Scientific American Content: Global
China's Huge Investments in Science Are Starting to Pay OffSeeing a chance to lead, China is deploying clean energy, quantum satellites and genomics -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Popular Science
17 must-have tools for backcountry adventures DIY Gear up and get outside. Before you strike out into the wilderness, you’ll need gear that’s tough enough to handle whatever you put it through. These 17 items are up for the task.
17min
Ingeniøren
400.000 danskere mister drikkevandskontrolMed nye regler for kontrol af drikkevandet, vil vandforsyninger, som leverer mindre end 10 kubikmeter i døgnet, blive fritaget for kontrol af myndighederne.
10h

LATEST

Gizmodo
Is Breast Milk Good for Grownups? Synthesized breast milk sugars. Image: Sugarlogix Today breast milk is recognized as a sort of liquid miracle for babies, but history is full of periods where people swapped in other things in its place. In the 15th century, it was cow and goat milk. In the 18th century, it was cereal or flour mixed with broth. More recently, it was baby formula. For reasons of convenience or in search of better
4min
Gizmodo
Free Money! Sign Up For an Amazon Music Unlimited Trial, Get a $5 Bonus Amazon Credit. $5 credit with new Amazon Music Unlimited trial . Use code MUSIC5. At $8 per month (for Prime members), Amazon Music Unlimited was already more affordable than Spotify Premium or Apple Music , but Amazon’s sweetening the pot right now with a $5 Amazon.com credit when you sign up for a free trial with promo code MUSIC5 . A similar deal was briefly available a couple of weeks ago with a $10 credit,
2min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Evolutionary biology can help us understand how language worksAs a linguist I dread the question, "what do you do?", because when I answer "I'm a linguist" the inevitable follow-up question is: "How many languages do you speak?" That, of course, is not the point. While learning languages is a wonderful thing to do, academic linguistics is the scientific study of language.
5min
Feed: All Latest
Slow iPhone? Don't Blame Apple. Blame Your AppsEvery year around this time, the same rumors pop up about slow iPhones and planned obsolescence. Don't fall for it this time.
5min
Feed: All Latest
Retracting Bad Science Doesn’t Make It DisappearOpinion: When a scientific paper is retracted, it can produce long-term aftershocks.
5min
Science | The Guardian
My cat is a monster. Why do I love him so much? | Jules HowardBe it the tale of the Grenfell fire survivor being reunited with her cat, or the ‘refugee cat’ lost in Greece and found in Norway stories of pets draw us in like no other What could be more heartening than the story of the Grenfell fire survivor who was reported this week to have been reunited with the cat she thought she’d lost in the blaze ? What could warm the cockles more than the story, also
8min
Science | The Guardian
It’s official – women are nicer than men. Is this really science? | Anne PerkinsA new study by neuroeconomists suggesting that women’s biology could make them a soft touch covers overly familiar gendered ground Richard Thaler has just won the Nobel prize for economics for his work explaining how human choice can be influenced. The insight that people make decisions for all sorts of reasons, not all of them based on a cool assessment of the consequences, led Professor Thaler t
8min
cognitive science
Poet Neil Hilborn on how writing helped him cope with mental illness submitted by /u/symonsymone [link] [comments]
10min
Scientific American Content: Global
We Need to Kick our Addiction to PlasticIt's not just an environmental or a health issue; it's also an issue of social justice -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
DNA study in the Pacific reveals 2000 percent increase in our knowledge of mollusc biodiversityScientists working in the new frontier for deep-sea mining have revealed a remarkable 2000% increase in our knowledge of the biodiversity of seafloor molluscs.
11min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees post Tropical Cyclone Nate's wide rainfall reachNASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite analyzed the temperatures in Post-tropical cyclone Nate's cloud tops as the storm moved over the Ohio Valley. Satellite imagery showed the storm was bringing rainfall from the northeastern U.S., to the Mid-Atlantic and south through the Appalachian Mountains.
11min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
DNA study in the Pacific reveals 2000 percent increase in our knowledge of mollusc biodiversityScientists working in the Pacific have revealed a remarkable 2000% increase in our knowledge of the biodiversity of seafloor molluscs in a region being explored for deep-sea mining. Using the latest DNA-taxonomy methodology, they have newly-described and recorded 21 species where only one was previously known. The discoveries made in the eastern region of the CCZ, a vast 5 million km² region of th
14min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gene drives have the potential to suppress mosquito populations, but resistant mosquitoes crop upResearchers successfully built a gene drive to reduce female fertility in the mosquito that spreads malaria, but mutations gradually arose that blocked the spread of the new genes. Tony Nolan of Imperial College London, UK, and colleagues report these findings in a new paper in PLOS Genetics.
14min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Trench Foot discovery paves way for new treatmentThe physical cause of trench foot has been uncovered more than 100 years after the painful and debilitating condition was first identified in the First World War.
14min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Head Start may protect against foster care placementParticipating in Head Start may help prevent young children from being placed in foster care, finds a national study led by a Michigan State University researcher.
14min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees post Tropical Cyclone Nate's wide rainfall reachNASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite analyzed the temperatures in Post-tropical cyclone Nate's cloud tops as the storm moved over the Ohio Valley. Satellite imagery showed the storm was bringing rainfall from the northeastern U.S., to the Mid-Atlantic and south through the Appalachian Mountains.
14min
New Scientist - News
The dearth of women in tech is nothing to do with testosteroneArguments over the causes of the gender gap in STEM jobs rage on. It's not due to hormones or innate brain differences, says Lise Eliot on Ada Lovelace Day
17min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ikea on Amazon? Swedish firm to test sales in online storesIkea will start selling furniture through third-party websites to find new ways to reach customers in the digital age, though "no decisions are made regarding what platforms/markets will be in the pilot."
17min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US spacewalkers float out to lubricate robotic armTwo US astronauts embarked Tuesday on the second spacewalk this month to make much-needed repairs to the International Space Station's robotic arm, NASA said.
17min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How dance can help students in STEM disciplinesA proof-of-concept study at North Carolina State University finds participation in dance programs helps students - including those in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) disciplines - develop skills such as creativity and persistence that benefited them in the classroom and beyond.
17min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop innovative process for printing luminescent materialsSpeed is of the essence at a bus stop. If you want to board, you need to find the button to open the door quickly. LEDs light up in a circle around the corresponding hand symbol, but at night the diodes can be so bright that it can be difficult to see, especially for older people. Bus manufacturer EvoBus of Mannheim is therefore looking for ways to produce a new kind of button that does not dazzle
17min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA satellites provide a thermal view Hurricane Nate after landfallNASA's Aqua satellite and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite analyzed the temperatures in Hurricane Nate's cloud tops and determined that the most powerful thunderstorms and heaviest rain areas were around the center of the tropical cyclone after it made landfall near the mouth of the Mississippi River.
17min
Ars Technica
Nvidia sets sights on the driverless revolution with Drive PX Pegasus Enlarge / Quite tidy looking, but powering plenty of futuristic initiatives. (credit: Nvidia) On Tuesday, Nvidia announced a new version of its automotive-grade compute platforms, Drive PX Pegasus. It's recognition that the computational needs of fully autonomous (also known as level 5) vehicles are going to be demanding. Such vehicles will have to fuse inputs from multiple sensors and sensor-typ
20min
Gizmodo
This Fake Cracking Effect On a 3,800-Foot High Glass Skywalk Might Be the Meanest Prank Ever GIF Modern materials engineering allows us to build what looks like precarious glass skywalks perched thousands of feet off the ground. They’re completely safe, but knowing that doesn’t make them any less terrifying to traverse—especially when the glass skywalk you’re on uses transparent LCD screens to make it look like it’s about to shatter and collapse. This tourist is clearly playing up his si
20min
Scientific American Content: Global
How the Durian Got its Sulfuric StenchFruit’s genome sequence has sulfur-related genes, which probably evolved to attract elephants and bats -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
21min
Scientific American Content: Global
How Men Can Help Women in STEM: Shut Up, Sit Back, and ListenIn other words, pay attention to women who have stories to tell about how STEM has failed them, and learn how you can make a difference -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
21min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Size doesn't matter—at least for hammerheads and swimming performanceSharks come in all shapes and sizes and perhaps the most unusual is the hammerhead shark, easily recognized by its oddly shaped head. Most research on hammerheads has focused specifically on their laterally expanded heads, or cephalofoil, and how they use it to see and smell as well as its effects on hydrodynamics and sensory efficiency. There are about nine known species of hammerhead sharks with
23min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Insight into our 50-plus lifespan still evolving, genetic study showsIt is an evolutionary riddle that has long puzzled scientists ... now the quest to find out why we live beyond 50 is being helped by a new genetic study.
23min
Ars Technica
Criminals stole millions from E. Europe banks with ATM “overdraft” hack Enlarge / Using a network of ATMs and a hack of card management apps, cybercriminals made off with millions from E. European banks. (credit: Sean Gallagher) Banks in several former Soviet states were hit with a wave of debit card fraud earlier this year that netted millions of dollars worth of cash. These bank heists relied on a combination of fraudulent bank accounts and hacking to turn nearly e
24min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Likely new treatment target identified for diabetic retinopathyIn oxygen-compromising conditions like diabetes, the body grows new blood vessels to help, but the result is often leaky, dysfunctional vessels that make bad matters worse.Now scientists have identified a new target for reducing that dysfunctional blood vessel development in the eye in a common condition called diabetic retinopathy, the leading cause of blindness in working-age adults.
28min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research IDs key factors that help women ex-convicts avoid recidivismNew research identifies four factors that help women ex-convicts avoid committing crimes, offering insights that can be used to help former inmates integrate more successfully into their communities after time in prison.
28min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Molecular basis for memory and learningLearning and memory are two important functions of the brain that are based on the brain's plasticity. Scientists from Goethe University Frankfurt report in the latest issue of the scientific journal Cell Reports how a trio of key molecules directs these processes. Their findings provide new leads for the therapy of Alzheimer's disease.
28min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How dance can help students in STEM disciplinesA proof-of-concept study finds participation in dance programs helps students -- including those in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) disciplines -- develop skills such as creativity and persistence that benefited them in the classroom and beyond.
28min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Green gentrification can limit the favourable effects of green areas on healthA scientific research conducted by ICTA-UAB and IMIM suggests that more socially disadvantaged neighbours do not benefit equally from the effects newly created green areas have on health. Scientists consider that greener cities are not healthier and more equal for everyone.
28min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Insight into our 50-plus lifespan still evolving, genetic study showsThe scientific reasons why people live beyond the age of 50 are more complex than thought, according to a new genetic study.
28min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA satellites provide a thermal view Hurricane Nate after landfallNASA's Aqua satellite and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite analyzed the temperatures in Hurricane Nate's cloud tops and determined that the most powerful thunderstorms and heaviest rain areas were around the center of the tropical cyclone after it made landfall near the mouth of the Mississippi River.
28min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new kind of influenza vaccine: One shot might do the trickCertain proteins in the influenza virus remain constant year after year. Cornell University researchers are taking one of those conserved proteins, Matrix-2 (M2), and packaging it in a nanoscale, controlled-release 'capsule' in an attempt to create a quick-acting, long-lasting, multi-strain vaccine against pandemic influenza A.
28min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA's Aqua satellite finds Hurricane Nate's strongest sideNASA's Aqua satellite helped forecasters see that the strongest side of Hurricane Nate using infrared light.
28min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Collectivistic and individualistic societies not absoluteHow people respond to the same situation can - at least in part - be explained by their cultural background. An often used framework to understand cross-cultural differences in how people feel, think and behave in social situations is that of individualism-collectivism (IC). Sylvia Huwaë shows in her PhD thesis that people's responses depend also upon how close they were with those who were presen
29min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Automotive intrusion detection and prevention systems against cyber attacksPanasonic Corporation announced today that it has developed automotive intrusion detection and prevention systems as a cyber security countermeasure for autonomous and connected cars.
29min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
On-the-fly analysis of how catalysts change during reactions to improve performanceChemistry is a complex dance of atoms. Subtle shifts in position and shuffles of electrons break and remake chemical bonds as participants change partners. Catalysts are like molecular matchmakers that make it easier for sometimes-reluctant partners to interact.
29min
Gizmodo
How to Change Google Assistant to a Male Voice Screenshot: E.Price For six glorious months a few years ago C-3PO was the voice of Waze on my phone. That December I drove from California to North Carolina, and having my favorite droid give me directions made the whole experience a lot more pleasant. I love it when you can change the voice of digital assistants you deal with daily. Sure, it’s not adding any functionality, but it can be fun to c
32min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fishing for new antibioticsTwo potent antibacterials found in fish do their dirty work in unexpected ways, report UConn chemists and colleagues in a paper accepted by the FEBS Journal. The research could point the way to entirely new classes of antibiotics.
35min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Forest grazing counteracts the effectiveness of trees to reduce flood riskPlanting trees can reduce flood risk, but a high intensity forest land use, such as grazing, can counteract the positive effect of the trees, a recently published study suggests.
35min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Parasite study paves way for infection therapiesFresh insight into how a harmful parasite harnesses the energy it needs to function could point towards therapies to prevent potentially fatal diseases.
35min
Futurity.org
Parole violations send felons through prison’s ‘revolving door’ New research on the US prison system suggests parole violations—such as failing a drug test or associating with felons—play a central role in people returning to prison and the high prison population in the United States. “One implication is that mass imprisonment is giving us less crime prevention than we might have assumed…” The study finds that felons who served time behind bars were more like
39min
Futurity.org
Watch: Greater animal diversity means more trapped carbon Animal diversity may be key to the carbon cycle in tropical rainforests like the Amazon, new research suggests. Trees in tropical forests are well known for removing carbon dioxide from the air and storing the potent greenhouse gas as carbon in their leafy branches and extensive roots, but the new research indicates animals are vital to the carbon cycle as well. The research is based on more than
39min
Ars Technica
Tim O’Reilly on why the future probably won’t be all that terrible Enlarge / Some classic O'Reilly titles. (OK, not really. But honestly these titles would teach some folks very valuable devops skills.) (credit: @ThePracticalDev ) Author and long-time friend of Ars Technica Rob Reid recently had the opportunity to interview legendary publisher Tim O'Reilly about O'Reilly's new future-focused nonfiction book. Given O'Reilly's importance and influence—and who hasn
40min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rivalries affect risk in sports, business, study findsBaltimore Ravens fans remember the game that was played during Week 12 of the 2012 National Football League season. Los Angeles Chargers fans never will forget it. With 1:58 left in the game, the then-San Diego Chargers led, 13-10, and the Ravens' offense was facing a dire situation: fourth down and 29 yards to go on their own 37-yard line.
41min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study explores why employees cheat and how companies could unknowingly contribute to the behaviorIn 2015, Volkswagen admitted to creating a device that allowed the company's vehicles to cheat emissions tests in the United States. The following year, Wells Fargo revealed that 5,300 employees had secretly opened millions of phony accounts in an attempt to hit sales targets and receive bonuses. More and more, employees are bending the rules at work to get ahead.
41min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Birds reveal the importance of good neighbours for health and ageingBirds who live next door to family members or to other birds they know well are physically healthier and age more slowly, according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA).
41min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The chemicals in firefighting foam aren't the new asbestosThis week's ABC Four Corners episode investigated contamination at defence force sites and surrounding aquifers with chemicals called perfluoroalkyl acids or PFAAs. Around 18 sites are reported to be affected, with the concern being the PFAAs have entered groundwater and contaminated water used for drinking, cleaning and watering plants for human consumption.
41min
New on MIT Technology Review
Floating Wind Farms Could Create Gobs of Energy
42min
Quanta Magazine
Ultra-Powerful Radio Bursts May Be Getting a Cosmic Boost Some of the brightest flashes in the universe may be coming into focus. So-called fast radio bursts are enigmatic, ultra-brief, ultra-powerful bursts of energy coming from distant galaxies. They last for only a fraction of a second, but in that time they emit the energy of perhaps 500 million suns. Their power and brevity have created an astrophysical puzzle: What could possibly be making such bl
46min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Our ability to focus on one voice in crowds is triggered by voice pitchScientists have discovered that a group of neurons in the brain’s auditory stem help us to tune into specific conversations in a crowded room.
47min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
School year 'relative age' causing bias in ADHD diagnosis, says researchYounger primary school children are more likely to be diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) than their older peers within the same school year, new research has shown.
47min
Ingeniøren
EU vil lave 'batteriernes Airbus'EU vil booste europæisk batteriproduktion for at styrke overgangen til elektrisk transport.
47min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Two separate teams of astronomers find evidence of missing Baryonic matter(Phys.org)—Two teams working independently have found evidence of the existence of Baryonic matter—particles that link galaxies together. One team was made of members from the Institute of Space Astrophysics, the other was based out of the University of Edinburgh. Both teams have uploaded a paper describing their work to the arXiv preprint server and both are claiming their findings solve the myst
47min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astronomers find a Neptune-sized exoplanet in a binary star system(Phys.org)—Using NASA's prolonged Kepler mission, known as K2, astronomers have discovered a new Neptune-sized planet in a binary star system in the Hyades open cluster. The newly found exoworld, designated K2-nnnA b, is the first known Neptune-sized planet in a binary system within an open cluster. The finding was reported Sept. 29 in a paper published on the arXiv pre-print server.
47min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A lesson for Canada: Quebec pharmacare system creates winners and losersQuebec spends $200 more per person than the rest of Canada to provide prescription drug coverage to everyone in the province, finds new research that could inform plans for a nationwide universal drug plan.
49min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Major breakthrough identifies new mechanism for the development of schizophreniaThe new research shows that dysfunctional brain blood vessels may be associated with the development of schizophrenia. There is potential for new treatments of schizophrenia by developing new drugs to target these abnormal blood vessels.
49min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Fake fin' discovery reveals new ichthyosaur speciesAn ichthyosaur first discovered in the 1970s but then dismissed and consigned to museum storerooms across the country has been re-examined and found to be a new species.
49min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Size doesn't matter -- at least for hammerheads and swimming performanceDifferent head shapes and different body sizes of hammerhead sharks should result in differences in their swimming performance right? Researchers from Florida Atlantic University have conducted the first study to examine the whole body shape and swimming kinematics of two closely related yet very different hammerhead sharks, with some unexpected results.
49min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Home-brewed poppy seed tea can be lethal, study findsA home-brewing technique used to extract morphine from unwashed poppy seeds can produce lethal doses of the drug, according to research at Sam Houston State University.
49min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Survey provides new directions for employment of people with disabilitiesSurvey findings indicate that the majority of employers have processes and practices in place for the inclusion of employees with and without disabilities, and that the commitment to the success of employees with disabilities is shared by supervisors and upper management. The findings offer insight into how effective these processes and practices are for all employees, and point to new directions
49min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Best way to recognize emotions in others: ListenIf you want to know how someone is feeling, it might be better to close your eyes and use your ears: People tend to read others' emotions more accurately when they listen and don't look, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.
49min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Type 1 diabetes and the microbiota: MAIT cells as biomarkers and new therapeutic targetsTogether with colleagues from AP-HP, scientists from the CNRS, INSERM and Paris Descartes University have discovered that the onset of type 1 diabetes is preceded by modification of MAIT lymphocytes. These cells -- associated with mucosae and able to recognize elements of the microbiota -- could therefore serve as new biomarkers for early detection and prevention of the illness.
49min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New tool helps GPs assess frailty in the elderlyResearchers have designed a new tool designed to help GPs assess which older people are the most frail and vulnerable. Since July this year, identifying and managing patients with frailty has been in the GP contract. The new tool helps GP surgeries provide better care to the most vulnerable patients, improve health service planning and potentially make better use of resources.
49min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The risk of type 1 diabetes not increased by swine flu vaccine PandemrixThere has been a fear that the swine flu vaccine, Pandemrix, would increase the risk of autoimmune diseases other than narcolepsy. However, a new study of children from Sweden and Finland shows that the vaccine increased neither the risk of developing autoantibodies against insulin-producing beta cells nor the occurrence of type 1 diabetes.
49min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel circuit design boosts wearable thermoelectric generatorsUsing flexible conducting polymers and novel circuitry patterns printed on paper, researchers have demonstrated proof-of-concept wearable thermoelectric generators that can harvest energy from body heat to power simple biosensors for measuring heart rate, respiration or other factors.
49min
Futurity.org
How nibbling deer boost invasive plants When white-tailed deer graze in forests, they prefer to eat native plants over certain less tasty invasive ones, such as garlic mustard and Japanese stiltgrass. Those eating habits can lower native plant diversity and abundance, while increasing the proportion of plant communities made up of non-native species. A new study, which pools data from previous studies at 23 sites across the northeaster
53min
Gizmodo
Windows Phone Is Dead—How to Make Android the Next Best Thing Android, powered by Microsoft. (Image: Gizmodo) Windows Phone is dead , but Microsoft isn’t getting out of mobile—in fact it’s redoubling its efforts. With plenty of apps for iOS and Android out now and improving fast, you can recreate much of the feel of a Windows Phone on your existing handset, as long as you can live without those rotating tiles. Here’s how to go all-in with Microsoft on mobil
56min
Ars Technica
Star Wars: The Last Jedi looks a lot like The Empire Strikes Back at first blush Lucasfilm released the second trailer for Star Wars: The Last Jedi on Monday evening. It shows that—like every Star Wars movie—the next edition will be filled with space battles, lightsaber duels, and campy dialog. The trailer makes it clear that Rey will be the central character of the ppcoming movie, set to release December 15 with tickets widely available now . Rey's training by Luke Skywalker
59min
Live Science
Listen, Don't Look: Why Your Ears Can Tell More Than Your EyesWhen it comes to understanding how someone truly feels, it may be best to close your eyes and just listen, a new study shows.
1h
Feed: All Latest
How to Erase Your Old Phone Before You Sell ItUpgrading to a shiny new phone? Here's how to clear out your old one.
1h
Feed: All Latest
From Cersei to Pennywise, the Most Devoted Cosplayers at This Year’s New York Comic ConCome for the intensely loyal fandom, stay for the incredible attention to detail and excellent makeup work.
1h
Gizmodo
New Rumors Tease Some Big Changes for Jodie Whittaker's First Season of Doctor Who Keanu Reeves discusses the premise of the next Bill & Ted movie. The Teen Titans Go! movie adds some major talent. New Avengers: Infinity War art gives us a better look at Black Widow’s new appearance. Plus, new details on Claire and Jamie’s steamy Outlander reunion and Stranger Things season two episode titles. Spoilers now! Bill & Ted Face The Music Keanu Reeves revealed the title of th
1h
Gizmodo
Tamagotchi Is Back—And I Already Killed Mine All images: Andrew Liszewski/Gizmodo & Bandai Just after 11 am on Saturday morning, I became the proud parent of my very first Tamagotchi, freshly hatched from its virtual egg. By yesterday afternoon it was dead; its passing a poignant reminder that the gadgets we adored as kids aren’t always as awesome 20 years later when we’re grownups. To commemorate the 20th anniversary of one of the worl
1h
Dagens Medicin
Kampagner for bloddonorer skal fortsat målrettes mænd Indsatsen for at få flere mænd tilmeldt som bloddonor skal fortsætte, da der fortsat er langt flere kvinder, som melder sig. Og kvinderne er mere udsatte, lyder det fra professor.
1h
Dagens Medicin
Danske Regioner har taget temperaturen på psykiatrienEn ny benchmark-rapport fra Danske Regioner giver et overblik over, hvordan det går med alt fra ventetider til udredning og behandling til udviklingen i antallet af sengepladser i den lukkede sengepsykiatri i hver region.
1h
Dagens Medicin
Ny aftale styrker samarbejdet mellem regioner og speciallæger En ny fireårig aftale om speciallægehjælp sikrer, at der også fremover er et borgernært speciallægetilbud af høj kvalitet.
1h
Scientific American Content: Global
Can Scientists Convince the Public to Accept CRISPR and Gene Drives?Scientists are trying new ways to win over a skeptical public -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Birds reveal the importance of good neighbors for health and agingBirds who live next door to family members or to other birds they know well are physically healthier and age more slowly, according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA). Scientists studied a population of Seychelles warblers to test whether territory owners with more related, or more familiar, neighbours had more peaceful territories and better health as a result.
1h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic’s 160th Anniversary Issue: November 2017 Washington, D.C. (October 10, 2017)—Genius retains similar qualities across centuries: unbridled creativity, passion, invention, an interplay of art and science. The Atlantic’s November 2017 issue goes in search of The Science of Creativity in two captivating pieces: one by the journalist and writer Walter Isaacson on how Leonardo da Vinci made Mona Lisa smile in the world’s most famous painting;
1h
Futurity.org
Why more iPhones break when a new model comes out Rationality goes out the window for some consumers who suddenly “lose” or break their fully functional current phone when a new model becomes available. Researchers say carelessness and neglect toward currently owned products stem from a desire to justify the attainment of a new, enhanced product without appearing wasteful. It’s the “upgrade effect.” “…consumers exhibit cavalier behavior toward o
1h
Ingeniøren
Nu er det blevet testet, om iPhones bliver langsommere med tiden Nej, din iPhone er ikke bygget til at blive langsommere med tiden - men alligevel kan den godt føles tungere at danse https://www.version2.dk/artikel/nu-blevet-testet-iphones-bliver-langsommere-med-tiden-1081535 Version2
1h
New Scientist - News
Will Alphabet’s internet balloons really help Puerto Rico?Google’s parent company wants to use its Project Loon tech to help restore the island’s hurricane-damaged mobile networks. But is it charity or business strategy?
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New theory on why the sun's corona is hotter than its surface(Phys.org)—A team of researchers from the U.S., Japan and Switzerland has found possible evidence of a source of energy that could be responsible for heating the sun's corona. In their paper published in the journal Nature Astronomy, the researchers describe studying data from the FOXSI-2 sounding rocket and what it revealed.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Close approach of asteroid 2012 TC4 poses no danger to EarthThe house-sized asteroid 2012 TC4 is slated to give Earth a close shave on Thursday, October 12, swooshing by our planet at approximately 5:41 UTC (1:41 a.m. EDT) at a distance of about 31,000 miles (50,000 kilometers). Although there were some worries that this rocky object could hit the Earth, latest observations confirm that it poses no danger to our home planet at all.
1h
Science | The Guardian
Experimental films? Putting movie science under the microscope Love films and science? Science(ish) author and podcaster Rick Edwards answered our questions, but can you answer his in the quiz below? Film and science have combined with varying degrees of success, from 50s B-movies all the way to Interstellar. But is science just a hokey hook from which to hang a plot? Or can films actually help to teach and encourage science? Hoping to answer those questions
1h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Developing nations need more than just money Grants from big science funders can be hard to use without better administration and mutual understanding, says Rana Dajani. Nature 550 159 doi: 10.1038/550159a
1h
Viden
Eksperternes 5 sex-råd til farNybagte fædre er mindre tilfredse med sexlivet end nybagte mødre. Men man kan selv gøre meget for at holde liv under dynerne.
1h
Viden
Elcykel-hit fjerner ‘dansk design’ fra sin markedsføringMate.bike har ændret sin markedsføringsvideo, efter DR-programmet So ein Ding har sat spørgsmålstegn ved, hvorvidt cyklen er dansk designet.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fossil find pushes back date of earliest fused bones in birds by 40 million years(Phys.org)—A trio of researchers with the Key Laboratory of Vertebrate Evolution and Human Origins of Chinese Academy of Sciences has found evidence that pushes back the earliest example of fused bones in birds by approximately 40 million years. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Min Wang, Zhiheng Li and Zhonghe Zhou describe their study of the fossilized
1h
New Scientist - News
Drone designers accidentally explain colour of albatross wingsWhy are some birds' wings darker on top? Engineers may have found the answer while trying to design a biomimetic drone that goes further on less fuel
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Futurity.org
Added gene makes corn produce key nutrient Researchers have discovered a way to boost the nutritional value of corn—the world’s largest commodity crop—by modifying the plant with a bacterial gene that causes it to produce methionine, a key nutrient. The discovery could benefit millions of people in developing countries, such as in South America and Africa, who depend on corn as a staple. It could also significantly reduce worldwide animal
1h
The Atlantic
One Harvey Weinstein in Hollywood, Another in the White House As the Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein reels from a New York Times exposé that describes years of abusive behavior towards women, many right-leaning pundits are seizing the opportunity to discuss predatory male behavior in the liberal tribe, much as lefty pundits used Bill O’Reilly’s downfall to discuss bad actors on the right. Many of these efforts offer worthwhile insights. And two contribu
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Publishers threaten to remove millions of papers from ResearchGate Take-down notices “imminent” as lawsuit is filed alleging widespread copyright infringement. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22793
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How the coffee industry is about to get roasted by climate changeFall is always a good time to create new habits, and coffee chains know it.
1h
Popular Science
China is opening a new quantum research supercenter From Our Blogs: Eastern Arsenal The country wants to build a quantum computer with a million times the computing power of all others presently in the world. On 37 hectares (370,000 square meters) of land in Hefei, Anhui Province, China is building a $10 billion research center for quantum applications.
2h
Feed: All Latest
Google Home Mini Review:
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Feed: All Latest
This New Alzheimer’s Test Looks Beyond a Single Problem GeneIt calculates how more than two dozen genetic variants combine to increase or decrease your risk of developing Alzheimer's during your lifetime.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nobody reads privacy policies – here's how to fix thatHave you ever actually read an app's privacy policy before clicking to accept the terms? What about reading the privacy policy for the website you visit most often? Have you ever read or even noticed the privacy policy posted in your doctor's waiting room or your bank's annual privacy notice when you receive it in the mail?
2h
Dagens Medicin
Patienterstatningen om meningitis-sager: Tre teenagers død kunne være undgåetTre drenge kunne i dag med overvejende sandsynlighed have været i live, hvis sundhedspersonalet havde behandlet dem rigtigt, lyder det fra Patienterstatningen i tre sager om meningitis.
2h
Dagens Medicin
Nye hjertepakker skal omfatte hele patientforløbetAnbefalinger for behandling af hjertesygdom gøres bredere, så de også inkluderer patienter med hjerterytmeforstyrrelser og omfatter det samlede behandlingsforløb fra diagnose til afsluttet behandling og rehabilitering.
2h
Dagens Medicin
Fagudvalg vil ikke tages til indtægt for anbefaling af PCSK9-hæmmerBehandlingsvejledning for hyperlipidæmi anbefaler Praluent frem for Repatha. Det får fagudvalg til at protestere til Medicinrådet, da medlemmerne mener, at de bliver taget til indtægt for ændringer og anbefalinger, de ikke har bidraget til.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
JILA spinning method confirms the electron still seems roundJILA physicists have for the first time used their spinning molecules technique to measure the "roundness" of the electron, confirming the leading results from another group and suggesting that more precise assessments are possible.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers image perfectly smooth side-surfaces of 3-D silicon crystals with a scanning tunneling microscopeA research collaboration between Osaka University and the Nara Institute of Science and Technology for the first time used scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to create images of atomically flat side-surfaces of 3-D silicon crystals. This work helps semiconductor manufacturers continue to innovate while producing smaller, faster, and more energy-efficient computer chips for computers and smartphon
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Designing selective reactions to modulate biological processesUnlike chemical reactions carried out in flasks in the laboratory, which allow researchers to convert reagents into products, usually in organic solvents, in biological environments, everything is much more unpredictable and unstable. Thus, reactions within a living organism proceed in a markedly hostile media: dense, complex, and surrounded by many other adjacent substances that threaten its feas
2h
Gizmodo
Don't Get Burned By Missing Amazon's One-Day Zippo Sale Zippo Gold Box Amazon’s having a one day fire sale (sorry, sorry) on Zippo lighters, lighter fluid, and more , with the iconic lighter starting at just $7, with tons of varieties available. In addition to the lighters though, you should also take note of Zippo’s hand warmers , now that winter is just around the corner. I own one of these, and it’s awesome. You just fill it with lighter fluid, lig
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Northern exposure: fossils of a southern whale found for the first time in the northAncient fossils of a whale species thought to be found only in southern waters have been discovered at northern sites in Japan and Italy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Some consumers 'lose' or break iPhones when new model becomes availableRationality often goes out the window when new iPhones become available, as some consumers lose or break their fully functional current iPhones for an upgrade, according to a new study.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sowing wheat earlier can help increase yields in IndiaYield gaps in wheat production in India can be countered with an earlier sowing date, says a University of Michigan researcher.
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Gizmodo
Twitter Users Have Feelings About the Porgs From The Last Jedi GIF The new trailer for The Last Jedi dropped last night . And it’s all some Star Wars nerds are talking about. But it’s clear that one character stole the show. That’s right. It’s porg time, baby. Every Star Wars trilogy needs its cuddly comic relief. The Return of the Jedi had the Ewoks, Episodes I-III tried to make Jar Jar Binks a thing, and now The Last Jedi is introducing us to the porgs, a
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Dagens Medicin
Patienter kan have gavn af stamceller fra navlesnoreBehandling med stamceller fra nyfødtes navlesnor kan øge hjertet evne til at pumpe blod hos patienter med hjertesvigt, viser nyt studie.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Studying entropy in metallic glassesA team led by Caltech recently solved a decades-old materials science mystery by tracking down the origin of entropy in metallic glasses.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists discover more about the ingredients for star formationAstronomers have shed fresh light on the importance of hydrogen atoms in the birth of new stars.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
When a porous solid retains its properties in liquid formKnown for their exceptional porosity that enables the trapping or transport of molecules, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) take the form of a powder, which makes them difficult to format. For the first time, an international team led by scientists from the Institut de recherche de Chimie Paris (CNRS/Chimie ParisTech) has evidenced the surprising ability of a type of MOF to retain its porous propert
2h
Scientific American Content: Global
New Telescope "Gives Back the Sky" to City-Dwellers -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Public unwittingly buying dangerous laser pointers, warn scientistsDangerous laser pointers are being sold to the public which unwittingly believes them to be safe, scientists from the University of Bath have warned.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New methods tackle a perplexing engineering conceptResearchers at the University of Illinois are working to turn a complex materials design problem into an intuitive concept, understandable to engineers from novice to advanced experience levels. The group developed guidelines to help understand materials engineered to become thicker when stretched. This highly useful property, which is not commonly found in nature, has applications for protective
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New magnet without the deficiencies of conventional samarium and neodymium magnetsLawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have developed a new, more efficient permanent magnet that removes the deficiencies of conventional samarium and neodymium magnets.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
High levels of lead contaminate many backyards in Brooklyn neighborhoodWhen we met Philip, he was chiseling black paint off the iron railing in front of his brownstone. He led us through his beautiful home and into the backyard. "Nothing will grow in this back corner," he explained. "It seems like there's definitely something wrong with that… We've dug up a lot of trash back here, so God only knows what else is in the soil."
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
High-resolution structural analysis of protein behind Huntington's diseaseHuntington's disease is a progressive, fatal neurodegenerative disorder that is caused by mutations in one specific gene called huntingtin (Htt). In the 20-plus years since the Htt gene was identified, researchers have focused on the protein encoded by the Htt gene, called Httex1. This protein accumulates in the brains of Huntington's disease patients, and the prevailing hypothesis has been that i
2h
Live Science
JFK Assassination Files Due for Release: Why Conspiracy Theorists Are ExcitedIt's been a good year for conspiracy theorists, so they say.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers map the illegal use of natural resources in the protected Brazilian AmazonNew research published in the open access peer-reviewed journal PeerJ uses law enforcement data collected from 2010 to 2015 to understand the geographical distribution of the illegal use of natural resources across the region's protected area network. In the study, a total of 4,243 reports of illegal use of natural resources were evaluated and mapped. These reports generated US $224.6 million in f
2h
Feed: All Latest
Hacking North Korea Won't Stop Its Nuclear ProgramSecurity researchers say penetrating North Korea's hacking operations and even its domestic intranet is possible. But not enough to stop its nuclear threat.
3h
Feed: All Latest
In Puerto Rico After Hurricane Maria, No Power Means No TelecomWithout power, phones and internet won't work. And without phones and internet, Puerto Rico can't coordinate repairs.
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Feed: All Latest
Marvel Keeps Making TV—But With 'Runaways' on Hulu, How Many Networks Is Too Many?With properties on broadcast, cable, and multiple streaming outlets, Marvel is feeling super-overextended these days.
3h
New Scientist - News
Human hearts kept ‘asleep’ in a box can survive outside the bodyA new way of storing hearts outside the body for a day or more could bring an end to people dying while awaiting an organ for a heart transplant
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New high-throughput sequencing technologies uncover a world of interacting microorganismsYour body teems with them—100 trillion microbes in your gut, lungs, mouth, and skin. Your home swarms with them—in toilets and sinks, on tables and chairs, in the carpet, and on your dog. Even the ground on which you stand abounds with countless bacteria, fungi, protozoa, algae, and viruses—all microscopic, all part of a community of organisms interacting with one another and the environment. Thes
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Heads-up, CEOs—corporate social responsibility may get you fired, study findsInvesting in product safety, employee diversity and carbon footprint reduction are all examples of corporate social responsibility (CSR) that can result in high praise for a chief executive—or get them fired—according to new research from the University of Notre Dame.
3h
cognitive science
Skype's Homeland Grapples With Dilemma Of Robot As Legal Person: "Estonia, the country which helped create Skype and hosts NATO's cyber-defense center, is also trying to stay ahead of the pack in regulating robotics." submitted by /u/trot-trot [link] [comments]
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research team preserves therapeutics in powder form in proof-of-concept experimentA team of biological engineers from the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory have discovered a way to store and transport at high temperatures certain types of medicines that would typically require freezing and cold storage. Their proof-of-concept experiment has significant implications for medical access in the developing world.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers discover an evolutionary stepping stone to beet-red beetsThe color red is splashed across gardens, forests and farms, attracting pollinators with bright hues, signaling ripe fruit and delighting vegetable and flower gardeners alike.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers map the illegal use of natural resources in the protected Brazilian AmazonNew research published in the open access peer-reviewed journal PeerJ uses law enforcement data collected from 2010 to 2015 to understand the geographical distribution of the illegal use of natural resources across the region's protected area network.
3h
Live Science
New Cave-Dwelling Eyeless Creature Baited with Stinky CheeseA pale, slender creature was found in a cave with the help of smelly cheese.
3h
Latest Headlines | Science News
New deep-sea sponge could play a starring role in monitoring ocean healthA new species of sponge that dwells on metal-rich rocks could help scientists track the environmental impact of deep-sea mining.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
AI and aerospace models used to optimise blood flow in veinsArtificial intelligence has been trained to use aerospace simulation software to design a device that may ultimately improve dialysis for patients.
3h
Ingeniøren
Batterier på spritnye iPhones svulmer opApple undersøger nu, hvorfor en række af selskabets helt nye iPhone 8-telefoner svulmer op, kort efter de er taget i brug.
3h
Ingeniøren
Open Source hardware: Første RISC-V chip til Linux er kommet på markedet SiFives U54-MC Coreplex er den første RISC-V-baserede chip, der understøtter Linux, Unix, og FreeBSD. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/open-source-hardware-foerste-risc-v-chip-linux-kommet-paa-markedet-1081482 Version2
3h
Scientific American Content: Global
Culture Shock: Precious Microbe Collections Languish in Threatened Bio-LibrariesVanishing public repositories of microbes, both beneficial and deadly, have been essential for advances such as penicillin and CRISPR -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian
What mysteries could be unlocked by new Antikythera shipwreck finds? Excavation has revealed fragments of bronze sculpture and raises the possibility of several buried statues in the area. So what do these discoveries tell us? The shipwreck at Antikythera, Greece, continues to reveal its secrets and surprise archaeologists. As reported last week , recent excavations on the 1st century BC shipwreck have revealed statue fragments, bronze ornamentation, and wooden re
3h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Siberian blue robin excites bird watchers in OrkneyThe sighting in North Ronaldsay is believed to be the first time an adult male Siberian blue robin has been seen in the UK.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Fake fin' discovery reveals new ichthyosaur speciesAn ichthyosaur first discovered in the 1970s but then dismissed and consigned to museum storerooms across the country has been re-examined and found to be a new species.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists confirm distinct regions in popular carbon capture and synthesis solventImagine building a city with just two types of buildings: red homes and green offices. You spread the buildings out evenly, alternating red and green. Now, imagine that same city with neighborhoods and business districts. The 3-D map would have distinct areas of red and green. Dr. Xiao-Ying Yu at DOE's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and her colleagues ended up with a similar map when they d
3h
Ingeniøren
Udvidet vindindsats i hovedstaden kompenserer ikke for regnefejlInvesteringer i udlandet, nye typer vindmølleprojekter, solcelleanlæg samt en øget målsætning på 100 MW vindmøller skal få Københavns Kommune nærmere et neutralt CO₂-regnskab. Regnskabet har dog stadig et stort hul, som ikke løses med de nuværende planer.
3h
Ingeniøren
Forsker: Amazon udnytter data og skaber monopol Amazon udnytter sine digitale platforme til at hugge konkurrenters kunder og produkter. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/amazon-udnytter-data-skaber-monopol-1081511 Version2
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dinosaur blood? New research urges caution regarding fossilised soft tissueScientists from the University of Bristol have conducted experiments to accelerate degradation in keratinous tissues such as feathers, scales and hair in order to simulate the processes that occur over deep time as something becomes a fossil.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mathematicians model 5G mobile communications of the futureScientists from RUDN University have created a mathematical model of reliable microwave communication for mobile phones and other devices. The results of the research have been published in a special issue of the IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications (JSAC) devoted to microwave communication and will be presented at the "Enabling Technologies, Applications, and Methods for Emerging 5G S
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Diversity of large animals plays an important role in carbon cycleTrees in tropical forests are well known for removing carbon dioxide from the air and storing the potent greenhouse gas as carbon in their leafy branches and extensive roots. But a new analysis led by Stanford University researchers finds that large forest animals are also an important part of the carbon cycle.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Battery based on sodium may offer more cost-effective storage than lithiumAs a warming world moves from fossil fuels toward renewable solar and wind energy, industrial forecasts predict an insatiable need for battery farms to store power and provide electricity when the sky is dark and the air is still. Against that backdrop, Stanford researchers have developed a sodium-based battery that can store the same amount of energy as a state-of-the-art lithium ion, at substant
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Randy Bresnik and Mark Vande Hai spacewalkTalk about an image making your head spin: ESA astronaut Paolo Nespoli took this stunning image of NASA astronauts Randy Bresnik and Mark Vande Hai during last week's spacewalk.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Novel circuit design boosts wearable thermoelectric generatorsUsing flexible conducting polymers and novel circuitry patterns printed on paper, researchers have demonstrated proof-of-concept wearable thermoelectric generators that can harvest energy from body heat to power simple biosensors for measuring heart rate, respiration or other factors.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers make progress toward solving the proton spin puzzleScientists in a research group led by Constantia Alexandrou, professor of physics at the University of Cyprus and the Cyprus Institute, made a crucial step towards solving a three-decades-old puzzle: They have successfully deciphered the total angular momentum (spin) of the nucleon, determining how it's shared among its constituents. CSCS supercomputer Piz Daint provided the necessary computationa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists successfully test new water simulation protocolWater may seem like a known quantity. There are, however, still aspects of water that remain unknown to scientists. Pure water, that is water without any additional trace material, still has complex properties that are yet to be fully understood by scientists. To unlock these properties, scientists use density functional theory (DFT), a framework of electronic structure, to study the forces and in
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wheat straw waste could be basis for greener chemicalsThe straw leftover from harvested wheat could be turned into bio-based chemicals that offer high greenhouse gas savings and do not compete with food supplies or damage ecosystems.
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The Atlantic
Republican Senators Want No Part of Trump-Corker Feud If Senator Bob Corker was hoping his blunt criticism of President Trump would inspire his fellow Republicans to join him in publicly confronting the leader of their party, he would be disappointed. And if the president was hoping that a chorus of GOP legislators would rise to his defense, he, too, should be dismayed. With their shrugs and with their silence, Republican senators responded on Monda
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The Atlantic
A Half a Dozen Battles I n the summer of 1864, Abraham Lincoln blessed a quixotic attempt by a Methodist minister named Colonel James F. Jaquess and a journalist named James R. Gilmore to broach with the Confederacy the possibility of a negotiated settlement of the Civil War. Jaquess and Gilmore crossed Union lines under the white flag of truce and called on Jefferson Davis, the rebel president, and Judah Benjamin, his
4h
The Atlantic
What Was the Most Influential Power Couple in History? Lisa Grunwald, co-author, The Marriage Book Adam and Eve were responsible, literally or metaphorically, for—in no particular order—the subservience of women; the pain of childbirth; the concepts of sin, shame, and clothing; a lot of great artwork; and oh yes, procreation, without which there would have been no one else to influence. Jeffrey Eugenides, author, T he Marriage Plot I nominate Adam an
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The Atlantic
The Conversation How America Lost Its Mind The election of Donald Trump, Kurt Andersen argued in his September cover story , revealed that a critical mass of Americans has become untethered from reality. Andersen also traced the roots of the exceptionalism that has turned the country into “Fantasyland.” Kurt Andersen documents well how America has lost its mind, but only partly why . We live in a country whose hi
4h
The Atlantic
Is the American Idea Doomed? O n May 5 , 1857, eight men sat down to dinner at Boston’s Parker House hotel. They had gathered to plan a magazine, but by the time they stood up five hours later, they had laid the intellectual groundwork for a second American revolution. These men were among the leading literary lights of their day, but they had more in mind that night than literary pursuits. The magazine they envisioned would
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The Atlantic
The Secrets of Google’s Moonshot Factory A snake-robot designer , a balloon scientist, a liquid-crystals technologist, an extradimensional physicist, a psychology geek, an electronic-materials wrangler, and a journalist walk into a room. The journalist turns to the assembled crowd and asks: Should we build houses on the ocean? Listen to the audio version of this article: Feature stories, read aloud: download the Audm app for your iPhone
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The Atlantic
What’s Normal? AFTER Election Day , “This is not normal” became a rallying cry for Donald Trump’s opponents: Harry Reid warned against press coverage that normalized the president-elect; a John Oliver monologue about Trump being abnormal won 14 million YouTube views; THIS IS NOT NORMAL T-shirts popped up around the country. But in July, after critics opined that his bullying tweets were “not normal,” Trump twee
4h
The Atlantic
Small as a Seed In everything, its opposite. In the sun’s ascendancy, its downfall. In darkness, light not yet apprehended. At night in bed, I fear the falling-off. Though falling, I will rise. I fear. Fall arriving now. In any word so small, the world. In the world I walk in, a wild wood.
4h
The Atlantic
Nuclear Launch Codes For Dummies After the Kennedy administration decided that the threat of a rogue general launching America’s nuclear weapons was too serious to ignore, a safeguard was deployed: a code lock mounted on all nuclear bombs. This was essentially the “launch code,” considered in popular lore to be the most important of all government secrets. However, the members of the Strategic Air Command—whose power the code lo
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The Atlantic
An American Mastodon in Paris It can be difficult to predict which American exports will stick the landing in France. Jerry Lewis , Burger King , and anything très Brooklyn : a resounding oui . Uber, Netflix , and Skippy peanut butter: not so much. Until June, when Costco opened its first French location, on the outskirts of Paris, the warehouse chain seemed doomed to join the latter. Last fall, Le Parisien dubbed the chain a
4h
The Atlantic
The White House Mythmaker The Founders did not envision a presidential cult of personality, but an unhappy paradox of American democracy is the sovereignty that politicians hold over the public that elects them. This sway has never been more evident than now, when tens of millions of us begin each day by reaching for our phone, skimming through our news feeds, or otherwise plugging into a communal presidential drama—pulle
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The Atlantic
Jennifer Egan’s Surprising Swerve Into Historical Fiction “The sea, the sea!” It’s the jubilant, elemental cry of a child released from a hot car on a summer day, but also a phrase with deep historical and literary roots. The shout of mercenary Greek soldiers—“ Thalatta! Thalatta! ”—in 401 b . c ., when they finally glimpsed the Black Sea, and thus their salvation, on their way back from fighting in Persia, in Xenophon’s telling. A symbol of solace and
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New Scientist - News
Buyer beware: Should genomic firms resell your data?Think carefully before you get your DNA tested: you’re selling as well as buying
4h
Ingeniøren
Frank Jensen: Forbyd nye dieselbiler i København fra 2019Kommunalvalg på vej: Overborgmesteren sætter fokus på en miljøzone i København. Det betyder blandt andet, at dieselbiler indregistreret fra 2019 ikke må befinde sig i byen.
4h
Ingeniøren
Microsoft dropper Windows 10 Mobile Både Bill Gates og Microsoft 10-chef bruger Androidmobiler. Windowstelefonen lægges i graven. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/microsoft-dropper-windows-10-mobile-1081527 Version2
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Little growth observed in India's methane emissionsMethane is the second most powerful greenhouse gas and concentrations are rising in the atmosphere. Because of its potency and quick decay in the atmosphere, countries have recognized that reduction of methane emissions are a means toward mitigating global warming.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Common acid reflux medications promote chronic liver diseaseApproximately 10 percent of Americans take a proton pump inhibitor drug to relieve symptoms of frequent heartburn and acid reflux. That percentage can be much higher for people with chronic liver disease. Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have discovered evidence in mice and humans that these medications alter gut bacteria in a way that promotes three types of ch
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Digital services collect unnecessary personal informationDigital services that require users to log in with a personal account often collect more information about users than is needed. At an international conference about digital identities at Karlstad University, researchers have presented findings about methods service providers use to collect personal information about users that may encroach on privacy.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Little growth observed in India's methane emissionsMethane is the second most powerful greenhouse gas and concentrations are rising in the atmosphere. Because of its potency and quick decay in the atmosphere, countries have recognised that reduction of methane emissions are a means toward mitigating global warming.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Uber riders in Dubai can now select electric-powered TeslaRide-hailing service Uber on Tuesday began offering its customers in Dubai the option to ride in one of 50 new Tesla electric-powered vehicles—a stark contrast to the large gas-guzzling sedans and luxury sports cars that dominate the emirate's six-lane highways.
5h
Ingeniøren
Gigtlæger famler i blinde: Med nye biomarkører skal det være slutNy forskning i biomarkører og samkøring af databaser skal bremse brugen af en milliard kroner om året på biologiske lægemidler, som lægerne ikke kender virkningen af.
5h
Ingeniøren
Velkommen til robotariet: 100 robotter giver liv til forskernes koderAmerikansk universitet har åbnet et roboteksperimentarium til næsten 16 millioner kroner. Forskere og udviklere fra hele verden kan uploade deres kode og få den testet i praksis på næsten 100 mobile robotter.
5h
The Atlantic
How the Trump Administration is Boosting Iran's Hardliners In a matter of days, President Donald Trump will roll out major components of his emerging Iran policy. On October 12, he’s expected to announce that he will decertify the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), or the nuclear deal with Iran, passing the buck to Congress on whether or not to re-impose sanctions on the country. So far, the administration has begrudgingly certified Iranian comp
5h
Science | The Guardian
How your blood may predict your future health New research into bloodstream ‘biomarkers’ aims to unlock the full impact of social status on people’s lifetime health outcomes. The key is exposure to stress Health is a well-known inequality issue . While ageing is inevitable and most of us will get sick at some point, the rate of your decline is likely to be faster the lower down the socioeconomic ladder you started. The intriguing thing is, n
5h
Science-Based Medicine
Preying on the Vulnerable: Electrodiagnostics, Bach Flower Remedies, and Sound Therapy for Autism, ADHD, and Learning ProblemsKaryne Jeanne Richardson offers a ridiculous program of electrodiagnosis, flower remedies, and fractal sound to treat autism and other disorders. There are science-based autism programs that work; it is unfortunate when parents subject their autistic children to onerous, expensive, time-consuming, useless treatments based on pseudoscientific claims and false promises.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NGOs slam UN aviation agency plan for biofuelsNearly 100 environmental and poverty fighting groups jointly released a letter Tuesday slamming a UN proposal that backs large-scale use of biofuels in commercial planes.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Engineers: lives lost in Mexico quake could have been savedWarm lighting would enhance the wood floors' natural glow, the developer promised, so when all the custom lightbulbs burnt out, Anahi Abadia and her husband grudgingly drove to Home Depot to replenish supplies for their chic new flat in southern Mexico City.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ibuprofen better choice over oral morphine for pain relief in children after minor surgeryWidely available ibuprofen is a better choice for pain relief in children who have undergone minor orthopedic outpatient surgery, as it has fewer adverse effects compared with oral morphine, according to results from a clinical trial published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
9h
Gizmodo
Microsoft Confirms Investigation Into Whether Russians Bought Pre-Election Ads Through Bing Photo: AP The sprawling inquiry into the extent of Russian attempts to purchase ads on the US internet before the 2016 federal elections has expanded to yet another digital giant, with Microsoft confirming that it has launched an internal investigation into whether it sold such advertisements via its Bing search engine. In a statement, a Microsoft spokesman told Gizmodo it had received reports in
9h
New on MIT Technology Review
China’s AI Awakening 中国 人工智能 的崛起The West shouldn’t fear China’s artificial-intelligence revolution. It should copy it.
10h
The Atlantic
Iranian Foreign Minister: Foreign Meddling Has Wrought a Fractured Middle East Iranians live in a troubled and unstable region. We cannot change geography, but our neighborhood was not always so stormy. Without delving too far back into history—although as an ancient peoples our memories are measured in millennia, not decades or even centuries—it’s safe to say that our region began to experience insecurity and instability when foreign, indeed completely alien powers, arrive
10h
Ingeniøren
Alka satser på analytics overalt: Kunderne kan godt se fidusen i at give os mere data Alle afdelinger i forsikringsselskabet Alka skal have adgang til – og være drevet af – data. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/alka-satser-paa-analytics-overalt-kunder-kan-godt-se-fidus-at-give-os-mere-data-1081357 Version2
10h
Ingeniøren
De skadelige, de ligegyldige og de værdiskabende - hvilken kollegatype tilhører du? Dansk ekspert vil løfte produktiviteten på danske arbejdspladser ved at dele medarbejdere op i tre forskellige grupperinger. Find ud af, hvilken kategori du hører under og læs, hvad du kan bruge det til. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/de-skadelige-de-ligegyldige-de-vaerdiskabende-hvilken-kollegatype-tilhoerer-du-10496 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
10h
Feed: All Latest
The New 'Star Wars: The Last Jedi' Trailer is Here AT-AT LastNew vehicles, new threats, and a potentially dangerous new alliance. Snoke 'em if you got 'em.
11h
Gizmodo
The Second Trailer for Star Wars: The Last Jedi Is Finally Here GIF Breathe. Just... breathe. The second trailer for Star Wars: The Last Jedi is finally here. It’s been six months since the first trailer for the highly-anticipated Star Wars sequel appeared, but now the wait for its follow-up is over. If you’re like me you may have just screamed. Teared up. And just froze in shock out of all of the stuff we just saw. Advertisement Porgs! Finn vs. Phasma! Kylo
12h
Science | The Guardian
Why does the durian stink? Scientists unravel smelly fruit's DNA Despite its stomach-churning aroma, the durian is an important tropical fruit crop and knowing more about its DNA may help protect it Once described by a detractor as smelling of “turpentine and onions, garnished with a gym sock”, southeast Asia’s durian fruit leaves no one unmoved – you either adore or abhor it. Popular in Thailand, Malaysia and Indonesia, the spiny, stinky delicacy is banned fr
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Heads-up, ceos: Corporate social responsibility may get you fired, study findsInvesting in product safety, employee diversity and carbon footprint reduction are all examples of corporate social responsibility (CSR) that can result in high praise for a chief executive — or get them fired — according to new research.
14h
Gizmodo
Mark Zuckerberg Took a Tour of Hurricane-Ravaged Puerto Rico in 'Magical' VR Image: Screengrab via Facebook On Monday, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg promoted the social media giant’s new Facebook Spaces app, which allows users to remotely cast cartoon avatars of themselves walking around locations in the real world, by taking a “magical” tour of Puerto Rico. Specifically, Zuckerberg toured parts of the commonwealth still devastated from Hurricane Maria—which has left the v
14h
BBC News - Science & Environment
'Sooty birds' reveal hidden US air pollutionBlack carbon trapped in the feathers of songbirds gives new insight into historic US air quality.
14h
BBC News - Science & Environment
New evidence on how birds took to the airKey modifications for flight happened as early as 120 million years ago, a fossil discovery suggests.
14h
The Atlantic
Trump’s EPA Repeals a Landmark Obama Climate Rule Ten months in, and the presidency of Donald Trump has acquired a reputation for ineffectiveness. Trump’s attempt to repeal Obamacare has failed three times; he has taunted and alienated some congressional Republicans; he has hemorrhaged senior administration officials while struggling to contain an FBI investigation. But Trump has found near-total success in a few areas of lawmaking—and few are a
15h
Science | The Guardian
Global cost of obesity-related illness to hit $1.2tn a year from 2025 Health bill will be ‘enormous burden’ without more preventative measures to check worsening epidemic, say experts The cost of treating ill health caused by obesity around the world will top $1.2tn every year from 2025 unless more is done to check the rapidly worsening epidemic, according to new expert estimates. Obesity and smoking are the two main drivers behind the soaring numbers of cancers, h
15h
Gizmodo
Cadillac's Super Cruise Makes The Self-Driving Future Seem Possible The building blocks for autonomous cars are already here, but so far the biggest step into that world for actual consumers has been Tesla’s Autopilot . Now General Motors is going there too with a semiautonomous highway driving feature called Super Cruise, available on the new Cadillac CT6 . Questions about how it stacks up to Autopilot will be endless, so I’ll get this out of the way first: Supe
15h
Feed: All Latest
The US Postal Service Is Working on Self-Driving Mail TrucksWith plans to get it running rural routes by 2025.
15h
Science | The Guardian
Scientists hope damage to Larsen C ice shelf will reveal ecosystems British Antarctic Survey researchers will study area opened up by loss of iceberg A68, which has been hidden for up to 120,000 years A team of scientists is planning an expedition to examine the marine ecosystem revealed when an enormous iceberg broke off the Larsen C ice shelf earlier this year. In July, the iceberg known as A68 broke off the shelf , leaving the area at its lowest recorded exten
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
School year 'relative age' causing bias in ADHD diagnosis, says researchYounger primary school children are more likely to be diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) than their older peers within the same school year, new research has shown.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Risk factors for heart health linked to marital ups and downs -- at least for menRisk factors for heart health seem to be linked to changes over time in the quality of marital relationships -- at least for men--finds a study published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fatty diet may boost risk of relapse in kids with multiple sclerosisA fatty diet may boost the risk of a relapse in kids with multiple sclerosis (MS) by as much as 56 per cent, with saturated fat associated with a tripling in risk, suggests research published online in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry.
15h
Live Science
Diet Tweaks Could Ease Runner's DiarrheaIf you're a long-distance runner, it may be an all-too-familiar scenario: You're partway through your run when your stomach starts to cramp and you need to find a bathroom — immediately.
15h
Gizmodo
Self-Driving Cars Are Super Duper Safe, Self-Driving Car Companies Say Waymo CEO John Krafcik prepares to step inside a driverless car during a Google event. Photo: AP Self-driving test vehicles are already on the roads in several states, including California, Arizona, and Massachusetts, but the futuristic world of robot cars on every street hasn’t materialized quite yet. People are still freaked out by the idea of getting in a car that doesn’t have anyone behind th
15h
Live Science
Decades Later, 'Tree Lobster' Stick Insects Escape ExtinctionDNA analysis has revealed that an insect known as a "tree lobster" is not extinct after all.
15h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Here's What's Coming Up On The New Season Of GOLD RUSH #GoldRush | RETURNS Fri Oct 13 9p Todd and Parker go head to head in a big way. Tony's ready to modernize the dredge. Everyone has something at stake in Gold Rush Season 8. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter
16h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Economics Nobel nudges behavioral economist into the limelightBehavioral economist Richard Thaler started influential investigations of behavioral economics, which earned him the 2017 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences.
16h
Gizmodo
The 10 Best Deals Of October 9, 2017 We see a lot of deals around the web, but these were our ten favorites today. For all of the day’s best deals, head over here . #1: Halloween Costumes Up to 35% Off Halloween Costumes & More Halloween is in three weeks (!) and if you or your kids are still struggling with this ever-important decision, this one-day Amazon sale is perfect for you. Pick up any kind of costume you’re looking for,
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Huge energy potential in open ocean wind farms in the North AtlanticBecause wind speeds are higher on average over ocean than over land, wind turbines in the open ocean could in theory intercept more than five times as much energy as wind turbines over land. This presents an enticing opportunity for generating renewable energy through wind turbines. But it was unknown whether the faster ocean winds could actually be converted to increased amounts of electricity.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Human brain recalls visual features in reverse order than it detects themNew research has contributed to solving a paradox of perception, literally upending models of how the brain constructs interpretations of the outside world. When observing a scene, the brain first processes details -- spots, lines and simple shapes -- and uses that information to build internal representations of more complex objects, like cars and people. But during recall, the brain remembers th
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Turbo charge' for your brain?Two brain regions -- the medial frontal and lateral prefrontal cortices -- control most executive function. Researchers used high-definition transcranial alternating current stimulation (HD-tACS) to synchronize oscillations between them, improving brain processing. De-synchronizing did the opposite.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Alzheimer's gene poses both risk and benefitsScientists studying the molecular roots of Alzheimer's disease have encountered a good news/bad news scenario. The bad news is that in the early stages of the disease, high-risk TREM2 variants can hobble the immune system's ability to protect the brain from amyloid beta. The good news, according to researchers, is that later in the disease, the absence of TREM2 protein seems to protect the brain f
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel treatment causes cancer to self-destruct without affecting healthy cellsScientists have discovered the first compound that directly makes cancer cells commit suicide while sparing healthy cells. The new treatment approach, described in today’s issue of Cancer Cell, was directed against acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells but may also have potential for attacking other types of cancers.
16h
Popular Science
31 percent off a Blendtec blender and other good deals happening today Gadgets A quick guide to getting the goods for cheaper. PopSci is always on the lookout for today's best deals. Our lists will be updated throughout the day, so check back to see if stumbled upon any awesome new discounts.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds few restrictions on Rx opioids through MedicareMedicare plans place few restrictions on the coverage of prescription opioids, despite federal guidelines recommending such restrictions, a new Yale study finds. The research results highlight an untapped opportunity for Medicare formularies to limit opioid prescribing, the researchers said.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Many opioid-dosage combinations have no prescribing restrictions under Medicare formularyMedicare Part D formularies allowed unrestrictive coverage for many opioids over the past decade, especially at high doses, including drugs commonly associated with overdose. Because formulary coverage directly affects prescribing, these findings suggest that formularies present on underused opportunity to restrict opioid prescribing.
16h
Ars Technica
Potent Nocebo: The more expensive a harmless cream, the more pain it inflicts Enlarge / Ow. (credit: Getty Images | Media for Medical ) The mind is a powerful medicine. Given an ineffective treatment, patients can experience real health improvements by simply believing that the treatment works—the placebo effect. But this blissful delusion has a dark side: when a harmless placebo becomes effective, it becomes harmful, too, causing side-effects seen in actual therapies. In
16h
The Scientist RSS
Gene Drive LimitationsIn lab populations of genetically engineered mosquitoes, mutations arose that blocked the gene drive's spread and restored female fertility.
17h
Big Think
Can You Learn How to Control Your Dreams? While 50% of people say they’ve had a lucid dream, only 20% have them regularly. Read More
17h
Ars Technica
Dealmaster: Get Columbus Day deals on Sonos speakers and Dell laptops Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our friends at TechBargains , we have another round of deals to share. Regardless of whether you look at Columbus Day as a worthy tradition, a whitewashing of history, or just a day off from work, there's no denying that it's typically a good time to grab some discounts. Today's edition is no different, as we're serving up savings on Dell and Lenovo laptops, Sonos
17h
Live Science
Real-Life Superpower: 'See' Around Corners with Smartphone TechSmartphone cameras can help detect moving objects even if they are hidden around corners, according to a new study.
17h
Ars Technica
Windows Phone is now officially dead: A sad tale of what might have been Of course we'll continue to support the platform.. bug fixes, security updates, etc. But building new features/hw aren't the focus. https://t.co/0CH9TZdIFu — Joe Belfiore (@joebelfiore) October 8, 2017 During the weekend, Microsoft's Joe Belfiore tweeted confirmation of something that has been suspected for many months: Microsoft is no longer developing new features or new hardware for Windows Mo
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Single 'solitons' promising for optical technologiesResearchers are a step closer to harnessing single pulses of light called solitons, using tiny ring-shaped microresonators, in findings that could aid efforts to develop advanced sensors, high-speed optical communications and research tools.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mathematicians from RUDN University have modeled 5G mobile communication of the futureScientists from RUDN University have created a mathematical model of reliable microwave communication for mobile phones and other devices. The results of the research have been published in the special issue of the IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications (JSAC) devoted to microwave communication and will be presented at the 'Enabling Technologies, Applications, and Methods for Emerging 5G
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genetically boosting the nutritional value of corn could benefit millionsScientists have found an efficient way to enhance the nutritional value of corn -- the world's largest commodity crop -- by inserting a bacterial gene that causes it to produce a key nutrient called methionine, according to a new study.
17h
Popular Science
We finally know how durian got so stinky Science It's one funky fruit. Researchers sequenced the durian fruit's genome and discovered some fun surprises.
17h
Feed: All Latest
'Blade Runner 2049': Let's Talk About That Disappointing Box Office DebutDespite critical praise, Denis Villeneuve's long-awaited sequel performed poorly at the box office. What happened?
17h
Feed: All Latest
The Best Justice League Cosplay from New York Comic ConWonder Woman and her fellow superheroes took over the annual fan convention this year. These are all the best looks.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists say cost of capturing CO2 decliningTechnology now in limited use removes about 90 percent of carbon dioxide from the smokestacks of coal-fired power plants, but energy experts say cost remains the chief obstacle to bringing the "clean coal" touted by President Donald Trump into the mainstream.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fake news is still here, despite efforts by Google, FacebookNearly a year after Facebook and Google launched offensives against fake news, they're still inadvertently promoting it—often at the worst possible times.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon farmers discovered the secret of domesticating wild rice 4,000 years agoAmazonian farmers discovered how to manipulate wild rice so the plants could provide more food 4,000 years ago, long before Europeans colonised America, archaeologists have discovered.
18h
Big Think
Why America Should Improve Its Own Democracy before Spreading Democracy Globally Mark Twain once said that God created war so that Americans would learn geography. Twain died before World War I, but his sardonic remark still has meaning. Read More
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What soot-covered, hundred-year-old birds can tell us about saving the environmentBirds in museum collections from Rust Belt cities around the turn of the century are covered with black soot from air pollution at the time. Scientists have compared the amount of soot on birds through the years to track envioronmental pollution over the last 135 years.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Amazon farmers discovered the secret of domesticating wild rice 4,000 years agoAmazonian farmers discovered how to manipulate wild rice so the plants could provide more food 4,000 years ago, long before Europeans colonized America, archaeologists have discovered.
18h
Gizmodo
Anker Makes a Surge Protector, and It's $5 Off Right Now Anker PowerStrip , $25 Of all of Anker’s charging gear, its PowerStrip surge protectormight be the least well known. But with six AC outlets and four USB ports, it’d be a great addition to your desk, nightstand, or pretty much anywhere else you plug things in. Today’s price is about $5 less than usual, no code required.
18h
Scientific American Content: Global
Bacteria Stab Amoebas to Escape Being EatenOne species has found yet another use for a favorite bacterial multitool -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
18h
Gizmodo
This Could Be How Durians Get Their Stinky Smell Image: Yun Huang Yong /Wikimedia Commons One sweaty New York City day last month, my friend and I ate snails for lunch and durian for dessert. I don’t know why we did this, but something about how affordable everything is in Chinatown encourages me to make strange decisions. I didn’t dislike the fruit’s taste, which was somehow both sweet like custard and meaty like steak and onions. We didn’t no
18h
Ars Technica
Loot boxes in video games will soon get a review flag from OpenCritic Enlarge (credit: OpenCritic ) In the week since I ranted about the increasingly poisonous practice of loot boxes appearing in retail-priced video games, more big-ticket titles have shown up to the loot box party. Apparently, we're not the only folks fed up with the trend, which combines slot-machine psychology with unclear real-money economies in games. On Monday, the review-aggregation site Open
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Amazon farmers discovered the secret of domesticating wild rice 4,000 years agoAmazonian farmers discovered how to manipulate wild rice so the plants could provide more food 4,000 years ago, long before Europeans colonized America, archaeologists have discovered.
18h
Popular Science
What to do if you think an online account has been hacked DIY Action stations. Even powerful tech companies aren't immune to hackers. So if bad actors compromise one of your accounts, don't panic. Here's how to get your digital data back.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A 'turbo charge' for your brain?Two brain regions -- the medial frontal and lateral prefrontal cortices -- control most executive function. Robert Reinhart used high-definition transcranial alternating current stimulation (HD-tACS) to synchronize oscillations between them, improving brain processing. De-synchronizing did the opposite.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Alzheimer's gene poses both risk -- and benefitsScientists studying the molecular roots of Alzheimer's disease have encountered a good news/bad news scenario. The bad news is that in the early stages of the disease, high-risk TREM2 variants can hobble the immune system's ability to protect the brain from amyloid beta. The good news, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, is that later in the disease,
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The human brain recalls visual features in reverse order than it detects themNew research has contributed to solving a paradox of perception, literally upending models of how the brain constructs interpretations of the outside world. When observing a scene, the brain first processes details -- spots, lines and simple shapes -- and uses that information to build internal representations of more complex objects, like cars and people. But during recall, the brain remembers th
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Huge energy potential in open ocean wind farms in the North AtlanticBecause wind speeds are higher on average over ocean than over land, wind turbines in the open ocean could in theory intercept more than five times as much energy as wind turbines over land. This presents an enticing opportunity for generating renewable energy through wind turbines. But it was unknown whether the faster ocean winds could actually be converted to increased amounts of electricity.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Formation of coal almost turned our planet into a snowballWhile burning coal today causes Earth to overheat, about 300 million years ago the formation of that same coal brought our planet close to global glaciation. For the first time, scientists show the massive effect in a study to be published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetically boosting the nutritional value of corn could benefit millionsRutgers scientists have found an efficient way to enhance the nutritional value of corn -- the world's largest commodity crop -- by inserting a bacterial gene that causes it to produce a key nutrient called methionine, according to a new study.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What soot-covered, hundred-year-old birds can tell us about saving the environmentBirds in museum collections from Rust Belt cities around the turn of the century are covered with black soot from air pollution at the time. Scientists have compared the amount of soot on birds through the years to track envioronmental pollution over the last 135 years.
18h
Ars Technica
It sure looks like Waymo is getting ready to launch in Phoenix Enlarge / One of the earliest families in Waymo's public trial in Phoenix poses with a Waymo minivan. (credit: Waymo ) Waymo, Google's self-driving car company, is laying the political groundwork to launch a truly driverless car service. On Monday, the company announced a new partnership with several non-profit organizations. Called "Let's Talk Self-Driving," the partnership aims to persuade Amer
18h
Live Science
No Sweat: Small Doses of Exercise May Ward Off DepressionAnyone who has experienced the euphoric "runner's high" that follows a satisfying workout will likely attest to a connection between physical activity and mental health.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Farsighted children struggle with attention, study findsFarsighted preschoolers and kindergartners have a harder time paying attention and that could put them at risk of slipping behind in school, a new study suggests.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Blood samples may provide patient radiosensitivity answersHow much radiation or chemotherapy can a certain person handle? With help from blood or tissue testing, it may be possible to answer this question in advance, which in turn could improve treatment, say researchers.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A new kind of influenza vaccine: One shot might do the trickCertain proteins in the influenza virus remain constant year after year. Researchers are taking one of those conserved proteins, Matrix-2 (M2), and packaging it in a nanoscale, controlled-release "capsule" in an attempt to create a quick-acting, long-lasting, multi-strain vaccine against pandemic influenza A.
19h
Ars Technica
New bill would end Native American “sovereign immunity” for patents Enlarge / US Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) at a hearing earlier this year. (credit: Mark Wilson/Getty Images ) Allergan's move to stop its patents from being reviewed by handing them off to a Native American tribe is winning support from few people outside the drug company. Now one lawmaker is seeking to ban it. Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) has introduced a bill (PDF) that would head off Allerga
19h
Gizmodo
Whole Foods Is Still Being Overly Secretive About Its Credit Card Breach Photo: Getty If the whole Equifax debacle changes anything at all, it should be the public perception of what a responsible disclosure looks like in the wake of a devastating data breach. That’s a lesson that, incredibly, Whole Foods seems determined to ignore. It’s been 12 days since Whole Foods first disclosed that its point-of-sale systems were compromised, leaving an untold number of credit c
19h
Popular Science
Last week in tech: Remember to set your final AIM away message Technology Your favorite Dashboard Confessional lyrics should work just fine. AIM is dying, but Google has lots of new hardware to ease the pain.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Formation of coal almost turned our planet into a snowballWhile burning coal today causes Earth to overheat, about 300 million years ago, the formation of coal brought the planet close to global glaciation. For the first time, scientists show the massive effect in a study to be published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What soot-covered, hundred-year-old birds can tell us about saving the environmentHorned Larks are cute little songbirds with white bellies and yellow chins—at least, now they are. A hundred years ago, at the height of urban smoke pollution in the US, their pale feathers were stained dark gray by the soot in the atmosphere. A new paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that the discoloration of birds in museum collections can be used to trace the amou
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Genetically boosting the nutritional value of corn could benefit millionsRutgers scientists have found an efficient way to enhance the nutritional value of corn - the world's largest commodity crop - by inserting a bacterial gene that causes it to produce a key nutrient called methionine, according to a new study.
19h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Kent mussels tested for plastic contaminationAlmost two thirds of mussels in the sea around Kent are contaminated with plastic particles, research has shown.
19h
New Scientist - News
Giant black hole seen flickering on and off after galaxy snackActive Galactic Nuclei occur when a black hole devours a cloud of gas and dust and shines really brightly. Now one has been seen doing it twice
19h
New Scientist - News
Smartphone lets you see round corners by light flicker on floorTracking tiny variations in light reflected at the base of a wall can let you count people in a room and see where they are moving
19h
Futurity.org
Head Start may keep kids out of foster care Head Start programs may keep young children from being placed in foster care, new research suggests. Kids up to age five in the federal government’s preschool program were 93 percent less likely to end up in foster care than kids in the child welfare system who had no type of early care and education, says Sacha Klein, an assistant professor of social work at Michigan State University. “The findi
19h
Gizmodo
9 Questions We Have After Seeing Blade Runner 2049 All Images: Warner Bros. When it comes to the world of Blade Runner , the mysteries have always been better than the solutions. Part of why a sequel like Blade Runner 2049 even exists is because the original film asked so many hard questions and gave so few concrete answers—and it’s a tradition that continues with the new film. To be fair, Denis Villeneuve’s Blade Runner 2049 feels like it has mo
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Ars Technica
New Pacific Rim Uprising trailer debuts at NY Comic Con New York Comic Con brought a deluge of geeky movie trailers this weekend. Among them is Pacific Rim Uprising , sequel to the kaiju-inspired monster disaster movie Pacific Rim . In the first film, pilots inhabited giant robots that fought off massive inter-dimensional monsters. Uprising looks like more of the same, and that's nothing to complain about. Uprising takes place 10 years after the first
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Type 1 diabetes and the microbiota: MAIT cells as biomarkers and new therapeutic targetsScientists have discovered that the onset of type 1 diabetes is preceded by modification of MAIT lymphocytes. These cells—associated with mucosae and able to recognize elements of the microbiota—could therefore serve as new biomarkers for early detection and prevention of the illness.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The female brain reacts more strongly to prosocial behavior than the male brain, study findsWomen are more generous than men, behavioral experiments show. Now, researchers have been able to demonstrate that female and male brains process prosocial and selfish behavior differently. For women, prosocial behavior triggers a stronger reward signal, while male reward systems respond more strongly to selfish behavior.
19h
Live Science
40 Percent of Cancer Cases in US Linked to WeightBeing overweight or obese increases a person's risk for at least 13 types of cancer, according to a new report.
19h
The Atlantic
The Problem With 'Containing' Donald Trump The United States is gripped by two interlocking constitutional crises: one spectacularly visible and noisy; the other unfolding more quietly. Senator Bob Corker’s Sunday remarks to The New York Times brought the quiet crisis into full public view. The noisy crisis is, of course, the presidency of Donald Trump. The quiet crisis is the response of the national-security system to the noisy crisis.
19h
Gizmodo
Easy Hack Lets You Add More Games to the SNES Classic Edition Image: Gizmodo Expanding your library of games on the new SNES Classic is not only possible, it’s trivially easy. Though it may not be entirely legal. Not long after the NES Classic Edition came out, a Russian coder named Cluster built a tool called Hakchi to cram more games into the little emulation box. Given that the SNES Classic Edition has most of the same off-the-shelf parts as its predeces
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A safe optical fiber for delivering light and drugs into the bodyAn electrical engineer and a biomaterials engineer have joined their expertise to develop a flexible, biodegradable optical fiber to deliver light into the body for medical applications.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Global kids study: More trees, less diseaseA study of 300,000 children in 35 nations says children whose watersheds have greater tree cover are less likely to experience diarrheal disease, the second leading cause of death for kids under the age of five. The study is the first to quantify the connection between watershed quality and individual health outcomes of children at the global scale. The study results from a major new database that
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fruit fly muscles with a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation don't relax properlyUsing fruit flies, researchers have figured out why a particular inherited human heart condition that is almost always due to genetic mutations causes the heart to enlarge, thicken and fail. They found that one such mutation interferes with heart muscle's ability to relax after contracting, and prevents the heart from fully filling with blood and pumping it out.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New biomarker predicts metastatic prostate cancersMany prostate cancers, which generally are diagnosed in older men, are "indolent," slow-growing tumors that aren't destined to be fatal. But some tumors are prone to becoming aggressive and spreading beyond the prostate, making them difficult to treat and life-threatening. Currently, doctors have limited ability to predict which newly diagnosed tumors will progress slowly and which will probably u
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Indigenous Nations' environmental stewardship in tackling invasive speciesAs invasive species are threatening ecological habitats throughout the US and Canada, the role of Indigenous nations as environmental stewards has often been overlooked, according to a new study. The findings provide examples of the many ways Indigenous nations are adapting to invasive species, documenting their impact and implementing active response strategies based on an online survey of over 1
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How honeybees read the waggle danceNeurons that enable honeybees to sense the waggle dance -- a form of symbolic communication used by female bees to inform the hivemates about the location of a food source -- have now been investigated.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Digital services collect unnecessary personal informationDigital services that require users to log in with a personal account often collect more information about users than is needed. Certain policies may encroach on our privacy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Safe to treat dementia patients with clot-busting drugs, study showsStroke patients with dementia treated with intravenous thrombolysis using powerful clot-busting drugs are at no higher risk of brain haemorrhage or death than other patients receiving the same treatment, a new study reports.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The risk of type 1 diabetes not increased by swine flu vaccine PandemrixThere has been a fear that the swine flu vaccine, Pandemrix, would increase the risk of autoimmune diseases other than narcolepsy. However, a new study of children from Sweden and Finland shows that the vaccine increased neither the risk of developing autoantibodies against insulin-producing beta cells nor the occurrence of type 1 diabetes.
19h
Gizmodo
The Latest Wildfires in a Destructive Season Are Ravaging Northern California [Updated] Flames from a wildfire burn Monday, Oct. 9, 2017, in Napa, Calif. The fire is one of several burning across Northern California. Photo: AP A night of wildfire-induced terror in Napa has given way to a morning hellscape. Unchecked fires raged through five northern California counties overnight on Sunday, incinerating an as yet uncounted number of structures, forcing harrowing hospital evacuations
19h
Scientific American Content: Global
Toward an Imagination ScienceIs imagination a fixed ability, or can it be enhanced through targeted intervention? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
20h
Ars Technica
Advertised broadband speeds should actually be realistic, UK tells ISPs Enlarge / BT Openreach van and a coil of yellow broadband fibre cable awaiting installation in February 2017 in London, England. (credit: Getty Images | Richard Baker) The United Kingdom's telecom regulator, Ofcom, wants to strengthen an industry code that lets Internet customers exit contracts without penalty when broadband providers fall short of their advertised speeds. Ofcom's proposed change
20h
Live Science
Bacteria Can Be Programmed to Assemble Structures from Gold ParticlesBacterial colonies programmed with synthetic genes can assemble microscopic particles of gold into useful devices such as sensors, a new study finds.
20h
New Scientist - News
Father of ‘nudge’ psychology wins economics NobelRichard Thaler has won this year's Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences for his work on the limits to human rationality and how to subtly influence people's behaviour
20h
New Scientist - News
Cold climate may have driven ancient humans’ move out of AfricaEast Africa became colder and drier around 75,000 years ago, just when modern humans were apparently migrating out of Africa
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Gizmodo
Amazon's Running Some of the Best SONOS Discounts We've Ever Seen SONOS PLAY:1 , $147 with code SONOSPLAY1 SONOS PLAY:5 , $399 with code SONOSPLAY5 There’s a new SONOS in town , which means you can score one of the best discounts ever on the still-great PLAY:1, as well as the PLAY:5, which didn’t get updated last week. Just note that you’ll need to have an Alexa device tied to your Amazon account for these promo codes to work. Update: The SONOS PLAYBAR also com
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Science | The Guardian
Apollo 14 song: a hymn to God, or to the Nazis? | Letter Stephen Sedley speculates on links between How Great Thou Art, the Horst Wessel Song and Wernher von Braun’s contribution to the US space programme Tim Radford’s review of The Earth Gazers by Christopher Potter (Review, 7 October) notes that the American astronaut Stuart Roosa played the hymn How Great Thou Art as his craft, Apollo 14, approached the moon. The review goes on to discuss the contri
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A spoonful of oil: Fats and oils help to unlock full nutritional benefits of veggies, study suggestsSome dressing with your greens may help you absorb more nutrients, according to a new study. The research found enhanced absorption of multiple fat-soluble vitamins in addition to beta-carotene and three other carotenoids. The results may ease the guilt of countless dieters who fret about adding dressing to their salads.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Surgery: Sticking instead of stitchingIn spite of medical advances, wound-related complications arising after operations can still be life-threatening. In order to avoid these complications in the future, a new nanoparticle-based tissue glue has been developed by researchers at Empa.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Molecular basis for memory and learning: Brain development and plasticity share similar signalling pathwaysLearning and memory are two important functions of the brain that are based on the brain’s plasticity. Scientists now report on how a trio of key molecules directs these processes. Their findings provide new leads for the therapy of Alzheimer’s disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
E-cigarettes should be promoted as a method of stopping smokingE-cigarettes should be promoted as a method of stopping smoking according to a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Establishing a conservation breeding program to save the last saolaThe saola (Pseudoryx nghetinhensis), a primitive wild cattle endemic to the Annamite mountain range in Vietnam and Lao People’s Democratic Republic (PDR), is in immediate danger of extinction. The primary threat to its survival is intensive commercial snaring to supply the thriving wild meat trade in Indochina. In order to save the saola it is essential to establish a conservation breeding program
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Double mastectomy tied to more missed workAs more breast cancer patients are choosing to remove both breasts, researchers examine the impact this aggressive surgery has on their employment.
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Gizmodo
Watch Out AirPods, Here Comes Bose All photos: Adam Clark Estes / Gizmodo Apple crushed a big problem when it released the AirPods. Companies had been trying—and failing—to build truly wireless earbuds for years. But then Apple showed up and was like, “Here they are!” Now, it’s Bose’s turn. The new SoundSport Free wireless earbuds are sleek, powerful, and dependable. The Bose buds can do things that the AirPods can’t . They’re als
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Futurity.org
How treating dirt well could fight climate change If managed well, soil could “significantly” offset increasing global emissions by trapping carbon dioxide. In two overlapping papers, researchers call for a reversal of federal cutbacks to related research programs to learn more about soil’s benefits and emphasize the need for more research into how—if managed well—it could mitigate a rapidly changing climate. Forested permafrost degrading in Ala
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Futurity.org
Oil on your salad may boost its benefits Dieters who fret about adding dressing to their salad can feel less guilty, a new small study of 12 women suggests. The findings show that added fat from soybean oil promotes absorption of seven different micronutrients in salad vegetables. “For most people, the oil is going to benefit nutrient absorption…” Those nutrients include four carotenoids—alpha and beta carotene, lutein, and lycopene—two
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bacteria self-organize to build working sensorsBy programming bacteria with a synthetic gene circuit that can recruit gold nanoparticles to the surface of their colony, researchers can build functional devices. A proof-of-concept study uses this technique to build dome-shaped pressure sensors with the help of living bacteria.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Solar energy: Prototype shows how tiny photodetectors can double their efficiencyPhysicists have developed a photodetector -- a device that converts light into electrons -- by combining two distinct inorganic materials and producing quantum mechanical processes that could revolutionize the way solar energy is collected. The researchers stacked two atomic layers of tungsten diselenide on a single atomic layer of molybdenum diselenide. Such stacking results in properties vastly
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Making fat mice lean: Novel immune cells control neurons responsible for fat breakdownThe biological causes underlying obesity have been under intense scrutiny with studies suggesting a link between the nervous and the immune systems. Now, in a breakthrough study to be published in Nature Medicine on Oct. 9, a research team led by Ana Domingos, from Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência, discovered an unforeseen population of immune cells associated with neurons that play a direct role i
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New congenital heart disease genes uncoveredA new study has helped shed new light on some of the underlying genetic causes of cases of CHD as well as the long-term outlook for patients who carry these mutations.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel circuit design boosts wearable thermoelectric generatorsUsing flexible conducting polymers and novel circuitry patterns printed on paper, researchers have demonstrated proof-of-concept wearable thermoelectric generators that can harvest energy from body heat to power simple biosensors for measuring heart rate, respiration or other factors.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Disease-carrying mosquitoes abound in deforested landsUF scientists synthesized and examined data from prior studies that had looked at how many pathogen-carrying mosquito species made their homes in forested lands vs. non-forested lands in 12 countries worldwide, including the United States.
20h
Popular Science
Good news! We're probably not living in a computer simulation. Science It's virtually impossible. Researchers calculate that it would take more computing power and storage than actually exists to create a digital reality.
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Gizmodo
On Star Trek: Discovery, Burnham Is Torn Between the Two Tenets of Starfleet All images: CBS Captain Lorca doesn’t have a lot of dimension, but it turns out that’s a good thing. Lorca is best when he is merely an archetype of a certain set of militaristic beliefs, set in opposition to scientist Stamets, who’s devoted to the pursuit of knowledge only. And of course, Burnham’s journey is about trying to navigate a path between them. This episode was split between the goings
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Watch out! Brain network calculates impact of approaching objectA neuroimaging study of two monkeys published in JNeurosci identifies a brain network that tracks the location of an object approaching the face and anticipates its potential consequences upon making contact with the body.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How honeybees read the waggle danceNeurons that enable honeybees to sense the waggle dance -- a form of symbolic communication used by female bees to inform the hivemates about the location of a food source -- are investigated in new research published in JNeurosci.
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NYT > Science
Why Stanford Researchers Tried to Create a ‘Gaydar’ MachineScientists worried that facial recognition software could be used to detect sexual orientation. Their efforts to raise an alarm caused an uproar.
20h
New Scientist - News
Most science papers turn out to be wrong. It’s time to fix thatResearch findings often crumble under the microscope. Rows over the best way to fix this must end so we can stop trust in science crumbling too, says Robert Matthews
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New Scientist - News
Evolution’s rules mean life on Earth isn’t that varied after allWhile there are millions of species on Earth, many of them have almost identical lifestyles, suggesting nature is more regular and rule-based than we thought
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Viden
Barbie-firma dropper kunstigt intelligent babysitterLegetøjsgiganten Mattel lancerer alligevel ikke produktet ‘Aristotle’, der var designet som en digital assistent til små børn.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Droughts and wildfires: How global warming is drying up the North American monsoonPrevious researchers had concluded that global warming was simply delaying the North American monsoon, which brings summer rains to the southwestern US and northwestern Mexico. But a new, high-resolution climate model that corrects for persistent sea surface temperature (SST) biases now accurately reflects current rainfall conditions and demonstrates that the monsoon is not simply delayed, but tha
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Durable end to the HIV/AIDS pandemic likely will require an HIV vaccineDespite remarkable gains in the treatment and prevention of HIV infection, development of an effective HIV vaccine likely will be necessary to achieve a durable end to the HIV/AIDS pandemic, according to experts.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nerve cells' gatekeepers take many formsScientists track the conformations of proteins that stand guard at transmembrane channels in the walls of nerve cells. The research could lead to refined drugs to treat neurological conditions.
20h
Feed: All Latest
MIT Wizards Invent Tech That Sees Around CornersEngineers at MIT have developed a clever and surprisingly simple way to see around corners, thanks to the hidden wonders of light.
21h
Ars Technica
Elon Musk says Tesla is still in Model 3 “production hell” Enlarge (credit: David Butow | Getty Images) If there's one thing the Internet likes, it's a good slapfight, particularly when the arguing involves Tesla. The most recent outbreak of hostilities began on Thursday, when Tesla-skeptical Daily Kanban reported that parts of the Model 3 production line had not yet been installed in Tesla's Fremont factory. The following day, Tesla CEO Elon Musk used T
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Gizmodo
Following ‘Faked’ Footage Scandal, Baltimore Moves to Restrict Public Access to Body Cam Footage Pinheiro’s body camera footage. Image Credit: Twitter/ Justin Fenton Two members of Baltimore County Council have introduced a new resolution to tighten public access to body camera footage. The measure, introduced by Republican councilmen Todd Crandell and Wade Kach, comes after dozens of criminal cases were dropped in Baltimore City following the release of camera footage that seemingly uncover
21h
Ars Technica
“Technical difficulties” plague Arizona lottery; same winning numbers drawn Enlarge / Note—this isn't the Arizona machine in question. (credit: Science & Society Picture Library/Getty Images) Arizona Lottery officials are investigating what they described on their website as "technical difficulties" surrounding one of their random number generators used to pick the winning numbers for many of the state's lottery games. As it turns out, the machine generated the same winn
21h
New on MIT Technology Review
The Trump Administration Acts to Axe the Clean Power Plan
21h
Live Science
Why Sexual Assault Victims Wait to Speak OutLast week, The New York Times reported that Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein had reached at least eight settlements with women who accused him of sexual harassment and unwanted physical contact.
21h
Gizmodo
The Mysteries of Blade Runner 2049 Were Not Meant to Be Explained in Sequels Image: Warner Bros All studios want nowadays is for their films to launch a franchise, to the point where the cinematic universe is sometimes being created before the first movie. However, it looks like Blade Runner 2049 has no intention of following suit—which could be a good thing, seeing as it may not get the chance to. Of course, it’s also annoying, since there were a lot of threads introduce
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Uber puts the brakes on UberPOP in NorwayUber announced Monday it was suspending its UberPOP ride-sharing service in Norway until adequate legislation had been adopted in the Scandinavian country.
21h
New Scientist - News
Kuwait’s plans for mandatory DNA database have been cancelledKuwait has revoked the world’s first law requiring everyone to submit samples of their DNA, after a court found it would violate personal liberty
21h
Science : NPR
EPA Chief Announces Reversal Of Obama-Era Curbs On Coal Plants In a speech in Kentucky on Monday, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt said the old rules aimed at reducing carbon dioxide were tantamount to declaring war on the coal industry. (Image credit: Andrew Harnik/AP)
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stanford-led study uncovers mutation that supercharges tumor-suppressorStanford scientists have found an answer to one of cancer biology's toughest and most important questions: how does the body suppress tumors?
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel treatment causes cancer to self-destruct without affecting healthy cellsScientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine have discovered the first compound that directly makes cancer cells commit suicide while sparing healthy cells. The new treatment approach, described in today's issue of Cancer Cell, was directed against acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells but may also have potential for attacking other types of cancers.
21h
New Scientist - News
Nanoflares in the sun’s plasma may cause its scalding atmosphereTiny explosions in the atmosphere may explain why the solar corona is a million degrees hotter than the sun’s surface
22h
Ars Technica
A horrifying mouth (that’s actually a caterpillar leg) and more 2017 microscopy Each year, Nikon provides a reminder that the world around us is stunning in its beauty, and we don't have to travel anywhere to see it. Instead, we simply have to magnify what's around us in the first place (and maybe hit it with a bit of UV light so it fluoresces). Everything from a simple green algae to curtain fibers to the legs of a caterpillar reveal details that we'd never guess existed, a
22h
Science : NPR
What Influences Attitudes Toward Gun Control Reform? A paper published this summer shows gun ownership relates to beliefs about mass shootings and points to gun ownership as a powerful driver of motivated cognition, says psychologist Tania Lombrozo. (Image credit: DmyTo/Getty Images/iStockphoto)
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Science | The Guardian
Did you solve it? The pain and pleasure of Japanese puzzles The solutions of today’s puzzles, and the results of the Nikoli Derby. In my column earlier today I set five examples of a new Japanese puzzle called Snake Place and we also played a re-run of the Nikoli Derby, where I asked you to submit a number, with the winner being the person submitting the lowest number that no one else also submits. The solutions to Snake place can be seen here (on a print
22h
The Atlantic
Richard Thaler Wins the Nobel in Economics For Killing Homo Economicus Richard Thaler, one of the fathers of behavioral economics and a professor at the Booth School of Business at the University of Chicago, has won the 2017 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Science. Renowned for his use of data to observe and predict how people behave in the real world , Thaler’s career has been a lifelong war on Homo economicus, that mythical species of purely rational hominids who
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Environmental groups denounce Trump override of climate planA coalition of left-leaning states and environmental groups are vowing to fight the Trump administration's move to kill an Obama-era effort to limit carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants.
22h
Big Think
Universal Brain Activation Discovered When Reading Stories New research at USC shows universal brain activity in the comprehension of stories for the first time. Read More
22h
Ars Technica
Alphabet’s Internet balloons will try to restore cell service in Puerto Rico Enlarge / Project Loon balloons. (credit: Alphabet) The Alphabet division that's building a balloon-powered Internet service has obtained an experimental license "to help provide emergency cellular service in Puerto Rico," the Federal Communications Commission announced Saturday . But it's not clear when—or if—the company will be able to provide service to the hurricane-damaged island, as the FCC
22h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Ancient whale turns up on wrong side of the worldA Southern Hemisphere whale species was briefly a northern resident.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Where is fiber fermented in the pig digestive tract?Fiber is increasingly being added to pig diets, but digestion of fiber in pigs is inefficient and poorly understood. In a new study from the University of Illinois, scientists pinpoint the locations within the digestive tract where fiber is fermented.
22h
Futurity.org
Spot exoplanets from Earth with new telescope add-on A new telescope attachment allows much greater precision in observing exoplanets—planets beyond our solar system—from Earth. With the new attachment, ground-based telescopes can produce measurements of light intensity that rival the highest quality photometric observations from space. The custom “beam-shaping” diffusers—carefully structured micro-optic devices that spread incoming light across an
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Streaming site Mixcloud inks deal in sign of ambitionsMixcloud, the streaming platform popular with DJs and podcasters, announced its first licensing deal with a major music label Monday in a sign of ambitions to compete with top sites.
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Gizmodo
Monday's Top Deals: 4K TV, Sonos Speakers, Halloween Costumes, and More Start off the new week with deals on a 4K TV , Sonos speakers , Halloween costumes for the whole family , a Blendtec blender , and more. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals TCL 55" 4K Roku TV , $398 Sometimes, I’m still amazed that you can get a 55" TV for $398 , let alone one with 4K resolution, HDR10 support, built-in Roku software, and t
22h
Science | The Guardian
Stereotype that women are kinder and less selfish is true, claim neuroscientists Reward system in female brains geared toward ‘prosocial’ behaviour, say researchers, but experts quick to dispute controversial findings “Woman seems to differ from man in mental disposition, chiefly in her greater tenderness and less selfishness,” wrote Charles Darwin in The Descent of Man. Now scientists claim that the stereotype is supported by evidence that the brain’s reward system may be ge
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Viden
Elbil-boom giver nye grønne udfordringerElbilers aftryk på klimaet er ikke nødvendigvis mindre end de brændstofdrevne, lyder det fra flere eksperter.
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Gizmodo
YouTube Bans Some Gun Modification Tutorials, But Plenty Remain Photo: Getty Fifty-eight people were killed in the Las Vegas massacre last week, the deadliest mass shooting in modern US history. Seventeen guns were found in gunman Stephen Paddock’s hotel room, including a dozen that had been modified with a “bump stock,” an added part that allowed the guns to fire more rapidly. And up until today, anyone with access to YouTube could watch a tutorial on how to
22h
New on MIT Technology Review
This Fun AI Tutorial Highlights the Limits of Deep Learning
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Ars Technica
Puerto Rico in talks with Tesla for batteries; Sonnen to help build microgrids Enlarge / SAN ISIDRO, PUERTO RICO - OCTOBER 07: People sit in their home lit by a single donated solar lamp more than two weeks after Hurricane Maria hit the island. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images) (credit: Getty Images) Tesla CEO Elon Musk pledged to send hundreds of energy-storing batteries to Puerto Rico to help the island recover from the devastating hurricane that took all of the island’s
22h
NYT > Science
E.P.A. Announces Repeal of Major Obama-Era Carbon Emissions RuleThe rollback of the Clean Power Plan, which limits greenhouse gas emissions from power plants, sets up a bitter fight over United States climate policy.
22h
Feed: All Latest
GM Buys Lidar Startup Strobe to Help It Deliver Self-Driving CarsThe startup says it can drop the cost of the laser sensors by 99 percent.
22h
Ars Technica
New Justice League trailer looks more Batman V. Superman than Wonder Woman Compared to the world's initial Justice League glimpses at San Diego Comic-Con 2016 , a new trailer from this weekend's New York Comic-Con outlines more of what seems like a plot for the November 17 film. Reporters in Metropolis were never ones to pull punches. "The world remains in mourning after the death of Superman," one broadcaster notes early in the new teaser. "Violence, terrorism, and act
22h
Gizmodo
This Horrible Stick Bug Is No Longer Extinct, Sorry Image: Mikheyev et al, Curr Bio (2017) A tiny island sits almost four hundred miles from the Eastern coast of Australia. Upon that island once lived a large population of giant stick insects—six inch-long “ land lobsters ” dwelling in trees—the Dryococelus australis. But a hundred years ago, mankind came along, bringing pests, black rats, with them. The bugs went extinct at the hands of the rats.
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Futurity.org
How activated carbon could get toxins out of soil Activated carbon, a substance widely used in water purification, can help eliminate the health risks associated with soil and water polluted by dioxins, new research suggests. The research looked specifically at soil and freshwater ecosystems that were contaminated mainly through the industrial manufacture of pesticides and other chemicals. “The goal is to find and validate a new direction in the
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Durable end to the HIV/AIDS pandemic likely will require an HIV vaccineDespite remarkable gains in the treatment and prevention of HIV infection, development of an effective HIV vaccine likely will be necessary to achieve a durable end to the HIV/AIDS pandemic, according to a new commentary from Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nerve cells' gatekeepers take many formsRice and UTHealth scientists track the conformations of proteins that stand guard at transmembrane channels in the walls of nerve cells. The research could lead to refined drugs to treat neurological conditions.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How global warming is drying up the North American monsoonPrevious researchers had concluded that global warming was simply delaying the North American monsoon, which brings summer rains to the southwestern US and northwestern Mexico. But a new, high-resolution climate model that corrects for persistent sea surface temperature (SST) biases now accurately reflects current rainfall conditions and demonstrates that the monsoon is not simply delayed, but tha
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New congenital heart disease genes uncoveredA new study from the NHLBI Pediatric Cardiac Genomics Consortium (PGCG), part of the Bench to Bassinet Program, has helped shed new light on some of the underlying genetic causes of cases of CHD as well as the long-term outlook for patients who carry these mutations. The team, led by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital, publishes its latest findings in Nature Genetics this week.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Addressing the double standardeditorial highlights the need for physicians and pharmacists to educate women about the important distinctions between these hormone therapies.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists complete conservation puzzle, shaping understanding of life on earthAn international team of scientists have completed the 'atlas of life' -- the first global review and map of every vertebrate on Earth. Led by researchers at the University of Oxford and Tel Aviv University, the 39 scientists have produced a catalogue and atlas of the world's reptiles. By linking this atlas with existing maps for birds, mammals and amphibians, the team have found many new areas wh
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Making fat mice lean: Novel immune cells control neurons responsible for fat breakdownThe biological causes underlying obesity have been under intense scrutiny with studies suggesting a link between the nervous and the immune systems. Now, in a breakthrough study to be published in Nature Medicine on Oct. 9, a research team led by Ana Domingos, from Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência, discovered an unforeseen population of immune cells associated with neurons that play a direct role i
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cancer scientists crack the durian genomeScientists from Singapore have mapped the complete genetic blueprint of durian, known in Asia as the 'king of fruits.'Infamous for its pungent and polarizing aroma, durian is well-known to ignite opposing passions of devotion or revulsion in different individuals.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study examines racial differences in quality of end-of-life careAn analysis of survey data found no significant racial differences in various aspects of the quality of end-of-life care, although survey respondents reported deficiencies in the quality of end-of-life care for both black and white patients who died, including unmet symptom needs, problems with communication and less than optimal decision-making, according to an article published by JAMA Internal
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Prototype shows how tiny photodetectors can double their efficiencyUC Riverside physicists have developed a photodetector -- a device that converts light into electrons -- by combining two distinct inorganic materials and producing quantum mechanical processes that could revolutionize the way solar energy is collected. The researchers stacked two atomic layers of tungsten diselenide on a single atomic layer of molybdenum diselenide. Such stacking results in prope
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A zero-index waveguideIn 2015, Harvard researchers developed the first on-chip metamaterial with a refractive index of zero, meaning that the phase of light could be stretched infinitely long. The metamaterial represented a new method to manipulate light and was an important step forward for integrated photonic circuits. Now, Harvard researchers have developed a zero-index waveguide compatible with current silicon phot
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Liquid biopsy may be new way to detect liver cancer earlier, easierAn international team of researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center, with colleagues at Sun Yet-sun University Cancer Center and other collaborating institutions, have developed a new diagnostic and prognosis method for early detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), based on a simple blood sample containing circulating tumor DNA.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bacteria self-organize to build working sensorsBy programming bacteria with a synthetic gene circuit that can recruit gold nanoparticles to the surface of their colony, Duke researchers can build functional devices. A proof-of-concept study appearing in Nature Biotechnology uses this technique to build dome-shaped pressure sensors with the help of living bacteria.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The female brain reacts more strongly to prosocial behavior than the male brainBehavioral Experiments show that women are more generous than men. Now, researchers at the UZH have been able to demonstrate that female and male brains process prosocial and selfish behavior differently. For women, prosocial behavior triggers a stronger reward signal, while male reward systems respond more strongly to selfish behavior.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genome architecture caught in motionResearchers at The Wistar Institute have uncovered new aspects of the three-dimensional organization of the genome, specifically how the genetic material is compacted and de-compacted in a timely fashion during the different phases of the cell cycle.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook security chief warns of dangers to fake-news solutionsFacebook's chief security officer warned that the fake-news problem is more complicated and dangerous to solve than the public thinks.
22h
Ingeniøren
Finland har ventet 10 år på atomreaktor – nu forlænges ventetidFørst hen i maj 2019 kan Finland tage et nyt stort atomkraftværk i brug.
22h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Cancer-genome study challenges mouse 'avatars' Grafting human cancer cells into mice alters tumour evolution. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22782
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Review: Why wait for iPhone X? iPhone 8 has most of the features for hundreds lessAs expected, Apple announced this year's updated iPhones on September 12, but the iPhone X gathered most of the headlines.
23h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
How Africa can use its traditional knowledge to make progress | Chika Ezeanya-EsiobuChika Ezeanya-Esiobu wants to see Africans unleash their suppressed creative and innovative energies by acknowledging the significance of their indigenous, authentic knowledge. In this powerful talk, she shares examples of untapped, traditional African knowledge in agriculture and policy-making, calling on Africans to make progress by validating and dignifying their reality.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google finds Russian-financed content: Washington PostGoogle has found evidence its platforms were exploited by Russian operatives seeking to interfere in the 2016 US presidential election, The Washington Post reported on Monday.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study describes how the three-dimensional architecture of the genome changes during the cell cycleResearchers at The Wistar Institute have uncovered new aspects of the three-dimensional organization of the genome, specifically how the genetic material is compacted and de-compacted in a timely fashion during the different phases of the cell cycle. This study was published in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A zero-index waveguide: Researchers directly observe infinitely long wavelengths for the first timeIn 2015, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) developed the first on-chip metamaterial with a refractive index of zero, meaning that the phase of light could be stretched infinitely long. The metamaterial represented a new method to manipulate light and was an important step forward for integrated photonic circuits, which use light rather tha
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Prototype shows how tiny photodetectors can double their efficiencyPhysicists at the University of California, Riverside have developed a photodetector - a device that senses light - by combining two distinct inorganic materials and producing quantum mechanical processes that could revolutionize the way solar energy is collected.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists complete conservation puzzle, shaping understanding of life on EarthAn international team of scientists have completed the 'atlas of life' - the first global review and map of every vertebrate on Earth.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How global warming is drying up the North American monsoonResearchers have struggled to accurately model the changes to the abundant summer rains that sweep across the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico, known to scientists as the "North American monsoon."
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What makes the durian fruit stink? Cancer scientists crack the durian genomeSingaporean scientists and international collaborators have achieved a world's first by deciphering the complete genetic map of durian, a prized tropical fruit delicacy known in Asia as the "king of fruits." The Singapore team's efforts were driven by both innate scientific curiosity and a love of the fruit.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The female brain reacts more strongly to prosocial behavior than the male brainBehavioral experiments have shown that women are likely to share a sum of money more generously than men. To gain a more in-depth understanding of this behavior, neuroscientists from the Department of Economics looked at the areas of the brain that are active when decisions of this kind are made. They are the first to demonstrate that the brains of men and women respond differently to prosocial an
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bacteria with synthetic gene circuit self-assemble to build working device with gold nanoparticlesResearchers at Duke University have turned bacteria into the builders of useful devices by programming them with a synthetic gene circuit.
23h
Scientific American Content: Global
For Rodent Week, the Gift of JerboasThey jump, they’re variously very large and very small, and they have very weird feet... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers use light-sensitive molecules to track proteins critical to cell signalingThe ability to track the movements of single molecules has revealed how proteins on the surface of nerve cells control gates that turn chemical signals into electrical signals. The finding is a step forward in detailing mechanisms involved in neurological disease, according to researchers at Rice University and the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
GM buys laser firm in bid to speed autonomous car researchGeneral Motors is buying a small company that is developing Laser light sensors for autonomous cars, a move the automaker says will speed deployment of self-driving technology.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Anthrax may have killed 100 hippos in NamibiaOver 100 hippos have died in Namibia in a remote national park in the past week, the country's environment minister said on Monday, warning that anthrax could be to blame.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Singapore's first robot masseuse starts workA robot masseuse has started work in Singapore today. Named Emma, short for Expert Manipulative Massage Automation, it specialises in back and knee massages as it mimics the human palm and thumb to replicate therapeutic massages such as shiatsu and physiotherapy.
23h
Popular Science
Is living forever going to suck? Health We might be too sick to enjoy our extended lifespans. The scuttlebutt around Silicon Valley is that soon we’re going to live way, way longer. But more life doesn’t necessarily mean a better life.
23h
New Scientist - News
Anti-doping agency to ban all gene editing in sport from 2018The World Anti-Doping Agency has extended its ban on “gene doping” to include all forms of gene editing – but it’s not clear if WADA will be able to enforce it
23h
Ingeniøren
Niels Bohr Bygningen: 2,5 km rør skal udskiftes - kan koste op mod én milliard ekstraNiels Bohr Bygningen skal huse store dele af det naturvidenskabelige fakultet. Men ventilationssystemer blev bestilt i forkert materiale og varmerør blev ført gennem serverrum. Hvem skal betale, og hvor skal KU bo?
23h
Gizmodo
Deadspin Video Appears To Show Dolphins O-Line Coach Chris Foerster Snorting Lines | Jezebel NeNe, N Deadspin Video Appears To Show Dolphins O-Line Coach Chris Foerster Snorting Lines | Jezebel NeNe, No! | Earther A Disturbing Amount of the World’s Honey Is Laced With Insecticides | Splinter GOP Senator Says Nearly All Senate Republicans Think Trump Could Cause ‘World War III’ | The Root White Female Candidate Gets Triggered, Claims Black Opponent isn’t ‘Intelligent’ |
23h
cognitive science
Some thoughts on the work of Richard Thaler who won the Nobel Prize in economics today for his work in behavioral economics. submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Official fish trade 'hugely underestimates' global catchesConservation of dwindling fish stocks is being severely hampered by poor controls on global trade, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Human minibrains reveal effects of psychedelic substanceScientists have identified changes in signaling pathways associated with neural plasticity, inflammation and neurodegeneration triggered by a compound from the family of dimethyltryptamine known as 5-MeO-DMT.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sustainable irrigation may harm other development goalsPursuing sustainable irrigation without significant irrigation efficiency gains could negatively impact environmental and development goals in many areas of the world, a new study has found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How brain cells die in Alzheimer's and FTDRemoval of a regulatory gene called LSD1 in adult mice induces changes in gene activity that that look unexpectedly like Alzheimer's. Another surprise: LSD1 is tangled up in brain samples from humans with Alzheimer's and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), suggesting LSD1 as a central downstream player in these diseases and a drug target.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Reported penicillin allergy appears to increase the risk of surgical site infectionsInvestigators found that surgical patients believed to be allergic to penicillin were significantly more likely to develop surgical site infections than were patients with no documented allergy, a difference totally attributable to the alternative antibiotics used to prevent such infections.
23h
Gizmodo
Microsoft Confirms Windows Phone Won't Be Resurrected Any Time Soon Image: Microsoft In case the lack of new phones or software updates didn’t already clue you in, Microsoft has shut down any efforts to keep Windows Mobile 10 alive. On Twitter, Microsoft’s corporate vice president for Windows Joe Belfiore stated that the company is no longer actively developing new features or hardware for the platform, and that he has even switched over to an Android phone for h
23h
Futurity.org
‘Deep tremors’ could warn us about earthquakes Deep tremors, a type of “slow earthquake” that releases energy over a period of hours to months, may lead to regular earthquakes, researchers report. The finding could help seismologists better forecast some strong earthquakes set to occur within a certain window of time, enabling warnings and other preparations that may save lives. “While the build-up of stress in the Earth’s crust is largely pr
23h
New on MIT Technology Review
Electric Buses Get a Power Boost
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More nurses are earning bachelor's degrees, but likely will not reach 2020 goalThe proportion of front-line nurses with bachelor's degrees in US hospitals increased from 44 percent in 2004 to 57 percent in 2013, but will fall short of a national goal to reach 80 percent by 2020, finds a new study by NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing.
23h
Feed: All Latest
The Best Instant Cameras of 2017: Polaroid, Instax, Fujifilm, LeicaThese are the best instant cameras you can buy in 2017.
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Gizmodo
NASA's Odyssey Takes Its First Picture of Martian Moon Phobos After 16 Years Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASU The Odyssey orbiter has been hovering above Mars, photographing its surface and taking data for 16 years now. There’s seemingly infinite combinations of things to study and instruments to study them with—this time, all NASA had to do was turn the camera around. Odyssey snapped its first photos of the tiny Martian moon, Phobos, with its Thermal Emission Imaging System (
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Gizmodo
55". 4k. Hdr. $398. TCL 55" 4K Roku TV , $398 Sometimes, I’m still amazed that you can get a 55" TV for $398 , let alone one with 4K resolution, HDR10 support, built-in Roku software, and the ability to use your phone as a remote. This has gotten down to this price a few times in the past, but it usually sells out quickly and goes back to $450. It’s 1-3 weeks backordered, but Amazon tends to under-promise
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Futurity.org
This can make middle managers inflate success Middle managers may be key in promoting unethical behavior among their subordinates, new research suggests. In a study of a large telecommunications company, researchers found that middle managers used a range of tactics to inflate their subordinates’ performance and deceive top management, according to Linda Treviño, professor of organizational behavior and ethics at Penn State. The managers may
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New Scientist - News
Exploding stars could have kick-started our ancestors’ evolutionThe savannahs early hominins occupied might have appeared thanks to a spate of wildfires 8 million years ago – which might in turn be linked to a nearby supernova
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Dagens Medicin
Anders Beich genvalgt som formand for almen medicinere Anders Beich fra Region Hovedstaden er genvalgt som formand for DSAM uden modkandidater. Det vigtigste i hans næste formandsperiode bliver kvalitetsarbejde i sektoren.
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Gizmodo
How to Pick the Best Browser for Your Phone Image: Screenshot Perhaps you’ve been using the same browser since you first unboxed your phone, or perhaps you switch between them on a weekly basis: There are just as many choices for browsers on mobile as there are on desktop and each runs a little differently. Below we’ve run through every major browser available—from stalwarts like Chrome and Safari to newer browsers like Puffin. If you want
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Futurity.org
Aging adults more likely to reveal thoughts of suicide A new study shows that 23 percent of people 50 and older who died by suicide had disclosed their suicidal intent. Conditions associated with aging such as chronic pain, diagnosed or perceived terminal illness, social isolation, and the death of friends and family can push older Americans toward ending their lives. “Health care providers need better preparation to screen and aid those in need to p
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Science | The Guardian
If the ‘antibiotic apocalypse’ happens, it’ll be because our politicians let it | Nick DeardenAgribusiness and big pharma prioritising profits could lead to 10 million deaths a year by 2050 – but political intervention can prevent this disaster An antibiotic apocalypse is coming. It threatens to reverse medical practice by 100 years by making life-saving operations impossible and turning routine infections into killers again. Rather than panic and head to the hills, we need to understand t
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The Atlantic
American Kakistocracy Kakistocracy is a term that was first used in the 17th century; derived from a Greek word, it means, literally, government by the worst and most unscrupulous people among us. More broadly, it can mean the most inept and cringeworthy kind of government. The term fell into disuse over the past century or more, and most highly informed people have never heard it before (but to kids familiar with the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SpaceX launches 10 satellites for Iridium mobile networkSpaceX launched its Falcon 9 rocket on Monday carrying 10 satellites to bolster the global data communications network for Virginia-based company, Iridium.
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Futurity.org
Nano ‘capsule’ flu shot could fight changing strains Researchers have created a new kind of quick-acting and long-lasting flu shot aimed at fighting pandemic influenza A. “Even if we have to give a booster shot every 10 years, like tetanus, that’s still very good…” A seasonal flu shot is a bit like a local weather forecast: Based on the conditions elsewhere and the direction of the prevailing wind, a meteorologist can give the public a pretty good
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
LIGO's unsung heroes Nature highlights just a few of the people who played a crucial part in the discovery of gravitational waves — but didn’t win the Nobel Prize. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22786
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Gizmodo
Russian Agents Used Google to Interfere in Election: Report Photo: AP Russian actors spent tens of thousands of dollars on Google ads meant to interfere with the 2016 US presidential election, the Washington Post reported on Monday. Citing employees “familiar” with Google’s internal investigations, the Post reports that these ads, which appeared on Gmail and YouTube, “do not appear to be from the same... troll farm that bought ads on Facebook.” Facebook h
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BBC News - Science & Environment
British mission to giant A-68 berg approvedUK scientists will take a ship to explore waters exposed by a huge new iceberg in the Antarctic.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists address many-electron problem by modeling an infinite chain of hydrogen atoms(Phys.org)—For the first time, scientists have determined the equation of state of an infinite chain of hydrogen atoms, which tells the amount of energy each hydrogen atom has, given the bond length between adjacent atoms.
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The Atlantic
Mike Pence's Flagrant Waste of Taxpayer Money On Sunday, Vice President Mike Pence made a big show of leaving an NFL game early. He declared himself upset that some players knelt during the singing of “The Star Spangled Banner.” “I will not dignify any event that disrespects our soldiers, our flag, or our national anthem,” he declared, as if attacking those things was the intent of the athletes. The NFL players knelt in protest because they
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Dagens Medicin
Kritisk undersøgelse af kræftgodkendelser får selv kritikForskere udtrykte i sidste uge forargelse over den måde EU godkender kræftlægemidler. Nu bliver forskerne kritiseret for manglende fagligt indsigt.
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Ars Technica
Super NES Classic hacks are now oh, so easy to pull off—you can even add features Enlarge / The clean look of the SNES Classic gets ruined a bit the second you plug stuff in. (credit: Kyle Orland) After guesses, estimations, and positive early tests, the Super NES Classic has emerged as a hackable little piece of gaming nostalgia—and quite an easy one to hack, at that. This weekend saw the September device receive a simple exploit in the form of hakchi2 , a Windows program des
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Quanta Magazine
How to Win at Deep Learning “Deep learning” is the new buzzword in the field of artificial intelligence. As Natalie Wolchover reported in a recent Quanta Magazine article , “‘deep neural networks’ have learned to converse, drive cars, beat video games and Go champions , dream, paint pictures and help make scientific discoveries.” With such successes, one would expect deep learning to be a revolutionary new technique. But on
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cognitive science
How to promote your Messenger Bot! - Engati Blog submitted by /u/getengati [link] [comments]
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dads are often having fun while moms work around the houseFor the first time, researchers have evidence of exactly what dads are doing while moms are taking care of housework or tending to their child. The results will be disappointing for those who expected more gender equity in modern society.
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Popular Science
The search for the extinct Tasmanian tiger Animals Or: What to do if you encounter an extinct animal Dear viewers: The extinct Tasmanian tiger of Australia is still extinct, yet, there’ve been a string of “plausible” sightings of the long gone marsupial.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Alphabet’s Balloons Will Float Data Into Puerto Rico
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Gizmodo
Avengers 4 Set Pictures Reveal a Radical New Look for Hawkeye Ridley Scott teases the focus of his next Alien movie. John Constantine is returning to live-action again. Gillian Anderson’s X-Files future is up in the air. Riverdale has found its long-lost Cooper brother. Plus, more footage from Professor Marston and the Wonder Women . Spoilers, away! Avengers 4 MCU Exchange has unearthed set pictures of multiple cast members on the Russian social media websi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Glycolaldehyde and ethylene glycol detected around Sagittarius B2(Phys.org)—Using the Shanghai Tianma 65m Radio Telescope (TMRT) a team of Chinese astronomers has detected a widespread presence of glycolaldehyde and ethylene glycol around the giant molecular cloud Sagittarius B2. The finding, presented Sept. 29 in a paper published on arXiv.org, could be important for studies of prebiotic molecules in the interstellar medium.
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Ars Technica
Apple TV 4K review: Ambition, meet reality Enlarge / The Apple TV 4K and remote. With the Apple TV 4K, Apple is trying to do more than just provide you with a gadget that can stream Netflix or iTunes Store movies in 4K. This device seeks to solve a problem: the digital TV viewing experience is fragmented and bad, especially if you want to use the sorts of TV network apps that gate episodes or live broadcasts behind a cable provider. The A
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Scientific American Content: Global
Unmasking Anxiety in AutismAnxiety can assume unusual forms—turning uncertainty, or even a striped couch, into a constant worry -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Bad House GuestParasitoid wasps inoculate other insects with their eggs, and their offspring then grow to feed on their "homes," effectively sucking the life out of their dying hosts.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
From flying taxis to robocops, Dubai as a tech pioneerFrom flying taxis to Batman-style surveillance motorcycles, Dubai's GITEX expo this week showcased innovations that were symbols of the city-state's ambitions to be a metropolis of the future.
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Dagens Medicin
Leveren bliver det nye fokus for diabetesbehandlingen Insulinsekretionen hos diabetespatienter normaliseres efter en Gastric Bypass-operation. Forskningen kommer derfor i stadig større grad til at koncentrere sig om at udvikle lægemidler, der kan kopiere de kirurgiske effekter medicinsk, lød meldingen på Dagens Medicins årlige konference om diabetes.
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Gizmodo
Should You Be Allowed to Sell Your Kidney? Photo Illustration by Elena Scotti/Gizmodo/GMG There are currently 96,559 candidates on the list awaiting a kidney transplant in the US. In major cities, the average wait is five to ten years. For those on the list, there are meager options to get off it. They could receive a kidney donation from a relative or a friend. Internationally, some have opted for a murkier route. In 2012, the World Heal
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Gizmodo
The First Reactions to Thor: Ragnarok Live Up to Your Hulk-Sized Expectations Image: Disney Everything we’ve seen from Thor: Ragnarok has blown us away. Bright, fun, Marvel movies have become the norm but, somehow, this has looked different. The trailers and clips have been trippy, manic, and hilarious. Plus, with each new look, they’ve only gotten weirder. Could the film actually live up to that insanity and our growing expectations? Well, the first reactions from the fil
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
India's ambitious plans to achieve sanitation for all must look beyond building individual toilets"Lovers built the Taj Mahal for their love. But I couldn't build a loo." So says Keshav, the lead character of a new Bollywood movie, after his wife leaves him for failing to build a toilet in their home. The film, Toilet: Ek Prem Katha, is a commercial film in support of governmental campaigns to improve sanitation in India.
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Ingeniøren
Professor roser statens energibesparelserDen overordnede tendens i statens energiforbrug ser lovende ud, mener forsker. Der har dog været et opsving i seneste periode.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanoparticles that stick wounds togetherIn spite of medical advances, wound-related complications arising after operations can still be life-threatening. In order to avoid these complications in the future, a new nanoparticle-based tissue glue has been developed by researchers at Empa.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A way to cause graphene to self-fold into 3-D shapes(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with Johns Hopkins University and MIT has found a way to cause flat sheets of graphene to self-fold into 3-D geometric shapes. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the group explains how they prepared the sheets and then used heat to cause them to fold.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Map of micronutrients shows importance of small and medium farmsThat different foods provide different essential micronutrients (such as calcium, vitamin A, and folate) isn't news. But now we know which farms produce the most. New research published in the inaugural issue of The Lancet Planetary Health is the first to map production of micronutrients worldwide on farms of different sizes, spanning 41 crops, 7 livestock products, and 14 fish groups.
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New Scientist - News
Half the universe’s missing matter has just been finally foundAbout half the normal matter in our universe had never been observed – until now. Two teams have finally seen it by combining millions of faint images into one
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Students bring sixty years of data to life on the webFor fields like environmental science, collecting data is hard.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fruit fly muscles with a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation don't relax properlyUsing fruit flies, Johns Hopkins researchers have figured out why a particular inherited human heart condition that is almost always due to genetic mutations causes the heart to enlarge, thicken and fail. They found that one such mutation interferes with heart muscle's ability to relax after contracting, and prevents the heart from fully filling with blood and pumping it out.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why people hate maths and how to fix itWhat do you think of when you think of maths? If you're like most people, it's probably something like: numbers, equations, boredom, anxiety and pain.
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Feed: All Latest
Meet The X-Ray Visionary Looking for Signs of Life on MarsAustralian astrobiologist Abigail Allwood will serve as a principal investigator on NASA's Mars 2020 mission.
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Feed: All Latest
Star Wars News: The Beginning of 'The Last Jedi'The latest batch of rumors from the galaxy far, far away has a lot of juicy tidbits about the next Star Wars film.
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New Scientist - News
Light-filtering paint cools your home when exposed to hot sunLaser cooling has been applied to paint, which could mitigate urban heat islands and solve the problem of how to cool objects in space
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Whoo cares about WA owls?Meet the first man studying owls in the Peel-Harvey Estuary.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists to visit hidden Antarctic ecosystem after giant iceberg calvingA team of scientists, led by British Antarctic Survey (BAS), is planning an urgent mission to investigate a mysterious marine ecosystem that's been hidden beneath an Antarctic ice shelf for up to 120,000 years. The researchers want to discover how this marine ecosystem will respond to environmental change in a climate-sensitive region.
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Live Science
Here's How to Talk to Your Kids About OpioidsMany parents don't think their child is at risk for misusing opioids. But the numbers suggest otherwise, and it's critical to prevent opioid use at a young age.
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Live Science
New Drug to Protect Infants from Whooping Cough Shows PromiseA potential new drug might protect infants from whooping cough in their first few months of life, before they can be vaccinated, early research suggests.
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Scientific American Content: Global
A Healthy Hate for LovegrassScientists and farmers on the Australian prairie have discovered a new way to fight invasive weeds -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica
Blue roads and glowing signs—how this startup’s tech lets cars see the world Enlarge (credit: Aurich / Getty) In the past couple of years, a number of intersecting trends in the automotive and technology worlds have come to be grouped together as mobility . This is not a reference to an IoT-enabled version of those scooters you see people riding at the grocery store but is instead a catch-all covering electric vehicles, self-driving vehicles, and ride-hailing services—eit
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The Atlantic
Remembering Hüsker Dü's Grant Hart When Grant Hart died in September of liver cancer at the age of 56, modern music lost one of its humblest titans. As the drummer, co–lead singer, and co-songwriter of Hüsker Dü from 1979 to the band’s dissolution in 1988, Hart was responsible for a body of songs that resequenced the DNA of punk—and of rock ’n’ roll. Along with his friends and contemporaries in The Replacements and R.E.M., he pave
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Gizmodo
Amazon Just Marked Down Hundreds of Halloween Costumes, Today Only Up to 35% Off Halloween Costumes & More Halloween is in three weeks (!) and if you or your kids are still struggling with this ever-important decision, this one-day Amazon sale is perfect for you. Pick up any kind of costume you’re looking for, for kids, adults, and even your furry friend (who may not be your friend after you dress them up as a pizza slice ). You’d better decide quick though,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Establishing a conservation breeding programme to save the last saolaThe saola (Pseudoryx nghetinhensis), a primitive wild cattle endemic to the Annamite mountain range in Vietnam and Lao People's Democratic Republic (PDR), is in immediate danger of extinction. The primary threat to its survival is intensive commercial snaring to supply the thriving wild meat trade in Indochina. In order to save the saola, it is essential to establish a conservation breeding progra
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Official fish trade hugely underestimates global catchesConservation of dwindling fish stocks is being severely hampered by poor controls on global trade, according to research published today (Monday, October 9, 2017) in Scientific Reports.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study finds 'staying longer at home' was key to stone age technology change 60,000 years agoA new study by scientists at the University of the Witwatersrand suggests that at about 58,000 years ago, Stone Age humans began to settle down, staying in one area for longer periods. The research also provides a potential answer to a long-held mystery: why older, Howiesons Poort complex technological tradition in South Africa, suddenly disappear at that time.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Archaeologist dives to study ancient trade routes in CyprusMany of us dream of spending the summer on the water, but for University of Toronto archaeologist Carrie Fulton, it's just another day on the job.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Digital media are changing the face of buildings, and urban policy needs to change with themLooking over the Melbourne skyline in the evening, I can see at least four high-rise building facades containing digital media. They've become animated, almost flickering like diamonds. And we see this across the globe: buildings now seem to compete to be the most mind-boggling in appearance.
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Live Science
End of the World As We Know It: What's the Draw of Dystopian Sci-Fi?Sci-fi and speculative fiction writers frequently imagine worlds rooted in social disintegration or even total collapse. What inspires these broken futures, and why are they so popular?
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Gizmodo
9 Horror Stories From People Who Had Their Electronic Devices Searched at the Border (AP Photo/Gregory Bull, File) Traveling to the United States can be a huge hassle. Even if you’re an American citizen, Customs and Border Protection (CBP) can pull you aside for extensive and invasive “secondary screening.” And by all accounts, this process has gotten worse since Donald Trump was elected . But it was horrible even before Trump gained power. How horrible? I filed a Freedom of Info
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Banking sun and wind energyThe EU has a hard goal: it wants the Member States to cut greenhouse gas emissions to a fifth, or even a tenth, of the present level by 2050.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Whatever happened to the 15-hour workweek?In 1930, the economist John Maynard Keynes predicted that technological change and productivity improvements would eventually lead to a 15-hour workweek. But, despite significant productivity gains over the past few decades, we still work 40 hours a week on average.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New technology illuminates microbes that can't be cultivated in a laboratoryAt Stanford University, researchers have used a new microfluidic analysis system to extract 29 novel microbial genomes (the complete set of genetic material) from samples from two Yellowstone National Park hot springs. They extracted the genomes while still preserving single-cell resolution, meaning they knew which cells the genetic material came from. This work was made possible by a new technolo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Geology of the Victoria Quadrangle on MercuryMercury, the innermost planet of our solar system is a grey, barren world to our human eyes. In stark contrast, this map shows a portion of the surface in a patchwork of colour, each shade corresponding to a different type of geological feature.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Natural algal population may explain how environmental changes affect global carbon cyclesAlthough they are invisible to the unaided eye, tiny green algae called Ostreococcus play a big role in how carbon, including carbon dioxide (CO2), cycle through our world. Researchers have sequenced and analyzed the complete set of genes (the genome) of 13 members of a natural Ostreococcus population. The analysis revealed that the O. tauri population is larger than anticipated. It's also diverse
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Feed: All Latest
Facebook Quietly Enters StarCraft War for AI Bots, and LosesFacebook entered a StarCraft competition for software bots, revealing its ambition to compete with Google in artificial intelligence.
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New Scientist - News
Nobel prizes would be better without all the fame and fortuneA Nobel prize brings big money and celebrity status for a few, but that's at odds with modern, collaborative science done for the greater good, says Geraint Lewis
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
El Nino in the Pacific has an impact on dolphins over in Western AustraliaIndo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus) are a regular sight in the waters around Australia, including the Bunbury area in Western Australia where they attract tourists.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ten questions you should ask before sharing data about your customersIn 2016, a group of University of Melbourne researchers managed to decrypt some data that should have been anonymous.
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The Atlantic
What Studying Conflict Resolution Teaches About Personal Relationships When people are threatened, evolutionary biology dictates extreme reactions: flee or fight? Donna Hicks, who studies conflict resolution at Harvard, says that this dynamic is at the core of much global tension—it’s just scaled up to the level of cities or countries. So she starts small, focusing on individual interactions. She puts an emphasis on dignity—the inherent value of a life—and says that
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Superbugs may meet their match in these nanoparticlesQuantum dots and antibiotics hit bacteria with a one-two punch.
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Science | The Guardian
Our Restless Earth: photography competition winners 2017 – in pictures The Geological Society of London has announced the 12 winners of its photography competition. The chosen images represent the dynamic processes which have shaped the UK and Ireland over its tectonic history, from ancient volcanic activity to ice age glaciers. The pictures will feature in a free exhibition at the Geological Society to mark Earth Science Week, 7-15 October. Continue reading...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Richard Thaler wins Nobel for work in behavioral economicsThe Nobel prize in economics has been awarded to Richard Thaler of the University of Chicago for research showing how people's choices on economic matters—whether on savings or game shows like "Deal or No Deal"—are not always rational.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Artificial nests aim to increase Shy Albatross breeding successSpecially built mudbrick and aerated concrete artificial nests, airlifted on to Bass Strait's Albatross Island in a trial program aimed at increasing the breeding success of the Tasmanian Shy Albatross, appear to have been accepted by the vulnerable sea-birds, early monitoring is showing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Know your cement, get greener concreteAn international team of scientists has created a new database of molecular dynamics models that simulate the properties of cement in all its varieties. It's intended to help fine-tune this component of concrete and curtail emissions in its manufacturing process.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Hubble's bubbles in the Tarantula NebulaAt a distance of just 160,000 light-years, the Large Magellanic Cloud is one of the Milky Way's closest companions. It is also home to one of the largest and most intense regions of active star formation known to exist anywhere in our galactic neighborhood—the Tarantula Nebula. This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows both the spindly, spidery filaments of gas that inspired the region's na
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Scientific American Content: Global
Jane Goodall, Still Traveling the World and Speaking Up for Animals at 83The famed primatologist talks about her past work, her environmental concerns and the importance of conservation -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists control the rate of breaking and fixing dihydrogen moleculeHydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe. The dihydrogen molecule, with an H-H bond, is one of the simplest and most flexible in chemistry. Cleaving a dihydrogen bond to produce or store energy requires designing the catalyst with the perfect balance of properties to achieve the desired reactivity. In addition, the ability to get that molecule to reassemble itself and to control the r
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
ATLAS experiment studies fragments of the top quarkTop quarks in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) proton-proton collisions are predominantly produced in pairs, with one top quark and one top antiquark. In order to measure the production rates of top quark pairs, the ATLAS Experiment examined events with an electron, muon, and one or two jets that were likely to have originated from bottom quarks. By comparing the number of events with one bottom-qu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Computing the physics that links nuclear structure, element formation, and the life and death of starsThe Big Bang began the formation and organization of the matter that makes up ourselves and our world. Nearly 14 billion years later, nuclear physicists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and their partners are using America's most powerful supercomputers to characterize the behavior of objects, from subatomic neutrons to neutron stars, that differ dramatically in s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Luwian hieroglyphic inscription explains the end of the Bronze AgeAn interdisciplinary team of Swiss and Dutch archaeologists today announced the rediscovery of a 29-meter-long Luwian hieroglyphic inscription that describes the events at the end of the Bronze Age in the Eastern Mediterranean. One of the greatest puzzles of Mediterranean archeology can thus be plausibly solved.
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New Scientist - News
We urgently need to broaden the conversation on AIIt’s time to get past the scare stories and start discussing the real uses and abuses of machine learning
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Ingeniøren
Krematoriet online: Nu kan den sidste rejse bestilles digitalt Der er ikke længere noget argument for at sende post og e-mails mellem landets kirkegårde og krematorier og Kirkeministeriets såkaldte ’Brune PersonSAG’. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/bestillingen-braending-begravelse-paa-kirkegaarde-krematorier-nu-digitaliseret-1081480 Version2
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Ingeniøren
Digital sladrehank bekræfter myter om unge bilisterForsikringsselskaber i Norge vil bruge kørselsdata til at bestemme prisen på forsikring.
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Ingeniøren
Techtopia #21: Kan virtual reality skabe bedre forretning for industrien?Podcast: VR giver bedre uddannede medarbejdere og rummer potentiale til besparelser og dermed bedre forretning. Siemens Wind Power viser vejen på konferencen Technomania.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
India's top court bans firecracker sales before DiwaliIndia's top court ordered a temporary ban on the sale of firecrackers in New Delhi on Monday, ahead of the Diwali festival that leaves the city shrouded in toxic smog.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sustainable irrigation may harm other development goals, study showsPursuing sustainable irrigation without significant irrigation efficiency gains could negatively impact environmental and development goals in many areas of the world, a new study has found.
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The Atlantic
Will the Supreme Court Unravel Public Employee Unions? In Chronicle of a Death Foretold , a 1981 novel by Nobel laureate Gabriel García Márquez, twin brothers in a port village stalk and murder a neighbor for the supposed crime of deflowering their sister. García Marquez’s anonymous narrator, tracing the roots of the crime years later, finds that almost everyone in the nameless town knew that Pablo and Pedro Vicario were planning to murder Santiago N
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The Atlantic
America's Many Divides Over Free Speech Would you say that people should be allowed to express unpopular opinions in public, even those that are deeply offensive to other people; or that government should prevent people from engaging in hate speech against certain groups in public? That choice kicked off a lengthy survey on free speech and tolerance that will be released later this month by The Cato Institute, which collaborated with Y
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Ingeniøren
Ugens job: Ekstraordinær lang liste med ledige ingeniørstillinger Flere virksomheder som for eksempel MT Højgaard, ISC Rådgivende Ingeniører, Dong, Teknologisk Institut og Energinet jagter ingeniører. Find dit drømmejob på ugens jobliste. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/ugens-job-ekstraordinaer-lang-liste-med-ledige-ingenioerstillinger-10473 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
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Ingeniøren
Et chat-klenodie takker af: AIM lukker og slukker I mere end 20 år har chatprogrammet tilladt internetbrugere verden over at kommunikere i realtid. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/chat-klenodie-takker-aim-lukker-slukker-1081479 Version2
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Viden
TEGNESERIE Stress aktiverer kroppens doping-fabrikNår du bliver stresset, begynder din krop at arbejde anderledes end normalt. Slå lyden til og klik dig gennem et illustreret kig ind i kroppen.
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Science | The Guardian
The Butchering Art: Joseph Lister’s Quest to Transform the Grisly World of Victorian Medicine – review Lindsey Fitzharris’s story of Lister’s battle to introduce hygiene to the operating theatre makes compelling reading Armed with surgical instruments, chloroform and his sterilising spray, Joseph Lister was ready for action. It was 1871 and the eminent surgeon was about to tackle an enormous abscess that, left unchecked, could prove fatal. There was one further complication: the patient was the Qu
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Ved at skrue på en detalje, kan man forbedre helhedenDet, der driver mig i mit job hver dag, er, at vi hele tiden har mulighed for at gøre det endnu...
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Dagens Medicin
Overlæger har mindre tid til patienterne Tiden til patienterne er faldet over de seneste år. I dag bruger overlægerne kun lidt over halvdelen af deres tid på patienterne, viser ny undersøgelse.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New insight into how brain cells die in Alzheimer's and FTDRemoval of a regulatory gene called LSD1 in adult mice induces changes in gene activity that that look unexpectedly like Alzheimer's. Another surprise: LSD1 is tangled up in brain samples from humans with Alzheimer's and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), suggesting LSD1 as a central downstream player in these diseases and a drug target.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Human minibrains reveal effects of psychedelic substanceA Brazilian study, published in Scientific Reports on Oct. 9, 2017, has identified changes in signaling pathways associated with neural plasticity, inflammation and neurodegeneration triggered by a compound from the family of dimethyltryptamine known as 5-MeO-DMT.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sustainable irrigation may harm other development goals, study showsPursuing sustainable irrigation without significant irrigation efficiency gains could negatively impact environmental and development goals in many areas of the world, a new study has found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Global kids study: More trees, less diseaseA study of 300,000 children in 35 nations says children whose watersheds have greater tree cover are less likely to experience diarrheal disease, the second leading cause of death for kids under the age of five.Published in Nature Communications, the study is the first to quantify the connection between watershed quality and individual health outcomes of children at the global scale. The study res
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What can be discovered at the junction of physics and chemistry?Tomsk State University scientist Rashid Valiev and colleagues from the universities of Helsinki and Oslo have discovered a new category of rare molecules whose properties can be controlled by changing the induction of an external magnetic field. These are paramagnetic molecules from the class porphyrins. Porphyrins are present in hemoglobin and chlorophyll and are closely related to the processes
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers report reversal of current flow in a quantum systemIn a classical thermodynamic system, heat current flows from the hotter body to the colder one, or electricity from the higher voltage to the lower one. The same thing happens in quantum systems, but this state can be changed, and the flow of energy and particles can be reversed if a quantum observer is inserted into the system.
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Ny bog om grøntsager på japanskHvis man skal have mange til at spise flere grøntsager, skal de ganske enkelt smage bedre. Det...
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The Atlantic
Is Catalonia Testing the Resiliency of Spanish Democracy? For many, the police violence that engulfed last week’s referendum for Catalan independence, which left some 800 people injured, did not suggest a strong, modern European democracy capable of dealing with dissent. In fact, for some, the scenes of Spain’s national police confiscating voter ballots and attacking protesters with batons and rubber bullets recalled images of a bygone era—the military
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The Atlantic
The Only Woman Running for President in Her Country The West African nation of Liberia will hold its general election on October 10th. It’s a significant moment for the country, which has suffered through not only 14 years of a bloody civil war that ended in 2003, but also an Ebola outbreak beginning in 2014 and falling commodity prices that have impeded its fragile recovery. On the day of the vote, President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf will step down a
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Ingeniøren
Vi er slet ikke klar til førerløse bilerRapport: Selv om teknologien snart er klar med biler, der kan køre os rundt uden chauffør, så mangler vi at få afklaret de helt grundlæggende forhindringer.
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Big Think
How Many Years of Your Life Will Your House Cost You? Of course, the reality is even worse than these maps suggest. Read More
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Klar politisk linje bag socialdemokraternes fodnoter i 80’erneSocialdemokratiets fodnotepolitik var i udgangspunktet ikke et spørgsmål om drilleri og...
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Ingeniøren
EU skal arbejde hårdt for at nå klimamål i 2030 og 2050Mellem 2030 og 2050 skal udledningen af EU's drivhusgasser reduceres tre til fire gange så meget som hidtil.
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Dagens Medicin
Sammen mod en moderne psykiatriOverlæge og yngre læge i Region Hovedstadens Psykiatri kommer med udtalelser om psykologer, som skaber et uheldigt samarbejdsklima. Det skaber et gammeldags og reduktionistisk billede af psykiatrien, som jeg ærlig talt ikke oplever at de fleste medicinere og speciallæger deler.
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Science | The Guardian
We all need psychoanalysis – it would make Britain a happier, kinder place | Susanna Rustin With one in four teenage girls being depressed, it’s clear that there is no shortage of people needing help. It needn’t cost the earth – and it certainly worked for me Was I mentally ill? I suppose I was, though the first time someone in my family used the phrase “verge of a nervous breakdown”, or something like it, I was taken aback. Probably I was about as far from well as it was possible to be
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Science-Based Medicine
The Pathological Optimist: More hagiography than documentary about Andrew Wakefield The Pathological Optimist is a recently released documentary by Miranda Bailey about Andrew Wakefield that I got a chance to see. In interviews and in the film's promotional materials, Bailey takes great pains to emphasize that she "doesn't take a side" about Wakefield. Unfortunately, her film demonstrates that, when it comes to pseudoscience, "not taking a side" is taking a side, and that a film
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Ingeniøren
Derfor gik strømmen på ØresundsforbindelsenStrømafbrydelsen, der lukkede Øresundsforbindelsen en times tid fredag, opstod under et planlagt elarbejde, da teknikerne forsøgte at slå nødstrømsanlægget fra.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Black rhino to return to Chad after South Africa dealSouth Africa and Chad on Sunday signed an agreement that will see the re-introduction next year of critically endangered black rhino to the central African country, decades after it was last seen there.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Iraqi animal lovers go online to help save Baghdad's straysThe welfare of stray cats and dogs roaming Iraq's capital Baghdad is far from a priority for most residents after years of bloodshed and insecurity.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Japan scientists grow drugs in chicken eggsJapanese researchers have genetically engineered hens whose eggs contain drugs that can fight serious diseases including cancer, in a bid to dramatically reduce the cost of treatment, a report said Monday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study first to show how couples spend time minute-by-minuteFor the first time, researchers have evidence of exactly what dads are doing while moms are taking care of housework or tending to their child.
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Science | The Guardian
Can you solve it? The pain and pleasure of Japanese puzzles A new logic puzzle from Japan, and another chance to be a number ninja UPDATE: Click here for the solutions and the results of the Nikoli Derby Hi guzzlers Last column we played the Nikoli Derby, a Japanese game in which I asked you to submit the lowest number nobody else submits. The winner was 69. Honestly! It was such fun that we’re going play another round today, below. (Again, there’s a priz
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reported penicillin allergy appears to increase the risk of surgical site infectionsA study by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators found that surgical patients believed to be allergic to penicillin were significantly more likely to develop surgical site infections than were patients with no documented allergy, a difference totally attributable to the alternative antibiotics used to prevent such infections.
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Science | The Guardian
The real risks of artificial intelligence AI professor and author Toby Walsh discusses the dangers of ‘stupid’ artificial intelligence with Jack Stilgoe . Professor Toby Walsh has recently published a book – Android Dreams – giving a researcher’s perspective on the uncertainties and opportunities of artificial intelligence. Here, he explains to Jack Stilgoe that we should worry more about the short-term risks of stupid AI in self-driving
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Science | The Guardian
Country diary: mushrooms work their magic amid the drizzle Dolebury Warren, Somerset In an iron age hill fort once ruled by rabbits, waxcaps speckle the ground with luminous colour This shapely hill has steep sides, the sheep-walked turf trodden into neat pleats along the contours. On the ridge, upstanding stony ribs encircle a heart of deeper soil – the iron age hill fort, the Dolebury . In medieval times, when rabbits were tender creatures, a protectiv
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dads are often having fun while moms work around the houseFor the first time, researchers have evidence of exactly what dads are doing while moms are taking care of housework or tending to their child. The results will be disappointing for those who expected more gender equity in modern society.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds double mastectomy tied to more missed workAs more breast cancer patients are choosing to remove both breasts, researchers examine the impact this aggressive surgery has on their employment.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Women who undergo aggressive surgery for breast cancer may miss more workA new study reveals that patients with breast cancer who received more aggressive treatments were more likely to experience disruptions in employment.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
35-second returns? Walmart speeds up online purchase returnsWalmart announced new moves Monday to speed up the return process for online purchases, including letting some shoppers keep the stuff they don't want and still get a refund.
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The Atlantic
It’s What Bob Corker Does Next That Counts Senator Bob Corker, a Republican of Tennessee, deserves credit for saying in public this evening to The New York Times what most prominent Republicans have known and many have said (in careful privacy) over the past two years. Namely: that Donald Trump is irrational, ill-informed, impulsive, unfit for command, and increasingly a danger to the country and the world. The man who has ultimate author
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New on MIT Technology Review
Put Humans at the Center of AIAt Stanford and Google, Fei-Fei Li is leading the development of artificial intelligence—and working to diversify the field.
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Ingeniøren
Danske Bank: Tests fandt ikke defekt sikring og batteri før stort IT-nedbrud Test af nødstrøm lagde Danske Bank i knæ i september. »Vi tester vores driftcenter nok,« mener banken. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/danske-bank-tests-fandt-ikke-defekt-sikring-batteri-foer-nedbrud-1081425 Version2
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ArXiv Query
Multiresolution Consensus Clustering in NetworksNetworks often exhibit structure at disparate scales. We propose a method for identifying community structure at different scales based on multiresolution modularity and consensus clustering. Our contribution consists of two parts. First, we propose a strategy for sampling the entire range of possible resolutions for the multiresolution modularity quality function. Our approach is directly based o
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Ingeniøren
Unge ingeniører efterligner knækstyret køretøj hos Danfoss To ingeniørstuderende fra Aalborg Universitet bruger efterårssemestret på Als, hvor de kombinerer teori og praksis i et projekt, hvor de udvikler en hydraulisk platform. De søgte hver for sig på sidste DSE Messe, men fik begge plads på Danfoss. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/unge-ingeniorer-efterligner-knaekstyret-koretoj-hos-danfoss-10404 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
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Ingeniøren
Eksperter: Kontrol med drikkevandet forringes med nye reglerSnart flyttes tjek af drikkevand ud til forbrugerens taphane - og dermed forsvinder kontrol med ledningsnettet.
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The Atlantic
The White House Lays Out Its Conditions for Extending DACA On Sunday night, the White House released a list of immigration reforms that it would demand in exchange for a deal to protect young undocumented immigrants, who were brought to the U.S. as children. The proposal includes cuts to legal immigration, and cracking down on sanctuary cities, and—right at the top of the list—“completing construction of a wall along the southern border of the United Sta
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Gizmodo
While Waiting for The Last Jedi, Revisit the Best Non-Empire Training Sequence in Star Wars Image: Disney XD We’ve got two months, and the wait from now until the release of Star Wars: The Last Jedi will be nothing but anxious anticipation. While we’re waiting for Rey to receive her Force training, it’s a good time to revisit one of the best training sequences in the franchise. I’ve been thinking about this a lot lately, what with Rey’s training featuring so heavily in Episode VIII ’s p
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ebola vaccine tested in adults and children in Africa hailed a successExperts have reported that an Ebola vaccine is safe for children as well as adults and produces an immune response.
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Futurity.org
Cancer survivors need more than primary care Despite efforts to move cancer survivor care out of the realm of specialists, new research suggests that primary care medicine may be insufficient in meeting the needs of cancer survivors. The study examined 12 advanced primary care practices from a national registry of workforce innovators. Not one had a comprehensive survivorship care program in place. “This is troubling because these are highl
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Futurity.org
Test finds dangerous Salmonella in cows much faster Researchers have created a much faster test for Salmonella bacteria. Salmonella , one of the leading causes of food-borne illness across all regions of the world, can infect animals as well as people, with commonly reported cases of people falling sick after handling pets and livestock. Tests that used to take days now take 24 hours, with a hundredfold improvement in detection for at least one ty
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