Gizmodo
Drink Up: High Lead Levels Found in Two InfoWars Supplements Image: YouTube/The Alex Jones Channel The most accurate description of the shrieking pageantry we’ve come to know as InfoWars is that it’s a dietary supplement business hiding behind a debased, unreliable, and exhaustingly stupid news network. Unfortunately for its founder Alex Jones, seen above chugging a glass of “Caveman True Paleo Formula,” two of those supplements were recently found to cont
11h
Ingeniøren
Regeringens muslingefarme kan være ny klima-bombeForskere i Sverige og Wales har målt, at kammuslinger i Østersøen udleder store mængder methan. Nu advarer de mod at tillade fiske- og muslingeopdræt uden at regne på klimaeffekten – hvilket ellers er, hvad den danske regering har planer om.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gentle touch soothes the pain of social rejectionThe gentle touch of another individual soothes the effects of social exclusion, one of the most emotionally painful human experiences, according to new UCL research.
1h

LATEST

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
More efficient separation of methane and CO2To make natural gas and biogas suitable for use, the methane has to be separated from the CO2. This involves the use of membranes, filters that stop the methane and allow the CO2 to pass through. Researchers at KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Belgium, have developed a new membrane that makes the separation process much more effective.
2min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists explain the pseudocapacitance phenomenon in supercapacitorsScientists in Russia and Armenia have predicted a new surface reconstruction of RuO2 that explains the origin of charge storage in supercapacitors. The miniaturization of electronic devices to the nanometer scale will increase the role of surface and quantum effects in terms of the properties and stability of the whole device. Surface science has therefore become crucial for future technological a
1min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wealth redistribution, not tax cuts, key to economic growthPresident Trump's new tax plan will follow the familiar script of reducing taxes for the rich in the name of job creation. Not only will these trickle-down policies not work—they'll make the problem worse. A new report by a team of complexity scientists demonstrates an alternative: Increase wages to create more investment opportunities for the wealthy, thus creating new jobs and a stronger economy
1min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers report toothy findings in odontode-bearing catfish studyCertain species of catfish are covered with bony plates bristling with thin teeth, similar to extinct vertebrate lineages. These teeth, which regularly fall out and grow back, are used for defense and, in males, to attract females. Researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, wanted to understand how teeth capable of regeneration can develop outside of the mouth. They discovered t
1min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemists develop a promising drug synthesis methodScientists from RUDN University with their colleagues from Yaroslavl have developed a new way to synthesize 1,2,4-oxadiazole derivatives used in many drugs. 1,2,4-oxadiazoles include ataluren, the active ingredient of a drug used in a treatment for genetic disorders. The results of the work are published in Tetrahedron Letters.
1min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Missing link between new topological phases of matter discoveredPhysicists at BESSY II have investigated a class of materials that exhibit characteristics of topological insulators. During these studies, they discovered a transition between two different topological phases, one of which is ferroelectric, meaning a phase in the material that exhibits spontaneous electric polarisation and can be reversed by an external electric field. This could also lead to new
7min
Science | The Guardian
Reboot your career with a job in robotics – live chat If you are interested in a career in artificial intelligence, ask our experts for advice on Wednesday 18 October from 1–2.30pm BST In the last year robots have got a bad rep. Headlines have dubbed machines our “future bosses” , with economists predicting more than 40% of UK jobs will be automated by 2030. But as machine learning improves, there is one sector which is booming: robotics. In the las
10min
Dagens Medicin
Sådan vurderer de praktiserende læger den nye overenskomst436 læger har deltaget i undersøgelse vedrørende holdninger til aftalen om en ny overenskomst for Almen Praksis.
26min
Dagens Medicin
Efter tolv år med HPV-vaccination: Vaccinen virker hundrede procentUndersøgelse af de første kvinder, der modtog HPV-vaccinen for 12 år siden, viser, at ingen af kvinderne har fået svære celleforandringer eller livmoderhalskræft.
26min
Ingeniøren
Danmarks offentlige digitalisering fremhæves som skoleeksempel på tysk tv I Tyskland er faxen stadig et gængs kommunikationsmiddel mellem borgere og det offentlige, mens det stort set er afskaffet herhjemme. Det er nu bemærket på den tyske kanal ARD 1. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/danmarks-offentlige-digitalisering-fremhaeves-skoleeksempel-paa-tysk-tv-1081772 Version2
31min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gentle touch soothes the pain of social rejectionThe gentle touch of another individual soothes the effects of social exclusion, one of the most emotionally painful human experiences, according to new UCL research.
41min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New Amazon threat? Deforestation from miningSprawling mining operations in Brazil have caused roughly 10 percent of all Amazon rainforest deforestation between 2005 and 2015 -- much higher than previous estimates -- says the first comprehensive study of mining deforestation in the iconic tropical rainforest. Surprisingly, the majority of mining deforestation (a full 90%) occurred outside the mining leases granted by Brazil's government, the
41min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New Amazon threat? Deforestation from miningSprawling mining operations in Brazil are destroying much more of the iconic Amazon forest than previously thought, says the first comprehensive study of mining deforestation in the world's largest tropical rainforest.
1h
Ingeniøren
Kampen mod madspild: Nu skal rodfrugter i varmtvandsbade med krydderolieAarhus Universitet tror, holdbarheden øges ved at ændre vaskeprocessen af grøntsager.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Big question for US cities: Is Amazon's HQ2 worth the price?Dozens of cities are working frantically to land Amazon's second headquarters, raising a weighty question with no easy answer:
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Baidu to hit the road with self-driving busBaidu chief executive Robin Li on Tuesday said the Chinese internet giant will have a self-driving bus on the road soon as it races for a lead in autonomous vehicles.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon has brought benefits - and disruption - to SeattleMemo to the many places vying for Amazon's second headquarters: It ain't all food trucks and free bananas.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wooing Amazon with sun, fun ... and giant buttonsMayors from Toledo to Tulsa are so eager to woo Amazon's much-vaunted second headquarters that they're brandishing bourbon, selling the sun, whispering sweet nothings to the company and even pushing its buttons.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New Delhi shuts power plant in fight against Diwali smogIndia's environmental watchdog shut down a coal-fired power plant and banned the use of diesel generators in New Delhi as air quality plummeted in the world's most polluted capital on Wednesday, the start of the Diwali festival.
1h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Neutronstjerners sammenstød rystede universetFor første gang er det lykkedes at opfange tyngdebølger såvel som lys fra to kolliderende...
1h
Dagens Medicin
Målepunkterne for næste års risikobaserede tilsyn sendt i høring Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed har sendt målepunkterne for det risikobaserede tilsyn i 2018 i høring.
1h
Ingeniøren
Analyse: Rigsrevisionen bekræfter eksperternes advarsler om kampflyindkøbRigsrevisionens undersøgelse har afdækket de samme huller i beslutningsgrundlaget for Danmarks indkøb af nye kampfly, som Forsvarsministeriet blankt har afvist gennem det seneste år.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Separating methane and CO2 will become more efficientTo make natural gas and biogas suitable for use, the methane has to be separated from the CO2. This involves the use of membranes: filters that stop the methane and let the CO2 pass through. Researchers at KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Belgium, have developed a new membrane that makes the separation process much more effective.
2h
Feed: All Latest
The Hunt for the Brain-Eating Amoebas of YellowstoneScientists descend on the Boiling River in Yellowstone to hunt for Naegleria fowleri, the brain-eating amoeba that kills 97 percent of the humans it infects.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Snap, NBCUniversal form original content ventureNBCUniversal and Snap Inc announced Tuesday a joint venture to produce original scripted shows for Snapchat, the social network popular with young audiences.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Massacre fears spark race to save rare Australia parrotCritically endangered Swift Parrots are under threat from squirrel-like sugar gliders in a battle for space in Australia's ancient forests, scientists said Wednesday as they race to save the rare birds.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Electric jet startup could become 'Uber in the sky'Eviation Aircraft chief executive Omer Bar-Yohay pictures a day not too far away when summoning a bargain plane ride with a smartphone will be as easy as hailing Uber.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Privacy groups warn of perils in smartwatches for kidsSmartwatches designed to help parents keep tabs on children could create privacy and security risks, activist and consumer groups said Wednesday as they called for probes by regulators.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is facial recognition the stuff of sci-fi? Not in ChinaFrom toilet-paper dispensers to fast-food restaurants, travel and crime-fighting, China is taking the lead in rolling out facial-recognition technology.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bidding war heats up for $5 billion second Amazon HQIt's the prize of a lifetime—a $5 billion investment creating 50,000 well-paid jobs that everyone wants, but only one US city will get.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Intel working with Facebook on chips for AIIntel chief Brian Krzanich said Tuesday his company is working on a super-fast chip designed specifically for artificial intelligence.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Healthy coral populations produce a surprising number of offspringHealthy coral populations can produce up to 200 times more juvenile corals than degraded coral populations nearby, according to a new study in Conservation Letters.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Crowdsourced game aims to find solutions to aflatoxinMars, Inc., UC Davis and partners have launched a crowdsourcing initiative to solve the problem of aflatoxin contamination of crops. A series of aflatoxin puzzles will go online on Foldit, a platform that allows gamers to explore how amino acids are folded together to create proteins. The puzzles provide gamers with a starting enzyme that has the potential to degrade aflatoxin. Gamers from around
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New simple method determines rate at which we burn calories walking up, down, flatWhen military strategists plan a mission, one of many factors is the toll it takes on the Army's foot soldiers.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nice ice, maybe: Study finds water-repelling surfaces ease ice removalWater-repellent surfaces and coatings could make ice removal a literal breeze by forcing ice to grow up rather than just skate by, says a new study from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and several Chinese institutions.
3h
Science | The Guardian
Jenny Graves wins Australia's $250,000 prime minister's prize for science Graves’ groundbreaking genetic work includes the ‘throwaway line’ that the male Y chromosome may one day go extinct Jenny Graves transformed our understanding of how sex chromosomes work, and led to the realisation that the human male Y chromosome may be on a path to extinction. For that and a slew of other groundbreaking work, Graves has been awarded Australia’s top science prize. Graves, now at
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Live fast die young: Updating signal detection theorySignal Detection Theory is a popular and well-established idea that has influenced behavioral science for around 50 years. Essentially, the theory holds that in a predator-prey relationship, prey animals will show more wariness and be more prone to flee as predators become more common. Danger signals are ambiguous, so in what appears to be a threatening situation, animals are better off running th
3h
Ingeniøren
Region H-system er kun beskyttet af standardpasswordet 'vip123' Brugere af et offentligt tilgængeligt system hos Region Hovedstaden blev anbefalet at beholde standardkodeord. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/standardkodeord-hos-region-h-vip123-brugere-blev-anbefalet-ikke-at-skifte-1081680 Version2
4h
Gizmodo
The LAPD Has Decided It Needs Drones Photo: AP The Los Angeles Police Department approved a test program to deploy drones alongside its officers on Tuesday, with the Police Commission voting 3-1 to roll out a year-long “small Unmanned Aerial System” program. Per the L.A. Times , the hotly contested decision allows police in the city to deploy the robots in a variety of conditions, including “tactical situations” (i.e. involving SWAT
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nice ice, maybe: Study finds water-repelling surfaces ease ice removalA new study has discovered that ice grows differently on water-absorbent vs. water-repellent surfaces. The research suggests that applying water-repellent coatings to windshields before winter storms -- or engineering surfaces that inherently repel water -- could enable a strong breeze to handle the burden of ice removal.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: New simple method determines rate at which we burn calories walking up, down, flatA new way to predict the energy a person expends walking will help predict and monitor the physiological status of walkers, including foot soldiers. Researchers at Southern Methodist University, Dallas, developed the Army-funded method, which significantly improves on two existing standards, and relies on three readily available variables. Accurate prediction is important because the rate at which
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Timing of gallbladder and weight loss surgery may help prevent complicationsThere is a strong association between obesity and gallstones; however, there is no clear evidence regarding the optimal order of gastric bypass surgery and gallbladder surgery (cholecystectomy) when both procedures are clinically indicated.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Anxiety and depression linked to migrainesIn a study of 588 patients who attended an outpatient headache clinic, more frequent migraines were experienced by participants with symptoms of anxiety and depression.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Subjective complaints may cause patients to stop treatment after switching to a biosimilarA biosimilar is a biological medicine that shows no clinically meaningful differences with another already approved biological medicine (the 'reference medicine').
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds epilepsy drug to be safe during pregnancyNew research indicates that use of the epilepsy drug lamotrigine during pregnancy does not increase the risk of birth malformations or neurodevelopmental disorders.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Certain older adults don't get to the hospital soon enough when experiencing a heart attackFor individuals experiencing a heart attack, delays in getting to the hospital can have life-threatening consequences.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Healthy coral populations produce a surprising number of offspringHealthy coral populations can produce up to 200 times more juvenile corals than degraded coral populations nearby, according to a new study in Conservation Letters.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is HPV vaccination safe for adult women?In a Journal of Internal Medicine study of more than 3 million Danish and Swedish adult women, human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination was not linked with 44 serious chronic diseases.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Obesity may exacerbate asthma in childrenIn a Pediatric Allergy & Immunology study of children hospitalized for asthma, obesity was a risk factor for repeated hospital admissions.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Newborns with trisomy 13 or 18 benefit from heart surgery, study findsHeart surgery significantly decreases in-hospital mortality among infants with either of two genetic disorders that cause severe physical and intellectual disabilities, according to a new study by a researcher at the Stanford University School of Medicine and his colleagues at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MRI may predict neurological outcomes for cardiac arrest survivorsMRI-based measurements of the functional connections in the brain can help predict long-term recovery in patients who suffer neurological disability after cardiac arrest, according to new research.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How many golden eagles are there?For conservation to be effective, wildlife managers need to know how many individuals of a species are out there. When species are spread out over large areas and occur at low densities, this can be tricky. However, a new study applies an old technique called 'mark-recapture' in a novel way to count golden eagles, eliminating the need to actually capture and mark eagles with math that allows scien
5h
Live Science
What Is Synesthesia?Synesthesia is a neurological condition that causes the brain to process data in the form of several senses at once; for example, hearing sounds while also seeing them as colorful swirls.
5h
Feed: All Latest
Sonos One Review: Amazon's Alexa Is Here, But It Still Has Some Growing Up to DoThe $199 Sonos One is a great-sounding Sonos speaker you can command with your voice.
5h
Gizmodo
Sonos Finally Squished Alexa Into A Speaker, But Maybe Just Buy A Dot All images: Sam Rutherford/Gizmodo Sonos wouldn’t like it, but you could call its new smart speaker an “Echo.” A high-end, very nice-sounding, but flawed Amazon Echo—the kind someone who just got a promotion might buy themselves, because unlike the $50 Dot or new $100 Echo, this speaker will set you back $200. Sonos has talked up smart speakers for more than a year, but now that it’s finally rele
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How many golden eagles are there?For conservation efforts to be effective, wildlife managers need to know how many individuals of a species are out there. When species are spread out over large areas and occur at low densities, as is the case with the Golden Eagle, figuring this out can be tricky. However, a new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications applies an old technique called "mark-recapture" in a novel way, eli
6h
New on MIT Technology Review
How to Spend $1,900 on Gene Tests Without Learning a ThingScience and marketing clash in the “jungle” of direct-to-consumer DNA apps.
6h
Scientific American Content: Global
Maryn McKenna's Big Chicken [Part Two]Award-winning journalist Maryn McKenna talks about her latest book Big Chicken: The Incredible Story of How Antibiotics Created Modern Agriculture and Changed the Way the World Eats. [Part 2 of... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Scientific American Content: Global
Maryn McKenna's Big Chicken [Part One]Award-winning journalist Maryn McKenna talks about her latest book Big Chicken: The Incredible Story of How Antibiotics Created Modern Agriculture and Changed the Way the World Eats. [Part 1 of... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Scientific American Content: Global
Ships At Sea Stoke Lightning StrikesExhaust fumes from ocean-going vessels lead to an almost doubling of lightning activity over shipping lanes compared to adjacent areas of the sea. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Ingeniøren
Fem tegn på, at din leder kører dig i sænk Stress er blevet en trussel for mange menneskers hverdag, og årsagen kan ofte være dårlige ledere. Tidligere jagerpilot og foredragsholder for virksomheder leverer fem tegn på, at du er udsat for kritisabel ledelse. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/fem-tegn-paa-at-din-leder-koerer-dig-saenk-10626 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
6h
Gizmodo
Ajit Pai Took Six Days to Respond to Donald Trump's Threat to Strip NBC's 'License' Photo: Getty Images On October 11th, President Donald Trump tweeted that if NBC was going to continue being so mean to him, he could simply have his subordinates “challenge their License,” adding that adversarial media was “Bad for country!” In a second tweet, the president claimed that “Network news has become so partisan, distorted and fake that licenses must be challenged, and if appropriate,
6h
Gizmodo
We Love the Badass Grandma In Pixar's Coco Image: Disney Respecting your elders is a staple of all cultures. But you really respect them when they can use their shoe like it’s a switchblade knife. That seems to be the case in Pixar’s Coco . In this new clip, the main character, Miguel, has a little run in with his grandmother after he and a musician share a nice moment. Check it out. Grandma is a badass. But come on, let the little boy pl
7h
Science | The Guardian
Dyslexia: scientists claim cause of condition may lie in the eyes In people with the condition, light receptor cells are arranged in matching patterns in both eyes, which may confuse the brain French scientists claim they may have found a physiological, and seemingly treatable, cause for dyslexia hidden in tiny light-receptor cells in the human eye. In people with the condition, the cells were arranged in matching patterns in both eyes, which may be to blame fo
8h
Ars Technica
Microsoft finally pledges to update Halo: Master Chief Collection… next year Enlarge / We really, really hope 343 pulls off 60 frames-per-second split-screen combat in 4K with this anthology's long-awaited Xbox One X patches. (credit: 343 Industries ) In 2014, the Halo: Master Chief Collection anthology launched as a much-needed lineup filler for the struggling Xbox One. But fans' hopes of a lovely, 1080p collection of four classic Halo games, including a remastered take
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
You would not ask a firefighter to perform open-heart surgery: Understanding 'collective intelligence'The concept of 'collective intelligence' is simple -- it asserts that if a team performs well on one task, it will repeat that success on other projects, regardless of the scope or focus of the work. While it sounds good in theory, it doesn't work that way in reality, according to a researcher.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Resolving traffic jams in human ALS motor neuronsA team of researchers used stem cell technology to generate motor neurons from ALS patients carrying mutations in FUS. They found disturbed axonal transport in these motor neurons, but also identified genetic and pharmacological strategies that mitigate this defect.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Schizophrenia disrupts the brain's entire communication system, researchers saySome 40 years since CT scans first revealed abnormalities in the brains of schizophrenia patients, international scientists say the disorder is a systemic disruption to the brain's entire communication system. The study sets the stage for future research on the debilitating mental illness that affects more than 21 million people worldwide. It is the largest analysis of 'white matter' differences i
8h
Gizmodo
China Blocks WeChat Features Ahead of 19th National Congress Photo: Getty Images In the lead up to the 19th National Congress of the Communist Party of China this month—a major changing of the guard which will see widespread retirements among senior leaders—the country’s censors have been cracking down on everything from an unnerving sex doll-sharing company to even milquetoast criticism of the government in the media. Now, popular Chinese social media app
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tropical beetles face extinction threatClimate change is putting many tropical high altitude beetles at risk of extinction, warn an international team of scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Domestication has not made dogs cooperate more with each other compared to wolvesFollowing domestication, dogs should be more tolerant and cooperative with conspecifics and humans compared to wolves. But looking at both in more naturalistic living conditions, however, speaks for more cooperative behavior of wolves. Researchers now show that the wild ancestors are excelling their domesticated relatives in teamwork. In an experimental approach dogs but not wolves failed to coope
9h
Feed: All Latest
Volvo's Revamped Polestar Brand Will Take on TeslaVolvo had unveiled the Polestar 1, a carbon fiber-wrapped, sleek challenge to Elon Musk.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When teeth grow on the bodyCertain species of catfish are covered with bony plates bristling with thin teeth. These teeth are used for defense and seduce the females. Researchers at UNIGE wanted to understand how these teeth capable of regeneration can develop outside of the mouth. They discovered that the extra-oral teeth always grow on a bone, even in the absence of a bony plate. This suggests a role for bone in the induc
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'You still end up with nothing': Reality of living in work poverty revealedAs the number of working families who live in poverty continues to rise in the UK, a new 'On the front line' article reveals the severe challenges that low pay, limited working hours and constrained employment opportunities bring.
9h
Ars Technica
Gmail on iOS might get what Android already had—third-party email support Enlarge (credit: Samuel Axon) Google has begun testing a new feature on the iOS Gmail app: the ability to add non-Google e-mail accounts. The change would make the Gmail app more competitive with Apple's own Mail app and numerous other popular email apps on iOS like Spark, Outlook, and Airmail. The test was announced in a post from Gmail's official Twitter account: Calling Gmail iOS users! Help u
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'You still end up with nothing': Reality of living in work poverty revealedAs the number of working families who live in poverty continues to rise in the UK, a new 'On the front line' article reveals the severe challenges that low pay, limited working hours and constrained employment opportunities bring.
9h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Photo of butchered rhino wins top awardA shocking image of a dehorned black rhino makes Brent Stirton Wildlife Photographer of the Year.
9h
Gizmodo
Tesla Workers Allegedly Faced Racial Discrimination And Harassment By Coworkers And Superiors: Lawsuit Photo via AP Images Three black former Tesla employees claim they suffered racial discrimination and racially-motivated abuse by company supervisors and fellow employees, according to a lawsuit filed Tuesday. The three plaintiffs, Owen Diaz and his son, Demetric, as well as Lamar Patterson, claim they were subjected to racially-charged remarks, racist graffiti drawings, and were directly called t
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
High blood pressure linked to common heart valve disorderFor the first time, a strong link has been established between high blood pressure and the most common heart valve disorder in high-income countries.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Amazonian hunters deplete wildlife but don't empty forestsConservationists can be 'cautiously optimistic' about the prospect of sustainable subsistence hunting by Amazonian communities, according to new research. The research team spent over a year working with 60 Amazonian communities and hiked for miles through trackless forests to deploy nearly 400 motion-activated camera traps -- in a bid to understand which species are depleted by hunting and where.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New examination of occupational licensing contradicts decades of researchFrom doctors to engineers to carpet layers to massage therapists, more than one in three Americans is required to hold a license to work in their occupation. Broad consensus among researchers holds that licensure creates wage premiums by establishing economic monopolies, but according to research, licensure does not limit competition nor does it increase wages.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How we determine who's to blameUsing eye-tracking technology, cognitive scientists have obtained the first direct evidence that people use a process called counterfactual simulation to imagine how a situation could have played out differently to assign responsibility for an outcome.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Electroplating: The birth of a single nucleus caught in cameraElectroplating, or electrodeposition, is one of the most important processes in chemistry, in which a metal cation in solution can be reduced to its elemental form by applying an electrical potential to an electrode.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Humans—the disturbing neighbours of reef sharksShark diversity and abundance is highest in remote reefs, as far as 25 hours away from main cities, reveals an international study conducted in the New Caledonia archipelago.
10h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Mysterious particles spotted in Saturn’s atmosphere Source may be dust shed by planet’s iconic rings, according to data from NASA's doomed Cassini probe. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22838
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Gizmodo
This Pen/Whistle/Ruler/Glass Breaker/Fire Starter Is a Fidgeter's Dream GP 1945 Bolt Action Pen When is a pen worth $40? Possibly never, but the GP 1945 makes a really strong case . This Kickstarter campaign is set to ship out pens starting in November, and the demo unit they sent me is incredibly impressive. My titanium model is very solid and well built (there’s also a lighter aluminum version), to the point that I don’t think I could break it if I tried. The butt
10h
Big Think
Dogs and Other Animals May Be More Self-Aware Than First Thought This is a nice addition to the findings of the “yellow snow” study. Read More
10h
New Scientist - News
Astronaut wee could show us how the plumes on Enceladus workThe way spaceships vent urine and water may be a good stand-in for studying how jets of vapour escape the hidden ocean on one of Saturn’s icy moons
10h
Live Science
Man Says Apple Watch App Helped Detect Blood Clot, Saved His LifeA New York man is crediting an Apple Watch app with saving his life, after the app helped him detect signs of a life-threatening blood clot.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Live fast die young: Updating signal detection theorySignal Detection Theory holds that in a predator-prey relationship, prey animals will show more wariness and be more prone to flee as predators become more common. New work from UC Davis shows that in a more realistic model, animals may become less wary as the risks of predation increase. The work has implications in a wide range of fields.
10h
Futurity.org
Moons work together to hold Saturn’s largest ring in place After examining data from NASA’s Cassini mission, astronomers have concluded that the teamwork of seven moons keeps the planet’s A ring—the largest and farthest of the visible rings—corralled. For three decades, astronomers thought that only Saturn’s moon Janus confined the planet’s A ring. Without forces to hold the A ring in check, the ring would keep spreading out and ultimately disappear. Thi
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Futurity.org
Flowing water could have carved valleys on ‘icy’ ancient Mars New research may bridge the gap between two ideas about the climate of ancient Mars—the “warm and wet” story of Martian geology and the “cold and icy” past of atmospheric models. Scientists have long tried to understand what ancient Mars might have been like, but the red planet has offered some mixed signals. Water-carved valleys and lakebeds leave little doubt that water once flowed on the surfa
10h
Ars Technica
Microsoft never disclosed 2013 hack of secret vulnerability database Enlarge / Microsoft in Dublin, Ireland. (credit: Red Agenda / Flickr ) Hackers broke into Microsoft's secret, internal bug-tracking database and stole information related to vulnerabilities that were exploited in later attacks. But the software developer never disclosed the breach, Reuters reported, citing former company employees. In an article published Tuesday , Reuters said Microsoft's decisi
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Gizmodo
Adequate Man Where Do You Start Shaving Your Face? Adequate Man Where Do You Start Shaving Your Face? | Jezebel Bob Weinstein Accused of Sexual Harassment | The Root #SolidarityIsForWhiteWomen, Part 2: On Rose McGowan and the Continued Failure of White Feminism | Earther Everything to Know About the Atlantic Coast Pipeline Federal Regulators Just Approved | Splinter ICE Allegedly Entraps and Arrests Father of Four When He Shows Up to Get His Gree
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Futurity.org
‘Skin’ sensor gives robots better sense of touch Engineers have developed a flexible sensor “skin” that can stretch over any part of a robot’s body or prosthetic to accurately convey information about shear forces and vibration—information critical to grasping and manipulating objects. If a robot sets out to disable a roadside bomb—or delicately handle an egg while cooking you an omelet—it needs to be able to sense when objects are slipping out
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Gizmodo
Twitter Has New Rules for Violent and Sexual Content Photo: AP Twitter’s downward spiral into a platform where abuse thrives has been well-documented over the years, but harassment on Twitter is in the news again this week because the company suspended actress Rose McGowan after she tweeted about sexual abuse in Hollywood. In response, CEO Jack Dorsey promised to introduce stricter rules against harassment—and it looks like some of those rules just
11h
Ars Technica
In 3-1 vote, LA Police Commission approves drones for LAPD Enlarge (credit: Peter Linehan / Flickr ) The Los Angeles Police Department, one of the nation’s largest municipal police forces, approved a one-year pilot program for drones—making it the largest city in the nation to undertake such an evaluation. According to the Los Angeles Times , the LA Police Commission approved a set of policies that limits "their use to a handful of tactical situations, s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Keeping active can help older people reduce the need for costly social careA concerted effort to encourage older people to keep active can help them live more independently and reduce the need for social care, argue experts in The BMJ today.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New anti-clotting drugs not associated with higher risk of major bleedingA new group of drugs used to treat patients with serious blood clots are not associated with a higher risk of major bleeding compared with the older anti-clotting drug, warfarin, finds a study published by The BMJ today.
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Agenda Items What We’re Following Trump’s Agenda: The Dow Jones Industrial Average hit 23,000 for the first time today , after an extended upswing for which President Trump has frequently claimed credit. But presidents don’t have much control over stock markets’ success, and Trump has yet to implement many of the business-friendly policies he’s promised. Indeed, he’s been more successful in dismantling polici
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
As bids for Amazon's headquarters come due, tech has a chance to spread the wealthAs Amazon established its dominance in online retail, logistics and cloud computing, the company's headquarters in Seattle grew appropriately massive. Today it represents a $5 billion investment in 33 buildings, 8 million square feet and more than 40,000 employees.
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Gizmodo
Use an Android Launcher to Get the Pixel 2's New Search Bar On Your Current Phone The Pixel 2 home screen The Pixel 2 comes packed with new features you won’t find on regular vanilla Android 8.0, and a big part of that is the home screen. Google redesigned its calendar widget to show upcoming events, and as a result it moved the search bar down to the bottom of the screen under the dock where you can access it even faster. If you’ve been following along you already have the ne
11h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
What Do The GOLD RUSH Bosses REALLY Think Of Each Other? #GoldRush | Friday 9p Family, country, gold, the bosses reveal what they love most about mining. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com/Discovery From: Discovery
12h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: The Fault in Our Czars Today in 5 Lines Representative Tom Marino withdrew his name from consideration to be the White House drug czar following the publication of a news report that revealed he had tried to hinder government efforts aimed at combatting the opioid epidemic. Senators Lamar Alexander and Patty Murray reached a bipartisan deal to stabilize Obamacare, which President Trump supported as a temporary fix. Aft
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Gizmodo
The 10 Best Deals of October 17, 2017 We see a lot of deals around the web over on Kinja Deals , but these were our ten favorites today. Head over to our main post for more deals, and follow us on Twitter and Facebook to never miss a chance to save. You can also join our Kinja Deals Community Facebook group to connect with your fellow deal hunters. #1: Anker’s Four-Port Travel Charger Anker PowerPort 4 , $19 with code BEST2242 The wa
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NYT > Science
Volcanoes Helped Violent Revolts Erupt in Ancient EgyptDuring the Ptolemaic Period, fluctuations in Nile flooding triggered by eruptions may have led to violent uprisings, researchers report.
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NYT > Science
How Dennis Overbye Makes Space-Time RelatableFrom exosolar planets to colliding stars, The Times’s cosmic affairs correspondent introduces readers to the universe they live in.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Here’s what space toilets can teach us about finding signs of alien lifeLessons learned from flushing space toilets can help researchers plan life-hunting missions to icy moons.
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Gizmodo
There's Never Going to Be a 'Right Time' for The Punisher TV Series Image: Netflix Netflix and Marvel made the right decision a few weeks ago when the companies decided to cancel The Punisher panel at New York Comic Con in the wake of the October 1 shooting in Las Vegas that left 58 people dead and 489 others wounded. The timing would have been beyond offensive, which raises the question: When can they release their show about a superhero who shoots people? Toget
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The Atlantic
The Strangely Revealing Debate Over Viking Couture A researcher at a Swedish university says that Viking burial clothes bear the word “Allah”—and some people really want to believe her. Annika Larsson, a textile researcher at Uppsala University who was putting together an exhibit on Viking couture, decided to examine the contents of a Viking woman’s boat grave that had been excavated decades ago in Gamla Uppsala, Sweden. Inspecting the woman’s si
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Ars Technica
21 years later, original developer works to fix 16-bit Sonic The announcement video for Jon Burt's Sonic 3D Blast: Director's Cut At this point, retro-game lovers are well used to fan-made "hacks" of classic titles that can do anything from adding modern players to Tecmo Bowl to adding an egg-throwing Yoshi to Sonic the Hedgehog 2 . What we can't recall seeing before, though, is the original developer of a decades-old console game returning to fix it via a
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Culturally tailored obesity intervention a success for hispanic studentsAn obesity intervention for Hispanic middle school students led by researchers at the University of Houston found that with consistent guidance from high school health mentors, called compañeros, students not only lost significantly more weight but also kept it off longer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bridging the terahertz gapHarvard researchers are exploring the possibility of using an infrared frequency comb to generate elusive terahertz frequencies. These frequencies -- which lie in the electromagnetic spectrum between radio waves and infrared light -- have long promised to transform communications and sensing but are very challenging to source. By harnessing a recently discovered laser state, SEAS researchers have
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fighting opioid addiction in primary care: new study shows it's possibleGeneral physicians can deliver medication-assisted therapy for opioid addiction with help from the team members they likely already have in their practices, a new analysis concludes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers show the potential of precision medicine for treating rare cancersFor the first time, researchers have been able to identify effective treatments for patients with rare cancers by analyzing genes and proteins in their blood and tumors.
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Feed: All Latest
Here Are Twitter's Latest Rules for Fighting Hate and AbuseMemo outlines steps Twitter plans to control hate and abuse on the service, including expanded definitions of nudity and more enforcement.
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Inside Science
Mice in New York Are Likely Evolving to Eat City Food Mice in New York Are Likely Evolving to Eat City Food Genetic study suggests America’s native white-footed mice are adapting their metabolism to conquer the Big Apple. Whitefootedmouse_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Szasz-Fabian Jozsef via Shutterstock Creature Tuesday, October 17, 2017 - 15:30 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- When Europeans settled in North America, they brought with
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Gizmodo
What Happens to Facebook’s Mind Reading Project Now That Its Leader Is Gone? Regina Dugan showing off Facebook’s plan to read your mind. (Image: Screenshot/ YouTube ) Regina Dugan, a tech exec with roots in the government sector as the former director of DARPA, is leaving Facebook and her departure calls into question the status of one of the craziest things Facebook has been working on. Fittingly, Dugan announced the departure in a post on Facebook today. If you’re unfam
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Colliding neutron stars seen by gravity waves and optical telescopesFor the first time, astronomers have observed a celestial event through both conventional telescopes and gravitational waves. The collision of two super-dense neutron stars just 120 million light-years from Earth was captured by both gravity wave observatories (Laser Interferometer Gravitational Observatory, LIGO in the US, and Virgo in Italy) and telescopes including the DLT40 survey based in Chi
13h
Science : NPR
Scientists Push To House More Lab Monkeys In Pairs Enhancing a research monkey's life by housing it with a pal often doesn't hurt the study, says a researcher who's done it. In her own experience, she says, "it actually helped to improve the science." (Image credit: Patrik Stollarz/AFP/Getty Images)
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Feed: All Latest
FCC Chair Finally Says Agency Won't Censor Trump's EnemiesSix days after President Trump suggested revoking broadcast licenses, FCC Chair Ajit Pai says agency won't act based on content.
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Gizmodo
Watch This Photoshop Master Use a Clever Trick to Make an Ugly Crane Disappear GIF GIF: YouTube A crane left parked in front of a sugar factory for months in Baltimore, Maryland, prevented photographer Paul Frederiksen from getting the exact shot he wanted. He had assumed that using Photoshop to erase the obtrusive crane was all but impossible, until Denyer , a UK-based photographer, performed a photo-editing miracle . The challenge with removing such a large object from a
13h
The Scientist RSS
Compound Found in Red Wine Boosts Immune Cell FunctionA low doses, resveratrol enhanced human T cell activity in vitro, while at high doses it interfered with cell signaling.
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Feed: All Latest
Great Oculus Rift + Touch Bundle Deal (and PC Deal)VR on the Oculus Rift + Touch is finally affordable.
13h
Big Think
‘But You Can’t Do That!’ Why Immoral Actions Seem Impossible Denying the possibility of immoral actions may be the very basis of our society. Read More
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The Atlantic
Have You Entered Our Instagram Contest Yet? We’ve noticed some themes in the submissions to our #ReadingMyAtlantic contest . Pets, for one—including this perfectly-posed pup and CityLab editor Adam Sneed’s sassy cat Saxby . Variations on hygge , which I am extremely here for as the weather turns. And of course, babies —so many sweet , adorable kiddos . Which brings us to the winner of last month’s contest … Zach Kouwe ’s four-month-old Jos
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Wasabi receptor' for pain discovered in flatwormsA Northwestern University research team has discovered how scalding heat and tissue injury activate an ancient 'pain' receptor in simple animals. The findings, from a study of flatworms, could lead to new strategies for analgesic drug design for the treatment of humans. That planarian flatworms use the same molecular receptor as flies, mice and humans to detect potentially damaging or noxious stim
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Navigational view of the brain thanks to powerful X-raysImagine Google Earth with only the street view and a far-away satellite view but not much of a map view. Brain imaging, for the most part, has been missing just that, and a lot of research on how the brain computes happens on that map-like level. New imaging tackles this special view of the brain with the highest-energy X-rays in the country that illuminate thick sections of a mouse brain.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Many women do not follow contraception guidelines after weight-loss surgery, Pitt study findsMany women do not follow the recommended guidelines to avoid contraception for 18-months after bariatric surgery.
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Gizmodo
Scientists Uncover a Clue About How Bacteria Develop Antibiotic Resistance Gonococcal urethritis under the microscope. Image: Wikimedia In recent years, superbugs have become one of the biggest threats to modern human health. At present, the CDC estimates that some 23,000 people die every year from multidrug-resistant infections in the United States. The threat of antibiotic-resistant bacteria to global health is big enough that this year the World Health Organization f
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Gizmodo
Escape This Wretched Earth With Google's Sweet New Solar System Maps Image: Google/NASA If you, like me, are tired of this world—these people—tired of being caught in the tangle of their lives , Google now allows you explore 16 other planetary bodies that are more serene than this one. Yesterday, Google announced that it has added 13 new worlds to its digital recreation of our solar system. The site previously only provided virtual tours of our Moon, Mars, and the
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Ars Technica
Windows 10 Fall Creators Update: Lots of small changes—and maybe the revolution Enlarge / Oddly, Microsoft's Mixed Reality house has no windows. (credit: Microsoft) It has arrived: Windows 10 version 1709, build 16299, the Fall Creators Update. Members of the Windows Insider program have been able to use this latest iteration for a while now, but today's the day it will hit Windows Update for the masses. As with the Creators Update earlier this year, the Windows Update deplo
13h
Big Think
Why Don't We Talk About Anxiety Disorder More Often? Anxiety is now the number one disorder on the planet. Yet it's oddly ignored from public conversation. Read More
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The Atlantic
What John McCain Gets Wrong About Trump's Nationalism Being a liberal in the Donald Trump era is tricky. On the one hand, you’re grateful for any conservative who denounces the president’s authoritarian lies. On the other, you can’t help but notice that many of the conservatives who condemn Trump most passionately—Bill Kristol, Bret Stephens, Michael Gerson, Jennifer Rubin—remain wedded to the foreign policy legacy of George W. Bush. And in criticiz
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The Atlantic
A Bipartisan Obamacare Breakthrough Updated on October 17 at 5:42 p.m. ET When it comes to the Affordable Care Act, Congress may fix what President Trump tried to break. Senators Lamar Alexander of Tennessee and Patty Murray of Washington state announced a tentative agreement on Tuesday that would shore up Obamacare’s shaky insurance exchanges, offering the first glimmer of bipartisan dealmaking after months of GOP attempts to rip
13h
New Scientist - News
A gaggle of 7 moons keep Saturn’s rings from breaking apartThe gravity from seven of its moons stops Saturn’s bright outer ring from spreading out and dispersing into space, according to Cassini spacecraft measurements
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Ars Technica
The Zoomable Universe is a feast for your eyes and brain The Zoomable Universe, by Caleb Scarf with Illustrations by Ron Miller (Scientific American/FSG) Sometimes we want science to show us the complexity and uncertainty of everything, but sometimes we just want it to dazzle us. You'll get a heaping dose of dazzle in Caleb Scharf and Ron Miller's coffee table book The Zoomable Universe: An Epic Tour Through Cosmic Scale, from Almost Everything to Near
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hiring not part of Alibaba pledge to create US jobsAlibaba executive vice chairman Joseph Tsai said Tuesday he expects to boost US jobs by expanding the Chinese firm's e-commerce platform—not by hiring American workers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US nuke waste repository in New Mexico will get more spaceWorkers are expected to begin mining operations at the U.S. nuclear waste dump in New Mexico for the first time in three years following a radiation release that contaminated part of the underground repository, the Energy Department said Tuesday.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Earth's new traveling buddy is definitely an asteroid, not space junkAt the 49th Annual Division for Planetary Sciences Meeting in Provo, Utah, astronomers led by Vishnu Reddy at the University of Arizona confirm true nature of one of Earth's companions on its journey around the sun.
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Ars Technica
EA shuts down Visceral, will reboot its Star Wars game due to “marketplace” EA has now dramatically shifted the development of the above unnamed Star Wars game. This image is from E3 2016; Visceral's game had long been hidden from the public with a way-off release target of 2019. (credit: EA) EA packed a double-whammy announcement into a single post on its blog on Tuesday. The company announced the dissolution of an internal game studio and a substantial reboot of that s
13h
Gizmodo
British Spies Accused of Gathering Untold Social Media Data on Innocents, 'Unlawfully' Sharing it With Foreign Powers A 24-hour Operations Room inside the GCHQ in Cheltenham, England. Photo: Getty British spy agencies have collected and shared huge databases of personal and social media information on millions of individuals, and effectively circumvented the investigatory body tasked with surveillance oversight, according to documents newly obtained by Privacy International, a London-based consumer advocacy grou
13h
Latest Headlines | Science News
How volcanoes may have ended the dynasty of Ptolemy and CleopatraVolcanic ash in polar ice reveal a link between eruptions and the timing of revolts in Cleopatra’s Egypt.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
In search of the ninth planetA University of Michigan doctoral student has logged two pieces of evidence that may support the existence of a planet that could be part of our solar system, beyond Neptune.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New examination of occupational licensing contradicts decades of researchFrom doctors to engineers to carpet layers to massage therapists, more than one in three Americans is required to hold a license to work in their occupation. Broad consensus among researchers holds that licensure creates wage premiums by establishing economic monopolies, but according to Northwestern University research, licensure does not limit competition nor does it increase wages.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How bright is the moon, really?The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is planning to take new measurements of the Moon's brightness, a highly useful property that satellites rely upon every day.
14h
Ars Technica
DOJ indicts Chinese fentanyl distributors selling to Americans online Enlarge / Deputy US Attorney General Rod Rosenstein (L) speaks during a news conference October 17, 2017 at the Justice Department in Washington, DC. (credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images ) Two men in China have been charged by American federal prosecutors as being the kingpins of a vast international conspiracy to manufacture and sell fentanyl, a powerful opioid, via unnamed Dark Web sites. In a press
14h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
We can hack our immune cells to fight cancer | Elizabeth WayneAfter decades of research and billions spent in clinical trials, we still have a problem with cancer drug delivery, says biomedical engineer Elizabeth Wayne. Chemotherapy kills cancer -- but it kills the rest of your body, too. Instead of using human design to fight cancer, why not use nature's? In this quick talk, Wayne explains how her lab is creating nanoparticle treatments that bind to immune
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fighting fires before they sparkWith warm, dry summers comes a deadly caveat for the western United States: wildfires. Scientists say the hot, dry climates found west of the Mississippi, along with decades of fire suppression efforts, are creating a devastating and destructive combination - leading to fires like the ones currently burning in California.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study links chocolate production to increased deforestation in poor nationsEvery year, more than five million family farms in countries such as Côte d'Ivoire, Cameroon, Indonesia and Brazil produce about four and a half million tons of cocoa beans, according the World Cocoa Foundation. Ghana and the Ivory Coast supply more than 70 percent of the world's cocoa.
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Popular Science
Dangerous hurricanes come in all shapes and sizes (literally) Environment Here's how size matters. Hurricanes come in all different sizes and shapes, and these differences mean each storm poses a different threat to folks in its path.
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Gizmodo
The Ultimate Gifts For Any Zelda Fan Are On Sale Today The Legend of Zelda: Hyrule Historia , $21 The Legend of Zelda: Art & Artifacts , $24 Preorder The Legend of Zelda Encyclopedia , $24 Nintendo created three gorgeous books that are must-owns for any Legend of Zelda fan, and all three are on sale today. They aren’t all-time low prices (except for the Zelda Encyclopedia , which comes out next year), but they’re solid discounts off what you’d no
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Feed: All Latest
Why the Krack Wi-Fi Mess Will Take Decades to Clean UpThe Krack Wi-Fi vulnerability exposes just how deeply broken IoT security really is—and just how limited the options are to repair it.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study links chocolate production to increased deforestation in poor nationsIn newly published research, Mark Noble, visiting assistant professor of sociology and anthropology at Lehigh, focuses on the link between cocoa exports and deforestation in developing nations.
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Big Think
Glue Made of Human Protein Heals Wounds Faster and Better Another bit of science fiction is coming to life as scientists develop a highly elastic and adhesive surgical glue, similar to the one Ryan Gosling used to seal his wound in Blade Runner 2049 . Read More
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The Atlantic
Is Trump to Thank for the Dow Hitting 23,000? Today, President Trump tweeted that the Dow passed 23,000 for the first time. Last week, he tweeted that the stock market had gained more than $5 trillion in value since Election Day last year. Before that, he called on the media to report more on the “virtually unprecedented stock market growth since the election.” These are just a few examples in a litany of tweets in which the president has ta
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Live Science
Why You Shouldn't Expect to See 'Blade Runner' Replicants Anytime SoonWhy don't we have intelligent robots that seem human, like the replicants in "Blade Runner"?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fighting fires before they sparkWith warm, dry summers comes a deadly caveat for the western United States: wildfires. Scientists say the hot, dry climates found west of the Mississippi, along with decades of fire suppression efforts, are creating a devastating and destructive combination -- leading to fires like the ones currently burning in California. Now, new research from The University of New Mexico is giving forest and fi
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Viden
Henrik har knogleskørhed: Er sunket seks centimeter i højdenMindst 350.000 danskere lider af knogleskørhed. Henrik Nørgaard fra Djursland er en af dem, der må leve med et skrøbeligt skelet.
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Gizmodo
World's Largest Mud Flow Probably Powered By Underground Magma Tunnel A school flooded by the mud (Image: Hugh e82 /Wikimedia Commons) The largest mud volcano eruption has been raging in Indonesia since May 29, 2006. At its peak, 180,000 cubic meters of mud flowed daily from a site near a heavily populated region of Java—enough mud to completely fill the Empire State Building every six days. Almost 60,000 villagers have fled since then, and it’s still spewing 80,00
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The Atlantic
China Is Quietly Reshaping the World The Pakistani town of Gwadar was until recently filled with the dust-colored cinderblock houses of about 50,000 fishermen. Ringed by cliffs, desert, and the Arabian Sea, it was at the forgotten edge of the earth. Now it’s one centerpiece of China’s “Belt and Road” initiative, and the town has transformed as a result. Gwadar is experiencing a storm of construction: a brand-new container port, new
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Gizmodo
She Took Up His Sims Challenge, Now They're Married After playing The Sims 2 for months in 2004, Brian, more commonly known by his online handle Pinstar, realized that he’d exhausted most of the game. In order to keep things fresh, he created a challenge for himself. He’d play the game through ten generations, working his way up from rags to riches. These rules became known as The Legacy Challenge, a popular way to play The Sims . They made Brian
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Therapeutic form of arsenic is a potential treatment for deadly type of brain cancerIn a study led by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), this anti-cancer agent is being considered for use against glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and aggressive type of deadly brain tumors. The study was published today in Molecular Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research (AAC
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists create most powerful micro-scale bio-solar cell yetResearchers have created a micro-scale biological solar cell that generates a higher power density for longer than any existing cell of its kind.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
HIV infection, even with antiretroviral therapy, appears to damage a growing child's brainOne of the largest and best-documented trials of children receiving early antiretroviral therapy -- the CHER clinical trial in South Africa -- finds ongoing white matter damage in HIV-positive children at the age of 7 years. The study aims to contribute to a better understanding of brain development in HIV-infected and exposed children, as well as the impact of long-term antiretroviral treatment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New techniques boost performance of non-volatile memory systemsComputer engineering researchers have developed new software and hardware designs that should limit programming errors and improve system performance in devices that use non-volatile memory technologies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
On-and-off fasting helps fight obesity, study findsUp to sixteen weeks of intermittent fasting without otherwise having to count calories helps fight obesity and other metabolic disorders. Such fasting already shows benefits after only six weeks, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A new target for marijuanaCellular-level changes to a part of the brain's reward system induced by chronic exposure to the psychoactive component of marijuana may contribute to the drug's pleasurable and potentially addictive qualities, suggests a study in young mice.
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Ars Technica
Dealmaster: Get a 15-inch Dell laptop with a 512GB SSD for $580 Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our friends at TechBargains , we have another round of savings to share. Today we've got more laptop deals, headlined by a $340 discount on a Dell Inspiron 15 5000 laptop with a Core i7 (7th-gen) processor and 512GB SSD. Other bargains on PCs, mesh W-iFi routers, 4K TVs, and more can be found below. Note: Ars Technica may earn compensation for sales from links on t
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The Scientist RSS
Study Digs into Sexual Harassment During FieldworkAmbiguous rules and absent consequences were linked to harassment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Need for speed makes genome editing efficient, if not betterResearchers have developed a computational model to quantify the mechanism by which CRISPR-Cas9 proteins find their genome-editing targets.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New imaging approach maps whole-brain changes from Alzheimer's disease in miceA new imaging system that offers a better way to monitor the brain changes indicative of Alzheimer's in mouse models of the disease could help speed new drug development.
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Big Think
If Our Homes Were Designed by Children, They’d Look Like This Children’s drawings of houses rendered as they’d look in real life. Read More
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The Atlantic
How Trump Changed the Topic to Obama's Consolation Calls With the political press in a volley of anonymous leaks and counterleaks about how Barack Obama did or did not console John Kelly after his son’s death, it’s important to reflect on how we got here—and what it shows about President Trump’s methods of controlling the media and the news cycle. First, a brief timeline. On October 4, four U.S. Special Forces soldiers were killed in an ambush in Niger
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Gizmodo
Why the Fuck Is Scott Disick Tweeting About Bitcoin? [Updated] Image: AP This morning we learned an important new detail about the troubled on-again, off-again beau of Kourtney Kardashian. That’s right, people: Scott Disick loves Bitcoin. This gives Disick the ignominious distinction of being the first Keeping Up with the Kardashians regular to weigh in on cryptocurrencies on Twitter—and yes, we checked . Two of the five cryptocoin messages he tweeted out to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New examination of occupational licensing contradicts decades of researchFrom doctors to engineers to carpet layers to massage therapists, more than one in three Americans is required to hold a license to work in their occupation. Broad consensus among researchers holds that licensure creates wage premiums by establishing economic monopolies, but according to Northwestern University research, licensure does not limit competition nor does it increase wages.
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Gizmodo
Experts Cast Doubt On Viking Textile With ‘Allah’ Inscription Image: Uppsala University Researchers from Sweden made headlines last week after claiming to have found the Arabic characters for “Allah” and “Ali” woven into Viking burial costumes . The discovery suggested a more intimate cultural relationship between the Vikings and the Arab world, but some experts are now questioning key assertions made by the Swedish researchers. Before we delve into this la
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The Atlantic
What Martin Scorsese Gets Right About Rotten Tomatoes Last weekend, Professor Marston and the Wonder Women , a drama about the creator of the famed comic-book character, became the latest mid-budget casualty. It was marketed on the back of its connection with Wonder Woman , one of the biggest hits of the year. It received a moderately wide release and got strong reviews , but its three-day box-office total was just $736,883—a flimsy average of $600
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Scientific American Content: Global
Trump's Drug Czar Nominee Withdraws from ConsiderationAn investigation revealed the president’s pick had worked to weaken opioid controls -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Amazonian hunters deplete wildlife but don't empty forestsConservationists can be 'cautiously optimistic' about the prospect of sustainable subsistence hunting by Amazonian communities -- according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UK).The research team spent over a year working with 60 Amazonian communities and hiked for miles through trackless forests to deploy nearly 400 motion-activated camera traps -- in a bid to understand which s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Worms learn to smell dangerUniversity of Iowa researchers report that a roundworm can learn to put on alert a defense system important for protecting cells from damage. The finding could lead to a new approach for treating neurodegenerative diseases in humans caused by damaged cells.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
High blood pressure linked to common heart valve disorderFor the first time, a strong link has been established between high blood pressure and the most common heart valve disorder in high-income countries, by new research from The George Institute for Global Health at the University of Oxford.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
High blood pressure boosts risk of common heart valve disorderElevated blood pressure is a risk factor for mitral regurgitation, a leakage of one of the heart valves, according to a paper published this week in PLOS Medicine by Kazem Rahimi of The George Institute for Global Health at the University of Oxford, UK and colleagues. The research suggests this valve disorder, which is increasingly diagnosed worldwide, particularly among older people, is not an in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Mystery clients' reveal weaknesses of tuberculosis care in rural ChinaMany health care providers in China -- especially those at village clinics and township health centers -- fail to correctly manage tuberculosis (TB) cases, according to a study involving standardized patients published this week in PLOS Medicine by Sean Sylvia of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA, Chengchao Zhou of Shangdong University, China, and colleagues at the World Bank, M
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists determine source of world's largest mud eruptionMore than 11 years after the Lusi mud volcano first erupted on the Indonesian island of Java, researchers may have figured out why the mudflows haven't stopped: deep underground, Lusi is connected to a nearby volcanic system.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study shows how water could have flowed on 'cold and icy' ancient MarsResearch by planetary scientists finds that periodic melting of ice sheets on a cold early Mars would have created enough water to carve the ancient valleys and lakebeds seen on the planet today.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What training exercise boosts brain power best? New research finds outOne of the two brain-training methods most scientists use in research is significantly better in improving memory and attention. It also results in more significant changes in brain activity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A new way to test body armorIn response to several high profile body armor failures, researchers have developed a new and extremely reliable way to test the ballistic fibers used in body armor.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Loops of liquid metal can improve future fusion power plants, scientists sayResearchers have proposed an innovative design to improve the ability of future fusion power plants to generate safe, clean and abundant energy in a steady state, or constant, manner. The design uses loops of liquid lithium to clean and recycle the tritium, the radioactive hydrogen isotope that fuels fusion reactions, and to protect the divertor plates from intense exhaust heat from the tokamak th
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A new way to harness wasted methaneScientists have identified a process that could be used to harness methane that is now wasted by being burned off at wellheads.
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Feed: All Latest
The Radical Message of 'Halt and Catch Fire'It wasn't about the power of technology, it was about how that power was wielded.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fire crews protect observatory on Southern California peakA dozen aircraft dropped water and fire retardant as crews worked in steep terrain Tuesday to battle a blaze near an historic observatory and communications towers on Mount Wilson northeast of Los Angeles.
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Gizmodo
This Timelapse Footage of Denali Is a Mountain of Spectacular Nature Video Tropes GIF Budget cuts, privatization, and drastically shrinking protected areas are just a few of the ways the current administration is threatening the country’s national park system. If you’re not convinced these are terrible ideas, filmmaker Taylor Gray’s remarkable timelapse footage of Denali , and other parks, will make you realize these ares are truly national treasures. Shot using a Nikon D750,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple clinics for your health? It almost just happenedHow about hitting your local Apple store for a quick health check-up? It's not as crazy as it sounds.
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New Scientist - News
Online dating may be breaking down society’s racial divisionsRacial segregation has eased in the US over the past two decades. Could hooking up online be responsible?
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Ars Technica
ZTE launches crazy, foldable, dual-screened smartphone ZTE Budget Android company ZTE is launching what has to be its craziest-looking smartphone ever, the Axon M. The M looks like someone took a Nintendo DS, removed the controls, and stuck two big smartphone screens on each side. The Axon M is a whopping 12.1mm thick. A hinge runs along the long side of the phone, and it opens up, just like a Nintendo DS. On each side of the phone, you get a 5.2-inc
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The Atlantic
The Slack Chat That Changed Astronomy In between its silly chatrooms and custom emojis, Slack is a place where real work gets done. But in some offices—no offense—the projects managed on the messaging platform are way cooler than others. Some even have cosmic significance. On August 17, observatories in the United States and Italy detected gravitational waves, forces that bend the fabric of the universe, as they washed over Earth. Sp
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The Atlantic
The Opening of 'The World’s Most Useless Airport' in Remote Saint Helena Last weekend, after five years of construction and controversy, the tiny and isolated British island of Saint Helena welcomed its first scheduled commercial flight. Saint Helena, a British Overseas Territory in the South Atlantic Ocean, is one of the most remote islands in the world—a volcanic outcrop with an area of only 47 square miles. According to Reuters , the only way to access the island p
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The Atlantic
Out of Tragedy, An Opportunity for Somalia Saturday’s twin-truck suicide bombings in Mogadishu, Somalia’s capital, have so far killed at least 320 people and injured hundreds. The assault took place at a buzzing intersection on a busy afternoon during peak traffic, causing maximum damage to people and property. In the aftermath, men and women searching for victims in the rubble looked small amid the mounds of steel that formed unnatural v
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cognitive science
Build chatbots couldn't get easier!Use Engati now to build a chatbot! submitted by /u/getengati [link] [comments]
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Airbnb rentals boom across AfricaRent-a-room giant Airbnb said Tuesday that it had provided accommodation for 1.2 million visitors to Africa over the last year—double the previous year as tourism expands across the continent.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New fires break out in California as wine country fires dimAs crews gained on the wildfires in California wine country, new blazes broke out in other parts of the state, including a fire in the mountains above Los Angeles that threatened a historic observatory Tuesday and more flames in the Santa Cruz mountains.
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Ars Technica
The new Han Solo film is done filming, and it has a name Solo The cast of Solo takes a break. (credit: Disney) Today, the next standalone Star Wars film wrapped. Directed by Ron Howard—after a bitter departure from previous directors Phil Lord and Christopher Miller ( The Lego Movie )—the movie at last has a name. It will be called Solo . The film explores Han Solo's early adventures and is rumored to give us a glimpse of how Han won the Millennium Fal
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Ars Technica
Six days later, FCC chair says Trump can’t order FCC to revoke TV licenses Enlarge / FCC Chairman Ajit Pai. (credit: Getty Images | Bloomberg) Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai initially resisted calls to tell President Trump that the FCC won't revoke broadcast licenses from stations whose news coverage Trump dislikes. But today, six days after Trump first said that NBC and other networks should have their licenses challenged, Pai said the FCC won't pu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What next for Amazon studio?As the head of Amazon's entertainment studio since 2014, Roy Price was tasked with shaping the e-retailer into a major player in the film and TV world.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazonian hunters deplete wildlife but don't empty forestsConservationists can be "cautiously optimistic" about the prospect of sustainable subsistence hunting by Amazonian communities - according to new research from the University of East Anglia.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
California's new normal may be more intense heat, fires, droughts and floodsAs portrayed in novels, the California of the future is barely habitable. Brutal storms alternate with crushing droughts. Mudslides and wildfires create waves of climate change refugees.
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Viden
Greenpeace: Her er de grønneste teknologifirmaerApple, Dell og HP bliver slået af et næsten ukendt lille mobilfirma. I den tunge ende af listen på 17 firmaer ligger Samsung og Amazon.
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Gizmodo
Here's An Extremely Rare Chance to Save on Google Play Credit $50 Google Play Gift Card , $45 We see deals on iTunes gift cards with some frequency, but Google Play credit almost never goes on sale . If you buy your movies, apps, music, or anything else from Google Play, this $5 gift card discount is basically free money .
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Preservation for the (digital) agesResearchers working with classicists and computer scientists have developed a method to preserve digital humanities databases. The preservation strategy allows scholars to re-launch a database application in a variety of environments -- from individual computers, to virtual machines, to future web servers -- without compromising its interactive features.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study reshapes understanding of climate change's impact on early societiesA new study linking paleoclimatology -- the reconstruction of past global climates -- with historical analysis shows a link between environmental stress and its impact on the economy, political stability, and war-fighting capacity of ancient Egypt.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Assessment shows metagenomics software has much room for improvementA recent critical assessment of software tools represents a key step toward taming the 'Wild West' nature of the burgeoning field of metagenomics.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Univision goes dark for Verizon's cable customersUnivision's channels have gone dark for Verizon's 4.7 million Fios cable customers because of a contract dispute.
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The Atlantic
How Mental Time Travel Helps Humans Predict the Future Have you ever caught yourself daydreaming? Turns out that humans predict the future by using their memories. In this video, based on a recent article , The Atlantic science writer Julie Beck explains how functional MRI scans have allowed researchers to determine that the same brain structures involved in remembering the past are also utilized in forecasting. This means that when we envision the f
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The Atlantic
Google Maps' Failed Attempt to Get People to Lose Weight On Monday, the reporter Taylor Lorenz noticed that Google Maps had a new feature: Walking distances were delivered in terms of calories. Instead of simply telling her that a walk would take 13 minutes, the app also converted that to an amount of energy, 59 calories. Then a click on that calorie count gave a further conversion, from calories to food. Taylor Lorenz / Twitter Specifically, mini cupc
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The Atlantic
The Biggest Winners: What Ivana Reveals About Trump Family Values There’s a story Ivana Trump tells in Raising Trump , her new memoir of parenting, work, and marriage. It was New Year’s Eve, 1977; she and Donald Trump were together in the hospital room after their first child had been born, discussing the matter of what name to give their new infant. Ivana suggested that the son should be named after the father: Donald Trump Jr. Donald, however, balked at this.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers and supercomputers help interpret the latest LIGO findingsAstrophysicist Chris Fryer was enjoying an evening with friends on August 25, 2017, when he got the news of a gravitational-wave detection by LIGO, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory. The event appeared to be a merger of two neutron stars—a specialty for the Los Alamos National Laboratory team of astrophysicists that Fryer leads. As the distant cosmic cataclysm unfolded, fresh
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Yeast spotlights genetic variation's link to drug resistanceResearchers have shown that genetic diversity plays a key role in enabling drug resistance to evolve. Scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and the Institute for Research on Cancer and Ageing of Nice in France, show that high genetic diversity can prime new mutations that cause drug resistance. The study published today (17 October) in Cell Reports has implications for our understandin
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Ars Technica
Google now offers special security program for high-risk users (credit: Yubico ) Today, Google rolled out a new program called Advanced Protection for personal Google accounts, intended to provide much higher account security to users of services like Gmail and Drive who are at a high risk of being targeted by phishers, hackers, and others seeking their personal data. The opt-in program makes Google services much less convenient to use, but it's built to pre
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Popular Science
Marie Curie mobilized an army of women to help win World War I Military Meet the little Curies. A visitor to Cure's Paris laboratory in October of 1917 would not have found her or her radium on the premises. Her radium was in hiding and she was at war.
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Surfing of bacterial droplets: Bacillus subtilis sliding revisited [Physical Sciences]Hennes et al. (1) report on the collective slipping of Bacillus subtilis colonies across the agar surface, termed “colony surfing.” We read this article with great interest. However, we understand that specific points require a more detailed discussion. We would like to highlight complementary biological observations on this area previously...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Kovacs et al.: Surfing or sliding: The act of naming and its implications [Physical Sciences]Kovács et al. (1) have greatly contributed to the characterization of “sliding” (2–4), a flagella-independent, “passive type of [bacterial] movement, [...] powered by the pushing force of dividing cells and additional factors facilitating the expansion over surfaces” (2). They suggest that bacterial surfing (5) should be described by the same...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Purported fragile-to-Arrhenius crossover in squalane [Physical Sciences]Jadhao and Robbins (1) claim to have discovered a crossover from Vogel–Fulcher–Tammann (VFT) to Arrhenius in squalane occurring at a viscosity of μ=1,000 Pa⋅s using extrapolation of the simple Eyring equation to the limiting low-shear viscosity from nonequilibrium molecular dynamic simulation at high shear rates. Stickel et al. (2) introduced...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Bair: Crossover to Arrhenius behavior at high viscosities in squalane [Physical Sciences]As noted in our paper (1), values of the Newtonian viscosity, ηN, of squalane from Deegan et al. (2) are well fit by the Vogel–Fulcher–Tammann (VFT) equation over the measured range of temperature, T. This is entirely consistent with the fairly straight line shown for their data in the Stickel...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
No experimental Fermi surface measurements have been reported or made on low-temperature martensitic lithium [Physical Sciences]Elatresh et al. (1) (ECAHDB) claim that the low-temperature martensitic structure of lithium “is not the heretofore assigned 9R.” This is based on comparing results of Fermi surface calculations to de Haas–van Alphen (dHvA) data from Springford and coworkers (2, 3). We note that Springford’s group took extensive steps to...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Martinez-Canales et al.: The structure(s) of lithium at low temperatures [Physical Sciences]In our recent article (1), we proposed that Fermiology measurements can be used as a complementary probe for determining the low-temperature state of Li. In a letter (2) criticizing our conclusions, Martinez-Canales, Loa, and Ackland (MLA) claim (i) that “obtaining dHvA signals from martensitic microstructures is usually impossible” and (ii)...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Mechanistic insights into electrochemical reduction of CO2 over Ag using density functional theory and transport models [Applied Physical Sciences]Electrochemical reduction of CO2 using renewable sources of electrical energy holds promise for converting CO2 to fuels and chemicals. Since this process is complex and involves a large number of species and physical phenomena, a comprehensive understanding of the factors controlling product distribution is required. While the most plausible reaction...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Evolutionary dynamics of language systems [Anthropology]Understanding how and why language subsystems differ in their evolutionary dynamics is a fundamental question for historical and comparative linguistics. One key dynamic is the rate of language change. While it is commonly thought that the rapid rate of change hampers the reconstruction of deep language relationships beyond 6,000–10,000 y,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Cavity hydration dynamics in cytochrome c oxidase and functional implications [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is a transmembrane protein that uses the free energy of O2 reduction to generate the proton concentration gradient across the membrane. The regulation of competitive proton transfer pathways has been established to be essential to the vectorial transport efficiency of CcO, yet the underlying mechanism at...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Visualizing nuclear RNAi activity in single living human cells [Cell Biology]Nuclear RNA interference (RNAi) is mediated by the canonical RNAi machinery and can lead to transcriptional silencing, transcriptional activation, or modulation of alternative splicing patterns. These effects transpire through changes in histone and DNA modifications via RNAi-mediated recruitment of chromatin-modifying enzymes. To prove that nuclear RNAi occurs and modulates transcription...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Cytoplasmic MTOCs control spindle orientation for asymmetric cell division in plants [Cell Biology]Proper orientation of the cell division axis is critical for asymmetric cell divisions that underpin cell differentiation. In animals, centrosomes are the dominant microtubule organizing centers (MTOC) and play a pivotal role in axis determination by orienting the mitotic spindle. In land plants that lack centrosomes, a critical role of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Period2 3'-UTR and microRNA-24 regulate circadian rhythms by repressing PERIOD2 protein accumulation [Genetics]We previously created two PER2::LUCIFERASE (PER2::LUC) circadian reporter knockin mice that differ only in the Per2 3′-UTR region: Per2::Luc, which retains the endogenous Per2 3′-UTR and Per2::LucSV, where the endogenous Per2 3′-UTR was replaced by an SV40 late poly(A) signal. To delineate the in vivo functions of Per2 3′-UTR, we...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
FOXO1 opposition of CD8+ T cell effector programming confers early memory properties and phenotypic diversity [Immunology and Inflammation]The factors and steps controlling postinfection CD8+ T cell terminal effector versus memory differentiation are incompletely understood. Whereas we found that naive TCF7 (alias “Tcf-1”) expression is FOXO1 independent, early postinfection we report bimodal, FOXO1-dependent expression of the memory-essential transcription factor TCF7 in pathogen-specific CD8+ T cells. We determined the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Systems-level identification of PKA-dependent signaling in epithelial cells [Medical Sciences]G protein stimulatory α-subunit (Gαs)-coupled heptahelical receptors regulate cell processes largely through activation of protein kinase A (PKA). To identify signaling processes downstream of PKA, we deleted both PKA catalytic subunits using CRISPR-Cas9, followed by a “multiomic” analysis in mouse kidney epithelial cells expressing the Gαs-coupled V2 vasopressin receptor. RNA-seq...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Genome-wide engineering of an infectious clone of herpes simplex virus type 1 using synthetic genomics assembly methods [Microbiology]Here, we present a transformational approach to genome engineering of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), which has a large DNA genome, using synthetic genomics tools. We believe this method will enable more rapid and complex modifications of HSV-1 and other large DNA viruses than previous technologies, facilitating many useful...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Expanded subgenomic mRNA transcriptome and coding capacity of a nidovirus [Microbiology]Members of the order Nidovirales express their structural protein ORFs from a nested set of 3′ subgenomic mRNAs (sg mRNAs), and for most of these ORFs, a single genomic transcription regulatory sequence (TRS) was identified. Nine TRSs were previously reported for the arterivirus Simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV). In the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structures of human-infecting Thogotovirus fusogens support a common ancestor with insect baculovirus [Microbiology]Thogotoviruses are emerging tick-borne zoonotic orthomyxoviruses infecting both humans and domestic animals with severe clinical consequences. These viruses utilize a single-envelope glycoprotein (Gp) to facilitate their entry into host cells. Here, we present the Gp structures of Thogoto and Dhori viruses, both of which are members of the Thogotovirus genus...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Motor origin of temporal predictions in auditory attention [Neuroscience]In behavior, action and perception are inherently interdependent. However, the actual mechanistic contributions of the motor system to sensory processing are unknown. We present neurophysiological evidence that the motor system is involved in predictive timing, a brain function that aligns temporal fluctuations of attention with the timing of events in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Framework for gradual progression of cell ontogeny in the Arabidopsis root meristem [Plant Biology]In plants, apical meristems allow continuous growth along the body axis. Within the root apical meristem, a group of slowly dividing quiescent center cells is thought to limit stem cell activity to directly neighboring cells, thus endowing them with unique properties, distinct from displaced daughters. This binary identity of the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Mediator subunit MED25 links the jasmonate receptor to transcriptionally active chromatin [Plant Biology]Jasmonoyl-isoleucine (JA-Ile), the active form of the plant hormone jasmonate (JA), is sensed by the F-box protein CORONATINE INSENSITIVE 1 (COI1), a component of a functional Skp–Cullin–F-box E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Sensing of JA-Ile by COI1 rapidly triggers genome-wide transcriptional changes that are largely regulated by the basic helix–loop–helix transcription...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Molecular mechanisms and structural features of cardiomyopathy-causing troponin T mutants in the tropomyosin overlap region [Biochemistry]Point mutations in genes encoding sarcomeric proteins are the leading cause of inherited primary cardiomyopathies. Among them are mutations in the TNNT2 gene that encodes cardiac troponin T (TnT). These mutations are clustered in the tropomyosin (Tm) binding region of TnT, TNT1 (residues 80–180). To understand the mechanistic changes caused...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Minimal and RNA-free RNase P in Aquifex aeolicus [Biochemistry]RNase P is an essential tRNA-processing enzyme in all domains of life. We identified an unknown type of protein-only RNase P in the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus: Without an RNA subunit and the smallest of its kind, the 23-kDa polypeptide comprises a metallonuclease domain only. The protein has RNase P...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Extracellular vesicles from human pancreatic islets suppress human islet amyloid polypeptide amyloid formation [Biochemistry]Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are small vesicles released by cells to aid cell–cell communication and tissue homeostasis. Human islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) is the major component of amyloid deposits found in pancreatic islets of patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). IAPP is secreted in conjunction with insulin from pancreatic β cells...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structure and dynamics of the RNAPII CTDsome with Rtt103 [Biochemistry]RNA polymerase II contains a long C-terminal domain (CTD) that regulates interactions at the site of transcription. The CTD architecture remains poorly understood due to its low sequence complexity, dynamic phosphorylation patterns, and structural variability. We used integrative structural biology to visualize the architecture of the CTD in complex with...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Mechanically switching single-molecule fluorescence of GFP by unfolding and refolding [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Green fluorescent protein (GFP) variants are widely used as genetically encoded fluorescent fusion tags, and there is an increasing interest in engineering their structure to develop in vivo optical sensors, such as for optogenetics and force transduction. Ensemble experiments have shown that the fluorescence of GFP is quenched upon denaturation....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Allocating dissipation across a molecular machine cycle to maximize flux [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Biomolecular machines consume free energy to break symmetry and make directed progress. Nonequilibrium ATP concentrations are the typical free energy source, with one cycle of a molecular machine consuming a certain number of ATP, providing a fixed free energy budget. Since evolution is expected to favor rapid-turnover machines that operate...
16h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Detection of isolated protein-bound metal ions by single-particle cryo-STEM [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Metal ions play essential roles in many aspects of biological chemistry. Detecting their presence and location in proteins and cells is important for understanding biological function. Conventional structural methods such as X-ray crystallography and cryo-transmission electron microscopy can identify metal atoms on protein only if the protein structure is solved...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Chemical substitutions in the selectivity filter of potassium channels do not rule out constricted-like conformations for C-type inactivation [Biophysics and Computational Biology]In many K+ channels, prolonged activating stimuli lead to a time-dependent reduction in ion conduction, a phenomenon known as C-type inactivation. X-ray structures of the KcsA channel suggest that this inactivated state corresponds to a “constricted” conformation of the selectivity filter. However, the functional significance of the constricted conformation has...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structural basis underlying complex assembly and conformational transition of the type I R-M system [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Type I restriction-modification (R-M) systems are multisubunit enzymes with separate DNA-recognition (S), methylation (M), and restriction (R) subunits. Despite extensive studies spanning five decades, the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying subunit assembly and conformational transition are still unclear due to the lack of high-resolution structural information. Here, we report the atomic...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Tectonic conformational changes of a coronavirus spike glycoprotein promote membrane fusion [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The tremendous pandemic potential of coronaviruses was demonstrated twice in the past few decades by two global outbreaks of deadly pneumonia. The coronavirus spike (S) glycoprotein initiates infection by promoting fusion of the viral and cellular membranes through conformational changes that remain largely uncharacterized. Here we report the cryoEM structure...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Discovery of an O-mannosylation pathway selectively serving cadherins and protocadherins [Cell Biology]The cadherin (cdh) superfamily of adhesion molecules carry O-linked mannose (O-Man) glycans at highly conserved sites localized to specific β-strands of their extracellular cdh (EC) domains. These O-Man glycans do not appear to be elongated like O-Man glycans found on α-dystroglycan (α-DG), and we recently demonstrated that initiation of cdh/protocadherin...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
An anion-immobilized composite electrolyte for dendrite-free lithium metal anodes [Chemistry]Lithium metal is strongly regarded as a promising electrode material in next-generation rechargeable batteries due to its extremely high theoretical specific capacity and lowest reduction potential. However, the safety issue and short lifespan induced by uncontrolled dendrite growth have hindered the practical applications of lithium metal anodes. Hence, we propose...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Asynchronous warming and {delta}18O evolution of deep Atlantic water masses during the last deglaciation [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]The large-scale reorganization of deep ocean circulation in the Atlantic involving changes in North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) and Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) played a critical role in regulating hemispheric and global climate during the last deglaciation. However, changes in the relative contributions of NADW and AABW and their properties...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Early snowmelt significantly enhances boreal springtime carbon uptake [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]We determine the annual timing of spring recovery from space-borne microwave radiometer observations across northern hemisphere boreal evergreen forests for 1979–2014. We find a trend of advanced spring recovery of carbon uptake for this period, with a total average shift of 8.1 d (2.3 d/decade). We use this trend to...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Tree genetics defines fungal partner communities that may confer drought tolerance [Ecology]Plant genetic variation and soil microorganisms are individually known to influence plant responses to climate change, but the interactive effects of these two factors are largely unknown. Using long-term observational studies in the field and common garden and greenhouse experiments of a foundation tree species (Pinus edulis) and its mutualistic...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
High-intensity urban light installation dramatically alters nocturnal bird migration [Ecology]Billions of nocturnally migrating birds move through increasingly photopolluted skies, relying on cues for navigation and orientation that artificial light at night (ALAN) can impair. However, no studies have quantified avian responses to powerful ground-based light sources in urban areas. We studied effects of ALAN on migrating birds by monitoring...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Interhost dispersal alters microbiome assembly and can overwhelm host innate immunity in an experimental zebrafish model [Ecology]The diverse collections of microorganisms associated with humans and other animals, collectively referred to as their “microbiome,” are critical for host health, but the mechanisms that govern their assembly are poorly understood. This has made it difficult to identify consistent host factors that explain variation in microbiomes across hosts, despite...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Phenotypic variation explains food web structural patterns [Ecology]Food webs (i.e., networks of species and their feeding interactions) share multiple structural features across ecosystems. The factors explaining such similarities are still debated, and the role played by most organismal traits and their intraspecific variation is unknown. Here, we assess how variation in traits controlling predator–prey interactions (e.g., body...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Elliptical orbits of microspheres in an evanescent field [Engineering]We examine the motion of periodically driven and optically tweezed microspheres in fluid and find a rich variety of dynamic regimes. We demonstrate, in experiment and in theory, that mean particle motion in 2D is rarely parallel to the direction of the applied force and can even exhibit elliptical orbits...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Unexpected source of Fukushima-derived radiocesium to the coastal ocean of Japan [Environmental Sciences]There are 440 operational nuclear reactors in the world, with approximately one-half situated along the coastline. This includes the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP), which experienced multiple reactor meltdowns in March 2011 followed by the release of radioactivity to the marine environment. While surface inputs to the ocean via...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Rapid evolution of hosts begets species diversity at the cost of intraspecific diversity [Evolution]Ecosystems are complex food webs in which multiple species interact and ecological and evolutionary processes continuously shape populations and communities. Previous studies on eco-evolutionary dynamics have shown that the presence of intraspecific diversity affects community structure and function, and that eco-evolutionary feedback dynamics can be an important driver for its...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
CRISPR-Cas9-based treatment of myocilin-associated glaucoma [Genetics]Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is a leading cause of irreversible vision loss worldwide, with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) a major risk factor. Myocilin (MYOC) dominant gain-of-function mutations have been reported in ∼4% of POAG cases. MYOC mutations result in protein misfolding, leading to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the trabecular...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Mycobacterium tuberculosis inhibits human innate immune responses via the production of TLR2 antagonist glycolipids [Immunology and Inflammation]Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a major human pathogen that is able to survive inside host cells and resist immune clearance. Most particularly, it inhibits several arms of the innate immune response, including phagosome maturation or cytokine production. To better understand the molecular mechanisms by which M. tuberculosis circumvents host immune defenses,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Semisynthetic glycoconjugate vaccine candidate against Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 5 [Medical Sciences]Glycoconjugate vaccines based on isolated capsular polysaccharide (CPS) save millions of lives annually by preventing invasive pneumococcal disease caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae. Some components of the S. pneumoniae glycoconjugate vaccine Prevnar13 that contains CPS antigens from 13 serotypes undergo modifications or degradation during isolation and conjugation, resulting in production proble
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Long-term restoration of visual function in end-stage retinal degeneration using subretinal human melanopsin gene therapy [Medical Sciences]Optogenetic strategies to restore vision in patients who are blind from end-stage retinal degenerations aim to render remaining retinal cells light sensitive once photoreceptors are lost. Here, we assessed long-term functional outcomes following subretinal delivery of the human melanopsin gene (OPN4) in the rd1 mouse model of retinal degeneration using...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Molecular basis of mammalian transmissibility of avian H1N1 influenza viruses and their pandemic potential [Microbiology]North American wild birds are an important reservoir of influenza A viruses, yet the potential of viruses in this reservoir to transmit and cause disease in mammals is not well understood. Our surveillance of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) at Delaware Bay, USA, revealed a group of similar H1N1 AIVs isolated...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Host-derived fatty acids activate type VII secretion in Staphylococcus aureus [Microbiology]The type VII secretion system (T7SS) of Staphylococcus aureus is a multiprotein complex dedicated to the export of several virulence factors during host infection. This virulence pathway plays a key role in promoting bacterial survival and the long-term persistence of staphylococcal abscess communities. The expression of the T7SS is activated...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Cannabidiol attenuates seizures and social deficits in a mouse model of Dravet syndrome [Neuroscience]Worldwide medicinal use of cannabis is rapidly escalating, despite limited evidence of its efficacy from preclinical and clinical studies. Here we show that cannabidiol (CBD) effectively reduced seizures and autistic-like social deficits in a well-validated mouse genetic model of Dravet syndrome (DS), a severe childhood epilepsy disorder caused by loss-of-function...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) signaling in spinal microglia drives visceral sensitization following colitis [Neuroscience]Pain is a main symptom of inflammatory diseases and often persists beyond clinical remission. Although we have a good understanding of the mechanisms of sensitization at the periphery during inflammation, little is known about the mediators that drive central sensitization. Recent reports have identified hematopoietic colony-stimulating factors as important regulators...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Direct measurement of weakly nonequilibrium system entropy is consistent with Gibbs-Shannon form [Physics]Stochastic thermodynamics extends classical thermodynamics to small systems in contact with one or more heat baths. It can account for the effects of thermal fluctuations and describe systems far from thermodynamic equilibrium. A basic assumption is that the expression for Shannon entropy is the appropriate description for the entropy of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Stress attenuates the flexible updating of aversive value [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]In a dynamic environment, sources of threat or safety can unexpectedly change, requiring the flexible updating of stimulus−outcome associations that promote adaptive behavior. However, aversive contexts in which we are required to update predictions of threat are often marked by stress. Acute stress is thought to reduce behavioral flexibility, yet...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Short- and long-term effects of imprisonment on future felony convictions and prison admissions [Social Sciences]A substantial contributor to prison admissions is the return of individuals recently released from prison, which has come to be known as prison’s “revolving door.” However, it is unclear whether being sentenced to prison itself has a causal effect on the probability of a subsequent return to prison or on...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Projections of white and black older adults without living kin in the United States, 2015 to 2060 [Social Sciences]Close kin provide many important functions as adults age, affecting health, financial well-being, and happiness. Those without kin report higher rates of loneliness and experience elevated risks of chronic illness and nursing facility placement. Historical racial differences and recent shifts in core demographic rates suggest that white and black older...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Prairie strips improve biodiversity and the delivery of multiple ecosystem services from corn-soybean croplands [Sustainability Science]Loss of biodiversity and degradation of ecosystem services from agricultural lands remain important challenges in the United States despite decades of spending on natural resource management. To date, conservation investment has emphasized engineering practices or vegetative strategies centered on monocultural plantings of nonnative plants, largely excluding native species from cropland....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Multigenerational silencing dynamics control cell aging [Systems Biology]Cellular aging plays an important role in many diseases, such as cancers, metabolic syndromes, and neurodegenerative disorders. There has been steady progress in identifying aging-related factors such as reactive oxygen species and genomic instability, yet an emerging challenge is to reconcile the contributions of these factors with the fact that...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Dixon et al., Combined hydrogels that switch human pluripotent stem cells from self-renewal to differentiation [Correction]CELL BIOLOGY Correction for “Combined hydrogels that switch human pluripotent stem cells from self-renewal to differentiation,” by James E. Dixon, Disheet A. Shah, Catherine Rogers, Stephen Hall, Nicola Weston, Christopher D. J. Parmenter, Donal McNally, Chris Denning, and Kevin M. Shakesheff, which was first published March 27, 2014; 10.1073/pnas.1319685111 (Proc...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Cekanaviciute et al., Gut bacteria from multiple sclerosis patients modulate human T cells and exacerbate symptoms in mouse models [Correction]IMMUNOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION Correction for “Gut bacteria from multiple sclerosis patients modulate human T cells and exacerbate symptoms in mouse models,” by Egle Cekanaviciute, Bryan B. Yoo, Tessel F. Runia, Justine W. Debelius, Sneha Singh, Charlotte A. Nelson, Rachel Kanner, Yadira Bencosme, Yun Kyung Lee, Stephen L. Hauser, Elizabeth Crabtree-Hartman,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction to Supporting Information for Palermo et al., CRISPR-Cas9 conformational activation as elucidated from enhanced molecular simulations [SI Correction]BIOPHYSICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY, BIOCHEMISTRY Correction to Supporting Information for “CRISPR-Cas9 conformational activation as elucidated from enhanced molecular simulations,” by Giulia Palermo, Yinglong Miao, Ross C. Walker, Martin Jinek, and J. Andrew McCammon, which was first published June 26, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1707645114 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114:7260–7265). The authors note...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Genome editing and glaucoma Genome editing treats glaucoma in mouse model. Image courtesy of iStockphoto/Natali_Mis. Mutations in the myocilin gene (MYOC) can lead to the misfolding and toxic buildup of the encoded protein in the trabecular meshwork (TM), a tissue that regulates pressure inside the eyes, triggering the death of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Profile of Lora V. Hooper [Profiles]Lora Hooper, a professor of immunology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, describes her career as “a random walk in science.” Her pursuit of science was aided by inspirational mentors who pointed her in directions she might not otherwise have taken. These unexpected turns ultimately led her to...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Synthetic genome engineering gets infectious [Microbiology]Since the start of this century, a handful of research groups have pursued the synthesis and large-scale engineering of genomes. Work on synthetic genomes has seen the field scale-up from the full synthesis of the small poliovirus genome (2002) (1), to a complete working synthetic bacterial genome (2010) (2), and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Trees harness the power of microbes to survive climate change [Ecology]Microorganisms are the most abundant and diverse taxa on Earth. They have the ability to tolerate extreme environments, catalyze a range of metabolic functions, and rapidly evolve in response to changing environmental conditions. Imagine if plants and animals could harness these powers. In fact, microorganisms confer numerous benefits to plants...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
NS1 is the fluid for “flu-transmission” [Microbiology]The development of modern medicine has allowed us to conquer numerous infectious diseases; however, we human beings constantly face threats from novel infectious diseases that have been previously unrecognized. These so-called “emerging infectious diseases” are often caused by zoonotic pathogens, which mostly originate in wild animals (1, 2). Human diseases,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
On the origin of biological construction, with a focus on multicellularity [Evolution]Biology is marked by a hierarchical organization: all life consists of cells; in some cases, these cells assemble into groups, such as endosymbionts or multicellular organisms; in turn, multicellular organisms sometimes assemble into yet other groups, such as primate societies or ant colonies. The construction of new organizational layers results...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Opinion: Fostering synthesis in archaeology to advance science and benefit society [Anthropology]In 1966 the US Congress passed the National Historic Preservation Act. Its intent: to ensure that the values embedded in historic buildings, archaeological sites, and other important places of the past honored all Americans in ways that would inspire and motivate present and future generations. In the intervening 50 years,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Spontaneous self-dislodging of freezing water droplets and the role of wettability [Applied Physical Sciences]Spontaneous removal of liquid, solidifying liquid and solid forms of matter from surfaces, is of significant importance in nature and technology, where it finds applications ranging from self-cleaning to icephobicity and to condensation systems. However, it is a great challenge to understand fundamentally the complex interaction of rapidly solidifying, typically...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Li-rich antiperovskite superionic conductors based on cluster ions [Applied Physical Sciences]Enjoying great safety, high power, and high energy densities, all-solid-state batteries play a key role in the next generation energy storage devices. However, their development is limited by the lack of solid electrolyte materials that can reach the practically useful conductivities of 10−2 S/cm at room temperature (RT). Here, by...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Resistin-like molecule {beta} is a bactericidal protein that promotes spatial segregation of the microbiota and the colonic epithelium [Immunology and Inflammation]The mammalian intestine is colonized by trillions of bacteria that perform essential metabolic functions for their hosts. The mutualistic nature of this relationship depends on maintaining spatial segregation between these bacteria and the intestinal epithelial surface. This segregation is achieved in part by the presence of a dense mucus layer...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Universal poroelastic mechanism for hydraulic signals in biomimetic and natural branches [Plant Biology]Plants constantly undergo external mechanical loads such as wind or touch and respond to these stimuli by acclimating their growth processes. A fascinating feature of this mechanical-induced growth response is that it can occur rapidly and at long distance from the initial site of stimulation, suggesting the existence of a...
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The Atlantic
Imagining the Future Is Just Another Form of Memory “Imagining the future is a kind of nostalgia.” This is a line from John Green’s young-adult book Looking for Alaska . It’s pretty, and melancholy, and very popular on Tumblr . It’s also scientifically accurate. Imagining the future is a kind of nostalgia, because humans predict what the future will be like by using their memories. This is how things you do over and over again become routine. For
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Science | The Guardian
Asp – or ash? Climate historians link Cleopatra's demise to volcanic eruption Study of ice-core records and Ancient Egyptian documents suggests environmental forces helped seal the last Ptolemaic ruler’s fate in 30BC The fall of Cleopatra’s Egypt to Augustus, the first Roman emperor, is usually told as a melodramatic power struggle between elites on the world stage. Cleopatra famously forged a doomed political alliance with the Roman general Mark Antony, who was also her l
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Yeast spotlights genetic variation's link to drug resistanceResearchers have shown that genetic diversity plays a key role in enabling drug resistance to evolve. Scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and the Institute for Research on Cancer and Ageing of Nice in France, show that high genetic diversity can prime new mutations that cause drug resistance. The study published today in Cell Reports has implications for our understanding of the evol
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New research opens the door to 'functional cure' for HIVScientists have for the first time shown that a novel compound effectively suppresses production of the virus in chronically infected cells.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Los Alamos researchers and supercomputers help interpret the latest LIGO findingsAstrophysicist Chris Fryer was enjoying an evening with friends on Aug. 25, 2017, when he got the news of a gravitational-wave detection by LIGO, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
To keep Saturn's A ring contained, its moons stand unitedFor three decades, astronomers thought that only Saturn's moon Janus confined the planet's A ring -- the largest and farthest of the visible rings. But after poring over NASA's Cassini mission data, astronomers now conclude that the teamwork of seven moons keeps this ring corralled.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Flexible 'skin' can help robots, prosthetics perform everyday tasks by sensing shear forceEngineers have developed a flexible sensor 'skin' that can be stretched over any part of a robot's body or prosthetic to accurately convey information about shear forces and vibration, which are critical to tasks ranging from cooking an egg to dismantling a bomb.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cancer: New compound targets energy generation, thereby killing metastatic cellsResearchers have identified an enzyme that supports the survival and dissemination of metastatic cells, and developed a synthetic compound that targets the enzyme and kills the metastatic cells in mice with cancer.
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Live Science
Tyrannosaurus Rex: Facts About T. Rex, King of the DinosaursThe large carnivorous dinosaur reigned during the late Cretaceous Period, 65 million years ago.
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Ars Technica
Netflix, Amazon, movie studios sue over TickBox streaming device (credit: Universal Studios et al. v. TickBox) Movie studios, Netflix, and Amazon have banded together to file a first-of-its-kind copyright lawsuit against a streaming media player called TickBox TV. The complaint (PDF), filed Friday, says the TickBox devices are nothing more than "tool[s] for mass infringement," which operate by grabbing pirated video streams from the Internet. The lawsuit was f
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Feed: All Latest
The Flawed System Behind the Krack Wi-Fi MeltdownWhen software standards aren't open and available for researchers to vet, bad things happen. Just look at Krack.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Three of the most deadly cancers get critical funding for researchThree of the most deadly cancers -- glioblastoma, sarcoma and ovarian -- get critical funding for clinical trials from Alliance for Cancer Gene Therapy.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Why (Ex-)Hurricane Ophelia Took a Wrong Turn toward Ireland and Britain—and Carried All That DustWhat set it apart from other Atlantic hurricanes was its direct route to Europe -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Blog » Languages » English
Creepy Cryptids: Jersey Devil vs. Mothman It’s a throwback to our Great Spring Creature Feature of 2015, now timed specially for spooky season! We cannot scientifically claim that such entities exist, but… well, if they did, they’d look pretty cool. Which of these mid-Atlantic cryptids is more your style? Jersey Devil “Native” to the Pine Barrens region of New Jersey, this critter is supposed to have a goat’s horned head, a bat’s wings,
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Ars Technica
Self-driving Chevy Bolts are coming to the streets of Manhattan in 2018 Enlarge / Autonomous Bolts under construction at GM's Orion Assembly Plant located in Orion Township, Michigan, in June 2017. (credit: General Motors) General Motors and Cruise Automation will be the first to test autonomous vehicles on public roads in New York state, it was announced on Tuesday. The cars—which will have a pair of humans onboard as backup—aren't taking the easy route, either. The
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New Scientist - News
Roadside barrier that folds like origami blocks traffic noiseTraffic noise has many frequencies, making it hard to suppress. A new barrier with movable folds can change its acoustic properties in response to traffic patterns
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New Scientist - News
Four brain genes help explain obsessive compulsive disorderOCD has been linked to genes active in a brain circuit involved in learning and decisions. The finding may help explain why the condition can run in families
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Viden
Amerikanske alligatorer æder sig mætte i hajerForskere har observeret de store krybdyr spise tre forskellige haj-arter og en rokke.
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Gizmodo
What The New Mutants Comics Can Tell Us About the Movie Image: 20th Century Fox Last week, Fox dropped the first trailer for its upcoming X-Men spinoff film The New Mutants , and it proved to be every bit the horror-inspired riff on the superhero genre that director Josh Boone promised it would be. Fascinating as the trailer is, its ties to Marvel’s comics might not be immediately clear. In Marvel’s books, the titular New Mutants are a group of kids w
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Autonomous cars head for the Big AppleAutonomous vehicles are already navigating the verdant hills of Pittsburgh and cruising the pitched avenues of San Francisco. They may soon be tested by the chaos of downtown Manhattan, where pedestrians, taxis, buses and bikes embark daily on an eternal quest to avoid impact.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook buys anonymous teen compliment app TBHFacebook has bought TBH, a teen-focused app that lets people give anonymous compliments to each other through polls and messages.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google to offer stepped-up security for 'high risk' usersGoogle said Tuesday it would offer stronger online security for "high risk" users who may be frequent targets of online attacks.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dutch open 'world's first 3D-printed bridge'Dutch officials toasted on Tuesday the opening of what is being called the world's first 3D-printed concrete bridge, which is primarily meant to be used by cyclists.
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The Scientist RSS
Bacteria Found in Womens Upper Reproductive TractsA new study identifies microorganisms residing in the human fallopian tubes and uterus, but some researchers are skeptical of the findings.
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Big Think
Is There a Personality Test for Tyrants, Fascists, and Authoritarians? When you see Nazis in the streets chanting things like “Jews will not replace us," it can be difficult to comprehend why they would believe such horrid things. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Preservation for the (digital) agesWhen Deborah Beck was preparing her book, Speech Presentation in Homeric Epic, her publisher suggested she make the database she had started in 2008—a searchable catalogue of features from every speech in the Homeric poems—available to the public as a web application and companion resource.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Preservation for the (digital) agesResearchers from the Texas Advanced Computing Center, working with classicists and computer scientists from The University of Texas at Austin, developed a method to preserve digital humanities databases. The preservation strategy allows scholars to re-launch a database application in a variety of environments -- from individual computers, to virtual machines, to future web servers -- without compr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new compound targets energy generation, thereby killing metastatic cellsProf. Uri Nir, of the Mina and Everard Goodman Faculty of Life Sciences at Bar-Ilan University, and his team have identified an enzyme that supports the survival and dissemination of metastatic cells, and developed a synthetic compound that targets the enzyme and kills the metastatic cells in mice with cancer. Their research has just been published in the journal Nature Communications.
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: A Mushroom Out of a Fairy Tale That You Might Find in the ForestRecently mushroom hunters have been sharing photos of the fly agaric, which has a reputation for strange and dangerous effects when ingested by other living things.
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