Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wearables to boost security of voice-based log-inA security-token necklace, ear buds or eyeglasses developed at the University of Michigan could eliminate vulnerabilities in voice authentication—the practice of logging in to a device or service with your voice alone.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA finds Tropical Storm Lan strengtheningInfrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed that Tropical Storm Lan was getting stronger as it moved through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
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Gizmodo

Israel Scraps Plans for Database of All Jewish American College Students Image: AP The Israeli government is cancelling its plans to set up a database of all Jewish college students in the United States (roughly 350,000 people) to market them Israeli content, Haaretz reported Tuesday . Using targeted advertising techniques, the planned purpose of the database was to galvanize interest among Jewish American students in Israel, Judaism, and Israeli activities. As the ou
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

To keep Saturn's A ring contained, its moons stand unitedFor three decades, astronomers thought that only Saturn's moon Janus confined the planet's A ring - the largest and farthest of the visible rings. But after poring over NASA's Cassini mission data, Cornell astronomers now conclude that the teamwork of seven moons keeps this ring corralled.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flexible 'skin' can help robots, prosthetics perform everyday tasks by sensing shear forceIf a robot is sent to disable a roadside bomb—or delicately handle an egg while cooking you an omelet—it needs to be able to sense when objects are slipping out of its grasp.
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Ars Technica

Two months after Disney split, Netflix pledges $8B for original content Another early holiday gift for Netflix investors this year. (credit: macappsaddict via Flickr ) In its most recent quarterly earnings report, Netflix announced its intentions to spend $7 billion to $8 billion on original content for 2018. "Our investment in Netflix originals is over a quarter of our total P&L [profit and loss] content budget in 2017 and will continue to grow," the company said in
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Science | The Guardian

Courtesy is the key in getting people to talk | LettersThe case for the effectiveness of non-coercive interrogation was made in an 18th-century short story by Friedrich Schiller, writes David Head . What role does the invasion of other countries play in terrorist motivations, asks Rob Basto The case for the effectiveness of non-coercive interrogation was made long before the examples given in Ian Leslie’s excellent essay on the subject ( We have ways
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Live Science

Bad Blood? Why Transfusions from Women May Be Risky for MenGetting blood from a woman who has ever been pregnant could be risky for men, a new study from the Netherlands suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tropical beetles face extinction threatClimate change is putting many tropical high altitude beetles at risk of extinction, warn an international team of scientists.
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The Atlantic

A Tax Proposal That Could Lift Millions Out of Poverty As the Trump Administration and Congressional Republicans attempt to portray a tax plan slanted to the top 1 percent as “middle-class” tax relief, it’s worth asking what actual tax relief for American workers would look like. Among the ideas that should be at the top of the list should be expanding the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), a policy that provides millions of low-income American workers
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The Atlantic

The Quixotic Effort to Get a Better Brexit Deal After last week’s announcement that Brexit negotiations have reached a “ disturbing ” deadlock, paired with U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May’s admission that the British government is preparing for “every eventuality … including a no-deal scenario,” apprehension over the possibility of the U.K. leaving the European Union without a trade deal have heightened—so much so, in fact, that some British l
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Viden

Fynsk bonde bag mirakelmiddel mod knogleskørhedMichael Mohr Jensen overvejede at give op. Nu er han manden bag et muligt vidundermiddel mod knogleskørhed.
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Gizmodo

The Untitled Han Solo Movie Finally Has a Pretty Obvious Title Image: Disney It’s Solo: A Star Wars Story . Ron Howard revealed the news on his Twitter page because, well, that’s how everything gets revealed now. Howard took over the project back in June when Lucasfilm fired then directors Phil Lord and Chris Miller. Since then, Howard has been working almost non-stop, as he shows regularly on his social media accounts, revealing all kinds of cool little tid
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Ars Technica

Volvo tears up the rules with a subscription-only 600-hp electric GT Volvo If I asked you to guess the manufacturer behind a new two-door, carbon-fiber bodied, 600hp plug-in hybrid electric vehicle, it's possible Volvo would not be the first name you thought of. And technically, it doesn't wear a Volvo badge anywhere, because this is the first product from Polestar, the automaker's new electric performance brand. It arrives in 2019 and is the first of five new EVs
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Breast cancer treatments today -- and tomorrow (video)Breast cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. Fortunately, the rate at which we're learning about this disease means patients have a lot more treatment options and far better chances of survival than they did 100 years ago. In observance of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Reactions describes what's changed about how we treat breast cancer and what patients can expect in the f
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

You would not ask a firefighter to perform open-heart surgeryThe concept of 'collective intelligence' is simple -- it asserts that if a team performs well on one task, it will repeat that success on other projects, regardless of the scope or focus of the work. While it sounds good in theory, it doesn't work that way in reality, according to an Iowa State University researcher.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

MSU Geographer studied changes of weather in Moscow over the last century and a quarterA researcher from Lomonosov Moscow State University's Faculty of Geography Mikhail Lokoshchenko has discovered the complex nature of changes in temperature and relative humidity in Moscow over the period of many years, from the end of the 19th century to the present day. The results were published in Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

RUDN University chemists developed a promising drug synthesis methodScientists from RUDN University jointly with their colleagues from Yaroslavl have developed a new way to synthesize 1,2,4-oxadiazole derivatives present in many drugs. 1,2,4-oxadiazoles include ataluren, the active ingredient of the drug used in genetic disorders treatment. The results of the work are published in the Tetrahedron Letters journal.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers release the brakes on the immune systemMany tumors possess mechanisms to avoid destruction by the immune system. For instance, they misuse the natural 'brakes' in the immune defense mechanism, which normally prevent an excessive immune response. Researchers at the University of Bonn have now been able to take off one of these brakes. The study, which involved colleagues from Hamburg and Würzburg, could pave the way for more effective c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How we determine who's to blameUsing eye-tracking technology, MIT cognitive scientists have obtained the first direct evidence that people use a process called counterfactual simulation to imagine how a situation could have played out differently to assign responsibility for an outcome.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gene transcription in virus-specific CD8 T cells differentiates chronic from resolving HCVMassachusetts General Hospital investigators have identified differences in gene transcription within key immune cells that may distinguish those individuals infected with the hepatitis C virus who develop chronic infection from those whose immune systems successfully clear the virus.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Busybody' protein may get on your nerves, but that's a good thingSalk researchers find that p75 protein is vital for signaling pain in nervous system.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Reservoir explorers find extra HIV/SIV pondYerkes scientists have identified an additional part of the HIV/SIV reservoir, immune cells that survive and harbor the virus despite long-term treatment with antiviral drugs. The cells display a molecule called CTLA4 -- information that should help those trying to eradicate HIV from the body.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New bowel cancer drug target discoveredResearchers at the Francis Crick Institute have discovered a new drug target for bowel cancer that is specific to tumour cells and therefore less toxic than conventional therapies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New approach helps rodents with spinal cord injury breathe on their ownOne of the most severe consequences of spinal cord injury in the neck is losing the ability to control the diaphragm and breathe on one's own. Now, investigators show that two different sets of neural signals control the movement of the diaphragm -- one that originates in the brain and one that starts in the spinal cord. The researchers turned on this alternative nerve pathway and restore breath-l
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Loops of liquid metal can improve future fusion power plants, scientists sayResearchers led by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have proposed an innovative design to improve the ability of future fusion power plants to generate safe, clean and abundant energy in a steady state, or constant, manner. The design uses loops of liquid lithium to clean and recycle the tritium, the radioactive hydrogen isotope that fuels fusion rea
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Ars Technica

Why aren’t there more “Mature” games for Nintendo Switch? Enlarge / Remember when this game was supposedly a sign of a less squeaky-clean image for Nintendo? Since removing the blood in the original Mortal Kombat on the Super NES, Nintendo has earned its image as the family-friendly alternative to the more sex-and-violence-soaked console competition. New reporting from The Wall Street Journal suggests Nintendo is working to change that with the Switch,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study shows how water could have flowed on 'cold and icy' ancient MarsFor scientists trying to understand what ancient Mars might have been like, the red planet sends some mixed signals. Water-carved valleys and lakebeds leave little doubt that water once flowed on the surface. But climate models for early Mars suggest average temperatures around the globe stayed well below freezing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New imaging approach maps whole-brain changes from Alzheimer's disease in miceAn estimated 5.5 million Americans live with Alzheimer's disease, a type of dementia that causes problems with memory, thinking and behavior. Although treatments can slow the worsening of symptoms, scientists are still working to better understand the neurodegenerative disease so that curative and preventative medicines can be developed. A new imaging system could help speed new drug development b
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists create most powerful micro-scale bio-solar cell yetResearchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have created a micro-scale biological solar cell that generates a higher power density for longer than any existing cell of its kind.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

North American first: Researchers publish scientific study on cannabis productionUniversity of Guelph researchers have published what is believed to be the first scientific paper in North America on improving medicinal cannabis plant production, helping move the industry into the realm of high-tech laboratories and evidence-based practices.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists determine source of world's largest mud eruptionOn May 29, 2006, mud started erupting from several sites on the Indonesian island of Java. Boiling mud, water, rocks and gas poured from newly-created vents in the ground, burying entire towns and compelling many Indonesians to flee. By September 2006, the largest eruption site reached a peak, and enough mud gushed on the surface to fill 72 Olympic-sized swimming pools daily.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

This stretchy implant could help kids avoid repeated open-heart surgeriesA new type of surgical implant grows along with its recipient.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Experts devise plan to slash unnecessary medical testingResearchers at top hospitals in the US and Canada have developed an ambitious plan to eliminate unnecessary medical testing, with the goal of reducing medical bills while improving patient outcomes, safety and satisfaction.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Flexible 'skin' can help robots, prosthetics perform everyday tasks by sensing shear forceUW and UCLA engineers have developed a flexible sensor 'skin' that can be stretched over any part of a robot's body or prosthetic to accurately convey information about shear forces and vibration, which are critical to tasks ranging from cooking an egg to dismantling a bomb.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wearables to boost security of voice-based log-inA security-token necklace, ear buds or eyeglasses developed at the University of Michigan could eliminate vulnerabilities in voice authentication -- the practice of logging in to a device or service with your voice alone.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA finds Tropical Storm Lan strengtheningInfrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed that Tropical Storm Lan was getting stronger as it moved through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

To keep Saturn's A ring contained, its moons stand unitedFor three decades, astronomers thought that only Saturn's moon Janus confined the planet's A ring -- the largest and farthest of the visible rings. But after poring over NASA's Cassini mission data, Cornell astronomers now conclude that the teamwork of seven moons keeps this ring corralled.
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Gizmodo

Let’s Break Down What That Monumental Neutron Star Collision Actually Told Us Image: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/CI Lab Astronomy has entered a new era, one where light and gravity both play a role in understanding the Universe’s craziest phenomena. On August 17, 2017, over 70 observatories around (and above) the world, including ones like LIGO and the Hubble Space Telescope, all spotted a flash of energy . This light came in many different flavors, and was consiste
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Electroplating: The birth of a single nucleus caught in cameraElectroplating, or electrodeposition, is one of the most important processes in chemistry, in which a metal cation in solution can be reduced to its elemental form by applying an electrical potential to an electrode.
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Live Science

Neutron-Star Collision Reveals Origin of Gold, Astronomers SayAn international team of astronomers detected the first gravitational waves from merging neutron stars, and found proof they are the source of the universe's heavy elements, including gold and platinum.
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Gizmodo

Tuesday's Top Deals: Bears, Beats, Battlestar Galactica In addition to bears , Beats , and Battlestar Galactica , we also can’t stop talking about deals on an Oster blender , pillows , and air-powered impact tools . Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Aukey 1080p Dash Cam , $56 with code 2V8IZIH2 Vantrue , $110 with code 92FOXSPN You never think you need a dash cam until you get into an accident, or see s
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Big Think

What Do Atheists Hope For? Is there a certain spiritual component to hope, supported by a belief in a God that can make goals and dreams come true? Or can an atheist be just as hopeful as a religious person? Read More
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Ars Technica

Researchers craft an LED just two atoms thick Enlarge / Hexagonal boron nitride, one of the materials used here. (credit: Wikimedia Commons ) Modern computers are, in many ways, limited by their energy consumption and cooling requirements. Some of that comes from the process of performing calculations. But often, the majority of energy use comes from simply getting data to the point where calculations are ready to be performed. Memory, stora
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers turn atomic force microscope measurements into color imagesA French and Japanese research group has developed a new way of visualizing the atomic world by turning data scanned by an atomic force microscope into clear color images. The newly developed method, which enables observation of materials and substances like alloys, semiconductors, and chemical compounds in a relatively short time, holds promise of becoming widely used in the research and developm
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The Atlantic

The War on ISIS Held the Middle East Together The fall of the Islamic State’s stronghold and symbolic capital in Raqqa brings a certain grim satisfaction. It was in this regional riverbank city that the grisly, nihilistic group honed its medieval methods, spreading terror with acts of violence both intimate and public. A coalition consisting of Kurds, the U.S. military, and a supporting phalanx of Syrian-Arab militias, apparently drove the l
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The Atlantic

Will Northern California Soon Have Southern California's Climate? The deadliest and most destructive spate of fires in California’s modern history continues to burn. The string of massive fires in the Napa and Sonoma Valleys have little precedent: They have killed 40 people, destroyed more than 5,700 structures, and incinerated more than 200,000 acres of land. The Washington Post reports that hundreds of people remain missing. “This is truly one of the greatest
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The Atlantic

Kyrie Irving, the NBA’s Singular Star As the 2017-18 NBA season gets underway, collaboration is en vogue. The reigning champions, the Golden State Warriors, open the year again as heavy favorites due in large part to a selfless approach ; their success has set not only the league’s competitive terms but also its stylistic ones. This offseason saw a frantic redistribution of All-Stars—Paul George and Carmelo Anthony joined Russell Wes
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Scientific American Content: Global

Climate Skeptics Want More CO2A key argument used to downplay the consequences of climate change is resurfacing -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NSQIP geriatric surgery pilot study may help improve outcomes for older surgical patientsAdding geriatric-specific risk factors to the blend of traditional risk factors could significantly improve the ability of surgeons to predict poor outcomes in older surgical patients, according to new study findings published online as an 'article in press' on the Journal of the American College of Surgeons website.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Assessment shows metagenomics software has much room for improvementA recent critical assessment of software tools represents a key step toward taming the 'Wild West' nature of the burgeoning field of metagenomics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new way to harness wasted methaneAn MIT team has identified a process that could be used to harness methane that is now wasted by being burned off at wellheads.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Loops of liquid metal can improve future fusion power plants, scientists sayThis article describes innovative liquid lithium loop to address needs of future fusion power plants.
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Ars Technica

FCC Republican says Trump is “rightfully venting” anger at the press Enlarge / FCC Commissioner Michael O'Rielly listens during a Senate Appropriations Subcommittee hearing in Washington, DC, on Tuesday, June 20, 2017. (credit: Getty Images | Bloomberg) Republican members of the Federal Communications Commission initially remained silent about President Trump's call to challenge and possibly revoke licenses that allow NBC and other networks to remain on the air. B
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Live Science

Volcanic Eruptions May Have Doomed an Ancient Egyptian DynastyThousands of years ago, fallout from volcanic activity may have sounded a death knell for an Egyptian dynasty.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New teleneurology curriculum provides guidelines for careHealth professionals can deliver quality neurological care remotely to patients through the emerging field of teleneurology. However, medical training has not caught up with the field, and a lack of formalized education for teleneurology doesn't exist. Now, a researcher at the University of Missouri School of Medicine, as part of an American Academy of Neurology (AAN) team, has developed a standar
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Volcanic eruptions linked to social unrest in Ancient EgyptDid volcanic eruptions in the planet's high northern latitudes play a role in causing violent rebellions in Ancient Egypt? A new study suggests that the answer is yes. Researchers examined a range of evidence -- from climate records to papyri -- finding a close link between eruptions and political unrest in the Ptolemaic era. The connection comes from the capacity of volcanoes to cool the atmosphe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new way to test body armorIn response to several high profile body armor failures, NIST researchers have developed a new and extremely reliable way to test the ballistic fibers used in body armor.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tropical beetles face extinction threatClimate change is putting many tropical high altitude beetles at risk of extinction, warn an international team of scientists.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Johns Hopkins finds training exercise that boosts brain powerOne of the two brain-training methods most scientists use in research is significantly better in improving memory and attention. It also results in more significant changes in brain activity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study shows how water could have flowed on 'cold and icy' ancient MarsResearch by planetary scientists at Brown University finds that periodic melting of ice sheets on a cold early Mars would have created enough water to carve the ancient valleys and lakebeds seen on the planet today.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

North American first: University of Guelph researchers publish scientific study on cannabis productionUniversity of Guelph researchers have published what is believed to be the first scientific paper in North America on improving medicinal cannabis plant production, helping move the industry into the realm of high-tech laboratories and evidence-based practices.This paper is the first of a series of studies University of Guelph researchers have conducted investigating ideal horticultural practices
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pill for glycemic control for type 2 diabetes shows promiseAmong patients with type 2 diabetes, the drug semaglutide taken by pill resulted in better glycemic control than placebo over 26 weeks, findings that support phase 3 studies to assess longer-term and clinical outcomes, as well as safety, according to a study published by JAMA.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Risks associated with receipt of blood transfusion from previously pregnant donorAmong patients who received red blood cell transfusions, receiving a transfusion from a donor who was ever pregnant, compared with a male donor, was associated with an increased risk of death among male recipients of transfusions but not among female recipients, according to a study published by JAMA
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pill for glycemic control for type 2 diabetes shows promiseAmong patients with type 2 diabetes, the drug semaglutide taken by pill resulted in better glycemic control than placebo over 26 weeks, findings that support phase 3 studies to assess longer-term and clinical outcomes, as well as safety, according to a study published by JAMA.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Receipt of blood transfusion from previously pregnant donor associated with increased risk of deathAmong patients who received red blood cell transfusions, receiving a transfusion from a donor who was ever pregnant, compared with a male donor, was associated with an increased risk of death among male recipients of transfusions but not among female recipients, according to a study published by JAMA.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Findings add to evidence of association between Zika virus and Guillain-Barré syndromeAn examination of cases of Guillain-Barré syndrome in Puerto Rico identified Zika virus infection as a risk factor, according to a study published by JAMA.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study reshapes understanding of climate change's impact on early societiesA new study linking paleoclimatology -- the reconstruction of past global climates --with historical analysis by researchers at Yale and other institutions shows a link between environmental stress and its impact on the economy, political stability, and war-fighting capacity of ancient Egypt.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The drop that's good to the very endTwo researchers in the UK, using laser-flash photography of microscopic droplet-particle collisions, have discovered that water droplets still have liquid tricks to reveal. Previous research has primarily examined droplet collisions with flat surfaces, such as a wall, but this research team examined the less studied case of a droplet having a head-on collision with a solid, spherical particle. The
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Force field analysis provides clues to protein-ion interactionThe importance of proteins and metal ion interactions is well understood, but the mechanistic interactions between the two are still far from a complete picture. Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin, are working to quantitatively describe protein-ion interactions using what is called an atomic multipole optimized energetics for biomolecular applications force field. They describe their
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Active sieving could improve dialysis and water purification filtersPhysicists have proven theoretically that active sieving, as opposed to its passive counterpart, can improve the separation abilities of filtration systems. This research on how active sieving could improve systems such as water purification and dialysis were reported this week in The Journal of Chemical Physics. Active sieving also has the potential to filter molecules based on movement dynamics,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Origami lattice paves the way for new noise-dampening barriers on the roadResearchers at the University of Michigan have brought a new method into the sound-dampening fold, demonstrating an origami lattice prototype that can potentially reduce acoustic noise on roadways. The technique allows researchers to selectively dampen noise at various frequencies by adjusting the distance between noise-diffusing elements. They report their work this week in the Journal of Applied
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Viden

Sexolog: Derfor er analsex noget for både mænd og kvinderAnalsex stiger i popularitet, men er der en fysiologisk grund til at dyrke det? Ifølge klinisk sexolog er svaret ja for både mænd og kvinder.
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Futurity.org

Volunteering keeps older minds sharp Volunteering may improve cognitive function of older adults, especially for women and those with lower levels of education. While the links of volunteering to physical health are well known, its associations with mental functioning are less clear. “Cognitive functions, such as memory, working memory, and processing are essential for living an independent life,” says Christine Proulx, an associate
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New on MIT Technology Review

Google’s First Ever Mobile Chip Will Turbocharge Image Processing
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

What's hidden under the Greenland ice sheet? | Kristin PoinarThe Greenland ice sheet is massive, mysterious -- and melting. Using advanced technology, scientists are revealing its secrets for the first time, and what they've found is amazing: hidden under the ice sheet is a vast aquifer that holds a Lake Tahoe-sized volume of water from the summer melt. Does this water stay there, or does it find its way out to the ocean and contribute to global sea level r
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Science : NPR

Search Of DNA In Dogs, Mice And People Finds 4 Genes Linked To OCD Scientists looking for genetic factors behind obsessive compulsive disorder looked for clues in the DNA of humans and two animal species. Genes active in a particular brain circuit emerged. (Image credit: Ute Grabowsky/Photothek via Getty Images)
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New on MIT Technology Review

Google’s First Mobile Chip Will Turbocharge Image Processing
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Here’s a breakdown of the animals that crossed the Pacific on 2011 tsunami debrisHundreds of marine animals from Japan have washed up on U.S. beaches since the destructive 2011 earthquake and tsunami.
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Gizmodo

Google Makes It Easier for At-Risk Users to Lock Down Their Accounts Photo: Getty Google is rolling out a fancy new security feature today that’s designed to protect users who face significant risk of having their accounts hacked—election and campaign officials, victims of intimate partner violence, and others seeking additional security. It’s called the Advanced Protection Program, and it’s designed to ensure that no one but you can access your Google tools like
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The Atlantic

The Loudest Underwater Sound Ever Recorded Has No Scientific Explanation In 1997, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration discovered an unusual, ultra-low-frequency sound emanating from a point off the southern coast of Chile. It was the loudest unidentified underwater sound ever recorded, detected by hydrophones 5,000 miles apart. It lasted for one minute and was never heard again. The Bloop , a mesmerizing short documentary by Cara Cusumano, investigates
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists create most powerful micro-scale bio-solar cell yetResearchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have created a micro-scale biological solar cell that generates a higher power density for longer than any existing cell of its kind.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Second Issue of Structural Heart: The Journal of the Heart Team is now availableThe Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) is pleased to announce that the second issue of Structural Heart: The Journal of the Heart Team is now available online.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists determine source of world's largest mud eruptionMore than 11 years after the Lusi mud volcano first erupted on the Indonesian island of Java, researchers may have figured out why the mudflows haven't stopped: deep underground, Lusi is connected to a nearby volcanic system.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Will Studies of 700 Pro Fighters Help Predict Future Brain Damage?Researchers hope blood and brain scans may detect new clues -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Discovery of new water droplet behavior could create more energy-efficient spray drying of productsEven in ancient Greece, philosopher Aristotle tried to sum up all the ways that water can behave. Now, about 2,400 years later, two Imperial College London scientists, using laser-flash photography of microscopic droplet-particle collisions, have discovered that water droplets still have liquid tricks to reveal.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Force field analysis provides clues to protein-ion interactionMuscle twitching, lactose digestion, blood movement—what could possibly connect these body functions? You may be surprised to learn that all these processes and many more are driven by metal ions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Origami lattice paves the way for new noise-dampening barriers on the roadManaging traffic noise pollution has vexed researchers in large part because of the broad range of frequencies we encounter on the road. Currently, only heavy, wall-like barriers can effectively dampen all of these various sounds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Active sieving could improve dialysis and water purification filtersPhysicists from École Normale Supérieure and Paris Science and Letters University in France have proven theoretically that active sieving, as opposed to its passive counterpart, can improve the separation abilities of filtration systems. These new views on how active sieving could improve systems such as those used in water purification and dialysis were reported this week in The Journal of Chemic
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study reshapes understanding of climate change's impact on early societiesA new study linking paleoclimatology—the reconstruction of past global climates—with historical analysis by researchers at Yale and other institutions shows a link between environmental stress and its impact on the economy, political stability, and war-fighting capacity of ancient Egypt.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

No evidence that widely marketed technique to treat leaky bladder/prolapse worksThere is no scientific evidence that a workout widely marketed to manage the symptoms of a leaky bladder and/or womb prolapse actually works, conclude experts.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Learning during development is regulated by an unexpected brain regionHalf a century of research on how the brain learns to integrate visual inputs from the two eyes has provided important insights in critical period regulation, leading to the conclusion that it occurs within the cortex. Scientists have now made the surprising discovery that a brain region that passes on input from the eyes to the cortex also plays a crucial role in opening the critical period of bi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Report identifies factors associated with harassment, abuse in academic fieldworkCollege students considering careers in fields like archaeology or geology that require extensive work at remote field sites might want to find out how potential supervisors and advisers conduct themselves in the field. Do they establish clear ground rules for the behavior of everyone on the team? Are the rules consistently enforced? According to a new report, such factors likely influence whether
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Major advance in nanopore detection of peptides and proteinsNanopore technology, which is used to sequence DNA, is cheap, hand-held and works in the jungle and in space. The use of this technology to identify peptides or proteins is now a step closer. Scientists have used a patented nanopore to identify the fingerprints of proteins and peptides, and it can even detect polypeptides differing by one amino acid.
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Ingeniøren

Skovbrande i Portugal skyld i morgenens usædvanlige himmelfænomenTirsdagen startede mørkere og rødere end sædvanligt, fordi partikler fra skovbrande i Spanien og Portugal er blæst hertil med orkanen Ofelia.
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Ingeniøren

Storebæltsbroens hemmelige rum får nye monorail-vogneHøjbroen over Storebælt blev 'født' med tre togvogne i bugen. De er nu ved at være udtjent, men det er sin sag at få dem ud igen – og ikke mindst at få nye vogne ind.
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Gizmodo

Watching Leaves Defy Gravity on a Trampoline Is the Best Way to Welcome Fall GIF GIF: YouTube The arrival of pumpkin spice jokes is often seen as the first sign of fall, but a trampoline full of gravity-defying dead leaves is a far more satisfying way to welcome the arrival of cooler temps and gourd-flavored coffee. Jumping into a pile of dead leaves is a seasonal rite of passage for most kids, but this trapeze artist takes it to a whole other level. Besides, can you thin
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cognitive science

Why Bertrand Russell was Wrong submitted by /u/Philosopher-Of-Mind [link] [comments]
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New on MIT Technology Review

Alphabet’s Drones Are Now Delivering Right Into People’s Backyards
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New on MIT Technology Review

How Close Are You Really?A diagram of your social network reveals the strength of your individual relationships, network scientists say.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Iceland’s New Negative-Emissions System Buries CO2 as Stone
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Live Science

Infant Chimp Snatched and Cannibalized Moments After Its BirthMoments after a wild chimpanzee was born, an adult chimp snatched the infant away from its mother and cannibalized it, according to a new study that is the first to document this macabre behavior.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Hiding in plain sight:' Discovery raises questions over scale of overlooked biodiversityScientists have used cutting edge DNA technology to demonstrate that one of Europe's top freshwater predators is actually two species rather than one.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Timing of melanoma diagnosis, treatment critical to survivalA new study underscores the importance of early detection and treatment of melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. The research indicates that the sooner patients were treated, the better their survival, particularly for stage I melanoma.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Many pelvic tumors in women may have common origin: Fallopian tubesMost, and possibly all, ovarian cancers start, not in ovaries, but instead in the fallopian tubes attached to them, report investigators.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nearly half of US medical care comes from emergency roomsNearly half of all US medical care is delivered by emergency departments, according to a new study. In recent years, the percentage of care delivered by emergency departments has grown. The paper highlights the major role played by emergency rooms in US health care.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

GP referral to Weight Watchers avoided type 2 diabetes in third of patientsMore than a third of patients at risk of developing type 2 diabetes avoided developing the condition after they were referred by their family doctor (GP) to a diabetes prevention program delivered by the commercial weight management provider, Weight Watchers, finds research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Skimping on sleep may contribute to gestational diabetesA new study has found that lack of sleep among pregnant women may be a contributing factor to the development of gestational diabetes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Invasive ladybird species threatens other ladybirds in EnglandThe harlequin ladybird was widely introduced across continental Europe to limit the population of pest insects.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mechanism explains how seizures may lead to memory lossA team of researchers reveals a mechanism that can explain how even relatively infrequent seizures can lead to long-lasting cognitive deficits in animal models.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Stress might be just as unhealthy as junk food to digestive systemWe all know that a poor diet is unhealthy, but a new study finds that stress may just as harmful to our bodies as a really bad diet.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bolstering fat cells offers potential new leukemia treatmentKilling cancer cells indirectly by powering up fat cells in the bone marrow could help acute myeloid leukemia patients, says a new study. Researchers found that boosting adipocytes, or fat cells, located in the bone morrow suppressed cancerous leukemia cells but -- in a surprise to the research team -- also induced the regeneration of healthy blood cells.
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Ars Technica

Video: Scott Kelly stopped by and we got to ask him a few questions (video link) Former astronaut Scott Kelly spent most of 2015 and a bit of 2016 in low-Earth orbit aboard the International Space Station, functioning as a human guinea pig to test the effects of long-duration exposure to microgravity. He’s currently on a tour promoting the book he wrote about the experience , and as part of that tour he stopped by the Condé Nast offices in New York to do some pre
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New imaging approach maps whole-brain changes from Alzheimer's disease in miceA new imaging system that offers a better way to monitor the brain changes indicative of Alzheimer's in mouse models of the disease could help speed new drug development.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Crashing neutron stars observed for the first timeAn international research team, including physicists from the Weizmann Institute of Science, has for the first time succeeded in observing a merger of two colliding neutron stars. The merger was simultaneously picked up by three detectors built for this purpose: the two belonging to the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, or LIGO, in the United States, and the Virgo detector in It
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rivers carry plastic debris into the seaEvery year, millions of tonnes of plastic debris ends up in the sea. The path taken by plastic to reach the sea must be elucidated before it will be possible to reduce the volume of plastic input. To date, there was only little information available on this. It has now been followed up by an interdisciplinary research team who were able to show that plastic debris is primarily carried into the sea
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Resolving traffic jams in human ALS motor neuronsA team of researchers at VIB and KU Leuven used stem cell technology to generate motor neurons from ALS patients carrying mutations in FUS. They found disturbed axonal transport in these motor neurons, but also identified genetic and pharmacological strategies that mitigate this defect.
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Futurity.org

Teens take risks, but that’s not a flaw of their brains A new study challenges the popular theory that slow development of the prefrontal cortex—and its weak connectivity with brain reward regions—explains teenagers’ seemingly impulsive and risky behavior. In a literature review, researchers examined the evidence behind that argument and found that much of it misinterpreted adolescent exploratory behavior as impulsive and lacking in control. Instead,
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Gizmodo

Deadspin Columbus Crew, Welcome To The Stadium Extortion Racket | Jezebel Reese Witherspoon and Jenn Deadspin Columbus Crew, Welcome To The Stadium Extortion Racket | Jezebel Reese Witherspoon and Jennifer Lawerence Share Stories of Abuse in Hollywood at Elle Event | Earther A Stunning Marine Monument off the Coast of Texas Faces New Threats After Hurricane Harvey | The Root For Those Considering Blaxit, I Present to You: Japan | Splinter A Philando Castile Memorial Fund Has Wiped Out All Studen
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ZTE's Axon M Pushes For a Dual-Screen Phone FutureZTE made the foldable Axon M for people who want way more screen space on a phone that still fits in their pocket.
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Ars Technica

Air Force General: “We’d be dumb not to” fly on SpaceX’s reusable rockets Enlarge / SpaceX launches the Air Force's X-38B space plane in September, 2017. (credit: SpaceX) The increasingly warm relationship between the US Air Force and the rocket company SpaceX appears to be approaching full-on bromance levels. The latest words of lavish praise for SpaceX have come from Gen. John W. Raymond, commander of Air Force Space Command, which oversees launch operations for the
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Latest Headlines | Science News

A universal flu shot may be nearing realityScientists are developing a universal vaccine against flu, making annual shots a thing of the past.
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Futurity.org

Thousands of scientists observe neutron star ‘death dance’ On the morning of August 17, gravitational waves arrived at Earth, tripping ultrasensitive detectors waiting for exactly this type of event. First, the US-based Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, or LIGO, caught a strong signal of gravitational waves from space. At nearly the same time, the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor on NASA’s Fermi space telescope had registered a burst of gamma r
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Gizmodo

This Dual-Screen Smartphone Is Weird, Monstrous, and Kinda Cool All images: Sam Rutherford Get ready, because rumors are saying that Apple, Samsung, and others have plans to bring actual bendable phones to market within the next few years. But before than can happen, there’s some important prep that needs to get ironed out first. That’s where the dual-screen ZTE Axon M comes in. The two 5.2-inch screens are held together by a single hinge along with a few str
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Quanta Magazine

Simple Bacteria Offer Clues to the Origins of Photosynthesis Researchers have caught their best glimpse yet into the origins of photosynthesis, one of nature’s most momentous innovations. By taking near-atomic, high-resolution X-ray images of proteins from primitive bacteria, investigators at Arizona State University and Pennsylvania State University have extrapolated what the earliest version of photosynthesis might have looked like nearly 3.5 billion yea
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Gizmodo

Get Your Best Rest with Amazon's One-Day Sale on Down Pillows eLuxurySupply Extra Soft Down Filled Pillow , $60-$112 When it comes to getting a good night’s sleep, it really starts with the pillow. You’ve probably had yours way too long and it’s time to replace that sucker. Amazon’s Gold Box is (down) filled with single and 2-pack pillow sets for great prices. But don’t sleep on this deal, because it’s gone at the end of the day. More Deals
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Popular Science

Google Pixel 2 Review: The phone that made me consider ditching iPhone Gadgets The screen, camera, and Google Assistant make a strong case for jumping ship. Great cameras, beautiful screens, and tight Google Assistant integration make the Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL attractive options, especially for iPhone converts.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Need for speed makes genome editing efficient, if not betterRice University researchers have developed a computational model to quantify the mechanism by which CRISPR-Cas9 proteins find their genome-editing targets.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Matchmaking with consequencesMyc proteins play an important role when cells become cancerous. Researchers from the University of Würzburg have studied just how they do this. They might thus open up ways to develop new therapies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

On-and-off fasting helps fight obesityUp to sixteen weeks of intermittent fasting without otherwise having to count calories helps fight obesity and other metabolic disorders. Such fasting already shows benefits after only six weeks. This is according to a study by Kyoung-Han Kim and Yun Hye Kim in the journal Cell Research which is published by Springer Nature.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New techniques boost performance of non-volatile memory systemsComputer engineering researchers have developed new software and hardware designs that should limit programming errors and improve system performance in devices that use non-volatile memory technologies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Find the Lady' in the quantum worldAn international team of researchers has proposed a new way to make atoms or ions indistinguishable by swapping their positions. These particles are then expected to exhibit exotic properties. The study involved physicists from the University of Bonn, the Austrian Academy of Sciences, and the University of California. The work has now been published in Physical Review Letters.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Revising the image of Islamic law'Scholar of Islamic studies Norbert Oberauer explores the unknown legal genre of the 'maxims' - Study sheds new light on the legal history of Islam: far more alterations from the Middle Ages to the modern age than expected -- Formulas of the maxims systematized the law, an innovative step in history that had long been overlooked.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

MIPT scientists revisit optical constants of ultrathin gold filmsThe authors of the paper provide reference data on the optical constants of gold for a wide range of wavelengths for films that are 20 to 200 nanometers thick. These findings will be of use to researchers working on various nanophotonic devices and metamaterials.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sales of sugar-sweetened drinks at restaurant chain fall by 11 percent after small levyIntroducing a small levy of 10 pence per drink to the price of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) sold in Jamie's Italian restaurants across the UK is likely to have contributed to a significant decline in SSB sales, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Oysters offer hot spot for reducing nutrient pollutionMarine scientists have quantified potentially denitrifying bacteria in the oyster gut and shell, with important implications for efforts to reduce nutrient levels in coastal waters through oyster restoration.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Shaping animal, vegetable and mineralA new technique to grow any target shape from any starting shape has now been developed by researchers, outlines a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Novel mechanism of resistance to anti-cancer drugsInvestigators have discovered a novel non-genetic cause of resistance to the targeted anti-cancer therapy cetuximab. Their findings suggest a strategy for overcoming this resistance.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Proteins and polymers: Spinning strands hint at folding dynamicsScientists have created flexible strings of magnetized beads to model how natural and synthetic strands bend and fold in dynamic conditions. The work could enhance knowledge of how proteins and DNA fold in biological systems and how synthetic fibers interact in fluids.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Portable 3-D scanner assesses patients with elephantiasisAn estimated 120 million people worldwide are infected with lymphatic filariasis, a parasitic, mosquito-borne disease that can cause major swelling and deformity of the legs, a condition known as elephantiasis. Scientists have shown that a portable scanning device can measure limb enlargement and disfigurement faster and more easily in patients with elephantiasis. The research tool makes it easy t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Biology of childhood brain tumor subtypes offers clues to precision treatmentsResearchers investigating pediatric low-grade gliomas (PLGG), the most common type of brain tumor in children, have discovered key biological differences in how mutated genes combine with other genes to drive this childhood cancer. By shedding light on subtle distinctions in tumor biology, these findings offer clues to designing more effective anticancer treatments to precisely target tumors in in
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Ars Technica

Gun waiting periods prevent hundreds of homicides, according to 45-year study Enlarge (credit: Getty | Anadolu Agency ) A few days to cool off and think things through may be enough to prevent hundreds of homicides each year, according to a new study in PNAS. A study tracking handgun laws on wait periods over a 45-year period found that a delay in obtaining a firearm after purchase reduced gun homicides by 17 percent. That breaks down to about 36 homicides per year for the
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Futurity.org

Giant sea bass are worth more alive than dead Giant sea bass are a flagship species for both commercial fisheries and the recreational dive industry. But where do they have the most value? The largest bony fish found along the California coast can be almost as large as a Smart car, weigh more than 500 pounds, and grow longer than 6 feet. Once commercially important, the fish were overfished in the 1900s, leading to the collapse of the fisher
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New Scientist - News

How to clean up the dirty water Puerto Ricans are drinkingNearly a month after Hurricane Maria, many people on Puerto Rico are still without clean drinking water and have resorted to wells on a contaminated site
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New on MIT Technology Review

Alphabet’s Drones Are Now Delivering Right Into Backyards
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Popular Science

The head of the largest mosquito control program has science on her side Science And thank goodness for that. There are more than 3,000 kinds of mosquitoes in the world, and if Jodi Holeman could, she'd catch one of each.
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Popular Science

TVs are about to get bigger. Way bigger. Technology Images are about to quadruple in size. Here's how they'll look. Images and screen sizes are increasing in size every year. Here's what that looks like.
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Popular Science

The most profound technologies are those that disappear Technology The future is smart, invisible, and requires no effort on our part—from smart assistants to biometric security protocols. The future is smart, invisible, and requires no effort on our part—from smart assistants to biometric security protocols.
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Popular Science

On the evolution of sneaker tech, from 1933 on Technology These shoes are made for running. A timeline of the innovations in running shoes including improvements in support, cushioning, and materials.
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Popular Science

Extreme skier Davo Karnicar folds his skis Technology Downhill dynamo. Davo Karnicar is the coolest athlete you've never heard of. He skied all the way down the highest peak on Earth, a first.
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Popular Science

Body, heal thyself Science The frontier of science is looking inward to fix what ails us. Scientists believe that the best medicine to heal ourselves can be found within the body. The key to improving this self-repair it to continue work into bio-medicine.
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Popular Science

Jane Poynter wants to send you to the edge of space in a very big balloon Space Eyes on the skies. Jane Poynter wants to take you higher in a very big balloon—and give science a lift, too.
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Popular Science

Where we're going, we won't need roads Technology Robo cars will force us off asphalt—and into the great out there. Autonomous cars will force us off asphalt—and into the great out there.
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The Atlantic

Trump's Nominee for Drug Czar Is Out President Trump’s pick to be White House drug czar, Representative Tom Marino of Pennsylvania, withdrew his name from consideration on Tuesday following the publication of a critical news report. It detailed how a law he wrote at the behest of pharmaceutical distributors has made it harder for the federal government to combat the opioid epidemic. Trump announced Marino’s withdrawal on Twitter , c
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The Atlantic

New Radio Atlantic Episode: Derek Thompson Details His Exclusive View Into the World of X, Google’s Moonshot Factory Washington, D.C. (October 17, 2017)–Few journalists have gotten a peek inside X, the secretive lab run by Google’s parent company Alphabet. Its scientists are researching cold fusion, hover boards, self-driving cars, among other potentially world-changing technologies. Derek Thompson , senior editor at The Atlantic, spent several days with the staff of X; and in Episode 15 of Radio Atlantic , ava
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Youth football: How young athletes are exposed to high-magnitude head impactsResearchers examined exposure to high-magnitude head impacts (accelerations greater than 40g) in young athletes, 9 to 12 years of age, during football games and practice drills to determine under what circumstances these impacts occur and how representative practice activities are of game activities with respect to the impacts. This type of information can help coaches and league officials make in
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Saving hearts after heart attacks: Overexpression of a gene enhances repair of dead muscleBiomedical engineers report a significant advance in efforts to repair a damaged heart after a heart attack, using grafted heart-muscle cells to create a repair patch. The key was overexpressing a gene that activates the cell-cycle of the grafted muscle cells, so they grow and divide more than control grafted cells.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Signaling pathway may be key to why autism is more common in boysResearchers have discovered sex differences in a brain signaling pathway involved in reward learning and motivation that make male mice more vulnerable to an autism-causing genetic glitch.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Keratin, proteins from 54-million-year-old sea turtle show survival trait evolutionResearchers have retrieved original pigment, beta-keratin and muscle proteins from a 54-million-year-old sea turtle hatchling. The work adds to the growing body of evidence supporting persistence of original molecules over millions of years and also provides direct evidence that a pigment-based survival trait common to modern sea turtles evolved at least 54 million years ago.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

World first for reading digitally encoded synthetic moleculesFor the first time ever, using mass spectrometry, researchers have successfully read several bytes of data recorded on a molecular scale using synthetic polymers. Their work sets a new benchmark for the amount of data -- stored as a sequence of molecular units (monomers) -- that may be read using this routine method. It also sets the stage for data storage on a scale 100 times smaller than that of
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Attending a middle vs K-8 school matters for student outcomesStudents who attend a middle school compared to a K-8 school are likely to have a lower perception of their reading skills, finds a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

During crisis, exposure to conflicting information and stress linked, studies findExposure to high rates of conflicting information during an emergency is linked to increased levels of stress, and those who rely on text messages or social media reports from unofficial sources are more frequently exposed to rumors and experience greater distress, according to research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Germ-free hatching eggs: An alternative to formaldehyde applicationHatching eggs in large-scale hatcheries are currently treated with formaldehyde to eliminate germs. Researchers have now developed a natural alternative.
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Big Think

How Living in Big Inner Cities Makes People Healthier and Happier The benefits of living in urban centers, where populations are more dense, include more accessibility to leisure, health, and safety services, according to a new study out of the UK. Read More
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Futurity.org

Some Americans consult religion about science questions When it comes to wers to questions about science, evangelical and black Protestants and Mormons are more likely than the general population to turn to religion for answers. The new study is the first to measure whether people would actively consult a religious authority or source of information with a question about science, says lead researcher Elaine Howard Ecklund, a professor of sociology at
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wits team involved in international breakthrough in astronomical observationFor the first time in history, Wits researchers have witnessed electromagnetic signals that are associated with the gravitational wave emission from the coalescence of two massive neutron stars.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Microbes leave 'fingerprints' on Martian rocksScientists around Tetyana Milojevic from the Faculty of Chemistry at the University of Vienna are in search of unique biosignatures, which are left on synthetic extraterrestrial minerals by microbial activity. The biochemist and astrobiologist investigates these signatures at her own miniaturized 'Mars farm' where she can observe interactions between the archaeon Metallosphaera sedula and Mars-lik
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Missing link between new topological phases of matter discoveredHZB-Physicists at BESSY II have investigated a class of materials that exhibit characteristics of topological insulators. During these studies they discovered a transition between two different topological phases, one of which is ferroelectric, meaning a phase in the material that exhibits spontaneous electric polarisation and can be reversed by an external electric field.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bringing the atomic world into full colorA French and Japanese research group has developed a new way of visualizing the atomic world by turning data scanned by an atomic force microscope into clear color images. The newly developed method, which enables observation of materials and substances like alloys, semiconductors, and chemical compounds in a relatively short time, holds promise of becoming widely used in the research and developm
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Electroplating: The birth of a single nucleus caught in cameraElectroplating, or electrodeposition, is one of the most important processes in chemistry, in which a metal cation in solution can be reduced to its elemental form by applying an electrical potential to an electrode.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

HIV infection, even with antiretroviral therapy, appears to damage a growing child's brainOne of the largest and best-documented trials of children receiving early antiretroviral therapy -- the CHER clinical trial in South Africa -- finds ongoing white matter damage in HIV-positive children at the age of 7 years. The study aims to contribute to a better understanding of brain development in HIV-infected and exposed children, as well as the impact of long-term antiretroviral treatment.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Domestication has not made dogs cooperate more with each other compared to wolvesFollowing domestication, dogs should be more tolerant and cooperative with conspecifics and humans compared to wolves. But looking at both in more naturalistic living conditions, however, speaks for more cooperative behavior of wolves. Researchers at Vetmeduni Vienna now show that the wild ancestors are excelling their domesticated relatives in teamwork. In an experimental approach dogs but not wo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Corticosteroids aid healing -- if the timing is rightA corticosteroid can improve the healing of damaged tendons, but it must be given at the right time, according to a new study from Linköping University in Sweden. In rats, the tendon became twice as strong. The results are presented in the journal Scientific Reports.
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Gizmodo

The Butchering Art: Victorian Medicine, From Blood-Caked Aprons and Body Snatching, to Antiseptic Thomas Eakins, The Gross Clinic (1875) “Ticketed spectators watched anatomists slice into the distended bellies of decomposing corpses, parts gushing forth not only human blood but also fetid pus. The lilting but incongruous notes of a flute sometimes accompanied the macabre demonstration. Public dissections were theatrical performances,” writes Dr. Lindsey Fitzharris in her new book The Butcheri
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Ingeniøren

Den førerløse minibus Olli står bomstille i VesthimmerlandVesthimmerlands Kommune ville være først med førerløse køretøjer i Danmark, men ifølge borgmesteren gør ny forsøgslov det for dyrt at gennemføre projektet.
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Ingeniøren

Miljøstyrelsens forsvar for nye regler om drikkevand bliver stemplet som politisk spinMiljøstyrelsen udsendte i sidste uge en pressemeddelelse med et forsvar for de ændringer af drikkevandsbekendtgørelsen, som møder kritik i hele branchen. Men også selve pressemeddelelsen får nu kritik.
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New on MIT Technology Review

"There is no transistor in this computer. It’s a completely different beast. It’s a native citizen of the multiverse."
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Icarus lifts offAfter the launch of a Soyuz 2 rocket scheduled for October 12 was postponed by two days, the carrier rocket yesterday docked with the ISS. On board: the Icarus board computer, the future brain of the German-Russian animal observation system.
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Popular Science

The 12 most important health innovations of the year Science They are the Best of What's New. One of the highlighted products could one day treat many forms of cancer, changing medicine’s ­approach to the disease for good.
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Popular Science

The best entertainment tech of the year Technology They are the Best of What's New. From a mobile powerhouse video game console to headphone tuned specifically to your ears. These are the best of what's new.
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Popular Science

This year's 11 most important innovations in engineering Technology They are the Best of What's New. One-rail roller coasters, a fax machine for DNA, and a translucent roof that closes like a camera. These are the Best of What's New.
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Popular Science

The top 11 innovations in recreation this year Technology They are the Best of What's New. Skis that fold in half, wool that glows, and a smokeless fire. These are the Best of What's New.
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Popular Science

The 10 most important automotive tech of the year Technology They are the Best of What's New. Tires that crush ice, a shape-shifting supercar, and back-seat surveillance. These are the Best of What's New.
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Popular Science

The most ingenious gadgets of 2017 Technology They are the Best of What's New. Fidget spinners, a wearable camera, and a coding toy with endless options. These are the Best of What's New…
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Popular Science

The year's most important innovations in security Technology They are the Best of What's New. A botnet vaccine, a harder drive, and 3-D bag scanner. These are the Best of What's New.
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Popular Science

The year's 10 most incredible aerospace inventions Space They are the Best of What's New. Drone swarms, a flying luxury car, and a rocket to the moon. These are the Best of What's New.
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Popular Science

2017's coolest tech for your home Technology They are the Best of What's New. The smartest cooker ever, an instant water filter, and a speed-drying adhesive. These are the Best of What's New…
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Popular Science

The year's most exciting innovations in software Technology They are the Best of What's New. The Google Assistant, an AI dating coach, and tech to keep dialog civil. These are the Best of What's New.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How bees find their way homeHow can a bee fly straight home in the middle of the night after a complicated route through thick vegetation in search of food? For the first time, researchers have been able to show what happens in the brain of the bee.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genomics researchers showcase their applications of Droplet Digital PCR at ASHG 2017 Annual MeetingDuring the conference, researchers will discuss how Droplet Digital PCR helps them screen stem cells for harmful mutations as well as how Droplet Digital PCR provides early detection of transplant rejection and delivers absolute quantification of gene expression to investigate cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

SUTD researchers developed single cell level sorting technology using sound wavesResearchers from SUTD developed a highly accurate single cell sorting technology using focused sound waves. This new technology enables rapid and accurate isolation of single cells from complex biological samples, which will facilitate the broad application of single cell analysis toward precision medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers confirm IASLC characterization of uncertain R status with prognosis between R0 and R1The findings of a recent study confirm the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC)'s proposed criteria for uncertain resection margin status, R(un), in residual tumor (R) classification. Dr. John Edwards of the University of Sheffield in the United Kingdom presented his team's findings today at the IASLC 18th World Conference on Lung Cancer (WCLC) in Yokohama, Japan.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Treatment based On BRCA1 level does not increase survival of stage II/III NSCLC N+ resected patientsResearch shows that treating stage II and III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) N+ resected patients with customized chemotherapy treatment based on their specific BRCA1 expression levels, as opposed to providing the standard treatment, did not increase overall survival rates among those patients who received individualized CT treatment. Dr. Bartomeu Massuti of Alicante University Hospital in Spa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Biopsy specimen found to be reliable for evaluating DLL3 expression in small cell lung cancerSmall cell lung cancer (SCLC) biopsy specimen was found to be reliable material for evaluating DLL3 expression; high levels of DLL3 in SCLC are correlated with poor survival trends. Dr. Li-Xu Yan of Guangdong General Hospital and Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences in China presented her findings from this study today at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) 18th Wor
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers developed single cell level sorting technology using sound wavesSound wave enables the sensation of hearing, and is an important way of communicating in the animal world. In physics, sound is considered as a mechanical vibration that can propagate in gases, liquids and solids. A research team from the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD), led by Assistant Professor Dr Ye Ai, is studying the interactions between ultrasound (beyond the audible li
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Method to weigh galaxy clusters could help astronomers understand mysterious 'dark matter' structuresThe furthest galaxy ever observed is so far away that the starlight we now detect was emitted less than 500m years after the Big Bang. It has taken about 13 billion years to reach us. But there's a lot of things about a galaxy that we can't see. For example, we think galaxies are immersed within gigantic "halos" of an invisible substance dubbed dark matter. Scientists don't actually know what dark
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Science | The Guardian

The secret to a high salary? Emotional intelligence People with better social skills tend to out-earn their colleagues, but what can you do to build your emotional IQ? While IQ remains a very strong predictor of career success , our research suggests that people with high emotional intelligence are more likely to have higher wages. The study, published in the Journal of Vocational Behaviour in August 2017, tested US university students for emotion
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Dagens Medicin

Kirurger døjer med ondt i kroppen Ph.d.- afhandling om kirurgers arbejdsmiljø, at både robotassisteret kirurgi og traditionel kikkertkirurgi er belastende for muskler og led.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spider-web 'labyrinths' may help reduce noise pollution(Phys.org)—Researchers have demonstrated that the geometry of a natural spider web can be used to design new structures that address one of the biggest challenges in sound control: reducing low-frequency noise, which is the second most widespread environmental problem in Europe after air pollution.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

"Burnout culture" fuels sexism at Uber: HuffingtonUber board member Arianna Huffington blamed a "burnout culture" for fueling sexism at the world's leading smartphone-summoned ride sharing service.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Matchmaking with consequencesMost human tumours have one thing in common: They harbour drastically increased amounts of the so-called Myc proteins. Animal experiments show that such high Myc concentrations contribute to causing cancer. But Myc proteins not only have harmful properties, they are also crucial in healthy cells: Acting as "transcription factors", they control the activity of a limited number of genes. A lot of th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers make the slipperiest surfaces adhesiveThe convenience of non-stick, Teflon-coated cookware is appreciated in kitchens worldwide, particularly by anyone doing the washing up. The chemical making up Teflon, polytetrafluoroethylene or PTFE, is one of the slipperiest materials known. Outside the kitchen, the low-friction surfaces and high chemical resistance of PTFE are essential to many applications across a range of industries. However,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Canadian study of gender-affirming surgery highlights patients' long, frustrating journeyAccess to gender-affirming surgery has improved in British Columbia over the past couple of years, but transgender people needing to access surgery still face complex and often unclear pathways, says a new study from the University of British Columbia.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pair of discoveries illuminate new paths to flu and anthrax treatmentsTwo recent studies led by biologists at the University of California San Diego have set the research groundwork for new avenues to treat influenza and anthrax poisoning. Published in PLOS Pathogens, the studies from Professor Ethan Bier's laboratory used a series of experiments to identify key pathways and mechanisms previously unknown or overlooked in the body's defenses, and possible treatments
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study: nearly half of US medical care comes from emergency roomsNearly half of all US medical care is delivered by emergency departments, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. In recent years, the percentage of care delivered by emergency departments has grown. The paper highlights the major role played by emergency rooms in US health care.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cleveland clinic study: Timing of melanoma diagnosis, treatment critical to survivalA new Cleveland Clinic study underscores the importance of early detection and treatment of melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. The research, published online today in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, indicates that the sooner patients were treated, the better their survival, particularly for stage I melanoma.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Osaka university researchers make the slipperiest surfaces adhesiveOsaka University-led research team develops new way of processing the non-stick fluoropolymers, PTFE. A heating element is added to a plasma chamber for treatment of PTFE. The combined effects of the heat and plasma enable the non-stick surface of PTFE to strongly bind to a rubber surface.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Can Robots and Humans Learn to Labor and Love as One?
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Viden

Eksperter: Alvorlige sikkerhedshuller i alle wi-fi-netværkAlvorlig fejl betyder, at alle trådløse netværk kan narres til at afsløre de data, der strømmer igennem dem.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Webcam on Mars Express surveys high-altitude cloudsAn unprecedented catalogue of more than 21 000 images taken by a webcam on ESA's Mars Express is proving its worth as a science instrument, providing a global survey of unusual high-altitude cloud features on the Red Planet.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mum takes more responsibility for the children, even in gender equal couplesThe social and moral responsibility for the children lies primarily with the mother, particularly at celebrations and festive seasons, according to Kristine Warhuus Smeby.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google's Pixel 2: A phone built for artificial intelligenceWhat's most fascinating about Google's new Pixel 2 phone is what's to come.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microsoft rolls out new Windows 10 update and laptopsMicrosoft has begun rolling out an update to its Windows 10 operating system, hoping to spark enthusiasm for its virtual- and augmented-reality ambitions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Israel Aerospace Industries, Hankuk Carbon, to make dronesIsrael Aerospace Industries says it has formed a joint venture with Korean company Hankuk Carbon to make unmanned aircraft together.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Volvo's electric car brand Polestar unveils first modelVolvo Cars' performance electric car brand, Polestar, unveiled a four-seat coupe in lightweight carbon fiber as its first model Tuesday, adding to competition in a market dominated until now by Tesla.
20h
Scientific American Content: Global

How to Make a Consciousness MeterZapping the brain with magnetic pulses while measuring its electrical activity is proving to be a reliable way to detect consciousness -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tiny protein coiled coils that self-assemble into cages(Phys.org)—A large team of researchers with members from Slovenia, the U.K, Serbia, France and Spain has developed a technique that causes proteins to self-assemble into geometric shapes on demand. In their paper published in the journal Nature Biotechnology, the group describes their technique and possible uses for the tiny cages.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronomers discover a post-asymptotic giant branch star with unusual evolutionary scenario(Phys.org)—Astronomers have detected a new metal-poor, luminous post-asymptotic giant branch star in the Small Magellanic Cloud. The newly found object, designated J005252.87-722842.9, appears to have undergone an unusual evolution process. The finding was presented October 12 in a paper published on the arXiv pre-print server.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Engineers could learn a lot from dance when designing urban transportThere is little more important for the sustainability of cities than the ways we move around them. With transportation estimated to account for 30% of energy consumption across the majority of the world's most developed nations, reducing the necessity for energy-reliant vehicles is fundamental to addressing the environmental impact of mobility.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stiff fibres spun from slimeNature is an excellent teacher – even for material scientists. Researchers, including scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, have now observed a remarkable mechanism by which polymer materials are formed. In order to capture prey, velvet worms shoot out a sticky secretion that stiffens into strong threads under the action of force. The extraordinary thing about these th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Need for speed makes genome editing efficient, if not betterRice University researchers have developed a computational model to quantify the mechanism by which CRISPR-Cas9 proteins find their genome-editing targets.
20h
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*Soonish*: The Future Is Weird and Scary and Also HilariousIn their new book, scientist Kelly Weinersmith and *SMBC* cartoonist Zach Weinersmith give a wild glimpse into a future that may or may not involve space elevators and brain-computer interfaces.
20h
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Microsoft Surface Book 2 Puts Desktop Brains in a Laptop BodyThe most power you've ever seen in a normal-looking laptop.
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Google Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL Review: There Is No Better Android PhoneWe review the $650 Pixel 2 and the $850 Pixel 2 XL, the new Android handsets from Google.
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Science | The Guardian

Jeremy Taylor obituary My husband, Jeremy Taylor, who has died aged 70, was a television producer and science writer. A modest man of huge intellectual capacity, he had a gift for communicating complex scientific ideas with ease, whether on paper, film or face to face. For 30 years Jerry made science documentaries for television, particularly for the BBC’s Horizon series, and later wrote two popular science books on ev
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Gizmodo

A Bizarre Tie-In May Hint at Another DC Hero Coming to Justice League Another star joins the Venom film. Todd McFarlane promises changes to Spawn for his new movie. Mike Colter talks Iron Fist’s appearance in Luke Cage season two. The CW is working on another supernatural cop show. Plus, new Ant-Man & The Wasp set pictures and another look at Syfy’s Happy! adaptation. Behold, spoilers! Justice League A new promotion between the film and The Big Bang Theory to w
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Gizmodo

Pixel 2 Review: Google Sticks to What It Does Best All images: Sam Rutherford/Gizmodo When Google released the Pixel last year, it was taking a stand. No longer would Google hardware be tainted with the brands and logos of other companies, even if behind the scenes, Google still needed help from those same companies to actually build its phones. And despite designs that were almost offensively ugly , a lack of standard flagship features such as w
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Gizmodo

Microsoft Made Pricey New Surface Books, Including a Giant One—They Seem Nice! All images: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo Microsoft is finally dragging its ambitious Surface Book line into the present day, refining the striking design and making this a laptop you can covet for reasons besides that funky hinge. The surprise launch of the original Surface Book back in 2015 might have left critics thunderstruck, but it hasn’t transformed the computer market like its slimmer sister, the Su
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Dagens Medicin

Overlæge vil give fagligt indspark i Nordjylland Overlæge Marianne Mulle Jensen (RV) stiller for første gang op til regionsrådsvalg i Nordjylland. Hun mener, der mangler sundhedsfaglige politikere i regionen, og derfor vil hun give sit faglige biddrag til de politiske belsutninger.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How to behave at a zoo – according to scienceWith October half-term approaching, millions around the world will head to their local zoo to indulge in the Halloween activities and get a little fresh autumnal air in the presence of some extraordinary animals. At this time of year, the animals are still wonderfully active and there's plenty to see and do. But there are certain things you should be doing as a visitor to ensure that the animals a
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Revealing quantum statistics with a pair of distant atomsAn international team of researchers has proposed a new way to make atoms or ions indistinguishable by swapping their positions. These particles are then expected to exhibit exotic properties. The study involved physicists from the University of Bonn, the Austrian Academy of Sciences, and the University of California. The work has now been published in Physical Review Letters.
21h
Ars Technica

Surprise! The Pixel 2 is hiding a custom Google SoC for image processing Enlarge / Google's Pixel Visual Core, an SoC designed for image processing and machine learning. (credit: Google) Google's newest flagship smartphone, the Pixel 2 , is nearly out. The company has been talking a big game about the 2's camera and calling it, definitively, "the best smartphone camera." But Google has been keeping a huge secret under wraps: the Pixel 2 has a custom, Google-designed S
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Ars Technica

Surface Book 2: More cores, more GPU, and more screen Just over two years ago, Microsoft unveiled its Surface Book hybrid laptop : a tablet with a detachable hinged keyboard base. It was a compelling concept , with Microsoft pulling off some clever tricks. The base contained a battery, boosting the life of the tablet portion substantially, and could optionally contain a discrete GPU, too. A little under a year ago, the Surface Book was partially ref
21h
Ars Technica

Microsoft gets back in the premium mouse game with Surface Precision Mouse Microsoft Microsoft used to make the best mice in the world, but for reasons that have never been entirely clear to me, the company decided to give up on this a few years ago. While the company has continued to make a number of interesting and unusual mice, for the last decade or so its focus has primarily been on mobile mice—the kind of thing you'd chuck in your laptop bag—rather than button-lad
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Ars Technica

Pixel 2 and 2 XL review—The best Android phone you can buy Ron Amadeo Welcome to year two of Google Hardware. In 2016, Google jumped into the Android hardware space with its first self-branded device, the Google Pixel . Google's software prowess shined on the Pixel 1, offering up exclusive features like the Google Assistant, the best Android camera thanks to advanced software processing, fast day-one OS updates and betas, and the smoothest, best-performi
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Scientific American Content: Global

Peering Within: An Introduction to the November Issue -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
21h
Scientific American Content: Global

Forget Pills and Surgery for Back PainMany physicians are advocating a simpler approach to treating lower back pain: exercise -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

Neutron Star Collisions Create GoldAstrophysicists searching for gravitational waves have finally learned what happens when you crash two neutron stars together--and it's very, very shiny. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Headlines | Science News

A universal flu vaccine may be nearing realityScientists are developing a universal vaccine against flu, making annual shots a thing of the past.
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Viden

Ny forskning: Rødkløver kan bremse knogleskørhedForskning fra Aarhus Universitet viser, at planteøstrogen i rødkløver kan bremse knogleskørhed hos kvinder i overgangsalderen.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers find mechanism by which plant roots avoid oxygen-deficient soilResearchers are warning about more frequently occurring extreme weather events in the future as a result of climate change. Current environmental catastrophes such as the numerous and particularly severe tropical hurricanes this year tend to confirm this trend. These extreme weather events are often accompanied by flooding, which increasingly affects agricultural land. This flooding is becoming an
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new type of robotic microscopeScientists at Oldenburg University can now use a "digitizing robotic microscope" for biological and medical research. Oldenburg University is one of the few German universities where this new type of microscope, which costs approximately 200,000 euros, is in use.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tough species of corals can go mobile and lay the foundations for new reefs in otherwise inhospitable areas, a studTough species of corals can go mobile and lay the foundations for new reefs in otherwise inhospitable areas, a study shows.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

3-D mapping of rooms using radarEngineers from University Alliance Ruhr have developed novel signal processing methods for imaging and material characterisation with the aid of radar. Their long-term objective is to use these techniques in combination with radar-based localisation of objects. Their vision is a flying platform capable of generating a three-dimensional representation of its surroundings. The technology might be, f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The use of jellyfish blooms as solutions for producing new productsWhile some people might find these slimy creatures at the beach very exciting, a number of species are poisonous; some tropical species are even among the most toxic animals on earth. Even worse, rising water temperatures, ocean acidification and overfishing seem to favor the jellyfish blooms. More and more often, they appear in huge swarms, which have already destroyed whole fish farms on Europea
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Bay Nettle JellyFrom their smaller size and fewer tentacles, nettle jellyfish inhabiting the Chesapeake Bay are noticeably different from their ocean-dwelling counterparts, prompting scientists to classify the two as different species.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Contemporary forms of work need to be incorporated into official statisticsPolicy makers would benefit from official statistics that encompass new forms of work including data on individuals who receive a salary and a self-employed income at the same time and the 'grey area' between the traditional classifications of employment and self-employment. According to Professor Teemu Kautonen (upper photo) and Assistant Professor Ewald Kibler, this information would ensure bett
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chemists develop optical imaging tool to target cancer cellsDr. Ning Fang of the Chemistry Department at Georgia State University has developed a new optical imaging technique, Single Particle Orientation and Rotational Tracking (SPORT), to image rotational motions in live cells and ultimately target cancer cells.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Waiting periods reduce deaths from guns, study suggests(Phys.org)—A trio of researchers with Harvard Business School has found evidence that they claim shows gun deaths decline when states enact waiting period laws. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Michael Luca, Deepak Malhotra and Christopher Poliquin describe their study and discuss their results.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Habitat loss is the top threat to Australia's speciesEarlier this month, Australia's outgoing Threatened Species Commissioner Gregory Andrews told ABC radio that land clearing is not the biggest threat to Australia's wildlife. His claim caused a stir among Australia's biodiversity scientists and conservation professionals, who have plenty of evidence to the contrary.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Optical frequency comb offers a convenient way to generate elusive terahertz frequenciesOptical frequency combs are widely-used, high-precision tools for measuring and detecting different frequencies—a.k.a. colors—of light. Unlike conventional lasers, which emit a single frequency, these lasers emit multiple frequencies simultaneously. The equally spaced frequencies resemble the teeth of a comb. Optical frequency combs are used for everything from measuring the fingerprints of specif
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Student makes design of 'swarm robot' Zebro suitable for serial productionMattijs Otten, an Industrial Design Engineering student at TU Delft, has created a modular design that facilitates serial production of the Zebro. Zebros are walking hexapod robots. In the future, researchers plan to create autonomous swarms of these robots, and serial production is essential to achieving this goal.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Quantum physics paves the way for new chemical productsResearch by an OU molecular physicist has discovered that electrons can control chemical reactions in experiments leading to purer, cheaper chemical products.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How bees find their way homeHow can a bee fly straight home in the middle of the night after a complicated route through thick vegetation in search of food? For the first time, researchers have been able to show what happens in the brain of the bee.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wolves found to be more cooperative with their own kind than dogs with theirs(Phys.org)—A team of researchers from the Wolf Science Center and the Comparative Cognition, Messerli Research Institute, both part of the Medical University of Vienna, has found that packs of wolves behave more cooperatively among themselves than do groups of dogs. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes how they tested both groups of anima
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Opinion: What rape culture says about masculinityThe phrase "rape culture" elicits strong responses. Prominent among them are confusion, scoffs, anger and even anonymous vitriol from internet "haters." When I posted on Facebook that I was seeking pro-feminist men to participate in a research project on rape culture, my co-investigator, Jacob Beaudrow, and I found ourselves to be on the receiving end of an email diatribe that included a death thr
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Scientific American Content: Global

Why People Refuse to Believe ScientistsIt has nothing to do with science itself -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren

Efter 80 afhøringer opgiver svensk politi at straffe skandale-kirurgEfter en omfattende efterforskning dropper svensk politi sigtelserne mod en italiensk kirurg, som uden videnskabelig dokumentation indopererede kunstige luftrør på patienter, som døde af det.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How technology will fight food fraudFood fraud is everywhere. In the aftermath of the horsemeat scandal in Europe, and with cases reported around the world, including in Canada, awareness is high.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists revisit optical constants of ultrathin gold filmsResearchers at MIPT have conducted highly precise measurements of the optical constants of ultrathin gold films with thicknesses ranging from 20 to 200 billionths of a meter in the optical part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Thin gold films are key components of modern micro- and nanoscale optical and optoelectronic devices. The research findings will be in demand among researchers in the field.
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Futurity.org

Extra fertilizer puts prairie plants off schedule Excess nitrogen from fertilizers can give an advantage to early-season plants in Midwestern prairies, leading to further changes in prairie ecosystems, new research suggests. The study shows how excess nutrients from fertilizers that find their way onto prairies tend to alter the composition of those ecosystems, a development that has implications for management practices and wildlife habitat. Th
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Popular Science

California's hepatitis A outbreak shows why people need easy access to health care Health We have to act now if we want to save lives in the future. The efforts to quell the flow of new cases will work eventually, but they're coming 18 deaths too late. We can do better.
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New Scientist - News

Ophelia shows many hurricanes could reach Europe in the futureTropical cyclones often get to Europe but normally they have weakened by the time they get there. Not any more, thanks to climate change
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Distant exoplanets revealed by light from wobbling starsAsk most folks what they would need to find planets orbiting distant stars, and very few will list a bottle of iodine.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new way to test body armorScientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a new way to investigate the high-performance fibers used in modern body armor. Described in the Journal of Polymer Science, the research may help increase confidence in the apparel that protects military units, police departments and public figures from gunfire. It may also lead to the development of new, light
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The importance of asymmetry in bacteriaNew research published in Nature Microbiology has highlighted a protein that functions as a membrane vacuum cleaner and which could be a potential new target for antibiotics.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The missing mass—what is causing a geoid low in the Indian Ocean?The Earth's interior is still a mystery to us. While we have sent missions to probe the outer reaches of our Solar system, the deepest boreholes on Earth go down to only a few kilometres. The only way to learn what's going on deep inside our planet, in the core and the mantle, is by indirect methods.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How far do invasive species travel?Around the globe, an increasing number of plant and animal species are introduced into new regions through human activity. However, the global patterns of their distribution are only poorly understood to date. Researchers at the Senckenberg and at the universities of Oldenburg and Vienna have now discovered that the spread of species can be convincingly explained by a combination of global trade f
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Oxitec's Zika-Fighting Mosquitoes Are the EPA's Problem NowOxitec has spent the last six years seeking US regulatory approval for its Zika-fighting GM mosquitoes. Now they're the EPA's problem.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Plastic between your toesPlastic is everywhere. This is in short the key outcome of a study by bachelor's student Froukje Lots and her supervisor Thijs Bosker. They found that every kilogram of sand on European beaches contained on average 250 fragments of microplastic. In some locations the number can be even higher, a spot in Iceland had 700 microplastics per kilogram, in Italy it was as high as 1,500 per kilogram. Bosk
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Gizmodo

What's the Laziest Reason You've Ever Used Technology? We all do it. We text our partners when they’re in the next room. We take an elevator for just one floor. And we FaceTime with the stovetop to make sure water isn’t boiling over while we watch TV in the other room. Well, maybe we don’t all do that last one. But this guy did. Technology has made many aspects of our lives better. But with that convenience comes the opportunity for us to become incr
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Dagens Medicin

Almen praksis får anbefalinger for valg af blodsukkerregulerende medicinSundhedsstyrelsen og IRF udsender rekommandationer for praktiserende lægers valg af glukosesænkende lægemidler til type 2-diabetes, men inddrager ikke andre former for medicinsk behandling af type 2-diabetes.
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Dagens Medicin

Folketinget vil ændre reglerne for patienterstatning Nye regler for patienterstatning er sendt i høring. Ændringerne betyder bl.a., at regionerne skal betale erstatning for fejl begået i det private, og det er helt urimeligt, siger Danske Regioners formand.
22h
Dagens Medicin

Diabetescenter henter forskningsleder i LondonSteno Diabetes Center Copenhagen har ansat Cristina Legido-Quigley som forskningsleder.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microbes leave 'fingerprints' on Martian rocksScientists around Tetyana Milojevic from the Faculty of Chemistry at the University of Vienna are in search of unique biosignatures, which are left on synthetic extraterrestrial minerals by microbial activity. The biochemist and astrobiologist investigates these signatures at her own miniaturized "Mars farm" where she can observe interactions between the archaeon Metallosphaera sedula and Mars-lik
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Gizmodo

Hatsune Miku Shows Us The Future Of PC Case Mods GIF [GIF: ippupu_ava ] Virtual idol Hatsune Miku appears to be dancing inside this modded PC case, which was recently shown in Osaka. Amazing, no? Created do-it-yourself PC get together, the case mod is outfitted with a clear LCD panel, giving the appearance that Miku is dancing. Here is a look inside: This case mod was on display earlier this summer in Tokyo. Akiba PC Hotline ’s photos shed a li
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

This ingenious approach not only binds CO2, but also improves the soilIf 4,000 Norwegian farms and nurseries produced biochar and mixed it with the soil, we could halve CO2 emissions from the agricultural sector. This entirely natural approach also produces more robust and healthy plants.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Early global greenhouse event gave rise to fire-adapted treesConifers that were living at the South Pole show an extreme adaptation to forest fires.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

California still under the throes of wildfire woesNorthern parts of California especially around the Napa and Somona Valley areas are still having major wildfire issues that continue to be exacerbated by weather conditions. Other areas of California are also in danger, though, due to other fires both north and south of the Santa Rosa area fires.
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Gizmodo

This $56 Blender Is Actually Three Devices In One Oster Pro 1200 , $56 You don’t need to spend a ton of money to get one of those cool multi-use blenders; this Oster Pro is three kitchen gadgets in one, and it’s only $56 today on Amazon . You get a food processing bowl, a standard blender jar, and a single-serve smoothie cup, all of which attach to the 1200W blender to transform it into the device of your choice. So you can go from chopping onio
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team uncovers link between forest fire smoke, pollution eventsSmoke from forest fires might contribute to more than half of certain gritty air pollution events in the continental U.S. during the summer, and as much as 20 percent of those events throughout the year, according to new research at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Children more likely to receive welfare benefits if their parents doYoung people are almost twice as likely to need social welfare payments if their parents have a history of receiving such assistance themselves, according to new research from the University of Melbourne.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A miniature laser-like device for surface plasmonsResearchers at ETH Zurich have developed a miniature device capable of producing laser-like beams of a particular kind of electromagnetic wave called a surface plasmon. Surface plasmons can be focused much more tightly than light waves, making them useful for applications such as sensing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Exascale and the cityWalk around any city neighborhood and chances are it looks nothing like it did 20 years ago. Thanks to growing urbanization, cities globally are rapidly expanding and accounting for more of our world's population, gross domestic product and greenhouse gases.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Key to expanding genetic code describedYale scientists have described the atomic structure of a protein that is the key tool in efforts by synthetic biologists to expand the genetic code.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers defy the limits of streamingGiven the growing number of users and the widening range of devices, streaming is no longer viable in its current form owing to the substantial amount of power and storage capacity it requires. But researchers at EPFL's Embedded Systems Laboratory (ESL) have found a way to reduce those requirements without impacting the quality of the video itself.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Doubling the power of the world's most intense laserThe most intense laser in the world is about to get a power upgrade with $2 million from the National Science Foundation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Feeling ambitious but economically left behind fuels feelings of discontent with government, study findsEconomic progress can cause people to feel dispossessed and angry if they don't feel like they are also advancing, according to a study.
22h
Scientific American Content: Global

Our Federal Science Agencies Are in Mortal DangerWhether by strategy or ineptitude or both, the Trump administration is starving them of the expertise they need to fulfill their essential functions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
22h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Give researchers a lifetime word limit Brian C. Martinson imagines how rationing the number of publications a scientist could put out might improve the scientific literature. Nature 550 303 doi: 10.1038/550303a
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Live Science

Ancient Sea Creature Looked Like a Wine Glass, Died AloneResembling a dainty tulip bloom or an elegant white-wine glass, the 500-million-year-old bottom-feeder looked uniquely ready for a romantic evening of sucking up microplankton along the seafloor.
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Live Science

Why Do We Get Addicted to Things?What makes a particular habit or substance an addiction?
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Live Science

In Photos: Mysterious Stone Structures in Saudi ArabiaImages reveal sprawling stone structures in Saudi Arabia that look like field gates from above and that may date back thousands of years.
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Live Science

400 Mysterious Ancient Stone Structures Discovered in Saudi ArabiaThe sprawling stone structures date back thousands of years and drape across old lava fields.
22h
Scientific American Content: Global

New VR Tech Aims to Take Surround-Sound to the Next LevelSpatial audio promises immersive virtual experiences that engage more of the senses -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Wikipedia's Fate Shows How the Web Endangers KnowledgeSocial networks train us to focus on images and emotions, sapping the quest for knowledge.
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Americans Love Automation, Until It Comes for Their JobsNew polls find most Americans believe automation destroys more jobs than it creates; one-third believe they're at risk of losing jobs.
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Feed: All Latest

Google's 'Advanced Protection' Locks Down Accounts Like Never BeforeGoogle offers a powerful new security setting aimed its most (rightfully) paranoid users.
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Gizmodo

Forget BMW, the Garmin Speak Is a Cheaper Way to Put Alexa in Your Car All images: Andrew Liszewski/Gizmodo The most useful place for a voice-activated digital assistant isn’t your office, kitchen, or living room. It’s in your car, where your hands and eyes should be pre-occupied with driving. So Garmin put Amazon’s Alexa in a new bare-bones navigation device that will ensure you’ll never get lost, and never get lonely, on a long drive. Last month, BMW announced tha
23h
Ars Technica

Garmin teamed up with Amazon to make a tiny Echo Dot for your car Enlarge (credit: Garmin) At a recent Amazon event, the company announced BMW would integrate Alexa into its 2018 models. It's no secret that Amazon wants to stick Alexa anywhere and everywhere it can, and BMW is only the beginning. The latest company to announce a collaboration with Amazon is Garmin: the wearable and navigation device manufacturer revealed the new Garmin Speak today, a small disk
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cognitive science

Happy? Sometimes, maybe no, but why evolve, yes etc. submitted by /u/ursvp [link] [comments]
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Plasma optic combines lasers into superbeamSince its introduction in the 1977 film "Star Wars," the Death Star has remained one of science fiction's most iconic figures. The image of Alderaan's destruction at the hands of the Death Star's superlaser is burned into the memory of millions of fans.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sunlight stimulates microbial respiration of organic carbonSunlight and microbes interact to degrade dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in surface waters, but scientists cannot currently predict the rate and extent of this degradation in either dark or light conditions. A recent study helps explain how sunlight alters organic matter composition.
23h
Scientific American Content: Global

Saving the Endangered Cuban CrocodileHybridization poses an increasing threat to the nation’s beloved reptile -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fish respond to predator attack by doubling growth rateScientists have known for years that when some fish sense predators eating members of their species, they try to depart the scene of the crime and swim toward safer waters. This sensible behavior is exactly what evolution would be expected to produce.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new way to harness wasted methaneMethane gas, a vast natural resource, is often disposed of through burning, but new research by scientists at MIT could make it easier to capture this gas for use as fuel or a chemical feedstock.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sentinel-5P satellite reported in excellent healthLaunched last week, Europe's Sentinel-5P satellite – the first Copernicus mission dedicated to monitoring the air we breathe – is in excellent health.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New research shows dinosaur dung fertilizes planetWhether it started with exhibits at the Natural History Museum or fun-terrified screams watching Jurassic Park, humans have always been awestruck by dinosaurs.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Clues to the innate drug resistance of a cocoa-fermenting pathogenAt first glance, the yeast Candida krusei seems as innocuous as microbes come: it's used for fermenting cocoa beans and gives chocolate its pleasant aroma. But it's increasingly found as a pathogen in immunocompromised patients—and C. krusei infections aren't always easy to cure. This yeast is naturally resistant to fluconazole, a first-line antifungal that's vital not just for treating many funga
23h
Ingeniøren

Uber giver mere trængsel i amerikanske byerApp-baserede taxitjenester ændrer transportmønstrene i amerikanske storbyer, viser nyt studie. Beboerne bruger busser og letbaner mindre, og trafikmængden vokser.
23h
Ingeniøren

Lukket klub med over 3.000 forskere hemmeligholdt analyser af stjerne-sammenstødForskere verden over, der stod bag observationer og analyser af det første registrerede neutronstjernesammenstød, var bundet til hemmelighed af en streng håndfæstning,
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers take a step toward quantum mechanical analysis of plant metabolismHurricanes, traffic jams, demographic development – to predict the effect of such events, computer simulations are required. Many processes in nature, however, are so complicated that conventional computers fail. Quantum simulators may solve this problem. One of the basic phenomena in nature is the interaction between light and matter in photosynthesis. Physicists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technol
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tropical thunderstorms are set to grow stronger as the world warmsThunderstorms are set to become more intense throughout the tropics and subtropics this century as a result of climate change, according to new research.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Europe's first all-electric telecom satelliteEurope's first all-electric telecom satellite has reached its final working orbit above the Pacific Ocean. Eutelsat-172B, built for Eutelsat by Airbus, carries new technologies developed through ESA-led projects, including fully articulated thruster arms.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Adding organic matter to soil has a limited effect on water holding capacitySequestering carbon in the soil via the addition of organic matter has been widely promoted for the mitigation of climate change. Enhancing soil organic matter can improve soil quality, i.e., increasing nutrient retention, improving soil structure, enhancing soil biotic activity and improving soil moisture and temperature regimes. Adding organic matter has also been widely promoted for increasing
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Water disinfectant wipes out legionella in hospital's water supplyA water disinfectant company has successfully eliminated Legionella from a South Australian hospital's water supply using a pH neutral electrochemical solution, which can also be used to disinfect food.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research team determines that constructing offshore wind turbines in port is the most cost effective methodWorking closely with industry partners, University of Delaware researchers have developed a new method for constructing offshore wind farms and proven that it is cheaper, faster and could make possible offshore wind deployment at a scale and pace able to keep up with the region's scheduled retirements of nuclear and coal-fired power plants.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fresh findings from CassiniNASA's Cassini spacecraft ended its journey on Sept. 15 with an intentional plunge into the atmosphere of Saturn, but analysis continues on the mountain of data the spacecraft sent during its long life. Some of the Cassini team's freshest insights were presented during a news conference today at the American Astronomical Society Division for Planetary Science meeting in Provo, Utah.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

World first for reading digitally encoded synthetic moleculesUsing mass spectrometry, researchers have for the first time read several bytes of data recorded on a molecular scale using synthetic polymers. Their work sets a new benchmark for the amount of data stored as a sequence of molecular units (monomers) that may be read using this routine method. It also sets the stage for data storage on a scale 100 times smaller than that of current hard drives. The
23h
The Atlantic

The Great Undoer Last week was a banner week for Donald Trump— after the first week of his presidency , perhaps the most productive, at least in terms of raw political accomplishments. The two big headlines, pulling the plug on subsidies in Obamacare insurance markets and tossing the Iran nuclear deal to Congress, are both highly fraught. Yet with these two decisions, President Trump has brought himself closer to
23h
The Atlantic

What Hollywood Forgets About LBJ President Lyndon Johnson has enjoyed a remarkable run in Hollywood. Next month, the most recent addition to the fictional canon will be Rob Reiner’s LBJ , a movie starring Woody Harrelson as the oversized Texan who dominated American political life like almost no one else in the 1960s. Reiner’s film revolves around Johnson’s transition from serving as a frustrated vice president to becoming the p
23h
Feed: All Latest

These Photographs Capture the Many Lives Traveling Along Germany's Iconic AutobahnThere are 8,000 miles in the famed highway network—and each of them has a story.
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Feed: All Latest

Virtual Therapists Help Veterans Open Up About PTSDAn artificially intelligent therapist named Ellie helps members of the military open up about their mental health.
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Feed: All Latest

Modern Love: Are Humans Ready for Intimacy With Robots?Hiroshi Ishi­guro builds androids. Beautiful, realistic, uncannily convincing human replicas. His quest? Untangle the ineffable nature of human connection.
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Ingeniøren

Ingen har søgt om at sende selvkørende biler ud på de danske vejeVejdirektoratet har ikke modtaget ansøgninger om forsøgsordninger med selvkørende køretøjer, selv om flere har kritiseret myndighederne for at være for langsomme om komme med på vognen.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pricey high-tech features define new smartphone warsThe front lines of the battle for smartphone dominance over the coming years have grown clearer after Chinese technology firm Huawei presented an AI-powered phone designed to go head-to-head with Samsung and Apple.
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Ingeniøren

Blinkende wifi-alternativ giver samme lyskvalitet som andre LED-kilderDet har ingen betydning for hverken lysets farve, strømforbruget eller varmeudviklingen, at en LED indgår i et netværk til datatransmission.
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New Scientist - News

Sleeping too little is no badge of honour – it harms our brainsSkipping sleep to get more done can have a profound effect. We need to prioritise rest before we sleepwalk into a public health disaster
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Keratin, proteins from 54-million-year-old sea turtle show survival trait evolutionResearchers Japan have retrieved original pigment, beta-keratin and muscle proteins from a 54-million-year-old sea turtle hatchling. The work adds to the growing body of evidence supporting persistence of original molecules over millions of years and also provides direct evidence that a pigment-based survival trait common to modern sea turtles evolved at least 54 million years ago.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

World first for reading digitally encoded synthetic moleculesFor the first time ever, using mass spectrometry, French researchers have successfully read several bytes of data recorded on a molecular scale using synthetic polymers. Their work sets a new benchmark for the amount of data -- stored as a sequence of molecular units (monomers) -- that may be read using this routine method. It also sets the stage for data storage on a scale 100 times smaller than
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Many pelvic tumors in women may have common origin -- fallopian tubesMost -- and possibly all -- ovarian cancers start, not in ovaries, but instead in the fallopian tubes attached to them.
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Dagens Medicin

Sverige protesterer mod EMA-rapportDen svenske regering mener, at der er fejl i den tekniske vurdering af Sveriges EMA-kandidatur og har sendt et brev til EU-kommissionen for at protestere.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Keratin, proteins from 54 million-year-old sea turtle show survival trait evolutionResearchers from North Carolina State University, Lund University in Sweden and the University of Hyogo in Japan have retrieved original pigment, beta-keratin and muscle proteins from a 54 million-year-old sea turtle hatchling. The work adds to the growing body of evidence supporting persistence of original molecules over millions of years and also provides direct evidence that a pigment-based sur
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Science : NPR

Astronaut Scott Kelly's Latest Mission: A Book After a year in space, Kelly says, writing a book was harder than he thought — but still, he adds, "If I write a bad sentence people are only going to get angry with me. They're not going to die." (Image credit: NASA/Getty Images)
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Ingeniøren

Forsvaret får skarp kritik for tavshed om mistænkt, russisk antivirus Center for Cybersikkerhed, der hører under Forsvarets Efterretningstjeneste, har ingen kommentarer til, hvordan danskerne skal forholde sig russiske Kasperskys antivirussoftware, som er forbudt på amerikanske myndigheders computere. Det er et samfundsproblem, mener kritiker. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/tysk-center-cybersikkerhed-udtaler-sig-danske-myndigheder-stille-graven-de-gemmer-sig Versi
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cognitive science

Should endangered languages be preserved, and at what cost? submitted by /u/OestlundMartin [link] [comments]
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Dagens Medicin

Nye diabetescentre skal sikre samarbejde mellem sektorer De fem nye Steno Diabetescentre ansvaret for et bedre samarbejde mellem hospitaler, kommuner og almen praktiserende læger.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Signaling pathway may be key to why autism is more common in boysResearchers led by Ted Abel, director of the Iowa Neuroscience Institute at the University of Iowa, have discovered sex differences in a brain signaling pathway involved in reward learning and motivation that make male mice more vulnerable to an autism-causing genetic glitch.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Schizophrenia disrupts the brain's entire communication system, researchers saySome 40 years since CT scans first revealed abnormalities in the brains of schizophrenia patients, international scientists say the disorder is a systemic disruption to the brain's entire communication system. The study sets the stage for future research on the debilitating mental illness that affects more than 21 million people worldwide. It is the largest analysis of 'white matter' differences i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US tech giants may find their future shaped by EuropeSilicon Valley is a uniquely American creation, the product of an entrepreneurial spirit and no-holds-barred capitalism that now drives many aspects of modern life.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Self-driving cars could ease traffic, but increase sprawlA new study inspired by Boston's early experiments with self-driving cars finds that the technology could ease congestion, but might also lead to more cars on the road and further encourage urban sprawl.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Australia rejects clean energy target for cheaper powerThe Australian government on Tuesday rejected a plan to generate 42 percent of the country's power from wind and solar energy, in a setback for compliance with climate change commitments
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Dagens Medicin

37 læger stiller op til kommunalvalgetI knap hver tredje kommune er der mindst en kandidat på listen til kommunalvalget, som er læge. Radikale Venstre er det mest populære parti blandt lægerne.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Light in the sky over UAE likely Russian rocket breaking upA light seen in the night sky over the United Arab Emirates likely was a discarded Russian spaceship breaking up after re-entering the Earth's atmosphere.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Greenpeace faults many tech giants for environment impactThe environmental group Greenpeace issued a report on Tuesday giving technology titans including Samsung Electronics, Amazon and Huawei low marks for their environmental impact.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Human remains found in large Australian crocHuman remains were found Tuesday in a large crocodile that police believe killed an elderly woman who wandered away from her aged-care home in northeast Australia.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Risking lives, Mexicans try to salvage belongings after quakeGuadalupe Vazquez is standing below the wreckage of what used to be her home, patiently waiting for workers to recover the few belongings she has left after Mexico's September 19 earthquake: some photographs of her daughters hanging on the wall, still visible from the street.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Netflix adds 5 mn subscribers, doubles profitNetflix said Monday it added some five million new subscribers over the past three months as profits doubled, in a quarterly update that sent shares of the streaming video giant higher.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Hiding in plain sight'—Discovery raises questions over scale of overlooked biodiversityScientists have used cutting-edge DNA technology and museum samples collected over the past two centuries to reveal a new species of diving beetle living in streams around the Mediterranean.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Invasive ladybird species threatens other ladybirds in EnglandThe harlequin ladybird, officially known as Harmonia axyridis, was widely introduced across continental Europe to limit the population of pest insects. In Britain, harlquins arrived primarily by spread from mainland Europe, and it is now very common and widespread over most of England and Wales. A new Insect Conservation and Diversity study shows a clear decrease in the numbers of a native ladybir
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study suggests oysters offer hot spot for reducing nutrient pollutionWhen it comes to oysters and their role in reducing nutrient pollution, a new study by researchers at William & Mary's Virginia Institute of Marine Science gets right to the guts—and the shell—of the matter.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tweeting rage: How immigration policies can polarize public discourseBefore a border wall became a budget bargaining chip, before the presidential pardon of a controversial sheriff and before federal policies were announced on social media, there was Arizona Senate Bill 1070, the "show me your papers" law.
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Science-Based Medicine

Chiropractor Disregards the Loss of His License, Continues to Treat Patients with Cervical Dysplasia with EscharoticsA chiropractor who bills himself as a chiropractic gynecologist has continued to practice after his license was permanently revoked. Among his many questionable practices, Nick LeRoy is treating cervical dysplasia with escharotics, a potentially dangerous replacement for conventional treatments to prevent cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Hiding in plain sight' -- Discovery raises questions over scale of overlooked biodiversityScientists from the University of Plymouth and the Institute of Evolutionary Biology in Barcelona have used cutting edge DNA technology to demonstrate that one of Europe's top freshwater predators is actually two species rather than one.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop mathematical techniques for designing shape-shifting shellsNature has a way of making complex shapes from a set of simple growth rules. The curve of a petal, the swoop of a branch, even the contours of our face are shaped by these processes. What if we could unlock those rules and reverse engineer nature's ability to grow an infinitely diverse array of shapes?
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Ars Technica

Gran Turismo Sport is extremely limited in offline mode Enlarge (credit: Polyphony Digital / Aurich Lawson ) On Tuesday, October 17, the long-awaited Gran Turismo Sport arrives for the Playstation 4. This seventh installment of one of the world's best-selling games franchises introduces a number of updates designed for high-end TVs, virtual reality, and e-sports enthusiasts. Although we've had a copy for a few days now, you'll have to wait a few more
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

ESnet's science DMZ design could help transfer, protect medical research dataLike other sciences, medical research is generating increasingly large datasets as doctors track health trends, the spread of diseases, genetic causes of illness and the like. Effectively using this data for efforts ranging from stopping the spread of deadly viruses to creating precision medicine treatments for individuals will be greatly accelerated by the secure sharing of the data, while also p
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Ingeniøren

Tysk rapport: Robotter stjæler ikke nødvendigvis job – men de æder af lønnenRobotter har ikke fået tysk arbejdsløshed til at stige, selv om de har stjålet en kvart million industrijob. Men det giver lavere løn at arbejde ved siden af robotter på fabriksgulvet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team uses magnetic beads to model microscopic proteins, polymersAn engineered string of micronwide beads may take up the slack where computer modeling fails researchers who study the bending, folding and other movements of polymers or biomolecules like actin and DNA.
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Ingeniøren

Åbent Region H-dokumentsystem gav adgang til læge-konto hos sædbank Oplysninger lækket via et dokumenthåndteringssystem hos Region Hovedstaden har gjort det muligt at logge ind på sædbanks hjemmeside som læge. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/frit-tilgaengeligt-login-dokumentstyrigssystem-gav-adgang-laege-konto-hos-saedbank-1081677 Version2
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Viden

Udfordring: Gør strømslugende internet grøntStreaming og sociale medier har mangedoblet vores brug af data og trukket energiforbruget med op. Forskere vil tvinge udviklingen i mere grøn retning og gøre Norden og Danmark til globale forbilleder.
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Science | The Guardian

Will a sugar tax work? Well, it did at Jamie Oliver's Italian restaurants Researchers say the chef’s 10p levy on sugary drinks led to a significant drop in sales – boding well for the government’s sugar tax plan Jamie Oliver’s 10p tax on sugary drinks sold in his Italian restaurants has resulted in a significant drop in sales, a study has found. The Jamie’s Italian chain introduced the sugary drinks tax to set an example as part of a campaign to persuade the government
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Gizmodo

Scott Pruitt's EPA Says Maybe More Radiation Exposure Wouldn't Be So Harmful A view of an abandoned cooling tower in Chernobyl, Ukraine on August 19, 2017. Photo: Getty Images Donald Trump’s appointment of former Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt as chief of the Environmental Protection Agency this year drew eyebrows, because Pruitt had made his career as a longstanding legal opponent of the EPA and a prominent climate change skeptic. Since he’s been put in charge of
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Ingeniøren

Sådan har Forsvarsministeriet tryllet med tallene bag kampflyindkøbetFor at kunne trække to streger under behovet for 27 nye kampfly har ministeriet lagt en række antagelser ind i sine beregninger, som ifølge Rigsrevisionen ikke er tilstrækkeligt underbygget. Ingeniøren har set nærmere på, hvor Rigsrevisionen har fundet huller.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Saving hearts after heart attacks: Overexpression of a gene enhances repair of dead muscleUniversity of Alabama at Birmingham biomedical engineers report a significant advance in efforts to repair a damaged heart after a heart attack, using grafted heart-muscle cells to create a repair patch. The key was overexpressing a gene that activates the cell-cycle of the grafted muscle cells, so they grow and divide more than control grafted cells.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New assay may boost targeted treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphomaDiffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is an aggressive cancer and the most frequently diagnosed non-Hodgkin lymphoma worldwide (nearly 40 percent of cases). Recent advancements indicate that both the prognosis and choice of treatment of DLBCL may depend on identifying its molecular subtype. In a report in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, researchers describe their development of a reliable, a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Youth football: How young athletes are exposed to high-magnitude head impactsResearchers examined exposure to high-magnitude head impacts (accelerations greater than 40g) in young athletes, 9 to 12 years of age, during football games and practice drills to determine under what circumstances these impacts occur and how representative practice activities are of game activities with respect to the impacts. This type of information can help coaches and league officials make in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Machine learning identifies breast lesions likely to become cancerA machine learning tool can help identify which high-risk breast lesions are likely to become cancerous, according to a new study. Researchers said the technology has the potential to reduce unnecessary surgeries.
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New on MIT Technology Review

You Could Become an AI Master Before You Know It. Here’s How.Automating machine learning will make the technology more accessible to non–AI experts.
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Gizmodo

Hey, Maybe Don't Fly Drones Where Firefighters Are Trying to Save Lives Photo: AP It’s understandable that UAV enthusiasts might be tempted to grab amazing footage of ongoing disasters like the northern California wildfires—providing a unique perspective of a climate change-fueled catastrophe which has now killed at least 41 people , burned down thousands of buildings and laid waste to hundreds of thousands of acres of land. But with over 11,000 firefighters and othe
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Ingeniøren

Seks overbevisende spørgsmål, der imponerer til jobsamtalen For at maksimere dine jobchancer skal du fjerne enhver tvivl om din dedikation, faglighed eller sociale kompetencer. De spørgsmål du stiller under samtalen kan afgøre, hvad arbejdsgiver synes om dig. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/seks-overbevisende-spoergsmaal-imponerer-jobsamtalen-10618 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
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Gizmodo

Here's How Honda's 'Musical Road' In California Was Done Wrong Not Just Once, But Twice Via Honda Back in 2008, Honda wanted to be cute and destroy a stretch of California road with grooves spaced out to play “The William Tell Overture” in tire noise as you drove across it. Well they got the grooves wrong and it sounded terrible. Not just the first time—the road workers got it wrong again when they had to relocate it. In the latest video from Tom Scott’s Amazing Places series on You
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Gizmodo

This Insane Gremlins Poster Has 84 Different References On It—Can You Guess Them All? Image: Hero Complex Gallery When Randall picked up Gizmo from the antique store in Gremlins , obviously the Mogwai was the standout selection. That may not be the case, however, for this Gremlins poster, which turns that store into a pop culture cornucopia. The poster is by artist Kevin M. Wilson, who goes by “Ape Meets Girl” so as to not get buried if you ever Google his name. It was released by
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Ars Technica

Full scale of Apple’s patent loss to VirnetX is now clear: $440 million Enlarge / Apple's FaceTime has been found to infringe patents belonging to VirnetX, a public patent-holding company. (credit: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images ) A patent-holding company called VirnetX has won a massive patent case against Apple, for the third time. Today, it became clear just how big the win was. An order unsealed Friday (PDF) reveals that, not only did a federal judge
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Gizmodo

GAO Will Investigate FCC's Sketchy Claim That a Cyberattack Broke Its Comment System Photo: AP The Government Accountability Office, a federal watchdog agency that provides investigative support to legislators, will look into the Federal Communications Commission and its chief Ajit Pai’s dubiously supported claims that a cyberattack took down the FCC’s public commenting system earlier this year. In May, the FCC claimed that downtime on its Electronic Comment Filing System, a plat
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Science : NPR

Nostalgia Isn't Just A Fixation On The Past - It Can Be About The Future, Too Is nostalgia an emotion that's bitter, or sweet? Psychologist Clay Routledge explains what causes us to feel nostalgic and how nostalgia affects us. (Image credit: Getty Images)
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Gizmodo

A Mars-Bound Astronaut Risks Everything for the Future in Others Will Follow Andrew Finch’s Others Will Follow is about a mission to Mars gone awry, but this isn’t The Martian . There are no alien potatoes, and no jokes about space pirates—just a lonely astronaut reflecting on his fate, and deciding to risk it all to send one last inspirational message back to Earth. The story is very simple—but the special effects are very cool and give the astronaut’s last act real emot
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Popular Science

Don’t freak out about the Chinese space station that's about to fall out of the sky Space It’s big, but our planet is bigger. Yes, the Tiangong-1, a Chinese space station is falling towards Earth in an uncontrolled descent, and will crash down somewhere on the planet.
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NYT > Science

Patents for Restasis Are Invalidated, Opening Door to GenericsThe ruling, by a federal judge in Texas, is a setback for Allergan, which had transferred the patents to a Mohawk tribe in order to protect them.
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Futurity.org

How wildfire smoke affects the atmosphere and climate Light-absorbing organic particulate matter, also known as brown carbon aerosol, in wildfire smoke loses its ability to absorb sunlight the longer it remains in the atmosphere, new research suggests. “Our study casts doubts on the warming implications of brown carbon…” Brown carbon aerosol changes its properties from light-absorbing to light-scattering the longer it remains in the atmosphere, find
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Gizmodo

What's The Best Electric Carving Knife? If you’re like me, the hum of an electric carving knife is one of sounds of the holidays. But, if you’re smart, you don’t just use your electric knife just for Thanksgiving Day turkey carving - they make pretty much any large-scale chopping task easier, from corn on the cob, to cutting veggies, to breaking down a whole chicken. So let’s slice into who makes the best electric carving knife, why, a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Liquid metal brings soft robotics a step closerScientists have invented a way to morph liquid metal into physical shapes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cancer relapse linked to body's own immune systemCancer cells that survive after treatment may use the body's own immune system to wake themselves up and fuel their growth, a new study shows. The research sheds new light on how the immune system loses its ability to keep cancer in check, leading to the patient relapsing.
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Futurity.org

Intervention gives at-risk moms ways to cope with depression Researchers have shown that a problem-solving intervention they developed significantly reduces depression symptoms in at-risk mothers. Depression is one of the most common mental disorders in the US, affecting over 16 million adults in 2015, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. And when depression strikes mothers, it can negatively affect the entire family. “We were pretty astou
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Ars Technica

Judge throws out Allergan patent, slams company’s Native American deal Enlarge / Allergan's R&D and global production site in Pringy, France. (credit: JEAN-PIERRE CLATOT/AFP/Getty Images ) A federal judge ruled today that patents protecting Allergan's $1.5 billion blockbuster dry-eye drug, Restasis, are invalid due to obviousness. The international drug company's stock dropped about five percent on the news. The ruling by US Circuit Judge William Bryson could have w
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Futurity.org

Book: Status quo trumps evidence in U.S. health care A new book argues that political incentives, doctors, and partisanship undermine evidence-based medicine in the United States. In 2002, Eric Patashnik of Brown University came across a puzzling study in the New England Journal of Medicine , which found that a widely used surgical procedure for osteoarthritis of the knee worked no better than a sham procedure in which a surgeon merely pretended to
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Ars Technica

Black members of Congress push for more diversity in Silicon Valley hires Enlarge / Rep. Barbara Lee (center) spoke along with Rep. G.K. Butterfield (right) at the San Francisco offices of Hustle on Monday. (credit: Cyrus Farivar) SAN FRANCISCO—Days after two leading members of the Congressional Black Caucus got Facebook to commit to hiring a black member to its board of directors, they again pressed major tech firms to diversify the hiring of executives and rank-and-f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Liquid metal brings soft robotics a step closerScientists have invented a way to morph liquid metal into physical shapes.
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Big Think

Does Acupuncture Work by Re-Mapping the Brain? Acupuncture has a bad rap in the scientific community, but can modern brain scanning techniques redeem it? Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sales of sugar-sweetened drinks in Jamie's Italian restaurants fall by 11 percent after 10p levyIntroducing a small levy of 10 pence per drink to the price of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) sold in Jamie's Italian restaurants across the UK is likely to have contributed to a significant decline in SSB sales, according to new research published in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.
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The Atlantic

Negotiating With Al-Shabaab Will Get America Out of Somalia When Ethiopian troops, with the Bush administration’s help, invaded Somalia on Christmas Day 2006 to remove a government suspected of sponsoring Islamic terrorists, it was assumed the war would be over quickly. Ten years later, it’s bloodier than ever. More than 300 people were killed in a truck bomb attack in the capital of Mogadishu on Saturday, and a huge section of the city, previously consid
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Popular Science

Wi-Fi has a serious vulnerability. Here's how to stay safe. Technology The weakness is in the encryption protocol we all use constantly. Wi-Fi is the invisible connective tissue of the internet. But on Monday, we all learned of a vulnerability with its encryption protocol.
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Clashes and Crashes What We’re Following Political Rifts: President Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell held a press conference to affirm their commitment to working together , with the president asserting their relationship “has been outstanding.” While Trump has attacked McConnell on Twitter over the Senate’s failure to repeal and replace Obamacare, Republicans’ slim majority in the Senate as they beg
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Ars Technica

Federal watchdog tells Equifax—no $7.25 million IRS contract for you Enlarge (credit: Bloomberg/Getty Images ) The Government Accountability Office (GAO) on Monday rejected Equifax's bid to retain its $7.25 million "taxpayer identity" contract—the one awarded days after Equifax announced it had exposed the Social Security numbers and other personal data of some 145 million people. At its core, the Equifax-IRS ordeal reveals the strangeness of the government contac
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NYT > Science

It Was a Universe-Shaking Announcement. But What Is a Neutron Star Anyway?Here are answers to some questions you might have about the discovery that was announced on Monday.
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Gizmodo

Essential Is Getting Sued For Allegedly Stealing Wireless Connector Technology Photo: Getty This summer, people got really frothy about the super-hyped Essential Phone from Android co-creator Andy Rubin. Then, Essential screwed up one thing after another , tainting the phone’s reputation as the company seemingly couldn’t get its shit together. And now, Essential is being sued. Keyssa, a wireless technology company backed by iPod creator and Nest founder Tony Fadell, filed a
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Gizmodo

How Apple Says It Prevented Face ID From Being Racist Photo: Apple When Apple debuted its new facial recognition unlock system, Face ID, in September, the company faced questions about how it would sidestep the security and bias problems that have undermined similar facial recognition systems in the past. Senator Al Franken was one of the many people curious about how exactly how Apple was going to ensure Face ID’s success, and today, Apple responde
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Did These Mechanics Get In Over Their Heads With This Restoration Project? Gear Dogs | Mondays 10p Nate's latest Doghouse project turns up all kinds of surprises. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gear-dogs/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/GearDogs https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.co
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Science | The Guardian

Neutron stars collision: Australian science reacts – as it happened Australia’s chief scientist Alan Finkel leads a panel discussing the extraordinary astronomical event witnessed for the first time • New frontier for science as astronomers witness neutron stars colliding • Gravitational wave observation is astronomical alchemy 11.52pm BST And that concludes the press conference. You can read our full story here: Related: New frontier for science as astronomers w
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Best Frenemies Today in 5 Lines During a news conference, President Trump said he and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell are “closer than ever before” and are working together to push the GOP agenda forward. Trump also said he’ll “be looking into” Representative Tom Marino, his drug czar nominee, after a report found the lawmaker helped pass a law hampering efforts to slow the opioid epidemic. U.S. Army Ser
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Gizmodo

The 10 Best Deals of October 16, 2017 We see a lot of deals around the web over on Kinja Deals , but these were our ten favorites today. Head over to our main post for more deals, and follow us on Twitter and Facebook to never miss a chance to save. You can also join our Kinja Deals Community Facebook group to connect with your fellow deal hunters. #1: SanDisk Flash Storage SanDisk Gold Box There’s no such thing as too much flash sto
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Gizmodo

Big Chicken Wants Trump to Gut Bird Law Image: AP The National Chicken Council and some Republican lawmakers want to kill rules that limit how many chicken carcasses poultry plants can process per minute, and they’re hoping President Donald Trump’s disdain for Obama-era red-tape will help them feed America’s growing bird-blood lust. In the midst of rising US demand for poultry , the chicken industry is lobbying hard for the US Departme
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The Atlantic

Why Trump Accused Obama of Not Consoling Families of Fallen Soldiers On October 4, four American Special Forces soldiers were killed during an operation in Niger. Since then, the White House has been notably tight-lipped about the incident. During a press conference Monday afternoon , 12 days after the deaths, President Trump finally made his first public comments, but the remarks—in which he admitted he had not yet spoken with the families and briefly attacked Ba
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Live Science

Why Gravitational Waves Are So ExhilaratingThe gravitational-wave research community seems to be having a remarkable string of good luck. Here's what the smashing finding means.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Predictions by GSI scientists now confirmedCentral predictions by GSI scientists on the formation of heavy elements such as gold and platinum in the universe have now been observed astrophysically. For the first time gravitational waves of merging neutron stars were detected. This also puts further focus on the future accelerator facility FAIR, as conditions for further research on neutron stars can be simulated there.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Untangling vitamin D activation pathways in inflammation and bone healthResearchers have identified a region of the genome that regulates vitamin D activation in the kidneys, opening the door for more sophisticated treatments of diseases, including bone and immune disorders, involving vitamin D. The results of this research will be published in the Oct. 20 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Doctors urged to make a public commitment to talk to their patients about gunsIn the wake of the Las Vegas mass shooting, Garen Wintemute, MD, MPH, from the Violence Prevention Program at UC Davis, says that if Congress and the White House won't do anything to stop gun violence, then doctors must take action. In a pointed editorial published in Annals of Internal Medicine, Dr. Wintemute urges physicians to make a public commitment (go.annals.org/commit-now) to talk to their
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The Scientist RSS

Cancers Relapse by Feeding Off Immune SignalsIn mice, the tumor cells are able to thwart the immune response that would kill them-but immunotherapy prevented the return of melanoma.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Keep Calm and … Massively Increase Investment in Artificial Intelligence
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The Atlantic

The Battles After ISIS Reports emerged Monday that ISIS had been defeated in Raqqa, the Syrian city it claims as its capital, signaling a major victory in the years-long battle against the militant group and the near end to its self-declared caliphate. But already there are signs the post-ISIS battles are only beginning: In neighboring Iraq, government forces have recaptured Kirkuk, an oil-richprovince that has been un
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Gizmodo

Bullshit Article About Bullshit Automation Promises Bullshit Life of Leisure Technology experts have been insisting for over a century that when the robot revolution finally succeeds, everyone will have a life of abundant wealth and leisure. That hasn’t been the case. But it hasn’t stopped plenty of people from still insisting that it will happen, even here in the year 2017. A new article in Australia’s The Daily Telegraph trots out some amazing predictions for the near f
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Live Science

How Do You Grow a Low-Fat Avocado?For avocado lovers who'd prefer a little less fat in their favorite fruit, a Spanish company could have the solution.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study suggests oysters offer hot spot for reducing nutrient pollutionVIMS-led study is the first to identify and quantify potentially denitrifying bacteria in the oyster gut and shell, with important implications for efforts to reduce nutrient levels in coastal waters through oyster restoration.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tweeting rage: How immigration policies can polarize public discourseIn a University of Washington study of tweets in the months before and after the 2010 passage of Arizona's 'show me your papers' law, findings show that the average tweet about Mexican immigrants and Hispanics, in general, became more negative. Assistant Professor of Sociology Rene Flores said the social media data was useful in determining whether people had changed their attitudes about immigran
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Gizmodo

Scientists Document 'Opportunistic' Alligators Eating Sharks An American Alligator chomping down on a nurse shark. (Image: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service J.N. “Ding” Darling National Wildlife Refuge) It’s a dog-eat-dog world out there, or in the case of the southeastern United States, it’s an alligator-eat-shark kind of a world, according to an unsettling new study from Kansas State University scientists. The American alligator, also known as Alligator mis
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Ars Technica

More than 4,000MW of coal power slated for retirement in Texas. But why? Enlarge / Emissions rise from smokestacks at Pacificorp’s 1,000MW coal-fired power plant on October 9, 2017 outside Huntington, Utah. (credit: George Frey/Getty Images ) Late last week, power company Vistra Energy announced that it would close two of its Texas coal plants by early 2018. In a press release, the company blamed "Sustained low wholesale power prices, an oversupplied renewable generat
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Skimping on sleep may contribute to gestational diabetesA new study has found that lack of sleep among pregnant women may be a contributing factor to the development of gestational diabetes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Biology of childhood brain tumor subtypes offers clues to precision treatmentsResearchers investigating pediatric low-grade gliomas (PLGG), the most common type of brain tumor in children, have discovered key biological differences in how mutated genes combine with other genes to drive this childhood cancer. By shedding light on subtle distinctions in tumor biology, these findings offer clues to designing more effective anticancer treatments to precisely target tumors in in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Portable 3-D scanner assesses patients with elephantiasisAn estimated 120 million people worldwide are infected with lymphatic filariasis, a parasitic, mosquito-borne disease that can cause major swelling and deformity of the legs, a condition known as elephantiasis. Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that a portable scanning device can measure limb enlargement and disfigurement faster and more easily in patie
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BBC News - Science & Environment

'Big, bad wolf' image flawed - scientistsNew research casts doubt on the idea that dogs are naturally more tolerant and friendly than wolves.
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Ars Technica

FCC’s DDoS claims will be investigated by government Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Bill Hinton ) The US Government Accountability Office (GAO) will investigate DDoS attacks that allegedly targeted the Federal Communications Commission's system for accepting public comments on FCC Chairman Ajit Pai's plan to roll back net neutrality rules. Senator Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii) and Rep. Frank Pallone (D-N.J.) requested the investigation in August, and th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Filling the early universe with knots can explain why the world is three-dimensionalFilling the universe with knots shortly after it popped into existence 13.8 billion years ago provides a neat explanation for why we inhabit a three-dimensional world. That is the basic idea advanced by an out-of-the-box theory developed by an international team of physicists.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Spinning strands hint at folding dynamicsA Rice University lab creates flexible strings of magnetized beads to model how natural and synthetic strands bend and fold in dynamic conditions. The work could enhance knowledge of how proteins and DNA fold in biological systems and how synthetic fibers interact in fluids.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Invasive ladybird species threatens other ladybirds in EnglandThe harlequin ladybird, officially known as Harmonia axyridis , was widely introduced across continental Europe to limit the population of pest insects.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vanderbilt researchers find novel mechanism of resistance to anti-cancer drugsVanderbilt investigators have discovered a novel non-genetic cause of resistance to the targeted anti-cancer therapy cetuximab. Their findings, reported Oct. 16 in Nature Medicine, suggest a strategy for overcoming this resistance.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Physically active white men at high risk for plaque buildup in arteriesWhite men who exercise at high levels are 86 percent more likely than people who exercise at low levels to experience a buildup of plaque in the heart arteries by middle age, a new study suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The importance of asymmetry in bacteriaResearch reveals a protein that acts as a vacuum cleaner of the membrane and which could be a potential new target for antibiotics.
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Big Think

Neutron Star Breakthrough Explains the Universe's Gold, Platinum, and Uranium This discovery finally points to the source of Earth's precious heavy elements, also proves Einstein correct in more ways than one. Read More
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Feed: All Latest

In 'Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2,' Planet Sovereign Defies PhysicsIs there a physical reason why a planet might have ended up looking like some sort of fat, intergalactic caterpillar?
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The Atlantic

A Remarriage of Convenience Between Donald Trump and Mitch McConnell The drab White House briefing room is no place for a wedding, so on Monday afternoon, President Trump and Mitch McConnell headed to the Rose Garden to renew their vows. “My relationship with this gentleman is outstanding, has been outstanding,” the president said about the Senate majority leader whom he had spent the late summer attacking and who his former chief strategist is now trying to depos
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The Atlantic

'Casting Couch': The Origins of a Pernicious Hollywood Cliché The chorus of condemnation against Harvey Weinstein, as dozens of women have come forward to accuse the producer of serial sexual assault and harassment, has often turned on a quaint-sounding show-business cliché: the “casting couch.” Glenn Close, for instance, expressed her anger that “the ‘casting couch’ phenomenon, so to speak, is still a reality in our business and in the world.” The casting
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Popular Science

Why can’t I touch my toes? Health Don't worry, it's not a fair measure of fitness. It turns out that the ability to touch your toes is the summation of a number of different physiological factors, many of which we have no control over.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Attending a middle vs. a K-8 school matters for student outcomesStudents who attend a middle school compared to a K-8 school are likely to have a lower perception of their reading skills, finds a new study by NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development.
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Live Science

So Much Drama! Roman Amphitheater Found Under Western Wall TunnelsArchaeologists have uncovered an ancient Roman amphitheater — one that hasn't seen the light of day in 1,700 years — beneath Jerusalem's Western Wall Tunnels. But subtle clues suggest that the ancient stage was never used.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Shaping animal, vegetable and mineralHarvard researchers demonstrate a technique to grow any target shape from any starting shape.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Students in right place, right time witness first-ever detected neutron star collisionNew research published in Science details perhaps one of the biggest discoveries so far in the field of astrophysics: the merger of two neutron stars. Two graduate students and two professors at the University of Notre Dame contributed to studies published on the collision.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fact-checking fake news on Facebook works - just too slowlyFacebook's effort to limit the spread of fake news using outside fact-checkers appears to be having an effect—though that finding comes with a major caveat.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Proposed New Mexico science standards omit global warmingA proposed overhaul of New Mexico's state science standards for public schools came under intense criticism Monday at a packed public hearing in the state capital for omitting or deleting references to global warming, evolution and the age of the Earth.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tesla sacks hundreds of workers on Model 3 stall: sourceTesla Motors, which recently missed its production target on the high-profile "Model 3," has dismissed hundreds of employees following annual performance reviews, a person familiar with the matter said Monday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Some faiths more likely to turn to religion for answers to scienceWhen it comes to seeking answers to questions about science, evangelical and black Protestants and Mormons are more likely than the general population to turn to religion, according to a new study by researchers from Rice University's Religion and Public Life Program, the University of Nevada-Reno and West Virginia University.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA finds newly formed tropical storm lan over open watersNASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible picture of newly formed Tropical Storm Lan in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA sees Tropical Depression Khanun sissipating in Gulf of TonkinNASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Storm Khanun after it had passed over southern China and began dissipating in the Gulf of Tonkin.
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Gizmodo

This One-Day Amazon Sale Will Give You The Right Socks, Underwear, and More For Your Workout Sports Socks, Underwear, and Accessories Gold Box Whether it’s a knee brace, compression shorts, or a ventilated duffel bag, this Amazon Gold Box is a god send for those of us that work out. Get the no-show socks you need, or that ankle brace you’ve been needing, even moisture-wicking boxers briefs. Though, if you need to stock up, you’d better do it fast, because this deal runs out at the end of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Break the attachment before selling your stuff, study saysEver tried to sell something you've owned for a while on Craigslist and found that no one is willing to pony up what you're asking?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Most medical students overconfident, underprepared on nutrition guidelinesResearchers surveyed 257 medical students and found more than 55 percent were confident they could counsel patients on nutritional recommendations, but half did not achieve a passing score on a nutrition quiz. Of particular note, only 12 percent were aware of Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs), a key guide to differentiated nutrition requirements, although more than 68 percent agreed that primary ca
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA finds newly formed tropical storm lan over open watersNASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible picture of newly formed Tropical Storm Lan in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Some faiths more likely to turn to religion for answers to scienceWhen it comes to seeking answers to questions about science, evangelical and black Protestants and Mormons are more likely than the general population to turn to religion, according to a new study.
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Ars Technica

Fall Update for Xbox One aims to look better, be more customizable, and faster The Fall Update for the Xbox One system software is now rolling out. It brings a redesigned and more customizable Home tab, a quicker and more convenient Guide, and new Community features that make keeping tabs on what your friends are up to easier. Microsoft The Home tab is built around a new concept called a "block." Each block—which can be a game, friend, Xbox Live Gold, or Xbox Game Pass—give
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Physically active white men at high risk for plaque buildup in arteriesWhite men who exercise at high levels are 86 percent more likely than people who exercise at low levels to experience a buildup of plaque in the heart arteries by middle age, a new study suggests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tweeting rage: How immigration policies can polarize public discourseA study of tweets in the months before and after the 2010 passage of Arizona's "show me your papers" law, findings showed that the average tweet about Mexican immigrants and Hispanics, in general, became more negative. Researchers said the social media data was useful in determining whether people had changed their attitudes about immigrants as a result of the law or whether they had begun behavin
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Clues to the Innate Drug Resistance of a Cocoa-Fermenting PathogenAt first glance, the yeast Candida krusei seems as innocuous as microbes come: it’s used for fermenting cocoa beans and gives chocolate its pleasant aroma. But it’s increasingly being found as a pathogen in immunocompromised patients — and C. krusei infections aren’t always easy to cure.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Women in science ask fewer questions than men, according to new researchStereotypes suggest that women love to talk, with some studies even finding that women say three times as much as men. But, new research shows there is an exception to this rule: professional STEM events, which could be indicative of the wider problem of gender inequality in the field.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Break the attachment before selling your stuffEver tried to sell something you've owned for a while on Craigslist and found that no one is willing to pony up what you're asking? It's because you're asking too much.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Family members play important role in managing chronic illnessFamily members often play an important role in managing chronic illnesses, and a family approach may produce more effective, long-term benefits for the patient, according to a researcher.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How to save giant tropical fruit bats: Work with local hunters who use bat teeth as moneyFlying foxes -- giant fruit bats that look like winged German shepherd puppies -- are in trouble. But scientists suggest a new way to help protect the bats on the Solomon Islands: working with local hunters who use the bats' teeth as currency. The traditional practice, it turns out, is a positive thing for bat conservation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA sees Hurricane Ophelia lashing IrelandNASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a thermal view of the clouds in hurricane Ophelia as it lashed Ireland. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission core satellite provided a look at the rainfall that was affecting the Emerald Isle.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chemical treatment improves quantum dot lasersOne of the secrets to making tiny laser devices such as opthalmic surgery scalpels work even more efficiently is the use of tiny semiconductor particles, called quantum dots. In new research at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Nanotech Team, the ~nanometer-sized dots are being doctored, or "doped," with additional electrons, a treatment that nudges the dots ever closer to producing the desired las
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Inside Science

Resting Healthy NBA Players During the Season May Not Help Them in Playoffs Resting Healthy NBA Players During the Season May Not Help Them in Playoffs Skipping regular season games may have little effect on playoff performance and injury prevention. NBA_WallCrowder.jpg John Wall of the Washington Wizards shoots in a playoff game against the Boston Celtics on May 12, 2017. Image credits: Keith Allison via Flickr Rights information: CC BY-SA 2.0 Sports Monday, October 16,
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Dana Foundation

National Health Education Week This week, join the celebration for National Health Education Week (October 16-20)! The weeklong campaign, sponsored by the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE), first began in 1995 as an effort to direct national attention towards public health issues and promote a general understanding of the role health education plays in our everyday lives. Not sure where to start? Each day this week,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars mergingSeven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on Aug. 17, 2017.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

An epigenetic key to unlock behavior changeA new study reveals how epigenetics interact with genes to shape different feeding behaviors in fruit flies. This research unlocks the molecular mechanism that leads 'rover' flies to forage for food more than 'sitter'[ flies. It is the first study of its kind to show a causal link between epigenetics, genetics and behavior.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Risk of Caesarean section is heritableWomen born by Caesarean section are more than twice as likely to develop FDP when giving birth than women born naturally. This is the conclusion of a study by a team of evolutionary biologists at the University of Vienna headed by Philipp Mitteroecker. Using a mathematical model, the team was able to explain the paradoxical phenomenon that natural selection did not lead to the reduction in the rat
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

During crisis, exposure to conflicting information and stress linked, UCI-led studies findExposure to high rates of conflicting information during an emergency is linked to increased levels of stress, and those who rely on text messages or social media reports from unofficial sources are more frequently exposed to rumors and experience greater distress, according to research led by the University of California, Irvine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

An architect gene is involved in the assimilation of breast milkA family of 'architect' genes coordinates the formation of organs and limbs during embryonic life. Geneticists from UNIGE and EPFL have discovered a function of one of these genes, Hoxd3, in the development of the gut of suckling mice. Specific mutations in this gene induce defective breast milk assimilation and important growth retardation. In humans, this genetic defect probably contributes to c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study finds nature is vital to beating climate changeWith just two weeks to go to the Bonn climate talks, The Nature Conservancy is launching a ground-breaking global report with 15 partners on natural climate solutions.Natural climate solutions could deliver cost-effectively over a third of greenhouse gas emissions reductions required to prevent dangerous levels of global warming -- equivalent to a complete stop on the burning of oil, worldwide.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists log newfound understanding of water's responses to changing temperaturesA team of chemists has uncovered new ways in which frozen water responds to changes in temperature to produce novel formations. Its findings have implications for climate research as well as other processes that involve ice formation -- from food preservation to agriculture.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rice U. study: Vibrating nanoparticles interactLike a tuning fork struck with a mallet, tiny gold nanodisks can be made to vibrate at resonant frequencies when struck by light. In new research this week, Rice University chemist Stephan Link and colleagues showed how to selectively alter those vibrational frequencies by gathering different-sized nanodisks into groups.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brain training shows promise for patients with bipolar disorderComputerized brain training can result in improved cognitive skills in individuals with bipolar disorder, researchers have discovered for the first time.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study reveals risk factors for substance use problems, as well as resilienceA new study explores factors increasing the risk for substance use problems among African-American/Black and Latino adults residing in a high-risk urban community, as well as patterns of resilience. It reveals that serious risk factors are highly prevalent and strongly associated with substance misuse; however, a substantial proportion could be characterized as resilient, and evidenced substance u
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Harvey runoff menaces Texas' coral reefsThe more than 13 trillion gallons of floodwater from Hurricane Harvey have created a massive plume of freshwater in the Gulf of Mexico that is threatening the coral reefs of the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary about 100 miles offshore of Galveston.
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Science | The Guardian

Trump says he'll declare the US opioid crisis a national emergency 'next week' Trump teases ‘major announcement, probably next week, on the drug crisis’ Says he could revisit Tom Marino nomination as drug czar Donald Trump on Monday teased a long-awaited announcement on tackling the crisis of opioid addiction . He also suggested his choice to lead to lead the National Office of Drug Control Policy might be under review. Related: West Virginians struggle for answers in Ameri
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Popular Science

Last week in tech: Strap an Oculus to your face and head to the Microsoft treehouse Technology Slap on a new Oculus headset and let’s relive the week’s big tech stories (or just read the words). Take a virtual look back at the week's biggest tech news. Actually, it's just a regular look back, but there's a bunch of virtual reality stuff in there to look at.
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The Atlantic

How Domestication Ruined Dogs' Pack Instincts The origin of humanity’s best friend is still murky, but here’s a likely scenario. In the distant past, wolves started skulking around human campsites, scavenging the carcasses left behind by hunters. Perhaps, to make the most of these opportunities, they evolved to be more docile. They transformed in both physique and temperament, and eventually became domestic dogs . As they changed, they gaine
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Science : NPR

Sleep Scientist Warns Against Walking Through Life 'In An Underslept State' "Human beings are the only species that deliberately deprive themselves of sleep for no apparent gain," says sleep scientist Matthew Walker. His new book is Why We Sleep. (Image credit: MCKIBILLO/Getty Images/Imagezoo)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists log newfound understanding of water's responses to changing temperaturesA team of chemists has uncovered new ways in which frozen water responds to changes in temperature to produce novel formations. Its findings have implications for climate research as well as other processes that involve ice formation—from food preservation to agriculture.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Vibrating nanoparticles interact: Placing nanodisks in groups can change their vibrational frequenciesLike a tuning fork struck with a mallet, tiny gold nanodisks can be made to vibrate at resonant frequencies when struck by light. In new research, Rice University researchers showed they can selectively alter those vibrational frequencies by gathering different-sized nanodisks into groups.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study finds nature is vital to beating climate changeBetter stewardship of the land could have a bigger role in fighting climate change than previously thought, according to the most comprehensive assessment to date of how greenhouse gas emissions can be reduced and stored in forests, farmland, grasslands and wetlands using natural climate solutions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

During crisis, exposure to conflicting information and stress linked, studies findExposure to high rates of conflicting information during an emergency is linked to increased levels of stress, and those who rely on text messages or social media reports from unofficial sources are more frequently exposed to rumors and experience greater distress, according to research led by the University of California, Irvine.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

An epigenetic key to unlock behavior changeWhen it comes to behaviour, researchers have moved beyond the "nature versus nurture" debate. It's understood that genes and environment both play a role. However, how they interact at a molecular level to shape behaviour is still unclear.
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Fish Depression Is Not a JokeFish can get depressed, just like you, and that could make them a good model organism for studying depression in people.
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Gizmodo

Compared to Wolves, Dogs Are Absolutely Terrible at Cooperation Wolves are better at intra-species cooperation than dogs, suggests new research (Image: Greg Toope/Shutterstock) Humans and dogs have a long history of working together, leading to the assumption that the collaborative abilities of dogs are the result of domestication. New research suggests this isn’t the case, and that wolves are far better at cooperation than their domesticated cousins, at leas
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Heads-up, CEOs -- corporate social responsibility may get you fired, study findsInvesting in product safety, employee diversity and carbon footprint reduction are all examples of corporate social responsibility (CSR) that can result in high praise for a chief executive -- or get them fired -- according to new research from the University of Notre Dame.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

New physics books don’t censor the math behind realitySpecial Relativity and Classical Theory and The Physical World offer deep dives into physical reality’s mathematical foundations.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Toward efficient high-pressure desalinationOne of the biggest operational challenges for desalination plants is the fouling of membranes by microbes. New research suggests a novel approach to reducing the rate of fouling, and thus improving desalination plant efficiency.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chemical treatment improves quantum dot lasersOne of the secrets to making tiny laser devices such as opthalmic surgery scalpels work even more efficiently is the use of tiny semiconductor particles, called quantum dots. In new research the ~nanometer-sized dots are being doctored, or 'doped,' with additional electrons, a treatment that nudges the dots ever closer to producing the desired laser light with less stimulation and energy loss.
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The Atlantic

40 Years Ago: A Look Back at 1977 Four decades ago Jimmy Carter was sworn in as the 39th president of the United States, the original Star Wars movie was released in theaters, the Trans-Alaska pipeline pumped its first barrels of oil, New York City suffered a massive blackout, Radio Shack introduced its new TRS-80 Micro Computer, Grace Jones was a disco queen, the Brazilian soccer star Pele played his “sayonara” game in Japan, an
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Live Science

Your Hair Color and Sleep Habits May Come from NeanderthalsNeanderthal DNA could influence your skin tone, hair color, sleep patterns, mood and even smoking behavior, a new study finds.
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Gizmodo

Federal Agencies Ordered to Adopt Basic Email Security Measures After Years of Doing Nothing Photo: Department of Homeland Security The Trump administration is now pushing federal agencies to finally adopt basic security protocols designed to protect government emails against spoofing and phishing attacks. Reuters reported on Monday that a senior cybersecurity official at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has confirmed that the agency will issue a “binding directive” which requir
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mechanism explains how seizures may lead to memory lossA team of researchers reveals a mechanism that can explain how even relatively infrequent seizures can lead to long-lasting cognitive deficits in animal models.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Catch a fleeting kilonovaAlerted by the first-ever gravitational waves caused by two neutron stars merging, astronomers detect the resulting optical flash.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Seeing the light of neutron star collisionsWhen two neutron stars collided on Aug. 17, a widespread search for electromagnetic radiation from the event led to observations of light from the afterglow of the explosion, finally connecting a gravitational-wave-producing event with conventional astronomy using light, according to an international team of astronomers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gravitational waves plus new clues from space reveal new way to make a black holeFor the first time, scientists have detected both gravitational waves and light shooting toward our planet from the birthplace of a new black hole created by the merger of two neutron stars. The discovery marks the beginning of a new era of
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The Atlantic

The Microbes That Supercharge Termite Guts The 19th-century American scientist Joseph Leidy has been described as the “ last man who knew everything .” An extraordinary polymath, Leidy was a scholar of parasites, a discoverer of dinosaurs , a collector of gemstones, a curator of museums, an exceptional illustrator, and the first person to use a microscope to solve a murder mystery. But learned though he was, he was still shocked by what w
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Women in science ask fewer questions than men, according to new researchStereotypes suggest that women love to talk, with some studies even finding that women say three times as much as men. But, new research from a team from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, shows there is an exception to this rule: professional STEM events, which could be indicative of the wider problem of gender inequality in the field.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Relatively few kidney patients need to start dialysis after undergoing TAVRThe rate of patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing a heart procedure called transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) who eventually need to start dialysis is relatively low, suggests a new study published in JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions.
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The Scientist RSS

Papers Based on Misidentified Cell Lines Top 32,000An analysis of contaminated literature finds that tens of thousands of papers used cell lines of questionable origins-and these were in turn cited by hundreds of thousands of other papers.
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Viden

Netflix-streaming går ud over klimaetNæste gang du lader det syvende afsnit House of Cards i træk starte, fordi du ikke orker at standse Netflix, bør du måske tænke dig om en ekstra gang, hvis du går op i verdens klimasituation.
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Science : NPR

After Hurricane Power Outages, Looking To Alaska's Microgrids For A Better Way Alaska is a leader in microgrids since its remote communities have had to power themselves for decades. (Image credit: Eric Keto/Alaska's Energy Desk)
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Live Science

Woman Needed Arms, Legs Amputated After Giving Birth: What Is Necrotizing Fasciitis?A woman in Canada developed a life-threatening infection shortly after giving birth that resulted in amputations of all four of her limbs.
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Gizmodo

New All-Seeing Billboard Uses Hidden Cameras to Show Ads Based on Age, Emotions Screengrab: LandSec London’s famous Piccadilly Circus is getting an immense and terrifying new video display called Piccadilly Lights. According to its maker, the enormous screen (which is almost the size of two professional basketball courts) can detect the vehicles, ages, and even emotions of people nearby, and respond by playing targeted ads. Imagine New York’s Time Square with a makeover from
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Science | The Guardian

Whales and dolphins lead 'human-like lives' thanks to big brains, says study The cultural brain hypothesis of human development could also explain cetaceans forming friendships – and even gossiping Life is not so different beneath the ocean waves. Bottlenose dolphins use simple tools, orcas call each other by name, and sperm whales talk in local dialects. Many cetaceans live in tight-knit groups and spend a good deal of time at play. That much scientists know. But in a ne
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Ars Technica

Desktop Outlook will get a redesign with the biggest changes happening on Macs Enlarge (credit: Microsoft) Microsoft has big design changes planned for Outlook on both the Windows and Mac platforms—but especially the Mac. In both cases, the new design direction borrows from Outlook for iOS. Microsoft gave a brief look at the coming updates during the Ignite conference a couple of weeks ago, and both The Verge and MSPoweruser dug into the changes. Microsoft spent the most ti
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Gut fungi might be linked to obesity and inflammatory bowel disordersFungi are overlooked contributors to health and disease.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Women in science ask fewer questions than men, according to new researchStereotypes suggest that women love to talk, with some studies even finding that women say three times as much as men. But, new research from a team from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, shows there is an exception to this rule: professional STEM events, which could be indicative of the wider problem of gender inequality in the field.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stress might be just as unhealthy as junk food to digestive systemWe all know that a poor diet is unhealthy, but a new study finds that stress may just as harmful to our bodies as a really bad diet.
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Science : NPR

Studies Skewed By Focus On Well-Off, Educated Brains What does a "normal" brain look like? Something a lot different when researchers make sure that study participants reflect the race, education and income levels of the U.S. at large. (Image credit: Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images)
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Gizmodo

Anker's Crazy-Popular Robotic Vacuum Just Got An Upgrade, and It's Only $200 at Launch Eufy Robotic Vacuum Cleaner , $200 with code 2GEROB11 The bestselling , top-rated , and audience-f avorite robotic vacuum just came out with a new and improved model , and you can suck up yours today for just $200 with code 2GEROB11. It has the features you guys loved about the first one - remote control, a slim body to reach under furniture, and large dust box, but boasts upgraded suction power,
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The Atlantic

The Plume of Gold Ejected by a Cosmic Collision Some 130 million years ago, in another galaxy, two neutron stars spiraled closer and closer together until they smashed into each other in spectacular fashion. The violent collision produced gravitational waves, cosmic ripples powerful enough to stretch and squeeze the fabric of the universe. There was a brief flash of light a million trillion times as bright as the sun, and then a hot cloud of r
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The Atlantic

Should Federal Prosecutors Be Able to Search Americans' Emails Overseas? The U.S. Supreme Court will decide whether American courts can issue warrants for data stored overseas under current federal law, adding another major case on digital privacy and the Fourth Amendment to its docket this term. The justices agreed to hear U.S. v. Microsoft on Monday at the request of the federal government. A three-judge panel of federal appellate judges sided with Microsoft last ye
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Gizmodo

How to Get the Pixel 2's Beautiful Live Wallpapers on Your Current Phone We already showed you how to get the Pixel 2 's new camera app and calendar widget on older Android devices, but there’s another fresh feature from Google that you can port over to your current phone. The Pixel 2 comes with some cool new live wallpaper options, too. Here’s how to get them without buying the new smartphone. What Are the New Live Wallpapers? Live wallpaper is pretty much exactl
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NYT > Science

Raising Concerns About a Widely Used Test to Measure FertilityNew research shows that the number of eggs a woman has left doesn’t necessarily predict her ability to conceive naturally.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gravitational waves detected after collision of neutron stars 120 million light years awayTel Aviv University researchers have confirmed that gravitational 'ripples in space' occur after the collision of neutron stars, very small (typically 18 miles across) and very dense bodies that are the remains of a massive star after a supernova explosion.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Novel reagent detects memory immune response in vaccinated animalsResearchers have developed a novel reagent capable of detecting rare, antigen-specific B cells that indicate successful vaccination in veterinary animals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA sees Tropical Depression Khanun sissipating in Gulf of TonkinNASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Storm Khanun after it had passed over southern China and began dissipating in the Gulf of Tonkin.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Family members play important role in managing chronic illnessFamily members often play an important role in managing chronic illnesses, and a family approach may produce more effective, long-term benefits for the patient, according to a Penn State researcher.
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Popular Science

In loving memory of Jeremy, the one-in-a-million mutant snail Animals Find me somebody to love. Jeremy just wanted somebody to love, and now is gone. Scientists found the "lefty" hero dead in a refrigerator last week. But the legacy lives on.
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Ars Technica

The search for painless Internet privacy gets another boost with InvizBox 2 Enlarge / Privacy comes in black or white, depending on your tastes. (credit: InvizBox) InvizBox , a small Irish company focused on building Wi-Fi routers with built-in Internet privacy, has successfully crowdfunded the next generation of its eponymous privacy platform. The InvizBox 2 and InvizBox 2 Pro are more than an evolution from the team's original product, which was an open source modifica
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How many opioid painkillers do surgery patients need? New prescribing recommendations unveiledSurgeons performing 11 common operations can turn to a free new prescribing tool based on data about how many opioid painkillers patients across Michigan actually took after their operations.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Neutrons observe vitamin B6-dependent enzyme activity useful for drug developmentScientists have performed neutron structural analysis of a vitamin B6-dependent protein, potentially opening avenues for new antibiotics and drugs to battle diseases such as drug-resistant tuberculosis, malaria and diabetes. Specifically, the team used neutron crystallography to study the location of hydrogen atoms in aspartate aminotransferase, or AAT, an enzyme vital to the metabolism of certain
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How cells induce inflammation upon detection of cytoplasmic DNAA research team has elucidated the mechanism by which human cells induce inflammation upon detection of cytoplasmic DNA. Notably, the signal network involved differs from that used in the same context in mice.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nidoviruses redundantly express genes and encode more proteins than previously believed, study findsArteriviruses, a family of single-stranded RNA viruses that belongs to the order Nidovirales, produce more proteins and messenger RNAs than previously reported, a finding that provides important insights about a virus that could potentially evolve to infect humans in the future, according to a new research study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists identify biomarker for progression, drug response in brain cancerScientists have reported results from a glioblastoma study in which they validated a biomarker indicative of a patient's prognosis and likely response to specific therapies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gamma-ray burst detection just what researchers exclusively predictedMore than a month before a game-changing detection of a short gamma-ray burst, scientists predicted such a discovery would occur.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chemical treatment improves quantum dot lasersOne of the secrets to making tiny laser devices such as opthalmic surgery scalpels work even more efficiently is the use of tiny semiconductor particles, called quantum dots. In new research at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Nanotech Team, the ~nanometer-sized dots are being doctored, or 'doped,' with additional electrons, a treatment that nudges the dots ever closer to producing the desired las
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Neutron star merger directly observed for the first timeOn August 17, 2017, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars -- the dense, collapsed cores that remain after large stars die in a supernova explosion. The merger is the first cosmological event observed in both gravitational waves -- ripples in the fabric of spacetime -- and the entire spectrum of light, from gamma rays to radio waves. University of Maryla
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain training shows promise for patients with bipolar disorderResearchers at McLean Hospital, an affiliate of Harvard Medical School, have discovered for the first time that computerized brain training can result in improved cognitive skills in individuals with bipolar disorder.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new target for marijuanaCellular-level changes to a part of the brain's reward system induced by chronic exposure to the psychoactive component of marijuana may contribute to the drug's pleasurable and potentially addictive qualities, suggests a study in young mice published in JNeurosci. The results could advance our understanding of marijuana's effects on the developing brain as the drug's rapidly changing legal status
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New Scientist - News

Trump’s U-turn may see Iran join North Korea as a nuclear stateIn refusing to recertify the Iran nuclear deal, US president Donald Trump risks creating another North Korea – as another Republican president did before him
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Ars Technica

The Evil Within 2 review: Open-ended fright Enlarge / Running is almost certainly better than shooting in a situation like this. It's oddly fitting that former detective Sebastian Castellanos, protagonist of The Evil Within 2 , doesn't seem to remember much about the first game. Tango Gameworks' 2014 horror-action game was awfully unmemorable for players, too. I certainly didn't remember much more than poor ol' Seb when I booted up the seq
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New 'Black Panther' Trailer Promises Marvel's Most Breathtaking Movie YetDirector Ryan Coogler's movie looks amazing—in all the best ways.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Risk of Caesarean section is heritable—Natural selection cannot reduce the rates of obstructed labourDuring the last decades, rates of Caesarean section have multiplied; by now it is one of the most frequently performed surgical treatments worldwide. Even if many of these C-sections are not strictly medically indicated, human childbirth is complicated and risky compared to that in other primates. Why has evolution by natural selection not led to a wider birth canal, thus reducing the high rates o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Break the attachment before selling your stuffEver tried to sell something you've owned for a while on Craigslist and found that no one is willing to pony up what you're asking? It's because you're asking too much.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA sees Hurricane Ophelia lashing IrelandNASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a thermal view of the clouds in hurricane Ophelia as it lashed Ireland. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission core satellite provided a look at the rainfall that was affecting the Emerald Isle.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Astronomers detect colliding neutron stars for first timeFour Northwestern University astronomers are part of an international research collaboration that is the first to detect the spectacular collision of two neutron stars using both gravitational waves and light. The discovery ushers in an exciting new era in astronomy -- multi-messenger astronomy with gravitational waves -- less than two years after the first detection of gravitational waves opened
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Toward efficient high-pressure desalinationOne of the biggest operational challenges for desalination plants is the fouling of membranes by microbes. New research from MIT suggests a novel approach to reducing the rate of fouling, and thus improving desalination plant efficiency.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

RIT researchers help usher in era of multi-messenger astronomy with LIGO discoveryRochester Institute of Technology played a significant role in the breakthrough discovery of colliding neutron stars, cosmic collision detected in gravitational waves and in light. "We can probably account for all the gold that has ever been made," said Richard O'Shaughnessy from RIT's Center for Computational Relativity and Gravitation. "We know how often neutron stars merge and can predict how m
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cognitive science

Lookit (Part 1): A New Online Platform for Developmental Research submitted by /u/MIT_Press [link] [comments]
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Scientific American Content: Global

Octopus-Inspired Robots: Silicone Skin Can Change Texture for "3-D Camouflage"Researchers have created a synthetic form of octopus skin that can transform from a flat, 2D surface to a three-dimensional one with bumps and pits -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ars Technica

First iPhone X batch reportedly only contains 46,500 units Enlarge / Is there an emoji to describe frustration if these delays come true? Reports detailing the first shipment of Apple's $999 iPhone X claim there will be even fewer devices to go around than originally expected. According to a Digitimes report that references news from the Chinese outlet Xinhuanet.com, Apple's manufacturer Foxconn recently began shipping the first round of iPhone Xs to the
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Whales and dolphins have rich 'human-like' cultures and societiesWhales and dolphins (cetaceans) live in tightly-knit social groups, have complex relationships, talk to each other and even have regional dialects -- much like human societies. A major new study has linked the complexity of Cetacean culture and behavior to the size of their brains.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gestational diabetes and cardiovascular disease riskA history of gestational diabetes was associated with a modest higher long-term risk of cardiovascular disease in women in a new study, although the absolute rate of cardiovascular disease was low in the study's younger group of predominantly white women and adhering to a healthy lifestyle over time appeared to help mitigate the risk, according to a new article.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Auto-fix tool gets more programmers to upgrade code, study findsFailure to make necessary upgrades to software code can have dire consequences, such as the major data breach at Equifax. A recent study finds that auto-fix tools are effective ways to get programmers to make the relevant upgrades -- if programmers opt to use them.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bite on this: Alligators caught eating sharksJaws, beware! Alligators may be coming for you. A new study documents American alligators on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts are eating small sharks and stingrays. This is the first scientific documentation of a widespread interaction between the two predators.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Marketing study examines what types of searches click for car buyersA new study examines how consumers allocated their time when searching offline and on the internet as they shopped for a new automobile, and what the outcomes were for price satisfaction.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Childhood poverty, poor support may drive up pregnant woman's biological agePregnant women who had low socioeconomic status during childhood and who have poor family social support appear to prematurely age on a cellular level, potentially raising the risk for complications, a new study has found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nanoantenna arrays power a new generation of fluorescence-based sensorsResearchers have designed and tested a series of plasmonic nanoantenna arrays that could lead to the development of a new generation of ultrasensitive and low-cost fluorescence sensors that could be used to monitor water quality.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hubble observes source of gravitational waves for the first timeThe NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has observed for the first time the source of a gravitational wave, created by the merger of two neutron stars. This merger created a kilonova -- an object predicted by theory decades ago -- that ejects heavy elements such as gold and platinum into space. This event also provides the strongest evidence yet that short duration gamma-ray bursts are caused by merge
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Latest Headlines | Science News

To understand the origins of pain, ask a flatwormA danger-sensing protein responds to hydrogen peroxide in planarians, results that hint at the evolutionary origins of people’s pain sensing.
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The Atlantic

The Barren Future of The Weinstein Company The power that Harvey Weinstein wielded—the power he abused for the entirety of his Hollywood career, according to dozens of allegations of harassment, rape, and assault—was wrapped up in his name. He made sure of that even before co-founding his own studio, The Weinstein Company, in 2005, encouraging his image in the press as that of a movie mogul pushing indie darlings to Oscar success and box-
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New on MIT Technology Review

Global Gasoline Demand Could Peak by 2030
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Science | The Guardian

Austria is on the verge of electing a 31-year-old. Does his age matter? | Stefan SternWorld leaders seem to be getting younger. But whether youthful energy and verve can ever make up for lack of experience remains a vexed question Grey power this is not. Sebastian Kurz, the 31-year-old leader of the conservative Austrian People’s Party (ÖVP), looks set to become the world’s youngest head of government after Sunday’s elections . The country of elegantly dressed, respectably middle-a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists spot explosive counterpart of LIGO/Virgo's latest gravitational wavesA team of scientists using the Dark Energy Camera (DECam), the primary observing tool of the Dark Energy Survey, was among the first to observe the fiery aftermath of a recently detected burst of gravitational waves, recording images of the first confirmed explosion from two colliding neutron stars ever seen by astronomers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Catch a fleeting kilonovaAlerted by the first-ever gravitational waves caused by two neutron stars merging, UCSB astronomers detect the resulting optical flash
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Astronomers follow gravitational waves to treasureAstronomers have tracked down the source of a gravitational wave and discovered the first observed kilonova: a nuclear furnace 100 million times brighter than the Sun producing thousands of times the entire mass of the Earth in heavy elements such as precious metals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Majority overestimates US gay population, could influence gay rights policiesThe public tends to overestimate the American gay and lesbian population, and those who do so are less likely to support equal rights measures, according to a new study by two University of Kansas political scientists.
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Gizmodo

And Now Star Trek: Discovery Has Lost Its Soul All images: CBS Let’s talk about Captain Lorca, Ash Tyler, Harcourt Fenton Mudd, and the moral center of Star Trek . I can’t believe I’m about to defend Harry Mudd. Goddammit, Discovery . So the plot of yesterday’s episode is that Lorca has been summoned by Starfleet command, away from the ship, and told not to use the s-drive (spore-drive, I guess) unless specifically ordered to. They’re worried
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Science | The Guardian

Whisper it – Greek theatre's legendary acoustics are a myth Tour guides may tell you that a pin dropping can be heard in every seat of the ancient theatre of Epidaurus – but scientists disagree It has been held up as a stunning example of ancient Greek sound engineering, but researchers say the acoustics of the theatre at Epidaurus are not as dazzling as they have been hailed. Dating from the fourth century BC, and seating up to 14,000 spectators, the the
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Astronomers strike cosmic gold, confirm origin of precious metals in neutron star mergersWhat many thought would be a long way off, the detection of gravitational waves from the merger of binary neutron stars, actually happened on Aug. 17. The observation of a blue and then red glow from the radioactive debris cloud left behind matched simulations of what the merger should look like, proving that such mergers are the source of most of the very heavy elements in the universe, including
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Majority overestimates US gay population, could influence gay rights policiesThe public tends to overestimate the American gay and lesbian population, and those who do so are less likely to support equal rights measures, according to a new study by two University of Kansas political scientists.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Gasoline Demand Could Peak by 2030
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Yahoo can provide dead man's emails to family, court saysMassachusetts' highest court says federal law does not prohibit Yahoo from providing a deceased man's family members access to his email account.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Neutrons observe vitamin B6-dependent enzyme activity useful for drug developmentScientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have performed neutron structural analysis of a vitamin B6-dependent protein, potentially opening avenues for new antibiotics and drugs to battle diseases such as drug-resistant tuberculosis, malaria and diabetes.
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Big Think

5 of the Biggest Questions That Science Can't Answer Yet While it's reasonable to trust that science will eventually answer our unsolved questions, assuming that it has all of the answers right now is not. Read More
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Gizmodo

Colliding Neutron Star Discovery Could Solve This Mystery About Our Expanding Universe Image: PK Blanchard/E. Berger/Pan-STARRS/DECam Today, physicists across the world celebrated as telescopes and observatories on Earth and in space captured a “kilonova. ” Two neutron stars collided 130 million light years away, sending gravitational waves, x-rays, gamma-rays, radio waves, and light waves to the Earth. But these events also serve as a new kind of tool—a tool with the potential to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

GW researchers contribute to global effort to identify extraordinary astrophysical eventThree astrophysicists from the George Washington University are part of a global group of scientists who collaborated on identification and study of the first confirmed observation of two merging neutron stars, a so-called kilonova.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

LIGO confirms 1989 prediction about neutron star mergers producing gamma ray burstsToday's announcement by LIGO confirms a longstanding prediction made almost thirty years ago by a team headed by Prof. Tsvi Piran at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Published in Nature in 1989 ('Nucleosynthesis, neutrino bursts and γ-rays from coalescing neutron stars'), the paper suggests that when two neutron stars merge they emit, in addition to gravitational waves, a burst of gamma-rays. T
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

International team observes first radio counterpart to gravitational wavesNRL Radio Astrophysics and Sensing Section astronomers join an international collaboration of researchers with the Caltech-led GROWTH project, resulting in the first ever observation of the radio counterpart to a gravitational wave event.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Neutrons observe vitamin B6-dependent enzyme activity useful for drug developmentScientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have performed neutron structural analysis of a vitamin B6-dependent protein, potentially opening avenues for new antibiotics and drugs to battle diseases such as drug-resistant tuberculosis, malaria and diabetes. Specifically, the team used neutron crystallography to study the location of hydrogen atoms in aspartate aminotrans
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Ars Technica

London’s sky turns red Monday, but we can’t blame pollution DANIEL DAN SORABJI/AFP/Getty Images Residents of England awoke on Monday morning to a sky that looked very much like a scene from the movie Blade Runner —red and hazy. Fortunately this isn't science fiction—or even pollution. Rather, it's a combination of the rare, powerful ex-hurricane Ophelia's winds and African dust. The large, extra-tropical cyclone that brought high winds and damaging seas t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Neutron star crash: 'The gift that will keep on giving'The astrophysics world is abuzz after the first-ever observation of two neutron stars merging in a cataclysmic crash that left a rich trail of debris for scientists to comb through.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gold origin confirmed with first ever gravitational wave sightingGold's origin in the Universe has finally been confirmed, after a gravitational wave source was seen and heard for the first time ever by an international collaboration of researchers, with astronomers at the University of Warwick playing a leading role.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nidoviruses redundantly express genes and encode more proteins than previously believed, study findsArteriviruses, a family of single-stranded RNA viruses that belongs to the order Nidovirales, produce more proteins and messenger RNAs than previously reported, a finding that provides important insights about a virus that could potentially evolve to infect humans in the future, according to a new research study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Side-by-side deposition of atomically flat semiconductor sheets enhances solar cell conversion efficiencySuper thin photovoltaic devices underpin solar technology and gains in the efficiency of their production are therefore keenly sought. KAUST researchers have combined and rearranged different semiconductors to create so-called lateral p-n heterojunctions—a simpler process they hope will transform the fabrication of solar cells, self-powered nanoelectronics as well as ultrathin, transparent, flexib
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nanoantenna arrays power a new generation of fluorescence-based sensorsResearchers from the Universities of Bristol and Bedfordshire, in collaboration with multinational company ABB, have designed and tested a series of plasmonic nanoantenna arrays that could lead to the development of a new generation of ultrasensitive and low-cost fluorescence sensors that could be used to monitor water quality.
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Gizmodo

Microsoft and Justice Department Will Square Off in Supreme Court Over Critical Privacy Case Photo: Getty The US Supreme Court has agreed to hear arguments in a critical case over data privacy, the outcome of which will likely determine how easily law enforcement can gain access to information stored in tech companies’ overseas data centers. Microsoft will go head-to-head with the Justice Department, arguing that the agency cannot use a warrant to collect emails held in Microsoft’s Irela
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Deep learning reconstructs hologramsDeep learning has been experiencing a true renaissance especially over the last decade, and it uses multi-layered artificial neural networks for automated analysis of data. Deep learning is one of the most exciting forms of machine learning that is behind several recent leapfrog advances in technology including for example real-time speech recognition and translation as well image/video labeling a
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Ars Technica

How the KRACK attack destroys nearly all Wi-Fi security Enlarge / Android users: your Wi-Fi combo can be set to all zeros. A paper by two Belgian researchers has cast more light on the vulnerabilities discovered in the Wi-Fi Protected Access II (WPA2) implementations on most, if not all, wireless networking devices that use the protocol. Dubbed "KRACK" (Key Reinstallation AttaCK) , the attack "abuses design or implementation flaws in cryptographic pro
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Popular Science

Your smartphone is hijacking your brain. Here's how to stop it. Health Is there an app for that? A sort of self-satisfied rage sets in whenever I see someone struggling to navigate typical life because they simply cannot look up from their phone.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gravitational waves shed first light on mergers of neutron starsResearchers representing the LIGO-Virgo Collaboration, of which the CNRS is a member, as well as 70 observatories, will reveal the latest discoveries from gravitational wave research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gold origin confirmed with first ever gravitational wave sightingGold's origin in the Universe has finally been confirmed, after a gravitational wave source was seen and heard for the first time ever by an international collaboration of researchers, with astronomers at the University of Warwick playing a leading role.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

LIGO announces detection of gravitational waves from colliding neutron starsThe US-based Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory and the Virgo detector in Italy announced on Oct. 16 that all three of their detectors had picked up the ripples, or gravitational waves, from two neutron stars that collided 130 million years ago. Among other discoveries, the detection allowed scientists to use gravitational waves to directly calculate the rate at which the universe
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New exercises help athletes manage dangerous breathing disorderA novel set of breathing techniques help athletes overcome vocal cord dysfunction and improve performance during high-intensity exercise. Vocal cord dysfunction, now also referred to as exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction (EILO), has been shown to improve for athletes after being trained to use the new techniques.
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Ingeniøren

Singapore indretter luftmotorveje for dronerFor at forhindre transportdroner i at støde sammen eller ramme fugle, bygninger og mennesker har Singapore fået kortlagt hele byen i 3D og udpeget dronekorridorer mellem byens højhuse.
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Gizmodo

Monday's Top Deals: SanDisk Gold Box, Portable Projector, Upgraded Robotic Vacuum, and More We start off the week with a SanDisk Gold Box , discount on an upgraded Eufy robotic vacuum , and an exclusive deal on a portable projector . Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals SanDisk Gold Box There’s no such thing as too much flash storage, so stock up during Amazon’s one-day SanDisk sale . Advertisement I imagine the most popular items here will
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Neutron stars: 'Hear' the mighty cosmic collisionScientists convert the gravitational wave signal from merging neutron stars into sound.
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The Atlantic

The Movement of #MeToo About 10 years ago, after I’d graduated college but when I was still waitressing full-time, I attended an empowerment seminar. It was the kind of nebulous weekend-long event sold as helping people discover their dreams and unburden themselves from past trauma through honesty exercises and the encouragement to “be present.” But there was one moment I’ve never forgotten. The group leader, a man in
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Gizmodo

Former Hurricane Ophelia Is Making London Look Pretty Apocalyptic Right Now Photo: AP If you’re in London right now you might want to look out your window. It’s disturbing to say the least. Photo: Jonathan Brady/WPA Pool/Getty Images No, not that. That’s just the Duchess of Cambridge dancing with Paddington Bear at Paddington Station to promote the movie Paddington 2 . If you look up at the sky, however, you’ll see an orange, apocalyptic hue—and it’s all the fault of the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nidoviruses redundantly express genes and encode more proteins than previously believed, study findsArteriviruses, a family of single-stranded RNA viruses that belongs to the order Nidovirales, produce more proteins and messenger RNAs than previously reported, a finding that provides important insights about a virus that could potentially evolve to infect humans in the future, according to a new research study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ocean atmosphere rife with microbesMicrobes are dispersed widely over the oceans with islands acting as stepping-stones to help transport of land-based organisms.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ESO telescopes observe first light from gravitational wave sourceESO's fleet of telescopes have detected the first visible counterpart to a gravitational wave source. These historic observations suggest that this unique object is the result of the merger of two neutron stars. The cataclysmic aftermaths of this kind of merger -- long-predicted events called kilonovae -- disperse heavy elements such as gold and platinum throughout the Universe. This discovery als
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hubble observes source of gravitational waves for the first timeThe NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has observed for the first time the source of a gravitational wave, created by the merger of two neutron stars. This merger created a kilonova -- an object predicted by theory decades ago -- that ejects heavy elements such as gold and platinum into space. This event also provides the strongest evidence yet that short duration gamma-ray bursts are caused by merge
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists demonstrate path to linking the genome to healthy tissues, diseaseA study has reached a major milestone in establishing a baseline understanding of gene expression across healthy human tissues, and linking genes to disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

First observations of merging neutron stars mark a new era in astronomyAfter LIGO detected gravitational waves from the merger of two neutron stars, the race was on to detect a visible counterpart, because unlike the colliding black holes responsible for LIGO's four previous detections, this event was expected to produce an explosion of visible light. Researchers have now found the source of the gravitational waves, capturing the first images of the event with the Sw
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cocktail tests on toxic waste called forSurprisingly low concentrations of toxic chemicals -- from fungicides to antidepressants -- can change the way some aquatic creatures swim and feed, according to new research. In addition, depending on the cocktail of toxins they can produce unexpected results.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

One in five witness someone collapse who requires CPR but the majority do not actAn estimated one in five adults in the UK witness someone collapse who needs immediate CPR, yet the majority of people do not act, according to new research. Researchers carried out a survey of 2,000 people across the country to find out how likely people are to witness a life-threatening cardiac arrest.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Inpatient satisfaction improved by five-minute intervention, study findsAs hospitals seek to improve inpatient satisfaction, one effective way takes only a few minutes and no expensive equipment. A study recently found that a daily five-minute conversation that focused on hospitalized patients 'as people' significantly improved their satisfaction with their medical care.
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Ars Technica

Supreme Court refuses to hear case questioning Google’s trademark Enlarge (credit: Leon Neal/Getty Images) The Supreme Court declined Monday to review a petition asserting that the term "google" has become too generic and therefore unqualified for trademark protection. Without comment, the justices set aside a legal challenge claiming that Google had fallen victim to "genericide" and should no longer be trademarked. A lawsuit claimed the word "google" had becom
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Gizmodo

Australia Launches First Nation-Wide Reporting System for Revenge Porn Australia’s “Image-based abuse” portal. (Image: Screenshot) Victims of revenge porn—the nonconsensual distribution of explicit images—have a difficult path to navigate to regain their privacy and seek justice. The laws have yet to catch up to the crime, and the average person doesn’t have the means to quickly take down intimate images from the web—they’re often at the mercy of tech giants. But th
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Futurity.org

Neutron star collision offers first image of gravitational waves Scientists have detected gravitational waves coming from the collision of two neutron stars, and, for the first time, captured their image. Some 130 million years ago, in a nearby galaxy, two neutron stars collided. The cataclysmic crash produced gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric of spacetime that traveled across the universe. On August 17, 2017, along with hundreds of other collaborator
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New Scientist - News

Gravitational waves have let us see huge neutron stars collidingWe’ve taken the first pictures of neutron stars colliding 130 million light years away. The resulting gravitational waves may solve some big cosmic mysteries
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nanoantenna arrays power a new generation of fluorescence-based sensorsResearchers from the Universities of Bristol and Bedfordshire, in collaboration with multinational company ABB, have designed and tested a series of plasmonic nanoantenna arrays that could lead to the development of a new generation of ultrasensitive and low-cost fluorescence sensors that could be used to monitor water quality.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

CIFAR fellows part of first gravitational wave detection of colliding neutron starsFor the first time, scientists have directly detected gravitational waves from the spectacular collision of two neutron stars, and at the same time detected visible light from the merger. The discovery, reported today by a collaboration of scientists from around the world, marks the first time that a cosmic event has been detected through both light and gravitational waves -- the ripples in space-
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Childhood poverty, poor support may drive up pregnant woman's biological agePregnant women who had low socioeconomic status during childhood and who have poor family social support appear to prematurely age on a cellular level, potentially raising the risk for complications, a new study has found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A kite that might flyWind turbines suspended high in the sky have potential as an alternative power source for Saudi Arabia.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Think laterally to sidestep production problemsThe side-by-side deposition of atomically flat semiconductor sheets enhances solar cell conversion efficiency.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Healthy lifestyle reduces cardiovascular risk after gestational diabetes, NIH study showsWomen who have had gestational diabetes may be able to reduce or even eliminate their risk for cardiovascular disease by following a healthy lifestyle in the years after giving birth, according to a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Learning during development is regulated by an unexpected brain regionHalf a century of research on how the brain learns to integrate visual inputs from the two eyes has provided important insights in critical period regulation, leading to the conclusion that it occurs within the cortex. The Levelt group now made the surprising discovery that a brain region that passes on input from the eyes to the cortex also plays a crucial role in opening the critical period of b
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bolstering fat cells offers potential new leukemia treatmentKilling cancer cells indirectly by powering up fat cells in the bone marrow could help acute myeloid leukemia patients, says a study from McMaster University published in Nature Cell Biology. Researchers with the McMaster Stem Cell and Cancer Research Institute found that boosting adipocytes, or fat cells, located in the bone morrow suppressed cancerous leukemia cells but -- in a surprise to the r
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gestational diabetes and cardiovascular disease riskA history of gestational diabetes was associated with a modest higher long-term risk of cardiovascular disease in women in a new study, although the absolute rate of cardiovascular disease was low in the study's younger group of predominantly white women and adhering to a healthy lifestyle over time appeared to help mitigate the risk, according to a new article published by JAMA Internal Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Whales and dolphins have rich 'human-like' cultures and societiesWhales and dolphins (cetaceans) live in tightly-knit social groups, have complex relationships, talk to each other and even have regional dialects -- much like human societies. A major new study, published today in Nature Ecology & Evolution, has linked the complexity of Cetacean culture and behavior to the size of their brains.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Storm brings 'apocalyptic' skies to BritainThe sun shone red and the sky darkened to a foreboding orange and brown across parts of Britain on Monday, as a storm swept air and dust in from southern Europe.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Report identifies factors associated with harassment, abuse in academic fieldworkCollege students considering careers in fields like archaeology or geology that require extensive work at remote field sites might want to find out how potential supervisors and advisers conduct themselves in the field. Do they establish clear ground rules for the behavior of everyone on the team? Are the rules consistently enforced? According to a new report, such factors likely influence whether
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bite on this: Researcher finds alligators eat sharksJaws, beware! Alligators may be coming for you, according to a Kansas State University researcher.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronomers first to see source of gravitational waves in visible lightFor the first time, astronomers have observed in visible light a cataclysmic cosmic event that generated gravitational waves detected on Earth.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Gravitational Waves: A Love SongScience songwriter Adam Sakellarides strikes again -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Feed: All Latest

KRACK Vulnerability Makes Wi-Fi Hacking Possible, Leaving Millions of Devices ExposedA vulnerability called KRACK affects nearly every Wi-Fi device on the market.
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Ars Technica

Super Nt is a $190 FPGA, HDMI SNES (and probably other acronyms) After busting onto the retro console re-release scene with a high-end, $500+ NES (and a slightly cheaper follow-up ), Analogue is now turning its focus to a recreation of the Super NES. The newly announced Super Nt advertises lag-free 1080p HDMI output and full compatibility with more than 2,200 Super NES and Super Famicom cartridges (and controllers) at a more mass-market-friendly price of $190.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The nursing workforce is growing more diverse and educated, finds NYU Meyers studyMore males and people of color are entering nursing, and more nurses are earning bachelor's degrees compared with a decade ago, according to a new study by NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Long nanotubes make strong fibersTo make long, strong and conductive carbon nanotube fibers, it's best to start with long nanotubes, according to scientists at Rice University.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Report identifies factors associated with harassment, abuse in academic fieldworkCollege students considering careers in fields like archaeology or geology that require extensive work at remote field sites might want to find out how potential supervisors and advisers conduct themselves in the field. Do they establish clear ground rules for the behavior of everyone on the team? Are the rules consistently enforced? According to a new report, such factors likely influence whether
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bite on this: Kansas State University researcher finds alligators eat sharksJaws, beware! Alligators may be coming for you, according to a Kansas State University researcher. A study in Southeastern Naturalist documents American alligators on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts are eating small sharks and stingrays. This is the first scientific documentation of a widespread interaction between the two predators.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A cautionary taleA team led by LMU's Veit Hornung has elucidated the mechanism by which human cells induce inflammation upon detection of cytoplasmic DNA. Notably, the signal network involved differs from that used in the same context in mice.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What's the next step for exon skipping therapies to treat duchenne muscular dystrophy?A team of leading European clinicians and scientists presents a unique perspective on how to move forward in the development of exon skipping therapies to treat the severe muscle-wasting disease Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds auto-fix tool gets more programmers to upgrade codeFailure to make necessary upgrades to software code can have dire consequences, such as the major data breach at Equifax. A recent study finds that auto-fix tools are effective ways to get programmers to make the relevant upgrades - if programmers opt to use them.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Astronomers first to see source of gravitational waves in visible lightFor the first time, astronomers have observed in visible light a cataclysmic cosmic event that generated gravitational waves detected on Earth. The event was the merger of two neutron stars in a galaxy 130 million light-years away. The merger resulted in a supernova-like explosion, the light of which was first observed by a team of astronomers at the Carnegie Institution for Science's Las Campanas
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Decoding the origin of heavy elements in the light from a neutron star mergerOn Aug. 17, scientists around the globe were treated to near-simultaneous observations by separate instruments: One set of Earth-based detectors measured the signature of a cataclysmic event sending ripples through the fabric of space-time, and a space-based detector measured the gamma-ray signature of a high-energy outburst emanating from the same region of the sky.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

How I became an entrepreneur at 66 | Paul TasnerIt's never too late to reinvent yourself. Take it from Paul Tasner -- after working continuously for other people for 40 years, he founded his own start-up at age 66, pairing his idea for a business with his experience and passion. And he's not alone. As he shares in this short, funny and inspirational talk, seniors are increasingly indulging their entrepreneurial instincts -- and seeing great suc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Whales and dolphins have rich 'human-like' cultures and societiesWhales and dolphins (Cetaceans) live in tightly-knit social groups, have complex relationships, talk to each other and even have regional dialects - much like human societies.
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Dagens Medicin

Styrelsesdirektør bakker op om kontroversiel udtalelse i Svendborg-sagen Sektionschef i Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed Karsten Bech har kritiseret to læger i den såkaldte Svendborg-sag til trods for, at den ene er frikendt. Det vakte vrede i Lægeforeningen, men nu bakker direktøren i Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed op om sektionschefen.
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Fight over the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Is BackCongress may soon allow drilling in the wildlife refuge to offset Republicans' planned tax cuts -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo

This High-Priced SNES Clone Plays Every Super Nintendo Game Ever in High-Def All images: Analogue The recently-released Super Nintendo Classic Edition is a fantastic way to replay 21 of your favorite 16-bit SNES games—but what about all the other classics that Nintendo excluded? If you’ve still got a stack of old Super Nintendo carts at home, the Analogue Super Nt should let you enjoy them on the fancy hi-def TV you upgraded to years ago. The Super Nt is the inevitable fo
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Futurity.org

6 ways health would suffer on a trip to Mars NASA has aims to have humans on Mars by the 2030s—but long-distance space travel comes with a unique set of health problems. How will those who make the trip cope with the mental and physical rigors of the journey? What role will isolation and stress play? And what are the health dangers? “I’d be very surprised if we didn’t see a Mars mission in our lifetime,” says Marc Jurblum, a training psychi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study finds auto-fix tool gets more programmers to upgrade codeFailure to make necessary upgrades to software code can have dire consequences, such as the major data breach at Equifax. A recent study finds that auto-fix tools are effective ways to get programmers to make the relevant upgrades - if programmers opt to use them.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Seeing the light of neutron star collisionsWhen two neutron stars collided on Aug. 17, a widespread search for electromagnetic radiation from the event led to observations of light from the afterglow of the explosion, finally connecting a gravitational-wave-producing event with conventional astronomy using light, according to an international team of astronomers.
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New on MIT Technology Review

This Robotic Surgeon Cuts Cleaner Than a Human
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Radio 'eyes' unlocking secrets of neutron-star collisionWhen a pair of superdense neutron stars collided and potentially formed a black hole in a galaxy 130 million light-years from Earth, they unleashed not only a train of gravitational waves but also an ongoing torrent of radio waves that are answering some of the biggest questions about the nature of such a cataclysmic event.
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Ars Technica

Supreme Court to decide if US has right to data on world’s servers Enlarge / Front row from left, US Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Associate Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Associate Justice Clarence Thomas, and Associate Justice Stephen Breyer, back row from left, Associate Justice Elena Kagan, Associate Justice Samuel Alito Jr., Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor, and Associate Justice Neil Gorsuch pose for a gr
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Gizmodo

This Ancient Reptile Evolved a Weird, Bird-Like Head 100 Million Years Before Birds Did Avicranium renestoi . Artistic reconstruction by Matt Celeskey . Imagine an animal with the body of a chameleon, the feet and claws of an anteater, the humped back of a camel, and a tail that is both flattened like a beaver’s, but also like that of a scorpion. If you’re thinking this sounds like someone just threw your local zoo into a blender—or that it’s not far off from mythical creatures like
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Huawei bets on AI phone in challenge to Apple, SamsungChinese technology group Huawei unveiled its latest smartphone Monday, talking up the advanced artificial intelligence capabilities it hopes will cement its place among the world's three biggest manufacturers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gamma-ray burst detection just what OSU researchers exclusively predictedMore than a month before a game-changing detection of a short gamma-ray burst - a finding announced today - scientists at Oregon State University predicted such a discovery would occur.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Colliding stars spark rush to solve cosmic mysteries Stellar collision confirms theoretical predictions about the periodic table. Nature News doi: 10.1038/550309a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Marketing study examines what types of searches click for car buyersA new study from The University of Texas at Dallas examines how consumers allocated their time when searching offline and on the internet as they shopped for a new automobile, and what the outcomes were for price satisfaction.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Seeing the light of neutron star collisionsWhen two neutron stars collided on Aug. 17, a widespread search for electromagnetic radiation from the event led to observations of light from the afterglow of the explosion, finally connecting a gravitational-wave-producing event with conventional astronomy using light, according to an international team of astronomers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Aus gravitational waves world-first findingAn Australian group was the first in the world to confirm the radio emission from a gravitational wave. University of Sydney Associate Professor Tara Murphy was in the US with a collaborator when they saw the gravitational wave announcement come through on the private LIGO email list. 'We immediately rang our team in Australia and told them to get onto the CSIRO telescope as soon as possible,' she
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Major advance in nanopore detection of peptides and proteinsNanopore technology, which is used to sequence DNA, is cheap, hand-held and works in the jungle and in space. The use of this technology to identify peptides or proteins is now a step closer. University of Groningen scientists have used a patented nanopore to identify the fingerprints of proteins and peptides, and it can even detect polypeptides differing by one amino acid. The results were publis
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronomers strike cosmic gold, confirm origin of precious metals in neutron star mergersThe first detection of gravitational waves from the cataclysmic merger of two neutron stars, and the observation of visible light in the aftermath of that merger, finally answer a long-standing question in astrophysics: Where do the heaviest elements, ranging from silver and other precious metals to uranium, come from?
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Inside Science

Gravitational Waves Throw Light on Neutron Star Mergers Space First gravitational wave detection of colliding neutron stars sent scientists racing to collect light from the event. 10/16/2017 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer https://www.insidescience.org/news/gravitational-waves-throw-light-neutron-star-mergers
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Ars Technica

How to harden a country that sits on a fault line Enlarge / The Champagne Pool at the southern end of the Okataina volcanic area. (credit: Flickr user: Darren Puttock ) ROTORUA, New Zealand—If you head east from my parents' home in New Zealand, you'll travel through rolling hills for a while. Then, as you crest a rather unremarkable climb, an unexpectedly spectacular view opens up before you. Mokoia Island is small, bushy, and brooding, and it s
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Futurity.org

Bright midday light eases bipolar depression Daily exposure to bright white light in the middle of the day significantly decreases symptoms of depression and increases functioning for people with bipolar disorder, research shows. Previous studies found morning bright light therapy reduced symptoms of depression in patients with seasonal affective disorder (SAD). But that kind of depression treatment can cause patients with bipolar disorder
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Dagens Medicin

Danskere får lov til at donere nyre anonymtPolitikere håber, at anonymitet vil sikre flere donorer til de mange nyrepatienter-
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Live Science

First Detection of Gravitational Waves from Neutron-Star Crash Marks New Era of AstronomyFor the first time ever, scientists have spotted both gravitational waves and light coming from the same cosmic event — in this case, the merger of two superdense stellar corpses known as neutron stars.
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Ars Technica

New film explores the real-life romantic threesome behind Wonder Woman Annapurna Pictures 2017 has been the year of Wonder Woman , at least in the realm of pop culture, and now there's a fascinating behind-the-scenes tale of the people who dreamed up the Amazonian superhero who stands for love. Professor Marston and the Wonder Women is about William Moulton Marston (Luke Evans), Elizabeth Holloway Marston (Rebecca Hall), and Olive Byrne (Bella Heathcote), three psyc
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Quantum simulator: First functioning componentHurricanes, traffic jams, demographic development – to predict the effect of such events, computer simulations are required. Many processes in nature, however, are so complicated that conventional computers fail. Quantum simulators may solve this problem. One of the basic phenomena in nature is the interaction between light and matter in photosynthesis. Physicists have now made a big step towards
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Blood pressure medication does not completely restore vascular functionTreatments for high blood pressure do not totally reverse its damaging effects on the vascular rhythms that help circulation of the blood say researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How dopamine tells you it isn't worth the waitA new study sheds light on how dopamine cells in the brain signal the passage of time.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Secure Wi-Fi Networks Everywhere Are Wide Open to Hacks, Thanks to a Newly Discovered Security Flaw
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Ingeniøren

Ekspert om wifi-sårbarhed: »Himlen er ikke ved at falde ned, men...« KRACK-Attack, der udnytter en sårbarhed i wifi-forbindelser, giver dansk it-sikkerhedsekspert store bekymringer. Men du kan slippe for dem ved at holde routere og firmware opdateret. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/ekspert-wpa2-saarbarhed-himlen-ikke-ved-at-ned-1081734 Version2 Forside relaterede artikler Alvorlig fejl betyder, at alverdens wifi-hotspots står åbne for overvågning
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Ingeniøren

Astronomer jubler over den første observation af sammenstød mellem to neutronstjernerDen første observation af et sammenstød mellem to ultrakompakte neutronstjerner giver anledning til ny forståelse af dannelsen af de tungeste grundstoffer og kosmiske eksplosioner. Danske forskere har bidraget til de nye observationer og opdagelser.
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Futurity.org

7 tips for avoiding chemicals that harm fertility People planning to conceive should be aware of common chemicals that can affect fertility. Here, Mark Green, lecturer in reproductive biology in the University of Melbourne School of BioSciences, offers seven ways to play it safe. In modern life we come into contact with many different chemicals through the products we use, the food we eat, and the air we breathe. Most of these chemicals cause no
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Einstein’s waves detected in star smashScientists detect the warping of space generated by the collision of two neutron stars.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

First observations of merging neutron stars mark a new era in astronomyAfter LIGO detected gravitational waves from the merger of two neutron stars, the race was on to detect a visible counterpart, because unlike the colliding black holes responsible for LIGO's four previous detections, this event was expected to produce an explosion of visible light. A small team led by UCSC was the first to find the source of the gravitational waves, capturing the first images of t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Harvey runoff menaces Texas' coral reefsThe more than 13 trillion gallons of floodwater from Hurricane Harvey have created a massive plume of freshwater in the Gulf of Mexico that is threatening the coral reefs of the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary about 100 miles offshore of Galveston.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Major advance in nanopore detection of peptides and proteinsNanopore technology, which is used to sequence DNA, is cheap, hand-held and works in the jungle and in space. The use of this technology to identify peptides or proteins is now a step closer. University of Groningen scientists have used a patented nanopore to identify the fingerprints of proteins and peptides, and it can even detect polypeptides differing by one amino acid. The results were publis
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Endogenous infection marker guides antibiotic therapyThe endogenous infection marker procalcitonin can help to guide the use of antibiotics when treating infections. The course of antibiotic therapy is shortened, and its side effects and mortality rate also decrease, as researchers from the University of Basel and other colleagues report in the journal The Lancet Infectious Diseases. They conducted a meta-analysis of over 6,700 international data se
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Social media accounts promote skeletal images of womenSkeletal images of bodies featuring protruding bones and pencil-thin limbs are being shared and promoted on social media, new research shows.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gamma-ray burst detection just what OSU researchers exclusively predictedMore than a month before a game-changing detection of a short gamma-ray burst -- a finding announced today -- scientists at Oregon State University predicted such a discovery would occur.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Astronomers strike cosmic gold, confirm origin of precious metals in neutron star mergersWhat many thought would be a long way off, the detection of gravitational waves from the merger of binary neutron stars, actually happened on Aug. 17. The observation of a blue and then red glow from the radioactive debris cloud left behind matched UC Berkeley and Berkeley Lab simulations of what the merger should look like, proving that such mergers are the source of most of the very heavy elemen
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Radio 'eyes' unlocking secrets of neutron-star collisionVLA detects radio waves from neutron-star collision that generated the gravitational waves observed by LIGO and VIRGO. Radio observatories will continue to provide important new information about this event over the coming months.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gravitational waves + new clues from space reveal new way to make a black holeFor the first time, scientists worldwide and at Penn State University have detected both gravitational waves and light shooting toward our planet from the birthplace of a new black hole created by the merger of two neutron stars. The discovery marks the beginning of a new era of "multi-messenger" + "multi-wavelength" space exploration with a global network of many types of observatories focusing t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Discovered! Neutron star collision seen for the first timeA team of Carnegie astronomers provided the first-ever glimpse of neutron stars colliding August 17. With UC Santa Cruz colleagues, they used the Swope telescope at Las Campanas Observatory to discover the light produced by the merger, pinpointing the origin of a gravitational wave signal less than 11 hours after it was detected. They also obtained the earliest spectra of the collision, which may
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The Scientist RSS

Labcyte: Echo Acoustic Liquid HandlingTouch-free liquid handling for synthetic biology workflows
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US warns of security flaw which can compromise Wi-Fi connections (Update)A newly discovered flaw in the widely used Wi-Fi encryption protocol could leave millions of users vulnerable to attacks, prompting warnings Monday from the US government and security researchers worldwide.
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Viden

Stjerne-eksplosion skaber tyngdebølger og “guldregn”Tyngdebølger er blevet kaldt århundredets opdagelse, og nu har forskere for første gang opfanget dem fra to neutronstjerner, der er kollideret og har skabt grundstoffer som guld, platin og uran.
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Viden

Fakta: Sådan ramte tyngdebølgerne JordenDet var en dag i august, at Jorden blev ramt af tyngdebølger fra stjerner, som kolliderede for 140 millioner år siden.
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Futurity.org

1 in 5 see someone need CPR, but majority don’t act An estimated one in five UK adults witness someone collapse who needs CPR right away, yet the majority of people don’t act, according to new research. Survival rates for out of hospital cardiac arrest in the UK are still worryingly low with less than one in ten people surviving. The British Heart Foundation estimates that 10,000 people die every year in the UK as rates of bystander CPR are as low
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Popular Science

Gravitational waves just showed us something even cooler than black holes Space Observatories all over the world caught a new kind of collision. For the first time ever, humans have observed gravitational waves and light from the same event, a neutron star collision 130 million light years away.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gravitational waves: Why the fuss?Great excitement rippled through the physics world Monday at news of the first-ever detection of two ultra-dense neutron stars converging in a violent smashup.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What are neutron stars?Thrilled physicists and astronomers announced Monday the first-ever observation of the merger of two neutron stars, one of the most spectacularly violent phenomena in the Universe.
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Feed: All Latest

Neutron Stars Collide, and the Gravitational Wave Sends Ripples Through AstrophysicsScientists detected their fifth gravitational wave in August, and announced it today. But keeping the discoveries quiet is getting harder and harder.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Germ-free hatching eggs: An alternative to formaldehyde applicationHatching eggs in large-scale hatcheries are currently treated with formaldehyde to eliminate germs. Researchers have now developed a natural alternative.
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NYT > Science

LIGO Detects Fierce Collision of Neutron Stars for the First TimeSeen and heard, the fireball is a stunning breakthrough into kilonovas, bursts of energy believed to produce metals like gold and uranium in the universe.
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Science | The Guardian

New frontier for science as astronomers witness neutron stars colliding Extraordinary event has been ‘seen’ for the first time, in both gravitational waves and light – ending decades-old debate about where gold comes from The collision of a pair of neutron stars, marked by ripples through the fabric of space-time and a flash brighter than a billion suns, has been witnessed for the first time in the most intensely observed astronomical event to date. The extraordinary
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Science | The Guardian

Monday's gravitational wave observation is astronomical alchemy Proof that celestial collisions called kilonovas create gold is the first wonder to arise from coordinated observations – expect more to come If you are wearing a piece of gold jewellery, take a good, hard look at it and consider this: you are likely to be wearing the celestial debris of a cataclysmic stellar collision, a collision so devastating that it literally shook the universe. That’s the c
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Neutron star smashup seen for first time, 'transforms' understanding of UniverseScientists have for the first time witnessed the crash of two ultra-dense neutron stars, cataclysmic events now known to have generated at least half the gold in the Universe, excited research teams revealed Monday.
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Science : NPR

Astronomers Strike Gravitational Gold In Colliding Neutron Stars In an astonishing discovery, astronomers used gravitational waves to locate two neutron stars smashing together. The collision created 200 Earth masses of pure gold, along with other elements. (Image credit: Robin Dienel/Carnegie Institution for Science)
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Quanta Magazine

Neutron-Star Collision Shakes Space-Time and Lights Up the Sky On Aug. 17, the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) detected something new. Some 130 million light-years away, two super-dense neutron stars, each as small as a city but heavier than the sun, had crashed into each other, producing a colossal convulsion called a kilonova and sending a telltale ripple through space-time to Earth. When LIGO picked up the signal, the a
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NYT > Science

Detecting a Kilonova ExplosionFor the first time, astronomers have seen and heard a pair of neutron stars collide in a crucible of cosmic alchemy.
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Gizmodo

Is Eating Synthetic Human Flesh Cannibalism? Illustration: Angelica Alzona/Gizmodo A disgusting factor which separates consuming human flesh from consuming muscle tissue of non-speaking animals is that you can’t separate eating dead humans from eating live humans. In the way that you call a baby cow “veal” or a pig “pork,” human flesh is just human flesh—you wouldn’t think about eating Dave’s “rounds” or his “snout,” you would think about e
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Gizmodo

Observatories Across the World Announce Groundbreaking New Gravitational Wave Discovery From LIGO: “Artist’s illustration of two merging neutron stars. The narrow beams represent the gamma-ray burst while the rippling spacetime grid indicates the isotropic gravitational waves that characterize the merger. Swirling clouds of material ejected from the merging stars are a possible source of the light that was seen at lower energies.” Image: National Science Foundation/LIGO/Sonoma State
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Gizmodo

Deadspin Martavis Bryant Wants Out Of Pittsburgh | Jezebel No, YOU’RE Terrified Of This Insanely Hau Deadspin Martavis Bryant Wants Out Of Pittsburgh | Jezebel No, YOU’RE Terrified Of This Insanely Haunted School | Earther Why a Bizarre Ex-Hurricane Is Pounding Ireland | Splinter Even Trump Reportedly Thinks Mike Pence Is a Crazed Anti-LGBTQ Zealot | The Root NJ Teacher Tells Students to ‘Speak American,’ but Who’s Gonna Tell Her That ‘American’ Isn’t a Language? |
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Gizmodo

Order Anker's Soda Can-Sized Projector For $269, Plus Some Free Accessories [Exclusive] Nebula Capsule + Tripod + Carrying Case , $269 Hot of the heels of their successful Nebula Mars mobile projector, Anker’s getting set to release an even smaller portable cinema , and our readers can save a bunch by preordering, and get some free accessories too. The Nebula Capsule is about the size of a soda can, but can turn any wall into a 100" display while outputting 360 degree audio. An
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Inside Science

Gravitational Waves Throw Light on Neutron Star Mergers Gravitational Waves Throw Light on Neutron Star Mergers First gravitational wave detection of colliding neutron stars sent scientists racing to collect light from the event. Top Image - CREDIT- NASA%27s Goddard Space Flight Center.gif A simulated animation of two colliding neutron stars. Image credits: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Space Monday, October 16, 2017 - 10:00 Yuen Yiu, Staff Write
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Scientific American Content: Global

Gravitational Wave Astronomers Hit Mother LodeSpacetime ripples from a stellar cataclysm in a distant galaxy help explain the cosmic origins of gold, and chart the course for a new age of “multi-messenger” astronomy -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

'A New Rosetta Stone for Astronomy' In September of 2015, astronomers detected, for the first time, gravitational waves, cosmic ripples that distort the very fabric of space and time. They came from a violent merger of two black holes somewhere in the universe, more than a billion light-years away from Earth. Astronomers observed the phenomenon again in December, and then again in November 2016, and then again in August of this yea
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Neutron star collision showers the universe with a wealth of discoveriesA collision of neutron stars was spotted with gravitational waves for the first time. Telescopes captured gamma rays, visible light and more from the smashup.
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Ars Technica

Neutron stars collide, solve major astronomical mysteries Enlarge (credit: NSF/LIGO/Sonoma State University/A. Simonnet) We've been extremely lucky. The LIGO and VIRGO detectors only operated simultaneously for a few weeks, but they were a remarkably busy few weeks. Today, those behind the joint collaboration announced that they've observed the merger of two neutron stars. And, because neutron stars don't swallow everything they encounter, the gravitati
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blood pressure medication does not completely restore vascular functionTreatments for high blood pressure do not totally reverse its damaging effects on the vascular rhythms that help circulation of the blood. Also, current hypertensive treatment did not fully restore the coherence or the strength of coupling between oscillations in the heart rate, respiration, and vascular rhythms
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Gizmodo

Why a Bizarre Ex-Hurricane Is Pounding Ireland Image: EarthNullSchool.net The extraordinary 2017 hurricane season continues apace this week, as Ireland braces against the remnants of hurricane—yes, hurricane —Ophelia, whose fierce winds reached the country’s southern coast Monday morning. Ophelia astounded meteorologists on Saturday when it intensified into a Category 3 hurricane farther east than any other major hurricane in history. While O
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Ingeniøren

Canadisk passagerfly kolliderer med droneEn drone ramte et kommercielt fly på vingen, da det i sidste uge var på vej til at lande i Québec. Ingen kom til skade ved episoden, men antallet af konflikter mellem droner og fly vokser eksplosivt.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Justices to hear government's email dispute with MicrosoftThe Supreme Court is intervening in a digital-age privacy dispute between the Trump administration and Microsoft over emails stored abroad.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Germ-free hatching eggs: An alternative to formaldehyde applicationHatching eggs in large-scale hatcheries are currently treated with formaldehyde to eliminate germs. Austrian researchers from TU Graz, acib and Roombiotic have now developed a natural alternative.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study reveals risk factors for substance use problems, as well as resilienceA new study explores factors increasing the risk for substance use problems among African-American/Black and Latino adults residing in a high-risk urban community, as well as patterns of resilience. It reveals that serious risk factors are highly prevalent and strongly associated with substance misuse; however, a substantial proportion could be characterized as resilient, and evidenced substance u
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sleep duration may affect the integrity of sperm DNAA new study found a link between sleep duration and a measure of chromosomal health in sperm. The findings are published in the Journal of Sleep Research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cocktail tests on toxic waste called forSurprisingly low concentrations of toxic chemicals -- from fungicides to antidepressants -- can change the way some aquatic creatures swim and feed, according to new research. In addition, depending on the cocktail of toxins they can produce unexpected results.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

DFG to fund electron microscopes for university researchAt its autumn session, the Joint Committee of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation) approved the funding of 17 high-performance electron microscopes with a total sum of €43 million. Funding for seven microscopes, amounting to €24 million, was awarded in the spring.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Early palliative care provides no quality of life benefits for recently diagnosed MPM patientsEarly specialist palliative care for patients that were recently diagnosed with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) does not impact quality of life (QOL) measures, according to research presented by Prof. Fraser Brims of Curtin University in Australia, at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) 18th World Conference on Lung Cancer (WCLC) in Yokohama, Japan.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fanged kangaroo research could shed light on extinctionFanged kangaroos -- an extinct family of small fanged Australian kangaroos -- might have survived at least five million years longer than previously thought. A new study has found the species might have competed for resources with ancestors of modern kangaroos.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Secure Wi-Fi Networks Are Wide Open to Hacks
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Gizmodo

Don't Panic, But Wi-Fi's Main Security Protocol Has Been Broken Image: Getty A major vulnerability has been discovered in the protocol governing basically all modern wi-fi routers. Here’s what we know so far. If you’ve set up a home wi-fi network, at some point you’ve encountered one or more screens concerning WEP and its successor WPA2. Both are security protocols created by the Wi-Fi Alliance that keep strangers from eavesdropping on what websites your comp
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Violation of the exponential decay law discovered in open quantum systems(Phys.org)—Ever since the early days of quantum mechanics, the decay dynamics of unstable quantum systems has been thought to follow an exponential decay law, just like the one used to describe radioactive decay and many other natural processes. The exponential law in the quantum domain was originally proposed by George Gamow and later developed by Eugene Wigner and Victor Weisskopf. According to
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Dagens Medicin

28 læger stiller op til regionsvalgetDer er flere læger på valglisterne til regionsvalget i november, end der var ved seneste regionsvalg, viser optælling.
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Dagens Medicin

Aarhus får ny professor i børnekræft Overlæge og forsker Jeanette Falck Winther er ny professor på Aarhus Universitet og Aarhus Universitetshospital.
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Dagens Medicin

Politikere vil kulegrave sygehusbyggeri efter nye problemer Nu er der igen problemer med økonomien ved sygehusbyggeriet i Viborg. Det får politikerne til at kræve en kulegravning af sygehusbyggeriet.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Integration of smoking cessation within CT lung cancer screenings shows life-saving resultsA study that integrated robust smoking cessation programs into an organized low-dose CT (LDCT) lung cancer screening program found that the inclusion of both interventions has the potential to decrease mortality rates while being relatively cost-effective. Dr. William Evans of McMaster University in Canada presented these findings today at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study cites race and socioeconomic factors as influential in NSCLC patient survival ratesNew research found race and specific socioeconomic factors to have a significant influence on disparities in the survival rates of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Dr. Yanyan Lou of the Mayo Clinic in the United States presented these findings today at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) 18th World Conference on Lung Cancer (WCLC) in Yokohama, Japan.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fanged kangaroo research could shed light on extinctionFanged kangaroos -- an extinct family of small fanged Australian kangaroos -- might have survived at least five million years longer than previously thought.A University of Queensland-led study has found the species might have competed for resources with ancestors of modern kangaroos.
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Ars Technica

Ophelia became a major hurricane where no storm had before Enlarge / It's safe to say that as a major hurricane, Ophelia was something of an outlier on Saturday. (credit: Sam Lillo/Twitter) The system formerly known as Hurricane Ophelia is moving into Ireland on Monday, bringing "status red" weather throughout the day to the island. The Irish National Meteorological Service, Met Éireann, has warned that, "Violent and destructive gusts of 120 to 150km/h a
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Telling ScansIn children's brain scans, scientists uncovered signs of multiple sclerosis before the kids showed any symptoms of the disease.
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The Scientist RSS

MilliporeSigma: Cryopreservation TipsThe true laboratory story behind liquid nitrogen cell storage.
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The Scientist RSS

MilliporeSigma: Cell Analysis TipsHow can you check on your cells' health quickly and easily?
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The Scientist RSS

MilliporeSigma: Membrane Selection TipsChoose your membranes wisely!
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The Scientist RSS

Will the Noninvasive Glucose Monitoring Revolution Ever Arrive?A needle-free alternative to the finger-prick test would be a godsend for many sufferers of diabetes, but the industry has yet to clear the technological hurdles.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronomers identify new asynchronous short period polar(Phys.org)—An international team of astronomers led by Gagik H. Tovmassian of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) has uncovered new details into the nature of a cataclysmic variable known as IGR J19552+0044. New observations reveal that this object is an asynchronous short period polar. The finding was presented October 5 in a paper published online on the arXiv pre-print server.
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Why Investors Are Betting That Bike Sharing Is the Next Uber'Dockless' bike-sharing companies are attracting investments from top-flight VC firms and private equity.
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Feed: All Latest

Meet the Mate 10, Huawei's New AI-Powered Flagship PhoneThe new Android handset from the Chinese manufacturer has a home-made chip that powers several AI features.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sleep duration may affect the integrity of sperm DNAA new study found a link between sleep duration and a measure of chromosomal health in sperm. In the study of 2020 semen samples provided by 796 male volunteers from colleges in Chongqing (China) from 2013 to 2015, volunteers with more than 9 hours per day of sleep and those with 6.5 hours or less per day sleep had 41% and 30% lower High DNA Stainability —- an index that represents the proportion
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Ars Technica

Huawei’s Mate 10 blends AI into every part of the smartphone experience Enlarge (credit: Valentina Palladino) Huawei's first "AI-powered" smartphone, the Mate 9 , debuted last year, and the Chinese company continues to dive further into the benefits of artificial intelligence in its newest smartphones. Huawei announced the Mate 10 and Mate 10 Pro smartphones today, both of which promise not only hardware improvements over the Mate 9, but also more AI power thanks to
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Gizmodo

Huawei’s Mate 10 Wants to be the Smartest Phone on the Block, But What Does That Even Mean? All images: Sam Rutherford/Gizmodo As the fall smartphone season starts to wind down, the number two smartphone maker in the world ( it’s not Apple anymore ) is sending us off with its answer to this year’s batch of iPhones, Pixels, and Galaxies with the Huawei Mate 10 and Mate 10 Pro. From the outside, The Mate 10’s specs and features put it on the same level as other flagship phones thanks to c
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Gizmodo

Another Familiar Villain Will Return for the Avatar Movies Avengers 4 is casting for a funeral. There’s fresh rumors about the big bad of the Gambit movie. Director Josh Boone reveals the characters he’d like to add in a New Mutants sequel. Plus, new Thor: Ragnarok footage, and Karl Urban on his potential involvement with the Dredd TV show. Spoilers now! Avatar 2-5 Giovanni Ribisi will reprise his role as asshole administrator of the human’s trip to Pand
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Scientific American Content: Global

Our Love of Exotic Pets Is Driving Wildlife DeclineThe wild pet trade may surpass habitat loss as a factor in the growing silence of the natural world -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren

DTU's LED-linse testes på fire forskellige kunstgræsbanerStøttet af Lokale- og Anlægsfonden skal to sjællandske og to jyske sportsanlæg nu også have etableret LED-belysning som forsøg. Formålet er først og fremmest at mindste lysforurening.
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Ingeniøren

Norsk søgræs skal øge kapaciteten i batterierEn stribe norske forskningsinstitutioner er gået sammen om at benytte alginat fra søgræs til at stabilisere silicium i batterier så meget, at det kan gøre det muligt at lagre mere strøm i litium-ion-batterier.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New antibiotic resistance genes foundResearchers have found several previously unknown genes that make bacteria resistant to last-resort antibiotics. The genes were found by searching large volumes of bacterial DNA.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Is rushing your child to the ER the right response?If a child gets a small burn, starts choking or swallows medication, parents may struggle to decide whether to provide first aid at home or rush them to the hospital, suggests a new national poll.
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Popular Science

It looks like we're in for another La Niña winter. What does that mean? Environment A quick refresher on what “the little girl” actually is. It seems like every year there’s some talk of El Niño or La Niña, and every year you intend to figure out what that really means. This is that year.
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Science-Based Medicine

Integrative medicine advocates react to criticisms of the Samuelis’ $200 million gift to UC-IrvineLast month, Susan and Henry Samueli donated $200 million to the University of California, Irvine to promote integrative medicine. We were pleasantly surprised by the unflattering coverage in the press of the gift. We were unpleasantly unsurprised by the reaction of integrative medicine advocates to the criticism.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Group: Orangutan orphans a sign of habitat destructionThe discovery last week of two orphaned baby orangutans on Borneo is further evidence that deforestation and illegal hunting are threatening survival of the great apes, an Indonesian conservation group said Monday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Russian supply ship docks at International Space StationAn unmanned Russian cargo ship has docked successfully at the International Space Station, delivering supplies to its six-member crew.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

30 killed as wildfires rage in Portugal and SpainAt least 27 people have died in fires which have ravaged forests in northern and central Portugal over the past 24 hours, rescuers said Monday, as three people were killed in Spain in blazes sparked by arsonists and fanned by Hurricane Ophelia.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Roman theater uncovered at base of Jerusalem's Western WallIsraeli archaeologists on Monday announced the discovery of the first known Roman-era theater in Jerusalem's Old City, a unique structure around 1,800 years old that abuts the Western Wall and may have been built during Roman Emperor Hadrian's reign.
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Ars Technica

South Park Fractured but Whole review: Emphasis on the “fractured” Enlarge / As a watchable piece of entertainment, The Fractured But Whole does pretty well. As a game, on the other hand... (credit: Ubisoft) Three-and-a-half years have passed, and yet I still can't get over how good a video game South Park: The Stick of Truth turned out to be . Licensed games have improved a lot in recent years, but their quality is never guaranteed, and the South Park license h
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Scientific American Content: Global

Women Code Breakers, a World of Endangered Species and Other New Science BooksBook recommendations from the editors of Scientific American -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian

ITV's Victoria illustrates how 19th-century sexism helped syphilis to spread With concealment common and women expected not even to show knowledge of the disease, infection of families by men was widespread across all classes Spoiler alert! Plot points from Victoria are revealed in this blog Historically, syphilis was extremely difficult to cure . Often patients would think that their disease had disappeared or been cured, only to have their bodies betray them with a resu
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Dagens Medicin

Jordemødre tager ikke længere telefonen på 1813 Region Hovedstaden fjerner to jordemødre fra akuttelefonen efter fejl fra akuttelefonens side i forbindelse med en dreng, som døde af meningitis.
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Feed: All Latest

How Instagram Helped Discover 'The Florida Project''s Bria Vinaite, One of the Year's Breakout Movie StarsVinaite, who plays a single mom in Sean Baker's film, brings her confidence and vulnerability to a much bigger screen.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Russia fines Telegram for not giving backdoor accessA Russian court on Monday fined the popular Telegram messenger app for failing to provide the country's security services with encryption keys to read users' messaging data.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

German envoy voices concerns about China web restrictionsA potential ban in China on software to avoid the country's censors could make it "impossible" to communicate privately online, the German ambassador warned Monday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Hungry bear' crisis grips far east Russian regionLarge numbers of hungry, aggressive bears are approaching humans and have killed two people in Russia's far east due to depleting food sources, a forestry worker told AFP Monday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Clouds over lava flows on MarsDiffuse, water-ice clouds, a hazy sky and a light breeze. Such might have read a weather forecast for the Tharsis volcanic region on Mars on 22 November 2016, when this image was taken by the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers advance characterization, purification of nanotube wires and filmsTo make continuous, strong and conductive carbon nanotube fibers, it's best to start with long nanotubes, according to scientists at Rice University.
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The Atlantic

Who Is Competent to Decide What Offends? As the ranks of college administrators have swelled in higher education, one task they’ve undertaken is more aggressively training students—and at times, faculty members— in what is variously called “cultural competence” or “diversity and inclusion.” The aims of these efforts are laudable. College ought to be as welcoming to students from historically marginalized groups as it is to anyone else;
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fungicides and antidepressants in rivers alter the swimming and feeding behaviour of aquatic animalsSurprisingly low concentrations of toxic chemical products in rivers including fungicides to antidepressants can change the swimming and feeding behaviours of some animals, according to a new research study led by experts from the University of Barcelona and the University of Portsmouth (United Kingdom).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Australia's getting a space agency—now what?With an Australian space agency on everyone's mind, we chatted to the European Space Agency's Director General about how we got here, what's next and why space agencies matter.
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