NYT > Science
Kazuo Ishiguro Awarded the Nobel Prize in LiteratureThe British author’s best sellers include “The Remains of the Day” and “Never Let Me Go.”
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New NASA study shows moon once had an atmosphereA new study shows that an atmosphere was produced around the ancient Moon, 3 to 4 billion years ago, when intense volcanic eruptions spewed gases above the surface faster than they could escape to space. The study, supported by NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute, was published in Earth and Planetary Science Letters.
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Unge ville ønske, at der ikke fandtes sociale medierBritiske teenagere er begyndt at gå på digitale privatlivskure for at slippe for elektronikken, viser undersøgelse. Dansk forsker mener, at man kan lære af erfaringerne fra Storbritannien.
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Ars Technica
Boeing just bought a company that’s building flying cars for Uber Enlarge / Artist's conception of Aurora's eVTOL, a prototype of a plane Uber hopes to use to offer flying car service in Dallas and Dubai starting in 2020. (credit: Aurora Flight Sciences ) On Thursday, the aviation giant Boeing announced that it is acquiring Aurora Flight Sciences. The lesser-known company specializes in cutting-edge aviation technologies, including electric airplanes, vertical-
4min
Live Science
Man v. Snake: 26-Foot-Long Python Loses Epic BattleA village in Indonesia enjoyed a snake-meat feast this weekend after a resident wrestled and killed a 26 foot-long (7.8 meters) python.
8min
Science | The Guardian
Cancer patients need more than survival | Fay SchopenThe hunger for ‘miracle cures’ has skewed our understanding of medical research. We need greater emphasis on quality of life The horror of a cancer diagnosis is unforgettable. It is the grimmest and most personal bad news. The solemnness of the doctor; the loaded pause as the nurse asks: “Is anyone with you today?”; the strategically placed box of tissues. Related: Over half of new cancer drugs 's
9min
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Controversial pesticides found in honey samples from six continents Neonicotinoids are at the centre of a long-running debate about whether they harm bees. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22762
10min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Molecule created that could 'kick and kill' HIVResearchers have been looking for ways to eliminate the 'reservoirs' where the virus hides, and researchers may have developed a solution. Their approach involves sending an agent to 'wake up' the dormant virus, which causes it to begin replicating so that either the immune system or the virus itself would kill the cell harboring HIV.
13min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cost-effectiveness of guinea worm disease eradicationEradication of guinea worm disease (dracunculiaisis), targeted by the World Health Organization (WHO) for the year 2015, is finally within reach, with only 25 reported human transmissions in 2016. Now, researchers have re-asserted the cost-effectiveness of the global Guinea Worm Eradication Programme (GWEP), some 30 years after it started.
13min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Simulating a brain-cooling treatment that could one day ease epilepsyUsing computer simulation techniques, scientists have gained new insights into the mechanism by which lowering the temperature of specific brain regions could potentially treat epileptic seizures.
13min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Carbon feedback from forest soils to accelerate global warmingAfter 26 years, the world's longest-running experiment to discover how warming temperatures affect forest soils has revealed a surprising, cyclical response: Soil warming stimulates periods of abundant carbon release from the soil to the atmosphere alternating with periods of no detectable loss in soil carbon stores. The study indicates that in a warming world, a self-reinforcing and perhaps uncon
13min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What Earth's climate system and topological insulators have in commonNew research shows that equatorial waves -- pulses of warm ocean water that play a role in regulating Earth's climate -- are driven by the same dynamics as the exotic materials known as topological insulators.
13min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Better genetic decoding of neurodevelopmental disordersNew research into improving the genetic decoding of neurodevelopmental disorders promises to help future diagnosis of children with such conditions, including intellectual disability, autism or schizophrenia.
13min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why lab researchers should talk with industry counterpartsA research team has found both obstacles and lessons from the process of getting a novel membrane for chemical processing out of the lab into the commercial world.
13min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Delivering bad news? Don't beat around the bushNew research shows that when it comes to receiving bad news, most people prefer directness, candor and very little -- if any -- buffer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Predicting when a sound will occur relies on the brain's motor systemWhether it is dancing or just tapping one foot to the beat, we all experience how auditory signals like music can induce movement. Now new research suggests that motor signals in the brain actually sharpen sound perception, and this effect is increased when we move in rhythm with the sound.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Road pricing most effective in reducing vehicle emissionsFor decades municipal and regional governments have used various traffic management strategies to reduce vehicle emissions, alongside advancements like cleaner fuel and greener cars. But not all traffic management strategies are created equal, says transportation experts. After reviewing more than 60 studies on the subject, scientists have concluded that road pricing -- or pay per use -- is the mo
13min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Squirtable' elastic surgical glue seals wounds in 60 secondsA highly elastic and adhesive surgical glue that quickly seals wounds without the need for common staples or sutures could transform how surgeries are performed.
13min
Big Think
One of the Elements Doesn’t Obey the Laws of Quantum Mechanics Chemists are surprised to find that berkelium electrons seem to live outside of quantum mechanics. Read More
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Ars Technica
Dealmaster: Get a 34-inch 3440×1440 Dell monitor for $608 Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our friends at TechBargains , we have another round of deals to share. Today's list is packed with solid bargains, highlighted a few nice discounts on high-end Dell monitors. Lenovo, meanwhile, is running a number of sales to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the ThinkPad brand. We've also got savings on HTC's Vive system and Amazon's Kindle Paperwhite, along with
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Gizmodo
Eye Strain Is a Small Price to Pay For Having My Own Tiny Video Game Arcade All images: Andrew Liszewski/Gizmodo The smartphone in your pocket can perfectly emulate any video game from the ‘80s, but not the experience of crowding around a cabinet at an arcade, waiting to try the latest hit game. Fortunately, if you’re a nostalgic gamer striving for the most authentic retro experience, you can now squeeze an actual arcade onto your desk—without having to keep a pile of qu
15min
Popular Science
How to find out what Facebook knows about you DIY The social media behemoth is watching. Do you know where your data is? Here are all the ways Facebook tries to build a profile of you, and the information it collects to do so.
16min
New Scientist - News
We just found nineteen new species of gecko in one tiny areaThe discovery of so many closely-related vertebrate species within such a small area is unprecedented
18min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Low serum calcium may increase risk of sudden cardiac arrestIn a new study, researchers found that individuals with lower levels of calcium in the blood, which is easily monitored, are more likely to experience SCA than those with higher calcium levels.
27min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
3-D quantum gas atomic clock offers new dimensions in measurementPhysicists have created an entirely new design for an atomic clock, in which strontium atoms are packed into a tiny three-dimensional cube at 1,000 times the density of previous one-dimensional clocks. In doing so, they are the first to harness the ultra-controlled behavior of a so-called 'quantum gas' to make a practical measurement device.
27min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Decision to rescind Waters of the United States rule (WOTUS) based on flawed analysisNew evidence suggests that the Trump Administration's proposal to rescind the 2015 Waters of the United States (WOTUS) rule that would limit the scope of the Clean Water Act inappropriately overlooks wetlands-related values.
27min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Prehistoric humans are likely to have formed mating networks to avoid inbreedingEarly humans seem to have recognized the dangers of inbreeding at least 34,000 years ago, and developed surprisingly sophisticated social and mating networks to avoid it, new research has found.
27min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists solve 3-D structure of key defense protein against Parkinson's diseaseScientists have identified the structure of a key enzyme that protects the brain against Parkinson's disease. The result of a decade of work, the research team said that solving the 3-D structure and inner workings of the PINK1 enzyme represented a major breakthrough.
27min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Climate solution in soil?The land under our feet and the plant matter it contains could offset a significant amount of carbon emissions if managed properly. More research is needed to unlock soil's potential to mitigate global warming, improve crop yields and increase resilience, say researchers.
27min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
DNA-based Zika vaccine is safe and effective at inducing immune responseA new generation DNA-based Zika vaccine demonstrated both safety and ability to elicit an immune response against Zika in humans in a phase 1 clinical trial.
27min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New technology uses mouth gestures to interact in virtual realityResearchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have developed a new technology that allows users to interact in a virtual reality environment using only mouth gestures.
29min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Good-guy bacteria may help cancer immunotherapies do their jobIndividuals with certain types of bacteria in their gut may be more likely to respond well to cancer immunotherapy, researchers at the Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center found in a study of patients with metastatic melanoma.
29min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA finds heavy rainfall in developing Tropical Storm NateAfter tropical depression 16 formed in the southwestern Caribbean Sea it continued organizing and strengthening.
29min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
International team reconstructs nanoscale virus features from correlations of scattered X-raysBerkeley Lab researchers contributed key algorithms which helped scientists achieve a goal first proposed more than 40 years ago -- using angular correlations of X-ray snapshots from non-crystalline molecules to determine the 3-D structure of important biological objects.
29min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Multiple research approaches are key to pandemic preparedness, NIAID officials sayPreparedness in the face of major disease outbreaks can save thousands of lives. A new article by Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of NIH, and colleagues examines the multifaceted nature of effective preparedness and the role that biomedical research plays. Specifically, the article examines three approaches to pandemic pre
29min
Gizmodo
Scientists Just Built the Most Precise Clock Ever to Help Understand Our Crazy Universe Image: G.E. Marti/JILA How accurate a clock do you really need, honestly? You’ll still probably show up late to parties and dial exactly three minutes late into every scheduled phone call. But scientists creating ultra-precise new atomic clocks don’t really have you in mind. Instead, they’re using wild physics to understand mysteries of the Universe that could alter time itself. A team of physici
39min
The Atlantic
Nina Simone Nominated for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame—Finally All these years, where was Nina Simone? Thursday’s nominations for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame contain a few surprises, but Simone’s inclusion makes for a special shock of realization: that this singular icon—an unmatched vocal talent and songwriter, history-making protest artist, and influencer of the Beatles —is not already in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. She wasn’t ever even nominated be
40min
Ars Technica
Pro apps’ APFS compatibility leads to a rough High Sierra transition Enlarge / High Sierra's default desktop wallpaper. (credit: Apple ) Mac users who have upgraded their SSD-equipped Macs to High Sierra are reporting compatibility problems with some widely used professional apps and some games. While APFS is not currently supported on Fusion Drives , built-in flash drives in current Mac hardware are automatically converted to APFS from the old HFS+ file system wh
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain wiring affects how people perform specific tasksThe way a person's brain is 'wired' directly impacts how well they perform simple and complex tasks, according to a new study.
48min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Discovery of a new fusion gene class may affect the development of cancerCancer researchers have discovered a new class of fusion genes with properties that affect and may drive the development of cancer.
48min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Low serum calcium may increase risk of sudden cardiac arrestIn a study in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, researchers found that individuals with lower levels of calcium in the blood, which is easily monitored, are more likely to experience SCA than those with higher calcium levels.
50min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Team led by UCLA astrophysicist observes primitive comet 1.5 billion miles from the sunAstronomers report a 'special comet' currently beyond Saturn's orbit -- the farthest active inbound comet ever seen, at an extraordinary 1.5 billion miles from the sun.
50min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Second grade handwashing experiment leads to big decrease in bacteria, illnessAn experiment with Petri dishes and black lights helped second graders observe the value of hand hygiene, according to an IDWeek 2017 study.
50min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers get straight to the heart of piezoelectric tissuesWhile some studies have supported the idea that the walls of the aorta are piezoelectric or ferroelectric, the most recent research finds no evidence of these properties. Researchers investigated by testing samples of pig aorta using a traditional setup, known as Sawyer-Tower, to detect ferroelectricity. Their experiments suggest the aorta has no special properties, and instead acts as a standard
50min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Prehistoric humans are likely to have formed mating networks to avoid inbreedingThe study, reported in the journal Science, examined genetic information from the remains of anatomically modern humans who lived during the Upper Palaeolithic, a period when modern humans from Africa first colonised western Eurasia. The results suggest that people deliberately sought partners beyond their immediate family, and that they were probably connected to a wider network of groups from wi
50min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Prehistoric humans are likely to have formed mating networks to avoid inbreedingEarly humans seem to have recognized the dangers of inbreeding at least 34,000 years ago, and developed surprisingly sophisticated social and mating networks to avoid it, new research has found.
50min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Soil microbes' contribution to the carbon cycle in a warming worldMicrobiologist Kristen DeAngelis at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, with colleagues elsewhere in New England, report results in the Oct. 6 issue of Science from their study of warming-related soil carbon cycling changes in a New England hardwood forest. Over two and a half decades, the team observed periods of substantial soil carbon loss, punctuated by periods of large changes in microbi
50min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What Earth's climate system and topological insulators have in commonNew research shows that equatorial waves -- pulses of warm ocean water that play a role in regulating Earth's climate -- are driven by the same dynamics as the exotic materials known as topological insulators.
50min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Decision to rescind Waters of the United States rule (WOTUS) based on flawed analysisNew evidence suggests that the Trump Administration's proposal to rescind the 2015 Waters of the United States (WOTUS) rule that would limit the scope of the Clean Water Act inappropriately overlooks wetlands-related values.
50min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Obama and Trump administrations get opposite environmental assessment resultsUsing vast discrepancies between environmental assessments by the Obama and Trump administrations related to the Clean Water Act (CWA) as a key example, authors of this Policy Forum highlight the need for a systematic protocol for government cost-benefits analyses of proposed regulations.
50min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The high price of the nocebo effectPeople receiving an inert treatment believed they experienced more severe adverse side effects when the dummy drug was labeled as expensive, scientists report.
50min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Honey samples worldwide test positive for neonicotinoidsA global sampling of honey finds 75 percent to be contaminated with neonicotinoid pesticides.
50min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New Neandertal and archaic human genomes advance our understanding of human evolutionTwo new studies on ancient genomes provide valuable insights into the lives of our ancestors and their cousins, the Neandertals. First, scientists have sequenced a new genome of a female Neandertal, which is only the second genome of the species to be fully sequenced with such a high level of quality.
50min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Carbon feedback from forest soils will accelerate global warming, 26-year study projectsAfter 26 years, the world's longest-running experiment to discover how warming temperatures affect forest soils has revealed a surprising, cyclical response: Soil warming stimulates periods of abundant carbon release from the soil to the atmosphere alternating with periods of no detectable loss in soil carbon stores. The study, led by Jerry Melillo of the Marine Biological Laboratory, indicates th
50min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
JILA's 3-D quantum gas atomic clock offers new dimensions in measurementJILA physicists have created an entirely new design for an atomic clock, in which strontium atoms are packed into a tiny three-dimensional cube at 1,000 times the density of previous one-dimensional clocks. In doing so, they are the first to harness the ultra-controlled behavior of a so-called 'quantum gas' to make a practical measurement device.
50min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Simulating a brain-cooling treatment that could one day ease epilepsyUsing computer simulation techniques, scientists have gained new insights into the mechanism by which lowering the temperature of specific brain regions could potentially treat epileptic seizures. The results are published in PLOS Computational Biology.
50min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers analyze cost-effectiveness of guinea worm disease eradicationEradication of guinea worm disease (dracunculiaisis), targeted by the World Health Organization (WHO) for the year 2015, is finally within reach, with only 25 reported human transmissions in 2016. Now, researchers writing in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have re-asserted the cost-effectiveness of the global Guinea Worm Eradication Programme (GWEP), some 30 years after it started.
50min
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Proton-size puzzle deepens Measurement in ordinary hydrogen agrees with a surprising 2010 result on the element's exotic cousin — but gives a smaller value than virtually every other experiment. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22760
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Gizmodo
Congressman Asks Homeland Security to Rectify Equifax's $7 Million Dollar IRS Contract Former Equifax CEO Richard Smith testifies before the House Digital Commerce and Consumer Protection Subcommittee (Photo: Getty) If you’ve spent any time in front of C-SPAN this week, you’ve probably seen Congress repeatedly taking Equifax’s former CEO out to the woodshed. It’s been quite the shellacking. And it almost seemed as if we’d finally reached a breaking point. America wasn’t going to pu
57min
Popular Science
These male jumping spiders evolved dance moves because the ladies ignore them Animals This is the cutest that spider mating has ever been. You don't often feel bad for spiders, but this video will make you sorry for these little guys.
58min
Live Science
You May Be More 'Neanderthal' Than You ThoughtThe newly sequenced genome of a female Neanderthal is revealing that our relatives may have passed on genes that today are linked to cholesterol levels, arthritis and other diseases.
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Live Science
World's Most Precise Clock Powered by Supercold Strontium AtomsA new kind of atomic clock is more precise than any yet built, with the ability to tick smoothly for a thousand times the lifetime of the universe.
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The Scientist RSS
Effects of Neanderthal DNA on Modern HumansA new study reveals how Neanderthal DNA in the genomes of present-day British people influences their traits.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Much of the world’s honey now contains bee-harming pesticidesA controversial group of chemicals called neonicotinoids has a global impact, tests of honey samples show.
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Science | The Guardian
Carbon emissions from warming soils could trigger disastrous feedback loop 26-year study reveals natural biological factors kick in once warming reaches certain point, leading to potentially unstoppable increase in temperatures Warming soils are releasing more carbon into the atmosphere than previously thought, suggesting a potentially disastrous feedback mechanism whereby increases in global temperatures will trigger massive new carbon releases in a cycle that may be i
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Gizmodo
Researchers: Uber’s iOS App Had Secret Permissions That Allowed It to Copy Your Phone Screen Photo: Getty To improve functionality between Uber’s app and the Apple Watch, Apple allowed Uber to use a powerful tool that could record a user’s iPhone screen, even if Uber’s app was only running in the background, security researchers told Gizmodo. After the researchers discovered the tool, Uber said it is no longer in use and will be removed from the app. The screen recording capability comes
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Proton size still perplexes despite a new measurementStudy of hydrogen atoms supports the case for a smaller proton.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Ancient humans avoided inbreeding by networkingAncient DNA expands foragers’ social, mating networks.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Key plant species may be important for supporting wildflower pollinatorsIncreased agricultural production has likely led to loss, fragmentation, and degradation of flower-rich habitats for pollinators. To counteract these negative effects of modern agricultural practices, efforts to maintain and restore diverse plants in agricultural landscapes -- called agri-environmental schemes (AES) -- have been implemented in numerous European countries.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Middle managers may turn to unethical behavior to face unrealistic expectationsWhile unethical behavior in organizations is often portrayed as flowing down from top management, or creeping up from low-level positions, a team of researchers suggest that middle management also can play a key role in promoting wide-spread unethical behavior among their subordinates.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Found in translationNew brain research by USC scientists shows that reading stories generates activity in the same regions of the brain for speakers of three different languages
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Improvement of the genetic decoding of neurodevelopmental disordersA team from ULB, HUDERF and (IB)² improves the genetic decoding of neurodevelopmental disorders.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New test opens path for better 2-D catalystsScientists at Rice University and Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed technology for rapid screening of two-dimensional materials for electrocatalysis of hydrogen. The Rice method could accelerate the development of 2-D materials for energy applications.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Planning for the futureOver the past decade, increasing temperatures across much of Africa and decreasing rainfall across East Africa have come to represent an alarming climate trend. Chief among concerns is the impact such conditions have on human health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Faster Salmonella test boosts food safety for humans and animalsA new test allows accurate, rapid testing for Salmonella, a bacteria that is one of the leading causes of food-borne illness across all regions of the world.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New 'movie' technique reveals bacterial signalling in sharper resolutionJohn Innes Centre researchers used a study of the plant-growth promoting bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens to develop an advanced analysis method which, they hope, will increase our capacity to understand plant and human diseases.
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cognitive science
Structural plasticity of the social brain: Differential change after socio-affective and cognitive mental training submitted by /u/OestlundMartin [link] [comments]
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Decision to rescind Waters of the United States rule (WOTUS) based on flawed analysis: studyNew evidence suggests that the Trump Administration's proposal to rescind the 2015 Waters of the United States (WOTUS) rule that would limit the scope of the Clean Water Act inappropriately overlooks wetlands-related values.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What Earth's climate system and topological insulators have in commonTopological insulators, materials that insulate on the inside but conduct electricity along their outer edges, have created quite a buzz in condensed matter physics. Now a new study in the journal Science shows that the same topological behavior that governs these exotic materials also drives equatorial waves—pulses of warm ocean water that play a major role in regulating the Earth's climate, incl
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Prehistoric humans are likely to have formed mating networks to avoid inbreedingEarly humans seem to have recognised the dangers of inbreeding at least 34,000 years ago, and developed surprisingly sophisticated social and mating networks to avoid it, new research has found.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
3-D quantum gas atomic clock offers new dimensions in measurementJILA physicists have created an entirely new design for an atomic clock, in which strontium atoms are packed into a tiny three-dimensional (3-D) cube at 1,000 times the density of previous one-dimensional (1-D) clocks. In doing so, they are the first to harness the ultra-controlled behavior of a so-called "quantum gas" to make a practical measurement device.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Carbon feedback from forest soils will accelerate global warming, 26-year study projectsAfter 26 years, the world's longest-running experiment to discover how warming temperatures affect forest soils has revealed a surprising, cyclical response: Soil warming stimulates periods of abundant carbon release from the soil to the atmosphere alternating with periods of no detectable loss in soil carbon stores. Overall, the results indicate that in a warming world, a self-reinforcing and per
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Science current issue
U.S.-Iran science exchange
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Science current issue
News at a glance
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Science current issue
Trio surfs gravitational waves to Nobel glory
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Science current issue
Revelations about rhythm of life rewarded
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Science current issue
Treaty tested by space miners
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Science current issue
China sprints ahead in CRISPR therapy race
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Science current issue
Neandertal genome reveals greater legacy in the living
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Science current issue
Seismic array shifts to Alaska
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Science current issue
Catalan scientists ponder fate after independence vote
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Science current issue
Against the grain
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Science current issue
Archaeology in a divided land
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Science current issue
Promoting human rights through science
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Science current issue
Nerve agents in honey
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Science current issue
The proton radius revisited
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Science current issue
Microbial change in warming soils
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Science current issue
Neutrophils take a round-trip
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Science current issue
Nocebo effects can make you feel pain
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Science current issue
The molecular basis of Alzheimer's plaques
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Science current issue
Broadly neutralizing antibodies to prevent HIV-1
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Science current issue
Deciphering dueling analyses of clean water regulations
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Science current issue
Survival of the spineless
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Science current issue
Fun and games
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Science current issue
A Fantastic Voyage in Genomics
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Science current issue
Single-cell transcriptomics to explore the immune system in health and disease The immune system varies in cell types, states, and locations. The complex networks, interactions, and responses of immune cells produce diverse cellular ecosystems composed of multiple cell types, accompanied by genetic diversity in antigen receptors. Within this ecosystem, innate and adaptive immune cells maintain and protect tissue function, integrity, and homeostasis upon changes in functiona
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Science current issue
The promise of spatial transcriptomics for neuroscience in the era of molecular cell typing The stereotyped spatial architecture of the brain is both beautiful and fundamentally related to its function, extending from gross morphology to individual neuron types, where soma position, dendritic architecture, and axonal projections determine their roles in functional circuitry. Our understanding of the cell types that make up the brain is rapidly accelerating, driven in particular by recen
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Science current issue
Single-cell epigenomics: Recording the past and predicting the future Single-cell multi-omics has recently emerged as a powerful technology by which different layers of genomic output—and hence cell identity and function—can be recorded simultaneously. Integrating various components of the epigenome into multi-omics measurements allows for studying cellular heterogeneity at different time scales and for discovering new layers of molecular connectivity between the g
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Science current issue
Making a denser optical lattice clock
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Science current issue
Climate and the carbon cycle
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Science current issue
From bees to honey
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Science current issue
Moving lymphatic endothelial cells about
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Science current issue
Price modulates early pain processing
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Science current issue
Gene expression during mitosis
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Science current issue
Rapidly recognizing resistance
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Science current issue
Imaging the unforeseen fate of neutrophils
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Science current issue
A triple threat for HIV
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Science current issue
How big is the proton?
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Science current issue
Harnessing complexity in laser light
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Science current issue
Giving grain boundaries more structure
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Science current issue
Elucidating pathological fibril structure
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Science current issue
A revealing repertoire for systemic sclerosis
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Science current issue
Initiating lung cancer
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Science current issue
Regulation through clustering
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Science current issue
Smothering seeing-eye training
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Science current issue
How does nitrogenase spring its trap?
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Science current issue
An atomic ring around the rosie
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Science current issue
Gut bacteria may tell human cells what to do
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Science current issue
An expanding shell around an evolved star
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Science current issue
The Rydberg constant and proton size from atomic hydrogen At the core of the "proton radius puzzle" is a four–standard deviation discrepancy between the proton root-mean-square charge radii ( r p ) determined from the regular hydrogen (H) and the muonic hydrogen (µp) atoms. Using a cryogenic beam of H atoms, we measured the 2S-4P transition frequency in H, yielding the values of the Rydberg constant R = 10973731.568076(96) per meter and r p = 0.8335(95)
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Science current issue
Trispecific broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies mediate potent SHIV protection in macaques The development of an effective AIDS vaccine has been challenging because of viral genetic diversity and the difficulty of generating broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs). We engineered trispecific antibodies (Abs) that allow a single molecule to interact with three independent HIV-1 envelope determinants: the CD4 binding site, the membrane-proximal external region (MPER), and the V1V2 glycan
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Science current issue
A Fermi-degenerate three-dimensional optical lattice clock Strontium optical lattice clocks have the potential to simultaneously interrogate millions of atoms with a high spectroscopic quality factor of 4 x 10 17 . Previously, atomic interactions have forced a compromise between clock stability, which benefits from a large number of atoms, and accuracy, which suffers from density-dependent frequency shifts. Here we demonstrate a scalable solution that ta
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Science current issue
Spatiotemporal mode-locking in multimode fiber lasers A laser is based on the electromagnetic modes of its resonator, which provides the feedback required for oscillation. Enormous progress has been made toward controlling the interactions of longitudinal modes in lasers with a single transverse mode. For example, the field of ultrafast science has been built on lasers that lock many longitudinal modes together to form ultrashort light pulses. Howev
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Science current issue
Segregation-induced ordered superstructures at general grain boundaries in a nickel-bismuth alloy The properties of materials change, sometimes catastrophically, as alloying elements and impurities accumulate preferentially at grain boundaries. Studies of bicrystals show that regular atomic patterns often arise as a result of this solute segregation at high-symmetry boundaries, but it is not known whether superstructures exist at general grain boundaries in polycrystals. In bismuth-doped poly
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Science current issue
Long-term pattern and magnitude of soil carbon feedback to the climate system in a warming world In a 26-year soil warming experiment in a mid-latitude hardwood forest, we documented changes in soil carbon cycling to investigate the potential consequences for the climate system. We found that soil warming results in a four-phase pattern of soil organic matter decay and carbon dioxide fluxes to the atmosphere, with phases of substantial soil carbon loss alternating with phases of no detectabl
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Science current issue
Interactions between brain and spinal cord mediate value effects in nocebo hyperalgesia Value information about a drug, such as the price tag, can strongly affect its therapeutic effect. We discovered that value information influences adverse treatment outcomes in humans even in the absence of an active substance. Labeling an inert treatment as expensive medication led to stronger nocebo hyperalgesia than labeling it as cheap medication. This effect was mediated by neural interactio
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Science current issue
A worldwide survey of neonicotinoids in honey Growing evidence for global pollinator decline is causing concern for biodiversity conservation and ecosystem services maintenance. Neonicotinoid pesticides have been identified or suspected as a key factor responsible for this decline. We assessed the global exposure of pollinators to neonicotinoids by analyzing 198 honey samples from across the world. We found at least one of five tested compou
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Science current issue
Visualizing the function and fate of neutrophils in sterile injury and repair Neutrophils have been implicated as harmful cells in a variety of inappropriate inflammatory conditions where they injure the host, leading to the death of the neutrophils and their subsequent phagocytosis by monocytes and macrophages. Here we show that in a fully repairing sterile thermal hepatic injury, neutrophils also penetrate the injury site and perform the critical tasks of dismantling inj
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Science current issue
Fibril structure of amyloid-{beta}(1-42) by cryo-electron microscopy Amyloids are implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. Fibrillar aggregates of the amyloid-β protein (Aβ) are the main component of the senile plaques found in brains of Alzheimer’s disease patients. We present the structure of an Aβ(1–42) fibril composed of two intertwined protofilaments determined by cryo–electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to 4.0-angstrom resolution, complemented by solid-state nucl
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Science current issue
Mitotic transcription and waves of gene reactivation during mitotic exit Although the genome is generally thought to be transcriptionally silent during mitosis, technical limitations have prevented sensitive mapping of transcription during mitosis and mitotic exit. Thus, the means by which the interphase expression pattern is transduced to daughter cells have been unclear. We used 5-ethynyluridine to pulse-label transcripts during mitosis and mitotic exit and found th
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Science current issue
New Products
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Science current issue
Webinar | Overcoming the evils of fixation and storage: Getting the most out of your FFPE samples
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Science current issue
Hard data and human empathy
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Ars Technica
Algorithm designer among those honored with the Chemistry Nobel Enlarge / To the left, a protein is shown with the sort of resolution possible in the early days of electron microscope work. As you transition to the right, the resolution changes to what's possible with present-day techniques. (credit: Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences ) The highest possible resolution we can get in a typical image is limited by the wavelength of the light we're using. Although
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Germs in the kitchen: Salmonella better known than CampylobacterWhat health risks are consumers aware of? What are they concerned about?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How yellow and blue make green in parrotsMany brightly colored birds get their pigments from the foods that they eat, but that's not true of parrots. Now, researchers reporting a study of familiar pet store parakeets -- also known as budgies -- have new evidence to explain how the birds produce their characteristic yellow, blue, and green feathers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Beer brands popular among youth violate code with youth-appealing adsAlcohol brands popular among underage drinkers are more likely to air television advertisements that violate the industry's voluntary code by including youth-appealing content, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Caution ahead: The growing challenge for drivers' attentionMany of the infotainment features in most 2017 vehicles are so distracting they should not be enabled while a vehicle is in motion, according to a new study. The study found In-Vehicle Information Systems take drivers' attention off the road for too long to be safe.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Did Teddy Evans fatally undermine Scott of the Antarctic?Scientists have uncovered documents and diary entries that suggest a team member stole food Scott needed, failed to pass on orders that would have sent out a dog team to meet the men and then changed his story over time to cover up his role in their deaths.
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Gizmodo
Track Your Weight Through the Holidays With This $34 Smart Scale Dr. Meter Smart Scale , $34 If it’s measurable, Dr. Meter probably makes something to measure it. Our readers have bought thousands of laser distance measures, IR thermometers, luggage scales, soil moisture meters, and more from them over the years, and now, they finally have a smart bathroom scale . This operates just like a regular bathroom scale, except it connects to your phone over Bluetooth
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The Atlantic
Photographing the Microscopic: Winners of Nikon Small World 2017 Nikon just announced the winners of the 2017 Small World Photomicrography Competition , and they’ve shared some of the winning and honored images with us here. The contest invites photographers and scientists to submit images of all things visible under a microscope. More than 2,000 entries were received from 88 countries in 2017, the 43rd year of the competition.
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Ars Technica
Researchers now updating and expanding evolution’s list of 20 amino acids (credit: Spencer Katz) Serine? So last century. Valine? Over it. Glycine? You’ve got to be kidding me. Those chemicals are part of the 20 amino acids that are typically incorporated into proteins. That means they have a dedicated place in what's called the genetic code, which translates between the bases of DNA to the amino acids of proteins. Granted, the genetic code has enabled the entire diver
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NeuWrite San Diego
Science for All: Shifting Academic Communication at ComSciCon“Whose advisor is unhappy that they’re here today?” asked Leanne Chukoskie, an assistant research scientist at the Institute for Neural Computation at UC San Diego and an affiliate of the Qualcomm Institute. Looking around at a sea of raised hands, she continued, “Know that the act of writing clearly for the public and preparing well … Continue reading Science for All: Shifting Academic Communicat
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Paper-based supercapacitor uses metal nanoparticles to boost energy densityUsing a simple layer-by-layer coating technique, researchers have developed a paper-based flexible supercapacitor that could be used to help power wearable devices. The device uses metallic nanoparticles to coat cellulose fibers in the paper, creating supercapacitor electrodes with high energy and power densities -- and the best performance so far in a textile-based supercapacitor.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Appetizing imagery puts visual perception on fast forwardPeople rated images containing positive content as fading more smoothly compared with neutral and negative images, even when they faded at the same rate, according to new findings.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lake water mixing: The might of the microorganism?Can microorganisms cause lake water to be mixed? The answer given by previous studies is no, since the movement of small, slow-swimming bacteria is not sufficient to disturb the stratification of lake water induced by differences in, for example, temperature or salinity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Women can be just as daring and risk-taking as menWomen can be just as risky as men -- or even riskier -- when the conventional macho measures of daring -- such as betting vast sums on a football game -- are replaced by less stereotypical criteria, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Impacts of ride-hailing on crashes differ from city to cityRide-hailing services reduce drunk-driving crashes in some cities, reports a new study. The research is the first to look at the specific effects of ride-hailing, or 'ride-sharing,' within specific cities, rather than averaging data across multiple cities.
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Blog » Languages » English
Progress Update: New Tutorial Hi players! Thanks to everyone who has contributed to the cube log that will become the new Eyewire tutorial! Since this quest was opened one month ago , the community have successfully gathered the following items: 28 easy cubes and 7 easy boutons 9 easy mergers 27 medium cubes 11 hard cubes Overall, we’re 32% of the way to the first benchmark! Here’s how the categories break down, which is now
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Identifying ways to minimize the harm of energy drinksBecause many countries allow the sale of energy drinks to young people, identifying ways to minimize potential harm from energy drinks is critical. A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior provided unique insights into intervention strategies suggested by young people themselves to reduce consumption. In addition to more research and education, these strategies incl
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New research on sperm stem cells has implications for male infertility and cancerNew research from scientists at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah and collaborators at University of Utah Health (U of U Health) sheds light on the complex process that occurs in the development of human sperm stem cells.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research on sperm stem cells has implications for male infertility and cancerNew research from scientists at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah and collaborators at University of Utah Health (U of U Health) sheds light on the complex process that occurs in the development of human sperm stem cells. This is the first study to characterize the changes human sperm stem cells undergo as they mature. The results have implications for understanding male in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Delivering bad news? Don't beat around the bushYou know you want to end your relationship, but you're nervous and don't want to be hurtful. So you spend the first 10 minutes of your dinner date making friendly and fidgety small talk before diving into the matter at hand.
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Viden
Førerløse Google-taxaer nærmer sig debutAllerede i år er det muligt, at Googles selvkørende bildivision Waymo sætter førerløse taxaer på gaden i USA.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
12,000 years ago, Florida hurricanes heated up despite chilly seasCategory 5 hurricanes may have slammed Florida repeatedly during the chilly Younger Dryas, 12,000 years ago. The cause? Hurricane-suppressing effects of cooler sea surface were out-weighed by side effects of slowed ocean circulation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Air pollution exposure on home-to-school routes reduces the growth of working memoryA new study has demonstrated that exposure to air pollution on the way to school can have damaging effects on children's cognitive development. The study found an association between a reduction in working memory and exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and black carbon during the walking commute to and from school.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Liverwort genes and land plant evolutionThe common liverwort is a living link to the transition from marine algae to land plants. Biologists have analyzed the genome sequence of the common liverwort (Marchantia polymorpha) to identify genes and gene families that were deemed crucial to plant evolution and have been conserved over millions of years and across plant lineages.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A candidate genetic factor for effects of prenatal alcohol exposure has been foundResearchers have found a genetic variation, which associates with the damage caused by maternal alcohol consumption. This genetic variation clarifies the role of genetic factors in the alcohol-induced developmental disorders and could be useful in future diagnostics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Body-on- a-chip' system to accelerate testing of new drugsBeing able to test new drugs in a 3-D model of the body has the potential to speed up drug discovery, reduce the use of animal testing and advance personalized medicine.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel PET tracer identifies most bacterial infectionsMedical scientists have developed a novel imaging agent that could be used to identify most bacterial infections.
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Ars Technica
Man who sued over Facebook childbirth livestream slapped with $120k in fees A still from a Facebook video made by Kanongataa of his son's birth. The video is still publicly available online. (credit: Kanongataa via Facebook ) A father who livestreamed his son's birth on Facebook and then sued various media outlets that used his clips has been ordered to pay $120,000 in attorneys fees after losing his case. US District Judge Lewis Kaplan ruled in February that TV stations
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Road pricing most effective in reducing vehicle emissionsMotor vehicles are a major source of air pollution in urban areas, and for decades municipal and regional governments have used various traffic management strategies in an effort to reduce vehicle emissions, alongside advancements like cleaner fuel and greener cars.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists enlist supercomputers, machine learning to automatically identify brain tumorsPrimary brain tumors encompass a wide range of tumors depending on the cell type, the aggressiveness, and stage of tumor. Quickly and accurately characterizing the tumor is a critical aspect of treatment planning. It is a task currently reserved for trained radiologists, but in the future, computing, and in particular high-performance computing, will play a supportive role.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees Ramon degenerate to a troughA trough is an elongated area of low pressure and that's exactly what former Tropical Storm Ramon has become in the eastern Pacific Ocean, along the southwestern coast of Mexico. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a look at the temperatures of Ramon's cloud tops and showed some strong thunderstorms remained in the stretched out remnants.
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Gizmodo
Watch Freakishly Agile Lice Swing on Pubes Like Trapeze Artists GIF Credit: NEJM If you’ve ever had to deal with an infestation of lice, you know that these parasites really like to get in there. A horrifying new video reveals the mad acrobatic chops that enable lice to make your hair their home, flinging themselves from strand to strand with the greatest of ease. A new case study in The New England Journal of Medicine tells a torrid tale of an unnamed 65-yea
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Predicting when a sound will occur relies on the brain's motor systemWhether it is dancing or just tapping one foot to the beat, we all experience how auditory signals like music can induce movement. Now new research suggests that motor signals in the brain actually sharpen sound perception, and this effect is increased when we move in rhythm with the sound.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Road pricing most effective in reducing vehicle emissionsFor decades municipal and regional governments have used various traffic management strategies to reduce vehicle emissions, alongside advancements like cleaner fuel and greener cars. But not all traffic management strategies are created equal, says UBC transportation expert and civil engineering professor Alexander Bigazzi. After reviewing more than 60 studies on the subject, Bigazzi has concluded
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees Ramon degenerate to a troughA trough is an elongated area of low pressure and that's exactly what former Tropical Storm Ramon has become in the eastern Pacific Ocean, along the southwestern coast of Mexico. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a look at the temperatures of Ramon's cloud tops and showed some strong thunderstorms remained in the stretched out remnants.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists enlist supercomputers, machine learning to automatically identify brain tumorsResearchers from The University of Texas at Austin developed a brain tumor identification method that combines biophysical models of tumor growth with machine learning algorithms. The researchers scored in the top 25% of participants in the Multimodal Brain Tumor Segmentation Challenge 2017 (BRaTS'17) and used supercomputers at the Texas Advanced Computing Center to accelerate the training and ana
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Delivering bad news? Don't beat around the bushNew research shows that when it comes to receiving bad news, most people prefer directness, candor and very little -- if any -- buffer.
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Feed: All Latest
Inside SynTouch, the Mad Lab Giving Robots the Power to FeelWant robots that don’t crush our skulls? Well, we better give them a sense of touch.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Massive wave of butterflies lights up Denver weather radarA lacy, cloud-like pattern drifting across a Denver-area radar screen turned out to be a 70-mile-wide (110-kilometer) wave of butterflies, forecasters say.
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Popular Science
Uber can actually help prevent drunk driving accidents—in some cities Technology Researchers still don’t fully understand the relationship between ridesharing, cities, and crashes. New research shows that Uber’s presence in a city only inconsistently leads to a decline in accidents caused by intoxication behind the wheel, and there’s far from being…
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Ars Technica
Lenovo’s 25th Anniversary ThinkPad brings back the keyboard we love Enlarge / Lenovo ThinkPad 25 (credit: Lenovo) A couple years ago , Lenovo announced its plans to build a "retro" ThinkPad that would resurrect design elements of ThinkPads past as an homage to the brand's long history. That ThinkPad is now real. Check out the ThinkPad 25, sold to commemorate 25 years of ThinkPads. Lenovo Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments
2h
The Atlantic
How Michael Clayton Presaged 2017 O ne of the disorientations of where we’re at—the obliterative sucking splotch of a present tense in which we now all live—is that it feels simultaneously like a malign mischance and like something we should have seen coming a mile off. For decades the poets have been sobbing, the screenwriters having nightmares, and the canaries in the coal mine toppling stoically from their perches. Works of ar
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
MEPs urged to probe Monsanto influence on researchA US firm pursuing a lawsuit against Monsanto is urging the European Parliament to examine its claims that the agro giant has hidden the dangers of its weedkiller, according to a letter obtained by AFP on Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook 'context' button is latest effort to fight fake newsFacebook said Thursday it was testing a new "button" to allow users to get more context about a news source, in the latest move by the leading social network to curb misinformation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spacewalkers install new hand on station's robot armSpacewalking astronauts gave the International Space Station's big robot arm a new hand Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hundreds of stations unable to inspect cars in MassachusettsMassachusetts drivers are struggling to get inspection stickers after hundreds of vehicle inspection stations were unable to transition to new equipment.
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New Scientist - News
This AI can tell true hate speech from harmless banterThe algorithm can figure out when the word “moron” is used in good fun, and when a seemingly innocuous word like "animal" is being used to demonise people
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Ingeniøren
Nu får vi snart det første billede af Mælkevejens sorte hulDe europæiske teleskoper på bjergtoppene i Chile har haft samme betydning som Hubble-rumteleskopet, og en ny opdagelse er på vej, der vil vække enorm opsigt, lover generaldirektøren for ESO.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
12,000 years ago, Florida hurricanes heated up despite chilly seasCategory 5 hurricanes may have slammed Florida repeatedly during the chilly Younger Dryas, 12,000 years ago. The cause? Hurricane-suppressing effects of cooler sea surface were out-weighed by side effects of slowed ocean circulation. That's the finding of USGS researcher Michael Toomey and colleagues in their Geology article published online today.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Brain study reveals how insects make beeline for homeScientists have discovered how the wiring of bees' brains helps them plot the most direct route back to their hive.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Multivitamin use during pregnancy linked to lower risk of autism with intellectual disabilityTaking a multivitamin during pregnancy was linked to a 30 percent decrease in risk of a child developing autism with an intellectual disorder, according to a new Drexel University study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Why lab researchers should talk with industry counterpartsAn MIT team has found both obstacles and lessons from the process of getting a novel membrane for chemical processing out of the lab into the commercial world.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New tool for oil and gas exploration beats all competitionThe new device has an unparalleled bandwidth, enabling it to reveal the structure of underground reservoirs at the depth of up to several tens of kilometers. The seismic station can be used for onshore, transition-zone, and marine exploration. It can be deployed at depths of up to 0.5 kilometers, both in the Arctic and in the South Seas.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Registry data examines oral anticoagulant use in women, adverse events after PCI dischargeData from the American College of Cardiology's National Cardiovascular Data Registry was the source of several published studies in recent months, including a study on predicting 30-day readmission rates for patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention and a study that found women were less likely to use oral anticoagulants to treat atrial fibrillation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Antimicrobial use in Danish animals continues downward trendThe total antimicrobial consumption in Danish animals has continued to decrease for the third consecutive year. This is one of the findings of the annual DANMAP report for 2016 from Statens Serum Institut as well as the National Veterinary Institute and the National Food Institute, which are both departments under the Technical University of Denmark.
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Ars Technica
Video: We take a look at some gorgeous custom computers (video link) A few weeks ago, we took a look at some of the ways you can use fans, memory, and cases packed with LEDs to give your PCs some personality. RGB illumination is just scratching the surface of PC customization; the devoted PC builder has custom cooling and high-end paint jobs as key tools in their arsenal. But not all of us want to build our own PCs, and some of the coolest modificatio
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video: The 2017 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: Cryo-electron microscopy explainedJacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson have claimed this year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry.
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The Atlantic
The Department of Justice Takes a Stand Against Transgender Rights in the Workplace The Department of Justice has issued a new memo on transgender workplace rights, arguing that a major civil-rights law does not cover discrimination on the basis of gender identity. The memo, first reported by BuzzFeed News, officially withdraws a 2014 memo sent out by then-Attorney General Eric Holder on this issue, reversing the position the Obama administration took late into the former presid
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The Atlantic
Statement from Atlantic Media General Counsel Aretae Wyler on Scam Using The Atlantic Names This morning, Atlantic Media General Counsel Aretae Wyler shared the following memo with The Atlantic staff on a scam in which individuals posing as editors and senior leadership have been sending fraudulent job offers to unwitting freelancers and individuals seeking employment. Anyone targeted by this scam may email Atlantic Media, which will advise victims of the scam and refer them to law enfo
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The Atlantic
Trump Wants to Censor the Media Frustrated with a set of damning reports about his relationship with Secretary of State Rex Tillerson—including the nugget that Tillerson called him a “moron” ( perhaps with an R-rated modifier )—the president offered a new suggestion on Twitter Thursday morning: Why not explore government censorship of the press? Why Isn't the Senate Intel Committee looking into the Fake News Networks in OUR cou
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Ars Technica
How Nintendo may be encouraging Switch hacking by trying to stop it Enlarge (credit: Aurich Lawson) More than six months after the Switch's launch, Nintendo still shows no public interest in giving players the ability to externally back up save files on the popular Switch console. "I can’t say there’s a solution coming, but we do hear the message," Nintendo of America President Reggie Fils-Aime told Kotaku in June , the last time the issue was addressed publicly
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers identify genetic drivers of most common form of lymphomaAn international research effort led by Duke Cancer Institute scientists has been working to better understand the genetic underpinnings of the most prevalent form of this cancer -- diffuse large B cell lymphoma -- and how those genes might play a role in patients' responses to therapies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Air pollution exposure on home-to-school routes reduces the growth of working memoryA study published in Environment International has demonstrated that exposure to air pollution on the way to school can have damaging effects on children's cognitive development. The study, led by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health, found an association between a reduction in working memory and exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and black carbon during the walking commute to and fr
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Once declared extinct, Lord Howe Island stick insects really do liveLord Howe Island stick insects were once numerous on the tiny crescent-shaped island off the coast of Australia for which they are named. Now, biologists who have analyzed the DNA of living and dead Lord Howe Island stick insects have some good news: those rediscovered on Ball's Pyramid, which are now being bred at the Melbourne Zoo and elsewhere, really are Lord Howe Island stick insects.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
More traits associated with your Neanderthal DNAAfter humans and Neanderthals met many thousands of years ago, the two species began interbreeding. Recent studies have shown that some of those Neanderthal genes have contributed to human immunity and modern diseases. Now researchers have found that our Neanderthal inheritance has contributed to other characteristics, too, including skin tone, hair color, sleep patterns, mood, and even a person's
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Folding of the cerebral cortex: Identification of important neuronsFolds in the cerebral cortex in mammals are believed to be indispensable for higher brain functions but the mechanisms underlying cortical folding remain unknown. By using the latest genome editing tools, we succeeded in establishing a technique and discovered important neurons for fold formation and the importance of the Cdk5 gene in those neurons. Some patients suffer from lissencephaly, whose c
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Science : NPR
Neanderthal Genes Help Shape How Many Modern Humans Look Calling someone a Neanderthal because of his coarse manners or brutish looks may seem like fun. But be careful. Neanderthal DNA persists inside many of us. (Image credit: Will Oliver /PA Images via Getty Images)
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cognitive science
A new paper in JPSP explores how the Big Five personality characteristics change in the teenage years. submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
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The Atlantic
Writing Advice From a (Newly Minted) Nobel Winner It’s tempting to talk of writing—the art of it, the craft of it, the lifestyle of it—as a kind of romance. Writers of serious literature (according to, at least, many writers of serious literature) do not simply type stark words onto blank pages; instead, they stare into an abyss and reach into their souls and find, if they are fortunate, the swirling fires of Prometheus. “We write to taste life
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Viden
Blade Runner: 6 teknologier som scifi-mesterværket forudsåKunstige dyr, flyvende biler og avanceret billedbehandling er bare nogle af de teknologier, som Blade Runner-filmen så i krystalkuglen for 35 år siden.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Modified peptides could boost plant growth and developmentA new study of peptide hormones critical for plant development could result in wide-ranging benefits for agriculture, tissue culture, and related industries, and even improve knowledge of peptides in humans. The study synthesized and examined the function of CLE peptides, a relatively new class of the peptide hormone family in plants.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How much can watching hockey stress your heart?A new study suggests that both the thrill of victory and the agony of defeat can have a substantial effect on the cardiovascular system. Investigators took the pulse of fans during a hockey game and found that on average, their heart rate increased by 75 percent when watching on TV, and by a whopping 110 percent (more than doubled, equivalent to the cardiac stress with vigorous exercise) when watc
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A need for bananas? Dietary potassium regulates calcification of arteriesResearchers have shown, for the first time, that reduced dietary potassium promotes elevated aortic stiffness in a mouse model. Such arterial stiffness in humans is predictive of heart disease and death from heart disease, and it represents an important health problem for the nation. The researchers also found that increased dietary potassium levels lessened vascular calcification and aortic stiff
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain study reveals how insects make beeline for homeScientists have discovered how the wiring of bees' brains helps them plot the most direct route back to their hive.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why can't mTOR inhibitors kill cancer? Study explainsAnti-cancer drugs called mTOR inhibitors slow the growth of cancer cells but show limited ability to cause cancer cell death. New studies explain why.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
12,000 years ago, Florida hurricanes heated up despite chilly seasCategory 5 hurricanes may have slammed Florida repeatedly during the chilly Younger Dryas, 12,000 years ago. The cause? Hurricane-suppressing effects of cooler sea surface were out-weighed by side effects of slowed ocean circulation. That's the finding of USGS researcher Michael Toomey and colleagues in their Geology article published online today.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new CRISPR-engineered cancer model to test therapeuticsUsing multiplex CRISPR-Cas9 editing of human hematopoietic, or blood-forming, stem cells followed by transplantation in mice, researchers designed customized mouse models for the progression of leukemia. In a number of different experiments, the animal models successfully reflected human responses to a therapeutic agent commonly used to treat blood cancers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Liverwort genes and land plant evolutionThe common liverwort is a living link to the transition from marine algae to land plants. In the Oct. 5, 2017 issue of Cell, an international team including researchers at the DOE Joint Genome Institute, analyzed the genome sequence of the common liverwort (Marchantia polymorpha) to identify genes and gene families that were deemed crucial to plant evolution and have been conserved over millions o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New findings on mechanisms for body temperature regulation by fat tissueNew discoveries about the mechanism responsible for heat generation in the body related to fat tissue oppose classical views in the field and could lead to new ways to fight metabolic disorders associated with obesity, according to a study led by Georgia State University.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First cell-type census of mouse brains: Surprises about structure, male-female differencesNeuroscientists at CSHL have mobilized advanced imaging and computational methods to comprehensively map -- 'count' -- the total populations of specific types of cells throughout the mouse brain. In a study published today in Cell, they report two highly surprising findings regarding distribution fo cell types across the brain as well as male-female brain differences.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The Lord Howe Island stick insect lives: A story of survivalResearchers use genetic sequencing of museum specimens to confirm that the Lord Howe Island stick insect, once thought to be extinct, survived by hiding out on a nearby island.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How yellow and blue make green in parrotsMany brightly colored birds get their pigments from the foods that they eat, but that's not true of parrots. Now, researchers reporting a study of familiar pet store parakeets -- also known as budgies -- have new evidence to explain how the birds produce their characteristic yellow, blue, and green feathers.The findings reported in the journal Cell on Oct. 5 promise to add an important dimension t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Once declared extinct, Lord Howe Island stick insects really do liveLord Howe Island stick insects were once numerous on the tiny crescent-shaped island off the coast of Australia for which they are named. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on Oct. 5 who have analyzed the DNA of living and dead Lord Howe Island stick insects have some good news: those rediscovered on Ball's Pyramid, which are now being bred at the Melbourne Zoo and elsewhere, really are
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More traits associated with your Neandertal DNAAfter humans and Neandertals met many thousands of years ago, the two species began interbreeding. Recent studies have shown that some of those Neandertal genes have contributed to human immunity and modern diseases. Now researchers reporting in the American Journal of Human Genetics on Oct. 5 have found that our Neandertal inheritance has contributed to other characteristics, too, including skin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Review articles put animal models under closer scrutinyHuman Society International will give grants of $5,000 (USD) to support the development and open access publication of in-depth review articles on different areas of human diseases.
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New on MIT Technology Review
An Amazing AI Advance Makes Google’s Smart Butler Sound Way Better
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New on MIT Technology Review
Warning: This Algorithm Will Self-Destruct After It’s UsedSecurity experts have long considered one-time programs impossible to build. Now quantum physics has made it possible.
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Gizmodo
Woman's Webcam Starts Following Her Movements and Taunts 'Hello' Screenshot: Rilana Hamer Internet of Things devices are notoriously insecure and webcams are among the creepiest targets for hacks. A woman in the Netherlands recently learned just how disturbing these vulnerabilities can be, capturing footage of a home webcam that started tracking her movements and speaking to her in a sinister, unfamiliar voice. In a Facebook post, Rilana Hamer recounted how th
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Popular Science
To support breast cancer research, skip pink ribbons and check out these charities Health Spend your dollars on research that might actually save lives. Your money is valuable, and it should go to a charity that’s going to do some good with it. As a high profile disease, breast cancer has plenty of organizations that you…
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Ars Technica
Netflix raises its US monthly fee again, but only for two plans Enlarge (credit: Netflix) Netflix has raised its prices again for some plans in the United States. The biggest change is to the premium plan, which supports 4K streaming and up to four simultaneous streams; it's going from $11.99 to $13.99 per month. The mid-tier plan that gives you two streams in HD is jumping just one dollar from $9.99 to $10.99. The entry-level plan that offers only one stream
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists develop 'body-on- a-chip' system to accelerate testing of new drugsUsing the same expertise they've employed to build new organs for patients, scientists at Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine and colleagues have engineered micro hearts, lungs and livers that can potentially be used to test new drugs. By combining the micro-organs in a monitored system, the researchers aim to mimic how the human body responds to medications.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Spray drying: Perfect dosing thanks to drug capsulesInstant coffee and powdered milk are produced by spray drying. Researchers have adapted this technique to the tricky question of incorporating insoluble substances in core-shell particles. The new method helps reduce the concentration of active ingredients in therapeutic medications.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tracking debris in the Earth‘s orbit with centimeter precision using efficient laser technologyUncontrollable flying objects in orbit are a massive risk for modern space travel, and, due to our dependence on satellites today, it is also a risk to global economy. Scientists have now developed a fiber laser that reliably determines the position and direction of the space debris' movement to mitigate these risks.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mitigating the unpleasant scent of adhesivesIt is a known fact that adhesives may smell unpleasant. However, as researchers have recently discovered, this doesn’t need to be the case. Through extensive research on acrylic adhesives they were able to identify the substances responsible for the offensive odors. So far, very little research has been conducted on the subject, but now manufacturers finally have the opportunity to optimize their
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Using elastomer films to generate electricityWater is still the most important source of renewable energy in Bavaria, Germany, accounting for some 33 percent of all renewable energy produced in the region, as showed by the Bavarian Energy Map. But conventional hydroelectric plants, especially micro hydro generators, are a subject of controversy due to their low output volumes and their interference with the ecosystem. Researchers are working
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Largest twin study pins nearly 80% of schizophrenia risk on heritabilityIn the largest study of twins in schizophrenia research to date, researchers have estimated that as much as 79% of schizophrenia risk may be explained by genetic factors. The estimate indicates that genetics have a substantial influence on risk for the disorder.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Key component of respiratory center identifiedStar-shaped cells called astrocytes are much more than simple support cells in the brain. In a new study on mice, researchers demonstrate that they also play a key part in the respiratory center of the brainstem and release inflammatory molecules that regulate breathing. The results can provide important clues as to the causes of respiratory disease and the sudden unexpected postnatal collapse of
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Completing the drug design jigsawA powerful new way of analysing how drugs interact with molecules in the body could aid the design of better treatments with fewer side-effects.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Newborns with congenital heart disease show signs of brain impairment even before cardiac surgeryUsing a novel imaging technique, researchers demonstrate for the first time that the brains of high-risk infants with congenital heart disease already show signs of functional impairment even before they undergo corrective open heart surgery.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Computer model unravels knotty problems in DNAIf you've ever tried to untangle a pair of earbuds, you'll understand how loops and cords can get twisted up. DNA can get tangled in the same way, and in some cases, has to be cut and reconnected to resolve the knots. Now a team of mathematicians, biologists and computer scientists has unraveled how E. coli bacteria can unlink tangled DNA by a local reconnection process. The math behind the resear
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mars' moon Phobos examined in a different lightNASA's longest-lived mission to Mars has gained its first look at the Martian moon Phobos, pursuing a deeper understanding by examining it in infrared wavelengths.
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Feed: All Latest
The Triumphant Return of the Lord Howe Island Stick InsectFor once, an uplifting tale of conservation, courtesy of a strange island called Ball's Pyramid.
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Live Science
Different Meditation Practices Reshape Brain in Different WaysDifferent types of meditation change the brain in different ways, a new study finds.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
What do peace and dynamite have in common?The Nobel Peace Prize will be announced on Friday but where do the prizes come from?
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Scientific American Content: Global
Moms of Kids with Rare Genetic Disorder Push for Wider Newborn ScreeningEarlier identification and treatment could be life-saving -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The 2017 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: Cryo-electron microscopy explained (video)Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson have claimed this year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry. The trio earned the prize for their work on cryo-electron microscopy, which is an imaging technique that lets researchers see proteins and other large biomolecules with atomic precision. Learn more about this discovery and its impact in this video from Speaking of Chemistry: https://youtu.be/02
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How yellow and blue make green in parrotsWhen it comes to spectacular displays of color, birds are obvious standouts in the natural world. Many brightly colored birds get their pigments from the foods that they eat, but that's not true of parrots. Now, researchers reporting a study of familiar pet store parakeets—also known as budgies—have new evidence to explain how the birds produce their characteristic yellow, blue, and green feathers
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Once declared extinct, Lord Howe Island stick insects really do liveLord Howe Island stick insects were once numerous on the tiny crescent-shaped island off the coast of Australia for which they are named. The insects, which can measure up to 6 inches in length, don't resemble sticks so much as tree lobsters, as they are also known. After ships accidentally introduced rats to the island about a century ago, the Lord Howe Island stick insects quickly disappeared. T
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Genome analysis of early plant lineage sheds light on how plants learned to thrive on landThough it's found around the world, it's easy to overlook the common liverwort - the plant can fit in the palm of one's hand and appears to be comprised of flat, overlapping leaves. Despite their unprepossessing appearance, these plants without roots or vascular tissues for nutrient transport are living links to the transition from the algae that found its way out of the ocean to the established m
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New Scientist - News
The sun’s energy could speed up dark matter so we can detect itIf dark matter is made of ultra-light particles with very little energy, one way to find them is to catch them after they ricochet off the sun
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The Atlantic
Baseball’s Wild Cards Are the Perfect Postseason Prologue Six years into its existence, Major League Baseball’s current Wild Card system still prompts plenty of chatter. The setup, in which the two non-division winners in each league’s bracket start things off with a one-game play-in, has no casual admirers; it usually provokes absolute disdain or total admiration. Tyler Kepner, writing for The New York Times between Tuesday’s game and Wednesday’s, rank
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Gizmodo
Netflix Is Raising Prices Again Image: Getty Many Netflix subscribers in the US will soon have to pay a little more each month for streaming. The video service is raising its prices for standard and premium plans. New members will start seeing the increased prices today, but current subscribers will be notified of the increase starting October 19. Advertisement The middle tier that enables Netflix watching on two devices simult
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Gizmodo
Thursday's Top Deals: Schwinn Elliptical Machine, Anker USB Port, Hoover Vacuum, Madden 18, and More Check out deals on a Schwinn elliptical machine , Anker USB Charging Hub , a Hoover vacuum , a first gen Amazon Echo , Madden 18 , and more. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. TOP TECH DEALS FREE Wickedly Prime Sweet ‘n’ Cheesy Popcorn with $25 Amazon.com purchase If you spend $25 on products shipped and sold by Amazon.com today , you can add a bag of their Sweet
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Violent helium reaction on white dwarf surface triggers supernova explosionAstronomers have found solid evidence about what triggered a star to explode, which will contribute to a further understanding of supernova history and behavior.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Understanding how gastric bypass works: Finding drug targets for obesity and diabetesMedical researchers have made a technological advancement toward accelerating the discovery of drug targets for obesity, type II diabetes and other metabolic diseases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fingerprints lack scientific basis for legal certaintyA new report on the quality of latent fingerprint analysis says that courtroom testimony and reports stating or even implying that fingerprints collected from a crime scene belong to a single person are indefensible and lack scientific foundation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New 'molecular trap' cleans more radioactive waste from nuclear fuel rodsA new method for capturing radioactive waste from nuclear power plants is cheaper and more effective than current methods, a potential boon for the energy industry, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Athletes and health aficionados: The lupine protein beverageWith its intensive colors and many blossoms, the lupine looks like an ornamental plant. Yet, the tall lupine is far too good to be used decoratively as the plant’s seeds contain nutritious proteins. However, it is rather complicated to make lupines edible for humans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Machinery that repairs itselfScientists are developing maintenance technology capable of forecasting machine downtimes in production before they occur. This allows plant managers to rectify faults before the machine breaks down. The system even corrects some defects automatically.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Safety assistance system warns of dirty bombsThe threat of terrorism has been on the rise in recent years, with experts and politicians particularly worried that terrorists might make use of dirty bombs. Researchers have developed a new system that will be able to detect possible carriers of radioactive substances, even in large crowds of people.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Monoclonal Antibodies Against Zika Show Promise in Monkey StudyUsing blood samples from an individual previously infected with Zika virus, NIAID-supported scientists, have developed an antibody-based Zika virus therapeutic that protected monkeys from infection. Because monoclonal antibodies are generally safe, they believe that this antibody cocktail might be appropriate for uninfected pregnant women; because the antibodies will likely cross the placenta, the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Appetizing imagery puts visual perception on fast forwardPeople rated images containing positive content as fading more smoothly compared with neutral and negative images, even when they faded at the same rate, according to findings published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Paper-based supercapacitor uses metal nanoparticles to boost energy densityUsing a simple layer-by-layer coating technique, researchers from the US and Korea have developed a paper-based flexible supercapacitor that could be used to help power wearable devices. The device uses metallic nanoparticles to coat cellulose fibers in the paper, creating supercapacitor electrodes with high energy and power densities -- and the best performance so far in a textile-based supercapa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists develop 'body-on- a-chip' system to accelerate testing of new drugsBeing able to test new drugs in a 3-D model of the body has the potential to speed up drug discovery, reduce the use of animal testing and advance personalized medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A candidate genetic factor for the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure has been foundResearchers at the University of Helsinki have found a genetic variation, which associates with the damage caused by maternal alcohol consumption. This genetic variation clarifies the role of genetic factors in the alcohol-induced developmental disorders and could be useful in future diagnostics.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Experimental Drug That Mutes Defective Genes Raises New HopesRNA interference systems would target genetic sources and shut down protein production -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Viden
Klimaforandringer kan betyde mere turbulens på flyveturenJetstrømmen i det nordlige atlanterhav flytter sig efter alt at dømme. Og det kan give flypassagerer store rystetur i fremtiden, viser ny forskning.
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Viden
Danske forskere vil kunne teste for konsekvenser af mikroplastikForskerne ved meget lidt om mikroplastik i naturen, selvom vi er storforbrugere af plastik. Det vil Aarhus Universitet gerne ændre på.
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Gizmodo
This Grainy Image Could Be the First British Passenger Liner Sunk by the Nazis in WW2 Image: GSI A mere eight hours after Britain declared war on the Nazis, a German torpedo struck the SS Athenia , sinking the passenger liner and killing more than 100 civilians. The ship’s final resting place has eluded shipwreck-hunters for nearly 80 years, but sonar images taken off the coast of Ireland now show what appears to be the wreck. As the BBC reports , Geological Survey Ireland has det
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A novel textile material that keeps itself germ-freeScientists have developed a novel weapon in the battle against deadly hospital-acquired infections -- a textile that disinfects itself. And independent tests show it can reduce bacteria levels by more than 90 per cent. By incorporating the specially-engineered textile in a device designed to be used on hospital doors instead of the traditional aluminum door plate, that part of the door that people
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Increased risk' donor organs a tough sell to transplant patientsThe opioid epidemic has created a tragic surge in donor organs. But despite their safety record, hundreds of the organs, labeled as 'increased risk,' go unused.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nanopatch polio vaccine deliversEfforts to rid the world of polio have taken another significant step. A fresh study of the Nanopatch -- a microscopic vaccine delivery platform -- has shown the device more effectively combats poliovirus than needles and syringes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Vertigo and understanding the body's balance systemFinding out what's happening in the brains of people with balance disorders, such as vertigo, might be one step closer following new research on the vestibular system, which controls balance and movement. An interdisciplinary team of optical physicists and biologists has found a novel way, using optical tweezers, or focused beams of light, to understand the vestibular system while animals are stil
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How cells adapt to help repair damageGenetic processes that allow cells to transform so they can mend damaged nerves have been identified by scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Predicting depression and PTSD before deployment could help soldiers copeA set of validated, self-reported questions administered early in a soldier's career could predict mental health problems such as depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after return from deployment, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Factors linked to dying comfortably for the very oldVery old people are more likely to die comfortably if they die in a care home or at home, compared with dying in a hospital, suggests a new study. Yet while the overwhelming majority of very old people reported symptoms at the end of life such as distress, pain and depression, the study found that these were not always treated effectively.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Milky Way's 'most-mysterious star' continues to confoundIn 2015, a star called KIC 8462852 caused quite a stir in and beyond the astronomy community due to a series of rapid, unexplained dimming events. The latest findings from astronomers take a longer look at the star, going back to 2006 -- before its strange behavior was detected by Kepler.
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NYT > Science
Bronze Arm Found in Famous Shipwreck Points to More Treasure BelowMarine archaeologists announced new findings from their most recent excavation of the roughly 2,000-year-old Antikythera wreck.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Anti-RAS antibodies show poor reliability in recognizing RAS proteinsResearchers from the Greehey Children's Cancer Research Institute at UT Health San Antonio co-authored a paper published Sept. 26 in Science Signaling that looks at the reliability of a common research tool to study RAS cancer mutations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mini form of replacement gene can delay degeneration in leber congenital amaurosisA new study demonstrates success in using a shortened form of the CEP290 gene for gene therapy in a mouse model of Leber congenital amaurosis type 10 (LCA10), a retinal degenerative disorder that causes childhood blindness.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
IUPUI microbiologists uncover clues to clustering of lethal bacteria in CF patients' lungsIn a new study IUPUI microbiologists are adding to body of knowledge of biofilm formation with the ultimate goal of finding better ways to disrupt that formation, leading to improved treatments for the chronic pneumonia in CF patients.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel PET tracer identifies most bacterial infectionsStanford University medical scientists have developed a novel imaging agent that could be used to identify most bacterial infections. The study is the featured basic science article in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine's October issue.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Violent helium reaction on white dwarf surface triggers supernova explosionAn international research team are the first to find solid evidence about what triggered a star to explode, which will contribute to a further understanding of supernova history and behavior.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Global burden of disease study focuses on liver cancerA new article published by JAMA Oncology reports the results of the Global Burden of Disease 2015 study on primary liver cancer incidence, death and years of healthy life lost in 195 countries or territories from 1990 to 2015.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
Don't suffer from your depression in silence | Nikki Webber AllenHaving feelings isn't a sign of weakness -- they mean we're human, says producer and activist Nikki Webber Allen. Even after being diagnosed with anxiety and depression, Webber Allen felt too ashamed to tell anybody, keeping her condition a secret until a family tragedy revealed how others close to her were also suffering. In this important talk about mental health, she speaks openly about her str
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Popular Science
WATCH: How long is a year? Science Sometimes one year can feel like one million. As things age, each trip around the sun becomes an ever-shrinking percentage of its lifetime. So how does a year feel to a first grader compared to the Grand Canyon?
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Gizmodo
Ivanka Trump Wants You to Know That Technology Is Important for the Future Photo: Getty Did you know that Ivanka Trump is an expert on education policy? Well, the president’s daughter wants you to know that she is, especially when it comes to “tech.” The 35-year-old former fashion designer outlined her grand plan for the future of technology education in a New York Post column on Thursday. In brief, the plan involves the Trump administration throwing a lot of money at v
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Ars Technica
Indiana Supreme Court: Sex with minors is OK, but it’s illegal to sext them Enlarge (credit: Ullstein Bild/ Getty Images) In Indiana, it's legal for adults to have consensual sex with minors aged 16 and 17. But it's illegal to sext those same minors, the Indiana Supreme Court ruled this week. The decision reinstated sexting charges against an adult who texted nude images of himself to a girl he knew was 16. The state's highest court, ruling 5-0, noted that the charges ag
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fingerprints lack scientific basis for legal certaintyIt may surprise many, especially those susceptible to the CSI effect, but fingerprint evidence is not conclusive beyond a reasonable doubt.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Supervolcanoes: Magma chambers have a sponge-like structureResearchers show that magma chambers under supervolcanoes are more like soggy sponges than reservoirs of molten rock. Before a volcano of this kind erupts, such mush must slowly be reactivated by heat input following deep magma recharge ultimately derived from the Earth's mantle.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Too much sugar? Even 'healthy people' are at risk of developing heart diseaseHealthy people who consume high levels of sugar are at an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease.
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The Atlantic
America's Political Divide Intensified During Trump's First Year As President Disagreement among Republican and Democratic voters on a range of political issues has risen sharply in recent years, a political divide that intensified during the first year of President Trump’s administration, according to a new report from the Pew Research Center. “The divisions between Republicans and Democrats on fundamental political values—on government, race, immigration, national securi
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The Economist: The world this week
KAL's cartoon
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The Economist: The world this week
Business this week
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The Economist: The world this week
Politics this week
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Gizmodo
Artist Protests Augmented Reality Sculpture By Digitally 'Vandalizing' Snapchat Balloon Dog Image: art.snapchat.com /Instagram/ sebastianstudio Augmented reality promised us a world of whimsy not confined by the rules of science. This week, we instead got a tech behemoth promoting their struggling app by plopping virtual sculptures into already magnificent places. And the art world is already firing back. In response to Snapchat’s new collaboration with Jeff Koons —a project that places
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Futurity.org
Links between brain ‘communities’ affect how we do stuff The connections within and between regions in our brain may affect our performance of both complex and simple tasks, a new study suggests. “Think of your brain as you would think of a university… Individuals organize themselves into densely interconnected communities…” The brain is organized into different subnetworks, or “modules,” that support distinct functions for different tasks, such as spe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New 'molecular trap' cleans more radioactive waste from nuclear fuel rodsA new method for capturing radioactive waste from nuclear power plants is cheaper and more effective than current methods, a potential boon for the energy industry, according to new research published in the journal Nature Communications.
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New on MIT Technology Review
This 12-Seater Electric Airplane Could Fly You on Short Trips—One Day
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fingerprints lack scientific basis for legal certaintyA new American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) working group report on the quality of latent fingerprint analysis says that courtroom testimony and reports stating or even implying that fingerprints collected from a crime scene belong to a single person are indefensible and lack scientific foundation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dundee scientists solve 3-D structure of key defense protein against Parkinson's diseaseScientists at the University of Dundee have identified the structure of a key enzyme that protects the brain against Parkinson's disease.The result of a decade of work, the research team said that solving the 3-D structure and inner workings of the PINK1 enzyme represented a major breakthrough.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Coming a step closer to understanding how gastric bypass worksA study by a team of researchers at the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Engineering in Medicine (MGH-CEM) and Shriners Hospital for Children has made a technological advancement toward accelerating the discovery of drug targets for obesity, type II diabetes and other metabolic diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study highlights 10 most unnecessary and overused medical tests and treatmentsUnnecessary medication. Tests that don't reveal the problem, or uncover a 'problem' that isn't really there. Procedures that have more risk than benefit. A new study highlights some of the most egregious examples of medical overuse in America. The goal is not to shame anyone, but to make healthcare more effective and efficient.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New 'molecular trap' cleans more radioactive waste from nuclear fuel rodsA new method for capturing radioactive waste from nuclear power plants is cheaper and more effective than current methods, a potential boon for the energy industry, according to new research published in the journal Nature Communications.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Perpetrators of genocide say they're 'good people'The men who were tried for their role in the 1994 Rwandan genocide that killed up to 1 million people want you to know that they're actually very good people.
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Scientific American Content: Global
New Observations Deepen Mystery of "Alien Megastructure" StarOrbiting dust could explain some—but not all—of the star’s bizarre behavior -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Germs in the kitchen: Salmonella better known than CampylobacterWhat health risks are consumers aware of? What are they concerned about? The answers to these questions are provided by the BfR Consumer Monitor, a representative population survey conducted regularly by the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR). On the one hand it reflects the public perception in Germany with regard to consumer health protection topics, while on the other hand it is
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Perpetrators of genocide say they're 'good people'The men who were tried for their role in the 1994 Rwandan genocide that killed up to 1 million people want you to know that they're actually very good people. That's the most common way accused men try to account for their actions in testimony before the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, a new study has found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Key component of respiratory center identifiedStar-shaped cells called astrocytes are much more than simple support cells in the brain. In a new study on mice, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden demonstrate that they also play a key part in the respiratory centre of the brainstem and release inflammatory molecules that regulate breathing. The results, which are presented in the scientific journal eLife, can provide important clues
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Largest twin study pins nearly 80% of schizophrenia risk on heritabilityIn the largest study of twins in schizophrenia research to date, researchers at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark, estimate that as much as 79% of schizophrenia risk may be explained by genetic factors. The estimate indicates that genetics have a substantial influence on risk for the disorder.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Completing the drug design jigsawA powerful new way of analysing how drugs interact with molecules in the body could aid the design of better treatments with fewer side-effects.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spike in airborne radioactivity detected in EuropeGerman officials say that a spike in radioactivity has been detected in the air in Western and Central Europe but there's no threat to human health.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Watching Netflix' 'Stranger Things' likely to cost you moreNetflix is raising the price for its most popular U.S. video streaming plan by 10 percent— a move aimed at bringing in more money to outbid HBO, Amazon and other rivals for addictive shows such as "Stranger Things."
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Ars Technica
Microsoft’s Edge browser now has iOS, Android versions Enlarge (credit: Microsoft) In a bid to improve cross-device user experience, Microsoft today released betas of its Edge browser for iOS and Android. The browsers have been developed to address a gap in the current Edge experience: with Windows Mobile all but unused, using Edge is a strictly PC-only experience. There's no easy way to, for example, switch from reading a site on your PC to reading
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Prince Charles warns 'plastic on the menu' in world's fishBritain's Prince Charles said that plastic is now "on the menu" in the fish we eat and called for decisive action as he opened a conference Thursday on protecting the world's oceans.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US spacewalkers begin repair of aging ISS robotic armTwo NASA astronauts embarked on a spacewalk Thursday to repair the International Space Station's aging robotic arm, the US space agency said.
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New Scientist - News
This snake knows how toxic it is and fights only when armedTiger keelback snakes get toxins from their food and always know how much poison they’re carrying – if they don’t have much, they opt for flight instead of fighting
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Scientific American Content: Global
Greenland's Coasts Are Growing as Seas RiseMelting glaciers are causing Greenland’s delta regions to expand -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
Intel's Latest Coffee Lake Processors Are Fast as Hell All images: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo Today Intel launches the next portion of its 8th Generation of processors. The CPUs, designed for use in desktop PCs, are fast, affordable, and they’re probably going to leave you very confused. That’s because Intel’s 8th Generation is a confusing Frankenstein-like monster. Normally the entire generation of a new family of processors is based on a single microarchit
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Ingeniøren
Politisk aftale tryller solcellepulje om til et nyt udbudRegeringen og resten af energiforligskredsen er blevet enige om at anvende 105 millioner kroner fra en allerede aftalt solcellepulje til et solcelleudbud i 2018. Trylleriet skal give mere sol for pengene.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Could we build a Blade Runner-style 'replicant'?The new Blade Runner sequel will return us to a world where sophisticated androids made with organic body parts can match the strength and emotions of their human creators. As someone who builds biologically inspired robots, I'm interested in whether our own technology will ever come close to matching the "replicants" of Blade Runner 2049.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Modified peptides could boost plant growth and developmentA new Australian study of peptide hormones critical for plant development could result in wide-ranging benefits for agriculture, tissue culture, and related industries, and even improve knowledge of peptides in humans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Multivitamins in pregnancy may be linked to lower autism risk in childrenTaking multivitamins during early pregnancy may be associated with a reduced risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in children compared with mothers who do not take multivitamins, finds a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Discrimination more likely when resources are scarceAt the height of the Great Recession, psychologist Amy Krosch noticed a troubling trend: people of color seemed to be getting much harder hit than the white population on a number of socioeconomic indicators. She wondered whether something about the psychological effects of economic scarcity might be making pre-recession racial disparities even worse.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why does divorce run in families? The answer may be geneticsChildren of divorced parents are more likely to get divorced when compared to those who grew up in two-parent families -- and genetic factors are the primary explanation, according to a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, October 2017A method developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory could protect connected and autonomous vehicles from possible network intrusion. A new ORNL technique makes ultrafast measurements using atomic force microscopy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Safety assistance system warns of dirty bombsThe threat of terrorism in Europe has been on the rise in recent years, with experts and politicians particularly worried that terrorists might make use of dirty bombs. Fraunhofer researchers have developed a new system that will be able to detect possible carriers of radioactive substances, even in large crowds of people. This solution is one of many defensive measures being realized in the REHST
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study says financial awards can actually discourage whistleblowers from reporting fraudFinancial awards can unintentionally discourage a whistleblower from reporting fraud in a timely manner by hijacking their moral motivation to do the right thing, according to a new study by researchers at Florida Atlantic University, Wilfrid Laurier University and Providence College.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Did Teddy Evans fatally undermine Scott of the Antarctic?The 1912 death of Scott of the Antarctic and four companions has long been blamed on poor planning by Scott, but documents discovered by a UNSW researcher reveal a different story – and a possible cover up.
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Popular Science
A man who's participated in 41 space missions remembers the Sputnik launch Space Reflections from a prodigious force in space exploration. When it comes to space exploration, Don Gurnett has seen it all.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Looking inside the basset hornThe internal structure of old musical instruments is of great interest to musicians, restorers, and instrument makers. As part of the MUSICES project, Fraunhofer researchers are using 3-D computed tomography methods to examine historical musical instruments belonging to the collection held by the Germanisches Nationalmuseum (GNM). Based on this experience, they are drawing up guidelines for obtain
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Futurity.org
Fight against malaria gets two new weapons Two new strategies show promise in battling malaria, a disease that kills more than 400,000 people each year, mostly children ages five and under in sub-Saharan Africa. Both new strategies involve making Anopheles mosquitoes more resistant to malaria parasites, which live in the insects and infect humans when female mosquitoes feed on human blood. Building mosquito resistance to the parasite woul
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Gizmodo
Google's Day of Ripping Off Other Companies Image Source: Google From the moment Google’s big product event kicked off on Wednesday, it seemed as if every speaker was attempting to temper expectations and say, in not so many words: “We get it, you’ve seen this before. But this time... Google’s doing it.” The most blatant example of a Google spokesperson teeing up this admission came from senior vice president of hardware Rick Osterloh. He
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Parenting advice gets a fact-checkA new website called Parentifact attempts to fight parenting misinformation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
No clear evidence that most new cancer drugs extend or improve lifeThe majority of cancer drugs approved in Europe between 2009 and 2013 entered the market without clear evidence that they improved survival or quality of life for patients, finds a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Staggering economic burden of dementia in younger people, study revealsFrontotemporal degeneration (FTD) -- the most common dementia for people under age 60 -- inflicts a significantly higher economic burden on both patients and their caregivers, a new study shows. While the social and economic cost of Alzheimer's is well documented, the study found that the average annual costs associated with FTD to total $119,654, nearly two times the reported annual cost of Alzhe
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
For women, high blood pressure in your 40s may be tied to increased risk of DementiaWomen who develop high blood pressure in their 40s may be more likely to develop dementia years later, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
To kickstart creativity, offer money, not plaudits, study findsThe best way to reward creativity is not with social-recognition awards such as plaques or other plaudits. According to new research, it's all about the money.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bioengineering as viable alternative to open fetal repair for spina bifida, research provesResearchers have discovered a promising alternative to open fetal surgery for spina bifida repair. The team has developed an alternative approach to current in utero treatment for spina bifida: a minimally-invasive repair using a bioengineered material -- a reverse thermal gel (RTG) -- to cover the neural tube defects (NTD) at an earlier gestational age than traditional treatment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gene therapy halts progression of cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy in clinical trialA gene therapy to treat cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy (CALD) -- a neurodegenerative disease that typically claims young boys' lives within 10 years of diagnosis -- effectively stabilized the disease's progression in 88 percent of patients, in a recent clinical trial.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why females have heart health advantageIn a first-ever study, researchers have found the biological reasons why females have a heart health advantage over men and it's tied to ovarian hormones. Essentially the interplay between female ovarian hormones and a circadian 'clock' molecule protects the heart health of women until they reach menopause.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Soil holds potential to slow global warming, researchers findIf you want to do something about global warming, look under your feet. Managed well, soil's ability to trap carbon dioxide is potentially much greater than previously estimated, according to Stanford researchers who claim the resource could "significantly" offset increasing global emissions. They call for a reversal of federal cutbacks to related research programs to learn more about this valuabl
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How to create a cyber secure homeAs technology becomes more important in our personal lives, so does securing it. Here are some fundamental steps you should always take to help protect yourself and your family.
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Feed: All Latest
From Mighty AI to Innoviz, 10 Startups Remaking TransportationThe folks addressing the most vexing and important problems standing between us and the future of transportation.
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Feed: All Latest
Why Sci-Fi Novels Are the New Comic Books For Streaming TVTV creators are raiding the sci-fi section like never before—for some obvious, and not-so-obvious, reasons.
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The Atlantic
Warby Parker's Co-Founder on Starting a Company From Scratch Before Warby Parker, the eyewear retailer worth more than $1 billion, was launched, none of its four founders had ever started a company before. So Dave Gilboa, Warby Parker’s co-founder and co-CEO, made a point of asking for guidance. “We spent a ton of time getting advice and mentorship from people who had either started a business before, or who had expertise in a specific area—like optometry,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discovery of a new fusion gene class may affect the development of cancerCancer researchers at Lund University in Sweden have discovered a new class of fusion genes with properties that affect and may drive the development of cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
BU: Beer brands popular among youth violate code with youth-appealing adsAlcohol brands popular among underage drinkers are more likely to air television advertisements that violate the industry's voluntary code by including youth-appealing content, according to a new study by researchers from Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain wiring affects how people perform specific tasksThe way a person's brain is 'wired' directly impacts how well they perform simple and complex tasks, according to a new study from researchers at Rice University.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UQ study shines a light to understand the body's balance systemFinding out what's happening in the brains of people with balance disorders, such as vertigo, might be one step closer following new research on the vestibular system, which controls balance and movement. An interdisciplinary University of Queensland team of optical physicists and biologists has found a novel way, using optical tweezers, or focused beams of light, to understand the vestibular syst
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Magma chambers have a sponge-like structureETH researchers show that magma chambers under supervolcanoes are more like soggy sponges than reservoirs of molten rock. Before a volcano of this kind erupts, such mush must slowly be reactivated by heat input following deep magma recharge ultimately derived from the Earth's mantle.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
Harnessing Technology and Collaboration for Social GoodInspiring young people to build their future is foundational; teaching them to combine this with open partnerships across disciplines and borders is transformational -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren
VIDEO: Robot arbejder synkront med sin digitale tvillingPreben Hjørnet fra robotfirmaet Blue Workforce demonstrerer på HI-messen, hvordan avanceret simulationssoftware letter opsætningen og fejlfindingen på en industrirobot.
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Ingeniøren
Robottens digitale tvilling rykker ud på fabriksgulvetRobotudvikleren Blue Workforce vil gøre robotter mere tilgængelige ved at rykke grænserne for, hvad man kan bruge virtuelle simuleringer til. På HI-messen fremviser firmaet ny avanceret software.
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Gizmodo
DNA Evidence Reveals True Identity of Elusive Bird Species The only Liberian Greenbul sample (Image: Collinson et al, J Ornithol (2017)) Ornithologist Wulf Gatter spent six days a week observing birds in the forest of Liberia, the West African country. He spotted one seen nowhere else, a medium-sized yellow songbird, on nine occasions during the county’s annual dry season lasting from November to February. It looked quite similar to another species, but
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nerve study shows how cells adapt to help repair damageGenetic processes that allow cells to transform so they can mend damaged nerves have been identified by scientists.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How Mount Agung's eruption can create the world's most fertile soilMount Agung in Bali is currently on the verge of eruption, and more than 100,000 people have been evacuated. However, one of us (Dian) is preparing to go into the area when it erupts, to collect the ash.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
15 new gecko species discovered in MyanmarWith support from Fauna & Flora International (FFI), 15 karst-adapted gecko species were recently found in Myanmar within the space of just two weeks, highlighting the outstanding biodiversity of limestone ecosystems.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Do Google and Facebook have an obligation to quash misinformation?Earlier this week, two articles from the online forum 4Chan appeared briefly in Google's "Top Stories" section after a search for the wrongly-named Las Vegas shooter. The articles, which appeared as two of the three top stories on Google's search page, were the result of a deep-web conspiracy theory that had taken hold of several 4Chan message boards.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Inside the Adidas Factory That Uses Robots to Build Running Shoes
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Gizmodo
Plug In Five Gadgets At Once With One Of Your Favorite USB Charging Hubs Anker PowerPort 5 , $19 Anker’s PowerPorts are our readers’ favorite USB charging hubs , and the standard 40W/5-port model is about $4 less than usual right now . These are great for your nightstand, your desk, or even your luggage if you bring a lot of gadgets when you travel. More Deals
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Futurity.org
How cells start the process of healing wounds Using an ultrafast, ultraprecise laser, researchers have taken a step towards a fuller understanding of the how the body triggers the complex process of healing wounds. In a sharp and pointy world, wound healing is a critical and marvelous process. Despite a tremendous amount of scientific study, however, many outstanding mysteries still surround the way in which cells in living tissue respond to
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Dagens Medicin
Bent Hansen om afskaffelsen af to pct.-kravet: »Vi har ikke åbnet noget som helst champagne« Det er godt, at to pct.-kravet er suspenderet. Men det ændrer ikke på, at sundhedsvæsenet også fremover vil være presset til at levere mere og mere sundhed per krone, siger Danske Regioners formand Bent Hansen og Lægeforeningens formand Andreas Rudkjøbing.
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Dagens Medicin
En medalje til den dygtige generalistVist har vi brug for dygtige specialister, men med multisygdom i vækst har vi faktisk også stort behov for dygtige generalister på hospitalerne.
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NYT > Science
Deep in 316-Page E.P.A. Doc, Reporter Finds Hint of Unexpected Turn in HistoryThere it was on Scott Pruitt’s schedule: a meeting with an acquaintance he knew from Oklahoma.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
We looked at 1,154 climate science results and found no evidence of 'publication bias'It is rare to encounter a scientific fact that stirs widespread debate and distrust quite like the matter of climate change.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Simplifying information aids fight against childhood obesity, study findsProviding simplified health information designed for parents with low health literacy helps all families in childhood obesity treatment programs regardless of their ability to understand health information, according to a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Macho pursuits dominate assessments of risky behavior, reinforcing gender stereotypesWomen can be just as risky as men -- or even riskier -- when the conventional macho measures of daring -- such as betting vast sums on a football game -- are replaced by less stereotypical criteria, according to new research led by the University of Exeter.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stealing from the body: How cancer recharges its batteriesNew research published today uncovers how the blood cancer 'steals' parts of surrounding healthy bone marrow cells to thrive, in work that could help form new approaches to cancer treatment in the future. Researchers at the University of East Anglia (UEA), funded by the Rosetrees Trust and The Big C Charity, found that healthy bone marrow stromal cells were made to transfer their power-generating
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists from MSU proposed a way of increasing the efficiency of solar batteriesResearchers from Department of Material Sciences, Lomonosov MSU, explained how changing the ratio of components forming light-absorbing layer of a perovskite solar cell influences the structure of created films and battery efficiency. The results of the study were published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry C.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Did Teddy Evans fatally undermine Scott of the Antarctic?University of New South Wales' Professor Chris Turney has uncovered documents and diary entries that suggest a team member stole food Scott needed, failed to pass on orders that would have sent out a dog team to meet the men and then changed his story over time to cover up his role in their deaths.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nerve study shows how cells adapt to help repair damageGenetic processes that allow cells to transform so they can mend damaged nerves have been identified by scientists.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
RUDN chemists identified the structure of the agent causing mutations in lionfish embryosResearchers from the People's Friendship University of Russia (RUDN University) have refined our understanding of the structure of synthetic toxins which impede the development of red lionfish embryos, but in their modified form can be used for studying embryos of vertebrata. The results are published in the Organic and Biomolecular Chemistry journal.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Newborns with CHD show signs of brain impairment even before cardiac surgeryUsing a novel imaging technique, Children's National Health System researchers demonstrate for the first time that the brains of high-risk infants with congenital heart disease already show signs of functional impairment even before they undergo corrective open heart surgery.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Colourful dunes on wind-swept MarsDunes are prominent indicators of prevailing winds, as can be seen on this crater floor on Mars, imaged by ESA's Mars Express on 16 May.
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Futurity.org
Nope, an alien megastructure isn’t dimming Tabby’s Star Boyajian’s Star, also known as Tabby’s Star, has attracted attention from astronomers and invited speculation. One theory even says the star could exist within a vast structure that an alien civilization built to harvest its energy. NASA’s Kepler space telescope has even observed dimming by the object—formally known as KIC 8462852—of up to 20 percent over a matter of days. Further, the star has h
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Ingeniøren
Tysk forskning skaber chips med indbygget vandkøling i silicium-lagMikrokanaler med vand inden i selve chippen leder varme bort og giver højere clock-frekvens.
5h
New on MIT Technology Review
Amazon Is Testing a New Delivery Service to Ship More Goods, Faster
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nanopatch polio vaccine deliversEfforts to rid the world of polio have taken another significant step, thanks to research led by University of Queensland bioscience experts and funding from the World Health Organisation (WHO). A fresh study of the Nanopatch -- a microscopic vaccine delivery platform first developed by UQ researchers -- has shown the device more effectively combats poliovirus than needles and syringes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study says financial awards can actually discourage whistleblowers from reporting fraudFinancial awards can unintentionally discourage a whistleblower from reporting fraud in a timely manner by hijacking their moral motivation to do the right thing, according to a new study by researchers at Florida Atlantic University, Wilfrid Laurier University and Providence College.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate solution in soil?The land under our feet and the plant matter it contains could offset a significant amount of carbon emissions if managed properly. More research is needed to unlock soil's potential to mitigate global warming, improve crop yields and increase resilience
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A need for bananas? Dietary potassium regulates calcification of arteriesResearchers have shown, for the first time, that reduced dietary potassium promotes elevated aortic stiffness in a mouse model. Such arterial stiffness in humans is predictive of heart disease and death from heart disease, and it represents an important health problem for the nation. The UAB researchers also found that increased dietary potassium levels lessened vascular calcification and aortic s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers create molecule that could 'kick and kill' HIVResearchers have been looking for ways to eliminate the 'reservoirs' where the virus hides, and researchers from UCLA, Stanford University and the National Institutes of Health may have developed a solution. Their approach involves sending an agent to 'wake up' the dormant virus, which causes it to begin replicating so that either the immune system or the virus itself would kill the cell harboring
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Modified peptides could boost plant growth and developmentA new Australian study of peptide hormones critical for plant development could result in wide-ranging benefits for agriculture, tissue culture, and related industries, and even improve knowledge of peptides in humans. The study, involving University of Queensland and University of Sydney researchers, synthesized and examined the function of CLE peptides, a relatively new class of the peptide horm
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ASU examines Mars' moon Phobos in a different lightNASA's longest-lived mission to Mars has gained its first look at the Martian moon Phobos, pursuing a deeper understanding by examining it in infrared wavelengths.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Low-cost, high-volume services make up big portion of spending on unneeded health careLow-cost, high-volume health services account for a high percentage of unnecessary health spending, adding strain to the health care system.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Freeze frame microscopy for 3-D biological images captures 2017 Nobel Prize in chemistry'The Nobel Committee's recognition of yet another type of biomedical imaging underscores just how important, and enabling imaging and microscopy techniques are to all areas of science and medicine,' stated Elizabeth M.C. Hillman, professor of Biomedical Engineering at Radiology, Columbia University, and general chair of the upcoming 2018 OSA BioPhotonics Congress.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New tool for oil and gas exploration beats all competitionThe MIPT Center for Molecular Electronics (CME) has developed and tested a seismic station for hydrocarbon exploration. The new device has unparalleled bandwidth, enabling it to reveal the structure of underground reservoirs at a depth of up to several tens of kilometers. The seismic station can be used for onshore, transition-zone, and marine exploration. It can be deployed at depths of up to 0.5
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New on MIT Technology Review
Amazon Is Trialling a New Delivery Service to Ship More Goods, Faster
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How to avoid war and conflict – with a little help from social psychologyThe posturing of US President Donald Trump and North Korean Leader Kim Jong-un give rise to a terrifying realisation: that we are moving closer to a nuclear war. The recognition that such a war could be our last raises the most serious questions about human behaviour.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Completing the drug design jigsawA powerful new way of analysing how drugs interact with molecules in the body could aid the design of better treatments with fewer side-effects.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study shows way to create common ground about gene-editingIn an increasingly crowded and hungry world, a range of new food production technologies are emerging in an effort to keep up. New gene editing approaches now let scientists hack into genomes to alter foods' characteristics – increasing yields, lengthening shelf-life, or improving disease resistance.
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Ars Technica
Intel Coffee Lake Core i7-8700K review: The best gaming CPU you can buy Enlarge (credit: Mark Walton) For those that game, there's no better processor than Intel's Coffee Lake Core i7-8700K. Where its predecessor, the Kaby Lake Core i7-7700K , offered little more than slightly higher clock speeds and a way to decode DRM-laden 4K video over 2015's 6700K , the 8700K boosts performance with six cores, 12 threads, and a mighty 4.7GHz boost clock, the fastest out-of-the-b
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Ars Technica
Google Pixelbook hands-on: Stunning hardware with the usual limited OS SAN FRANCISCO—The Google Pixelbook is the latest in a line of flagship Chrome OS laptops that are extremely nice and extremely expensive. If it ran anything other than Chrome OS, it would be a top-tier laptop, but it does run Chrome OS, so for $1,000, it's kind of a hard sell. Boy, is it a sharp piece of hardware. It's wrapped in aluminum, like previous Chromebook Pixels. The palm rest is covered
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Quanta Magazine
One-Way Salesman Finds Fast Path Home A salesman has to visit every major city in the U.S. What is the cheapest way to hit them all exactly once and then return to the headquarters? The computation of the single best answer for what is known as the traveling salesman problem is famously infeasible. Nevertheless, computer scientists have long known how to find a pretty good route — one that incurs no more than 1.5 times the optimal co
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Dagens Medicin
Flere overlevende kræver øget viden om senfølger efter kræftDanskerne overlever i stigende grad kræft, hvilket sandsynligvis vil give flere senfølger, påpeger ny rapport fra Sundhedsstyrelsen. Men det kræver mere viden.
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Dagens Medicin
Nyt kræftcenter uddeler 2,5 mio. kroner til netværk og samarbejde Kræftforskere og klinikere, der ønsker støtte til etablering af nationale tværfaglige miljøer, netværk og kompetenceudvikling, kan søge økonomisk støtte hos Danish Comprehensive Cancer Center (DCCC).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Smart bandage could promote better, faster healingResearchers from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Harvard Medical School and MIT have designed a smart bandage that could eventually heal chronic wounds or battlefield injuries with every fiber of its being.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How to feed an invading army thousands of miles from homeConquering Romans relied on resources from near and far to sustain their forces against the native tribes in Wales, according to new research by Cardiff University archaeologists.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
3 ways self-driving cars could disrupt industryAre you ready to see more self-driving cars on the road?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
OSIRIS-REx cameras and spectrometers tested during Earth flybyOn Sept. 22, OSIRIS-REx soared under the South Pole, coming within 10,600 miles of Earth before using the planet's gravity to slingshot itself onto the path to the asteroid Bennu.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Two independent studies find mobility of researchers results in better science(Phys.org)—Two teams of researchers working independently have come to roughly the same conclusion: Researchers that are free to move between countries produce results that are more creative and innovative than do those that stay at home. The first team led by Cassidy Sugimto of Indiana University has published a Comment piece in the journal Nature describing their study of citation rates of resea
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Science-Based Medicine
Complementary and Alternative Medicines and CancerDoes complementary and alternative medicine offer any meaningful benefits to cancer patients?
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Ars Technica
It’s official: Trump administration turns NASA back toward the Moon Enlarge / Vice President Mike Pence speaks at Kennedy Space Center earlier this year. (credit: NASA) For close observers of space policy, a likely human return to the Moon has been one of the worst-kept secrets of the new Trump administration. First, new space companies such as SpaceX, Blue Origin, and Bigelow Aerospace started to introduce plans that involved lunar exploration. Then, Vice Presid
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The #FreeBassel Effect Proves Online Activism Is Still PowerfulMy friend Bassel Khartabil may no longer be with us, but his dream of spreading open culture to the Middle East will live on through those it inspires and enables.
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The Speculum Finally Gets a Modern RedesignThe medical gadget hasn't been revamped in almost 200 years. A group of designers hopes to change that.
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Feed: All Latest
Colloidal Silver Turns You Blue—But Does It Work?Celebrities ranging from Gwyneth Paltrow to Infowar's Alex Jones swear by colloidal silver as a germ-fighting miracle cure. But the medical community says there's no evidence it works.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Computer model unravels knotty problems in DNAIf you've ever tried to untangle a pair of earbuds, you'll understand how loops and cords can get twisted up. DNA can get tangled in the same way, and in some cases, has to be cut and reconnected to resolve the knots. Now a team of mathematicians, biologists and computer scientists has unraveled how E. coli bacteria can unlink tangled DNA by a local reconnection process. The math behind the resear
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Earlier school start times may increase risk of adolescent depression and anxietyTeenagers with school starting times before 8:30 a.m. may be at particular risk of experiencing depression and anxiety due to compromised sleep quality, according to a recent study out of the University of Rochester Medical Center.
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Gizmodo
Casting Calls Reveal More Flashbacks For Ant-Man and The Wasp The League goes all in for new Justice League posters. Josh Brolin is caught in some strange photos from the Deadpool 2 set. We’re getting a little more Star Trek: Discovery this year than previously planned. Plus, Odette Annabelle on her Supergirl villain, and new Star Wars: Rebels footage. Spoilers, go! Ant-Man & the Wasp Central Casting Georgia has put an ad on Facebook looking for Argenti
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Scientific American Content: Global
Deaths from Opioid Overdoses SoarMen and women of all ages are dying from heroin and fentanyl overdoses -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The immense challenge of desertification in sub-Saharan AfricaToday, dry areas represent more than 41% of land on the globe and they are home to more than two billion people.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemically stabilizing atomically flat materials improves their potential for commercial applicationTwo-dimensional materials could underpin a novel family of flexible, low-power electronic devices, but their success depends on ensuring the layers are chemically stable. A*STAR researchers now show that one 2-D material, phosphorene, can be stabilized with the right choice of substrate and an electric field.
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Futurity.org
Immune cells may not be at root of fetal alcohol syndrome Scientists are challenging the theory that cells in the brain’s immune system are the culprit behind the neurological damage that occurs in babies exposed to alcohol while in the womb. “In order to develop treatments for this condition, we must first understand how alcohol affects the developing brain,” says Ania Majewska, an associate professor of neuroscience at the University of Rochester Medi
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Ars Technica
Why Apple could be slapped with a massive $15 billion Irish tax bill Enlarge / Apple CEO Tim Cook. (credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images ) The European Commission on Wednesday stepped up its campaign to force big American technology companies to pay more taxes on Wednesday. It ruled that Luxembourg had violated EU rules by allowing the bulk of Amazon's European profits to go untaxed, and it announced it was taking Ireland to court for failing to collect higher taxes
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Optimum drill geometry for creating deep, narrow holes is determined using a computational modelImproving the design of drills capable of excavating deep holes should increase their performance and longevity. Scientists from A*STAR develop a computational model that can determine the ideal drill design, achieving significant savings.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A protein duo ensures that the chromosomes in reproductive cells find their significant otherReproduction is made easier by finding the right partner—and it's no different for the chromosomes inside reproductive cells. Now, an international team of researchers, including A*STAR scientists, has revealed just how chromosomes find their perfect match.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Determining the mass of the Milky Way using hypervelocity starsFor centuries, astronomers have been looking beyond our solar system to learn more about the Milky Way galaxy. And yet, there are still many things about it that elude us, such as knowing its precise mass. Determining this is important to understanding the history of galaxy formation and the evolution of our universe. As such, astronomers have attempted various techniques for measuring the true ma
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Ingeniøren
Kronik: Sådan bliver København smart i en fart Intelligent trafikstyring Selvkørende biler
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Ingeniøren
Dansk forskning: Sådan beregnes den perfekte flyvingeEt dansk gennembrud inden for optimering af flyvinger kan føre til betydelige besparelser på flys brændstofforbrug. Samme teknik kan også bruges til optimering af brofag og andre store mekaniske strukturer.
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Futurity.org
Giant tsunami reshaped California coastline New evidence suggests a gigantic tsunami hit the California coast 900 years ago, removing three to five times more sand than any El Niño storm in history. The researchers also estimate how far inland the coast eroded. “We found a very distinct signature in the GPR data that indicated a tsunami and confirmed it with independent records detailing a tsunami in the area 900 years ago,” explains lead
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New data structure allows rapid tracking and policing of network dataTo protect networks from malicious threats, cyber-security solutions must track all the data flowing through the network—just like security guards checking travelers in airports. However, it is hard to design a solution that works fast enough to process all the information in real time, and to block threats before they can strike. Now, A*STAR researchers have designed a way to structure data that
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
World War III is being waged in cyberspaceMy introduction to advanced communication technology (i.e. the Internet and World Wide Web) came in 1999.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study explains how continents leave their roots behindIn some areas of the seafloor, a tectonic mystery lies buried deep underground.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New CRISPR tool targets RNA in mammalian cellsResearchers from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard have shown that a CRISPR-based editing system can cut and bind RNA in mammalian cells. In a paper out this week in Nature, the team used CRISPR-Cas13, which the researchers had helped discover, to both reduce RNA levels and "tag" RNAs in order to view and track them within cells. The researchers previously used CRISPR-Cas13 to target RNA in b
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Dagens Medicin
Studie: Mere end halvdelen af alle godkendte kræftlægemidler virker ikkeBritisk forskning dokumenterer, at kun en lille brøkdel af den samlede pulje af de kræftmidler, som det europæiske lægemiddelagentur EMA har godkendt til det europæiske marked fra 2009 til 2013, forlænger overlevelsen og øger livskvaliteten.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Establishing a genome-wide map of bacterial genes crucial for colonization of plants by beneficial microbesWorking with the plant growth-promoting bacterium Pseudomonas simiae, researchers have identified 115 genes that negatively affect its ability to colonize a plant root system when mutated.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Airborne method of understanding northern lakes and their links to climate changeResearchers at Umeå University in Sweden are exploring the potential to create a landscape level map of the shapes of lake basins through a laser survey. This is a critical missing piece of the puzzle for understanding the role of lake carbon cycling at large spatial scales.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How the Chinese cyberthreat has evolvedWith more than half of its 1.4 billion people online, the world's most populous country is home to a slew of cyberspies and hackers. Indeed, China has likely stolen more secrets from businesses and governments than any other country.
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Feed: All Latest
Bell's V-280 Tiltrotor Gets Ready for First FlightThe V-22 Osprey-inspired aircraft could replace the Army's aging Black Hawk helicopters.
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Feed: All Latest
Cyberattacks Against Abortion Clinics Have Increased At an Alarming RateAbortion providers have long faced harassment, both online and and in person. But a recent wave of cyberattacks have caused havoc lately—and proved difficult to stop.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Archaeologists may have discovered St. Nick's bonesTurkish archaeologists believe they may have discovered the remains of St. Nicholas—from whom the legend of Santa Claus emerged—beneath a church at his birthplace in southern Turkey.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists take the temperature of dengue fever riskWhen disease-bearing mosquitoes expand into new habitats, public health officials should test the ability of new arrivals to transmit viruses at a variety of temperatures, a new Yale-led study suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Life frozen in time under an electron microscope gets a Nobel PrizeThe scientists who developed the ability to see some of the building blocks of life under the electron microscope have been awarded the 2017 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Magma chambers have a sponge-like structureETH researchers show that magma chambers under supervolcanoes are more like soggy sponges than reservoirs of molten rock. Before a volcano of this kind erupts, such mush must slowly be reactivated by heat input following deep magma recharge ultimately derived from the Earth's mantle.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NIST finds a way to measure fuel cell 'printing' at a fast clipIf you're wondering when a hydrogen-powered car will become a viable option for you, take heart. A team including scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) may have overcome a significant hurdle to manufacturing hydrogen fuel cells by creating a way to check whether the expensive catalysts the cells need have been incorporated quickly and effectively. Improved measure
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Futurity.org
Talking to preteens about drugs doesn’t tempt them Researchers report finding no evidence that discussing drug and alcohol use with preteens encourages them to try drugs or drinking. “Communities can use data to guide prevention efforts and not worry they’re harming students.” The study focused on school-based surveys of fifth- and sixth-graders to determine whether their behaviors changed over time. The research team found that, among two groups
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Better TogetherWhen it comes to thwarting roundworms, scientists find that combining four antiparasitic drugs in smaller doses packs a greater punch than the four drugs alone.
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Ars Technica
Explaining the new cryptocurrency bubble—and why it might not be all bad Enlarge (credit: Aurich Lawson / Getty) You're going to hear a lot about initial coin offerings (ICOs) in the coming months. As investors have poured more and more money into newly created virtual currencies, they have created a gold-rush mentality. In recent months, some ICOs have raised tens of millions of dollars, and in early October the cryptocurrency market as a whole was worth about $140 b
7h
Scientific American Content: Global
Let's Use Government Data to Make Better PolicyIt's a no-brainer, as long as privacy concerns are taken seriously -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
The Atlantic
The Computer That Predicted the U.S. Would Win the Vietnam War At just about the halfway point of Lynn Novick and Ken Burns’s monumental documentary on the Vietnam War, an army advisor tells an anecdote that seems to sum up the relationship between the military and computers during the mid-1960s. “There’s the old apocryphal story that in 1967, they went to the basement of the Pentagon, when the mainframe computers took up the whole basement, and they put on
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Correcting errors at the quantum computing scaleComputing power has grown exponentially over many decades, so why is the much-promised next leap of quantum computers taking so long to arrive?
7h
Gizmodo
The Smartest Vacuum You've Ever Seen Is Perfect For Pet Owners, and Deeply Discounted Today Hoover REACT Pet Plus , $179 Hoover’s new REACT line of vacuums is full of smart features, and the Pet Plus model just got a massive price drop , for one day only. The namesake feature of the REACT is a suite of sensors that detect what kind of floor you’re on, and adjust the brush head speed accordingly. Vacuum bristles can push dirt away on hard floors at the least, and actually damage their fi
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Prisoners recovering from addiction encounter 'cliff edge' with little support on releaseA new report warns that drug recovery work in prison is largely futile unless suitable accommodation and support are available to prisoners after release.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rare songbird may never have existedOne of the world's most elusive species of songbird may be so hard to spot because it never existed in the first place, according to new research from the University of Aberdeen.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lake mixing – the might of the microorganismCan microorganisms cause lake water to be mixed? The answer given by previous studies is no, since the movement of small, slow-swimming bacteria is not sufficient to disturb the stratification of lake water induced by differences in, for example, temperature or salinity.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mumbai may be vulnerable to future hurricanesHistorically, tropical cyclones (also known as hurricanes) have rarely hit Mumbai, India. But how will future storms impact this coastal city on the Arabian Sea? That's the focus of a leading-edge study underway by the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory's Initiative on Extreme Weather and Climate.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers eye papermaking improvements through high-performance computingWith the naked eye, a roll of paper towels doesn't seem too complicated. But look closely enough, and you'll see it's made up of layers of fibers with thousands of intricate structures and contact points. These fluffy fibers are squeezed together before they are printed in patterns, and this resulting texture is key to the paper's performance.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Students demonstrate validity of models that use free, publicly accessible climate dataAs concern about the consequences of climate change grows, researchers are thinking hard about the data and models that drive their understanding of these changes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanopatch polio vaccine deliversEfforts to rid the world of polio have taken another significant step, thanks to research led by University of Queensland bioscience experts and funding from the World Health Organisation (WHO).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Knotty problems in DNAIf you've ever tried to untangle a pair of earbuds, you'll understand how loops and cords can get twisted up. DNA can get tangled in the same way, and in some cases, has to be cut and reconnected to resolve the knots. Now a team of mathematicians, biologists and computer scientists has unraveled how E. coli bacteria can unlink tangled DNA by a local reconnection process. The math behind the resear
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Dagens Medicin
Lægemiddelindustriforeningen vil have principper for samarbejde mellem læger og medicinalindustri konkretiseret Lægemiddelindustriforeningen opfordrer de to regioner, som har stoppet for sponsorering af lægers kongresrejser, til hurtigt at konkretisere principper for det fremtidige samarbejde mellem læger og medicinalindustri.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
100 Women: Where are the female Nobel Prize winners?The 2017 Nobel prizes for the sciences have all been announced, but many in the scientific community are pointing out the lack of female laureates.
7h
Gizmodo
Former Head of AT&T Had a Top Secret Security Clearance, Like Many Others in the Tech Community Robert Allen, chairman and CEO of AT&T, addresses a news conference in New York, Aug. 20, 1994. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan) The former head of AT&T, Robert Eugene Allen, passed away in September 2016 at the age of 81. And while Allen’s 223-page FBI file is relatively unexceptional, it serves as a good reminder that telecommunications companies have been working on sensitive government work f
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Project reveals benefits of communicating with industry when conducting researchWhen Shreya Dave was an MIT doctoral student working on a new kind of filter for desalination plants, she paid a visit to a working reverse-osmosis desalination plant in Spain. She quickly learned an important lesson that she now says she would likely have missed if she'd stayed in the lab.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sentinel-5P sealed from viewAs preparations for the launch of Sentinel-5P continue on track, the team at Russia's Plesetsk site has bid farewell to the satellite as it was sealed from view in the Rockot fairing. Liftoff is set for 13 October at 09:27 GMT (11:27 CEST).
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Dagens Medicin
Færre patienter får udskrevet recepter til antibiotikaSiden 2007 er antallet af patienter, der får udskrevet antibiotika, faldet med 17 procent, viser ny rapport. Det samlede forbrug af antibiotika er uændret.
8h
Feed: All Latest
Google's Pixel Event Shows Google Assistant's Massive ImportanceTo win the assistant game, Google needs a hardware ecosystem. And it's not waiting for one to materialize.
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Feed: All Latest
Apple’s Siri Falls Behind in the Virtual Assistant Race It StartedGoogle's Assistant and Amazon's Alexa offer more capabilities than Apple's Siri, their predecessor.
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Feed: All Latest
Were US Diplomats in Cuba Victims of a Sonic Attack—or Something Else?It was either a new, sci-fi sound gun or something else. Here’s a hypothesis for the something else.
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Science | The Guardian
Scientists 'concealed' death of patient at centre of vegetative state breakthrough Therapy which restored consciousness hailed as huge advance, but researchers criticised for withholding fact that patient died of lung infection months after treatment French scientists have been criticised for concealing the death of the patient at the centre of a breakthrough in which consciousness was restored to a man in a persistent vegetative state. The treatment was hailed as a major advan
8h
Latest Headlines | Science News
50 years ago, a spacecraft discovered oxygen in moon rocksIn 1967, scientists dreamed of lunar processing plants to turn moon rocks into oxygen.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Let's Reserve Half of Earth for ConservationIt could help save crucial ecosystems and preserve biodiversity—and although such a plan would be tough to implement, it would not be impossible -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Ars Technica
Blade Runner 2049 review: A wonderful step forward, into the past Enlarge (credit: Warner Bros.) The moment that made me believe in Blade Runner 2049 as a worthy sci-fi sequel came roughly 10 minutes into the film. The sequel's star, Ryan Gosling, plays a Blade Runner who is only identified by his serial number, KD3:6-7. We see the film open with a sweeping outdoor shot; we see K take on a Blade Runner assignment of killing a humanoid "Replicant;" and we see K
8h
The Atlantic
What Science Says About 'Thoughts and Prayers' After the deadliest gun attack in modern U.S. history left 59 dead and hundreds injured in Las Vegas, White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders , both Nevada senators , and many of their peers on the Hill took to Twitter to express—with some variation—that their “thoughts and prayers” were with the victims. Their use of the platitude, or a derivative, was not without precedent: Since the start of
8h
The Atlantic
America's Child-Poverty Rate Has Hit a Record Low The economy is nearing full employment. The stock market is at record highs. The expansion keeps continuing. Add to that one more very good piece of economic news: The child-poverty rate fell to a record low in 2016. That finding comes from a new analysis of government and academic data by Isaac Shapiro and Danilo Trisi, both researchers at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, a nonpartisa
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The Atlantic
The Nuanced Bluster of Kamasi Washington “He just played the craziest shit, man. I mean everything—the past, present, the future,” the producer Flying Lotus once said of his friend and collaborator, the Los Angeles–based saxophonist Kamasi Washington. The horn player, who emerged in 2015 as a nostalgic figure in modern jazz, blew with the same fire as John Coltrane, Sun Ra, and Pharoah Sanders, and his massive debut album—a three-hour j
8h
Scientific American Content: Global
In a Body Farm for Trees, Scientists Root Out the KillersResearchers have spent decades tracking the lives and deaths of thousands of trees -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science
Bronze Arm Found at Antikythera ShipwreckA graceful bronze arm once attached to a statue dating to the first century was recently recovered from an ancient shipwreck near the Greek island of Antikythera.
8h
Live Science
Mysterious Stone Tools Unearthed at Bronze-Age Site in WalesAmateur archaeologists excavating a Bronze Age site in the United Kingdom have discovered a cache of unusual stone tools unlike any that have been found before.
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Live Science
Photos: Bronze-Age Stone Tools Unearthed at Site of Ancient StreamA team of amateur archeologists excavating a Bronze Age site in the United Kingdom has unearthed a cache of unusual stone tools deposited in an ancient stream more than 4,000 years ago.
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Live Science
How Hockey Fans' Hearts React to Stressful Moments in the GameThere's nothing quite like the rush of seeing your favorite sports team pull off a win at the last second.
8h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Government 'failed to clean up air'New figures show the UK government failed to reduce illegal levels of air pollution in the 18 months after a court ordered it to clean up the air.
8h
Ingeniøren
Nye Google-høretelefoner kan tolke 40 sprog i realtid Ved Googles Pixel 2-begivenhed i går, demonstrerede de høretelefonerne Google Pixel Bud, der gennem den nye Pixel 2-telefon kan oversætte 40 sprog uden betydeligt lag. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/nye-google-hoeretelefoner-kan-tolke-mellem-40-sprog-realtid-1081364 Version2
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Ingeniøren
Danske svin får mindre antibiotika og zinkMedicinforbruget til grise faldt sidste år omkring fem pct. Både forskere og landbruget glæder sig.
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Ingeniøren
Vegas-skyderi oversvømmet med fake news: »For en uge siden havde jeg afvist, at det var muligt« It-giganternes algoritmer har været med til at sprede falske nyheder om skyderiet. Det ligger i algoritmernes natur, siger mediekommentator. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/ekspert-facebook-google-under-las-vegas-skyderi-algoritmer-favoriserer-fake-news-1081363 Version2
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Inverter improvement clears way for smaller, more efficient motor drive systems for electric vehiclesA Purdue University professor of electrical and computer engineering and a recent Ph.D. graduate have found a way to make smaller, more efficient motor drive systems for hybrid and electric cars, trucks, trains, ships and aircraft.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ancient asteroid impact exposes the moon's interiorScientists have long assumed that all the planets in our solar system look the same beneath the surface, but a study published in Geology on Oct. 4 tells a different story.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Unexpected phenomenon in a merger of a cluster of galaxiesAn international team of astronomers led by Francesco de Gasperin has witnessed a gas tail of a galaxy that slowly extinguished, but then reignited. It is unclear where the energy for the rejuvenation comes from. The researchers have published their findings in Science Advances.
8h
The Atlantic
American History, Marked and Unmarked Seven years ago, my brother Andrew began traveling around the United States, seeking out historic sites that were already memorialized—that is, clearly marked. But he soon discovered that some of the most interesting places of memory had no sign, no marker, no candlelit vigil. They remained unmarked. Andrew is a photographer; I’m a historian. We see the world through different lenses. But we both
8h
The Atlantic
The Florida Project Is One of 2017’s Best Films The setting of The Florida Project is a three-story motel, coated in resplendent light-purple paint, called The Magic Castle. It’s named for the nearby Walt Disney World, a few miles away in Orlando, Florida, but it’s just a sound-alike knock-off; at one point, the building draws in customers who mistakenly thought they had booked a week at the Magic Kingdom. Still, for Moonee (Brooklynn Kimberly
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Dagens Medicin
Ni kommuner vil styrke kræftrehabilitering i tværkommunalt samarbejdeNi nordsjællandske kommuner skal nu stå sammen om kræftrehabilitering. Borgere skal på tværs af kommunegrænser for at få det bedst tilgængelige tilbud målrettet dem.
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Dagens Medicin
Økonomer: Sygehuse vil fortsat blive presset af krav om effektiviseringer Opgøret med produktivitetskravet betyder ikke et farvel til effektiviseringer, mener sundhedsøkonomer. Selv uden kravet kan vi forvente produktivitetsstigninger.
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Dagens Medicin
Hvad kommer efter to pct.-kravet? Sundhedsvæsenet har ganske enkelt behov for lederskab af en helt anden kaliber end den, som praktiseres lige nu.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astronomers measure new distances to nearby starsAstronomers from the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO), in collaboration with others from the REsearch Consortium On Nearby Stars (RECONS), have determined new distances to a group of faint young stars located within 25 parsecs (pc) of the sun. These measurements, based on parallax observations obtained over periods ranging from nine to twelve years, include new measures of the star known as TRAPPIST-
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Examining Mars' moon Phobos in a different lightNASA's longest-lived mission to Mars has gained its first look at the Martian moon Phobos, pursuing a deeper understanding by examining it in infrared wavelengths.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The super-Earth that came home for dinnerIt might be lingering bashfully on the icy outer edges of our solar system, hiding in the dark, but subtly pulling strings behind the scenes: stretching out the orbits of distant bodies, perhaps even tilting the entire solar system to one side.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The scientific quest to explain Kepler's most enigmatic findSome 1,500 light years from Earth, a mystery of stellar proportions is playing out. A singular star out there captured scientists' and the public's imagination in September 2015 with its strangely fluctuating brightness. Ever since then, the scientific community has been observing this enigmatic character and sifting methodically through the data in search of an answer. Certain explanations are el
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tooth root pulp becomes rich source of stem cellsStem cells. Few research discoveries hold as much promise of single-handedly expanding medical treatment options as they do. Miraculously able to act as transformers—either re-creating or morphing into a variety of cell types found within the organisms they originate from—stem cells offer humanity hope for new, more effective therapies against a number of chronic and terminal diseases. And finding
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Dagens Medicin
Kræftforeninger overvejer initiativ mod stigende medicinpriser Den europæiske sammenslutning af kræftforeninger ECL diskuterer lige nu et hollandsk forslag til en model for lægemiddelmarkedet samt en ny forretningsstruktur, der skal aftvinge lægemiddelindustrien magt og sætte en stopper for løbske priser på ny medicin.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study investigates the presence of contaminants on drinking waterBrazilian and American scientists are attempting to determine emerging contaminants in the environment based on the comparison of water and sewage treatment systems in each country. They are collecting samples from a wide variety of sources such as surface water, groundwater, wastewater, reuse water, sewage water and residential drinking water.
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Ingeniøren
Fyn siger nej til gratis bycykler fra kinesereKinesisk firma ville gratis drive 2000 bycykler på Fyn. Men alle kommuner har sagt nej tak efter advarsel fra cykelhandlernes brancheorganisation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Discrimination on the grounds of political ideas prevails over other typesFollowing the gradual retreat of other stereotypes, political ideas are becoming established as a significant reason for arousing trust or mistrust between people. This is one of the main conclusions in an article published in the European Journal of Political Research titled "The tie that divides: Cross-national evidence of the primacy of partyism."
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
North Korea gets second web connection via Russian firmA state-owned Russian company has opened up a second internet connection for North Korea which could strengthen Pyongyang's cyber capabilities and undermine US efforts to isolate the regime, security experts said.
9h
The Atlantic
Protecting Heroin Clinics From Prosecution PHILADELPHIA—The rolling green lawn, jungle gym, and quaint public library inside McPherson Square in the city’s Kensington neighborhood attracts both families from the neighborhood and people from across the country with opioid addictions. The small park, like the streets around it, has become a destination for so-called “drug tourists” in recent years, drawn by the plentiful supply of heroin so
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Science : NPR
Classifying Attacks: Mental Illness Or Terrorism? New research explores our tendency to label mass shooters as either mentally ill or as terrorists, based on whether they are Muslim or not.
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The Atlantic
The Toxic Nostalgia of Brexit It began with such gusto: an inspiring montage of Prime Minister Theresa May’s journey so far, to the tune of Florence & the Machine’s “You’ve Got the Love”; an energetic step onto the stage, as Rihanna and Calvin Harris’s “This Is What You Came For” played; and then a standing ovation as May began her much-anticipated speech on the fourth and final day of this year’s Conservative Party Conferenc
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Ingeniøren
Drone fjernaflæser hjerterytme og vejrtrækningAustralske forskere har udviklet end drone, der gør det muligt at analysere sundhedstilstanden hos store grupper af mennesker fra luften.
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Ingeniøren
VIDEO: Transportrobot flytter lageret rundt på egen håndGoPal er selvkørende og klarer den interne palletransport. Robotten tilhører en en hurtigt voksende robotrace: SDV (Self Driving Vehicle), der navigerer rundt i firmaet på egen hånd.
10h
Viden
Zika-vaccine afprøvet på menneskerVaccinen aktiverede immunsystemet uden af have de store bivirkninger.
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Science | The Guardian
We’re all connected now, so why is the internet so white and western? | Mark Graham and Anasuya SenguptaGoogle and Wikipedia have a responsibility to see that their content isn’t skewed – and we users should hold them to account We recently passed a milestone in the history of human connectivity – people online now ​ make up the majority ​ of the world’s population. This has largely gone unnoticed, but it is an important moment and not just for statistical reasons. North American and European intern
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Polluted lake is poor Nicaraguans' lifelineLooking tired and haggard, William Coronado pulls up before dawn with a boat full of fish on the muddy shore of Nicaragua's Lake Managua, a dumping ground for trash and waste.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Vanuatu volcano island evacuation completeThe evacuation of more than 11,000 people from a Vanuatu island threatened by a volcano was completed Thursday, authorities said, as aid began arriving to help the displaced.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Iraq flight ban halts dig for lost ancient cityIsmael Nuraddini peers into a hole in the earth of Iraq's Kurdistan region at what researchers believe could be remnants of a lost city dating back more than 2,000 years.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Taiwan's battle with betel nut addictionFor years Huang Sheng-yi helped feed Taiwan's addiction to the betel nut, planting thousands of the trees on his mountainous farm.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lovelorn koala nabbed after zoo escape in hunt for mateAustralian wildlife staff needed a crane to rescue a lovelorn female koala who escaped from her enclosure at the start of her first mating season, impatient to find a partner.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bain hoping to settle with Western Digital on Toshiba dealThe investment fund heading the consortium that plans to buy Toshiba Corp.'s memory chip business said Thursday it will try to reach a speedy settlement with Western Digital, the U.S. joint venture partner of Toshiba that is opposing the sale.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
To kickstart creativity, offer money, not plaudits, study findsHow should employers reward creative types for turning in fresh, inventive work: with a plaque or a party recognizing their achievement, or with cold, hard cash? According to new research co-written by a University of Illinois expert in product development and marketing, it's all about the money, honey.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A novel textile material that keeps itself germ-freeScientists have developed a novel weapon in the battle against deadly hospital-acquired infections - a textile that disinfects itself.
12h
Ingeniøren
Dagens gode nyhed: Verdens lande er blevet rigtig gode til at spare på energienMere effektive apparater og produkter har formindsket det globale energiforbrug med 12 pct. fra 2000 og til 2016, konkluderer ny IEA-rapport om netop energieffektivitet.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Teleoperating robots with virtual reality: Making it easier for factory workers to telecommuteMany manufacturing jobs require a physical presence to operate machinery. But what if such jobs could be done remotely? Researchers have now presented a virtual-reality (VR) system that lets you teleoperate a robot using an Oculus Rift headset.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Test reveals antibiotic-resistant bacteria in a half hourA new test can identify whether bacteria are resistant to antibiotics in a mere half hour, giving medical professionals a new tool for fighting infections and superbug bacteria.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ornamented artifact may indicate long-distance exchange between Mesolithic communitiesAn ornamented bâton percé found in Central Poland may provide evidence of exchange between Mesolithic communities, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dutch children bereaved by domestic homicides 'more burdened than expected'The majority of Dutch children who lost a parent to intimate partner homicide had already experienced violence, often without professional support.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Win-win for spotted owls and forest managementRemote sensing technology has detected what could be a win for both spotted owls and forestry management, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Advanced heart failure reversed in an animal modelResearchers have discovered a previously unrecognized healing capacity of the heart. In a mouse model, they were able to reverse severe heart failure by silencing the activity of Hippo, a signaling pathway that can prevent the regeneration of heart muscle.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Surface helium detonation spells end for white dwarfResearchers have found evidence that the brightest stellar explosions in our Universe could be triggered by helium nuclear detonation near the surface of a white dwarf star.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cell stress response sheds light on treating inflammation-related cancer, agingStress -- defined broadly -- can have a profoundly deleterious effect on the human body. Even individual cells have their own way of dealing with environmental strains such as ultraviolet radiation from the sun or germs. One response to stress -- called senescence -- can trigger cells to stop dividing in cases of cancer and aging. This may hold promise for treating inflammation-related disorders.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
In warmer climates, Greenlandic deltas have grownUnlike most other deltas worldwide, Greenland's are growing -- a trend with major consequences for both fishing and tourism.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
BRCA1: Mystery of breast cancer risk gene solved, 20 years after its discoveryMore than 20 years after scientists revealed that mutations in the BRCA1 gene predispose women to breast cancer, scientists have pinpointed the molecular mechanism that allows those mutations to wreak their havoc.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fish shrinking as ocean temperatures riseOne of the most economically important fish is shrinking in body weight, length and overall physical size as ocean temperatures rise, according to new research by LSU Boyd Professor R. Eugene Turner published today. The average body size of Menhaden -- a small, silver fish -- caught off the coasts from Maine to Texas -- has shrunk by about 15 percent over the past 65 years.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
In Iceland stream, possible glimpse of warming futureWhen a normally cold stream in Iceland was warmed, the make-up of life inside changed as larger organisms thrived while smaller ones struggled. The findings carry implications for life in a warming climate.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dentists get cracking on the stem cell frontResearchers have developed a new method for extracting tooth root pulp that quadruples the number of stem cells that can be harvested and replicated to treat a variety of medical conditions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Antidote to synthetic cannabis ‘Spice’ intoxication could be found in slimming drugEarly research has potentially found an antidote that can rapidly stop the intoxicating effects of cannabis and synthetic cannabinoids.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New fundamental insight into the battle against bacteriaThe intestinal bacterium E. coli can adapt to changes in its surroundings. Scientists have discovered how the H-NS protein makes this possible. This new knowledge can be an important starting point in combating bacteria and diseases such as peritonitis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Zika-affected pregnancies from near and far: Lessons learnedThe multidisciplinary team at Children's National Health System has consulted on 90 dyads (mothers and their Zika-affected fetuses/infants). The lessons learned about when and how these women were infected and how their offspring were affected by Zika may be instructive to institutions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why Zika became more dangerous: Discovery offers cluesVirus with a certain sugar in its protein envelope more readily passes to the brain in infected mice, causing inflammation and death.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The vitamin ergothioneine: an antioxidant for oxygen-free areas?Chemists have been able to show for the first time that anaerobic bacteria can produce the vitamin ergothioneine in the absence of oxygen. This suggests that bacteria were forming this compound even before there was oxygen in the Earth's atmosphere. The vitamin's function therefore remains a mystery, as it was previously ascribed a role in oxygen-dependent processes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Research rethinks the evolutionary importance of variability in a populationIt's been long thought that variability within a population is key to population's growth and survival but new research questions that assumption. Researchers found that variability can actually lower population growth in single-cell organisms. This insight is important for characterizing the fitness of a population, which is useful, for instance, in understanding how bacteria respond to antibioti
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Antifungals and probiotics may play a key role in the development of treatment for Crohn's diseaseScientists have determined that fungus may play a key role in chronic intestinal inflammation disorders. They found that patients with Crohn's disease tend to have much higher levels of the fungus Candida tropicalis compared to their healthy family members. A new review looks at these findings and provides insights into potential new therapeutic approaches using antifungals and probiotics in the t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Assessing regional earthquake risk and hazards in the age of exascaleResearchers are building the first-ever end-to-end simulation code to precisely capture the geology and physics of regional earthquakes, and how the shaking impacts buildings.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Female fish like males who singNoisier seas seem to hamper fish reproduction. New research shows that noise pollution impedes reproduction in sand and common gobies, both of which are important food sources for juvenile cod.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Resistance training prevents age-related tendon damageA new study suggests that resistance training may prevent age-related tendon problems, such as ruptures and tendinopathies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New approach may hold the key to treating antibiotic-resistant bacteriaA new study highlights the therapeutic potential of a simple chemical mimic of host defense peptides (C10OOc12O) to cure bacterial infections both on its own, as well as in combination with otherwise inefficient antibiotics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
NASA's Webb Telescope to witness galactic infancyScientists will use NASA's James Webb Space Telescope to study sections of the sky previously observed by NASA's Great Observatories, including the Hubble Space Telescope and the Spitzer Space Telescope, to understand the creation of the universe's first galaxies and stars.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Flights worldwide face increased risk of severe turbulence due to climate changeFlights all around the world could be encountering lots more turbulence in the future, according to the first ever global projections of in-flight bumpiness.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Albatross feces show diet of fishery discardsThe first-ever analysis of fish DNA in albatross scat indicates a high level of interaction between seabirds and commercial fisheries. This non-invasive method could be used to assess whether fisheries are complying with discard policies. Extending the analysis to other marine predators could help monitor marine biodiversity and broader marine ecosystem changes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Safe motherhood campaign associated with more prenatal visits, birth planning, study findsIn Tanzania, pregnant women who were exposed to a national safe motherhood campaign designed to get them to visit health facilities for prenatal care and delivery were more likely to create birth plans and to attend more prenatal appointments.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hurricane exposes and washes away thousands of sea turtle nestsMarine biologists have released estimates of sea turtle nests lost to Hurricane Irma, finding that 56 percent of green turtle nests and 24 percent of loggerhead nests were lost within Archie Carr National Wildlife Refuge. Both are endangered species. The losses put a damper on what had been a record year for green turtle nesting.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Possible therapeutic target for regulating body weightA new study reveals a novel gene involved in maintaining body weight.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Healing molecule discovery could reduce limb amputations for diabetes patientsScientists have discovered new insights into a molecule that is part of the body's tissue repair system, in a finding that could help treat non-healing wounds and injuries, such as diabetic foot.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tungsten offers nano-interconnects a path of least resistanceAs microchips become smaller, the shrinking size of their copper interconnects leads to increased electrical resistivity at the nanoscale. Finding a solution to this technical bottleneck is a problem for the semiconductor industry; one possibility involves reducing the resistivity size effect by altering the crystalline orientation of interconnect materials. Researchers conducted electron transpor
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Burmese python’s hungry escapades may have consequences for human healthAs the large, invasive Burmese python eats its way through south Florida's mammals, the mosquitoes in the area have fewer types of animals to bite. Now, more mosquitoes are drawing blood from a rat that carries a virus dangerous to humans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Doing homework is associated with change in students’ personalityHomework may have a positive influence on students’ conscientiousness. Students who do more homework than their peers show positive changes in conscientiousness, according to new research. Thus, schools may be doing more than contributing to students’ learning, but they may also be effecting changes of their students’ personality.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Smart pump: small but powerfulParticulate matter harms the heart and lungs. In the future, a smartphone with an inbuilt gas sensor could be used to warn of heavy exposure. To help the sensor respond quickly and provide accurate measurements, researchers have developed a powerful micro diaphragm pump for delivering ambient air to the sensor.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Membrane for islets of Langerhans transplantationsResearchers have developed a membrane with which individual islets of Langerhans – insulin-producing cell clusters – can be encapsulated. The idea behind the system is that these islets could eventually be safely transplanted to cure type 1 diabetes patients.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What is STEM education?Everyone needs a good teacher -- including teachers. Two new studies show how digging deeper into what STEM education means and strategically designing online classrooms can enhance teaching science, technology, engineering, and math.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Women use gossip to compete for a man's attentionAlthough both men and women gossip, women may be more likely to use gossiping and rumour-mongering as tactics to badmouth a potential rival who is competing for a man's attention. Women also gossip more about other women's looks, whereas men talk about cues to resource holding (e.g., wealth) and the athleticism of their competitors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Toxic cocktail: Okinawan pit viper genome reveals evolution of snake venomFor the first time, researchers have sequenced a habu genome, that of the Taiwan habu, and compared it to that of its sister species.
12h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Food and farming policies 'need total rethink'A major conference examines how to limit the more damaging impacts of intensive farming systems.
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Science | The Guardian
Month-old meerkat triplets make their way in the world – video Staff at Symbio wildlife park, located on the southern outskirts of Sydney, have announced the arrival of meerkat triplets. Born on 31 August to first-time parents Aya and Penfold, and weighing in at an estimated 25g and just 8cm, the pups have now emerged from the comfort of their den and are beginning to discover the world beyond. Still finding their feet, they are shadowing their parents’ ever
13h
Ingeniøren
Stjerne-ingeniør gik bag om ryggen på GoogleUber vidste udmærket, at Anthony Levandowski både havde stjålet forretningshemmeligheder hos sin tidligere arbejdsgiver Google og forsøgt at shanghaje hele firmaets flok af lidar-specialister.
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Science | The Guardian
Over half of new cancer drugs 'show no benefits' for survival or wellbeing Of 48 cancer drugs approved between 2009-2013, 57% of uses showed no benefits and some benefits were ‘clinically meaningless’, says BMJ study Most cancer drugs that have recently arrived on the market have come with little evidence that they boost the survival or wellbeing of patients, research reveals. Forty-eight cancer drugs were approved by the European Medicines Agency between 2009 and 2013
14h
Gizmodo
Did a Meteorite Start a Forest Fire in New Hampshire? It's Unlikely A long exposure shot of the Perseid meteor shower over Villarejo de Salvanes, Spain in 2013. Photo: AP A three-alarm forest fire in the White Mountains near Woodstock, New Hampshire was linked to reports of a meteorite strike, the Boston Globe reported on Wednesday. On Tuesday night, one witness said that the day before “at 7:35 p.m., he was driving by and saw a meteor streak through the sky and
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Increased risk' donor organs a tough sell to transplant patientsThe opioid epidemic has created a tragic surge in donor organs. But despite their safety record, hundreds of the organs, labeled as 'increased risk,' go unused.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A novel textile material that keeps itself germ-freeScientists have developed a novel weapon in the battle against deadly hospital-acquired infections -- a textile that disinfects itself.And independent tests show it can reduce bacteria levels by more than 90 per cent. By incorporating the specially-engineered textile in a device designed to be used on hospital doors instead of the traditional aluminum door plate, that part of the door that people
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Folding of the cerebral cortex -- identification of important neuronsFolds in the cerebral cortex in mammals are believed to be indispensable for higher brain functions but the mechanisms underlying cortical folding remain unknown. By using the latest genome editing tools, we succeeded in establishing a technique and discovered important neurons for fold formation and the importance of the Cdk5 gene in those neurons. Some patients suffer from lissencephaly, whose c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Caution ahead: The growing challenge for drivers' attentionMany of the infotainment features in most 2017 vehicles are so distracting they should not be enabled while a vehicle is in motion, according to a new study by University of Utah researchers.The study, led by psychology professor David L. Strayer, found In-Vehicle Information Systems take drivers' attention off the road for too long to be safe.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New vehicle infotainment systems create increased distractions behind the wheelNew vehicle infotainment systems take drivers' eyes and attention off the road and hands off the wheel for dangerous periods of time, according to new research from the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NY State Medicaid expansion widened racial gap in access to high-quality cancer surgeryThe 2001 New York State Medicaid expansion -- what is considered a precursor to the Affordable Care (ACA) -- widened the racial disparity gap when it came to access to high-quality hospitals for cancer surgery, according to a new study from Georgetown University.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How much can watching hockey stress your heart?A new study suggests that both the thrill of victory and the agony of defeat can have a substantial effect on the cardiovascular system. Investigators took the pulse of fans during a hockey game and found that on average, their heart rate increased by 75 percent when watching on TV, and by a whopping 110 percent (more than doubled, equivalent to the cardiac stress with vigorous exercise) when watc
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New vehicle infotainment systems create increased distractions behind the wheelNew vehicle infotainment systems can take drivers' eyes and attention off the road and hands off the wheel for dangerous periods of time, according to new research from the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. Drivers using in-vehicle technologies like voice-based and touch screen features were visually and mentally distracted for more than 40 seconds when completing tasks like programming navigatio
15h
New on MIT Technology Review
Hijacking Computers to Mine Cryptocurrency Is All the RageHackers are using old tricks and new cryptocurrencies to turn stolen computing power into digital coins.
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Ingeniøren
Lægesekretær om journaler efter Sundhedsplatform: »Det ser mildest talt ud ad helvede til« Sundhedsplatformen skulle overtage nogle af lægesekretærernes opgaver. Men arbejdet er bare flyttet til andre faggrupper, siger lægesekretær og tillidsmand. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/sundhedsplatformen-opgaverne-har-bare-skiftet-haender-1081114 Version2
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Ingeniøren
Topchef hos Europas bedste arbejdsplads: Fire tip til at skabe prisvindende ledelse Tre gange er det svenske konsulentfirma kåret til den bedste arbejdsplads i Europa og fire gange Sveriges bedste. Den administrerende direktør i Cygni, Jon Persson, leverer fire råd til at løfte niveauet for ledelse. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/topchef-hos-europas-bedste-arbejdsplads-fire-tip-at-skabe-prisvindende-ledelse-10393 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
15h
The Atlantic
Death at a Penn State Fraternity At about 3 p.m. on Friday, February 3, Tim Piazza, a sophomore at Penn State University, arrived at Hershey Medical Center by helicopter. Eighteen hours earlier, he had been in the kind of raging good health that only teenagers enjoy. He was a handsome, redheaded kid with a shy smile, a hometown girlfriend, and a family who loved him very much. Now he had a lacerated spleen, an abdomen full of bl
15h
Live Science
Palace of Versailles: Facts & HistoryThe Palace at Versailles housed kings and queens of France until the French Revolution.
16h
Gizmodo
YouTube's Search Results Promote Conspiracy Theories About the Las Vegas Shooting Image: Screengrab via YouTube Fabrications, hoaxes and other lies about the horrific mass shooting in Las Vegas this week which killed at least 59 people and wounded well over 500 others have been spreading rampant on YouTube, and it’s unclear if the video giant has any plans to do anything about it. Per the Guardian , entering simple search queries like “Las Vegas shooting” into YouTube’s search
17h
Feed: All Latest
Uber Self-Driving Case: Google's Waymo May Not Need a Smoking GunTime to talk about "negative trade secrets."
18h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Athenia: Is this the wreck of the first British ship torpedoed in WW2?The remains of a passenger liner torpedoed by a U-boat just hours into the war may have been found.
18h
Gizmodo
Deadspin Who Will Katie Nolan Be At ESPN? Deadspin Who Will Katie Nolan Be At ESPN? | Jezebel New Details Emerge About Journalist Kim Wall’s Death | The Root #NotRacists Be Like: The Top 10 Phrases Used by People Who Claim They Are Not Racist | Earther Puerto Rico Has a Once In a Lifetime Opportunity to Rethink How It Gets Electricity | Splinter The Entire Rationale For These Tax Cuts Is Bullshit |
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Healthy people are at risk of developing heart disease, says Surrey expertHealthy people who consume high levels of sugar are at an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Predicting depression and PTSD before deployment could help soldiers copeA set of validated, self-reported questions administered early in a soldier's career could predict mental health problems such as depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after return from deployment, according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Psychology.
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Gizmodo
This Is What The Batmobile For The Upcoming 1800s-Era Batman Movie Should Be Not long ago, it was announced that the next Batman movie was going to be an animated version of the famous Batman alternate-history comic, Gotham by Gaslight. The basic conceit of this comic was to place Batman in 1889 London, where he’d be in pursuit of Jack the Ripper. As far as I can tell, there was no Batmobile designed for this Batman, in that world, and I think that was a grave error. So I
19h
Gizmodo
Build Your Own RPGs With Humble's Newest Bundle Humble RPG Maker Bundle Humble is mostly known for selling games, but today, they’re selling stuff to help you make those games yourself . The bundle includes a number of RPG Maker software programs, plus a few full RPG games to give you inspiration. Purchased separately, all of the software would cost nearly $700, but today, you can get it all for as little as $15 .
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Feed: All Latest
That Flag-Burning Seattle Seahawks Photo Isn’t Fake News. It’s a MemeAn image of Seattle Seahawks Michael Bennett burning the flag went viral last week. It's totally fake. But that didn't matter.
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Gizmodo
Logitech's POWERPLAY Brings Wireless Charging to your Gaming Mice Logitech POWERPLAY Back in early 2016, Logitech unveiled the G900 Chaos Spectrum , a wireless gaming mouse that was faster than wired ones. It was the best gaming mouse ever, and now they’ve improved it with the G903 , which adds compatibility with the POWERPLAY , a mouse pad that charges the G903 and G703 wirelessly. As mice have gotten better and better, mouse pads have become less and less nec
19h
Gizmodo
Should You Buy a New Google Home Speaker? The new Google Home lineup Google announced a pair of new smart home speakers on Wednesday in an effort to compete with devices from Amazon and Apple. The search giant now offers a pint-sized Google Home Mini for $49 and a powerful Google Home Max for $399, along with its original $129 Google Home. Picking a new smart speaker just got even more complicated, but we’re here to help. Here’s how Goog
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Futurity.org
Americans are working longer but aren’t as healthy Americans born in 1960 will be able to start collecting their full Social Security retirement check at the age of 67—two years later than their parents—because of a change in the federal retirement age enacted in 1983. But today’s pre-retirement generation already has more health issues and health-related limits than prior generations did when they were in their late 50s. The findings suggest tha
19h
Ars Technica
Bakery that listed “love” as ingredient is full of filth, bugs, violations Enlarge / This image, taken from Nashoba's site, doesn't resemble the loveless scene reported by the FDA this week. (credit: Nashoba ) The Food and Drug Administration showed no fondness for a bakery that listed love as an ingredient on its granola label. Love is not an ingredient, according to the agency. Dozens of news headlines appeared today and late yesterday reporting the fact, citing a war
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Multivitamins in pregnancy may be linked to lower autism risk in childrenTaking multivitamins during early pregnancy may be associated with a reduced risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in children compared with mothers who do not take multivitamins, finds a study published in The BMJ today.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
No clear evidence that most new cancer drugs extend or improve lifeThe majority of cancer drugs approved in Europe between 2009 and 2013 entered the market without clear evidence that they improved survival or quality of life for patients, finds a study published by The BMJ today.
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Futurity.org
Volcanic eruptions led to mass extinction 250M years ago Massive volcanic eruptions and resulting environmental changes caused the Great Permian Extinction approximately 250 million years ago, research suggests. The study reports a global spike in the chemical element nickel at the time of extinction. The anomalous nickel most likely came from emanations related to the concurrent huge volcanic eruptions in what is now Siberia. These eruptions, the rese
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Futurity.org
Sunlight and microbes in permafrost add carbon to atmosphere Microbes in permafrost that eat sun-weakened carbon and convert it into carbon dioxide may be providing a major pathway for the greenhouse gas to enter the atmosphere, new research suggests. Researchers had known that sunlight beaming down on permanently frozen soil, or permafrost, in the Arctic breaks down carbon in that permafrost and releases the greenhouse gas into the atmosphere, but they di
20h
Gizmodo
How on Earth Can Google Expect Us to Pay $1,000 for a Chromebook? All photos: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo Looking at the new Pixelbook from afar, it’s really hard to understand why anyone, let alone Google, could demand a retail price of $1,000 for this thing. It’s got Chrome OS inside—the operating system you stick in cheap laptops with cheap guts because it needs practically no processor power to run. And Google made no attempt to explain why a Chromebook should go fo
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Gizmodo
Casino Royale Director Says He Would Only Return to James Bond If Daniel Craig Didn't Image: MGM Martin Campbell, the director who brought both Pierce Brosnan and Daniel Craig’s James Bonds to the big screen, has said he would think about coming back if Craig was gone for good. But don’t worry—that’s not actually an insult. In an interview with Cinema Blend , Campbell was asked whether he would ever return for another James Bond film. Campbell was the director behind both Goldeney
20h
Feed: All Latest
Google’s Gadget Vision: Same Stuff, Different ScreensCall it the Unified Theory of Google Hardware.
20h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Repairing the Damage What We’re Following Las Vegas: President Trump emphasized caring and unity in his remarks after meeting with victims and first responders of the mass shooting in Las Vegas. In the wake of the shooting, House Speaker Paul Ryan has joined other politicians in calling for mental-health reform—yet while improved access to care would likely help a lot of people, researchers say it wouldn’t do much to
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Science | The Guardian
Charlatans threaten stem cell research with unproven cures, say experts Stem cell medicine has huge potential but unscrupulous clinics offering unrealistic hopes are endangering its future The credibility of stem cell research is at risk because of charlatans and dodgy clinics peddling unproven cures for diseases, according to a group of eminent scientists in the field. Stem cell research, or regenerative medicine, has great potential and has already delivered some b
20h
Ars Technica
Supreme Court says live streaming would “adversely affect” oral arguments Enlarge / Justices pose for a group portrait in the East Conference Room of the Supreme Court. (credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images ) The Supreme Court is setting aside a request to live stream its oral arguments. The attorney for Chief Justice John Roberts Jr. told members of Congress that live streaming even the audio portion of its oral arguments might impact the outcome. "The Chief Justice appreci
20h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Chemistry Nobel Prize goes to 3-D snapshots of life’s atomic detailsAn imaging technique that gives up-close 3-D views of proteins is honored in this year's chemistry Nobel Prize.
21h
The Atlantic
Trump Returns to the Script in Las Vegas President Trump, visiting Las Vegas on Wednesday, struck a solemn tone, consoling victims and celebrating the first responders in Sunday night’s massacre at a country music festival. “Many families tonight will go to bed in a world that is suddenly empty,” Trump said. “The people they so dearly love were torn away from them forever. Our souls are stricken with grief for every American who lost a
21h
The Atlantic
The Problem With Trump's Madman Theory Last weekend, President Donald Trump reportedly told the U.S. trade representative to scare South Korean negotiators by telling them he was a madman. “You tell [the South Koreans] if they don't give the concessions now, this crazy guy will pull out of the deal,” he said, referring to the U.S.-Korea free trade agreement. That report came at the end of a day in which the president’s tweets about an
21h
Ars Technica
Hands-on with the Pixel 2 and 2 XL: One’s nice, one’s not SAN FRANCISCO—I have touched the new Pixel phone. It's tough to write about Google's new smartphones because, well, it's not about the hardware. The phones are delivery mechanisms for Google's software and AI algorithms, and none of that is really done yet. The hardware is fine. The Pixel 2 XL, with its slimmer bezels and 18:9 screen, looks more modern than the Pixel 2. In fact, the most striking
21h
Big Think
A Dream Deprivation Epidemic Has One Sleep Expert Worried “We are at least as dream-deprived as we are sleep-deprived." Dr. Naiman said. Read More
21h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Take the Matt Graham Bushcraft Challenge – Primitive Atlatl Build Matt Graham is bringing together some of the best bushcrafters in the world for an all-new Discovery series this fall. To kick things off, he’s issuing a global challenge to build an atlatl and a dart using only natural resources. Join the challenge by posting your own video with the title “Matt Graham Bushcraft Challenge” Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebo
21h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: Electric Honeycombs Form When Nature Gets Out of BalanceA 17-year-old high school student in Pakistan replicated a physics visualization, and developed results that surprised some older scientists.
21h
Gizmodo
Batman: White Knight Is Telling a Dark Story About Police Brutality Image: DC Comics The idea that Batman is the true source of the evils that plague Gotham City isn’t exactly new, but it’s one that DC’s comics have largely left unexplored, leaving fans to debate it among themselves. In Sean Murphy’s Batman: White Knight , the publisher is finally getting in on the Great Batman Debate and pushing it forward. The Batman-as-Catalyst argument posits that, in his que

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