EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Better sleep, less fearHigher quality sleep patterns are associated with reduced activity in brain regions involved in fear learning, according to a study of young adults published in JNeurosci. The results suggest that baseline sleep quality may be a useful predictor of susceptibility to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Transparent solar technology represents 'wave of the future'See-through solar materials that can be applied to windows represent a massive source of untapped energy and could harvest as much power as bigger, bulkier rooftop solar units, scientists report today in Nature Energy.
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Ingeniøren
Apple Pay lanceret i Danmark: Blokerer automatisk for andre mobilbetalinger Apple har et særdeles besidderisk forhold til sine brugere, når det kommer til mobilbetalinger. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/apple-pay-klar-danmark-blokerer-automatisk-andre-mobilbetalinger-1081966 Version2
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LATEST

The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: 'The Degradation of Our Politics' What We’re Following Senate Defections: Jeff Flake, the senator from Arizona, announced he won’t run for reelection next year in a speech that condemned “the degradation of our politics” and “the regular and casual undermining of our democratic norms and ideals” by President Trump. Read the full transcript of the senator’s remarks here . Flake’s criticism echoes that of fellow Republican Senator
14min
Live Science
Here's How Steel Wool Burns (and Why It Looks Like the Death of Krypton)Steel wool is absolutely magnificent when lit on fire, as Reddit user ChazDodge showed in a recent video that makes the wiry, burning puff look like the death of the planet Krypton.
14min
Dagens Medicin
Penkowa får frataget sin autorisation i to år Omstridt hjerneforsker får frataget sin autorisation for en periode på to år.
20min
Ars Technica
Local TV and radio stations no longer required to have local studios Enlarge / An old television studio. (credit: Getty Images | Steven Beijer | EyeEm) The Federal Communications Commission today eliminated a decades-old rule that required TV and radio stations to maintain studios in the local communities they serve. The FCC's Republican majority claims that the change will produce cost savings that broadcasters can use to improve "programming, equipment upgrades,
29min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Proton therapy may be better option for elderly patients with esophageal cancerA study led by Mayo Clinic researchers has found that proton beam therapy, in combination with chemotherapy, prior to surgery, may be a better option than a combination using traditional radiation therapy techniques with chemotherapy when treating elderly patients with esophageal cancer.
33min
Ars Technica
Ancient mutation helped create delicious, fatty pork. Scientists just fixed it Enlarge (credit: Getty |Mark Boster ) Of all the frights you might experience between now and Halloween, this one might be the worst: Chinese scientists have genetically engineered pigs to be reduced-fat. They meant well. The engineering created hardier, leaner pigs that the scientists argue will improve pig welfare and cut losses and energy use on farms. Publishing data on their genetically modi
45min
Gizmodo
Twitter Reveals New Ad Rules After Enabling Election Propaganda Photo: Getty In response to increased scrutiny over Russia-bought ads that targeted Americans during the 2016 election, Twitter has announced new measures to increase transparency around ads purchased on its service. The company says it will now disclose the total cost of all ad campaigns and share who purchased them. Information will also be made available to users about ads that specifically ta
49min
Ars Technica
Judge overturns $417M verdict over Johnson & Johnson baby powder Enlarge / Johnson's baby powder, stocked at a supermarket shelf in Alhambra, California. (credit: FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images) A judge has thrown out a $417 million verdict against Johnson & Johnson , which came about when a jury sided with a terminally ill plaintiff who said that Johnson's baby powder caused her ovarian cancer. On Friday, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Maren Nelson gran
49min
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Which Of These Super Trucks Would You Pick? It's Thunder vs. Lighting! #DieselBrothers | Mondays 9p Diesel Dave and Heavy D set up a drag race, a towing test and a tug of war to figure out which giveaway truck is supreme. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/diesel-brothers/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DieselBrothersTV https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on T
55min
Gizmodo
The 10 Best Deals of October 24, 2017 We see a lot of deals around the web over on Kinja Deals , but these were our ten favorites today. Head over to our main post for more deals, and follow us on Twitter and Facebook to never miss a chance to save. You can also join our Kinja Deals Community Facebook group to connect with your fellow deal hunters. #1: Blunt Umbrellas You could buy a $5 umbrella every time you get caught in a storm,
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Popular Science
Can the Apple TV 4K be a cord-cutter's only streaming device? Gadgets High-quality picture and smart home functionality set Apple's entertainment machine apart. The Apple TV 4K is the only stand-alone box with Dolby Vision HDR inside, but can it justify its high price?
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Latest Headlines | Science News
What detecting gravitational waves means for the expansion of the universeThe latest LIGO signal proves that gravitational waves travel at the speed of light, ruling out a swath of cosmological theories in the process.
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Flake's Speech Today in 5 Lines Arizona Senator Jeff Flake announced that he will not seek reelection in 2018, saying in a speech that he “will not be complicit” in the “reckless, outrageous, and undignified behavior” coming from the White House. The ongoing feud between Senator Bob Corker and President Trump escalated when Corker called Trump “an utterly untruthful president.” Congress approved a $36.5 billion
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Live Science
Why 'Vaginal Seeding' with Mom's Microbes May Be Risky for NewbornsThe practice of "vaginal seeding," in which a mother transfers her vaginal fluid to her newborn after a cesarean section, is generally not recommended, according to new guidelines.
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Ars Technica
Political ads on Twitter will now be labeled with lots of spending data Enlarge (credit: Twitter) In light of recent Russia-related disclosures , American politicians have begun weighing in on the lack of transparency in the world of politically motivated online ads. On Tuesday, Twitter chose to get ahead of potential political and legal action by announcing plans to open its advertising disclosure process in a big way. A blog post titled " New Transparency for Ads o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Stronger tests of Einstein's theory of general relativity with binary neutron starsEinstein's theory of general relativity has withstood 100 years of experimental scrutiny. However, these tests do not constrain how well the very strong gravitational fields produced by merging neutron stars obey this theory. New, more sophisticated techniques can now search for deviations from general relativity with unprecedented sensitivity. Scientists at the Max Planck Institutes for Gravitati
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US should take steps to manage costly climate risks: reportThe US government should manage risks posed by climate change that could cost it tens of billions of dollars more per year by mid-century, a congressional report published Tuesday said.
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The Scientist RSS
Anger Flares over EPAs Perceived Science CensorshipProtests are sparking over the Trump Administration's latest move to silence a discussion around climate change.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New clinical care guidelines issued for patients with mitochondrial diseasePhysicians who see patients with mitochondrial disease now have a practical new tool -- a set of guidelines for managing and caring for those patients. Occurring in at least one in 4,500 individuals, mitochondrial disease is caused by defects in genes affecting the function of mitochondria, crucial energy-producing structures found in every cell.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fireworks in spaceSome of the most exciting things that we've seen from looking at gene expression in space is that we really see an explosion, like fireworks taking off, as soon as the human body gets into space.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Managing risky behavior reduces future incarceration among aggressive juvenile offendersClinically aggressive juvenile offenders on probation in Cook County, Illinois, who participated in a two-week intervention program focusing on reducing risky behavior were four times less likely to be incarcerated in the 12 months after the intervention than their peers who participated in an information-based health promotion program.a pair of handcuffs
1h
Big Think
After Death You’re Aware That You’ve Died, Scientists Claim Some evidence attributes a certain neurological phenomenon to a near death experience. Read More
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Feed: All Latest
BadRabbit Ransomware, Linked to NotPetya Outbreak, Sweeps Russia and Ukraine"BadRabbit," linked to the authors of NotPetya, hits hundreds of victims, including subways, an airport, and media firms.
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Gizmodo
This Bear’s Grotesquely Enlarged Tongue Is the Stuff of Nightmares The bear’s tongue was so swollen it had been dragging along the floor. (Image: The University of Edinburgh’s Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies) Think you’re having a bad day? Check out this bear and his impossibly swollen tongue. Alarmed by the bear’s predicament, an international team of experts were asked to perform an emergency procedure, giving the poor animal a new lease on life. The
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New on MIT Technology Review
Mastercard’s New Blockchain Is Interesting Because of What It Leaves Out
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UK probes Equifax hackingBritain's financial watchdog on Tuesday said it was investigating a massive hack of the US consumer credit rating service Equifax that affected potentially almost 700,000 British customers.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Organic material mattersResearchers test the capability of a novel nanoparticle to remove cadmium toxicity from a freshwater system
2h
Ars Technica
The LA Metro wants tech firms to help it launch a new kind of transit Enlarge (credit: LA Metro ) LOS ANGELES—The Los Angeles Metropolitan Transit Authority is soliciting proposals from tech companies to help it build a software-driven ridesharing service called MicroTransit that would augment its existing network of trains and buses. The service would feature shuttle-like vehicles smaller than buses but larger than private automobiles, and it would aim to offer a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Indigenous groups warn Paris accord imperiled by deforestationIndigenous leaders and forestry experts warned on Tuesday that without more funding and protection for forests and their peoples, the world will fail to meet the ambitious goals set by the Paris Agreement.
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The Atlantic
'I Will Not Be Complicit' Arizona Republican Jeff Flake announced his decision to retire from the U.S. Senate on Tuesday, pairing the news with a blistering attack on President Trump. “Reckless, outrageous, and undignified behavior has become excused and countenanced as ‘telling it like it is,’ when it is actually just reckless, outrageous, and undignified,” Flake said on the Senate floor. “And when such behavior emanates
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New combination therapy of registered drugs shortens anti-Wolbachia therapyResearchers have found a way of significantly reducing the treatment required for lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis from several weeks to seven days. By targeting Wolbachia, a bacterial symbiont that the filarial parasites need to live, the team has discovered a drug synergy that enables effective treatment over a shorter time.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Heart failure therapy hope as drug blocks deadly muscle scarringA potential treatment to prevent deadly muscle scarring that contributes to chronic heart failure has been uncovered.
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Feed: All Latest
Facing Prospect of Regulation, Twitter Plans New Ad DisclosuresAs lawmakers discuss new rules for political ads, Twitter says it will reveal who's paying for ads and who's being targeted.
2h
Big Think
New Study Confirms Three Methods for Controlling Your Dreams Researchers at the University of Adelaide found high success rates for lucid dreaming. Read More
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Gizmodo
I Put Diesel In My Car's Gasoline Tank! What Do I Do Now? Image: Jason Torchinsky It’s thankfully a rare problem but a horrifying one: an unwitting driver accidentally dumps diesel fuel into their gasoline-powered car, somehow bypassing the differently sized nozzles. This is disastrous for your engine, so if it happens, here’s what to do next. Hello! This is the beginning of what will be a regular feature on this internet website: A column in which I in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sophisticated DNA labs unveiled to help trace the missingState-of-the-art laboratories were unveiled Tuesday in the Netherlands to help millions of families track down loved ones missing in conflicts and disasters around the world through new, sophisticated DNA tests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists explore national security implications of gene editingA trio of scientists from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the Morgridge Institute for Research participated in an international think tank this month on the intersection of genome editing technology and national security.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Morgridge, UW scientists explore national security implications of gene editingA trio of scientists from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the Morgridge Institute for Research participated in an international think tank this month on the intersection of genome editing technology and national security.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers introduce new method for monitoring Indian Summer MonsoonResearchers from Florida State University have created a tool for objectively defining the onset and demise of the Indian Summer Monsoon—a colossal weather system that affects billions of people annually.
2h
The Atlantic
Full Transcript: Senator Jeff Flake Announces He Won't Seek Reelection In a surprise reveal on Tuesday, Arizona Senator Jeff Flake announced that he will not seek reelection in 2018, becoming the second Republican in the upper chamber to forgo a campaign next year. Like Tennessee Senator Bob Corker, who made a similar announcement last month, Flake has been a vocal critic of the Trump administration. And like Corker, Flake seems poised to use his newfound freedom to
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Genetics may put a person at risk of high triglycerides, but adopting a healthy diet can helpTriglycerides, a type of fat in the blood, are important for good health. But having high triglycerides might increase a person's risk of heart disease, and may be a sign of metabolic syndrome—a combination of high blood pressure, high blood sugar, and too much fat accumulation at the waist. People with metabolic syndrome have increased risk for heart disease, diabetes, and stroke.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Single nanoparticle mapping paves the way for better nanotechnologyResearchers have developed a method that makes it possible to map the individual responses of nanoparticles in different situations and contexts. The results pave the way for better nanomaterials and safer nanotechnology.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
High-speed locomotion neurons found in the brainstemA clearly defined subpopulation of neurons in the brainstem is essential to execute locomotion at high speeds. Interestingly, these high-speed neurons are intermingled with others that can elicit immediate stopping.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Seasonality of hair lossA new study explores the relationship between seasonality and hair loss at a population level using Google Trends data.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel histone modifications couple metabolism to gene activityScientists have discovered that two new classes of histone modifications couple cellular metabolism to gene activity.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Twitter to disclose info on political ads amid scrutinyTwitter says it will provide more information about political ads on its service, including who is funding them and how they are targeted.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Siletzia's origin along an oceanic spreading center: What's Bremerton got to do with it?Fifty million years ago, Bremerton, Washington, may have looked a lot like Iceland: hot new land atop an oceanic spreading center. That land was part of the Siletzia terrane, a thick wedge of basaltic crust that extends from Oregon to British Columbia.
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The Scientist RSS
The Weird Growth Strategy of Earths First TreesAncient fossils reveal how wood-less trees got so big: by continuously ripping apart their xylem and knitting it back together.
2h
Live Science
Brits' Fondness for Feeding Birds Is Changing Their BeaksIn the U.K., a long-standing national habit of feeding wild birds is changing the shape of certain species' beaks.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Managing risky behavior reduces future incarceration among aggressive juvenile offendersClinically aggressive juvenile offenders on probation in Cook County, Illinois, who participated in a two-week intervention program focusing on reducing risky behavior were four times less likely to be incarcerated in the 12 months after the intervention than their peers who participated in an information-based health promotion program.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Siletzia's origin along an oceanic spreading center: What's Bremerton got to do with it?Fifty million years ago, Bremerton, Washington, may have looked a lot like Iceland: hot new land atop an oceanic spreading center. That land was part of the Siletzia terrane, a thick wedge of basaltic crust that extends from Oregon to British Columbia.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Saudi Arabia plans to build futuristic city for innovatorsSaudi Arabia's powerful crown prince on Tuesday announced plans to build a futuristic city run entirely on alternative sources of energy and said the ultraconservative kingdom must return to "moderate Islam."
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Taste, not appearance, drives corals to eat plasticsScientists have long known that marine animals mistakenly eat plastic debris because the tiny bits of floating plastic might look like prey.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
North Atlantic right whale carcass spotted in MassachusettsAnother rare North Atlantic right whale has been found dead, adding to an already unusually high mortality rate this year, according to an animal welfare organization.
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Gizmodo
This $19 Rechargeable Flashlight Puts Out Nearly 1,000 Lumens Aukey 960 Lumen LED Flashlight , $19 with code 5UII9CEH Update : Sold out This might look like any other miniature LED flashlight at first glance, but at 960 lumens, it’s far brighter than just about any other flashlight of its size, and its built-in USB rechargeable battery is a luxury as well. Get it for $19 with promo code 5UII9CEH.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Noninvasive brain imaging shows readiness of trainees to perform operationsWhile simulation platforms have been used to train surgeons before they enter an actual operating room (OR), few studies have evaluated how well trainees transfer those skills from the simulator to the OR. Now, a study that used noninvasive brain imaging to evaluate brain activity has found that simulator-trained medical students successfully transferred those skills to operating on cadavers and w
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A definitive method to detect wildfire tainted wine grapesWine producers and grape growers have a new, powerful tool at their disposal to help manage the impact of grapes exposed to smoke from forest fires. Researchers have devised a new analytical test to precisely and accurately measure the amount of volatile phenols-compounds absorbed by grapes when exposed to smoke that can impact wine flavor -- that are present in the fruit prior to wine production.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Antibiotics from a 'molecular pencil sharpener'Scientists have discovered a 'molecular pencil sharpener' that chews away its outer coating to release a powerful antibiotic. Their discovery opens the door to finding new antibacterial agents and drugs to fight toxins.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A quantum spin liquidResearchers report creating a metal oxide with a honeycomb lattice that scientists have sought to advance quantum computing research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US dollar lures investors at the expense of the euroA worldwide shift in the appetite for currency since the 2008 global financial crisis appears to have hurt the Eurozone and helped the United States, according to new research from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Automatic acoustic gunshot sensor technology may benefit shooting victimsA number of U.S. cities have installed acoustic gunshot sensor technology to accurately locate shooting scenes and potential gunshot victims, but the effectiveness of this technology for saving lives had not been studied until surgeons at the University of California, San Francisco-East Bay in Oakland, Calif., found that this sensor technology may benefit shooting victims by helping them get to th
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nurses' depression tied to increased likelihood of medical errorsDepression is common among nurses and is linked to a higher likelihood they'll make medical errors, new research suggests. The study found that more than half of nurses who took part in a national survey reported sub-optimal physical and mental health.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Separate but unequal: NYU Metro Center Report examines segregation in NYC schoolsA new report by the Metropolitan Center for Research on Equity and the Transformation of Schools at New York University (NYU Metro Center) explores patterns of segregation in New York City public schools and finds a link between increased school diversity and modest academic benefits.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Electronic entropy enhances water splittingResearchers have long known that cerium is the best element to use when splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen—a key technique in creating hydrogen gas for fuel. But why, exactly, cerium is so successful has been far less understood.
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Ars Technica
Dealmaster: Grab a Dell desktop PC with 16GB of RAM for $620 Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our friends at TechBargains , we have another round of deals to share. Today's list is led by a familiar face, as the steep discount on Dell's XPS 8910 desktop PC that we noted in last week's Dealmaster is back again. No points for originality, sure, but a deal's a deal. Beyond that, Amazon is running a number of discounts on its Kindle devices, while Dell is doing
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Gizmodo
'Bad Rabbit' Ransomware Strikes Russia and Ukraine [Update: Vaccine Found] Photo: AP A new ransomware attack dubbed “Bad Rabbit” is sweeping Russia and Ukraine, among other Eastern European countries, according to several reports. It’s too early to tell how far reaching the event will be, or at this time who has been hit thus far, but a series of reports concerning attacks on Ukrainian transportation and infrastructure have alarms blaring. Advertisement Russian cybersec
3h
New on MIT Technology Review
CRISPR, the Future of Life Science Research But Still Much to LearnBuilding a scientific framework that distills the rules of life is a challenge scientists are now tackling. This is leading to an exciting array of projects that will lead to breakthroughs in such things as treating diseases and in understanding aging.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
Why I risked my life to expose a government massacre | Anjan SundaramA war zone can pass for a mostly peaceful place when no one is watching, says investigative journalist and TED Fellow Anjan Sundaram. In this short, incisive talk, he takes us inside the conflict in the Central African Republic, where he saw the methodical preparation for ethnic cleansing, and shares a lesson about why it's important to bear witness to other people's suffering. "Ignored people in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Anticipating aftershocks: Scientists improve seismic forecasts for CaliforniaSouthern California has the highest earthquake risk of any region in the U.S., but exactly how risky and where the greatest risks lie remains an open question.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New technology could cut MRI scan timesPatients who have to undergo a magnetic resonance imaging scan may be spared the ordeal of having to lie still in the scanner for up to 45 minutes, thanks to new technology patented by Rice University, also known as "compressed sensing" technology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Raton Basin earthquakes linked to oil and gas fluid injectionsA rash of earthquakes in southern Colorado and northern New Mexico recorded between 2008 and 2010 was likely due to fluids pumped deep underground during oil and gas wastewater disposal, says a new University of Colorado Boulder study.
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The Atlantic
World Series Hopes Ride on a Pair of Aces Baseball retains its sly humor. The early talk of the 2017 postseason centered on the diminishing importance of starting pitchers and the preeminence of bullpens ; games stretched well beyond their time slots as managers brought in scores of fresh arms. The October ace—long one of baseball’s sturdiest archetypes—had all of a sudden become outdated, his endurance and inning-by-inning know-how no l
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genetic causes of children's food allergiesWhat role do genes play in egg, milk, and nut allergies? Scientists have found five genetic risk loci that point to the importance of skin and mucous membrane barriers and the immune system in the development of food allergies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sacrificing one life to save others: Psychopaths' force for 'greater good'New research shows that people would sacrifice one person to save a larger group of people -- and in addition, the force with which they carry out these actions could be predicted by psychopathic traits.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First drug to prevent the onset of chemotherapy-induced neuropathy testedPeripheral neuropathy is a very common side-effect of chemotherapy and may eventually lead to early discontinuation of treatment. New research has led to the identification and successful testing of a new molecule capable of preventing this neurological complication. This molecule could potentially become the first existing treatment to prevent this frequent adverse effect and improve the quality
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA examines heavy rainfall generated by former Typhoon LanWhen Typhoon Lan made landfall in Japan on Oct. 22, the Global Precipitation Measurement mission core satellite or GPM analyzed the storm and added up the high rainfall that it generated. By Oct. 24, Extra-tropical cyclone Lan moved east into the Bering Sea and generated storm warnings.
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Gizmodo
How Apps Use Your Photos to Track Your Location Well she sneaks around the world from Kiev to Carolina If you’re worried about apps tracking your location, it’s not enough to limit your location sharing. You need to limit camera-roll sharing too. If you’ve ever given an app access to your camera roll—to take photos, or store screenshots, or any given reason—you’ve also let it see where all those photos were taken. Felix Krause, an iOS develope
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Live Science
Scientists Want to Help You Have Lucid DreamsIf you've ever realized you were dreaming while you were still asleep, you've had what's called a lucid dream.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Kindred Robots Are Learning to Grab and Sort Clothing in a Warehouse for the Gap
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When humidity benefits batteriesSometimes you can find simple solutions to complex problems, as demonstrated by the team of INRS's Dr. Lionel Roué, which cleverly improved the performance of silicon-based electrodes for lithium-ion batteries. It is well known that the robustness of the electrodes in these batteries, which are used in a host of devices, is key to their useful life
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NIH BRAIN Initiative launches cell censusA catalog of the brain's "parts list," the NIH BRAIN Initiative Cell Census Network (BICCN) will provide researchers with a comprehensive reference of the diverse cell types in human, monkey, and mouse brain. A network of integrated centers, collaborating laboratories, and data resources will be funded by 11 grants projected to total about $50 million annually over five years. All data will be sha
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Gizmodo
The United States Has Lost One of Its Greatest Astronauts Taken in June 1973, this photo shows Paul Weitz operating the control and display console of the Apollo Telescope Mount solar observatory. (Image: NASA) Veteran astronaut Paul J. Weitz has died at the age of 85. Among his many accomplishments, Weitz served as a pilot aboard the Skylab space station, commanded the first flight of the Space Shuttle Challenger, and logged nearly 800 total hours in s
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Popular Science
Can you really die from a broken heart? Health Extreme emotional distress can cause the heart muscles to weaken. The severe emotional distress that accompanies a broken heart can sometimes, in rare cases, lead to life threatening physical changes.
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The Atlantic
When the Facebook Traffic Goes Away In newsrooms in six countries scattered across the globe, alarm bells started to go off over the weekend: Something very strange was happening to the newsrooms’ posts on Facebook. Instead of appearing in the News Feeds of people following them on the social network, the posts were appearing in a new, separate section of the site, termed Explore Feed. Facebook in Slovakia, Sri Lanka, Serbia, Boliv
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NYT > Science
Lights, Camera and, Yes, Music: Reporting From the Operating Room as Doctors Perform Fetal SurgeryNeil Young was singing, “I want to see you dance again,” as Lexi Royer’s son came into view. He seemed to be kneeling inside her womb.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Earliest known marine navigation tool revealed with scanning technologyDetails of the earliest known marine navigation tool, discovered in a shipwreck, have been revealed thanks to state-of-the-art scanning technology.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genetics may put a person at risk of high triglycerides, but adopting a healthy diet can helpTriglycerides, a type of fat in the blood, are important for good health. But having high triglycerides might increase a person's risk of heart disease, and may be a sign of metabolic syndrome.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A quarter of problematic pot users have anxiety disorders, many since childhoodAbout a quarter of adults whose marijuana use is problematic in early adulthood have anxiety disorders in childhood and late adolescence, according to new data.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Taste, not appearance, drives corals to eat plasticsScientists have long known that marine animals mistakenly eat plastic debris because tiny bits of floating plastic look like prey. But a new study of plastic ingestion by corals suggests there may be an additional reason for the potentially harmful behavior: The plastic simply tastes good. Chemical additives in the plastic may be acting as a feeding stimulant.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Wing prints' may identify individual bats as effectively as fingerprints identify peopleFor decades, bats have defied scientists' best ideas for keeping track of individuals, a critical element in wildlife research. Biologists have now discovered a means of identifying individual bats that may be as universal, distinctive, permanent and collectable as fingerprints: bats' wings.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Arsenic can cause cancer decades after exposure endsArsenic in drinking water may have one of the longest dormancy periods of any carcinogen. By tracking the mortality rates of people exposed to arsenic-contaminated drinking water in a region in Chile, the researchers provide evidence of increases in lung, bladder, and kidney cancer even 40 years after high arsenic exposures ended.
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Gizmodo
Tesla Just Installed a Solar Panel and Batteries For Puerto Rico's Children's Hospital Photo: AP Tesla just took a major step in Puerto Rico, installing its first solar power system with storage at Hospital del Niño in San Juan. In a country where the power is still out for more than 2.5 million, doctors have performed surgery by cell phone light and the hum of diesel generators is a near constant, the installation is a major success. Advertisement “We built this in a week,” one of
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The Scientist RSS
Opinion: Share Your DataOur analysis of a collection of open-access datasets quantifies their benefit to the scientific community.
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Gizmodo
Zelda: Breath Of The Wild Is Getting A Second Wind Thanks To Switch Update Last week, a Nintendo Switch update made it possible to share short videos of select first-party games on social media. The feature isn’t perfect, but it doesn’t matter. Right now, despite being in the middle of fall game season, many video game fans are talking about months-old Nintendo releases instead. Zelda , unsurprisingly, is the most popular shared game on Twitter’s #NintendoSwitch video t
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New Scientist - News
A smart city in China tracks every citizen and yours could tooHangzhou’s smart city project optimises the city by tracking each citizen – and it’s been so successful that the concept is set to be exported around the world
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Efficient large-scale wind turbine deployment can meet global electricity generation needs [Physical Sciences]Miller and Kleidon (1) study future global deployment of wind turbines. They use a general circulation model (GCM) with 2.8° resolution to simulate the electricity generation for different wind-power deployments using global constant installed capacity densities. Results from the simulations with the maximum electricity generation over land and over water...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Badger and Volker: Correctly estimating wind resources at large scales requires more than simple extrapolation [Physical Sciences]Badger and Volker (1) claim that our paper (2) incorrectly estimates the wind energy resource and underestimates it by more than 50%. However, a detailed reading of their work (3) reveals that their estimates are consistent with ours (and others; table 2 of ref. 2), yet their extrapolation to larger...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Simulations predict microbial responses in the environment? This environment disagrees retrospectively [Biological Sciences]In their recent study, Hu et al. (1) simulated in the laboratory the deep-sea oil plume of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) disaster, and claim successful enrichment of the dominant oil-degrading bacteria found in the environment. Although the simulation offers valuable insights into microbial succession patterns following the addition of oil,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Delmont and Eren: Strain variants and population structure during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill [Biological Sciences]A laboratory simulation revealed the succession patterns of oil degradation and microbial community changes during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, one of the largest environmental catastrophes in human history (1). Hu et al. successfully recovered genomes of several oil-degrading bacteria, including one of “Candidatus Bermanella macondoprimitus,” with high identity to...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Black-swan events: Population crashes or temporary emigration? [Biological Sciences]Using the Global Population Dynamics Database (GPDD) to identify extreme events in abundance times series, Anderson et al. (1) state that “Black-swan events manifest primarily as population die-offs and crashes (86%) rather than unexpected increases, and ignoring heavy-tailed process noise leads to an underestimate in the magnitude of population crashes.”...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Youngflesh and Lynch: Migration and population growth rate in animal black-swan events [Biological Sciences]We thank Youngflesh and Lynch (1) for their thoughtful comments on our paper (2). As they note, we should have mentioned immigration and emigration alongside the intrinsic population properties (e.g., population birth rate, mortality, and age at maturity) and extrinsic causes of black-swan events (e.g., extreme climate, disease, predation, competition,...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Unique amalgamation of primary and secondary structural elements transform peptaibols into potent bioactive cell-penetrating peptides [Chemistry]Mass-spectrometry-based metabolomics and molecular phylogeny data were used to identify a metabolically prolific strain of Tolypocladium that was obtained from a deep-water Great Lakes sediment sample. An investigation of the isolate’s secondary metabolome resulted in the purification of a 22-mer peptaibol, gichigamin A (1). This peptidic natural product exhibited an...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Topological phenomena in classical optical networks [Physics]We propose a scheme to realize a topological insulator with optical-passive elements and analyze the effects of Kerr nonlinearities in its topological behavior. In the linear regime, our design gives rise to an optical spectrum with topological features and where the bandwidths and bandgaps are dramatically broadened. The resulting edge...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Mechanistic principles underlying regulation of the actin cytoskeleton by phosphoinositides [Biochemistry]The actin cytoskeleton powers membrane deformation during many cellular processes, such as migration, morphogenesis, and endocytosis. Membrane phosphoinositides, especially phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2], regulate the activities of many actin-binding proteins (ABPs), including profilin, cofilin, Dia2, N-WASP, ezrin, and moesin, but the underlying molecular mechanisms have remain
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Broad role for YBX1 in defining the small noncoding RNA composition of exosomes [Biochemistry]RNA is secreted from cells enclosed within extracellular vesicles (EVs). Defining the RNA composition of EVs is challenging due to their coisolation with contaminants, lack of knowledge of the mechanisms of RNA sorting into EVs, and limitations of conventional RNA-sequencing methods. Here we present our observations using thermostable group II...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Staufen1 inhibits MyoD translation to actively maintain muscle stem cell quiescence [Cell Biology]Tissue regeneration depends on the timely activation of adult stem cells. In skeletal muscle, the adult stem cells maintain a quiescent state and proliferate upon injury. We show that muscle stem cells (MuSCs) use direct translational repression to maintain the quiescent state. High-resolution single-molecule and single-cell analyses demonstrate that quiescent...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Content of mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) in cardiomyocytes is regulated by microRNA-1 in physiologic and pathologic hypertrophy [Cell Biology]The mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter complex (MCUC) is a multimeric ion channel which, by tuning Ca2+ influx into the mitochondrial matrix, finely regulates metabolic energy production. In the heart, this dynamic control of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake is fundamental for cardiomyocytes to adapt to either physiologic or pathologic stresses. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Modulation of apoptotic response by LAR family phosphatases-cIAP1 signaling during urinary tract morphogenesis [Developmental Biology]The elimination of unwanted cells by apoptosis is necessary for tissue morphogenesis. However, the cellular control of morphogenetic apoptosis is poorly understood, notably the modulation of cell sensitivity to apoptotic stimuli. Ureter maturation, the process by which the ureter is displaced to the bladder wall, represents an exquisite example of...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Mutator genomes decay, despite sustained fitness gains, in a long-term experiment with bacteria [Evolution]Understanding the extreme variation among bacterial genomes remains an unsolved challenge in evolutionary biology, despite long-standing debate about the relative importance of natural selection, mutation, and random drift. A potentially important confounding factor is the variation in mutation rates between lineages and over evolutionary history, which has been documented in...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Kinship and familiarity mitigate costs of social conflict between Seychelles warbler neighbors [Evolution]Because virtually all organisms compete with others in their social environment, mechanisms that reduce conflict between interacting individuals are crucial for the evolution of stable families, groups, and societies. Here, we tested whether costs of social conflict over territorial space between Seychelles warblers (Acrocephalus sechellensis) are mitigated by kin-selected (genetic...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
UTX-guided neural crest function underlies craniofacial features of Kabuki syndrome [Genetics]Kabuki syndrome, a congenital craniofacial disorder, manifests from mutations in an X-linked histone H3 lysine 27 demethylase (UTX/KDM6A) or a H3 lysine 4 methylase (KMT2D). However, the cellular and molecular etiology of histone-modifying enzymes in craniofacial disorders is unknown. We now establish Kabuki syndrome as a neurocristopathy, whereby the majority...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Human papillomavirus oncoproteins induce a reorganization of epithelial-associated {gamma}{delta} T cells promoting tumor formation [Immunology and Inflammation]It has been shown that γδ T cells protect against the formation of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in several models. However, the role of γδ T cells in human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated uterine cervical SCC, the third-leading cause of death by cancer in women, is unknown. Here, we investigated the impact...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Packaging and transfer of mitochondrial DNA via exosomes regulate escape from dormancy in hormonal therapy-resistant breast cancer [Medical Sciences]The horizontal transfer of mtDNA and its role in mediating resistance to therapy and an exit from dormancy have never been investigated. Here we identified the full mitochondrial genome in circulating extracellular vesicles (EVs) from patients with hormonal therapy-resistant (HTR) metastatic breast cancer. We generated xenograft models of HTR metastatic...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Human papillomavirus oncogenes reprogram the cervical cancer microenvironment independently of and synergistically with estrogen [Medical Sciences]High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) infect epithelial cells and are causally associated with cervical cancer, but HPV infection is not sufficient for carcinogenesis. Previously, we reported that estrogen signaling in the stromal tumor microenvironment is associated with cervical cancer maintenance and progression. We have now determined how HPV oncogenes and estrogen...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
PAF promotes stemness and radioresistance of glioma stem cells [Medical Sciences]An integrated genomic and functional analysis to elucidate DNA damage signaling factors promoting self-renewal of glioma stem cells (GSCs) identified proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-associated factor (PAF) up-regulation in glioblastoma. PAF is preferentially overexpressed in GSCs. Its depletion impairs maintenance of self-renewal without promoting differentiation and reduces tumor-initia
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Cardiovascular homeostasis dependence on MICU2, a regulatory subunit of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter [Medical Sciences]Comparative analyses of transcriptional profiles from humans and mice with cardiovascular pathologies revealed consistently elevated expression of MICU2, a regulatory subunit of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter complex. To determine if MICU2 expression was cardioprotective, we produced and characterized Micu2−/− mice. Mutant mice had left atrial enlargement and Micu2−/− cardiomyocytes had...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Spatial organization of a model 15-member human gut microbiota established in gnotobiotic mice [Microbiology]Knowledge of the spatial organization of the gut microbiota is important for understanding the physical and molecular interactions among its members. These interactions are thought to influence microbial succession, community stability, syntrophic relationships, and resiliency in the face of perturbations. The complexity and dynamism of the gut microbiota pose considerable...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Visual perception as retrospective Bayesian decoding from high- to low-level features [Neuroscience]When a stimulus is presented, its encoding is known to progress from low- to high-level features. How these features are decoded to produce perception is less clear, and most models assume that decoding follows the same low- to high-level hierarchy of encoding. There are also theories arguing for global precedence,...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Opioid and orexin hedonic hotspots in rat orbitofrontal cortex and insula [Neuroscience]Hedonic hotspots are brain sites where particular neurochemical stimulations causally amplify the hedonic impact of sensory rewards, such as “liking” for sweetness. Here, we report the mapping of two hedonic hotspots in cortex, where mu opioid or orexin stimulations enhance the hedonic impact of sucrose taste. One hedonic hotspot was...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
M344 promotes nonamyloidogenic amyloid precursor protein processing while normalizing Alzheimer’s disease genes and improving memory [Neuroscience]Alzheimer’s disease (AD) comprises multifactorial ailments for which current therapeutic strategies remain insufficient to broadly address the underlying pathophysiology. Epigenetic gene regulation relies upon multifactorial processes that regulate multiple gene and protein pathways, including those involved in AD. We therefore took an epigenetic approach where a single drug would simultaneously..
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Perceiving social interactions in the posterior superior temporal sulcus [Neuroscience]Primates are highly attuned not just to social characteristics of individual agents, but also to social interactions between multiple agents. Here we report a neural correlate of the representation of social interactions in the human brain. Specifically, we observe a strong univariate response in the posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS)...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Dynein/dynactin is necessary for anterograde transport of Mbp mRNA in oligodendrocytes and for myelination in vivo [Neuroscience]Oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system produce myelin, a lipid-rich, multilamellar sheath that surrounds axons and promotes the rapid propagation of action potentials. A critical component of myelin is myelin basic protein (MBP), expression of which requires anterograde mRNA transport followed by local translation at the developing myelin sheath. Although...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
{beta}2-Adrenoceptor signaling in airway epithelial cells promotes eosinophilic inflammation, mucous metaplasia, and airway contractility [Pharmacology]The mostly widely used bronchodilators in asthma therapy are β2-adrenoreceptor (β2AR) agonists, but their chronic use causes paradoxical adverse effects. We have previously determined that β2AR activation is required for expression of the asthma phenotype in mice, but the cell types involved are unknown. We now demonstrate that β2AR signaling...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Pathogenesis of hypothyroidism-induced NAFLD is driven by intra- and extrahepatic mechanisms [Physiology]Hypothyroidism, a metabolic disease characterized by low thyroid hormone (TH) and high thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels in the serum, is strongly associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Hypothyroidism-induced NAFLD has generally been attributed to reduced TH signaling in the liver with a consequent decrease in lipid utilization. Here, we...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Engineering sulfur storage in maize seed proteins without apparent yield loss [Agricultural Sciences]Sulfur assimilation may limit the pool of methionine and cysteine available for incorporation into zeins, the major seed storage proteins in maize. This hypothesis was tested by producing transgenic maize with deregulated sulfate reduction capacity achieved through leaf-specific expression of the Escherichia coli enzyme 3′-phosphoadenosine-5′-phosphosulfate reductase (EcPAPR) that resulted in...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Small-molecule inhibitors directly target CARD9 and mimic its protective variant in inflammatory bowel disease [Biochemistry]Advances in human genetics have dramatically expanded our understanding of complex heritable diseases. Genome-wide association studies have identified an allelic series of CARD9 variants associated with increased risk of or protection from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The predisposing variant of CARD9 is associated with increased NF-κB–mediated cytokine production. Conversely, the...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
PrimPol is required for replication reinitiation after mtDNA damage [Biochemistry]Eukaryotic PrimPol is a recently discovered DNA-dependent DNA primase and translesion synthesis DNA polymerase found in the nucleus and mitochondria. Although PrimPol has been shown to be required for repriming of stalled replication forks in the nucleus, its role in mitochondria has remained unresolved. Here we demonstrate in vivo and...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Human SHMT inhibitors reveal defective glycine import as a targetable metabolic vulnerability of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma [Biochemistry]The enzyme serine hydroxymethyltransferse (SHMT) converts serine into glycine and a tetrahydrofolate-bound one-carbon unit. Folate one-carbon units support purine and thymidine synthesis, and thus cell growth. Mammals have both cytosolic SHMT1 and mitochondrial SHMT2, with the mitochondrial isozyme strongly up-regulated in cancer. Here we show genetically that dual SHMT1/2 knockout...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Pressure effects on collective density fluctuations in water and protein solutions [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Neutron Brillouin scattering and molecular dynamics simulations have been used to investigate protein hydration water density fluctuations as a function of pressure. Our results show significant differences between the pressure and density dependence of collective dynamics in bulk water and in concentrated protein solutions. Pressure-induced changes in the tetrahedral order...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Multiple interactions between an Arf/GEF complex and charged lipids determine activation kinetics on the membrane [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Lipidated small GTPases and their regulators need to bind to membranes to propagate actions in the cell, but an integrated understanding of how the lipid bilayer exerts its effect has remained elusive. Here we focused on ADP ribosylation factor (Arf) GTPases, which orchestrate a variety of regulatory functions in lipid...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Molecular basis for unique specificity of human TRAF4 for platelets GPIb{beta} and GPVI [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-receptor associated factor 4 (TRAF4), an adaptor protein with E3-ligase activity, is involved in embryogenesis, cancer initiation and progression, and platelet receptor (GPIb-IX-V complex and GPVI)-mediated signaling for reactive oxygen species (ROS) production that initiates thrombosis at arterial shears. Disruption of platelet receptors and the TRAF4 interaction...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Self-association of a highly charged arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptide [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements reveal a striking difference in intermolecular interactions between two short highly charged peptides—deca-arginine (R10) and deca-lysine (K10). Comparison of SAXS curves at high and low salt concentration shows that R10 self-associates, while interactions between K10 chains are purely repulsive. The self-association of R10 is stronger...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Evidence of evolutionary selection for cotranslational folding [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Recent experiments and simulations have demonstrated that proteins can fold on the ribosome. However, the extent and generality of fitness effects resulting from cotranslational folding remain open questions. Here we report a genome-wide analysis that uncovers evidence of evolutionary selection for cotranslational folding. We describe a robust statistical approach to...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Intragenic DNA methylation and BORIS-mediated cancer-specific splicing contribute to the Warburg effect [Cell Biology]Aberrant alternative splicing and epigenetic changes are both associated with various cancers, but epigenetic regulation of alternative splicing in cancer is largely unknown. Here we report that the intragenic DNA methylation-mediated binding of Brother of Regulator of Imprinted Sites (BORIS) at the alternative exon of Pyruvate Kinase (PKM) is associated...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Phylogenetic diversity anomaly in angiosperms between eastern Asia and eastern North America [Ecology]Although eastern Asia (EAS) and eastern North America (ENA) have similar climates, plant species richness in EAS greatly exceeds that in ENA. The degree to which this diversity difference reflects the ages of the floras or their rates of evolutionary diversification has not been quantified. Measures of species diversity that...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Soilborne fungi have host affinity and host-specific effects on seed germination and survival in a lowland tropical forest [Ecology]The Janzen–Connell (JC) hypothesis provides a conceptual framework for explaining the maintenance of tree diversity in tropical forests. Its central tenet—that recruits experience high mortality near conspecifics and at high densities—assumes a degree of host specialization in interactions between plants and natural enemies. Studies confirming JC effects have focused primarily...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Competitive network determines the direction of the diversity-function relationship [Ecology]The structure of the competitive network is an important driver of biodiversity and coexistence in natural communities. In addition to determining which species survive, the nature and intensity of competitive interactions within the network also affect the growth, productivity, and abundances of those individuals that persist. As such, the competitive...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Macrophage-like nanoparticles concurrently absorbing endotoxins and proinflammatory cytokines for sepsis management [Engineering]Sepsis, resulting from uncontrolled inflammatory responses to bacterial infections, continues to cause high morbidity and mortality worldwide. Currently, effective sepsis treatments are lacking in the clinic, and care remains primarily supportive. Here we report the development of macrophage biomimetic nanoparticles for the management of sepsis. The nanoparticles, made by wrapping...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Diel cycling and long-term persistence of viruses in the ocean’s euphotic zone [Environmental Sciences]Viruses are fundamental components of marine microbial communities that significantly influence oceanic productivity, biogeochemistry, and ecosystem processes. Despite their importance, the temporal activities and dynamics of viral assemblages in natural settings remain largely unexplored. Here we report the transcriptional activities and variability of dominant dsDNA viruses in the open ocean’s..
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Insight into the growth pattern and bone fusion of basal birds from an Early Cretaceous enantiornithine bird [Evolution]Bird skeletons exhibit remarkable modifications that allow for flight. The most distinguishable features are the fusion of the bones in the hand, feet, and pelvis into composite rigid and bony structures. However, the historical origins of these avian bone fusions remain elusive because of the rarity of transitional fossils and...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
FGF4 retrogene on CFA12 is responsible for chondrodystrophy and intervertebral disc disease in dogs [Genetics]Chondrodystrophy in dogs is defined by dysplastic, shortened long bones and premature degeneration and calcification of intervertebral discs. Independent genome-wide association analyses for skeletal dysplasia (short limbs) within a single breed (PBonferroni = 0.01) and intervertebral disc disease (IVDD) across breeds (PBonferroni = 4.0 × 10−10) both identified a significant...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Selective neutralization of IL-12 p40 monomer induces death in prostate cancer cells via IL-12-IFN-{gamma} [Immunology and Inflammation]Cancer cells are adept at evading cell death, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. IL-12 plays a critical role in the early inflammatory response to infection and in the generation of T-helper type 1 cells, favoring cell-mediated immunity. IL-12 is composed of two different subunits, p40 and p35. This...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Breast tumor cell-specific knockout of Twist1 inhibits cancer cell plasticity, dissemination, and lung metastasis in mice [Medical Sciences]Twist1 is an epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT)-inducing transcription factor (TF) that promotes cell migration and invasion. To determine the intrinsic role of Twist1 in EMT and breast cancer initiation, growth, and metastasis, we developed mouse models with an oncogene-induced mammary tumor containing wild-type (WT) Twist1 or tumor cell-specific Twist1 knockout (Twist1TKO)....
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Ninjurin 1 has two opposing functions in tumorigenesis in a p53-dependent manner [Medical Sciences]WT p53 is critical for tumor suppression, whereas mutant p53 promotes tumor progression. Nerve injury-induced protein 1 (Ninj1) is a target of p53 and forms a feedback loop with p53 by repressing p53 mRNA translation. Here, we show that loss of Ninj1 increased mutant p53 expression and, subsequently, enhanced cell...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Inhibition of DAI-dependent necroptosis by the Z-DNA binding domain of the vaccinia virus innate immune evasion protein, E3 [Microbiology]Vaccinia virus (VACV) encodes an innate immune evasion protein, E3, which contains an N-terminal Z-nucleic acid binding (Zα) domain that is critical for pathogenicity in mice. Here we demonstrate that the N terminus of E3 is necessary to inhibit an IFN-primed virus-induced necroptosis. VACV deleted of the Zα domain of...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Maladaptive DNA repair is the ultimate contributor to the death of trimethoprim-treated cells under aerobic and anaerobic conditions [Microbiology]The bactericidal effects of antibiotics are undoubtedly triggered by target-specific interactions, but there is growing evidence that an important aspect of cytotoxicity results from treatment-induced metabolic perturbations. In this study, we characterized molecular mechanisms whereby trimethoprim treatment results in cell death, using Escherichia coli as the model organism. E. coli...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Local synaptic integration enables ON-OFF asymmetric and layer-specific visual information processing in vGluT3 amacrine cell dendrites [Neuroscience]A basic scheme of neuronal organization in the mammalian retina is the segregation of ON and OFF pathways in the inner plexiform layer (IPL), where glutamate is released from ON and OFF bipolar cell terminals in separate inner (ON) and outer (OFF) sublayers in response to light intensity increments and...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
TREM2 deficiency attenuates neuroinflammation and protects against neurodegeneration in a mouse model of tauopathy [Neuroscience]Variants in the gene encoding the triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2) were recently found to increase the risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In the brain, TREM2 is predominately expressed on microglia, and its association with AD adds to increasing evidence implicating a role for the innate...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Transcription factor ISX mediates the cross talk between diet and immunity [Physiology]The intestinal epithelium is a major site for the conversion of dietary β-carotene to retinaldehyde by the enzyme BCO1. The majority of retinaldehyde is further metabolized to retinol (vitamin A), esterified and packaged into triacylglycerol-rich chylomicrons for bodily distribution. Some serve on-site for the synthesis of retinoic acid, a hormone-like...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Natural variation identifies genes affecting drought-induced abscisic acid accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana [Plant Biology]Accumulation of the stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA) in response to drought and low water-potential controls many downstream acclimation mechanisms. However, mechanisms controlling ABA accumulation itself are less known. There was a 10-fold range of variation in ABA levels among nearly 300 Arabidopsis thaliana accessions exposed to the same low...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Disruption and rescue of interareal theta phase coupling and adaptive behavior [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Rescuing executive functions in people with neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders has been a major goal of psychology and neuroscience for decades. Innovative computer-training regimes for executive functions have made tremendous inroads, yet the positive effects of training have not always translated into improved cognitive functioning and often take many days...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Rethinking people’s conceptions of mental life [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]How do people make sense of the emotions, sensations, and cognitive abilities that make up mental life? Pioneering work on the dimensions of mind perception has been interpreted as evidence that people consider mental life to have two core components—experience (e.g., hunger, joy) and agency (e.g., planning, self-control) [Gray HM,...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
How truth wins in opinion dynamics along issue sequences [Social Sciences]How truth wins in social groups is an important open problem. Classic experiments on social groups dealing with truth statement issues present mixed findings on the conditions of truth abandonment and reaching a consensus on the truth. No theory has been developed and evaluated that might integrate these findings with...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Thermosensitivity of growth is determined by chaperone-mediated proteome reallocation [Systems Biology]Maintenance of a properly folded proteome is critical for bacterial survival at notably different growth temperatures. Understanding the molecular basis of thermoadaptation has progressed in two main directions, the sequence and structural basis of protein thermostability and the mechanistic principles of protein quality control assisted by chaperones. Yet we do...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Piff et al., Higher social class predicts increased unethical behavior [Correction]PSYCHOLOGICAL AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES Correction for “Higher social class predicts increased unethical behavior,” by Paul K. Piff, Daniel M. Stancato, Stéphane Côté, Rodolfo Mendoza-Denton, and Dacher Keltner, which was first published February 27, 2012; 10.1073/pnas.1118373109 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 109:4086–4091). The authors note that on page 4088, right column,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Eissa et al., Cross-scale effects of neural interactions during human neocortical seizure activity [Correction]NEUROSCIENCE, APPLIED MATHEMATICS Correction for “Cross-scale effects of neural interactions during human neocortical seizure activity,” by Tahra L. Eissa, Koen Dijkstra, Christoph Brune, Ronald G. Emerson, Michel J. A. M. van Putten, Robert R. Goodman, Guy M. McKhann Jr., Catherine A. Schevon, Wim van Drongelen, and Stephan A. van Gils,...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Spatial structure of gut microbiota Bacteria identified in the gnotobiotic mouse colon by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The spatial organization of bacterial species within the gut is believed to influence the relationships among members of the gut microbial community and between community members and their hosts. However, the spatial structure...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Darwin’s prescient guess [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Pearce et al. (1) have made a bold and challenging attempt to provide a quantitative estimate for the accumulation of nucleobases, like adenine, on the Hadean Earth some 4 billion y ago, before life began. Why bold? There must have been a source of organic compounds for life to begin,...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Lipid sorting and the activity of Arf signaling complexes [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Efficient signal transduction by lipid-anchored small GTPases requires assembly of specific complexes on cell membranes, comprising the small GTPase, and variably their guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), GTPase activating proteins (GAPs), and effectors. In this context, the lipid membrane plays a key role in regulating the structural integrity and thus...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Compartmentalized dendritic signaling in a multitasking retinal interneuron [Neuroscience]The rich diversity of cell types and synaptic motifs in the vertebrate retina provides an excellent platform for uncovering fundamental principles of neural circuit function at the cellular, synaptic, and network levels. In PNAS, Chen et al. (1) report on a remarkable example of compartmentalized dendritic signaling in a retinal...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Distinct ice patterns on solid surfaces with various wettabilities [Applied Physical Sciences]No relationship has been established between surface wettability and ice growth patterns, although ice often forms on top of solid surfaces. Here, we report experimental observations obtained using a process specially designed to avoid the influence of nucleation and describe the wettability-dependent ice morphology on solid surfaces under atmospheric conditions...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Nonequilibrium fluctuations of lipid membranes by the rotating motor protein F1F0-ATP synthase [Biophysics and Computational Biology]ATP synthase is a rotating membrane protein that synthesizes ATP through proton-pumping activity across the membrane. To unveil the mechanical impact of this molecular active pump on the bending properties of its lipid environment, we have functionally reconstituted the ATP synthase in giant unilamellar vesicles and tracked the membrane fluctuations...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Semiconductor quantum dot-sensitized rainbow photocathode for effective photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation [Chemistry]The present study reports the fabrication of CdSe quantum dot (QD)-sensitized photocathodes on NiO-coated indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes and their H2-generating ability upon light irradiation. A well-established spin-coating method was used to deposit CdSe QD stock solution onto the surface of NiO/ITO electrodes, thereby leading to the construction of...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Multielectron, multisubstrate molecular catalysis of electrochemical reactions: Formal kinetic analysis in the total catalysis regime [Chemistry]Cyclic voltammetry responses are derived for two-electron, two-step homogeneous electrocatalytic reactions in the total catalysis regime. The models developed provide a framework for extracting kinetic information from cyclic voltammograms (CVs) obtained in conditions under which the substrate or cosubstrate is consumed in a multielectron redox process, as is particularly prevalent...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Production of diverse PET probes with limited resources: 24 18F-labeled compounds prepared with a single radiosynthesizer [Chemistry]New radiolabeled probes for positron-emission tomography (PET) are providing an ever-increasing ability to answer diverse research and clinical questions and to facilitate the discovery, development, and clinical use of drugs in patient care. Despite the high equipment and facility costs to produce PET probes, many radiopharmacies and radiochemistry laboratories use...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Prebiotic stereoselective synthesis of purine and noncanonical pyrimidine nucleotide from nucleobases and phosphorylated carbohydrates [Chemistry]According to a current “RNA first” model for the origin of life, RNA emerged in some form on early Earth to become the first biopolymer to support Darwinism here. Threose nucleic acid (TNA) and other polyelectrolytes are also considered as the possible first Darwinian biopolymer(s). This model is being developed...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Origin of the RNA world: The fate of nucleobases in warm little ponds [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Before the origin of simple cellular life, the building blocks of RNA (nucleotides) had to form and polymerize in favorable environments on early Earth. At this time, meteorites and interplanetary dust particles delivered organics such as nucleobases (the characteristic molecules of nucleotides) to warm little ponds whose wet–dry cycles promoted...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Formation of most of our coal brought Earth close to global glaciation [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]The bulk of Earth’s coal deposits used as fossil fuel today was formed from plant debris during the late Carboniferous and early Permian periods. The high burial rate of organic carbon correlates with a significant drawdown of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) at that time. A recent analysis of a high-resolution...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Bird specimens track 135 years of atmospheric black carbon and environmental policy [Environmental Sciences]Atmospheric black carbon has long been recognized as a public health and environmental concern. More recently, black carbon has been identified as a major, ongoing contributor to anthropogenic climate change, thus making historical emission inventories of black carbon an essential tool for assessing past climate sensitivity and modeling future climate...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
SMELL-S and SMELL-R: Olfactory tests not influenced by odor-specific insensitivity or prior olfactory experience [Medical Sciences]Smell dysfunction is a common and underdiagnosed medical condition that can have serious consequences. It is also an early biomarker of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, where olfactory deficits precede detectable memory loss. Clinical tests that evaluate the sense of smell face two major challenges. First, human sensitivity to individual...
4h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Big data modeling to predict platelet usage and minimize wastage in a tertiary care system [Medical Sciences]Maintaining a robust blood product supply is an essential requirement to guarantee optimal patient care in modern health care systems. However, daily blood product use is difficult to anticipate. Platelet products are the most variable in daily usage, have short shelf lives, and are also the most expensive to produce,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Core Concept: Circumventing the blood-brain barrier [Neuroscience]If the brain is the body’s central processing unit, then the blood–brain barrier is its firewall. A specialized network of cells that lines the brain’s vascular system, the blood–brain barrier selectively ushers in nutrients and other essential biomolecules while denying entry to most everything else. But the same system that...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Resistivity bound for hydrodynamic bad metals [Physics]We obtain a rigorous upper bound on the resistivity ρ of an electron fluid whose electronic mean free path is short compared with the scale of spatial inhomogeneities. When such a hydrodynamic electron fluid supports a nonthermal diffusion process—such as an imbalance mode between different bands—we show that the resistivity...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
The topography of the environment alters the optimal search strategy for active particles [Physics]In environments with scarce resources, adopting the right search strategy can make the difference between succeeding and failing, even between life and death. At different scales, this applies to molecular encounters in the cell cytoplasm, to animals looking for food or mates in natural landscapes, to rescuers during search and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Configurational entropy measurements in extremely supercooled liquids that break the glass ceiling [Physics]Liquids relax extremely slowly on approaching the glass state. One explanation is that an entropy crisis, because of the rarefaction of available states, makes it increasingly arduous to reach equilibrium in that regime. Validating this scenario is challenging, because experiments offer limited resolution, while numerical studies lag more than eight...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Universal photonic quantum computation via time-delayed feedback [Physics]We propose and analyze a deterministic protocol to generate two-dimensional photonic cluster states using a single quantum emitter via time-delayed quantum feedback. As a physical implementation, we consider a single atom or atom-like system coupled to a 1D waveguide with a distant mirror, where guided photons represent the qubits, while...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Geophysical potential for wind energy over the open oceans [Sustainability Science]Wind turbines continuously remove kinetic energy from the lower troposphere, thereby reducing the wind speed near hub height. The rate of electricity generation in large wind farms containing multiple wind arrays is, therefore, constrained by the rate of kinetic energy replenishment from the atmosphere above. In recent years, a growing...
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The Atlantic
The Strangest Political Attack Ad of 2017 Virginians aren’t enjoying a one-year pause in campaign ads like most other Americans in 2017. The commonwealth’s airwaves are saturated by TV spots from Ralph Northam, the state’s Democratic lieutenant governor, and Ed Gillespie, a former Republican National Committee chairman. Whichever candidate takes the governor’s mansion will also hand their party a morale boost ahead of next year’s midterm
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The Atlantic
Operation Barkhane: France's Counter-Terrorism Forces in Africa What began as a French military reaction to an Islamic insurgency in Mali in 2012 has now grown into a more permanent and cross-border counter-terrorism effort by France and five African nations called Operation Barkhane. Currently, about four thousand French soldiers are involved, based in Mali, Chad, Niger, Ivory Coast, and Burkina Faso, and operating across the entire southern Sahara region. F
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Gizmodo
Microsoft Drops Lawsuit Challenging Justice Department Gag Orders—But the Fight Is Not Finished Photo: Getty After filing a lawsuit against the US government last year, Microsoft announced yesterday that it is dropping the suit challenging the gag orders which frequently accompany warrants used to pry user data from tech companies. The gag orders prevent Microsoft and other companies from alerting users when the companies receive government requests for their data, which Microsoft argued wa
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study investigates effects of domestic violence on workplaces, by asking perpetratorsA new study takes an unconventional approach to understanding the significant effects of domestic violence in the workplace. By seeking the views of the perpetrators of violence, the study found that domestic violence perpetration, like victimization, has costs to the workplace in terms of worker safety and productivity and that most employers lack adequate resources to help perpetrators deal with
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Electronic entropy enhances water splittingAn electron transitioning from state to state increases cerium's entropy, making it ideal for hydrogen production, researchers have found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
No magic wand required: Scientists propose way to turn any cell into any other cell typeIn fairy tales, all it takes to transform a frog into a prince or a mouse into a horse is the wave of a magic wand. But in the real world, transforming one living thing into another isn't so easy. A new paper grounded in both math and biology lays out a way to do it with individual cells. If it works, it could have applications from regenerating diseased or lost tissue to fighting cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The problem with being prettyWhile good-looking people are generally believed to receive more favorable treatment in the hiring process, when it comes to applying for less desirable jobs, such as those with low pay or uninteresting work, attractiveness may be a liability, according to research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Comparison of outcomes for robotic-assisted vs. laparoscopic surgical proceduresTwo studies compare certain outcomes of robotic-assisted vs. laparoscopic surgery for kidney removal or rectal cancer.
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Ars Technica
Congress opens probe into FBI’s handling of Clinton e-mail investigation Enlarge (credit: Mark Wilson/Getty Images) Two House committees announced Tuesday that they would conduct a joint probe into the FBI's handling of the Clinton e-mail investigation. The Clinton investigation concluded with no charges being levied against the former secretary of state who was running for president under the Democratic ticket. House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
US dollar lures investors at the expense of the euroA worldwide shift in the appetite for currency since the 2008 global financial crisis appears to have hurt the Eurozone and helped the United States, according to new research from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers introduce new method for monitoring Indian Summer MonsoonResearchers from Florida State University have created a tool for objectively defining the onset and demise of the Indian Summer Monsoon -- a colossal weather system that affects billions of people annually.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
SNMMI publishes appropriate use criteria for FDG PET/CT imaging of cancer patientsThe Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) has published appropriate use criteria (AUC) for FDG PET/CT in Restaging and Treatment Response Assessment of Malignant Disease. As cancer patients move through therapy, FDG PET/CT has proven an effective tool for assessing treatment response and updating the stage of malignancy. This AUC aims to improve utilization and guide providers
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Popular Science
How artificial intelligence could help spies do their jobs Technology When the intelligence analyst is an algorithm. Primer has developed an AI system that’s in part intended to augment the job of an intelligence analyst at a spy agency.
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Gizmodo
10 Incredibly Silly Han Solo Stories That Absolutely Won't Be in the Solo Movie Image: Lucasfilm/Disney. The allure of Han Solo is one of the most potent draws of the whole Star Wars mythos. A swarthy smuggler with a troublesome past who evolves into one of the Rebellion’s greatest heroes? It was an appeal that led to all sorts of stories being written about Han in the myriad tie-in novels and comics... some good some bad, and some completely ridiculous. Here are parts of Ha
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Dana Foundation
The Effects of Moderate Drinking on the Brain Photo credit: Shutterstock For those of us who enjoy a glass of wine with dinner or a beer or two with friends after work on occasion, research over the last decade handed us a gift with multiple reports suggesting that moderate drinking may have some health benefits by lowering one’s risk of cardiovascular incidents and dementia. But a recent study by Anya Topawala and colleagues in London says
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Universities should actively support open scholarshipUniversities should take action to support the sharing of educational resources, argues a new perspective publishing 24 October in the open access journal PLOS Biology. Open scholarship not only benefits society at large, argues author Erin McKiernan from the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, but also fulfils universities' core missions of knowledge dissemination, community engagement, and
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Gizmodo
Deadspin Pistons Home Games Are Already Attendance Disasters | Jezebel Condé Nast International Appe Deadspin Pistons Home Games Are Already Attendance Disasters | Jezebel Condé Nast International Appears to Have Blacklisted Terry Richardson | Earther There’s a Huge Drinking Water Problem Plaguing Rural America, Too | Very Smart Brothas Deon Cole’s Apology to the Black Race Is the Blackest Thing That Happened This Week | Splinter Tiny Montana Firm Suspiciously Scores $300 Million Contract to Res
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Universities should actively support open scholarshipUniversities should take action to support the sharing of educational resources, argues a new perspective publishing Oct. 24 in the open access journal PLOS Biology. Open scholarship not only benefits society at large, argues author Erin McKiernan from the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, but also fulfils universities' core missions of knowledge dissemination, community engagement, and pub
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Ars Technica
The latest Pixel 2 issues: A high-pitched whine and clicking noises Enlarge / The Pixel 2 versus the Pixel 2 XL. One looks like a modern phone from 2017, the other looks dated. (credit: Ron Amadeo) After dealing with all sorts of screen issues, another problem with Google's flagship smartphone is popping up. This time it's an audio issue: users on Google's official forums and elsewhere are reporting odd sounds coming from the Pixel 2 speakers. Customers are compl
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Feed: All Latest
SpaceX Keeps Lining Up Covert Military LaunchesThere was a time when SpaceX had to sue to bid on Air Force missions. No longer.
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The Atlantic
This Race Car Driver Is Defying Stereotypes at 200 Miles Per Hour “Never underestimate a vegan hippie chick with a race car,” says Leilani Münter in a new video by The Atlantic . Münter, who drove the first-ever vegan-themed race car in the world, is gunning for a future in which NASCAR runs on 100 percent renewable energy. In the video, she challenges NASCAR stereotypes and explains why the sports world needs more activists.
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Gizmodo
New Evidence Suggests Doctors Are Misdiagnosing a Third Type of Diabetes Image: John Campbell /Flickr The common understanding of diabetes mellitus includes two types: type one and type two. But there’s a third type that’s been around for a while you may not have even heard of—and some doctors think it’s being misdiagnosed. Type 3c diabetes, or “Diabetes of the Exocrine Pancreas,” is a third type caused by pancreatic damage. But a recent study found that doctors were
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Gizmodo
Amazon's Tiny New 4K Fire TV (Almost) Does It All All photos: Adam Clark Estes / Gizmodo In recent years, set-top boxes have been shrinking down to tinier, cheaper packages with a growing list of fun new features. The new Fire TV dongle with 4K, HDR, and Dolby Atmos showcases some of the best aspects about this trend. It’s cute. It’s a thrill to use. It’s just $70 . The only problem is that you still can’t use the new Fire TV for everything. It’
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Supercomputers help scientists improve seismic forecasts for CaliforniaResearchers have used the Stampede1 and 2 supercomputers to complete one of the world's largest earthquake simulation models: The Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast (UCERF3). The simulations showed that in the week following a magnitude 7.0 earthquake, the likelihood of another magnitude 7.0 quake in California would be up to 300 times greater than the week before.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Single-cell diagnostics for breast cancerWomen diagnosed with breast cancer may benefit from having the molecular subtype of different cells within their tumors identified, argue researchers. While breast cancer is often treated as a whole, they discuss the growing consensus that cancer cells within a tumor can have multiple origins and respond variably to treatment. The authors advocate for more accurate diagnostic tests to capture mole
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Science : NPR
Climate Change Journalist Warns: 'Mother Nature Is Playing By Different Rules Now' Author Jeff Goodell says that American cities are under threat from extreme weather, rising sea levels and lax enforcement of environmental regulations. His new book is The Water Will Come.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Identifying the mechanism for a new class of antiviral drugs could hasten their approvalNew research shows that a new class of antiviral drugs works by causing the virus' replication machinery to pause and backtrack, preventing the virus from efficiently replicating. This discovery, made possible by a high-throughput experimental technique called 'magnetic tweezers,' could speed the development and approval of related antiviral drugs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Taste, not appearance, drives corals to eat plasticsScientists have long known that marine animals mistakenly eat plastic debris because tiny bits of floating plastic look like prey. But a new Duke study of plastic ingestion by corals suggests there may be an additional reason for the potentially harmful behavior: The plastic simply tastes good. Chemical additives in the plastic may be acting as a feeding stimulant.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A quarter of problematic pot users have anxiety disorders, many since childhoodAbout a quarter of adults whose marijuana use is problematic in early adulthood have anxiety disorders in childhood and late adolescence, according to new data from Duke Health researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Diabetes: New insulin sensitizers discoveredResearchers may have found a way to treat insulin resistance, a precursor to type 2 diabetes, while avoiding side effects such as weight gain.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Smart Ring: Mobile on-body devices can be precisely and discreetly controlled using a tiny sensorMobile end-user devices, such as the new version of the “Apple Watch”, have a drawback: their small screen size makes them difficult to use. Computer scientists have now developed an alternative, which they call “DeformWear”. A tiny switch, no larger than the head of a pin, is built into a ring for example, and worn on the body. It can be moved in all directions, pressed, pinched, and pushed towar
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Adhesives and composite materials made from Swiss tree barkStudies show that tannins extracted from native tree bark can be used to produce adhesives and composite materials. An additional area of application might be 3D printing.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cryo-EM imaging suggests how the double helix separates during replicationFiguring out how accurate replication works at the level of individual molecules and atoms is one of the great achievements of modern science. The journey of investigators is not yet done, however. A major unsolved part of the puzzle is understanding how the entire process of copying the genome begins. In new research, insight into how the two stands of the double helix separate in the earliest st
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fresh look at fresh water: Researchers create a 50,000-lake databaseCountless numbers of vacationers spent this summer enjoying lakes for swimming, fishing and boating. But are they loving these lakes to death?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The many reverberations of colonialism: A Native American language facing extinctionWe tend to view colonialism in the past tense and to see it as an unfortunate precursor to our modern world. However, for many, colonialism is not something that died and went away, but something that shapes their entire world, especially when it comes to language.
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Viden
Følger du disse mobilmyter?Fx forlænger man ikke batteriets levetid ved at lade fra 0-100 procent, fastslår ekspert.
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Viden
Mikroplast flyder mellem sandkorn på Europas strandeOgså på fynske og sjællandske strande er der plast-rester mellem sandkornene, viser undersøgelse fra 13 europæiske lande.
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Ars Technica
New wave of data-encrypting malware hits Russia and Ukraine Enlarge (credit: Eset) A new, potentially virulent wave of data-encrypting malware is sweeping through Eastern Europe and has left a wake of outages at news agencies, train stations, and airports, according to multiple security companies Tuesday. Bad Rabbit, as the outbreak is being dubbed, is primarily attacking targets in Russia, but it's also infecting computers in Ukraine, Turkey and Germany,
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New on MIT Technology Review
Getting To IconicHow world-leading brands balance talent and technology for CX excellence
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Gizmodo
Amazon Wants You To Finally Get A Good Cutting Board John BoosMaple Wood Edge Grain Reversible Cutting Board , $70 Take the pack of three bamboo or plastic cutting boards you bought on a whim and throw them in the garbage. Or, at least order this awesome John Boos solid maple, reversible wooden cutting board and then throw your other crappy ones out when this arrives. At $70, it’s a worthwhile investment, but that price is gone by the end of the da
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Live Science
Unbearable: An Enormously Swollen Tongue Was Destroying a Bear's LifeA rescued bear with an enormous tongue gets surgery in Myanmar.
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Ars Technica
Jails pocket up to 60 percent of what inmates pay for phone calls (credit: Jason Farrar ) There's widespread agreement that prisoners in the US pay far too much for phone calls, but several of the Federal Communications Commission's attempts to cap those prices have been blocked in court. One of the biggest obstacles is that phone companies have to pay large "site commissions" to prisons and jails in order to win the exclusive right to offer phone service to in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetics may put a person at risk of high triglycerides, but adopting a healthy diet can helpTriglycerides, a type of fat in the blood, are important for good health. But having high triglycerides might increase a person's risk of heart disease, and may be a sign of metabolic syndrome. A new study from nutrition researchers at the University of Illinois shows that some individuals with variations of a 'gene of interest' may be at an even higher risk of developing high triglycerides. Speci
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tarloxitinib puts tumor-seeking tail on anti-EGFR drug to precisely target lung cancerUniversity of Colorado Cancer Center study being presented Oct. 28 at the AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference on Molecular Targets: By pairing an anti-EGFR drug with a 'tail' that only activates the drug when it is very near tumor cells, tarloxitinib brings the drug to tumors while keeping concentrations safe in surrounding tissues.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Raton Basin earthquakes linked to oil and gas fluid injectionsA rash of earthquakes in southern Colorado and northern New Mexico recorded between 2008 and 2010 was likely due to fluids pumped deep underground during oil and gas wastewater disposal, says a new University of Colorado Boulder study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Anticipating aftershocksResearchers from the US Geological Survey and the Southern California Earthquake Center used the Stampede1 and 2 supercomputers at the Texas Advanced Computing Center to complete one of the world's largest earthquake simulation models: The Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast (UCERF3). The simulations showed that in the week following a magnitude 7.0 earthquake, the likelihood of another
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Science : NPR
Watch The Moment A Dying Chimpanzee Recognizes An Old Friend We may all tear up watching this elderly chimpanzee reunite with a friend at the end of her life — a testament to the complexity of animal thinking and feeling, says anthropologist Barbara J. King. (Image credit: AFP/Getty Images)
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New on MIT Technology Review
Connectivity and QoLHow digital consumer habits and ubiquitous technology are driving smart city development in Asia Pacific
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How Neanderthals influenced human genetics at the crossroads of Asia and EuropeA new study explores the genetic legacy of ancient trysts between Neanderthals and the ancestors of modern humans, with a focus on Western Asia, the region where the first relations may have occurred.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
There is no safe amount of alcohol during pregnancy, new study showsAny amount of alcohol exposure during pregnancy can cause extreme lasting effects on a child, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mysterious DNA modification seen in stress responseEmory geneticists have been studying methylation of the DNA letter A (adenine). It appears more in the mouse brain under conditions of stress, and may have a role in neuropsychiatric disorders.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pollutant emitted by forest fire causes DNA damage and lung cell deathScientists performed tests with particles from forest and crop fires in the Amazon. Not only did they induce inflammation, oxidative stress and genetic damage in human lung cells, but they also drove one-third of the cultured cells to death.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Jumping nanoparticlesTransitions occurring in nanoscale systems, such as a chemical reaction or the folding of a protein, are strongly affected by friction and thermal noise. Almost 80 years ago, the Dutch physicist Hendrik Kramers predicted that such transitions occur most frequently at intermediate friction, an effect known as Kramers turnover. Now, a team of scientists have measured this effect for a laser-trapped
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How to predict high school dropoutsTeenagers who do not access healthcare when needed are at greater risk of dropping out of high school. Dropouts are more likely to have combinations of the following traits: low conscientiousness, neuroticism and introversion. The study examined data from the US National Longitudinal Study of Adolescents to Adult Health, a nationally representative sample of 90,000 students in grades 7 to 12 at 13
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain region that motivates behavior change discoveredEver been stuck in a rut? Researchers found that stimulating a region of the brain called the posterior cingulate cortex can lead to changes in routine behavior. Neurons there ramp up their firing rates, then peak just before a pattern shifts. Knowing this could help businesses better understand how to spur employee innovation, exploration and creativity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Microplastics in the Baltic have not risen for 30 yearsThe concentration of microplastics in water and fish from the Baltic Sea has been constant for the past 30 years, despite a substantial increase in plastic production during the same period, report investigators.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sea-level rise, not stronger storm surge, will cause future NYC floodingRising sea levels caused by a warming climate threaten greater future storm damage to New York City, but the paths of stronger future storms may shift offshore, changing the coastal risk for the city, according to a team of climate scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Neuroscientists build case for new theory of memory formationNeuroscientists propose that the existence of 'silent engrams' suggests current theories of memory formation need to revised.
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Live Science
Photos: Discoveries from a Bronze Age BattlefieldIn northeastern Germany, archaeologists have discovered a battlefield, more than 3,000 years old, along the banks of the Tollense Valley.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Electronic entropy enhances water splittingNorthwestern University researchers find that an electron transitioning from state to state increases cerium's entropy, making it ideal for hydrogen production.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study investigates effects of domestic violence on workplaces -- by asking perpetratorsResearchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and Western University released a new study today, taking an unconventional approach to understanding the significant effects of domestic violence in the workplace. By seeking the views of the perpetrators of violence, the study found that domestic violence perpetration, like victimization, has costs
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Separate but unequal: NYU Metro Center Report examines segregation in NYC schoolsA new report by the NYU Metro Center explores patterns of segregation in New York City public schools and finds a link between increased school diversity and modest academic benefits.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Kent State professor receives NSF grant to develop eye-tracking softwareJonathan Maletic, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Computer Science in the College of Arts and Sciences at Kent State University, has received a three-year, $290,610 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to help support basic research on how programmers write and develop large-scale software systems. His project will help grow the applications of eye-tracking software.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Automatic acoustic gunshot sensor technology may benefit shooting victimsA number of US cities have installed acoustic gunshot sensor technology to accurately locate shooting scenes and potential gunshot victims, but the effectiveness of this technology for saving lives had not been studied until surgeons at the University of California, San Francisco-East Bay in Oakland, Calif., found that this sensor technology may benefit shooting victims by helping them get to the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA examines heavy rainfall generated by former Typhoon LanWhen Typhoon Lan made landfall in Japan on Oct. 22, the Global Precipitation Measurement mission core satellite or GPM analyzed the storm and added up the high rainfall that it generated. By Oct. 24, Extra-tropical cyclone Lan moved east into the Bering Sea and generated storm warnings.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UT Health San Antonio researchers define mechanism that causes kidney cancer to recurResearchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UT Health San Antonio) and US Department of Veterans Affairs have identified the molecular mechanism causing kidney cancer to resist drug treatment. The findings were published in the journal Nature Communications. They discovered NOX4, an enzyme in the cell's mitochondria, senses the Warburg effect (movement of adenosi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Colon cancer: APC protein affects immunity by preventing pre-cancerous inflammationAdenomatous polyposis coli is a gene whose mutations are associated with a rare, hereditary form of colorectal cancer known as familial adenomatous polyposis. Research led by scientists at the Institut Pasteur and Inserm have recently demonstrated that mutations to this gene do not only lead to the emergence of colon polyps; they also harm the immune system, leaving it unable to tackle inflammatio
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Live Science
Why a Wasp Just Cut a Bee in Half (and Left with Its Rear End)A gruesome video shows how wasps hunt and kill.
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Gizmodo
Soylent Banned in Canada for Not Actually Being a Meal Image: Getty In a major blow to Canadians who love bland on-the-go meal replacement goop, The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has blocked all shipments of Soylent into the country. Soylent first began shipping to Canada in July 2015 , announcing the move with a video of people reading fanatical complaints from Canucks requesting Soylent, with “O Canada” playing in the background. It seems
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Small cyber attack hits Russia and UkraineA cyber attack Monday hit a Ukrainian international airport and three Russian media outlets just four months after the "NotPetya" malware spread from two countries across the world.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How Neanderthals influenced human genetics at the crossroads of Asia and EuropeWhen the ancestors of modern humans migrated out of Africa, they passed through the Middle East and Turkey before heading deeper into Asia and Europe.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
No magic wand required: Scientists propose way to turn any cell into any other cell typeIn fairy tales, all it takes to transform a frog into a prince, a servant into a princess or a mouse into a horse is the wave of a magic wand.
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Live Science
Do You Know the Risk Factors for Cancer? Many Americans Don'tMany Americans have misconceptions about risk factors for cancer, according to a new survey.
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Science | The Guardian
BBC apologises over interview with climate denier Lord Lawson Exclusive: Lawson’s claim that global temperatures are not rising went unchallenged, breaching guidelines on accuracy and impartiality The BBC has apologised for an interview with the climate change denier Lord Lawson after admitting it had breached its own editorial guidelines for allowing him to claim that global temperatures have not risen in the past decade . BBC Radio 4’s flagship news progr
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Science : NPR
Wine Organization Forecasts Historically Bad Year Due To Weather Events Europe, home to the world's leading wine producers, is making wine at significantly lower levels than usual – and that's because of weather such as frost and drought that have damaged vineyards. (Image credit: Laurent Cipriani/AP)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ice sheets may melt rapidly in response to distant volcanoesVolcanic eruptions have been known to cool the global climate, but they can also exacerbate the melting of ice sheets, according to a new paper.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What we call postdoctoral researchers matters, scientists sayEight scientists and science policy experts make the case for standardizing how postdoctoral researchers are categorized by human resources offices and provide a framework that institutions can follow.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A little myelin goes a long way to restore nervous system functionIn long-lived animals, renewed but thin myelin sheaths are enough to restore the impaired nervous system and can do so for years after the onset of disease, scientists have discovered.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers tackle long-standing problem of few-femtosecond internal conversionObserving the crucial first few femtoseconds of photochemical reactions requires tools typically not available in the femtochemistry toolkit. Such dynamics are now within reach with the instruments provided by attosecond science. In a new study, researchers characterize one of the fastest internal conversion processes in a molecule studied to date.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Tracking the Cost of Gene TherapyThough expensive now, prices could get cheaper for more common diseases.
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New on MIT Technology Review
A New Strain of Ransomware Is Hitting Eastern Europe
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New on MIT Technology Review
Here’s the Economic Argument that the Trump Administration Should Fight Climate Change
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Latest Headlines | Science News
A new material may one day keep mussels off piers and boat hullsMussels don’t stick to a new lubricant-infused silicone material.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Animal models in regenerative medicine in upcoming special issue of tissue engineeringNovel approaches to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine are first evaluated and optimized in animal models before making the leap to clinical testing in human subjects.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How Neanderthals influenced human genetics at the crossroads of Asia and EuropeA new study explores the genetic legacy of ancient trysts between Neanderthals and the ancestors of modern humans, with a focus on Western Asia, the region where the first relations may have occurred.
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Gizmodo
A Congressional Wikipedia Troll Is Covertly Dragging Republicans Photo: Getty Someone in the House of Representatives (or spoofing a congressional IP address) is having a lot of fun making troll-ish edits on Wikipedia again, according to the Twitter bot @congress-edits , which tracks edits to the site made by IP addresses associated with Congress. And this time they’re sending hidden messages. As first reported by Buzzfeed last week , one or more pranksters ha
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Ars Technica
Some dead bodies donated to research in US end up in warehouses of horrors Enlarge (credit: Getty | RAJIB DHAR ) Dead human bodies are critical to medical training, physicians and researchers say. And thousands of Americans are happy to donate their meat suits for the greater good after they're gone. But in the US, a body’s trip from a morgue to a medical school or lab can be gruesome, shady, and expensive. Some don’t make it at all. Instead, bits and pieces of donated
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New Scientist - News
How we could make oxygen on Mars, plus fuel to get homeOn Mars oxygen and fuel are in short supply, but there might be a way to make both from carbon dioxide in the air
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Viden
Forskere: CO2 i verdenshave får konsekvenser for alt livVerdenshavene optager enorme mængder CO2. Det forsurer vandet og påvirker alt liv, bekræfter ny forskning.
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Gizmodo
Researchers Hack Tinder, Ok Cupid, Other Dating Apps to Reveal Your Location and Messages Image: Tinder Security researchers have uncovered numerous exploits in popular dating apps like Tinder, Bumble, and OK Cupid. Using exploits ranging from simple to complex, researchers at the Moscow-based Kaspersky Lab say they could access users’ location data, their real names and login info, their message history, and even see which profiles they’ve viewed. As the researchers note, this makes
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Popular Science
What case should you get for your phone? Gadgets The best skins, shells, and armors. There are many types and styles of phone cases to choose from. Which one is right for you and your phone? Click here to find out.
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The Atlantic
No, 401(k)s Aren't a 'Great and Popular Middle Class Tax Break' Following reports that congressional Republicans were, as part of a planned tax reform, considering a cap on contributions to tax-deferred 401(k) plans, President Trump on Monday promised such a change wouldn’t happen. “There will be NO change to your 401(k),” the president tweeted . “This has always been a great and popular middle class tax break that works, and it stays!” But even as he rushes
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
No magic wand required: Scientists propose way to turn any cell into any other cell typeIn fairy tales, all it takes to transform a frog into a prince or a mouse into a horse is the wave of a magic wand. But in the real world, transforming one living thing into another isn't so easy. A new paper grounded in both math and biology lays out a way to do it with individual cells. If it works, it could have applications from regenerating diseased or lost tissue to fighting cancer.
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: How Beets Became Beet-RedConfronted with a surplus of an amino acid found in many plants, beets evolved the ability to transform it into the scarlet hue found on your dinner table.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees Tropical Storm Saola near GuamInfrared data from NASA satellites helped confirm that former Tropical Depression 27W has strengthened into a tropical storm near Guam. The storm has been renamed Tropical Storm Saola and NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed the system in infrared light to determine the location of its strongest storms.
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Gizmodo
The Real Fakery Of The Ouija Board Photo by Paul Tamayo There’s a simple explanation for how the Ouija board works: it’s not ghosts, but how you feel about them. You remember the Ouija board, right? If you went to sleepovers as a kid, you might have played with one. You gathered around with a few friends, put your fingers on the pointer, and asked a question. The pointer seemed to move of its own accord as it spelled out answers t
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Ars Technica
Singapore freezes private car ownership to fight congestion Enlarge (credit: Marco Verch ) Singapore is capping the number of private passenger cars allowed on its streets, the city's transportation regulator announced on Monday . Singapore is a city of 5.6 million people packed into an area smaller than New York City. Like any big city it has to worry about traffic congestion, but as a sovereign city-state it is able to take more extreme measures than mo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
There is no safe amount of alcohol during pregnancy, new study showsAny amount of alcohol exposure during pregnancy can cause extreme lasting effects on a child, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees Tropical Storm Saola near GuamInfrared data from NASA satellites helped confirm that former Tropical Depression 27W has strengthened into a tropical storm near Guam. The storm has been renamed Tropical Storm Saola and NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed the system in infrared light to determine the location of its strongest storms.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The problem with being prettyWhile good-looking people are generally believed to receive more favorable treatment in the hiring process, when it comes to applying for less desirable jobs, such as those with low pay or uninteresting work, attractiveness may be a liability, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers advocate for single-cell diagnostics for breast cancerWomen diagnosed with breast cancer may benefit from having the molecular subtype of different cells within their tumors identified, argue two researchers in an opinion article published in Trends in Cancer. While breast cancer is often treated as a whole, they discuss the growing consensus that cancer cells within a tumor can have multiple origins and respond variably to treatment. The authors adv
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Spots on supergiant star drive spirals in stellar windAstronomers have recently discovered that spots on the surface of a supergiant star are driving huge spiral structures in its stellar wind.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New approach to studying concussion urgedUnderstanding the puzzling and complex nature of concussion and how to treat it will take a whole new way of approaching the problem, according to new research. The researchers advocate the use of systems science -- a discipline that analyzes complex problems as whole systems and integrates research findings from different disciplines.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Many planned roads in the tropics shouldn't be builtWe are living in the most dramatic era of road expansion in human history, but many planned roads should not be built, concludes a major study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Self-esteem mapped in the human brainA team of researchers has devised a mathematical equation that can explain how our self-esteem is shaped by what other people think of us.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New self-regulating nanoparticles could treat cancerScientists have developed 'intelligent' nanoparticles which heat up to a temperature high enough to kill cancerous cells -- but which then self-regulate and lose heat before they get hot enough to harm healthy tissue.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Delphi boosts self-driving efforts with $400 mn deal for nuTonomyAutomotive equipment maker Delphi said Tuesday it was acquiring US university spinoff nuTonomy in a move to bolster its technology for self-driving vehicles.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
India top court bans dirty fuel to fight Delhi's bad airIndia's top court Tuesday banned the use of petroleum coke—a cheap but dirty fuel—in New Delhi's neighbouring states, the latest crackdown aimed at improving air quality in one of the most polluted cities in the world.
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Gizmodo
Geostorm's Weather Control Tech Is Exceptionally Bogus, Scientists Explain GIF Image source: Warner Bros. Pictures For a movie about a global weather apocalypse , Geostorm is disastrously boring , but its weather control technology deserves your brief attention. It is uniquely ridiculous! Sadly, the premise is more relevant than ever. In Geostorm , humanity never got its shit together to address global warming, but thankfully, scientists figured out how to build a netwo
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Quanta Magazine
Best-Ever Algorithm Found for Huge Streams of Data It’s hard to measure water from a fire hose while it’s hitting you in the face. In a sense, that’s the challenge of analyzing streaming data, which comes at us in a torrent and never lets up. If you’re on Twitter watching tweets go by, you might like to declare a brief pause, so you can figure out what’s trending. That’s not feasible, though, so instead you need to find a way to tally hashtags on
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New Scientist - News
An AI has learned how to pick a single voice out of a crowdThe artificial intelligence can solve the "cocktail party problem" with 90 percent accuracy and will soon be installed in public places
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Wing prints' may identify individual bats as effectively as fingerprints identify peopleResearch by a USDA Forest Service scientist and her partners may solve a longtime problem in bat research by demonstrating that bats' wings are as reliable a method of identifying individual bats as fingerprints are for human beings.
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Scientific American Content: Global
India Gears Up for Second Moon MissionThe Chandrayaan-2 orbiter, lander and rover will track how lunar dust might scupper settlement -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic
The Political Thrill of Having an Enemy I didn’t have a cause to die for. If I was at a sit-in protesting government repression, and the military threatened to come in and “clear” the square, I’d probably run for the hills. The one time I was citizen-arrested by a cab driver and quite literally dragged into a Cairo police station, I felt a sense of dread that I haven’t felt since. As someone who studies Islamists who are often willing
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds increase of herbicide in older adultsAmong a sample of older adults living in Southern California, average urine levels of the herbicide glyphosate and its metabolite increased between 1993 and 2016, as did the proportion of samples with detectable levels, according to a study published by JAMA.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Wing prints' may identify individual bats as effectively as fingerprints identify peopleFor decades, bats have defied scientists' best ideas for keeping track of individuals, a critical element in wildlife research. Sybill Amelon, a research wildlife biologist with the Forest Service's Northern Research Station, and her colleagues have discovered a means of identifying individual bats that may be as universal, distinctive, permanent and collectable as fingerprints: bats' wings.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pilot project provides findings and advice on data sharing in development researchHaving worked with seven volunteering IDRC-funded development research projects for sixteen months, a pilot data sharing project led by Professor Cameron Neylon and also funded by IDRC, has published its final report in the dedicated collection in the innovative open science journal Research Ideas and Outcomes (RIO). From the grant proposal, through data management plans and the final research art
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Blog » Languages » English
Grim’s Haunted Mansion: Horror Movie Marathon! By the time that the epic sporting match starts to wind down, you are definitely tuckered out, but you know Grim will be gone a little while longer from his mansion. Surely he intended for you to do something else here— something else to make you “a little more like Grim.” Whether that means something spooky, fun, or both, you decide to explore the rest of the house and see if there are any more
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Science | The Guardian
Brexit 'more complex than first moon landing', says academic study Analysis by German professor claims project for UK to leave the EU is a trickier task than Nasa’s 1969 moonshot Britain extricating itself from the European Union will be “incomparably more complex” than the first moon landing, an academic study has found. Roland Alter, a professor at Heilbronn University in Germany who specialises in risk assessment, said he had been inspired to carry out his an
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study indicates arsenic can cause cancer decades after exposure endsA new paper published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute shows that arsenic in drinking water may have one of the longest dormancy periods of any carcinogen. By tracking the mortality rates of people exposed to arsenic-contaminated drinking water in a region in Chile, the researchers provide evidence of increases in lung, bladder, and kidney cancer even 40 years after high arsenic exp
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Daydreaming is good: It means you're smartA new study suggests that daydreaming during meetings isn't necessarily a bad thing. It might be a sign that you're really smart and creative. People with efficient brains may have too much brain capacity to stop their minds from wandering.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Value of acknowledging adolescents' perspectivesAcross very different cultures -- Ghana and the United States -- when parents acknowledge the perspectives of their adolescent children and encourage them to express themselves, the youths have a stronger sense of self-worth, intrinsic motivation, and engagement, and also have less depression. Yet having the latitude to make decisions appears to function differently in the two cultures, with posit
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Starting at age 6, children spontaneously practice skills to prepare for the futureDeliberate practice is essential for improving a wide range of skills important for everyday life, from tying shoelaces to reading and writing. Yet despite its importance for developing basic skills, academic success, and expertise, we know little about the development of deliberate practice. A new study from Australia found that children spontaneously practice skills to prepare for the future sta
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Paul Weitz: Skylab and shuttle astronaut dies aged 85US astronaut Paul Weitz, who helped save a Nasa space station after it was damaged during launch, has died aged 85.
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Gizmodo
Clever 3D-Printed Widget Turns a Balloon Into a Flower Vase How often do you actually get flowers and need a vase to put them in? On your birthday, maybe? When a family member passes? So why bother storing a rarely-used fancy vase when this clever 3D-printable plastic widget turns a party balloon into a decent place to keep a few flowers alive? Designed by Evan Gant, the simple BalloonVase looks precarious, but once filled with water the base of the ballo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ice sheets may melt rapidly in response to distant volcanoesVolcanic eruptions have been known to cool the global climate, but they can also exacerbate the melting of ice sheets, according to a paper published today in Nature Communications.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Construction material-based methodology for contingency base selectionIn an era of global responsiveness, there is a continuing need for agencies and organizations to set up temporary contingency bases (CB) of operations in foreign nations. Examples of such CBs include epidemic hospitals, refugee camps, natural disaster response headquarters, and temporary military installations. The decision whether to import all construction material, to build entirely of local ma
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Gizmodo
Tuesday's Best Deals: Storm-Proof Umbrellas, Cutting Board, Custom-Tailored Suits, and More We start off this Tuesday with deals on tropical storm-proof umbrellas , a cutting board , custom-tailored suits , and more. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals DREVO Gram 84 Key Mechanical Keyboard - Red Switches , $34 with code Gramr010 DREVO Gram 84 Key Mechanical Keyboard - Black Switches , $34 with code Gramr010 If you don’t need a number pad, D
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Scientific American Content: Global
Neurologists' Role in Nazi "Racial Hygiene" Only Now Comes to LightThe killing and exile of “non-Aryan” members of the profession and collaboration of neurologists in eugenic and euthanasia efforts escaped scrutiny immediately after the war -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pollutant emitted by forest fire causes DNA damage and lung cell deathScientists performed tests with particles from forest and crop fires in the Amazon. Not only did they induce inflammation, oxidative stress and genetic damage in human lung cells, but they also drove one-third of the cultured cells to death.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Medicare graduate nurse education demonstration increases primary care workforceThe Report to Congress on the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Graduate Nurse Education Demonstration has just been released documenting health care workforce gains addressing the nation's shortage of primary care. The $200 million initiative is the first to test whether Medicare funding of graduate clinical education of Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs) would help meet n
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mysterious DNA modification seen in stress responseEmory geneticists have been studying methylation of the DNA letter A (adenine). It appears more in the mouse brain under conditions of stress, and may have a role in neuropsychiatric disorders.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study indicates arsenic can cause cancer decades after exposure endsA new paper published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute shows that arsenic in drinking water may have one of the longest dormancy periods of any carcinogen. By tracking the mortality rates of people exposed to arsenic-contaminated drinking water in a region in Chile, the researchers provide evidence of increases in lung, bladder, and kidney cancer even 40 years after high arsenic exp
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Daydreaming is good. It means you're smartA new study from the Georgia Institute of Technology suggests that daydreaming during meetings isn't necessarily a bad thing. It might be a sign that you're really smart and creative. People with efficient brains may have too much brain capacity to stop their minds from wandering.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Stephen Hawking PhD readers crash Cambridge University websiteStephen Hawking's PhD thesis, written as a 24-year-old, was made available to the public on Monday.
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New on MIT Technology Review
IBM Can Run an Experimental AI in Memory, Not on Processors
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NYT > Science
How Climate Change Is Playing Havoc With Olive Oil (and Farmers)Extreme weather is making olive oil production far more erratic just as global demand is growing. A summer heat wave in Europe was the latest calamity.
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Gizmodo
Missing Flight MH370 Inspires New Way to Locate Ocean Impacts Photo: AP The Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 investigation has been reopened with the help of a private firm. Its incomplete story has refused to offer closure to the families of its 239 victims and has sparked conspiracy theories . But scientists have continued investigating the impact since it occurred three and a half years ago. It’s inspired one team to create a new way of locating large dist
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The Atlantic
The Square Is a Masterful Symphony of Discomfort Nothing seems to fascinate the writer and director Ruben Östlund more than the life cycle of a bad decision. Early on in his new film The Square , which won the Palme d’Or at this year’s Cannes Film Festival, the well-to-do museum curator Christian (Claes Bang) takes it upon himself to right a perceived wrong: the theft of his cellphone. A tracking app tells him it’s somewhere in a tower block in
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New on MIT Technology Review
Fearsome Machines: A PrehistoryA time line of what happened when in the history of artificial intelligence.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Trump Administration Is Launching a Weather and Climate SatelliteThe Joint Polar Satellite System 1 (JPSS) will serve multiple functions, even as it has been described by the White House as an important tool to help prepare for future storms -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren
Opladende drone skal komme elbiler til undsætningAmazon har patenteret en drone, som skal levere strøm til elbiler på farten.
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Science | The Guardian
Tim Peake webchat – post your questions now The British astronaut hasn’t only been to space – he’s run a marathon and presented a Brit award in space, too. Ahead of his new book, Ask an Astronaut, we’ll be joining him to answer your questions on Thursday 26 October at 1.30pm 2.42pm BST Until the day that Elon Musk starts selling supersaver returns on his proposed moon shuttle, Tim Peake has experienced something that 99.999 per cent of us
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Using sound waves for biomedical breakthroughsSound waves could be the future of biomedical research, diagnosing and treatment, according to a chemistry professor. A data analyst is using an acoustic device to separate extracellular vesicles to get a deeper look at their properties.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Disaster makes people with depression less healthyPeople who exhibit even a few depressive symptoms before a major life stressor, such as a disaster, may experience an increase in inflammation -- a major risk factor for heart disease and other negative health conditions -- after the event.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New research highlights worldwide risk of HIV, Hepatitis C epidemicsTwo reviews studied the global prevalence of injecting drug use and of interventions to prevent the spread of blood borne viruses among people who inject drugs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Saguaro and other towering cacti have a scrambled historyBiologists continue to debate the genealogy of the cactus family, even differing by a factor of 10 about how many different genera there are. A study based on new genome sequences of four columnar cacti, including saguaro and cardon, illustrates why this is. Because of the long lives of these columnar cacti, ancient genes drop out at random and give the impression of parallel evolution in those sp
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Jumping nanoparticlesTransitions occurring in nanoscale systems, such as a chemical reaction or the folding of a protein, are strongly affected by friction and thermal noise. Almost 80 years ago, the Dutch physicist Hendrik Kramers predicted that such transitions occur most frequently at intermediate friction, an effect known as Kramers turnover. Now, a team of scientists have measured this effect for a laser-trapped
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Spots on supergiant star drive spirals in stellar windA Canadian-led international team of astronomers recently discovered that spots on the surface of a supergiant star are driving huge spiral structures in its stellar wind. Their results are published in a recent edition of Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Blood-based epigenetic research may hold clues to autism biology, study suggestsUsing data from blood and brain tissue, a team led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that they could gain insights into mechanisms that might help explain autism by analyzing the interplay between genes and chemical tags that control whether genes are used to make a protein, called epigenetic marks.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ice sheets may melt rapidly in response to distant volcanoesVolcanic eruptions have been known to cool the global climate, but they can also exacerbate the melting of ice sheets, according to a paper published today in Nature Communications.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Robot-assisted surgery for kidney removal not always cost-effectiveRobot-assisted laparoscopic surgery to remove a patient's entire kidney requires slightly longer operating times and results in increased costs compared with the use of traditional laparoscopic surgery, according to a large, multiyear analysis conducted by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exposure to glyphosate, chemical found in weed killers, increased over 23 yearsAnalyzing samples from a prospective study, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers found that human exposure to glyphosate, a chemical widely found in weed killers, has increased approximately 500 percent since the introduction of genetically modified crops.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Prehospital blood transfusion among combat casualties associated with improved survivalAmong medically evacuated US military combat causalities in Afghanistan, blood product transfusion within minutes of injury or prior to hospitalization was associated with greater 24-hour and 30-day survival than delayed or no transfusion, according to a study published by JAMA.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds increase of herbicide in older adultsAmong a sample of older adults living in Southern California, average urine levels of the herbicide glyphosate and its metabolite increased between 1993 and 2016, as did the proportion of samples with detectable levels, according to a study published by JAMA.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Comparison of outcomes for robotic-assisted vs. laparoscopic surgical proceduresTwo studies published by JAMA compare certain outcomes of robotic-assisted vs. laparoscopic surgery for kidney removal or rectal cancer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cleaning marine litter in the Mediterranean and the Baltic SeaNewly funded, EU Horizon 2020 project targets increasing pollution in marine areas by focusing on the development of innovative cleaning technologies and approaches.
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Ars Technica
Your old GameCube controllers now work with the Nintendo Switch Enlarge / If you have these lying around, dig them out of the closet for some Switch action! Classic Nintendo GameCube controllers can now work with the Nintendo Switch via a USB adapter, following a version 4.0.0 system update released late last week. While Nintendo didn't list the feature in its official release notes , the new controller support was discovered and spread on Twitter yesterday,
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Gizmodo
Neanderthals With Disabilities Survived Through Social Support Image: Erik Trinkaus A re-analysis of a 50,000 year old Neanderthal skull shows that, in addition to enduring multiple injuries and debilitations, this male individual was also profoundly deaf. Yet he lived well into his 40s, which is quite old by Paleolithic standards. It’s an achievement that could have only been possible with the help of others, according to new research. When the remains of t
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Robotic docs can boost surgery time and costRobots in the OR may not be worth the extra time or money for all procedures.
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Futurity.org
‘Molecular pencil sharpener’ releases antibiotic Picture a brand-new, unsharpened pencil. You can’t write with the graphite at its core until a pencil sharpener chews away its wooden tip. Microcin B17 is an antibiotic that kills E. coli bacteria. Before activation, it lies embedded in a structure called a prodrug, like the core of an unsharpened “molecular pencil.” Scientists have discovered a “molecular pencil sharpener” that chews away its ou
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Ars Technica
Self-driving startup nuTonomy bought by Delphi for $400 million Enlarge / nuTonomy was spun out of MIT and has stayed true to its New England roots. (credit: nuTonomy) On Tuesday we learned that Boston-based nuTonomy is being bought by tier-one auto supplier Delphi. Delphi is paying $400 million for the startup, plus about $50 million more in earn-outs. In return, it gets an extra arrow in its self-driving quiver. Four-year-old nuTonomy is developing an autom
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Popular Science
Two graphs that explain why California’s wildfires will only get worse Nexus Media News Risks are growing while environmental protections are disappearing. Climate change is making California’s wildfires worse—and our policies aren't helping.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
What it's like to be a woman in Hollywood | Naomi McDougall JonesWhat we see in movies matters: it affects our hobbies, our career choices, our emotions and even our identities. Right now, we don't see enough women on screen or behind the camera -- but waiting for Hollywood to grow a conscience isn't going to fix the problem, says Naomi McDougall Jones. Join forces with the actress and activist as she outlines her four-point plan for a total representation revo
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Futurity.org
Shale gas beats coal in lifetime pollution head-to-head The lifetime toxic chemical releases from coal-generated electricity are 10 to 100 times greater than those from electricity generated with natural gas obtained through hydraulic fracturing, a new study suggests. The study is a comparative analysis of the harmful health effects of electricity produced from shale gas and coal. It looks at the amount of toxic chemicals released into the air, soil,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spots on supergiant star drive spirals in stellar windA Canadian-led international team of astronomers recently discovered that spots on the surface of a supergiant star are driving huge spiral structures in its stellar wind. Their results are published in a recent edition of Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EU parliament votes to ban controversial weedkiller by 2022The European Parliament Tuesday called for the controversial weedkiller glyphosate to be banned by 2022 amid fears it causes cancer, a day before EU states vote on whether to renew its licence.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Construction material-based methodology for contingency base selectionIn an era of global responsiveness, there is a continuing need for agencies and organizations to set up temporary contingency bases (CB) of operations in foreign nations. Examples of such CBs include epidemic hospitals, refugee camps, natural disaster response headquarters, and temporary military installations.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers discover which brain region motivates behavior changeEver been stuck in a rut? University of Pennsylvania researcher Michael Platt and colleagues found that stimulating a region of the brain called the posterior cingulate cortex can lead to changes in routine behavior. Neurons there ramp up their firing rates, then peak just before a pattern shifts. Knowing this could help businesses better understand how to spur employee innovation, exploration and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How to predict high school dropoutsTeenagers who do not access healthcare when needed are at greater risk of dropping out of high school. Dropouts are more likely to have combinations of the following traits:low conscientiousness neuroticism introversion.The study in the Journal of Economic Psychology examined data from the US National Longitudinal Study of Adolescents to Adult Health, a nationally representative sample of 90,000 s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research team led by NUS scientists breaks new ground in memory technologyAn international research team led by scientists from the National University of Singapore pioneered the development of a novel thin, organic film that supports a million more times read-write cycles and consumes 1,000 times less power than commercial flash memories.
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cognitive science
Researchers Demonstrate ‘Mind Reading’ Brain Decoding Technology submitted by /u/OestlundMartin [link] [comments]
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Ingeniøren
12 borgmestre lover at købe rene miljøbusser fra 2025Mandag underskrev 12 borgmestre var nogle af verdens storbyer en aftale om at gøre trafikken mere miljøvenlig. Derfor skal der fra 2025 kun indkøbes 0-emissionbusser til den offentlige trafik.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What we call postdoctoral researchers matters, scientists sayIn a forthcoming opinion piece in the journal eLife, eight scientists and science policy experts make the case for standardizing how postdoctoral researchers are categorized by human resources offices and provide a framework that willing institutions can follow.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How the financial press influences investors' opinion and behaviorResearchers at the University of Luxembourg have found that the financial press can have detrimental or positive effects on the behaviour of investors and their opinion on the economy as a result of the language used in reporting.
7h
New Scientist - News
Artificial intelligence tells nightmare-inducing tales of terrorThe Shelley AI is writing its own horror stories after learning from reddit. Some are weird, some are spine tingling, and others? Well, see for yourself...
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Futurity.org
Most ovarian cancers get their start in fallopian tubes Most ovarian cancers may have their genetic origins in the fallopian tubes, the thin fibrous tunnels that connect the ovaries to the uterus, a small study suggests. The study, providing new evidence for a link that some scientists have suspected, could eventually lead to new ways to prevent or treat the disease. Ovarian cancer, the fifth-largest cause of cancer deaths in women, is diagnosed late
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Gentle' dying -- or suicide?When terminally ill patients wish to hasten death by fasting, should physicians assist them to do so? An ethicist argues that voluntary stopping of eating and drinking is often equivalent to assisted suicide, and that the practice should be regulated.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Underwater sound waves help scientists locate ocean impactsA new method to locate the precise time and location that objects fall into our oceans has now been developed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Does stem cell therapy offer the best hope for neurodegenerative diseases?As the brain has limited capability for self-repair or regeneration, stem cells may represent the best therapeutic approach for counteracting damage to or degeneration of brain tissue caused by injury, aging, or disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Diabetes researchers discover potential new insulin sensitizersResearchers may have found a way to treat insulin resistance, a precursor to type 2 diabetes, while avoiding side effects such as weight gain.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study provides more clarity on the genetic causes of children's food allergiesWhat role do genes play in egg, milk, and nut allergies? A study published in Nature Communications, led by the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) and Charité --Universitätsmedizin Berlin, has found five genetic risk loci that point to the importance of skin and mucous membrane barriers and the immune system in the development of food allergies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds smokers wrongly believe Natural American Spirit cigarettes are healthierSmokers wrongly believe Natural American Spirit cigarettes to be healthier than other brands due to NAS's advertising claims, according to new research from the Penn Tobacco Center of Regulatory Science (TCORS) at the Annenberg School for Communication. This belief was found among both former and current smokers and was not linked to brand preference.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How the financial press influences investors' opinion and behaviorResearchers at the University of Luxembourg have found that the financial press can have detrimental or positive effects on the behaviour of investors and their opinion on the economy as a result of the language used in reporting.
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The Atlantic
'An Utterly Untruthful President' Updated on October 24 at 12:00 p.m. ET If President Trump’s relationship with his former ally Senator Bob Corker was frayed before, it now appears to be ruptured completely. The two Republicans reignited their feud on Tuesday after the president did not take kindly to Corker’s criticism of his leadership and his suggestion that Trump “stay out” of congressional negotiations over a tax bill. In a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A major study finds many planned roads in the tropics shouldn't be builtThe researchers say many new roads being built or planned today are in high-rainfall tropical and subtropical areas, usually in developing nations.
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Science : NPR
Astronaut Paul Weitz Dies At 85; Veteran Of Skylab And Shuttle Missions Selected by NASA in 1966, Weitz went on to fly on the first manned Skylab mission and performed vital space walks to fix the stricken station. He later commanded the maiden flight of Challenger. (Image credit: AP)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers create definitive method to detect wildfire tainted wine grapesWine producers and grape growers have a new, powerful tool at their disposal to help manage the impact of grapes exposed to smoke from forest fires.
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Ars Technica
New York City’s future storm risk dominated by sea level rise Enlarge (credit: National Weather Service ) Over the last few decades, a warming Atlantic Ocean has produced a number of very powerful hurricanes, some of which retained strength much further north than usual. Fortunately for the US, however, few of them made landfall on the continental US, leading to talk of a " hurricane hiatus " that came to a decisive close this year. A new analysis of New Yo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
France, Ireland ready to discuss tax on Internet giantsFrench President Emmanuel Macron and Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar say they are ready to discuss the contentious issue of taxing internet giants after a meeting in Paris.
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The Atlantic
Better Than Ambien There was a time not long ago when this reporter was, shall we say, stretched a bit thin. At night, she lay in her bed, which was covered with laundered and not-yet-folded yoga pants, attempting to gain respite. Yet none would come. Instead, she would play mental chess with various cost-benefit analyses, or she would arrange and rearrange her mental to-do list, as though, like so much broccoli un
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Saguaro and other towering cacti have a scrambled historyVisitors to Mexico and the U.S. Southwest can't help but stand in awe of the solitary and majestic saguaro, the towering clusters of the organ pipe cactus and Baja's cardón, the appropriately named "elephant" cactus. The saguaro alone can grow to a height of more than 75 feet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Solving how a complex disease threatens oak treesTeamwork between Forest Research, Bangor University and others has for the first time, tracked down the cause of the stem bleeding symptoms of this newly identified threat to the native oak.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
For robotics and AI, great power comes with great responsibilityAdvances in artificial intelligence and robotics stand to make our lives better. Dangerous jobs could be outsourced. Huge datasets could be analyzed instantly. Boring tasks could be automated.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New way to prevent unfavorable intestinal microbiotaA physiological approach to restore the gut's ecosystem in various diseases by using antimicrobial peptides has been developed by Hokkaido University scientists.
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: Wild and Captive Chimpanzees Share Personality Traits With HumansA new study confirms early research by Jane Goodall, who first attributed such traits to chimps about 60 years ago.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
EPA regulation on arsenic in US public water systems likely prevented over 200 cancer cases per yearA new study highlights the critical role of federal drinking water regulations in reducing toxic exposure and protecting human health.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Are e-cigarettes with higher nicotine associated with more smoking, vaping?The use of electronic cigarettes with higher nicotine concentrations by high school students in California was associated with a greater likelihood of subsequent use of conventional combustible cigarettes and e-cigarettes, according to a new article.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Are teens more likely to take charge of their health when money is on the line?Using small financial incentives and accessible monitoring tools such as wireless glucometers and apps may motivate young people with type 1 diabetes to engage in the management of their condition, research indicates. Participants in the intervention group were nearly three times more likely to achieve daily glucose monitoring goals. The authors say the study shows that the strategy may be an effe
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Cancer biology still needs physicists Considering game theory and the role of physical forces could lead to better treatments for cancer, says Robert Austin. Nature 550 431 doi: 10.1038/550431a
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New Scientist - News
What the controversial ‘human’ teeth fossils really tell usTwo 9.7-million-year-old fossil teeth found in Germany probably belong to a primitive primate and something like a deer, not an early human ancestor as has been reported
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How climate change limits educational accessThe effects of climate change can creep into nearly every aspect of life in heavy-hit areas. They may even limit children's access to education, says Nicholas School of the Environment graduate Heather Randell.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Meet your inner lizardAn ancient little lizard-like creature from the Scottish Borders is the missing ancestral link between human beings and the fish we evolved from millions of years ago.
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Gizmodo
Save 20% On Blunt Umbrellas, Which Can Withstand Tropical Storm-Force Winds You could buy a $5 umbrella every time you get caught in a storm, only to watch it disintegrate before you get to safety, or you could invest in a Blunt umbrella for 20% off. Blunt umbrellas feature rounded safety tips to avoid poking anyone in the eye, include a special pocket for a Tile device tracker, and most importantly, can withstand winds of up to 72 mph (in the case of the standard model
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Popular Science
10 instant messaging hacks to talk more good DIY Do more with your favorite communication app. Master your favorite instant messaging app with these expert tips, covering Facebook Messenger, Google Hangouts, Messages for iOS, WhatsApp, and social media.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Electricity sector uncertainty calls for new decision-making toolsBefore it was stayed by the U.S. Supreme Court in February 2016, the Clean Power Plan offered state electric utilities and their regulators a degree of certainty as they confronted a rapidly changing market and technology landscape. Although not all agreed with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's approach, the Clean Power Plan's predictable long-term emissions reduction targets provided cle
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New type of light interaction with atoms allows for manipulating cloud shapeA team of researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel has found a new way to manipulate atoms using light. In their paper published in Physical Review Letters, the team describes the new technique and possible uses for it.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microplastics in the Baltic have not risen for 30 yearsThe concentration of microplastics in water and fish from the Baltic Sea has been constant for the past 30 years, despite a substantial increase in plastic production during the same period. This is the surprising conclusion of a new study just published in Science of the Total Environment.
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The Atlantic
The Doom Loop of Modern Liberalism Here are three trends that are often discussed in isolation: The low birth rates of advanced economies The rise of a xenophobic anti-immigration politics The fragility of the welfare state While these subjects might seem to have nothing to do with each other, in fact they crash into each other like dominos. As rich countries have fewer babies, they need immigration to grow their prime-age workfor
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Heart failure therapy hope as drug blocks deadly muscle scarringA potential treatment to prevent deadly muscle scarring that contributes to chronic heart failure has been uncovered by scientists at the University of Edinburgh.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Long-term opioid use does not increase risk of Alzheimer's diseaseOpioid use is not associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease, shows a recent study from the University of Eastern Finland. A previous study from the US reported an association between high cumulative doses of opioids and an increased risk of dementia, but the Finnish study does not confirm this finding.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel histone modifications couple metabolism to gene activityScientists of Helmholtz Zentrum München and Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich (LMU) have discovered that two new classes of histone modifications couple cellular metabolism to gene activity. The study was published in Nature Structural and Molecular Biology.
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Feed: All Latest
How Federal Law Protects Online Sex TraffickersOpinion: The Communications Decency Act shields sex-trafficking websites. It's time for Congress to intervene.
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Feed: All Latest
There's a New Mario Game Out This Week (and Assassin's Creed, and Wolfenstein), But Fall Ain't What It Used to BeThe holidays used to feel like a deluge of new games—now it's just a shallow sea of annualized sure-thing sequels.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Growing number of single-person households presents challenges for citiesTwo social trends that pose imminent challenges – and require policy responses – to sustainable futures in our cities are the rise of single-person households and homelessness.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mobile on-body devices can be precisely and discreetly controlled using a tiny sensorMobile devices like the Apple Watch have a drawback: their small screen size makes them difficult to use. Computer scientists at Saarland University have now developed an alternative, which they call "DeformWear." A tiny switch, no larger than the head of a pin, is built into a ring, for example, and worn on the body. It can be moved in all directions, pressed, pinched, and pushed toward the right
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Air pollution cuts solar energy potential in ChinaSevere air pollution in northern and eastern China blocks about 20 percent of sunlight from reaching solar panel arrays in winter, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New mapping tool tracks elk migration to reduce brucellosis riskElk and cattle commingle on a hay line in western Wyoming. New research has created a mapping tool for reducing the risk of transmitting brucellosis from elk to cattle.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Shallow soils promote savannas in South AmericaThe boundary between South American tropical rainforests and savannas is influenced by the depth to which plants can root, research indicates. Shallow rooting depth promotes the establishment of savannas. Previous research has shown that precipitation and fire mediate tropical forest and savanna distributions. The study shows that below ground conditions need to be considered to understand the dis
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Drug delivery using liposomesLiposomes are successful drug delivery vehicles prescribed for several types of cancer but also for treatment of fungal infections or pain management. Now researchers show a straightforward method to functionalize liposomes for specific targeting, potentially paving the way to personalized medicine.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Want to lose weight? Snap that selfie, set that goal, share with othersProgress pics, before and after selfies and public declarations in virtual communities are helpful for reaching weight loss goals, new study finds.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
On the watch for antibiotic-resistant mycoplasma pneumoniaeAn infectious disease sentinel surveillance network is in development, for Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections at eight medical centers across the United States.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
To stay young, kill zombie cells Killing off cells that refuse to die on their own has proved a powerful anti-ageing strategy in mice. Now it's about to be tested in humans. Nature 550 448 doi: 10.1038/550448a
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Gizmodo
Simple Benchmarks to Run on Your Computer to Check If It's Working Well Image: Futuremark At first glance the computer on your desk might look a lot like last year’s model or the model your colleague has, but looks can be deceptive—if you want to really rate your laptop and find its place in the power and performance stakes, that’s where benchmarks come in. Long revered by gamers as a way of objectively judging the raw power of a rig, benchmarking is the best way to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Self-assembly of highly-porous crystalline particles into novel photonic materials for sensing applicationsIn a lab just outside of Barcelona, tiny particles are arranging themselves into ordered 3-D structures, like little animated Lego bricks clicking themselves into place. These particles are highly porous organic-inorganic hybrids whose size and shape can be controlled to tune the properties of the resulting ensemble.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A huge marine reserve in the Pacific will protect rich tourists rather than fishThe small Pacific archipelago of Palau has a poaching problem. When I went there in 2016 for instance, four Vietnamese crews were held for nearly two months after their timber-hulled "blue boats" were apprehended in local waters. They were fishing for tuna, but sharks were also found on board as well as sea cucumber – an expensive delicacy on the Chinese market.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UBC researchers create definitive method to detect wildfire tainted wine grapesWine producers and grape growers have a new, powerful tool at their disposal to help manage the impact of grapes exposed to smoke from forest fires.Researchers from UBC's Okanagan campus have devised a new analytical test to precisely and accurately measure the amount of volatile phenols-compounds absorbed by grapes when exposed to smoke that can impact wine flavour-that are present in the fruit p
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Underwater sound waves help scientists locate ocean impactsScientists have developed a new method to locate the precise time and location that objects fall into our oceans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New combination therapy of registered drugs shortens anti-Wolbachia therapyResearchers from LSTM's Research Centre for Drugs and Diagnostics have found a way of significantly reducing the treatment required for lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis from several weeks to seven days. By targeting Wolbachia, a bacterial symbiont that the filarial parasites need to live, the team has discovered a drug synergy that enables effective treatment over a shorter time.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
High-speed locomotion neurons found in the brainstemA clearly defined subpopulation of neurons in the brainstem is essential to execute locomotion at high speeds. Interestingly, these high-speed neurons are intermingled with others that can elicit immediate stopping. How defined groups of brainstem neurons can regulate important aspects of full motor programs, reports a study by researchers of the Biozentrum at the University of Basel and the Fried
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Gentle' dying -- or suicide?When terminally ill patients wish to hasten death by fasting, should physicians assist them to do so? LMU ethicist Ralf Jox argues that voluntary stopping of eating and drinking is often equivalent to assisted suicide, and that the practice should be regulated.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Australian research highlights worldwide risk of HIV and Hepatitis C epidemicsTwo reviews of the global prevalence of injecting drug use and of interventions to prevent the spread of blood borne viruses among people who inject drugs are published today in leading international journal The Lancet Global Health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Standardized ambulatory surgical protocol reduces unplanned postoperative returnsHealth system study of patients undergoing open inguinal hernia repair identifies patient education and anesthetic management as key elements of care.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A major study finds many planned roads in the tropics shouldn't be builtWe are living in the most dramatic era of road expansion in human history, but many planned roads should not be built, concludes a major study by researchers at James Cook University in Australia.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Saguaro and other towering cacti have a scrambled historyBiologists continue to debate the genealogy of the cactus family, even differing by a factor of 10 about how many different genera there are. A study based on new genome sequences of four columnar cacti, including saguaro and cardon, illustrates why this is. Because of the long lives of these columnar cacti, ancient genes drop out at random and give the impression of parallel evolution in those sp
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Inside Science
Will Passengers Ever Fly on Pilotless Planes? Will Passengers Ever Fly on Pilotless Planes? The technology is progressing quickly, but the main challenge may be overcoming our fears. Plane_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: PublicDomainPictures via Pixabay Rights information: CC0 Public Domain Technology Tuesday, October 24, 2017 - 09:15 Brian Owens, Contributor (Inside Science) -- Autonomous cars from companies like Google, Uber and Tesla will s
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Diabetes still on rise, but new study suggests major progress in screening, diagnosisA study that compared total US diabetes diagnoses over a 26-year period found that while the prevalence nearly doubled, from 5.5 to 10.8 percent, the proportion of missed cases of diabetes dropped significantly during the same period, from 16.3 to 10.9 percent.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Botulinum toxin injections may provide relief for children and teens with hard-to-treat migrainesOne in 10 school-aged children suffer from migraines, but there are few FDA-approved medications for them. While botulinum toxin injections are approved to treat migraines in adults, children and teens may benefit as well, early research suggests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Diabetic blindness: Protein that plays key roleResearchers have identified a protein (ARF6) that when inhibited reduces diabetic retinopathy, a condition that results when blood vessels at the back of the eye leak fluid into the eye, impairing vision.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nanodiamonds show promise for aiding recovery from root canalPeople who undergo root canals may soon have a tiny but powerful ally that could prevent infection after treatment. In a new paper, researchers write that combining nanodiamonds with gutta percha, a material used to fill disinfected root canals, may enhance the gutta percha's protective properties.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fossils from the world's oldest trees reveal complex anatomy never seen beforeThe first trees to have ever grown on Earth were also the most complex, new research has revealed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Single-molecule dissection of developmental gene controlScientists have made significant discoveries on how developmental genes are controlled by the methyltransferase enzyme PRC2, outlines a new report.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Stress-induced embolisms that interrupt water transport are a universal component of tree mortalityAbout half of carbon dioxide emissions are absorbed by trees and other plants. This carbon dioxide uptake is threatened by droughts, which are increasing in frequency. For the first time, scientists synthesized all known drought manipulation studies to determine how drought kills trees. They found that hydraulic failure is a universal component of tree death. Hydraulic failure is when a tree's wat
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Juno probe discovers surprising activity in Jupiter's interiorNASA's Juno spacecraft has plumbed the depths of Jupiter, revealing that the planet's famous bands of swirling winds extend thousands of kilometres down. The work is the sharpest glimpse yet into Jupiter's interior.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
IBM scientists demonstrate in-memory computing with 1 million devices for applications in AI"In-memory computing" or "computational memory" is an emerging concept that uses the physical properties of memory devices for both storing and processing information. This is counter to current von Neumann systems and devices, such as standard desktop computers, laptops and even cellphones, which shuttle data back and forth between memory and the computing unit, thus making them slower and less e
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Experiments with levitated nanoparticles reveal role of friction at the nanoscaleTransitions occurring in nanoscale systems, such as a chemical reaction or the folding of a protein, are strongly affected by friction and thermal noise. Almost 80 years ago, the Dutch physicist Hendrik Kramers predicted that such transitions occur most frequently at intermediate friction, an effect known as Kramers turnover. Now, reporting in Nature Nanotechnology, a team of scientists from the E
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tracking a parasite that's ravaging fishIn Switzerland – not to mention the rest of Europe and the United States – freshwater fish are falling victim to a deadly disease that is rampant in the summer and dormant in the winter. It is caused by a parasite that thrives in rivers and attacks salmonid fish in particular. Researchers from EPFL, EAWAG and FIWI have come up with a mathematical model for predicting outbreaks as part of a three-y
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New on MIT Technology Review
Here’s the Economic Argument to Trump for Fighting Climate Change
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Gizmodo
When Hope Runs Out, Cancer Patients Are Making Their Own DIY Immunotherapy Treatments Every generation has had its breakthrough that promised to, at long last, finally cure cancer, but this time around the chances of actually pulling it off are looking pretty good. Rapid advancement in fields like genetics have led to incredible success using immunotherapies to turn patients’ own bodies into cancer-fighting machines. Pharmaceutical companies, philanthropic billionaires and the fed
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Harnessing the power of fire whirlsResearchers in the University of Maryland Department of Fire Protection Engineering (FPE) have published a review of 'fire whirls' – a powerful vortex of swirling flames, often the destructive force in urban and wildland fires – in the Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics. Their size, unpredictable nature, and ability to propel burning embers (i.e., firebrands) far into the air present many reasons to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Oldest known marine navigation tool revealed with scanning technologyDetails of the earliest known marine navigation tool, discovered in a shipwreck, have been revealed thanks to state-of-the-art scanning technology at WMG, University of Warwick.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Politicians divide parties with violent speech, study findsScroll through Twitter or watch an NFL game and you'll quickly remember we live in a time of unprecedented political polarization. Who's to blame for the lack of unity? According to BYU researchers, politicians' penchant for using violent language isn't helping.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Novel histone modifications couple metabolism to gene activityScientists of Helmholtz Zentrum München and Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich (LMU) have discovered that two new classes of histone modifications couple cellular metabolism to gene activity. The study was published in Nature Structural and Molecular Biology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Coated mirrors achieve record-setting far ultraviolet reflectance levelsIn 2016, scientists at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) produced mirrors with the highest reflectance ever reported in the farultraviolet (FUV) spectral range (100-200 nm). To develop these mirrors, the team developed a new three-step physical vapor deposition process to coat aluminum mirrors with protective magnesium fluoride (MgF²) or lithium fluoride (LiF) films to protect the aluminum from n
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Adhesives and composite materials made from Swiss tree barkStudies conducted by the National Research Programme show that tannins extracted from native tree bark can be used to produce adhesives and composite materials. An additional area of application might be 3-D printing.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Noninvasive brain imaging shows readiness of trainees to perform operationsWhile simulation platforms have been used to train surgeons before they enter an actual operating room (OR), few studies have evaluated how well trainees transfer those skills from the simulator to the OR. Now, a study that used noninvasive brain imaging to evaluate brain activity has found that simulator-trained medical students successfully transferred those skills to operating on cadavers and w
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study explores the seasonality of hair lossA new British Journal of Dermatology study explores the relationship between seasonality and hair loss at a population level using Google Trends data.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What we call postdoctoral researchers matters, scientists sayIn an opinion piece in the journal eLife, eight scientists and science policy experts make the case for standardizing how postdoctoral researchers are categorized by human resources offices and provide a framework that institutions can follow.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Choosing Wisely' movement: Off to a good start, but change needed for continued successFive years ago, a group of medical organizations did something they'd never done before: give doctors a list of things they shouldn't do for their patients. The momentum behind this campaign, called 'Choosing Wisely,' has snowballed, but it needs to evolve in order to eliminate unnecessary care.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Portland State study calls for new approach to studying concussionUnderstanding the puzzling and complex nature of concussion and how to treat it will take a whole new way of approaching the problem, according to new research led by Portland State University. The researchers advocate the use of systems science -- a discipline that analyzes complex problems as whole systems and integrates research findings from different disciplines.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Resilience intervention improves well-being in young patients with cancerA new randomized clinical trial of a pilot program found that a brief in-person intervention can improve psychosocial health in a particularly vulnerable population -- adolescents and young adults living with cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Yoga can be an effective supportive therapy for people with lung cancer and their caregiversIn a feasibility trial of people with advanced lung cancer receiving radiation therapy, and their caregivers, yoga was beneficial to both parties.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
People with leukemia and their oncologists have vastly different perceptions of prognosisA study of 100 people with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) receiving chemotherapy found that patient and physician perceptions of treatment risk and the likelihood of a cure varied widely. Overall, patients tended to overestimate both the risk of dying due to treatment and the likelihood of a cure.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nitrous oxide emissions may get worse as climate warmsNew research from the University of Minnesota, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shows nitrous oxide emissions, a greenhouse gas, may get worse as the climate warms. While not as prevalent in the atmosphere as carbon dioxide, a nitrous oxide molecule is nearly 300 times more effective in terms of warming the planet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Project Blue and the quest to photograph exoplanetsThe world's collective imagination to answer the age-old question, "Are we alone," has been reignited now that we understand exoplanets – planets in orbit around stars other than Earth's Sun – are not uncommon. There's an increased urgency to develop capabilities for directly photographing exoplanets around nearby stars and to characterize their surface conditions and, Alpha Centauri, being the ne
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fingerprinting to solve crimes is not as robust as you thinkPolice have used fingerprint evidence to catch and convict criminals for more than 100 years. It's a commonly used technique in Australia: more than 10,000 fingerprint matches were made in Victoria alone last year.
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Gizmodo
Marvel Already Has Plans For Two New Thor: Ragnarok Characters Beyond the Movie Kevin Feige teases Captain Marvel’s role in bringing the current chapter of the Marvel Cinematic Universe to a close. Michael Bay’s next movie project resurrects an animated favorite. Jeff Goldblum offers a suitably quirky tease on his Jurassic World 2 return. Plus new Punisher photos, and a new Stranger Things clip. Behold, spoilers! Thor: Ragnarok Odin returns in the latest TV spot. Meanwhile,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds African American executives more likely to be demoted than Caucasian, Asian or Hispanic counterpartsResearchers looked at data from over a 20-year period of more than 8,000 executives in 2,800 US listed companies, and found that black executives accounted for just one per cent of all executives. They also found that black executives are 74 per cent more likely to get demoted, face a 43 per cent lower probability of promotion and are 55 per cent more likely to leave the executive ranks altogether
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Passive solar windows heat up in cold weatherResearchers have developed a way to transform ordinary windows into solar-powered heaters that use the sun's energy to increase the window temperature by up to 8 K (nearly 15 °F) in cold weather. The researchers expect that the new solar thermal surfaces will lead to significant energy savings through reduced heating costs.
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Feed: All Latest
Review: GoPro Hero6 BlackIf you're all about slo-mo and smooth 4K, GoPro's got you covered.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new study shows that ants go for the wiser option, even if it means working a bit harderA new study shows that ants go for the wiser option, even if it means working a bit harder.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is there a darker side to sharenting?Uploading adorable, diaper-clad baby pics—harmless fun or red flag? Do you remember the first picture of yourself posted on Facebook? I deleted mine. It was in my dyed hair and bad make-up phase. No one wants to look back on that.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Are religious people more moral?Why do people distrust atheists?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Formation of magma oceans on exoplanetInduction heating can completely change the energy budget of an exoplanet and even melt its interior. In a study published by Nature Astronomy an international team led by the Space Research Institute of the Austrian Academy of Sciences with participation of the University of Vienna explains how magma oceans can form under the surface of exoplanets as a result of induction heating.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Solar-Sail Technology Gets Its Day in the SunThe privately funded LightSail 2 spacecraft will make a test flight in Earth orbit -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Patients prefer doctors not use computers in exam roomA new study suggests that people with advanced cancer prefer doctors communicate with them face-to-face with just a notepad in hand rather than repeatedly using a computer.
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Gizmodo
This Storm Chaser Captures Monsoon Footage Like You've Never Seen Before GIF GIF: Vimeo Meteorologists can predict, with some degree of accuracy, whether or not it’s going to rain tomorrow. But determining the exact severity of an approaching storm isn’t quite as easy. So in order to capture the amazing timelapse sequences in his new film, Monsoon IV , Mike Olbinski had to drive nearly 13,000 miles across the southern US to chase down these massive storms. Using a pai
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fuel economy worse in fall, winter thanks to higher share of new light trucks soldFall and winter are a good time to buy a vehicle as dealers clear out inventory from the previous model year but it's also the time of year when average fuel economy of new vehicle sales is at its lowest.
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Goo for Growing OrganoidsScientists engineered a synthetic, nutrient-rich gel that feeds growing organoids as they mature from human pluripotent stem cells into 3-D bowels.
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Futurity.org
Dad’s alcohol abuse may up risk of teen dating violence Teens who grew up with a parent with an alcohol use disorder may have a higher risk of being involved in abusive dating relationships. The research also suggests that the root causes of teen dating violence are visible as early as infancy. “Our findings underscore the critical need for early intervention and prevention with families who are at-risk due to alcohol problems…” “Although teen dating
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NYT > Science
‘Hotumn’ Takes Hold as October Temperatures SoarPut away those Halloween masks and holiday decorations. It’s still swimsuit weather from the Northeast to the Great Plains.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Turning a pinch of salt into an electrical switchA team of scientists from the University of Liverpool, University College London and the University of Zaragoza in Spain has discovered a way to induce and control a fundamental electrical switching behaviour on the nano-scale.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study sheds light on relationship between environment, hormones and evolutionDifferent species of spadefoot toads approach metamorphosis differently, and it's all thanks to the pond they grew up in, according to a team of researchers that includes a University of Michigan scientist.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Thruster for Mars mission breaks recordsAn advanced space engine in the running to propel humans to Mars has broken the records for operating current, power and thrust for a device of its kind, known as a Hall thruster.
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Gizmodo
Honolulu Bans Texting While Crossing The Street Photo: AP Make a mental note if you’re visiting Hawaii soon: Starting Wednesday, texting while walking across a street in Honolulu is illegal, thanks to a new law that allows police to fine pedestrians up to $35 for checking their phone, while crossing an intersection in the Hawaiian city and surrounding county, according to the New York Times . That’s right—while walking. Honolulu is believed to
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Futurity.org
Disasters can turn mild depression into inflammation People who exhibit even a few depressive symptoms before a major life stressor, such as a disaster, may experience an increase in inflammation—a major risk factor for heart disease and other negative health conditions—after the event. A new study followed 124 people (38 men and 86 women, including whites, Hispanics, and African-Americans) who lived in Texas City, Texas, before and after a petroch
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New York is still feeling the effects of Hurricane Sandy, five years laterBreezy Point isn't next to the beach—it more or less is the beach. It's a community built on sand. Occupying the Rockaway Peninsula that juts out of Queens, NY and into the Atlantic Ocean, residents are never more than a few minutes' walk to the brackish bays that surround the thin strip of land. The flat landscape and many of the alleys and parking lots swim in loose drifts of sand. It's not hard
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Dagens Medicin
Alle utilsigtede hændelser bliver ikke indrapporteretDet sker langt fra altid, at fejl og utilsigtede hændelser i medicineringen på landets sygehuse bliver indrapporteret, selv om det er et lovkrav, viser ny forskning.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study explores dried cranberries' effect on gut healthNovel investigation evaluates the potential impact of eating dried cranberries on typical indicators of a healthy gut microbiome.
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Popular Science
Don't worry about eggs—these other foods are way more likely to give you Salmonella Health And they're harder to avoid. An apology up front: this is not a free pass to eat raw cookie dough.
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Gizmodo
Cosmetics Brand Tarte Exposed Personal Information About Nearly 2 Million Customers Tarte Cosmetics, a cruelty-free cosmetics brand carried by major retailers like Sephora and Ulta, exposed the personal information of nearly two million customers in two unsecured online databases. The databases were publicly accessible and included customer names, email addresses, mailing addresses, and the last four digits of credit card numbers, according to the Kromtech Security Center , the
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Science : NPR
Can Science Change The Mildewed Fortunes Of New York Heritage Hops? Hops helped make vast fortunes for 19th century farmers and brewers in New York state before a mildew blight ushered in their demise. Now, undergrads hope to develop mildew-resistant heritage hops. (Image credit: Lela Nargi/For NPR)
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Ars Technica
TiVo embraces voice controls in new Bolt Vox, Mini Vox, and Vox Remote Enlarge (credit: TiVo ) TiVo announced today an update to its line of set-top boxes that makes voice a main feature. The new Bolt Vox and Mini Vox devices include all the features of the original TiVo Bolt and TiVo Mini. But now, the devices also have native voice functionality. That means the set-top boxes, using the new TiVo Vox Remote, can now search for, record, and play content across live T
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: The grace of SaturnSaturn's graceful lanes of orbiting ice—its iconic rings—wind their way around the planet to pass beyond the horizon in this view from NASA's Cassini spacecraft. And diminutive Pandora, scarcely larger than a pixel here, can be seen orbiting just beyond the F ring in this image.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astronomers observe unusual outburst activity of binary star AG DraconisEuropean astronomers have spotted an unusual outburst activity of a binary star system known as AG Draconis. New observations reveal that the recent changes of brightness of this star are slightly different than the changes that occurred during previous outbursts. The findings were presented October 13 in a paper published on arXiv.org.
10h
Dagens Medicin
Medicin mod mavesyre kan øge hjerte-kar-risikoDansk forskning viser, at længere tids forbrug af mavesyrehæmmende medicin kan være forbundet med en øget risiko for at få blodprop i hjertet og slagtilfælde.
10h
Ingeniøren
Spørg Scientariet: Hvorfor blev Storstrømsbroen bygget med mindre levetid?En læser undrer sig over konstruktionen af Storstrømsbroen, da den tilsyneladende ikke holdt så godt. Banedanmark svarer på spørgsmålet.
10h
Live Science
Ancient Coptic Tombstone Found Along Egypt's Avenue of SphinxesArchaeologists unearthed an ancient Coptic tombstone during a dig Sunday (Oct. 22), according to Egypt’s antiquities ministry.
10h
Futurity.org
Are teen thrill-seekers more likely to smoke? Teens who are “sensation seekers” may be more likely than others to smoke cigarettes, new research shows. The researchers examined the association between sensation seeking—the desire for new and intense experiences—and cigarette smoking through adolescence and young adulthood. They found that sensation seeking was more strongly associated with smoking cigarettes during adolescence than at other
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rethinking tourism and its contribution to conservation in New ZealandNew Zealand is one of 36 global hotspots for biodiversity. Its unique wildlife is a major draw card for tourists.
10h
Live Science
Clowns or Holes: What Is Your State Most Afraid Of?Californians and Texans seem to suffer from a fear of holes, Georgians fear heights, and Americans generally seem to really be creeped out by the number 13 — or at least, that's what our search histories suggest.
11h
Live Science
'Eye' Can't Look: 9 Eyeball Injuries That Will Make You SquirmInjuries to eyeballs might make you want to squirm and cover your eyes, but these icky accidents and odd occurrences can also be illuminating.
11h
Gizmodo
Indochino Is Launching Its Black Friday Suit Sale Early, Just For Our Readers [Exclusive] Indochino Black Friday Sale , $349 with code KINJA17 Our readers have purchased thousands of custom-tailored suits over from Indochino the last few years, and as a result, they’re unlocking their Black Friday sale early , just for us. For a limited time, take your pick of 65 suit styles—most of which are part of their latest collection—for just $349 with promo code KINJA17. These suit s regularly
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fact checkers outperform historians when evaluating online informationHow do expert researchers go about assessing the credibility of information on the internet? Not as skillfully as you might guess – and those who are most effective use a tactic that others tend to overlook, according to scholars at Stanford Graduate School of Education.
11h
Live Science
In Photos: 700-Year-Old Shipwreck Discovered in ChinaA shipwreck dating back around 700 years, to a time that the Mongols controlled China, has been discovered at a construction site in Heze City, China.
11h
Live Science
This Shipwreck Dates to When Genghis Khan's Descendants Ruled ChinaThe 700-year-old shipwreck was found at a construction site in China, buried beneath silt and mud. It may have sank after being hit and taking on water.
11h
Ars Technica
Real-life zombies tend to be the fast ones, neuroscience study suggests Enlarge / Slow zombies. (credit: George Romero ) In decades of films, the dead have risen from the grave to stalk the living. Classic zombies go slow (a literal plodding approach of death), while modern zombies are often swifter, sometimes speedy. Though science-fiction fans will endlessly debate which is better, a new neuroscience study on the closest thing we have to zombies in real life—those
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Strong social skills increasingly valuable to employers, study findsEmployers increasingly reward workers who have social and technical skills rather than technical skills alone, according to a new analysis by a Harvard education economist.
11h
Dagens Medicin
Praktiserende læger får ny vejledning i behandling af hjerte-kar-sygdommeDSAM har opdateret hjertevejledning fra 2007 og sender de nye anbefalinger i høring.
11h
Ingeniøren
Luftforurening blokerer for Kinas solenergiAfbrænding af fossile brændsler reducerer effektiviteten af solcellepanelerne med mindst 20 procent i det nordlige og østlige Kina.
11h
Viden
Hackere skal belønnes for at hacke smartphone-appsGoogle lancerer program, der skal forbedre sikkerheden i deres smartphones.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Under the sea ice, behold the ancient Arctic jellyfishThe doings of creatures under the Arctic sea ice are many, but they are rarely observed by humans; it's pretty hard to get under the ice to look. In recent years, marine biologist Andy Juhl and his colleagues have gotten around this problem by driving snowmobiles several miles from Point Barrow, Alaska, out onto the adjoining frozen Chukchi Sea, drilling holes in the four-foot-plus thick ice, and
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Galileo in place for launchTwo more Galileo satellites have reached Europe's Spaceport in French Guiana, joining the first pair of navigation satellites and the Ariane 5 rocket due to haul the quartet to orbit this December.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Reintroduced marsupials may pose new threat to ground–dwelling birdsNative marsupials reintroduced in south-western Australia are a threat to ground-dwelling birds, a University of Queensland study has found.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemists introduce novel method to separate isotopesSeparating different versions of elements—isotopes—is an excruciatingly difficult task: They differ by just one or two extra neutrons, an infinitesimal difference in mass. But University of Chicago researchers announced Oct. 23 that they've added an entirely new way to do so.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
War on weeds takes toll on beneficial bacteria in the soilAs farmers battle in their above-ground war on weeds, they may inadvertently create underground casualties – unintentionally attacking the beneficial bacteria that help crops guard against enemy fungus, according to Cornell University research.
11h
Feed: All Latest
LA Metro Looks to Rideshare Companies Like Uber, Lyft, and Chariot to Build the Future of Public TransitLos Angeles Metro is looking for a private company to help it design and implement an experiment in on-demand service.
11h
Feed: All Latest
How Sand Hill Road Became the Main Street of Venture CapitalVenture capitalists reflect on how Sand Hill Road near Stanford University became the Main Street of their industry.
11h
Science | The Guardian
Could science fiction save NHS data and improve our health? | Anne PerkinsThe most persistent fear for healthcare in 2100 was about the exploitation of genetic data. But health data could be a huge force for good. We need an open debate now The NHS lurches its way through funding crises and organisational dilemmas. It faces the challenge of antibiotic resistance and it must ponder the deeply conflicted question of the uses and abuses of new technology. Its short-term ho
11h
The Atlantic
The Deadly Panic-Neglect Cycle in Pandemic Funding It was the nightmare that wasn’t. On July 20, 2014, as West Africa struggled to quash a historically large outbreak of Ebola, an infected man carried the virus to Lagos, Nigeria— Africa’s largest city . In that dense throng of 21 million people, many of whom travel extensively, it seemed that Ebola would be impossible to track and contain. But Nigeria was ready. In the previous years, it has been
11h
Ars Technica
Balloon navigation breakthrough helps extend cell service in Puerto Rico Enlarge / A balloon launches from Nevada on its way to Puerto Rico. (credit: X ) One of Puerto Ricans' most basic needs in the wake of Hurricane Maria is communication with the outside world. Cell phone companies on the island are still working to repair infrastructure after the hurricane took 95 percent of the island's cell phone towers out of service . So X , Alphabet's company devoted to techn
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lightning produces afterglow of gamma radiationLightning can produce X-rays and gamma radiation. In the past, researchers thought that this phenomenon only lasted for a very short time, about one ten-thousandth of a second. However, the ionizing radiation of lightning appears to emit much longer than presumed. An afterglow of gamma radiation arises, which lasts up to 10,000 times longer. This is demonstrated for the first time by computer simu
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Legibility in writing systems emerges spontaneously, rather than evolving over timeThe visual appearance of most scripts corresponds with the basic constraints of the human visual system, thus facilitating the perception and processing of letters. For example, cardinals (horizontal and vertical lines) are more numerous than oblique lines. But how did it happen? Has the legibility of writing systems gradually evolved through cultural transformation or cultural selection? Or do hu
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using CRISPR to make warmer, less fatty pigsA team of researchers with members from several institutions in China and one in the U.K. has used the CRISPR-Cas 9 gene editing technique to cause test pigs to retain less bodyfat. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describes their gene editing experiment, their success rate and the condition of the genetically modified pigs that were born as par
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers use acoustic gravity waves to locate precise time and location that objects hit the sea surfaceScientists have developed a new method to locate the precise time and location that objects fall into the oceans. The method, developed by researchers from Cardiff University, uses underwater microphones, also known as hydrophones, to listen for underwater sound waves that are emitted when an object hits the sea surface.
11h
Dagens Medicin
Hundredevis af medicinstuderende viser støtte i Svendborg-sagen Under overskriften ‘DetKanBliveMig’ har to medicinstuderende på Københavns Universitet taget initiativ til et fællesbillede for at vise støtte til den dømte læge i Svendborg-sagen.
11h
Dagens Medicin
Nyt forsøg med tre demensvenlige sygehuseSom et led i den nationale demenshandlingsplan er tre sygehusafdelinger blevet udvalgt til en forsøgsordning med demensvenlige sygehuse.
11h
Science | The Guardian
UK is 30-40 years away from 'eradication of soil fertility', warns Gove Farmers must be incentivised to tackle decline in biodiversity, says environment secretary at launch of parliamentary soil body The UK is 30 to 40 years away from “the fundamental eradication of soil fertility” in parts of the country, the environment secretary Michael Gove has warned. “We have encouraged a type of farming which has damaged the earth,” Gove told the parliamentary launch of the Su
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Understanding how electrons turn to glassResearchers at Tohoku University have gained new insight into the electronic processes that guide the transformation of liquids into a solid crystalline or glassy state.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers study the pathobiology of antibiotic side reactionsYou get an infection, you are given penicillin—and then you could get hemorrhagic diarrhea. This rare but extremely unpleasant side reaction can be related to the enterotoxin tilivalline produced by a regular intestinal bacterium. Austrian scientists have now scrutinized the toxin's biosynthetic pathway and presented the results in the journal Angewandte Chemie. Their findings give important insig
11h
Dagens Medicin
Kristjar Skajaa stopper som institutleder
12h
Ingeniøren
FBI låst ude af 7.000 krypterede mobiler Agenter fra FBI har ikke været i stand til at bryde ind i 7.000 krypterede mobiler, fortæller FBI-direktør https://www.version2.dk/artikel/fbi-laast-ude-7000-krypterede-mobiler-1081974 Version2
12h
Ingeniøren
Hackere inficerer populær medieafspiller til MAC Angrebet er blot endnu et i serien af angreb mod applikations-magere i Apples økosystemer. Apple har et udvikler-signaturproblem, siger sikkerhedsekspert. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/hackere-inficerer-populaer-medieafspiller-mac-1081973 Version2
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
GAO: Climate change already costing US billions in lossesA non-partisan federal watchdog says climate change is already costing U.S. taxpayers billions of dollars each year, with those costs expected to rise as devastating storms, floods, wildfires and droughts become more frequent in the coming decades.
12h
Feed: All Latest
All of Apple's Face-Tracking Tech Behind the iPhone X's AnimojiThe face-tracking tech Apple debuted with the iPhone X has been in the works for decades.
12h
Feed: All Latest
Chasing the Illegal Loggers Looting the Amazon ForestThe urgent question: Can government agents finally prove that enough trees come from illegal logging sites in Peru to stop shipments into the US?
12h
The Atlantic
The National-Security-Law Expert Who Blocked Trump's Travel Ban The late Justice Antonin Scalia once compared a constitutional doctrine he disliked to “some ghoul in a late night horror movie that repeatedly sits up in its grave and shuffles abroad, after being repeatedly killed and buried.” Donald Trump’s travel ban—and the court challenges to it—also refuse to die. The first travel ban was an Executive Order (known as “EO-1”) issued on January 27, 2017. It
12h
Ars Technica
Engare review: The geometry of Islamic art becomes a treasure of a game Enlarge / Welcome to Engare . (credit: Mahdi Bahrami ) Your first-blush impression of new video game Engare , perhaps more than any other arty "indie" game in recent memory, will likely boil down to what you think about video games in general. If you're looking for something to blow the industry's tropes out of the water, then Engare should skyrocket to the top of any list you're making. It's a c
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Elephant poaching in Africa falls but ivory seizures up: studyElephant poaching in Africa declined for a fifth straight year in 2016 but seizures of illegal ivory hit records highs, the CITES monitor said Tuesday, calling it a "conflicting phenomena".
12h
Dagens Medicin
Vi HAR handlet på SvendborgsagenSå længe lovgivningen er, som den er, mener vi faktisk ikke, at der er at fralægge sig ansvar, når vi opfordrer vores medarbejdere til at journalisere. Det er at varetage både vores medarbejderes og vores patienters interesser.
12h
Ingeniøren
Apple rykker ind på markedet for industrielle appsFra på torsdag bliver det muligt at udvikle IoS-apps til General Electrics’ IoT-platform. GE og Apple vil i fælleskab føre forbrugerelektronikkens brugervenlighed over i industrielle apps.
12h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
India gears up for second Moon mission The Chandrayaan-2 orbiter, lander and rover will track how lunar dust might scupper settlement. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22870
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Singapore to freeze number of cars on its roadsSingapore, one of the most expensive places in the world to buy a vehicle, has announced it will freeze the number of private cars on its roads from next year but vowed to expand public transport.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gaza Bronze Age remains disappearing under concreteArchaeologists and preservation activists in the Gaza Strip have managed to halt the destruction of a Bronze Age site for now, but the future of what remains may still be in jeopardy.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Trump on 'wrong side of history' on climate: Ban Ki-moonUS President Donald Trump is "standing on the wrong side of history" in withdrawing from the Paris climate accord, former UN chief Ban Ki-moon told AFP in London on Monday.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Global wine output hits 50-year low: OIVWorldwide wine production tumbled 8.2 percent this year to hit a 50-year low due to climate fluctuations, the International Organisation of Vine and Wine (OIV) said Tuesday.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Novartis sees bright future for eye unitSwiss pharmaceutical giant Novartis said Tuesday a strategic review of its eye care unit showed that Alcon can deliver strong growth, but that a possible spin-off or listing is at least two years away.
13h
Dagens Medicin
Danske forskere giver forklaring på overdødelighed ved brug af antibiotikaAntibiotikaet clarithromycin skader celler og udløser åreforkalkning, viser dansk studie. Resultaterne forklarer, hvorfor tidligere studier har vist en overdødelighed ved brugen af clarithromycin.
13h
Ingeniøren
Watson skal hjælpe danske radiologer og diabetespatienterHvert år skal mindst to nye projekter med IBM's Watson sættes i gang i Region Hovedstaden. Det er resultatet af en rammeaftale med IBM. I første omgang gælder det radiologer samt kræft- og diabetespatienter.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sacrificing one life to save others -- research shows psychopaths' force for 'greater good'New research shows that people would sacrifice one person to save a larger group of people -- and in addition, the force with which they carry out these actions could be predicted by psychopathic traits.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Auxin tells the stem cells to stop growing and the gynoecium to start forming in flowersNara Institute of Science and Technology-led research found the plant hormone auxin governs the change from cell division at shoot tips to the development of female parts of a flower. Auxin levels are themselves controlled by the CRABS CLAW protein, which joins forces with another protein to negatively regulate stem cell growth. This highly regulated process is essential for successful plant repro
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Forest fires contributed to record global tree cover lossA sharp increase in forest fires stoked record losses in global forest cover equivalent to the area of New Zealand in 2016, a Global Forest Watch report said Monday.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New self-regulating nanoparticles could treat cancerScientists from the University of Surrey have developed 'intelligent' nanoparticles which heat up to a temperature high enough to kill cancerous cells - but which then self-regulate and lose heat before they get hot enough to harm healthy tissue.
13h
Ars Technica
DOJ changes “gag order” policy, Microsoft to drop lawsuit Enlarge / Microsoft General Counsel and Executive Vice President Brad Smith addresses shareholders during Microsoft Shareholders Meeting December 3, 2014 in Bellevue, Washington. (credit: Stephen Brashear/Getty Images) The Department of Justice has recently changed its own policy, saying it would now halt the standard never-ending gag orders that companies are faced with when they receive legal d
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How much water flows into agricultural irrigation?Irrigation for agriculture is the largest use of fresh water around the globe, but precise records and maps of when and where water is applied by farmers are difficult to locate. Now a team of researchers has discovered how to track water used in agriculture.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Antibiotics from a 'molecular pencil sharpener'Picture a brand-new, unsharpened pencil. The graphite at its core can't be used for writing until a pencil sharpener chews away its wooden tip.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study points to inefficiencies in Dallas mass transitLack of access to good-paying jobs is one of the primary products of a largely inefficient Dallas transit system, according to a city of Dallas-commissioned study conducted by Shima Hamidi, director of The University of Texas at Arlington's Institute of Urban Studies, and her research team.
13h
Viden
Brugervenlighed afgør slaget om mobilbetalingBrugervenligheden bliver det væsentligste parameter for, hvilken mobilbetalings-løsning danskerne vælger, vurderer betalingsfirmaerne.
14h
The Atlantic
Climate Change Will Bring Major Flooding to New York Every 5 Years New York is a city on the water. For hundreds of years, its rivers and harbor have worked to its advantage, bringing it speedy transportation and pleasant temperatures. The next couple hundred years may not be as smooth sailing. Global warming, caused by the release of carbon-dioxide pollution into the atmosphere, will cause the seas to rise and the storms to intensify around the city. A new stud
14h
Ingeniøren
Billedanalyse finder huller og problemer på hollandske veje og kanaler Ved at kigge på billeder af vejskilte kan analyse finde problematiske punkter på vejnet. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/billedanalyse-finder-huller-problemer-paa-hollandske-veje-kanaler-1081807 Version2
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New self-regulating nanoparticles could treat cancerScientists from the University of Surrey have developed 'intelligent' nanoparticles which heat up to a temperature high enough to kill cancerous cells -- but which then self-regulate and lose heat before they get hot enough to harm healthy tissue.
14h
Ars Technica
Korean banks sue Newegg, allege online retailer aided massive fraud Enlarge / Totes on a conveyor belt which will be used to pick an order inside Newegg's small item warehouse as seen on July 2, 2014 in the City of Industry. Newegg is a leading online retailer. (credit: Gary Friedman/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images) Newegg, the well-known online electronics retailer and slayer of patent trolls , has been sued in federal court in Los Angeles by several major Ko
14h
NYT > Science
ScienceTake: One Simple Signal Sets Off a Complicated Frog JourneyPoison frogs in a South American rain forest carry tadpoles to water. But the males aren’t choosy about whose tadpoles they transport.
14h
NYT > Science
How Poison Frogs ParentPoison frogs carry their tadpoles long distances to rainforest pools where they finish growing into adults. But do they care for unrelated tadpoles?
14h
Science-Based Medicine
Mainstream Doctors Actually Do What CAM Claims They Don’tAlternative medicine proponents criticize mainstream medicine and think they can do better. Evidence from medical journals shows that their criticisms are not valid.
15h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
iCourts modtager bevilling på 28 mio. kr. til at fortsætte forskningen i internationale domstolePå baggrund af anbefalingerne af et internationalt bedømmelsespanel har Danmarks Grundforskningsfond...
15h
Viden
Mobilbetaling er en rodebutik - særligt for iPhone-brugereTo forskellige tekniske løsninger har gjort det totalt forvirrende for brugerne, hvor de kan købe med mobilen.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Self-esteem mapped in the human brainA team of UCL researchers has devised a mathematical equation that can explain how our self-esteem is shaped by what other people think of us, in a new study published in the scientific journal eLife.
15h
Ingeniøren
Italienere lander den nye storstrømsbro med tørskoede metoderDe italienske entreprenører, der skal bygge den nye storstrømsbro, vil præfabrikere alt fra fundamenter til søjler og brodæk og sejle dem på plads.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Single nanoparticle mapping paves the way for better nanotechnologyResearchers at Chalmers University of Technology and the Technical University of Denmark have developed a method that makes it possible to map the individual responses of nanoparticles in different situations and contexts. The results pave the way for better nanomaterials and safer nanotechnology and were recently published in the journal Nature Communications.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A quantum spin liquid: Honeycomb lattice meets elusive standards of the Kitaev modelResearchers from Boston College and Harvard have created an elusive honeycomb-structured material capable of frustrating the magnetic properties within it in order to produce a chemical entity known as "spin liquid," long theorized as a gateway to the free-flowing properties of quantum computing, according to a new report in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.
16h
Viden
Apple Pay er nu i Danmark: Kræver den rigtige bankDu skal være kunde hos Nordea eller Jyske Bank for at kunne benytte Apples mobilbetalingsløsning fra i dag.
17h
Viden
Sådan får du dit mobilbatteri til at leve længereGUIDE: Er du træt af manglende strøm på din smartphone, er der råd fra batterieksperter.
17h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Astrolabe: Shipwreck find 'earliest navigation tool'Marine archaeologists say the object - discovered off the coast of Oman - is an astrolabe.
17h
Science | The Guardian
High-risk patients being underprescribed statins, study finds Cholesterol-lowering drugs are also being overprescribed to people at low risk of having a heart attack or stroke, researchers find Statins are being overprescribed to low-risk groups and underprescribed to high-risk groups, research by the British Journal of General Practice (BJGP) has shown. The report found potential “undertreatment” among people who have at least a 20% chance of cardiovascula
17h
Science | The Guardian
Take the kids … to Jodrell Bank Discovery Centre, Cheshire Jodrell Bank is famous for the monumental Lovell telescope – but alongside all the serious science there are plenty of fun activities and hands-on experiments to inspire kids The Lovell telescope, centrepiece of the Jodrell Bank Observatory, which has dominated the Cheshire countryside since it was constructed in 1957, was listed as a UK candidate for Unesco world heritage site status this month.
17h
New on MIT Technology Review
Our Guide to This Year’s Best Holiday GiftsThe 13 most drool-worthy techie gifts for family, friends, and Fido.
18h
New on MIT Technology Review
Don’t Let Regulators Ruin AITech policy scholar Andrea O’Sullivan says the U.S. needs to be careful not to hamstring innovation.
18h
New on MIT Technology Review
Fiction That Gets AI RightWhat to watch and read before the robots take over.
18h
New on MIT Technology Review
How to Root Out Hidden Biases in AIAlgorithms are making life-changing decisions like denying parole or granting loans. Cynthia Dwork, a computer scientist at Harvard, is developing ways of making sure the machines are operating fairly.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers test first drug to prevent the onset of chemotherapy-induced neuropathyPeripheral neuropathy is a very common side-effect of chemotherapy and may eventually lead to early discontinuation of treatment.Collaboration between research and industry led to the identification and successful testing of a new molecule capable of preventing this neurological complication.This molecule could potentially become the first existing treatment to prevent this frequent adverse effect
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Single nanoparticle mapping paves the way for better nanotechnologyResearchers at Chalmers University of Technology and the Technical University of Denmark have developed a method that makes it possible to map the individual responses of nanoparticles in different situations and contexts. The results pave the way for better nanomaterials and safer nanotechnology and were recently published in the journal Nature Communications.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Antibiotics from a 'molecular pencil sharpener'Scientists at Rutgers University-New Brunswick and other institutions have discovered a 'molecular pencil sharpener' that chews away its outer coating to release a powerful antibiotic. Their discovery opens the door to finding new antibacterial agents and drugs to fight toxins.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A quantum spin liquidResearchers from Boston College and Harvard report creating a metal oxide with a honeycomb lattice that scientists have sought to advance quantum computing research.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Starting at age 6, children spontaneously practice skills to prepare for the futureDeliberate practice is essential for improving a wide range of skills important for everyday life, from tying shoelaces to reading and writing. Yet despite its importance for developing basic skills, academic success, and expertise, we know little about the development of deliberate practice. A new study from Australia found that children spontaneously practice skills to prepare for the future sta
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study highlights value of acknowledging adolescents' perspectivesAcross very different cultures -- Ghana and the United States -- when parents acknowledge the perspectives of their adolescent children and encourage them to express themselves, the youths have a stronger sense of self-worth, intrinsic motivation, and engagement, and also have less depression. Yet having the latitude to make decisions appears to function differently in the two cultures, with posit
18h
New on MIT Technology Review
The Dangers of Tech-Bro AITabitha Goldstaub, a cofounder of CognitionX , which helps companies deploy AI, says that diversifying the field is necessary to make sure products actually work well.
18h
New on MIT Technology Review
The AI IssueDespite the worries, AI is still in its infancy. Here’s what we really need to focus on.
18h
New on MIT Technology Review
India Warily Eyes AITechnology outsourcing has been India’s only reliable job creator in the past 30 years. Now artificial intelligence threatens to wipe out those gains.
18h
New on MIT Technology Review
How We Feel About Robots That FeelAs robots become smart enough to detect our feelings and respond appropriately, they could have something like emotions of their own. But that won’t necessarily make them more like humans.
18h
Gizmodo
The Teaser Trailer for World of Tomorrow Episode Two Is Oh So Wonderful The teaser trailer for Don Hertzfeldt’s World of Tomorrow Episode Two is here, and while it’s disappointingly short, it’s just as weird and wonderful as you’d hope. The full title for the animated scifi short is World of Tomorrow Episode Two: The Burden of Other People’s Thoughts . The sequel continues the story of the time-traveler named Emily that was begun in the 2015 Oscar-nominated original.
19h
Gizmodo
Facebook: Hey, Nice Media You Got There, Shame if Some Kind of News Feed Change Happened to It Photo: AP Facebook tests of a major change to the way its News Feed works in at least six countries have once again raised fears the social media giant—a powerful gatekeeper between publishers and audiences—could be preparing to doom parts of the media, the Guardian reported . Per the Guardian , Facebook has tested a new layout in which posts from friends and family as well as paid advertisements
19h
Ars Technica
Canadian regulators have blocked Soylent, producers say Soylent, shipping now. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has taken action that led to a cessation of shipments of Soylent to Canadian customers, according to Soylent producer Rosa Foods. As Ars reported two years ago, Rosa Foods began shipping Soylent in Canada in July of 2015. Then, there was a recall, triggered by Rosa Foods itself, of the meal replacement bars related to some customer
19h
Ingeniøren
EU kan trække tæppet væk under nye danske drikkevandsreglerMiljøstyrelsen begrunder de stærkt kritiserede ændringer af drikkevandsbekendtgørelsen med krav i et EU-direktiv. Men det selvsamme direktiv står over for en revision, som kan trække det i den modsatte retning af de ændringer, Danmark nu gennemfører.
19h
Live Science
The Five (and More) SensesHumans have five basic senses: touch, sight, hearing, smell and taste. Other senses also help us understand and perceive the world around us.
19h
Live Science
Potatoes: Health Benefits, Risks & Nutrition FactsPotatoes are often thought of as a comfort food — richly mashed or crisply fried — but when prepared the right ways, these vegetables are actually quite nutritious.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New asthma biomarkers identified from lung bacteriaNew research suggests that the lung microbiome plays a significant role in asthma severity and response to treatment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
People with autism at greater risk of attempting suicidePeople who show characteristics of autism are more at risk of attempting suicide, according to a new study.
19h
Gizmodo
This Nightmare On Elm Street LP Box Set Is Simply Exquisite All Images: Mike Saputo/Death Waltz Monsters, scares, and gore can only take a horror movie so far. Sound and music are also essential—which is why this brand new box set of the scores to the Nightmare on Elm Street films is such a perfect idea. Death Waltz Records is releasing the set, which it’s calling the “Box of Souls.” It features the vinyl scores to the seven original films in the Nightmar
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain patterns underlying mothers' responses to infant criesInfant cries activate specific brain regions related to movement and speech, according to a study of mothers in 11 countries. The findings identify behaviors and underlying brain activities that are consistent among mothers from different cultures.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
To grasp water scarcity, researchers probe links between human and natural systemsUnderstanding the fine-level interactions between nature and people is essential in determining whether a region will suffer water scarcity in the future.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Five new malaria targets that could lead to an effective vaccineIn the largest study of its kind, five new malaria vaccine targets have been discovered. Researchers studied the malaria parasite at its most vulnerable stage -- when invading human red blood cells -- and identified five targets that lead to a reduction in the parasite's ability to enter red blood cells.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why did the 2014 Oso, WA, landslide travel so far?On Saturday, 22 March 2014, a devastating landslide roared across the North Fork of the Stillaguamish River, near Oso, Washington. The landslide killed 43 people as it plowed through the Steelhead Haven neighborhood. When it stopped, after crossing the river, the neighborhood, and State Route 530, the Oso landslide had traveled 1.4 kilometers.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Florida needs more pet-friendly sheltersFlorida needs more pet-friendly shelters, especially for older adults who represent 50 to 75 percent of deaths following disasters like hurricanes, according to a recent study.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Archaeologists uncover cuneiform archive in Iraq’s Kurdish regionArchaeologists have made sensational finds in the Kurdistan region of northern Iraq. The researchers found a cuneiform archive of 93 clay tablets dating from 1250 BCE -- the period of the Middle Assyrian Empire. What the tablets record remains a mystery for the time being. The researchers will have to decipher them -- a long and difficult task.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New magma pathways after giant lateral volcano collapsesGiant lateral collapses are huge landslides occurring at the flanks of a volcano. Such collapses are rather common events during the evolution of a large volcanic edifice, often with dramatic consequences such as tsunami and volcano explosions. These catastrophic events interact with the magmatic activity of the volcano, as new research suggests.
20h
Scientific American Content: Global
California Gun Injuries Spike after Nevada Gun ShowsFirearm deaths and injuries went up in California communities after gun shows in neighboring Nevada—but not after more strictly regulated California gun shows. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Running on autopilot: Scientists find important new role for 'daydreaming' networkA brain network previously associated with daydreaming has been found to play an important role in allowing us to perform tasks on autopilot. Scientists showed that far from being just 'background activity', the so-called 'default mode network' may be essential to helping us perform routine tasks.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Older Neanderthal survived with a little help from his friendsAn older Neanderthal from about 50,000 years ago, who had suffered multiple injuries and other degenerations, became deaf and must have relied on the help of others to avoid prey and survive well into his 40s, indicates a new analysis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Better sleep, less fearHigher quality sleep patterns are associated with reduced activity in brain regions involved in fear learning, according to a study of young adults. The results suggest that baseline sleep quality may be a useful predictor of susceptibility to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Herbicide's link to Parkinson's diseaseScientists have revealed how oxidative stress explains a common herbicide's link to risk of Parkinson's disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Boost for lipid research: Researchers facilitate lipid data analysisIllnesses such as cancer and multiple sclerosis may also be associated with lipids. Disorders are difficult to assess due to the diversity of lipids. Scientists now present a new tool for the analysis of lipids.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Proton therapy lowers treatment side effects in pediatric head and neck cancer patientsPediatric patients with head and neck cancer can be treated with proton beam therapy (PBT) instead of traditional photon radiation, and it will result in similar outcomes with less impact on quality of life.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sumatran tigers on path to recovery in 'in danger' UNESCO World Heritage siteNew research looks at the effectiveness of the park's protection zone and finds that the density of Sumatran tigers has increased despite the continued threat of living in an 'In Danger' World Heritage Site.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Expanding Brazilian sugarcane could dent global CO2 emissionsVastly expanding sugarcane production in Brazil for conversion to ethanol could reduce current global carbon dioxide emissions by as much as 5.6 percent, researchers report. This can be accomplished without impinging on environmentally sensitive areas in Brazil and while allowing for the expansion of other agricultural crops and human needs, the researchers report.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gun deaths, injuries in California spike following Nevada gun showsWhen gun shows are held in Nevada, gun-related deaths and injuries spike across the state line in California for at least the next two weeks. A new study examined gun deaths and injuries in California before and after gun shows in California and Nevada, and their results show a nearly 70 percent increase in deaths and injuries from firearms in California communities within convenient driving dista
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
African-Americans live shorter lives due to heart disease and strokeAfrican-Americans carry a higher burden of cardiovascular diseases compared with white Americans. Risk factors for heart disease appear earlier in African-Americans than in whites. Social determinants of health, stress and cultural factors all play a role.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Irregular heartbeat linked to higher thyroid hormone levelsIndividuals with higher levels of thyroid hormone (free thyroxine or FT4) circulating in the blood were more likely than individuals with lower levels to develop irregular heartbeat, even when the levels were within normal range. Blood levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), which regulates the production of thyroid hormones and is primarily measured in clinical practice to assess thyroid fun
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Limited data on medical cannabis use in childrenA systematic review of published studies on the use of medical cannabis in children and adolescents finds a notable lack of studies and a minimal number of the randomized, controlled trials needed to confirm the effectiveness of a treatment.
20h
Live Science
Demand for Stephen Hawking's Doctoral Thesis Crashes WebsiteThe University of Cambridge made famed cosmologist Stephen Hawking's 1966 Ph.D. thesis freely available to the public today (Oct. 23), and demand for the document has been so intense that it crashed the download website.
21h
BBC News - Science & Environment
The Lion Man: An Ice Age masterpieceThe story behind a small ivory sculpture that was carved 40,000 years ago.
21h
Gizmodo
Florida Couple’s Amazon Delivery Came With 65 Pounds of Free, Dank-Ass Weed Photo: AP Two Amazon customers who purchased 27 gallon plastic storage bins earlier this year were surprised to find their UPS delivery weighed 93.5 pounds, approximately 65 pounds of which was tightly compacted bales of marijuana. Per WFTV , the Orlando couple who had placed the Amazon order somewhat understandably deemed this precious gift unwelcome and immediately contacted the authorities. Th
21h
Science : NPR
Predictably Unpredictable: Why We Don't Act Like We Should We don't always do what we're supposed to. We don't save enough for retirement. We order dessert when we're dieting. In other words we misbehave. Nobel Prize winning economist Richard Thaler asks why. (Image credit: Scott Olson/Getty Images)
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fruit-eating increases biodiversityBy dispersing the seeds of plants, fruit-eating animals contribute to the possibility of increased plant speciation and thus biodiversity, investigators have discovered.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Enough vitamin D when young associated with lower risk of diabetes-related autoimmunityGetting enough vitamin D during infancy and childhood is associated with a reduced risk of islet autoimmunity among children at increased genetic risk for type 1 diabetes, according to a study.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
These shrews have heads that shrink with the seasonIf any part of the body would seem ill equipped to shrink, it would probably be the head and skull. And, yet, researchers have found that the skulls of red-toothed shrews do shrink in anticipation of winter, by up to 20 percent. As spring approaches, their heads grow again to approach their previous size.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists warn that saline lakes in dire situation worldwideSaline lakes around the world are shrinking in size at alarming rates. But what -- or who -- is to blame? Lakes like Utah's Great Salt Lake, Asia's Aral Sea, the Dead Sea in Jordan and Israel, China's huge Lop Nur and Bolivia's Lake Popo are just a few that are in peril. These lakes and others like them are suffering massive environmental problems according to a group of scientists and water manag
21h
NYT > Science
Congressional Auditor Urges Action to Address Climate ChangeThe Government Accountability Office says costs to the federal Treasury from climate change will continue to rise.
21h
Ars Technica
We need to talk about “Lethe,” last night’s episode of Star Trek: Discovery Enlarge / Ash Tyler is so brave, so hunky, and so nice ... but is he actually [redacted in the name of spoilers]? (credit: CBS) Star Trek: Discovery has been getting tighter with each episode, but in last night's "Lethe," the show turned a corner into addictively good storytelling. There were a couple of standout moments, plus an evolving conspiracy theory involving Klingon spies. But the best pa
23h
Futurity.org
Future vaccine targets even more forms of pneumonia A new vaccine under development could further lower the number of deaths from pneumonia. In 2004, pneumonia killed more than 2 million children worldwide, according to the World Health Organization. By 2015, the number was less than 1 million. Better access to antibiotics and improved nutrition account for part of the decline. But scientists say it’s mostly due to vaccines introduced in the early
23h
Gizmodo
See Your Name (or Whatever) In Lights With My Cinema Lightbox My Cinema Lightbox The concept is simple: a customizable, movie-theater-style marquee that fits on your coffee table. My Cinema Lightbox is super simple to set up (which you can’t say for a real movie theater marquee). Just add your six AA batteries or plug in into a USB port and it’s ready to be emblazoned with your words. It comes with 100 letters, with triples and quadruples of most, to create
23h
Futurity.org
To generate more solar power, put this material on glass Transparent solar materials on windows could gather as much energy as bulkier rooftop solar units, say researchers. “Highly transparent solar cells represent the wave of the future for new solar applications…” The authors of a new paper argue that widespread use of such highly transparent solar applications, together with the rooftop units, could nearly meet US electricity demand and drastically
23h
Gizmodo
Deadspin ESPN Cancels Barstool Sports TV Show After One Episode | Jezebel NYPD Officers Who Allegedl Deadspin ESPN Cancels Barstool Sports TV Show After One Episode | Jezebel NYPD Officers Who Allegedly Raped Teen in Custody Are Now Attacking Her Over ‘Provocative Selfies’ | Very Smart Brothas Justin Timberlake is a White Man | Earther An Art Installation in the Massachusetts Woods Sheds Light on the Hemlock’s Dying Days | Splinter George W. Bush Is Definitely Still Evil |
23h
cognitive science
The benefits of daydreaming: Zoning out plays a key role in allowing you to perform tasks on autopilot submitted by /u/saijanai [link] [comments]
23h
Futurity.org
Humans pushed crops toward domestication earlier than we thought Ancient people may have altered the evolution of crops around 30,000 years ago, about 10,000 years before experts previously thought, new research suggests. “This study changes the nature of the debate about the origins of agriculture…” Robin Allaby, a professor in the University of Warwick’s School of Life Sciences, has discovered that human crop gathering was so extensive as long ago as the las
23h
Futurity.org
This tube could be the spot for a city on the moon A large open lava tube in the Marius Hills region of the moon could protect astronauts from hazardous conditions on the surface. No one has ever been on the moon longer than three days, largely because space suits alone can’t shield astronauts from its elements: extreme temperature variation, radiation, and meteorite impacts. Unlike Earth, the moon has no atmosphere or magnetic field to protects
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bariatric surgical patients at risk for newly persistent opioid useNearly 9 percent of bariatric surgical patients -- or about one in 12 -- who did not take opioid pain medications until their weight-loss operation, or the month before it, report that they are still using prescription opioids one year postoperatively, according to new research findings.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists write 'traps' for light with tiny ink dropletsA microscopic 'pen' that is able to write structures small enough to trap and harness light using a commercially available printing technique could be used for sensing, biotechnology, lasers, and studying the interaction between light and matter.
23h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Paris accord: US and Syria alone as Nicaragua signsNicaragua signs the Paris agreement, leaving only two countries not supporting it.
23h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Call and Response What We’re Following Rushed Condolences: President Trump contradicted the account that Sergeant La David Johnson’s widow gave of their conversation about her husband’s death, reigniting the controversy over his condolences for grieving military families. The debate began when Trump falsely claimed that he had called “virtually all” the families of service members who had been killed during his ti
23h
Feed: All Latest
Essential Phone (PH-1) Price Cut: Should You Buy it for $500?One of the best flagship phones of 2017 just got a massive price cut.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists write 'traps' for light with tiny ink dropletsA microscopic 'pen' that is able to write structures small enough to trap and harness light using a commercially available printing technique could be used for sensing, biotechnology, lasers, and studying the interaction between light and matter.
23h
Ars Technica
FBI director: Unbreakable encryption is a “huge, huge problem” Enlarge / Federal Bureau of Investigation Director Christopher Wray participates in a question-and-answer session while arguing for the renewal of Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act at the Heritage Foundation October 13, 2017 in Washington, DC. (credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images ) FBI Director Christopher Wray told a conference of law enforcement officials on Sunday that
23h
Popular Science
Millions of years ago, hollow trees literally tore themselves apart to grow Science Sometimes, early life was profoundly weird. Some of the earliest forest-forming trees were members of a group called Cladoxylopsida, which had an empty space where their heart(wood) should be.
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: As Winter Sets In, Tiny Shrews Shrink Their Skulls and BrainsResearchers who documented a head-size reduction of as much as 20 percent say it may be a survival strategy to reduce energy use in the colder months.
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Gizmodo
Palestinian Man Arrested After Facebook Auto-Translates 'Good Morning' as 'Attack Them' Image: AP A Palestinian construction worker was arrested by Israeli police after Facebook incorrectly translated the text of one of his posts. Haaretz reports that the man uploaded a picture from his job at a construction site with the text “good morning” in Arabic. When officers used Facebook’s automatic translation service to read the post, the text was mistranslated as “attack them” in Hebrew
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
With Pride -- And 100 oz Of Gold -- On The Line, Parker Is Looking For His Biggest Season Ever #GoldRush | Friday 9p Parker prepares his crew for the season ahead and must get twice as much gold out of Big Red if they have any hope of beating the Hoffman team. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Go
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: Uncovering an Overlooked Source for Iconic Alabaster StatuesA team of scientists matched stone in statues and religious icons to a quarry in the French Alps, reconstructing a medieval European art trade route.
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: War of the Words Today in 5 Lines In her first public comments since speaking with President Trump, Myeshia Johnson, the widow of Sergeant La David Johnson, offered her account of the condolence call. Trump contradicted her remarks on Twitter, saying the conversation was “very respectful.” Trump promised that there will be “no change” to the 401(k) retirement program, as Republicans mull how to finance new tax cu
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Inbreeding hurts the next generation’s reproductive successInbreeding has evolutionary consequences for humans.
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Live Science
Low-Fat Bacon? Scientists Use CRISPR to Breed Petite PigletsA group of scientists in China has successfully modified the genes of pigs to create a slimmer swine.
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Big Think
Is Not Having Children a Moral Decision? The world's human population is skyrocketing, creating more competition and suffering. Yet few thinkers address a solution. Is there one? Read More
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Jupiter's stormy winds churn deep into the planet Juno probe discovers surprising activity in the giant planet’s interior. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22866
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New Scientist - News
Your autopilot mode is real – now we know how the brain does itEver realised you’ve driven yourself home but haven’t really been paying attention? Brain scans have shown how wandering minds switch into autopilot mode
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New Scientist - News
New York should prepare for 15-metre storm surges by 2300Due to rapidly rising seas, floods that once struck New York City every 500 years will soon hit every five years
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Gizmodo
The Cursed History of NYC MetroCards Photo: Adam Clark Estes If you’ve ridden the New York City subway, you know the feeling. You buy a flimsy plastic card that lets you ride the train, and when you try to swipe it at the turnstile, it doesn’t work. You swipe again. The machine asks you to swipe again. You swipe again. The machine asks you to swipe again at the same turnstile. This can go on for hours, until you beg an MTA employee
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NYT > Science
U.S. Hospitals Wrestle With Shortages of Drug Supplies Made in Puerto RicoOfficials warn that Hurricane Maria’s effects on manufacturing on the island may be long-lasting.
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Gizmodo
Scientists Capture Rare Footage of Spooky-Ass Arctic Jellyfish GIF Credit: Earth Institute, Columbia University Using a small robotic sub, scientists from Columbia University have captured rare video of arctic jellyfish slithering along the bottom of the Chukchi Sea near Utqiaġvik, Alaska. The footage came as a complete surprise to the researchers, who weren’t expecting to see jellyfish during the Arctic winter. The scientists’ research , published in Marine
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Big Think
Migraines Could Be the Body’s Way of Protecting the Brain We don’t know what causes migraines. But this new theory ties a lot of things together. Read More
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Science : NPR
Screening For Diabetes Is Working Better Than Thought The CDC says 7 million people have Type 2 diabetes and don't know it. But a new analysis says that number's much lower. Screening efforts should focus on people at highest risk, the researchers say. (Image credit: ERproductions Ltd/Blend Images/Getty Images)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How much water flows into agricultural irrigation?Irrigation for agriculture is the largest use of fresh water around the globe, but precise records and maps of when and where water is applied by farmers are difficult to locate. Now a team of researchers has discovered how to track water used in agriculture.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bloated browser functionality presents unnecessary security, privacy risksNew research by computer scientists at the University of Illinois at Chicago have identified numerous browser functionalities rarely used or needed by websites, but which pose substantial security and privacy risks to web surfers. Blocking website access to unnecessary browser functionality would help reduce these risks.
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Ars Technica
Now we know why Xbox One backward compatibility took so long This launch-day Xbox One could have supported Xbox 360 games from the get go, had a few things gone differently. (credit: Wired ) Anyone who followed Microsoft's gaming plans in 2013 knows how much the company's confusing policies and public reversals regarding "always on" Internet connection and used game restrictions on the Xbox One damaged the company's image. Now it sounds like the turmoil su
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Gizmodo
Scientists Want to Update These Four Fundamental Constants Image: Stoughton/NIST Some numbers don’t change. These values are deeply connected to the very fabric of the Universe and our human existence. Until they aren’t, of course. Then we change them—for good reason. Scientists around the world just recommended changes to four fundamental constants. The tiny updates are important for the most accurate and precise measurements, but will ultimately allow
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UTA study points to inefficiencies in Dallas mass transitLack of access to good-paying jobs is one of the primary products of a largely inefficient Dallas transit system, according to a city of Dallas-commissioned study conducted by Shima Hamidi, director of The University of Texas at Arlington's Institute of Urban Studies, and her research team.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A fresh look at fresh water: Researchers create a 50,000-lake database Countless numbers of vacationers spent this summer enjoying lakes for swimming, fishing and boating. But are they loving these lakes to death?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New asthma biomarkers identified from lung bacteriaNew research from the University of Illinois at Chicago suggests that the lung microbiome plays a significant role in asthma severity and response to treatment.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A little myelin goes a long way to restore nervous system functionA team of researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison reports that in long-lived animals, renewed but thin myelin sheaths are enough to restore the impaired nervous system and can do so for years after the onset of disease.
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Gizmodo
238 Thirsty Cities to Amazon: Stimulate Me, Daddy Image: Getty The proposal deadline has come and gone on Amazon’s unusually public search to plant a second headquarters in one of North America’s metropolitan areas. Among other factors, Amazon’s stated “preference” for candidates cities with a population over 1 million should have whittled possible HQ2 locales down to a few dozen. Instead, the final tally of hopefuls topped 200 . Publicity stunt
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Ars Technica
Crippling crypto weakness opens millions of smartcards to cloning Enlarge (credit: Gemalto) Millions of smartcards in use by banks and large corporations for more than a decade have been found to be vulnerable to a crippling cryptographic attack. That vulnerability allows hackers to bypass a wide range of protections, including data encryption and two-factor authentication. The critical vulnerability, which researchers disclosed last week , allows attackers to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Surgical checklist can help prevent life-threatening infections in low resource settingsProcess maps for infection prevention can provide a means for improving surgical safety in low- and middle-income countries
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Popular Science
Your best, beef-free Instagrams tagged #NoRedOctober Environment Don't have a cow, man. For the month of October, we’re encouraging everyone to put aside their burgers, lamb chops, and steaks for 31 days in an effort to curb those animal farts from reaching…
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Live Science
Best Educational Toys & Games for 7- to 10-Year-OldsElementary school kids are naturally curious about their world. Help them explore it with educational science toys that need to be pieced together, figured out and investigated with hands-on experiments.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nicaragua signs Paris climate agreement: officialNicaragua signed the Paris climate agreement Monday, leaving the United States and Syria as the only two holdouts on the global climate pact.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mars rover mission progresses toward resumed drillingNASA's Mars rover Curiosity team is working to restore Curiosity's sample-drilling capability using new techniques. The latest development is a preparatory test on Mars.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Artificial intelligence finds 56 new gravitational lens candidatesA group of astronomers from the universities of Groningen, Naples and Bonn has developed a method that finds gravitational lenses in enormous piles of observations. The method is based on the same artificial intelligence algorithm that Google, Facebook and Tesla have been using in the last years. The researchers published their method and 56 new gravitational lens candidates in the November issue
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The Atlantic
Why Aren't There More New Countries? What is a country? Is it a place like the United States that is recognized by all other countries and is a member of the United Nations? Is it, like Kosovo, a place that is recognized by most of the world’s powers but isn’t a UN member? Where does Taiwan, which has its own government and its own military despite being claimed by China, fit? And where does all this leave places like Catalonia and
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Gizmodo
An Insurer Is Offering Apple Watches For $25 Image: Alex Cranz/ Gizmodo The Apple Watch hasn’t exactly been the breakout hit that Apple hoped it would be. Increasingly, though, Apple has been turning its attention to a market where the watch could still hit it big: insurers. On Monday, CNBC reported that one of the nation’s largest life insurance providers, John Hancock, has partnered with Apple to offer members of its Vitality program an A
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Older Neandertal survived with a little help from his friendsAn older Neandertal from about 50,000 years ago, who had suffered multiple injuries and other degenerations, became deaf and must have relied on the help of others to avoid prey and survive well into his 40s, indicates a new analysis published Oct. 20 in the online journal PLoS ONE.
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Live Science
Primordial Fossils of Earth's 1st Trees Reveal Their Bizarre StructureEarth's first trees had hundreds of tree-like structures within them, making them exceedingly more intricate than the insides of modern trees, a new study finds.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
FSU study finds Florida needs more pet-friendly sheltersFlorida needs more pet-friendly shelters, especially for older adults who represent 50 to 75 percent of deaths following disasters like hurricanes, according to a recent study from Florida State University.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Protein regulates vitamin A metabolic pathways, prevents inflammationResearchers have discovered how uncontrolled vitamin A metabolism in the gut can cause harmful inflammation. The discovery links diet to inflammatory diseases, like Crohn's disease and inflammatory bowel syndromes, and could inform nutritional interventions.
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Gizmodo
A Salute to Bidlo Kwerve, the Man With the Most Important Skull in the Star Wars Galaxy Image: Lucasfilm/Disney. Thanks to a wildly obsessive fanbase that craves cataloguing and detailing every inch of the movies, everyone in the Star Wars galaxy has their own story. Today, we’d like to take some time to honor Bidlo Kwerve, a man who helped defeat the Empire by using his head. Well, by Luke using his head, more specifically. You’ve probably never thought about it that much—it’s lite
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Gizmodo
Samsung's Tiny Portable SSDs are On Sale Today; Just Don't Lose Them Samsung T5 Portable 500GB SSD , $180 Samsung T5 Portable 1TB SSD , $378 Several capacities of Samsung’s adorably tiny T5 external SSDs are marked down to some of their lowest prices ever today on Amazon. The 500GB model is the best deal of the bunch in terms of percentage savings versus its usual price, but the 1TB model has never been cheaper.
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Science : NPR
Stephen Hawking's Ph.D. Thesis Crashes Cambridge Site After It's Posted Online By late Monday, the thesis had been viewed more than 60,000 times, a Cambridge official says. He adds, "Other popular theses might have 100 views per month." (Image credit: Cambridge University Libary)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
5 years after Superstorm Sandy, the lessons haven't sunk inFive years after Superstorm Sandy was supposed to have taught the U.S. a lesson about the dangers of living along the coast, disaster planning experts say there is no place in America truly prepared for climate change and the tempests it could bring.
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Gizmodo
It’d Be A Business Miracle If Tesla And Uber Succeed At All Photo: AP Raise cash, burn it, rinse, repeat—that has essentially been the business model of enterprising startups like Tesla and Uber for some time. And an insightful report from The Economist shows just how uncommon it is for companies like that to achieve prolonged success. Musk is no stranger to questioning Wall Street’s logic about his all-electric automaker. As Tesla’s stock rocketed upward
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cryo-EM reveals ignition mechanism for DNA replicationAn international team of scientists, led by structural biologists at Van Andel Research Institute, has shed new light on a critical step in DNA replication, offering fresh insights into a fundamental process of life and driver of many different diseases, including cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New tool captures fertility knowledge and attitudes in transgender youthA novel tool developed by researchers at Children's National Health System-with critical input from transgender youth and their parents-assesses the level of interest or concern these teens and their families have regarding the impacts of medical gender treatments on long-term fertility.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Older Neandertal survived with a little help from his friendsAn older Neandertal from about 50,000 years ago, who had suffered multiple injuries and other degenerations, became deaf and must have relied on the help of others to avoid prey and survive well into his 40s, indicates a new analysis published Oct. 20 in the online journal PLOS ONE.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why did the 2014 Oso landslide travel so far?On Saturday, 22 March 2014, a devastating landslide roared across the North Fork of the Stillaguamish River, near Oso, Washington. The landslide killed 43 people as it plowed through the Steelhead Haven neighborhood. When it stopped, after crossing the river, the neighborhood, and State Route 530, the Oso landslide had traveled 1.4 kilometers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MIT neuroscientists build case for new theory of memory formationMIT neuroscientists propose that the existence of 'silent engrams'suggests current theories of memory formation need to revised.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon says it received 238 proposals for 2nd headquartersAmazon said Monday that it received 238 proposals from cities and regions in the United States, Canada and Mexico hoping to be the home of the company's second headquarters.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dr. YouTube ... what's your diagnosis?According to Pew Research center, in 2013, about six out of ten Americans searched for health information online in the past year. With patients regularly turning to the internet for health advice, a group of researchers aimed to evaluate the educational quality of seasonal influenza videos on the user-generated, video-sharing platform, YouTube.
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Ars Technica
New teardown brings more smoke to reports of a touchscreen Google Home Enlarge / Amazon's Echo Show may have a Google-made rival in the near future. (credit: Amazon ) Sections of code within a recent update to the Google app seem to bolster reports that Google is working on a competitor to Amazon’s Echo Show smart speaker. An Android Police teardown of the Google app’s v7.14.15 beta update uncovered several references to functions and commands that can be performed
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Live Science
Woman's Rare Condition Causes Her to Sweat Blood, Doctors ReportA young woman in Italy has a rare and mysterious condition that causes her to sweat blood, according to a new report of her case.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cryo-EM imaging suggests how the double helix separates during replicationLife would be impossible if the DNA in dividing cells were replicated with anything less than near-perfect precision. Every time a nucleated cell commits to becoming two cells, every "letter" of its genome must be replicated once and only once. In humans, the task boggles the imagination. If unwound, the double helix crammed into each of our cells would measure 6 feet in length. In our bone marrow
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Scientific American Content: Global
Forest Fires Stoke Record Loss in World Tree CoverWildfires contributed to global tree cover loss equivalent to the size of New Zealand in 2016 -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New magma pathways after giant lateral volcano collapsesGiant lateral collapses are huge landslides occurring at the flanks of a volcano. Giant lateral collapses are rather common events during the evolution of a large volcanic edifice, often with dramatic consequences such as tsunami and volcano explosions. These catastrophic events interact with the magmatic activity of the volcano, as a new research in Nature Communications suggests. Giant lateral c
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video: How do we know the age of the Earth?The Earth is 4.565 billion years old, give or take a few million years. How do scientists know that? Since there's no "established in" plaque stuck in a cliff somewhere, geologists deduced the age of the Earth thanks to a handful of radioactive elements. With radiometric dating, scientists can put an age on really old rocks—and even good old Mother Earth. For the 30th anniversary of National Chemi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Reduced impact logging still harms biodiversity in tropical rainforestsEven low levels of logging in the Amazon rainforest may lead to great losses in biodiversity, new research has found. The research looked at 34 different plots in the state of Pará -- a focal point for Amazon protection efforts in the last decades. They found that even low levels of logging leaded to negative effects on dung beetle diversity and rates of dung beetle-mediated
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cryo-EM imaging suggests how the double helix separates during replicationFiguring out how accurate replication works at the level of individual molecules and atoms is one of the great achievements of modern science. The journey of investigators is not yet done, however. A major unsolved part of the puzzle is understanding how the entire process of copying the genome begins. In new research, insight into how the two stands of the double helix separate in the earliest st
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
You rang? Researchers address 'alarm fatigue' among staff and the rate of false alarmsAt CHEST 2017 two studies from researchers in New York aim to decrease alarm rates, tackle alarm fatigue, and assess alarm accuracy in the ICU.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sea-level rise, not stronger storm surge, will cause future NYC floodingRising sea levels caused by a warming climate threaten greater future storm damage to New York City, but the paths of stronger future storms may shift offshore, changing the coastal risk for the city, according to a team of climate scientists.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Air pollution cuts solar energy potential in ChinaSevere air pollution in northern and eastern China blocks about 20 percent of sunlight from reaching solar panel arrays in winter, according to a Princeton University study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research posits earliest tree growth methodResearchers report exceptionally well-preserved fossil tree trunks approximately 374 million years old from Xinjiang, Northwest China. These fossils suggest that earth's earliest forest trees were able to achieve great size by a unique method that involved building a hollow cylindrical skeleton of interconnected, growing, woody strands that both tore itself apart and collapsed under its own weight
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Ars Technica
After Supreme Court detour, Apple v. Samsung goes to a fourth jury trial Enlarge / People hold their iPhone during the Apple iPhone 3G launch ceremony in Seoul, South Korea, in 2009. (credit: Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images ) The Apple v. Samsung lawsuit is getting a big "reset," thanks to last year's Supreme Court ruling on design patents. The long-running litigation rollercoaster has included so many turns it's hard to keep track. The case was filed in 2011 and went to
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New Scientist - News
Robotic underwater miners can go where humans can’tThis aquatic drone can crawl down abandoned pits to get the treasure that’s too dangerous for humans to reach, which may mean a future with fewer new mines
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Five new malaria targets that could lead to an effective vaccineIn the largest study of its kind, five new malaria vaccine targets have been discovered by scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators. Researchers studied the malaria parasite at its most vulnerable stage - when invading human red blood cells - and identified five targets that lead to a reduction in the parasite's ability to enter red blood cells.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fossils from the world's oldest trees reveal complex anatomy never seen beforeThe first trees to have ever grown on Earth were also the most complex, new research has revealed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sea-level rise, not stronger storm surge, will cause future NYC floodingRising sea levels caused by a warming climate threaten greater future storm damage to New York City, but the paths of stronger future storms may shift offshore, changing the coastal risk for the city, according to a team of climate scientists.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
To grasp water scarcity, researchers probe links between human and natural systemsUnderstanding the fine-level interactions between nature and people is essential in determining whether a region will suffer water scarcity in the future. That's a key finding of a study titled "Finding Water Scarcity Amid Abundance Using Human-Natural System Models," to be published next week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
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Science : NPR
CRISPR Bacon: Chinese Scientists Create Genetically Modified Low-Fat Pigs Scientists have used CRISPR, a new gene-editing technique, to create pigs that can keep their bodies warmer, burning more fat to produce leaner meat. (Image credit: Zheng et al. / PNAS)
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Science | The Guardian
Stephen Hawking's expanding universes thesis breaks the internet Demand for 1966 PhD work, made freely available for the first time, crashes Cambridge’s repository website Stephen Hawking’s 1966 doctoral thesis has broken the internet after becoming available to the general public for the first time. Demand for the thesis, entitled Properties of Expanding Universes , was so great on Monday that it caused Cambridge University’s repository site to go down. The s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Two studies explore gender, language, and treatment setting as barriers in screening and patient care in lung cancerMore people die of lung cancer than any other type of cancer, and two new studies from CHEST 2017 reveal disparities in lung cancer screening and care that may impact detection, as well as mortality and survival rates in the disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New magma pathways after giant lateral volcano collapsesGiant lateral collapses are huge landslides occurring at the flanks of a volcano. Such collapses are rather common events during the evolution of a large volcanic edifice, often with dramatic consequences such as tsunami and volcano explosions. These catastrophic events interact with the magmatic activity of the volcano, as a new research by scientists of GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Teamwork makes the dream work?In new research from CHEST 2017, a team from Montefiore Medical Center in New York aimed to create a team-driven atmosphere in the hospital and hypothesized that the use of personalized numbered jerseys for each member of the code team would help to improve teamwork and overall time to perform critical clinical actions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lung cancer driver ALK-fusion found in melanomaA University of Colorado Cancer Center study published today in the journal Molecular Cancer Therapeutics finds a genetic change called ALK-fusion in a patient sample of a melanoma subtype called mucosal melanoma. When researchers treated a tumor grown from this sample with the drugs crizotinib and ceritinib -- both FDA approved to treat ALK-positive lung cancer -- the tumor responded dramatically
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Resident physicians feel unprepared to counsel patients on medical cannabisA recent study from Saint Peter's University Hospital in New Brunswick, New Jersey, highlights the need for further education among resident physicians in the use of medical cannabis. It found 38 percent of resident physicians thought medical marijuana was a prescribed substance, while 78 percent did not know into what category medical cannabis fell within the Controlled Substance Act. Researchers
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Live Science
Why Does Our Universe Have 3 Dimensions?Physicists have a new scenario of the universe's expansion at the Big Bang that may explain why our universe has three large spatial dimensions.
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Ars Technica
Of course Star Trek: Discovery will come back for Season 2 Enlarge / Captain Gabriel Lorca (Jason Isaacs) and Lieutenant Ash Tyler (Shazad Latif). (credit: CBS ) On Monday, the day after Star Trek: Discovery ’s sixth episode aired, CBS announced that the show would be brought back for a second season. The show—which is only available in the United States on CBS All Access , the network’s online streaming platform—has been met with generally positive revi
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Popular Science
Last week in tech: Oh no, what happened to Google Calendar? Technology A touchscreen flip phone, a new UE speaker, and the best new tech of the year. Cruise through the week's big tech stories and cool new products in convenient bite-sized chunks.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New study shows how cells can be led down non-cancer pathAs cells with a propensity for cancer break down food for energy, they reach a fork in the road: they can either continue energy production as healthy cells, or shift to the energy production profile of cancer cells. In a new study, researchers map out the molecular events that direct cells' energy metabolism down the cancerous path. Their findings could lead to ways to interrupt the process.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Moment of impact: A journey into the Chicxulub CraterWhen the Chicxulub asteroid slammed into Earth about 66 million years ago, it obliterated 80 percent of Earth's species, blasted out a crater 200 kilometers across, and signaled an abrupt end to the Cretaceous Period. The impact, its catastrophic effects, and its aftermath have engrossed scientists and the public alike since it was first discovered.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists discover superconductor with bounceScientists have discovered extreme 'bounce,' or super-elastic shape-memory properties in a material that could be applied for use as an actuator in the harshest of conditions, such as outer space, and might be the first in a whole new class of shape memory materials.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nanotube fiber antennas as capable as copperThin fibers made of carbon nanotubes can be formed into antennas that are just as capable as copper antennas, according to researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Drug can dramatically reduce weight of people with obesityA drug that targets the appetite control system in the brain could bring about significant weight loss in people with clinical obesity, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Support for populist ideologies linked to feelings of disadvantage and national narcissismPeople who perceive they are part of a disadvantaged group are more likely to have an unrealistic belief in the greatness of their nation and support populist ideologies, new research shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Optical communication coming to silicon chipsUltrathin films of a semiconductor that emits and detects light can be stacked on top of silicon wafers, researchers report in a study that could help bring optical communication onto silicon chips.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
So my brain amyloid level is elevated: What does that mean?Testing drugs to prevent or delay the onset of Alzheimer's dementia and using them in the clinic will mean identifying and informing adults who have a higher risk of Alzheimer's but are still cognitively normal. A new study has shed light on how seniors cope with such information.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Exploring disease predisposition to deliver personalized medicineExploring the links between diseases and tissue-specific gene activity, geneticists have been able to build a model that constitutes a first step towards the identification of specific sequences in the non-coding genome signalling their pathogenicity in the context of a specific disease. In a second study, they went even further by associating particular disease risks - including schizophrenia, ca
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Patients at risk over failure to recognize important diabetes subtypeThe health of people with diabetes is being put at risk due to the failure of doctors to recognize which type of diabetes they have, a new study.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Mating with Neandertals reintroduced ‘lost’ DNA into modern humansNeandertal DNA brought back some old genetic heirlooms to modern humans.
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The Atlantic
Harvey Weinstein's Statements Have Taken a Striking Turn “Brit Marling is a super talented actress and writer. Mr. Weinstein has a different recollection of the events.’’ That was Harvey Weinstein’s spokesperson, Sallie Hofmeister, offering a statement to The Atlantic in response to Marling’s essay that shares her experience—an invitation to shower, an offer of a massage, in a form now eerily familiar—of a 2014 encounter with Weinstein. The statement i
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The Atlantic
Is Egg Donation Safe? Jessica Wing was a healthy Stanford University student when she was paid to donate eggs on three separate occasions—funds which she allocated toward her student debt. Less than ten years later, she died of colon cancer. Because Jessica had no family history of the disease, her mother, Dr. Jennifer Schneider, wondered if there might be a link between the many hormone injections necessary for egg d
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New Peruvian bird species discovered by its songA new species of bird from the heart of Peru remained undetected for years until researchers identified it by its unique song.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Possible new anti-TB treatment pathAs part of the long effort to improve treatment of tuberculosis (TB), microbiologists report that they have for the first time characterized a protein involved in making a glycolipid compound found in the TB cell wall, which is critical for the disease-causing Mycobacterium to become infectious.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Better food choices near schools for healthier teethThere's something endearing about the crooked, gapped-tooth smiles of children whose permanent teeth are coming in. While it's normal for adult teeth to show up at very different times, should we expect the same good oral health conditions for all children at all times?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study links mutations in notch gene to role in B cell cancersIn B cell tumors, mutated overactive versions of the Notch protein directly drive the expression of the Myc gene and many other genes that participate in B cell signaling pathways, researchers have found. Myc is a critical gene in governing cell proliferation and survival.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Antimicrobial gel could improve root canal resultsThe results of root canal treatments could improve because of an antimicrobial gel recently discovered and developed. A research team has developed an injectable antimicrobial gel that could disinfect a tooth during a root canal procedure.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists develop new theory of molecular evolutionResearchers have developed a new theory of molecular evolution, offering insights into how genes function, how the rates of evolutionary divergence can be predicted, and how harmful mutations arise at a basic level.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Resistive memory components the computer industry can't resistFor years, the computer industry has sought memory technologies with higher endurance, lower cost, and better energy efficiency than commercial flash memories. Now, an international collaboration of scientists may have solved many of those challenges with the discovery of thin, molecular films that can store information.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Experiment provides deeper look into the nature of neutrinosThe first glimpse of data from the full array of a deeply chilled particle detector operating beneath a mountain in Italy sets the most precise limits yet on where scientists might find a theorized process to help explain why there is more matter than antimatter in the universe.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Open channels of communication may help patients overcome misperceptions of prognosisResearchers from the Aventura Hospital Medical Center in Aventura, Fla., aimed to assess the quality of continuity of care by analyzing family perceptions, education, and their psychological stress during the process.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Long-lasting blood vessel repair in animals via stem cellsAn Emory/Yonsei team developed a new method for generating endothelial cells, which make up the lining of blood vessels, from human iPSCs. When endothelial cells are surrounded by a supportive gel and implanted into mice with damaged blood vessels, they become part of the animals' blood vessels, surviving for more than 10 months.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Neighborhoods can affect the need for urgent asthma careIn a new study presented at CHEST 2017, researchers from Columbia University Medical Center in New York aimed to determine if the associations between combustion-related air pollutant levels and urgent asthma care differed by neighborhood in New York City. The research revealed asthma prevalence and emergency department visits for asthma vary widely among different neighborhoods.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dr. YouTube ... what's your diagnosis?According to Pew Research center, in 2013, about six out of 10 Americans searched for health information online in the past year. With patients regularly turning to the internet for health advice, a group of researchers aimed to evaluate the educational quality of seasonal influenza videos on the user-generated, video-sharing platform, YouTube.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Clinicians' personal religious beliefs may impact treatment provided to patients who are homosexualIn a report presented at CHEST 2017, researchers from the Texas Medical Center in Houston, Texas, sought to determine if a clinician's own religious beliefs could influence the care of a homosexual patient.
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Gizmodo
The Disastrous Geostorm Is Mostly About People Staring at Computer Monitors If watching people watch computers is your idea of fun, you are going to love Geostorm . The directorial feature debut of Dean Devlin, who produced Stargate, Godzilla , and the Independence Day movies, Geostorm is a film that really wants to be Independence Day by showing destruction on a global scale with iconic heroes saving the day. But it’s not. Instead the whole thing is a muddled mess peppe
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The Scientist RSS
Building Blocks of Life May Have Formed in Water DropletsReactions that generate fundamental components of the cell run smoothly in microdroplets, study shows.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rising sea levels creating first Native American climate refugeesRising sea levels and human activities are fast creating a "worst case scenario" for Native Americans of the Mississippi Delta who stand to lose not just their homes, but their irreplaceable heritage, to climate change.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Acute kidney failure with VTE proves difficult to treatResearchers from the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center conducted a prospective, observational study to assess the impact that weight and renal function have on venous thromboembolism (VTE) rates among in-patients receiving prophylaxis with low-molecular-weight or unfractionated heparin.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How do we know the age of the Earth? (video)The Earth is 4.565 billion years old, give or take a few million years. How do scientists know that? Since there's no 'established in' plaque stuck in a cliff somewhere, geologists deduced the age of the Earth thanks to a handful of radioactive elements. With radiometric dating, scientists can put an age on really old rocks -- and even good old Mother Earth. For the 30th anniversary of National Ch
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel technique explains herbicide's link to Parkinson's diseaseNorthwestern Medicine scientists have revealed how oxidative stress explains a common herbicide's link to risk of Parkinson's disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Are clinicians prepared to give bad news?Delivering news about end-of-life issues is one of the most difficult tasks clinicians encounter in medical practice. Researchers from the Texas Medical Center on behalf of the ETHICS study investigators, in Houston, Texas, aimed to assess how prepared health-care providers feel in communicating end-of-life issues and determining if proper training had been given to health-care providers.
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New Scientist - News
Possible exomoon may be an ocean-covered world as big as SaturnThe exomoon candidate found in July is a real oddity – early calculations suggest it’s huge and doesn’t fit any moon formation processes we currently know
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Science : NPR
The Good Psychology In 'The Good Place' Despite my skepticism at the outset, for a light and amusing TV sitcom "The Good Place" does a pretty good job with philosophy — and a pretty good job with human psychology, too, says Tania Lombrozo. (Image credit: NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images)
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The Atlantic
A Lazy Person's Guide to Happiness Happiness is an active process, not something you get by sitting back and waiting. It’s something to be grabbed by the horns or more vulnerable areas and then conquered. At least, this is the gist of the message from Tony Robbins and gurus of his ilk. Many also say happiness is not something we can buy, or steal, or work too hard to acquire. If you work too hard at it, you end up obsessing over y
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Ars Technica
Police body cams had no “statistically significant effect” in DC Enlarge (credit: Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images) Police body cams worn by 2,600 officers in the nation's capital did not affect citizen complaints or the use of force by the Metropolitan Police Department (MPD), according to a new study. "We found essentially that we could not detect any statistically significant effect of the body-worn cameras," according to Anita Ravishankar , an MPD researche
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Gizmodo
Yup, That's James Comey's Twitter Photo: Getty Back in March, Gizmodo published an investigation into what was “almost certainly” former FBI director James Comey’s Twitter account. At the time, he was still the FBI director and his very public falling out with president Donald Trump was still a ways off. Now that Comey is free, he has decided to let the world know that he is indeed Reinhold Niebuhr . After some serious sleuthing
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Booms & busts: How the 1980s could've predicted the great recessionMany argue the Great Recession could have been ameliorated through strategic policies, but the government ignored warning signs of coming economic distress. Instead, increased borrowing incited a financial and real estate boom, which resulted in a bubble that eventually burst.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New Peruvian bird species discovered by its songA new species of bird from the heart of Peru remained undetected for years until researchers identified it by its unique song.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Support for populist ideologies linked to feelings of disadvantage and national narcissismPeople who perceive they are part of a disadvantaged group are more likely to have an unrealistic belief in the greatness of their nation and support populist ideologies.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists discover superconductor with bounceThe U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has discovered extreme "bounce," or super-elastic shape-memory properties in a material that could be applied for use as an actuator in the harshest of conditions, such as outer space, and might be the first in a whole new class of shape memory materials.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists update four key fundamental constantsPaving the way for transforming the world's measurement system, an international task force has determined updated values for four fundamental constants of nature.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scheme would make new high-capacity data caches 33 to 50 percent more efficientA memory management scheme would increase by 33 to 50 percent the efficiency of data caches that use the massive new memory banks known as 'in-package DRAM.'
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New gene linked to debilitating lung diseaseHealth scientists have heralded the discovery of a gene associated with lung fibrosis as 'a potential new avenue of treatment for further research into this terrible disease.'
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mongolian microfossils point to the rise of animals on EarthA cache of embryo-like microfossils has been discovered in northern Mongolia that may shed light on questions about the long-ago shift from microbes to animals on Earth.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Transparent solar technology represents 'wave of the future'See-through solar materials that can be applied to windows represent a massive source of untapped energy and could harvest as much power as bigger, bulkier rooftop solar units, scientists report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How the brain learns to fear: New understandingWhat happens in the brain when we learn that fire is very hot and can hurt us? It's the kind of learning that results from the association of a sensory stimulus and the perception of threat. New research in mice suggests that the accepted understanding of that critical operation is incorrect in important respects.
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Live Science
Scared? Your Sleep Quality Could Be to BlameThe quality of your sleep could play a role in how your brain responds to fear, which, in turn, could determine how likely you are to develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a small, new study suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Better food choices near schools for healthier teethThere's something endearing about the crooked, gapped-tooth smiles of children whose permanent teeth are coming in. While it's normal for adult teeth to show up at very different times, should we expect the same good oral health conditions for all children at all times?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The opioid crisis: 'What have we learned and where do we go from here'?Anesthesiology and pain medicine should play a leading role in developing effective alternatives and solutions to the US opioid crisis, according to the November issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia -- a special thematic issue presenting information on the 'background, problems, and possible solutions to the opioid epidemic.'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UMass Amherst microbiologists contribute to possible new anti-TB treatment pathAs part of the long effort to improve treatment of tuberculosis (TB), microbiologists led by Yasu Morita at the University of Massachusetts Amherst report that they have for the first time characterized a protein involved in making a glycolipid compound found in the TB cell wall, which is critical for the disease-causing Mycobacterium to become infectious.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New Peruvian bird species discovered by its songA new species of bird from the heart of Peru remained undetected for years until researchers identified it by its unique song.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Disaster makes people with depression less healthyPeople who exhibit even a few depressive symptoms before a major life stressor, such as a disaster, may experience an increase in inflammation -- a major risk factor for heart disease and other negative health conditions -- after the event.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ames Laboratory, UConn discover superconductor with bounceThe US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has discovered extreme 'bounce,' or super-elastic shape-memory properties in a material that could be applied for use as an actuator in the harshest of conditions, such as outer space, and might be the first in a whole new class of shape memory materials.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stephen Hawking's PhD thesis goes online for the first timeStephen Hawking's PhD thesis, 'Properties of expanding universes', has been made freely available to anyone, anywhere in the world, after being made accessible via the University of Cambridge's Open Access repository, Apollo.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Moment of impact: A journey into the Chicxulub CraterWhen the Chicxulub asteroid slammed into Earth about 66 million years ago, it obliterated 80 percent of Earth's species, blasted out a crater 200 kilometers across, and signaled an abrupt end to the Cretaceous Period. The impact, its catastrophic effects, and its aftermath have engrossed scientists and the public alike since it was first discovered.
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Gizmodo
The FBI Can't Stop Fearmongering About Encryption FBI Director Christopher Wray participates in a question-and-answer session while arguing for the renewal of Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act at the Heritage Foundation, October 13, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo: Getty) Never in the past century has the FBI ever had greater access to consumer data than it does today. It has never been easier to locate a person of interest
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Britain to give Canada the shipwrecks of explorer FranklinBritain announced Monday it will give Canada the shipwrecks of British explorer John Franklin, who perished with his crew while trying to chart the Northwest Passage through the Arctic in the 1840s.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Malaysia embraces Melanie's work on the illegal wildlife tradeRESEARCH into how the law can be used to protect endangered species has led to a University of Huddersfield lecturer's expertise being harnessed by an overseas nation that has some of the world's most diverse and fascinating wildlife.
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Live Science
Shrews' Heads (and Brains) Shrink As Seasons ChangeIn winter, something happens to the skulls of adult red-toothed shrews that is exceedingly rare among vertebrates.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Mind-reading' brain-decoding techResearchers have demonstrated how to decode what the human brain is seeing by using artificial intelligence to interpret fMRI scans from people watching videos, representing a sort of mind-reading technology.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Rethinking well-being and sustainability measurements from local to global scalesA new study suggests that standard ways of measuring well-being and sustainability in communities used by global organizations may be missing critical information and could lead to missteps in management actions. The article suggests alternative and complementary approaches that use indicators grounded in the values of a particular community.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Smart birds: Canada geese give hunters the slip by hiding out in ChicagoIt's open season for Canada geese in Illinois from mid-October to mid-January. Unfortunately for hunters, Canada geese are finding a new way to stay out of the line of fire. Rather than being 'sitting ducks' in a rural pond, they're setting up residence in the city. Ornithologists conducted a recent study to try to find out why there were so many Canada geese in Chicago in the winter.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Rising sea levels creating first Native American climate refugeesRising sea levels and human activities are fast creating a 'worst case scenario' for Native Americans of the Mississippi Delta who stand to lose not just their homes, but their irreplaceable heritage, to climate change.
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Science | The Guardian
The Guardian view on gene therapy: money well spent | EditorialA rare and fatal disease will be now treated on the NHS. But the real problems come from common and unglamorous complaints The NHS is to fund a very expensive treatment for a very rare but terrible childhood disorder that leaves babies condemned to life in a sterile bubble. This is a triumph for medical science but it should also provoke some deep and careful thought. The treatment in question, st
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Gizmodo
Save $30 On Three Different Kindles Kindle , $50 Kindle Paperwhite ,$90 Kindle Voyage , $170 Prime exclusive Kindle discounts come around fairly often, but today’s $30 discounts are notable in that they’re available to all Amazon shoppers. The Kindle , Kindle Paperwhite , and Kindle Voyage are all included in the sale. Most readers will probably want to get the Paperwhite for $90, since the $50 Kindle has a lower resolution screen
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Ars Technica
Kaspersky pledges independent code review to cast off spying suspicions Enlarge / Kaspersky Lab CEO and Chairman Eugene Kaspersky speaks at a conference in Russia on July 10, 2017. (credit: Anton NovoderezhkinTASS via Getty Images ) After reports that data collected by the company's anti-malware client was used to target an NSA contractor and various accusations of connections to Russian intelligence, today Kaspersky Lab announced the launch of what company executive
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
College labor market remains strongEmployers will face tough competition for talent in the 2017-18 job market, thanks to a seven-year growth streak in the college labor market, according to Michigan State University's Recruiting Trends, the largest annual survey of employers in the nation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanotube fiber antennas as capable as copperFibers made of carbon nanotubes configured as wireless antennas can be as good as copper antennas but 20 times lighter, according to Rice University researchers. The antennas may offer practical advantages for aerospace applications and wearable electronics where weight and flexibility are factors.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Red light, green light: New cop car can trip traffic signalsThe Philadelphia Police Department is getting a new fleet of patrol vehicles that include a feature any motorist stuck at a traffic light would envy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study shows how cells can be led down non-cancer pathAs cells with a propensity for cancer break down food for energy, they reach a fork in the road: They can either continue energy production as healthy cells, or shift to the energy production profile of cancer cells. In a new study, University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers map out the molecular events that direct cells' energy metabolism down the cancerous path. Their findings could lead to way
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Meta-analysis uncovers poor outcomes due to hyperthermia after post-cardiac arrest coolingRebound hyperthermia, or fever, is common after controlled body cooling to treat comatose survivors of cardiac arrest, but a new study presents evidence of significantly worse neurologic outcomes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA follows extra-Tropical Cyclone Lan speeding through northern JapanNow an extra-tropical cyclone over northern Japan, Lan was a typhoon when it made landfall just south of Tokyo over the weekend of Oct. 21 and 22. NASA's Aqua satellite and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided imagery of the extra-tropical cyclone.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rethinking the private sector's role in disaster reliefNatural disasters have filled the news in recent months, occurring so frequently that they seem to intimate apocalypse: wildfires, earthquakes, hurricanes. But as national and international media coverage of these events recedes, the local effects persist—often for years.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Experiment provides deeper look into the nature of neutrinosThe first glimpse of data from the full array of a deeply chilled particle detector operating beneath a mountain in Italy sets the most precise limits yet on where scientists might find a theorized process to help explain why there is more matter than antimatter in the universe.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists update four key fundamental constantsPaving the way for transforming the world's measurement system, an international task force has determined updated values for four fundamental constants of nature. The updated values comprise the last scientific piece of the puzzle for redefining the modern metric system, known as the International System of Units (SI). If approved by an international body next year, the revised SI will enable aut
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The Atlantic
Images of the Season: Fall Is in the Air, Part II One last look at my favorite season of the year, with more autumnal images from across the Northern Hemisphere. Harvests, festivals, migrations, winter preparations, and, of course, the colorful leaves. Today’s collection features photographs from Switzerland, Belarus, Nepal, Russia, France, England, Kazakhstan, China, and across the United States.
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Popular Science
Want to help the bees? Keep these out of your garden. Animals Three-fourths of the world’s honey contains neonicotinoids. Swiss scientists analyzed 198 honey samples from all over the world and found at least one neonicotinoid in 75 percent of the samples.
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Inside the Massive Tunnel Seattle Built to Replace an Aging HighwayNow that Bertha's done digging, the new underground highway is nearly ready for human travelers.
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The Scientist RSS
Genetic Risk Factors for Breast Cancer IdentifiedResearchers identify 72 novel genetic variants associated with breast cancer risk.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Reduced impact logging still harms biodiversity in tropical rainforestsMore than 403 million hectares of tropical forests worldwide have been earmarked for timber concessions with selective logging a common economic activity. The Brazilian Amazon alone holds around 4.5 billion m3 of commercial timber volume, and increased is the demand on Amazonian hardwood as African and Asian timber stocks are exhausted.
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Gizmodo
Traces of Alzheimer’s Disease Detected in Wild Animals for the First Time Images: University of Oxford An international team of researchers has uncovered tell-tale signs of Alzheimer’s disease in dolphins, marking the first time that the age-related disorder has been detected in a wild animal. Until very recently, scientists thought that only humans were susceptible to Alzheimer’s disease. That changed back in August of this year when researchers from Kent State Univer
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rethinking well-being and sustainability measurements from local to global scalesA new study suggests that standard ways of measuring well-being and sustainability in communities used by global organizations may be missing critical information and could lead to missteps in management actions. The paper, published today in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution by a team of 40 scientists, policy-makers and on-the-ground practitioners, suggests alternative and complementary appr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Antimicrobial gel developed at IU School of Dentistry could improve root canal resultsThe results of root canal treatments could improve because of an antimicrobial gel discovered and developed at the Indiana University School of Dentistry. Ghaeth H. Yassen, a visiting assistant professor, has developed an injectable antimicrobial gel that could disinfect a tooth during a root canal procedure.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
BOTOX® injections may provide relief for children and teens with hard-to-treat migrainesOne in 10 school-aged children suffer from migraines, but there are few FDA-approved medications for them. While BOTOX® injections are approved to treat migraines in adults, children and teens may benefit as well, early research suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sumatran tigers on path to recovery in 'in danger' UNESCO World Heritage siteA new scientific publication from WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) and the Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park Authority looks at the effectiveness of the park's protection zone and finds that the density of Sumatran tigers has increased despite the continued threat of living in an 'In Danger' World Heritage Site.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
These shrews have heads that shrink with the seasonIf any part of the body would seem ill equipped to shrink, it would probably be the head and skull. And, yet, researchers reporting in Current Biology on October 23 have found that the skulls of red-toothed shrews do shrink in anticipation of winter, by up to 20 percent. As spring approaches, their heads grow again to approach their previous size.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mongolian microfossils point to the rise of animals on EarthA Yale-led research team has discovered a cache of embryo-like microfossils in northern Mongolia that may shed light on questions about the long-ago shift from microbes to animals on Earth.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Austrian researchers facilitate lipid data analysisNo lipids, no life. In all organisms, lipids form cell walls, store energy and release it when necessary, and play an important role in cell signalling. It has been proved that changes in the composition of lipids play a causal role in illnesses such as cancer, fatty liver and multiple sclerosis. According to rough estimates, there are about 300,000 different lipid species. For the detection of li
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Gizmodo
Stranger Things' Second Season Lives Up to Its Incredible Expectations All images: Netflix Here’s the thing about Stranger Things season two: If you liked season one, and pretty much everyone did, then you’ll like this season just fine. Everything is turned up a bit, but the soul of Stranger Things remains what it was last season—a story about friendship, family, and giant piles of ‘80s nostalgia. It is incredibly difficult to review season two of Stranger Things wi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
More iron in lakes is making them brown, study showsThe iron concentration in lakes is increasing in many parts of northern Europe. This has been shown in a study in which researchers in Sweden examined 23 years of data from 10 countries. High iron levels contribute to browner water; furthermore, iron binds environmental toxins such as lead and arsenic.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How hospitals respond when it's uncertain if the newborn is a boy or a girlWhen babies are born with atypical sex anatomy, the hospital's response has a major impact on a family's experience and decisions about sometimes irreversible procedures.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Teams work better with a little help from your friendsHere’s something both you and your boss can agree on: Workplace teams are better when they include your friends. Researchers analyzed the results of 26 different studies (called a meta-analysis) and found that teams composed of friends performed better on some tasks than groups of acquaintances or strangers.
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In Camden, Bridging the Skills Gap Means More than Tech TrainingHopeworks couples tech training with trauma-informed counseling to help transition Camden residents into the tech workforce.
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Gizmodo
This Doomed Doll House Simulates Tragedies to Teach Kids About Fire Safety GIF Years ago, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission realized that blowing up mannequins was the most effective way to demonstrate the importance of fireworks safety. The city of Poznań, Poland, has taken a similar approach when it comes to teaching kids about fire safety, but using an incredibly detailed miniature doll house that can simulate a blazing inferno. Developed by the city’s fire
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The Atlantic
Better Sleep Can Build Emotional Resilience There might have been a secret reason Albert Einstein could make a decision as scary as the one he made in 1939, when he went against his personal pacifist convictions and encouraged President Franklin Roosevelt to pursue the research necessary to make an atomic bomb. “I was well aware of the dreadful danger for all mankind, if these experiments would succeed,” Einstein later wrote. A strange lif
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Ars Technica
Cray supercomputers coming to Azure cloud Enlarge / Cray XC50 supercomputer. (credit: Cray) Microsoft will add Cray supercomputers to its Azure cloud computing service to handle the needs of those with high performance computing (HPC) workloads. Cloud computing systems like Azure can be used to build large cluster-like machines for high performance distributed workloads. Combined with FPGAs and GPUs , this makes them competitive, some of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
B3 vitamin component fights carcinogen action in human cells, says researchBrazilian scientists investigate tumoral development caused by benzo[a]pyrene, a hydrocarbon present in cigarette smoke, automotive exhaust, burnt wood fumes and barbecued meat. Culture of human lung cells was exposed to the agent for a week; the preventive role of nicotinamide riboside halted the damaging effects derived from alterations in genetic expression and cell metabolism.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rising sea levels creating first Native American climate refugeesRising sea levels and human activities are fast creating a 'worst case scenario' for Native Americans of the Mississippi Delta who stand to lose not just their homes, but their irreplaceable heritage, to climate change.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Booms & busts: How the 1980s could've predicted the Great RecessionFor anyone who lived through the early 1980s and early 1990s, the Great Recession two decades later should not have been a surprise, according to a paper released by Princeton University.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Canada geese give hunters the slip by hiding out in ChicagoIt's open season for Canada geese in Illinois from mid-October to mid-January. Unfortunately for hunters, Canada geese are finding a new way to stay out of the line of fire. Rather than being 'sitting ducks' in a rural pond, they're setting up residence in the city.University of Illinois ornithologist Mike Ward says he and a team of researchers conducted a recent study to try to find out why there
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Penn study links mutations in notch gene to role in B cell cancersResearchers found that in B cell tumors, mutated overactive versions of the Notch protein directly drive the expression of the Myc gene and many other genes that participate in B cell signaling pathways. Myc is a critical gene in governing cell proliferation and survival.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers demonstrate 'mind-reading' brain-decoding techResearchers have demonstrated how to decode what the human brain is seeing by using artificial intelligence to interpret fMRI scans from people watching videos, representing a sort of mind-reading technology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Protein regulates vitamin A metabolic pathways, prevents inflammationA team of researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have discovered how uncontrolled vitamin A metabolism in the gut can cause harmful inflammation. The discovery links diet to inflammatory diseases, like Crohn's disease and inflammatory bowel syndromes, and could inform nutritional interventions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Support for populist ideologies linked to feelings of disadvantage and national narcissismNew research shows that people who perceive they are part of a disadvantaged group are more likely to have an unrealistic belief in the greatness of their nation and support populist ideologies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nanotube fiber antennas as capable as copperThin fibers made of carbon nanotubes can be formed into antennas that are just as capable as copper antennas, according to researchers at Rice University and the National Institute of Standards and Technology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA follows extra-Tropical Cyclone Lan speeding through northern JapanNow an extra-tropical cyclone over northern Japan, Lan was a typhoon when it made landfall just south of Tokyo over the weekend of Oct. 21 and 22. NASA's Aqua satellite and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided imagery of the extra-tropical cyclone.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees Tropical Depression 27W still strugglingTropical Depression 27W continues to struggle to organize south of the island of Guam in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of the depression that revealed most of the storms associated with it were south of the center as a result of vertical wind shear.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Virus-like particle vaccine protects against RSV vaccine-enhanced respiratory disease, study findsA virus-like particle vaccine can prime the body’s immune response and prevent the severe respiratory disease that results when patients given an early form of a vaccine for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are exposed to RSV, according to a study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees Tropical Depression 27W still strugglingTropical Depression 27W continues to struggle to organize south of the island of Guam in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of the depression that revealed most of the storms associated with it were south of the center as a result of vertical wind shear.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Innovative material for soft sensor could bring new tactile techA new type of soft and stretchable sensor could find uses in applications ranging from athletics and health monitoring to prosthetics and virtual reality.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Legibility emerges spontaneously, rather than evolving over timeOlivier Morin from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena analyzed and compared the letters of more than 100 scripts from all over the globe. He found no evidence for a long-term evolution of legibility, but found that the orientation of lines in the letters of most scripts presented surprising and widespread patterns, favoring certain kinds of orientation, symmetries, a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Introduction of a novel system for in vitro analyses of zebrafish oligodendrocyte progenitor cellsDr. Michell M. Reimer, group leader at the Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD), Cluster of Excellence at the TU Dresden, and his team introduce a novel, easy-to-use, and highly reproducible OPC culture platform for adult zebrafish cells. This system will help to unravel the molecular and cellular programs that enable zebrafish to functionally regenerate spinal cord injuries. The resul
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Selective memoryA memory management scheme developed t MIT and elsewhere would increase by 33 to 50 percent the efficiency of data caches that use the massive new memory banks known as 'in-package DRAM.'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rethinking well-being and sustainability measurements from local to global scalesA new study suggests that standard ways of measuring well-being and sustainability in communities used by global organizations may be missing critical information and could lead to missteps in management actions. The paper, published today in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution by a team of 40 scientists, policy-makers and on-the-ground practitioners, suggests alternative and complementary appr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Trial shows drug can dramatically reduce weight of people with obesityA drug that targets the appetite control system in the brain could bring about significant weight loss in people with clinical obesity, according to new research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Enough vitamin D when young associated with lower risk of diabetes-related autoimmunityGetting enough vitamin D during infancy and childhood is associated with a reduced risk of islet autoimmunity among children at increased genetic risk for type 1 diabetes, according to a study published this week in the journal Diabetes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists update 4 key fundamental constantsPaving the way for transforming the world's measurement system, an international task force has determined updated values for four fundamental constants of nature.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Malaysia embraces Melanie's work on the illegal wildlife tradeResearch into how the law can be used to protect endangered species has led to a University of Huddersfield lecturer's expertise being harnessed by an overseas nation that has some of the world's most diverse and fascinating wildlife.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rhythm of memoryInhibited neurons set the tempo for memory processes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How hospitals respond when it's uncertain if the newborn is a boy or a girlWhen babies are born with atypical sex anatomy, the hospital's response has a major impact on a family's experience and decisions about sometimes irreversible procedures.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Patients at risk over failure to recognize important diabetes subtypeThe health of people with diabetes is being put at risk due to the failure of doctors to recognise which type of diabetes they have, a new study in the journal Diabetes Care reports.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Shrew skulls shrink for winter survival Getting smaller by absorbing bone tissue may help animals to save energy when food is scarce. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22874
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Gizmodo
It Sounds Like Snap Spectacles Turned Into a Massive Boondoggle Image: Snap Inc This is kind of a sad story. In November, Snap Inc blew everybody’s mind by releasing a surprisingly interesting piece of hardware. The camera-equipped sunglasses called Spectacles worked with Snapchat and looked cool. But a year later, the company reportedly has “hundreds of thousands” of unsold Spectacles sitting in warehouses in China. It’s unclear if any of them will ever see
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Popular Science
These Staten Islanders lost their neighborhood to Sandy. Here’s why they’re not taking it back. Environment A community goes back to nature. Just a few years ago, the reeds and raptors competed for space with neat lawns belonging to the small houses lining Kissam Avenue. Now most of the homes are gone, and…
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Gizmodo
Newly Released Files Show Steve Jobs Gave President Clinton Unsolicited Cabinet Recommendations Steve Jobs shakes hands with President Bill Clinton at the White House’s Chinese State Dinner on October 29, 1997 (Clinton Presidential Library) President Bill Clinton and Apple cofounder Steve Jobs were buddies before Jobs died of cancer in 2011. Jobs even gave Clinton advice in the middle of the Lewinsky scandal. But the details of the relationship between the two men have been pretty scarce. N
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NYT > Science
The Healing Edge: To Mend a Birth Defect, Surgeons Operate on the Patient Within the PatientIn a startling experimental procedure, doctors lift the uterus from a pregnant woman and operate on a fetus with miniature instruments.
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Ars Technica
Returning to Second Life Seriously, this once happened. A decade ago, dozens of media outlets and technologists discovered "The Next Internet." An original cyberspace science fiction fantasy had finally come to fruition as the world gained a second digitized reality. In a short period of time, countries established embassies , media companies opened bureaus , one of Earth’s biggest rock bands played a concert , political
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Ars Technica
The Essential Phone gets a $200 price drop, now $499 Remember the Essential Phone , which was delayed so much it launched right in the middle of the iPhone (and Pixel 2) hype season? The phone built by Andy Rubin's new company offers an innovative design and a great software loadout, but the subpar camera and lack of water resistance put it solely in the "second-tier" phone category. Essential's second-tier phone still had a top-tier price, though,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers at VA's PTSD Brain Bank seek answers to complicated mental health conditionVA's National PTSD Brain Bank, the only one of its kind in the world, is currently storing tissue from 168 brains. The bank aims to help with one of VA's most pressing challenges: understanding the complex nature of PTSD, and pointing the way toward new and better treatments.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Experiment provides deeper look into the nature of neutrinosThe first glimpse of data from the full array of a deeply chilled particle detector operating beneath a mountain in Italy sets the most precise limits yet on where scientists might find a theorized process to help explain why there is more matter than antimatter in the universe.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Proton therapy lowers treatment side effects in pediatric head and neck cancer patientsPediatric patients with head and neck cancer can be treated with proton beam therapy (PBT) instead of traditional photon radiation, and it will result in similar outcomes with less impact on quality of life.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
College labor market remains strongEmployers will face tough competition for talent in the 2017-18 job market, thanks to a seven-year growth streak in the college labor market, according to Michigan State University's Recruiting Trends, the largest annual survey of employers in the nation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sumatran tigers on path to recovery in 'in danger' UNESCO World Heritage siteA new scientific publication from WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) and the Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park Authority looks at the effectiveness of the park's protection zone and finds that the density of Sumatran tigers has increased despite the continued threat of living in an 'In Danger' World Heritage Site.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Transparent solar technology represents 'wave of the future'See-through solar materials that can be applied to windows represent a massive source of untapped energy and could harvest as much power as bigger, bulkier rooftop solar units, scientists report today in Nature Energy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rethinking the private sector's role in disaster reliefLatent potential within the private sector could provide a powerful new solution to disaster relief, according to a report out of the Yale Center for Business and the Environment.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mongolian microfossils point to the rise of animals on EarthA Yale-led research team has discovered a cache of embryo-like microfossils in northern Mongolia that may shed light on questions about the long-ago shift from microbes to animals on Earth.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Science shapes new century of sandwich recommendations for children at Centennial Meeting of Academy of Nutrition and DieteticsThe study, a modeling analysis, was conducted to assess the energy and nutrients contributed from all sandwiches in the US diets of children and adolescents. It used government data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) as well as USDA Typical Food Patterns to assess how Americans currently eat. The striking conclusion is that the ingredients inside the sandwich -- not
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Boost for lipid research: Austrian researchers facilitate lipid data analysisIllnesses such as cancer and multiple sclerosis may also be associated with lipids. Disorders are difficult to assess due to the diversity of lipids. Austrian scientists from Graz present a new tool for the analysis of lipids in Nature Methods.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Virus-like particle vaccine protects against RSV vaccine-enhanced respiratory disease, study findsResearchers have discovered that a virus-like particle vaccine can prime the body's immune response and prevent the severe respiratory disease that results when patients given an early form of a vaccine for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are exposed to RSV, according to a study led by Georgia State University.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
These shrews have heads that shrink with the seasonIf any part of the body would seem ill equipped to shrink, it would probably be the head and skull. And, yet, researchers reporting in Current Biology on Oct. 23 have found that the skulls of red-toothed shrews do shrink in anticipation of winter, by up to 20 percent. As spring approaches, their heads grow again to approach their previous size.
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The Atlantic
Trump Attacks a Grieving Widow’s Account “You know, when I was a kid growing up, a lot of things were sacred in our country,” White House Chief of Staff John Kelly said Thursday . Among those were Gold Star families: “I just thought—the selfless devotion that brings a man or woman to die on the battlefield, I just thought that that might be sacred.” But Kelly acknowledged that might no longer be true: “Gold Star families, I think that l
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Live Science
Happy Mole Day! Mayors Celebrate Scientific Date with Research PushMove over Pi Day: Mayors across the U.S. are celebrating the day of the mole — which began at 6:02 a.m. this morning (10/23) in honor of the vast number 6.02 X 10^23 — by advocating unfettered scientific research.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Sony’s New Autonomous Car Camera Sees Road Signs at 160 Meters
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Consumers see ‘organic’ and ‘non-GM’ food labels as synonymousWhat are the best ways to communicate whether a food has GM ingredients? To gauge consumers’ willingness to pay for food labeled as GM vs. non-GM, researchers conducted a national survey of 1,132 respondents.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Integrative health group visit reduce chronic pain in underserved Spanish-speaking LatinosSpanish-speaking Latinos suffering from chronic pain, who typically lack access to effective treatments due to insurance, income, and language barriers, showed significant benefits from an Integrative Medical Group Visit (IMGV) approach that was adapted for this population.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Crops evolving 10 millennia before experts thoughtAncient hunter-gatherers began to systemically affect the evolution of crops up to 30,000 years ago -- around 10 millennia before experts previously thought -- according to new research by the University of Warwick.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Adolescents underreport amphetamine use, likely unaware that adderall is amphetamineHigh school seniors appear to be underreporting their nonmedical use of amphetamine, despite reporting using Adderall without a doctor's orders, finds a study by the Center for Drug Use and HIV/HCV Research (CDUHR) at NYU Meyers College of Nursing.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows mindfulness meditation app works -- but acceptance training component is crucialA Carnegie Mellon University-led study found that one component of mindfulness interventions is particularly important for impacting stress biology. Acceptance, or learning how to be open and accepting of the way things are in each moment, is critical for the training's stress reduction effects. Published in Psychoneuroendocrinology, the researchers offer the first scientific evidence that a brief
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Science | The Guardian
Small-minded? Shrews shrink their skulls to survive winter, study shows The animals reduce the size of their brains and skulls as winter approaches and regrow them in the spring, say researchers They use echolocation to explore their habitat and produce an unpleasant scent to avoid being eaten by cats. But the common shrew has another survival trick: as winter approaches, its skull shrinks and then regrows in the spring. Dubbed “Dehnel’s phenomenon” after the scienti
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Science | The Guardian
Did you solve it? Are you smarter than a Brazilian 15-year-old? The answers to today’s puzzles On my puzzle blog earlier today I set this question from Brazil’s State School Mathematics Olympiad Homero is clutching three identical pieces of string in his fist, as illustrated below left. He asks Sofia to tie two ends of the string, chosen at random, at either side of his fist, as illustrated below centre, so that there is one free end at either side. Continue
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Gizmodo
Shrews Shrink Their Heads to Survive Winter The species of shrew used in this study, Sorex araneus. Credit: Carol Zub Right now, as autumn descends upon the Northern Hemisphere, many animals are preparing for the frigid and lean winter months. Bears are going through a serious bulking phase. Hares and stoats are changing the colors of their coats. Oh, and shrews’ heads are shrinking. New research shows that the skull of at least one variet
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Scientific American Content: Global
Small-Minded Strategy: The Common Shrew Shrinks Its Head to Survive WinterThe startling change may help conserve energy -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
Watch Live as Physicists Discuss the Mysteries of Dark Matter at Gizmodo Image: Victor Jeffres We live in a universe filled with weird stuff that we don’t really understand: dark matter. Physicists have observed its spooky effects but have’t seen it directly. Even scarier: There seems to be around six times as much dark matter in the universe as regular matter. Tonight, we’ll be broadcasting a discussion on this mysterious substance over Facebook live at 7:00 pm ET fr
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Major study of genetics of breast cancer provides clues to mechanisms behind the diseaseSeventy-two new genetic variants that contribute to the risk of developing breast cancer have been identified by a major international collaboration involving hundreds of researchers worldwide.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Understanding how electrons turn to glassResearchers have gained new insight into the electronic processes that guide the transformation of liquids into a solid crystalline or glassy state.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Western US Quake? Fifty simulations of the 'Really Big One' show how a 9.0 Cascadia earthquake could play outThe largest number yet of detailed simulations for how a Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake might play out provides a clearer picture of what the region can expect when the fault unleashes a 9.0 earthquake.
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Viden
Tesla laver aftale om elbilfabrik i KinaAftalen giver Tesla en endnu bedre plads på det kinesiske marked, hvor andelen af elbiler vokser.
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Gizmodo
Monday's Best Deals: Amazon Kindles, Yankee Candles, Nintendo 3DS SNES Edition, and More Cure your case of the Mondays with deals on Yankee candles , Amazon Kindles , a pre-order sale on the Nintendo 3DS XL Super NES edition , and many more. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Kindle , $50 Kindle Paperwhite , $90 Kindle Voyage , $170 Prime exclusive Kindle discounts come around fairly often, but today’s $30 discounts are notable in that
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Quanta Magazine
Newfound Wormhole Allows Information to Escape Black Holes In 1985, when Carl Sagan was writing the novel Contact , he needed to quickly transport his protagonist Dr. Ellie Arroway from Earth to the star Vega. He had her enter a black hole and exit light-years away, but he didn’t know if this made any sense. The Cornell University astrophysicist and television star consulted his friend Kip Thorne, a black hole expert at the California Institute of Techno
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Futurity.org
Mindfulness apps with acceptance training can reduce stress Mindfulness meditation apps can reduce the body’s response to biological stress, new research suggests. “…this study shows that it’s possible to learn skills that improve the way our bodies respond to stress…” Acceptance, or learning how to be open and accepting of the way things are in each moment, is particularly important for impacting stress biology and benefitting from the training’s stress
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reduced impact logging still harms biodiversity in tropical rainforestsA new study finds that even low levels of logging in the Amazon rainforest may lead to great losses in biodiversity.The research in Biological Conservation, looked at 34 different plots in the state of Pará -- a focal point for Amazon protection efforts in the last decades. They found that even low levels of logging leaded to negative effects on dung beetle diversity and rates of dung beetle-media
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ESMO calls for cancer-specific targets to be included in NCDs' global and national agendasMost premature deaths from cancer, or other NCDs, are preventable or curable if health systems respond more effectively to the needs of their population.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Queen's University Belfast leads study to transform prostate cancer treatmentQueen's University Belfast has led the world's largest research study using a diagnostic test developed by Almac Diagnostics, to better understand the biology of prostate cancer tumours, which could lead to a transformation in how prostate cancer is diagnosed and treated.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NUS researchers discover pathway by which blood cells release a potent signalling factorThe pathway by which blood cells release the important signalling lipid, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), has now been discovered by NUS Medicine researchers. They showed that the membrane protein Mfsd2b is responsible for exporting S1P out of blood cells into the circulation, where it is needed for trafficking of immune cells. However, immune cells can also cause autoimmune and inflammatory disease
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Discovered in plants a mechanism that corrects defects in protein foldingVarious human nervous system diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer's, Huntington's, and Parkinson's diseases, are associated with the same basic disorder: the loss of nerve cells capacity to fold their proteins correctly, which causes protein aggregations that form "clumps" that end up generating the cell death.
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The Atlantic
The Toxic Politics of Migration in the Czech Republic I met the future prime minister of the Czech Republic early in 2014, at a Washington, D.C. breakfast organized by the “No Labels” movement. Andrej Babis had recently been appointed his nation’s finance minister. He and the No Labels organizers had met at a conference in Europe and been mutually fascinated by each other’s promises of trans-ideological problem-solving. I wasn’t as impressed. Babis
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Ars Technica
Unreleased Super NES game to come packed with every Analogue Super Nt An over-the-top trailer for the previously unreleased version of Super Turrican , coming to the Analogue Super NT as a "Director's Cut" The Super NES Classic Edition isn't the only piece of modern hardware sporting an unreleased, decades-old console game . Analogue announced today that its recently revealed FPGA-based Super Nt hardware would come packed with a new expanded and "uncut" version of
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A step closer to a cure for adult-onset diabetesIn healthy people, exosomes -- tiny structures secreted by cells to allow intercellular communication -- prevent clumping of the protein that leads to type 2 diabetes. Exosomes in patients with the disease don't have the same ability. This discovery takes us a step closer to a cure for type 2 diabetes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Geophysicist finds teaching opportunities in movie mistakesFew scientists regard the 1997 movie Volcano, in which flaming magma suddenly spews from the La Brea tar pits and incinerates much of Los Angeles, as a means to foster scientific literacy. After all, Southern California has no magma to spew. But one geophysicist sees it differently.
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Gizmodo
You Should Probably Buy a Set-top Box or Streaming Dongle, No Matter What TV You Have Image: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo Smart TV features are for the most part terrible, so if you’re looking to pipe Netflix or whatever service into your television, you’re best off buying a smart box or dongle. We would never suggest that you shouldn’t invest in a big beautiful new screen —you cannot watch Game of Thrones on an Apple TV alone—but don’t do it for the smart features. The fact is that matter
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists warn that saline lakes in dire situation worldwideSaline lakes around the world are shrinking in size at alarming rates. But what—or who—is to blame? Lakes like Utah's Great Salt Lake, Asia's Aral Sea, the Dead Sea in Jordan and Israel, China's huge Lop Nur and Bolivia's Lake Popo are just a few that are in peril. These lakes and others like them are suffering massive environmental problems according to a group of scientists and water managers in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
World mayors pledge emissions-free cities by 2030The mayors of London, Los Angeles, Paris and several other major world cities are pledging to ban gasoline and diesel vehicles from "large parts" of their cities by 2030.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Washington D.C. Tackles Emissions with Dockless BikesThe city aims to cut its emissions 50 percent by 2032, in large part by developing car alternatives -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo
You Can Levitate Tiny Diamond Particles Using a Cheap Red Laser Pointer GIF Did you know a cheap red laser pointer is good for more than just annoying people at a movie theater? As YouTube’s Styropyro , aka Drake Anthony, demonstrates, by focusing the beam you can actually use it to lift and levitate tiny specs of diamond dust , similar to how Star Trek’s tractor beams seemingly work. The science behind this experiment earned physicist Steven Chu the Nobel Prize in P
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Popular Science
Pollution kills nine million people a year Environment This doesn't feel like progress. Air, water, and soil pollution kill millions each year—and they don't have to. Environmental protections have been shown to save lives.
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Ars Technica
Proposed law would regulate online ads to hinder Russian election influence Enlarge (credit: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images) A bipartisan group of federal lawmakers wants to make it more difficult for Russia to influence US elections. To that end, the group has drawn up legislation requiring Internet-based companies like Google, Twitter, and Facebook to disclose who is buying political advertisements on their platforms and maintain those records after elections. The Honest Ads
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Ingeniøren
Udenrigsministeriet mørklagde historier om isby med atomreaktorDanmarks udenrigsministerium forsøgte i 1950'erne og 1960'erne at censurere journalisters historier om den amerikanske militærbase Camp Century i Grønland for at nedtone planer om missiler under indlandsisen.
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New on MIT Technology Review
A Bigger, Badder Botnet of Things Has Been Found, and It’s Primed to Ravage the Web
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NYT > Science
The New Health Care: The Cookie Crumbles: A Retracted Study Points to a Larger TruthGetting people to eat better is difficult. So is doing research about it, which is why skepticism is important.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists discover new gene associated with debilitating lung diseaseFinding of lung fibrosis gene highlights a potential new avenue for treatment.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discovered in plants a mechanism that corrects defects in protein foldingDiscovered in plants a mechanism that corrects defects in proteins such as those that cause Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases in humans. Defective protein folding causes nervous system diseases in humans and hinders the proper functioning of the chloroplasts in plants.The aggregation of misfolded proteins in the chloroplasts sends a SOS signal to the nucleus to repair them in few hours. This ne
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Unique study: more iron in lakes is making them brownThe iron concentration in lakes is increasing in many parts of northern Europe, including Sweden. This has been shown in a study in which researchers at Lund University in Sweden examined 23 years of data from 10 countries. High iron levels contribute to browner water; furthermore, iron binds environmental toxins such as lead and arsenic.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel therapies for multidrug-resistant bacteriaScientists at the University of Surrey in collaboration with research partners at the University of Sheffield and University of Würzburg, Germany, have developed novel antimicrobials, which could be used to treat infections, caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exploring disease predisposition to deliver personalized medicineExploring the links between diseases and tissue-specific gene activity, geneticists from UNIGE have been able to build a model that constitutes a first step towards the identification of specific sequences in the non-coding genome signalling their pathogenicity in the context of a specific disease. In a second study, they went even further by associating particular disease risks -- including schiz
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Activation of immune T cells leads to behavioral changesScientists from the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences in Japan and collaborators have found that T cells -- immune cells that help to protect the body from infections and cancer -- change the body's metabolism when they are activated, and that this activation actually leads to changes in behavior.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research revises our knowledge of how the brain learns to fearWhat happens in the brain when we learn that fire is very hot and can hurt us? It's the kind of learning that results from the association of a sensory stimulus and the perception of threat. New research in mice appearing today in Nature Neuroscience suggests that the accepted understanding of that critical operation is incorrect in important respects.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists warn that saline lakes in dire situation worldwideSaline lakes around the world are shrinking in size at alarming rates. But what -- or who -- is to blame? Lakes like Utah's Great Salt Lake, Asia's Aral Sea, the Dead Sea in Jordan and Israel, China's huge Lop Nur and Bolivia's Lake Popo are just a few that are in peril. These lakes and others like them are suffering massive environmental problems according to a group of scientists and water manag
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
So my brain amyloid level is 'elevated' -- What does that mean?Testing drugs to prevent or delay the onset of Alzheimer's dementia and using them in the clinic will mean identifying and informing adults who have a higher risk of Alzheimer's but are still cognitively normal. A new study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has shed light on how seniors cope with such information.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers bring optical communication onto silicon chipsUltrathin films of a semiconductor that emits and detects light can be stacked on top of silicon wafers, researchers report in a study that could help bring optical communication onto silicon chips.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Synthetic hydrogels deliver cells to repair intestinal injuriesBy combining engineered polymeric materials known as hydrogels with complex intestinal tissue known as organoids -- made from human pluripotent stem cells -- researchers have taken an important step toward creating a new technology for controlling the growth of these organoids and using them for treating wounds in the gut that can be caused by disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UCSF innovators use EHRs to track hospital-acquired infectionIn a first for hospital infection control, the UC San Francisco Health Informatics team has used electronic health records (EHRs) to track down a source of a common hospital-acquired infection by tracing the movements of more than 85,000 patients over a three-year period.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Wriggling microtubules help understand coupling of 'active' defects and curvatureImagine a tiny doughnut-shaped droplet, covered with wriggling worms. The worms are packed so tightly together that they locally line up, forming a nematic liquid crystal similar to those found in flat panel displays. In the journal Nature Physics, scientists are reporting on an examination of such an active nematic -- but with flexible filaments and microscopic engines rather than worms.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Are teens more likely to take charge of their health when money is on the line?A new study shows that using small financial incentives and accessible monitoring tools such as wireless glucometers and apps may motivate young people with type 1 diabetes to engage in the management of their condition. Participants in the intervention group were nearly three times more likely to achieve daily glucose monitoring goals. The authors say the study shows that the strategy may be an e
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Single-molecule dissection of developmental gene controlScientists at EPFL and Max Plank have made significant discoveries on how developmental genes are controlled by the methyltransferase enzyme PRC2. The study is published in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Wealth-associated disparities in death, disability in older adults in US, EnglandLow wealth was associated with death and disability among older adults in both the United States and England, two countries with very different health care and safety-net systems, according to a new article published by JAMA Internal Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Are e-cigarettes with higher nicotine associated with more smoking, vaping?The use of electronic cigarettes with higher nicotine concentrations by high school students in California was associated with a greater likelihood of subsequent use of conventional combustible cigarettes and e-cigarettes, according to a new article published by JAMA Pediatrics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Teens who vape higher doses of nicotine are more likely to become regular smokers, vapersEven if it tastes like Gummi Bears and is inhaled as smoke-free aerosol, vaping higher concentrations of nicotine may increase how often teenagers use electronic cigarettes or smoke traditional cigarettes. This is the first study to evaluate the association of e-cigarette nicotine concentration with future smoking and vaping behavior in youth. In comparison to teens who vaped nicotine-free e-cigar
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists develop new theory of molecular evolutionResearchers from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and the University College London have developed a new theory of molecular evolution, offering insights into how genes function, how the rates of evolutionary divergence can be predicted, and how harmful mutations arise at a basic level.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Resistive memory components the computer industry can't resistFor years, the computer industry has sought memory technologies with higher endurance, lower cost, and better energy efficiency than commercial flash memories. Now, an international collaboration of scientists may have solved many of those challenges with the discovery of thin, molecular films that can store information.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists: Expanding Brazilian sugarcane could dent global CO2 emissionsVastly expanding sugarcane production in Brazil for conversion to ethanol could reduce current global carbon dioxide emissions by as much as 5.6 percent, researchers report in the journal Nature Climate Change. This can be accomplished without impinging on environmentally sensitive areas in Brazil and while allowing for the expansion of other agricultural crops and human needs, the researchers rep
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Major study of genetics of breast cancer provides clues to mechanisms behind the diseaseSeventy-two new genetic variants that contribute to the risk of developing breast cancer have been identified by a major international collaboration involving hundreds of researchers worldwide.
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The Atlantic
The Walking Dead Staggers On for Another Year Much like the beleaguered, heavy-lidded, gray-bearded Rick Grimes (Andrew Lincoln), The Walking Dead has an enemy to defeat this season. For Rick, it’s been pretty obvious for the past year and a half who his nemesis is: Negan (Jeffrey Dean Morgan), the baseball bat-wielding psychopath who has laid bloody waste to the show’s ensemble and halted its narrative drive in the process. But the series i
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
A pro wrestler's guide to confidence | Mike KinneyYou are more than you think you are, says former pro wrestler Mike Kinney -- you just have to find what makes you unique and use it to your advantage. For years Kinney "turned up" the parts of himself that made him special as he invented and perfected his wrestling persona, Cowboy Gator Magraw. In a talk equal parts funny and smart, he brings his wisdom from the ring to everyday life, sharing how
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Teams work better with a little help from your friendsHere's something both you and your boss can agree on: Workplace teams are better when they include your friends.
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Gizmodo
Computer Parts Site Newegg Is Being Sued for Allegedly Engaging in Massive Fraud Image: Newegg.com A suit filed Friday in the US District Court in Los Angeles by four South Korean banks alleges “massive fraud” with an outstanding debt of at least $230 million, and California-based electronic parts seller Newegg has been named as a defendant, along with wholesaler ASI Corporation and its officers. The Industrial Bank of Korea, Keb Hana Bank, Nonghyup Bank, and Kookmin Bank—whi
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Gizmodo
Deadspin Here’s A Superhuman Volleyball Play From Three Different Angles | Jezebel Cardi B Claims Ra Deadspin Here’s A Superhuman Volleyball Play From Three Different Angles | Jezebel Cardi B Claims Racist Employees Kicked Her Out of an Albany Hotel For No Good Reason | The Root Va. Middle Schoolers Simulate Sex Acts With Pinned Down Black Students While Yelling Racial Slurs | Splinter ICE Enters a Private Home Without a Warrant to Detain a Man They Later Released | Earther Report Pollution in Y
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Feed: All Latest
Meet Botnik, the Surreal Comedy App That’s Turning AI Into LOLBotnik's predictive-text keyboards infuse add randomness to specific story tropes to create truly dada ditties.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Routes out of isolation for Yellowstone grizzliesIn summer of 2017, biologists from Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks confirmed sightings of a grizzly bear in the Big Belt Mountains northeast of Helena, Montana. The bear, an adventurous vanguard from its home range in the Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem of northwestern Montana, could be an unwitting pioneer on a path that may one day bring grizzlies from the Northern Continental Divide face
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers bring optical communication onto silicon chipsThe huge increase in computing performance in recent decades has been achieved by squeezing ever more transistors into a tighter space on microchips.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Single-molecule dissection of developmental gene controlScientists at EPFL and Max Plank have made significant discoveries on how developmental genes are controlled by the methyltransferase enzyme PRC2. The study is published in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology.
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Verdens hidtil største kræftstudie åbner for skræddersyede brystkræftscreeningerVidensgrundlaget til mere præcis vurdering af risiko for brystkræft er nu på plads....
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Immune response: Scientists identify 'first responders' to bacterial invasionWhen bacteria enter our body, they kick-start a powerful immune response. But this chain of reactions doesn't fully account for our immediate responses. Researchers show that so-called ion channels play a key role as 'first responders'.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Routes out of isolation for Yellowstone grizzliesAn interagency team of Montana and Wyoming biologists models possible routes to a reunion of the Yellowstone and Northern Continental bear populations through adventurous male immigrants. An influx of genetic diversity through breeding with outsiders could give the Yellowstone grizzly population greater resiliency to changing environmental conditions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Psychedelic drugs may reduce criminal behaviorNewly published research suggests that common psychedelic drugs -- such as 'magic mushrooms', LSD and mescaline (a substance derived from the peyote cactus) -- may reduce criminal offenses. The new study found that psychedelic drugs are associated with a decreased likelihood of antisocial criminal behavior.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Biosimilar drugs could cut US health spending by $54 billion over next decadeBiosimilar drugs have been touted as one strategy to help curb the runaway costs of biologics that have advanced the treatment of illness such as rheumatoid arthritis and many cancers. A new study finds biosimilars could cut health care spending in the United States by $54 billion over the next decade. The savings are about 20 percent larger than a similar, widely cited analysis done three years a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Symptom burden may increase hospital length of stay, readmission risk in advanced cancerHospitalized patients with advanced cancer who report more intense and numerous physical and psychological symptoms appear to be at risk for longer hospital stays and unplanned hospital readmissions.
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Science | The Guardian
Breast cancer study uncovers new genetic variants for increased risk Researchers hope new discoveries will help explain why some women are predisposed to breast cancer, as well as why certain forms are harder to treat Common inherited genetic variants that together increase the risk of breast cancer by about a fifth have been identified by scientists. A huge team of researchers working together around the world uncovered 65 new variants. On their own, they contrib
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fifty simulations of the 'Really Big One' show how a 9.0 Cascadia earthquake could play outOne of the worst nightmares for many Pacific Northwest residents is a huge earthquake along the offshore Cascadia Subduction Zone, which would unleash damaging and likely deadly shaking in coastal Washington, Oregon, British Columbia and northern California.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Expanding Brazilian sugarcane could dent global CO2 emissionsVastly expanding sugarcane production in Brazil for conversion to ethanol could reduce current global carbon dioxide emissions by as much as 5.6 percent, researchers report in the journal Nature Climate Change.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Resistive memory components the computer industry can't resistMake way for some new memsistors. For years, the computer industry has sought memory technologies with higher endurance, lower cost, and better energy efficiency than commercial flash memories. Now, an international collaboration of scientists may have solved many of those challenges with the discovery of thin, molecular films that can store information.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists develop new theory of molecular evolutionResearchers from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and the University College London have developed a new theory of molecular evolution, offering insights into how genes function, how the rates of evolutionary divergence can be predicted, and how harmful mutations arise at a basic level.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wriggling microtubules help understand coupling of 'active' defects and curvatureImagine a tiny donut-shaped droplet, covered with wriggling worms. The worms are packed so tightly together that they must locally line up with respect to each other. In this situation, we would say the worms form a nematic liquid crystal, an ordered phase similar to the materials used in many flat panel displays.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A way to dramatically improve resolution of confocal microscopyA team of researchers at Cornell University has developed a way to dramatically improve the resolution of confocal microscopy. They describe the technique in a paper they have had published in Physical Review X.
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Blog » Languages » English
Grim’s Haunted Mansion: Zombies vs. Vampires All right, the cat’s fed, the ouija board’s questions are nearly exhausted, what next? What next, indeed, in the life of the Grim Reaper? As you check the faded wall calendar and hear a chime from the enormous grandfather clock, it all comes together: it’s time for you to go out to the lawn for that annual “sporting event.” From the sound of it, Grim asked you to play referee. As for the teams, i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Teams work better with a little help from your friendsHere's something both you and your boss can agree on: Workplace teams are better when they include your friends. Researchers analyzed the results of 26 different studies (called a meta-analysis) and found that teams composed of friends performed better on some tasks than groups of acquaintances or strangers.
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New Scientist - News
Geese-like birds seem to have survived the dinosaur extinctionA bird group named the Vegaviidae, which resembled modern loons and geese, is the first identified with members that lived before and after the Cretaceous extinction
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New Scientist - News
Chronic back pain stem cell treatment could cut need for opioidsA stem cell treatment could bring relief to millions of people with chronic lower back pain. If it works, it may help curb the opioid painkiller epidemic
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Personalizing human-robot interaction may increase patient useDetermining the elements in the human-robot interaction that make users more motivated to continue is important in designing future robots that will interact with humans on a daily basis, say investigators looking into their use in healthcare.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genetic rescue boosts recovery of Australia's endangered mountain pygmy possumsFor the first time, a breeding technique known as genetic rescue has been shown to increase population numbers and survival rates of the endangered mountain pygmy possum, now at their highest numbers since 1996.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Crops evolving ten millennia before experts thoughtAncient hunter-gatherers began to systemically affect the evolution of crops up to thirty thousand years ago -- around ten millennia before experts previously thought -- according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How the microbiome is linked to autoimmune disordersA new study reveals a new mechanism in the gut microbiome that regulates pro- and anti-inflammatory cells.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Vaquita porpoise rescued as part of VaquitaCPR conservation project, then releasedScientists with the VaquitaCPR conservation project announced they succeeded in locating and rescuing a highly endangered vaquita porpoise yesterday, but in an abundance of caution the vaquita, which was a calf, was released. VaquitaCPR is trying to save the world's most endangered marine mammal. Less than 30 are left in the world.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Zircon as Earth's timekeeper: Are we reading the clock right?Zircon crystals in igneous rocks must be carefully examined and not relied upon solely to predict future volcanic eruptions and other tectonic events, researchers have shown.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Taming 'wild' electrons in grapheneGraphene -- a one-atom-thick layer of carbon -- is a better conductor than copper and is very promising for electronic devices, but with one catch: Electrons that move through it can't be stopped. Until now, that is. Scientists have learned how to tame the unruly electrons in graphene, paving the way for the ultra-fast transport of electrons with low loss of energy in novel systems.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Solution to mysterious behavior of supercooled waterResearchers have developed a model to explain mysterious breakdown of Stokes-Einstein relationship in supercooled water. They revealed that intermittent hydrogen bond breakage between water molecules led to non-conformity with the Stokes-Einstein relationship.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel transdisciplinary study uncovers microbes that may one day deter major grape diseaseResearchers have conducted a novel transdisciplinary study to characterize the microbial communities within the vascular system of grapevines and their connections with Pierce's disease, an economically significant disease of the California grape industry. Through the study, the researchers found potentially beneficial microbes that could one day be used as a deterrent to Xylella fastidiosa, the p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Genetic rescue boosts recovery of Australia's endangered mountain pygmy possumsFor the first time, a breeding technique known as genetic rescue has been shown to increase population numbers and survival rates of the endangered mountain pygmy possum, now at their highest numbers since 1996.
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New on MIT Technology Review
A New Botnet of Things May Ravage the Web
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Understanding how electrons turn to glassResearchers have gained new insight into the electronic processes that guide the transformation of liquids into a solid crystalline or glassy state.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists identify 'first responders' to bacterial invasionWhen bacteria enter our body, they kick-start a powerful immune response. But this chain of reactions doesn't fully account for our immediate responses. Researchers at KU Leuven, Belgium, show that so-called ion channels play a key role as 'first responders.'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A step closer to a cure for adult-onset diabetesIn healthy people, exosomes -- tiny structures secreted by cells to allow intercellular communication -- prevent clumping of the protein that leads to type 2 diabetes. Exosomes in patients with the disease don't have the same ability. This discovery by a research collaboration between Chalmers University of Technology and Astrazeneca takes us a step closer to a cure for type 2 diabetes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Groundwater, tundra fires may work together to thaw permafrostGroundwater may play an unrecognized role in thawing Arctic permafrost following wildfires, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Depression strongly linked to higher long-term risk of early death for both women, menDespite increased awareness about mental illness, depression remains strongly linked to a higher risk of early death -- and this risk has increased for women in recent years -- according to results from the 60-year Stirling County Study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study finds shortcomings in Canadian regulations governing use of sugar claimsPrepackaged food and beverages labelled with claims such as 'no added sugar' or 'reduced in sugar' can have lower sugar levels than products without sugar claims, but may not have notable reductions in calories and some can contain amounts of sugar considered in 'excess' by the World Health Organization. This is the conclusion of a recent Canadian study, report scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Electricity from shale gas vs. coal: Lifetime toxic releases from coal much higherDespite widespread concern about potential human health impacts from hydraulic fracturing, the lifetime toxic chemical releases associated with coal-generated electricity are 10 to 100 times greater than those from electricity generated with natural gas obtained via fracking, according to a new study.
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Futurity.org
Salmon sex moves mountains (very slowly) Salmon play a significant role in shaping mountain landscapes, according to a new study that shows that when they spawn, the earth moves. But it only happens over the course of hundreds of thousands or even millions of years. For a new paper in Geomorphology , Brian Yanites, an assistant professor of earth and atmospheric sciences at Indiana University, and colleagues modeled the effect of spawni
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Futurity.org
Can robots feel guilty? Answer reveals 3 parts of mental life Asking people to think about the sensations and emotions of inanimate or non-human entities, offers a glimpse into how they think about mental life. The responses show that Americans break mental life into three parts—body, heart, and mind—a finding that challenges earlier research on this topic and could have important implications for understanding people’s social interactions and moral judgmen
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The Atlantic
Why Is This Deer Licking This Fox? When Chris Lowe first saw the buck stoop to lick the small, silver-speckled fox, he thought his eyes might be playing tricks on him. He’d just gotten back from a run on Santa Catalina, a remote Southern Californian island where he studies sharks, and came upon the two animals in the scrub. Mule deer and island foxes, the rascally miniature descendants of gray foxes, are everyday sights on Catalin
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Gizmodo
Italian Scientists Report Patient Who Sweats Blood Image Reprinted with permission from CMAJ Profuse sweating can lead to embarrassing pit stains and discomfort, sure. But you are sweating sweat. This Italian patient sweats blood. The 21-year-old patient entered a medical ward following three years of bleeding from her palms and face. She didn’t have any cuts and nothing seemed to cause or trigger her bleeding episodes. Her condition was so bad t
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Gizmodo
How Microsoft's New Invoke Smart Speaker Stacks Up to the Competition Better late than never, right? Microsoft is finally ready to compete in the smart speaker market after unveiling its Cortana-powered version of the Amazon Echo earlier this year . The Harman Kardon Invoke launched on Sunday with high-quality audio and a stylish design for $199. But how does it compare to the competition from Amazon, Google, Apple and Sonos? Let’s find out. Microsoft’s Harman Kard
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Futurity.org
Nanotubes make flexible antennas lighter than copper Carbon nanotube fibers configured as wireless antennas can work as well as copper ones but weigh 20 times less, researchers report. The antennas may offer practical advantages for aerospace applications and wearable electronics where weight and flexibility are factors. The discovery offers more potential applications for the strong, lightweight nanotube fibers developed by the lab of Matteo Pasqu
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Gizmodo
The Walking Dead Is Back and Rick Has Already Messed Up So, So Bad Image: Jackson Lee Davis/AMC. Season eight of The Walking Dead is here, and war has begun. Rick and the Alexandrians, Maggie and Hilltop, and Ezekiel and the Kingdom have banded together to strike the first blow against Negan and Saviors, but it’s no spoiler to say something goes very, very wrong. This is The Walking Dead , after all. “Mercy” is a pretty solid start to the new season, which is he
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fifty simulations of the 'Really Big One' show how a 9.0 Cascadia earthquake could play outThe largest number yet of detailed simulations for how a Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake might play out provides a clearer picture of what the region can expect when the fault unleashes a 9.0 earthquake.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Routes out of isolation for Yellowstone grizzliesAn interagency team of Montana and Wyoming biologists models possible routes to a reunion of the Yellowstone and Northern Continental bear populations through adventurous male immigrants. An influx of genetic diversity through breeding with outsiders could give the Yellowstone grizzly population greater resiliency to changing environmental conditions. They report their results Ecological Society o
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Ingeniøren
Brintbusser var fremtiden ved OL 2010 - og er det stadig i ved OL i 2020Denne gang er det Toyota, som forsøger sig med en brintdrevet bus.
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Ars Technica
Two-week-old Pixel 2 XL displays are already showing burn-in Enlarge / The Pixel 2 XL in all its slim-bezel glory. (credit: Ron Amadeo) The Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL are the best Android phones you can buy, but boy does the 2 XL have a lot of display issues. In addition to graininess and a weird blue shift at certain viewing angles, the 2 XL is now experiencing burn-in on units that are just a week or two old. Android Central was the first to report the issue
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Gizmodo
Google Is Investigating an Issue with the Pixel 2 XL’s Screen It seems the Pixel 2 XL’s off-axis color shift may be just the start of Google’s display woes. (Image: Sam Rutherford/Gizmodo) The screen on Google’s Pixel 2 XL is taking a hammering. First, users noticed how its weird color-shift effect made it look excessively blue when viewed off axis. Then, they saw how the device’s default settings can make images look dull and dreary. But the latest issue w
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New Scientist - News
Narcissists aren’t very conservative but believe in inequalityProbing the views and personalities of 2000 people has found that narcissists don't much care about traditional values, but they are more racially prejudiced
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Key discoveries offer significant hope of reversing antibiotic resistanceTwo recent studies provide significant new hope in the fight against antibiotic resistance. By identifying what makes some bacteria resistant to the most commonly prescribed antibiotics, and how this can be reversed, the findings have demonstrated potentially life-saving consequences and could help reverse the tide of antibiotic resistance.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Birds without own brood help other birds with parenting, but not selflesslyBirds will sometimes care for the offspring of other birds of their own species if they anticipate future benefits. Being tolerated in another bird's territory and the chance to inherit that territory later are considered rewards for which some birds are willing to postpone their own chance of reproduction.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists track ovarian cancers to site of origin: Fallopian tubesSome scientists have suspected that the most common form of ovarian cancer may originate in the fallopian tubes, the thin fibrous tunnels that connect the ovaries to the uterus. Now, results of a study of nine women suggest that the genomic roots of many ovarian tumors may indeed arise in the fallopian tubes, potentially providing insights into the origin of ovarian cancer and suggesting new ways
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Iranian scholar sentenced to death Ahmadreza Djalali, a researcher in disaster medicine, has 20 days to appeal against his death sentence. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22875
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New on MIT Technology Review
Arm Has a Plan to Secure the Internet of Things
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