clean hydrogen fuel from water using sunlightOsaka University-centered researchers combined graphitic carbon nitride and black phosphorous to make a new metal-free composite photocatalyst capable of producing hydrogen from water. The photocatalyst featured good photocatalytic production of hydrogen, even when powered by low-energy near infrared light.
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Gizmodo
5 Incredibly Stupid Security Mistakes You Make Everyday Photo: Unsplash While you can never be 100 percent safe from hackers, viruses, and other nasties lurking on the internet without going completely off the grid, you can at least cut out the dumbest security mistakes you keep making—seriously, now’s the time to address these, before you have a chance to regret it. 1) Using the same login details forever Image: Screenshot You’ve heard it before but
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Live Science
Colonial Privy? Paul Revere's Outhouse Excavated in BostonPaul Revere is famous for his midnight ride, but now he might be celebrated — at least among archaeologists — for the contents of his outhouse, according to news sources.
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Dagens Medicin
Rigshospitalet politianmeldt efter meningitis-dødsfaldRigshospitalet anklages for svigt i sag, hvor en ung mand døde af meningitis.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Too little is known about wildfire smokeHow do fire-suppression chemicals and pesticides affect wildfire smoke and the health of those who breathe it? UC Davis graduate students discovered that this question cannot be answered based on current scientific evidence and, in a review published in Current Topics in Toxicology, they recommend studies on the compounds in wildfire smoke.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers discovered excessive social interaction reduced collective responseFrom schools of fish, to swarms of insects, to flocks of birds, many animals live and move in groups. They have no leader, no central coordinator, and yet manage to perform awe-inspiring coordinated displays of collective motion. These swarming behaviors are archetypal examples of how local coordination between nearby animals translates into an emerging global behavior. But how localized should th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Soil amendments for healthier spinachSoils keep plants healthy by providing plants with water, helpful minerals, and microbes, among other benefits. But what if the soil also contains toxic elements?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How U.S. chemical warfare in Vietnam unleashed an enduring disasterIn the end, the military campaign was called Operation Ranch Hand, but it originally went by a more appropriately hellish appellation: Operation Hades. As part of this Vietnam War effort, from 1961 to 1971, the United States sprayed over 73 million liters of chemical agents on the country to strip away the vegetation that provided cover for Vietcong troops in "enemy territory."
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Periodically-patterned hydrogels: a model for cooperative deformation(Phys.org)—In nature, some organisms use deformations to create three-dimensional movement. One example is the Venus fly trap, which opens and shuts its leaves to catch prey. When open, the leaves are concave, but when closed the leaves are convex. Scientists are interested in mimicking controlled deformations for applications in soft electronics or actuators.
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Popular Science
Wait a second: What came before the big bang? Science Not everyone thinks the universe had a beginning. Cosmologists used to think the universe was totally timeless: no beginning, no end.
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Popular Science
In photos: The last great American watchmaker Gadgets Watchmakers use century-old tools to turn gold and gems into timepieces. In Pennsylvania, watchmakers use tools from 100 years ago to turn gold and gems into timepieces.
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Popular Science
Five experts on how time shapes our world—and how our minds shape time Technology If you’ve ever waited in line, you need to read this. Five experts on how time shapes our world—and how our minds shape time…
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Popular Science
Deep dive: How exactly the Apple Watch tracks swimming Technology Measuring motion in the water is complex. This is how Apple’s wearable does it. We spoke with an Apple executive and an engineer for an inside look at how the Apple Watch tracks swimming.
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Popular Science
What happened to PopSci.com? Technology A quick note from the online director. I could be coy and kick this off with “you may notice something pretty new around these parts” but that would be silly, and I’ve never been good at being coy.
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Popular Science
No matter how you're affected by a tragedy, help is available Health Experts weigh in on the psychological reverberations of violence. At least 58 people were killed in a mass shooting on Sunday night. Experts weigh in on the steps that victims and their families can take.
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Popular Science
Three men just won a Nobel Prize for the work of more than a thousand people Science 1 experiment. 1,011 people. 1 experiment. 1,011 people. 3 Nobel Prize winners.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Microsoft Is Going All In on Virtual and Augmented Reality
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Ingeniøren
Samtlige Yahoo-konti viser sig nu at være ramt af hack Hackere fik i 2013 adgang til alle brugerkonti hos internetgiganten Yahoo - og ikke bare én milliard konti, som oprindeligt blev meldt ud. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/yahoo-opjusterer-historiens-stoerste-datalaek-samtlige-tre-milliarder-konti-ramt-1081341 Version2
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Soil amendments for healthier spinachSoils keep plants healthy by providing plants with water, helpful minerals, and microbes, among other benefits. But what if the soil also contains toxic elements, such as cadmium? The solution goes back to the soil. Researchers are investigating which soil additives work best.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
SUTD researchers discovered excessive social interaction reduced collective responseResearchers from the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) have uncovered the detrimental effects of excessive interaction and network connections in a wide range of living and engineered systems.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New method to measure cell stiffness could lead to improved cancer treatmentsUCLA biophysicists have created a new method to rapidly determine a single cell's stiffness and size -- which could ultimately lead to improved treatments for cancer and other diseases.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Too little is known about wildfire smokeHow do fire-suppression chemicals and pesticides affect wildfire smoke and the health of those who breathe it? UC Davis graduate students discovered that this question cannot be answered based on current scientific evidence and, in a review published in 'Current Topics in Toxicology,' they recommend studies on the compounds in wildfire smoke.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Unlocking the secrets of the universe; LIGO team awarded 2017 Nobel Prize in physicsDavid H. Reitze, LIGO Executive Director and Fellow of The Optical Society, said 'With continued, long-term investment, Advanced LIGO and now Virgo in Italy, will continue to add to the early building blocks of their dedication to the field of gravitational wave science. We celebrate their success and the incredible team from the LIGO Scientific Collaboration.'
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Conflict and climate change lead to a rise in global hungerLast year about 11 per cent of the total human population (approximately 850 million people on the planet) suffered from daily hunger, according to a recent United Nations report on the state of food security and nutrition in the world.
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Viden
Forsker: Stil krav til sociale medier mod ”fake news”Misinformation på nettet truer demokratiet og kræver øget regulering af de sociale medier. Men vi skal også selv tænke os bedre om, mener dansk professor, som har undersøgt mekanismerne.
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Gizmodo
Amazon Just Got Nailed for Allegedly Evading $300 Million in EU Taxes Photo: AP The European Union’s competition commissioner Margrethe Vestager issued a recovery order against Amazon on Wednesday over hundreds of millions of euros in back taxes the company avoided by routing its finances through Luxembourg. “Luxembourg gave illegal tax benefits to Amazon. As a result, almost three quarters of Amazon’s profits were not taxed,” Vestager said in a statement. “Amazon
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2017: Cryo-electron microscopyThe Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2017 goes to Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank, and Richard Henderson "for developing cryo-electron microscopy for the high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules in solution."
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Big Think
Earth’s Hidden Continent Zealandia Finally Recognized After decades of research and analysis of geoscience data, the seventh largest geological continent officially exists. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Driverless vehicles could bring out the best or worst in our cities by transforming land useThe convergence of technology and the city is seen as a possible remedy for the challenging issues of urbanisation. Autonomous vehicles are among the most popular of many smart city solutions. Also known as driverless car technology, it could reshape our cities.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Hertz chamber for radio-frequency testingA view inside ESA's cavernous Hertz chamber for radio-frequency testing of satellites, which will be on show to the public during this Sunday's ESA Open Day in the Netherlands.
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Dagens Medicin
Psykiater: Satspuljen kan ikke redde psykiatrien – det kan kun finanslovenRegeringen har i sit udspil til fordeling af satspuljemidler afsat 390 mio. kr. til psykiatrien over de kommende fire år. Det vil kun give et kortvarigt løft, advarer psykiater, der efterlyser permanente bevillinger på finansloven.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Integrating data to learn moreTremendous amounts of data are generated in scientific research each day. Most of this data has more potential than we are using now, says Katy Wolstencroft, assistant professor in bioinformatics and computer science. We just need to integrate and manage it better.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
PSU study tracks potentially harmful species from Japanese tsunami to American shoresNearly 300 aquatic species have landed on American shores since the 2011 Japanese tsunami by hitching rides on manmade debris, according to a team of researchers from Portland State University and other institutions. Their findings about long-distance life rafting on debris and its impact on the environment were published in the Sept. 29 issue of the journal 'Science.'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What is STEM education?Everyone needs a good teacher -- including teachers. two new studies show how digging deeper into what STEM education means and strategically designing online classrooms can enhance teaching science, technology, engineering, and math.
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Gizmodo
Wild Rumors About the Comic Book Villain of the Gambit Movie There’s even more speculation about yet another superhero showing up in Avengers: Infinity War . A Pirates of the Caribbean director could helm the Maleficent sequel. Supergirl ’s recruited an animated Justice League icon. Plus, The Flash teases an emotional journey for Wells, and what’s to come on The Gifted . To me, my spoilers! Gambit Splash Report claims that the Gambit movie, currently trapp
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Gizmodo
HP's Spectre Laptops Might Just Be the Prettiest You Can Buy All images: Sam Rutherford/Gizmodo About a month ago, Intel announced its new 8th-gen CPUs , so we put together a little roundup of all the coolest notebooks getting new Core i silicon. But one company was notably left off the list, because it didn’t have anything to share at that time. Now, HP is finally ready to show off its new Spectre and Spectre x360, and even though the saying goes beauty i
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Gizmodo
Using AI Smarts, Photoshop Elements Can Now Automatically Open Closed Eyes in a Photo GIF Have you ever had the perfect photo ruined by someone with their eyes closed in the shot? You could fix the problem with a bit of cloning from an alternate shot using a photo editing app—but Adobe is making the process much easier in the new 2018 version of Photoshop Elements with a dedicated ‘Open Closed Eyes’ feature. You can spend an entire career using Photoshop and still not master the s
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Science | The Guardian
Laika review – adorable space dog blasts off on family mission to Mars Unicorn theatre, London The story of the stray that became Russia’s first cosmonaut is interwoven with a mother and son’s plans to visit the red planet in a show for six to 12-year-olds Something is scratching at the door that opens on to the stage and my 10-year-old theatre companion, Qeiva, is scared. Suddenly an actor in a brown fluffy jumper bursts on to stage. She scampers among us, panting
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Feed: All Latest
'Destiny 2' Makes You Question Your Life—At Least For a WhileBungie's sequel is a game about dying. But ultimately, in its endgame, the game has trouble remembering that.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nuclear magnetic resonance: high sensitivity on smallest spaceIn many areas from materials sciences to medicine, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is used for detailed molecule-specific investigations. Scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now succeeded in enhancing the sensitivity of NMR measurements. For this purpose, the scientists used so-called Lenz lenses that focus magnetic flux. The scientists present their method in the journal P
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Scientific American Content: Global
Belief in Aliens May Be a Religious ImpulseIs belief in aliens a religious impulse? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Ingeniøren
Energiagentur: Kraftig vækst i grøn el-kapacitet på vejPå baggrund af stor vækst i især solenergi-udbygningen i 2016 vurderer Det Internationale Energiagentur nu, at kapaciteten for vedvarende energi i verden vil vokse med 43 pct. frem mod 2022.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New fundamental insight into the battle against bacteriaThe intestinal bacterium E. coli can adapt to changes in its surroundings. Leiden scientists have discovered how the H-NS protein makes this possible. This new knowledge can be an important starting point in combatting bacteria and diseases such as peritonitis. Publication 2 October in the journal eLife.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change study of leatherback sea turtle hatchlings decline fails to provide answers(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with Monash University in Australia and the West Indies Marine Animal Research and Conservation Service has found that changes in temperature and rainfall in the West Indies is not a factor in the declining rate of survival of leatherback sea turtle hatchlings in the U.S. Virgin Islands. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the team d
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new brain-computer interface for music compositionIf that melody has just come to you, and if you know your way around a score, you might be able to think it into being now a group of researchers have developed a new brain-computer interface (BCI) application.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Analysis of Martian meteorites has uncovered 90 million years' worth of new information about one of the red planAnalysis of Martian meteorites has uncovered 90 million years' worth of new information about one of the red planet's volcanoes – and helped pinpoint which volcano the meteorites came from.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New statistical method for evaluating reproducibility in studies of genome organizationA new statistical method to evaluate the reproducibility of data from Hi-C—a cutting-edge tool for studying how the genome works in three dimensions inside of a cell—will help ensure that the data in these "big data" studies is reliable.
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Science : NPR
Chemistry Nobel Prize Awarded For Advances In Cell Imaging The 2017 Nobel Prize in chemistry has been awarded to researchers Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson for their work to develop cryo-electron microscopy.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Flights worldwide face increased risk of severe turbulence due to climate changeFlights all around the world will be encountering lots more turbulence in future, according to the first ever global projections of in-flight bumpiness.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why people around the world fear climate change more than Americans doWhen asked about major threats to their country, Europeans are more likely than Americans to cite global climate change, according to a recent Pew Research Center survey. Just 56 percent of Americans see climate change as a major threat, versus an average of 64 percent of Europeans surveyed.
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Futurity.org
Mold in sea salt could spoil your food Sea salts may contain molds that can spoil food, new research suggests. In a new study, researchers found varying levels of mold contamination in commercial sea salts. Among those molds were important food spoilage molds like Aspergillus and Penicillium , and even some notorious producers of mycotoxins. “Fungi can survive in surprisingly hostile places.” “This new finding contradicts the conventi
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day:Salamander MummyUsing newly developed X-ray imaging technology, paleontologists revealed the skeleton, soft tissues, and remnants of an ingested frog within a 35-million-year-old petrified salamander.
9h
Dagens Medicin
Nordjylland får ny direktør for Patientforløb Eva Sejersdal Knudsen er tiltrådt som ny direktør for Patientforløb i Region Nordjylland.
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Dagens Medicin
Bedrageridømt læge får reduceret dommen i landsrettenEn praktiserende læge fra Kalundborg er blevet dømt for bedrageri af 110.000 kr. i en ankesag ved Østre Landsret. Domfældelsen er betydeligt mindre end ved byretten.
9h
Science-Based Medicine
More Integrative PropagandaDefenders of integrative quackery attack proponents of science-based medicine for simply pointing out the scientific evidence and exposing their poor logic.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Studying bumblebees to learn more about human intelligence and memory(Phys.org)—A team of researchers at Queen Mary University in the U.K. has found that bumblebees with more "synaptic complexes" in their brains are able to learn new things more quickly and also have better memories than those with fewer of them. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B the group describes studying neural connections in individual bee brains and comparing what
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Okinawan pit viper genome reveals evolution of snake venomA bite from a pit viper, locally known as habu, can cause permanent disability and even death. Yet, much about its venom remains an enigma. Highly variable in composition, even between littermates, this toxic cocktail keeps changing over generations.
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New Scientist - News
WHO launches bold plan to slash cholera deaths by 90 per centThe global health agency pledged to reduce the death toll – now running at 95,000 a year – by improving sanitation and strategically deploying an oral vaccine
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New Scientist - News
New York City mice may be evolving to eat fast food like pizzaWhite-footed mice from New York City are genetically distinct from their country-dwelling cousins, and their urban diets may be responsible
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The vitamin ergothioneine—an antioxidant for oxygen-free areas?Chemists at the University of Basel have been able to show for the first time that anaerobic bacteria can produce the vitamin ergothioneine in the absence of oxygen. This suggests that bacteria were forming this compound even before there was oxygen in the Earth's atmosphere. The vitamin's function therefore remains a mystery, as it was previously ascribed a role in oxygen-dependent processes.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Shipbuilding showing the way for sustainability managementCombining sustainability into business is often felt as a challenge, if not even impossible. Environmental aspects and social responsibility are seen as opposite requirements compared to financial targets of a company. The ever more stringent environmental legislation and the development of perception of morale are forcing business leaders to think about how they should develop their leadership.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Powerful micro diaphragm pump for mini-sensorsParticulate matter harms the heart and lungs. In the future, a smartphone with an inbuilt gas sensor could be used to warn of heavy exposure. To help the sensor respond quickly and provide accurate measurements, researchers at Fraunhofer have developed a powerful micro diaphragm pump for delivering ambient air to the sensor.
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Futurity.org
Could climate change benefit some Northeastern farms? Some aspects of climate change could benefit certain forms of agriculture in the Northeastern United States, new research suggests—though the researchers caution that there are many variables in the future scenario they envision. Although a projected increase in hot days will cause more heat stress in dairy cows and economic challenges for the equine industry, some animal agricultural endeavors i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Foxconn to announce location of Wisconsin plant WednesdayTaiwanese technology manufacturer Foxconn is expected to announce it will locate its new sprawling manufacturing complex in Mount Pleasant, Wisconsin.
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Feed: All Latest
The Three Fundamental Moments of Podcasts' Crazy RiseMainstream awareness wasn't a foregone conclusion—podcasts needed a few major developments to hit it big.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Monster volcanoes on Mars—how space rocks are helping us solve their mysteriesMars famously has the largest volcanoes known to science. The largest is Olympus Mons, pictured above, which towers 22km above the surrounding plains – over two and a half times taller than Mount Everest. This extinct volcano is 640km wide even at its narrowest point, greater than the distance between London and Glasgow, or Los Angeles and San Francisco. And Olympus Mons isn't alone in the Earth-b
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Dagens Medicin
Læger udskriver mindre penicillin til nyfødteAntallet af recepter på penicillin til spædbørn er faldet. Det hænger sammen med indførslen af landsdækkende vaccinationsprogrammer mod pneumokoksygdom, viser undersøgelse fra Aarhus.
9h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Cool way to peer into molecules’ inner workings wins chemistry Nobel PrizeThree scientists will split the prize for their work developing cryo-electron microscopy.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Antibiotic-resistant infections in petsNearly every day on the job, veterinary clinical medicine professor Dr. Jason Pieper, a veterinary dermatologist, sees antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections in cats, dogs and other pets. This is not just a local phenomenon; nationally, rates of antibiotic-resistant infections in companion animals are rising at an alarming rate. Pieper spoke to News Bureau life sciences editor Diana Yates about
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Science | The Guardian
Antikythera shipwreck yields bronze arm – and hints at spectacular haul of classical statues Arm points to existence of at least seven statues from Greek shipwreck, already the source of most extensive and exciting ancient cargo ever found Marine archaeologists have recovered a bronze arm from an ancient shipwreck off the Greek island of Antikythera, where the remains of at least seven more priceless statues from the classical world are believed to lie buried. Divers found the right arm,
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Scientific American Content: Global
How Do We Encourage More Women in STEM?Everyday Einstein talks to Rep. Lois Frankel about women in STEM -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new way to produce clean hydrogen fuel from water using sunlightOsaka University-led researchers develop new metal-free photocatalyst and show visible and near infrared light-driven production of hydrogen from water.
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Futurity.org
Our eyes are drawn to meaning, not shiny objects Our visual attention homes in on the parts of a scene that have meaning, not those that “stick out” most, new research suggests. Our eyes perceive a wide field of view in front of us, but we only focus our attention on a small part of this field. How do we decide where to direct our attention, without thinking about it? The dominant theory in attention studies has been “visual salience,” says Joh
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Ingeniøren
VIDEO: Robot rulles hen, hvor opgaven skal løsesEn rullende robotkonsol gør det økonomisk overkommeligt for små og mellemstore virksomheder at komme i gang med at automatisere, mener producenten EasyRobotics. Her fortæller direktør og medejer Per Lachenmeier om tankerne bag den fleksible og mobile arbejdsstation, som netop nu præsenteres på den årlige HI-messe.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Plenty of fish in the sea? Not necessarily, as history showsAustralia has had tens of thousands of years of fisheries exploitation. That history reveals a staggering natural bounty, which has been alarmingly fragile without proper management. The current debate over the federal government's new draft marine park plans is the latest chapter of this story.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change, population growth may lead to open ocean aquacultureA new analysis suggests that open-ocean aquaculture for three species of finfish is a viable option for industry expansion under most climate change scenarios – an option that may provide a new source of protein for the world's growing population.
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The Atlantic
Stuck Together in an Era of Connectedness Living a connected life is now inseparable from seeing unspeakable tragedies as they intrude suddenly but seamlessly into the same streams where we chat, work, and play. On Monday, as a gunman began slaughtering scores on the Las Vegas strip, I sat safely at home, pricey headphones wrapped around my ears, watching a dog video on Twitter. Two clicks later I listened in too-high fidelity as strange
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Scientific American Content: Global
Nobel in Chemistry for Seeing Biomolecules in ActionThe Nobel Prize in Chemistry goes to Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson for developing cryo-electron microscopy for the high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules in... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sunlight and the right microbes convert Arctic carbon into carbon dioxideNearly half of the organic carbon stored in soil around the world is contained in Arctic permafrost, which has experienced rapid melting, and that organic material could be converted to greenhouse gases that would exacerbate global warming.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using social media to take on climate changeOn a typical Friday night, most graduate students would be thinking about their weekend plans to see friends and blow off steam. Instead two UConn Ph.D. candidates are devoting their downtime to tackling climate change one video at a time.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Predatory bacteria that engineer portholes and paint frescoes in harmful bacteriaA microbiological mystery of how one bacterium could invade another and grow inside it without breaking the other bacterium instantly has been illuminated by scientists at the University of Nottingham and Indiana University.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New antenna in Alaska expands spacecraft communications capabilitiesNASA's newest communications antenna became operational today following a ribbon-cutting ceremony at the Alaska Satellite Facility in Fairbanks. The antenna will increase the agency's communications support to Earth-observing missions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mini Crypto chip is a self-contained encryption engineThe Air Force's new Mini Crypto chip will secure communications and data between systems like unmanned aerial vehicles and explosive ordnance disposal robots, while being "losable."
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds organic soil captures, holds more carbonOver the past nine years, Northeastern scientists Geoffrey Davies and Elham Ghabbour have been getting their hands dirty, analyzing soil samples from nearly every state in the country. All that sifting, sorting, labeling, and testing has culminated in new research showing that soil from organic farms is better at sequestering carbon than soil from conventional farms.
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The Scientist RSS
Judge Recommends Ruling to Block Internet Access to Sci-HubThe American Chemical Society seeks a broad order that includes millions of dollars in damages and demands action from Internet service providers and search engines.
10h
Gizmodo
Vacuum All of the Things With This Dyson V6 Deal, No Cord Required Refurb Dyson V6 , $180 The Dyson V6 cordless vacuum is ideal for cleaning rugs, hardwood floors, car seats, ceilings, shelves...pretty much anything really, and you can get a refurb on Amazon today for $180, or $75 less than buying it new. I bought a refurb of the Animal variant of this vacuum a few months ago, and absolutely love it. Just note that this deal is only available today, and it could
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Live Science
Are 'Flatliners' Really Conscious After Death?What happens in the brain and body in the moments after cardiac arrest?
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Live Science
'Don't Let Your Guard Down': Atlantic Hurricane Season Isn't Over YetAfter a series of monster hurricanes made September the most active month on record for the Atlantic, the basin has quieted down, though likely not for long.
10h
Live Science
Experts Call for Mass Killers' Names to Be Kept QuietDenying mass shooters their fame could decrease attacks.
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Ingeniøren
Nobelprisen i kemi hylder mikroskopiteknik, der har revolutioneret biokemienSchweizer, brite og amerikaner deler en nobelpris og ni millioner svenske kroner for deres bidrag til udvikling af kryo-elektronmikroskopi.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Electron behaviour under extreme conditions described for the first timeResearchers have modelled the actions of electrons under extreme temperatures and densities, such as those found within planets and stars.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scholars deconstruct questions at the heart of protests involving national anthemWhen President Trump called for owners of National Football League teams to fire players who take a knee during the national anthem to protest racism, the response by players and others was an even more widespread dissent before games that touched a deep cultural nerve and shook a seminal American institution.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Parole violations, not new crimes, help drive prison's revolving doorFailing a drug test, associating with felons and other technical parole violations are among the key drivers of prison's "revolving door," according to new UC Berkeley research.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
An Inner Look into the Minds and Brains of People with OCDComplex computer modeling demonstrates that obsessive-compulsive disorder patients learn about their environments but don’t use that information to guide their actions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Antikythera shipwreck yields statue pieces and mystery bronze disc Archaeologists think that at least seven life-sized sculptures are hidden nearby. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22735
10h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Cryo-electron microscopy wins chemistry Nobel Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson share the prize for developing a technique to image biomolecules. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22738
10h
New Scientist - News
Chemistry Nobel for ice microscopes that show molecules of lifeThe award has gone to Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson for developing cryo-electron microscopy, which brings down substances to liquid nitrogen temperatures.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Transatlantic tussles: EU cases against US firmsThe EU's decision to slap Amazon with a multi-million euro tax bill and take Ireland to court for not complying with a landmark case against Apple are the latest in a string of competition cases against US firms.
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The Atlantic
The 'Unfortunate Family' of American Shooting Survivors Sandy Phillips is getting ready to go to Las Vegas. As long as the funds come through, she and her husband, Lonnie, along with several other volunteers, will be on a plane to Nevada by the end of the week. After her daughter, Jessica, was killed in 2012 during the shooting at a movie theater in Aurora, Colorado, that took 12 lives, Phillips and her husband sold their house and lived out of a camp
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Feed: All Latest
In Building an Electric Car, Dyson Goes Its Own WayAppliance maker Dyson plans to make an electric car by 2020, but will buy self-driving software from others.
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Feed: All Latest
Live Video: Watch Google's Pixel 2 Phone EventGoogle is set to announce new Pixel phones and other new hardware at a live event in San Francisco. The live video starts at 9am PDT.
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Feed: All Latest
Artificial Synapses Could Lead to Brainier, Super-Efficient ComputersA self-organized mesh of artificial synapses might point the way to devices that match the brain’s energy-efficient computing prowess.
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Feed: All Latest
Elon Musk Finally Gets His Melancholy Theme Song
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Feed: All Latest
The Social Network Doling Out Millions in Ephemeral MoneySteemit is a social network that pays users for their contributions. But in the cryptocurrency gold rush, it's unclear who stands to profit.
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Feed: All Latest
How to Build Self-Conscious Artificial IntelligenceTo replicate ourselves in artificial intelligence, we first have to embrace human error. Sci-fi writer Hugh Howey says we shouldn't try it.
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Feed: All Latest
Algorithms Have Already Gone RogueIn his new book, Tim O'Reilly identifies the first case of an algorithm run amok—and it's not what you think.
10h
Ingeniøren
It-problemer (igen) skyld i for høj kontanthjælp Danskere på kontanthjælp har igen ved månedskiftet fået udbetalt for meget i boligstøtte. Det er it-problemer, der resulterer i, at kontanthjælpsmodtagere modtager for mange penge. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/kontanthjaelpsmodtagere-fik-igen-udbetalt-mange-penge-pga-it-problemer-1081331 Version2
10h
Viden
Fotos af livets byggeklodser giver nobelprisTre forskere får nobelprisen i kemi for teknik, der kan tage ekstremt detaljerede billeder.
10h
BBC News - Science & Environment
The dog with the world's longest tongueMeet Mochi from South Dakota, who has just bagged herself a Guinness World Record.
10h
Live Science
Nobel Prize in Chemistry Awarded for 3D Images of Life's MoleculesThe 2017 Nobel Prize in chemistry was awarded to three scientists for their work in producing 3D images of life's molecular machinery.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How millennials approach writing, giving presentations, and data visualization diverges from previous generationsA new study from MIT Sloan highlights communication trends among millennial MBAs, with revealing findings.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: African land coverAt 20 m resolution, this land cover classification map of Africa was created using 180 000 Copernicus Sentinel-2A images captured between December 2015 and December 2016.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study shows the surprising power of Wikipedia in scienceA new MIT working paper released last month and featured on Wikimedia Monthly Research Showcase demonstrated the surprising scientific power of Wikipedia.
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Feed: All Latest
Comcast Cable Is Abandoning Customers in the Name of Free SpeechComcast cable is trying to weasel out of its obligations to consumers by saying its First Amendment rights are under attack.
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Feed: All Latest
Silicon Valley’s Trillion-Dollar Numbers GameTechies in Silicon Valley love making outrageous promises—but they’re pushing the limits of plausibility.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Another chance to put your name on MarsWhen it lands on Mars in November of 2018, NASA's InSight lander will be carrying several science instruments—along with hundreds of thousands of names from members of the public.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What is STEM education?New research shows that K-12 teachers use eight mental models to teach science, technology, engineering and math—a more complex system than initially apparent.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Teacher leadership in online classrooms shapes communicationEveryone needs a good teacher—including teachers. Providing support for teacher education shifts how participants chat in digital classrooms.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The Latest: Nobel winner 'like Google Earth for molecules'The Latest on the Nobel Chemistry Prize (all times local):
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Inside Science
Three Share Chemistry Nobel Prize for Developing New Technique to Image the Molecules of Life Three Share Chemistry Nobel Prize for Developing New Technique to Image the Molecules of Life So-called cryo-electron microscopy can see the atoms of biological proteins in water. nobelprize_2017_chem.jpg Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Rights information: Copyright American Institute of Physics ( reprinting information ) Technology Wednesday, October 4, 2017 - 06:30 Catherine Me
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New method to measure cell stiffness could lead to improved cancer treatmentsUCLA biophysicists have developed a new method to rapidly determine a single cell's stiffness and size—which could ultimately lead to improved treatments for cancer and other diseases.
11h
Ingeniøren
Endnu en gang: Danskere flokkes om halveret bredbåndstilskudBåde midler og ansøgninger til statens støttepulje til bredbånd er halveret i forhold til sidste år.
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Feed: All Latest
Google Liveblog: Pixel 2, Home Mini, Pixel Buds, and moreGoogle unveils a new Pixel phone today, along with some other exciting hardware. Our liveblog starts at 8am PDT.
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Science | The Guardian
Nobel prize in chemistry awarded for method to visualise biomolecules Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson receive £825,000 prize for developing method for generating 3D images of life-building structures The Nobel prize in chemistry has been awarded to three scientists for developing a technique to produce images of the molecules of life frozen in time. Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson will receive equal shares of the 9m Swedi
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NYT > Science
Phys Ed: For Your Brain’s Sake, Keep MovingExercise changes the workings of new brain cells in ways that may protect against dementia, a study in mice suggests.
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NYT > Science
Nobel Prize in Chemistry Awarded for 3D Views of Life’s Biological MachineryJacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson developed a process that may lead to “detailed images of life’s complex machineries,” the committee said.
11h
The Atlantic
Puerto Rico Needs More Than Relief—It Needs Reconstruction Right now, it’s hard to tell in what direction Puerto Rico and the United States Virgin Islands are heading after sustaining hits from Hurricane Irma and then Hurricane Maria in September. The picture of the damage in Puerto Rico verges on the apocalyptic now, and much of the situation is currently deteriorating. Millions are still without power, fuel, food, and water are running out, hospitals a
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The Atlantic
The Opposition With Jordan Klepper Isn’t Paranoid Enough The pitch for the Comedy Central show The Opposition With Jordan Klepper , airing in the 11:30 p.m. slot after Trevor Noah’s Daily Show , was that it could fill the role that Stephen Colbert did for Noah’s predecessor, Jon Stewart. While The Daily Show exists to poke holes in the mainstream news media and political class, The Opposition (like The Colbert Report ) is a rebuttal delivered through a
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Nobel prize awarded for imaging moleculesThe Nobel prize in chemistry is awarded to three scientists for advances in the imaging of biological molecules
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Science : NPR
Nobel Prize In Chemistry Honors Views Of Human Cells Working At The Atomic Level Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson worked to develop cryo-electron microscopy, which the Royal Swedish Academy says "both simplifies and improves the imaging of biomolecules." (Image credit: Martin Hogbom/Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers simulate 1770 magnetic storm using data from historical documentationAuroras are light shows that typically occur at high latitudes such as the Arctic and Antarctic; however, they can expand toward the equator during severe magnetic storms. Past observations of such unusual auroras can therefore allow researchers to determine the frequency and severity of magnetic storms. The more information that can be gathered about historically intense magnetic storms, the grea
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Scientific American Content: Global
Once Again, No Female Nobel Winners in ScienceIncluding the zero honored this year, there have been just 17 in the history of the prizes. Why so terribly few? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren
Store konsulenthuse på tværs af landet søger ingeniører På dagens liste finder du firmaer som Rambøll, Cowi, Sweco og ISC Rådgivende Ingeniører, der alle jagter dygtige konsulentkræfter. Find det rette job for dig. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/store-virksomheder-paa-tvaers-landet-soeger-konsulenter-raadgivere-10379 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Mejeriingeniøruddannelsen stormer frem takket være virksomhedssamarbejdeFor få år siden blev der kun uddannet ca. 10 mejeriingeniører om året fra Institut...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Three researchers win Nobel Prize in Chemistry for developments in electron microscopyScientists Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson won the Nobel Chemistry Prize on Wednesday for cryo-electron microscopy, a simpler and better method for imaging tiny, frozen molecules.
11h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: Slow and Steady, a Tortoise Is Winning Its Race With ExtinctionThe Burmese Star Tortoise was called functionally extinct by ecologists, but a captive breeding program in Myanmar has saved them, a study says.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Vanuatu says most residents evacuated from belching volcanoVanuatu officials said Wednesday they have nearly completed the evacuation of an island where a belching volcano has been threatening to blow.
12h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
FOOD og AAK vil revolutionere fedtet i isenKan man lave is med umættet olie? Det spørgsmål stillede forskere på producent...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Robotic bugs train insects to be helpersTiny mobile robots are learning to work with insects in the hope the creatures' sensitive antennae and ability to squeeze into small spaces can be put to use serving humans.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers discover what is on the menu for dragonfliesResearchers from the Universities of Turku and Helsinki, Finland, have discovered the prey species of adult dragonflies and damselflies, as modern laboratory techniques enabled the study of the insects' diet. In the study, prey DNA was extracted from tiny dragonfly droppings and the researchers managed to identify dozens of prey species from the samples. The results shed light on dragonflies' posi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
South American howler monkeys may be more threatened than previously thoughtAmong the largest primates in the Americas and with one of the loudest calls in the animal kingdom, howler monkeys are iconic species of South American tropical forests. They live in several types of forest ecosystems, from dry to riparian and rainforest. Although the forests they inhabit are being increasingly lost to deforestation for agriculture, howler monkeys are categorized as "Least Concern
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'New era' in solar energy fuelling growth in renewables: IEAThe renewable energy sector is growing faster than expected, driven largely by a "new era" in solar power and strong expansion in China, the International Energy Agency said on Wednesday.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Senators weigh bill to remove obstacles to self-driving carsA bill to clear away obstacles to a new era of self-driving cars is facing opposition from safety advocates who say it would give automakers free rein to put unsafe vehicles on the road.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon must pay $295 million in back taxes, EU saysAmazon has to pay $295 million in back taxes to Luxembourg, the European Union ordered Wednesday, in its latest attempt to tighten the screws on multinationals it says are avoiding taxes through sweetheart deals with individual EU states.
12h
Big Think
What an Independent Catalonia Would Do to the Map of Spain Nothing says "late great nation" than a new map of your country with its territory reduced Read More
12h
Dagens Medicin
DSAM: Husk patientrelationen i klyngearbejdet En vigtig opgave i de kvalitetsklynger, der skal indføres i almen praksis med den nye overenskomst, er at forbedre kontakten mellem læge og patient, mener DSAM-formand.
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Dagens Medicin
Læger: KBU er ikke et rekrutteringsværktøj Hvis den kliniske basisuddannelse skal forlænges, som flere lægefaglige direktører anbefaler, skal det ikke ske som led i en rekrutteringsstrategi, mener Lægeforeningens formand for uddannelse og forskning og PLO-bestyrelsesmedlem.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
One in 4 people leave work a year after a heart attack, Danish study findsOne in four people in Denmark who suffer a heart attack leave their jobs within a year of returning to work.Heart attack survivors with diabetes, heart failure, depression and lower educational and income levels were the most likely to not be working a year after their heart attack.
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Science | The Guardian
Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson win the 2017 Nobel prize in chemistry – as it happened This year’s prize has been awarded for developing cryo-electron microscopy for the high resolution structure determination of biomolecules in solution Nobel prize in chemistry awarded for method to visualise biomolecules 12.36pm BST There we have it, Crispr and lithium-ion batteries lose out to cryo-electron microscopy, a technique that has allowed scientists to study molecules in unprecedented r
12h
The Atlantic
Why Venezuela's Opposition Has Stalled Out In delivering one of the most bellicose addresses ever heard at the United Nations General Assembly on September 19, President Donald Trump got at least one thing right: his description of Venezuela. The corrupt dictatorship of President Nicolás Maduro, he declared, “has brought a once thriving nation to the brink of total collapse … Maduro has defied his own people, stealing power from their ele
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The Atlantic
How America Changed Its Approach to Political Islam Sometimes Islamist groups succeed. Sometimes they underperform. But they almost always matter. This means that the United States needs answers for questions not just about the nature of Islamist movements, but also about the more politically thorny question of what the U.S. should do about them. How the U.S. and Europe should respond—or even if they should treat Islamist parties as distinctive in
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
How fracking is upending the chemical industry As shale-gas compounds flood the market, chemists are working out the best ways to convert them into the ingredients of modern life. Nature 550 26 doi: 10.1038/550026a
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Ars Technica
Uber expands board to 17 members, reduces Kalanick’s power Enlarge / Dara Khosrowshahi, seen here in 2013, has been Uber's CEO since September 2017. (credit: Matthew Lloyd/Bloomberg via Getty Images) In the wake of a possible lawsuit, Uber’s board of directors agreed to various changes that will set a new course for the beleaguered company. Amongst the most notable plans are a stock sale (14 to 17 percent) to an investor group comprised primarily of Soft
12h
Ingeniøren
Sandstrand 100 km fra Fukushima er mere radioaktiv end ved kraftværketSand og brakvand langt fra Fukushima ophober cæsium-137 efter atomkraftkatastrofen i Japan i 2011.
12h
The Atlantic
The Social Experiment Facebook Should Run Facebook’s greatest strength—its ability to identify and connect like-minded people—is also a major vulnerability. Over the past month, the company has revealed that Russia-linked accounts purchased thousands of fake political ads on its platform around the 2016 U.S. election. These ads “microtargeted” Americans based on their divisions along political, racial, and religious lines. Some, as CNN r
13h
Ingeniøren
Ny metode lytter sig til fejl på togskinnerMan kan lytte sig til fejl. I hvert fald på togskinner. Derfor er alle landets skinner nu lyttet igennem for at forhindre brud og støj.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fukushima operator gets first safety approval since 2011 disasterThe operator of the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant cleared a major regulatory hurdle Wednesday to restart two reactors in Japan, its first since the 2011 tsunami sparked the worst atomic accident in decades.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sydney, Melbourne warned to prepare for 50-degree daysSydney and Melbourne could regularly face 50 degree Celsius (122F) days within 25 years even if Australia meets its Paris global warming targets, a new study warned Wednesday.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cats kill one million birds a day in AustraliaFeral and pet cats kill more than one million birds in Australia every day, new research showed Wednesday, with the staggering slaughter driving the decline of many species.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
2013 hack hit all 3 billion Yahoo accounts: companyA 2013 hack affected all three billion accounts at Yahoo, triple the original estimate, the online giant's parent company said Tuesday following a new analysis of the incident.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Trial pitting Waymo against Uber delayed a monthA judge on Tuesday delayed the start of trial in Waymo's suit against Uber over swiped self-driving car technology, giving the unit of Google-parent Alphabet time to study fresh evidence.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Greece backs extradition of Russian to US over bitcoin fraudA Greek court ruled Wednesday to extradite Russian cybercrime suspect Alexander Vinnik to the United States, where he is wanted in connection with a $4 billion bitcoin fraud case.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nobel Chemistry Prize: Major award for molecular mattersThe Nobel Prize for Chemistry rewards researchers for major advances in studying the infinitesimal bits of material that are the building blocks of life.
13h
Viden
Yahoo: Hackerangreb ramte alle tre milliarder brugerkontiVirksomheden understreger, at datatyveri tilsyneladende ikke omfattede kodeord i klar tekst eller kreditkortoplysninger. Men andre personlige oplysninger er mistet.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ammonia emissions unlikely to be causing extreme China hazeAs China struggles to find ways to remedy the noxious haze that lingers over Beijing and other cities in the winter, researchers from Georgia Institute of Technology have cast serious doubt on one proposed cause: high levels of ammonia in the air.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Trophy hunting is unlikely to affect evolutionIn recent years, there has been growing controversy surrounding the evolutionary effects of trophy hunting in big game animals worldwide. An article published in the Journal of Wildlife Management explains why the removal of males possessing large horns and antlers does not inevitably cause harmful artificial selection.
14h
Dagens Medicin
Danmark er blandt de mest attraktive lande for udenlandske lægerLæge og sygeplejersker fra andre EU-lande søger især mod Danmark, hvis de ønsker at arbejde i udlandet, viser ny analyse.
14h

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