Science : NPR

$15,500 Reward Offered After Endangered Wolf Shot Dead The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has banded together with five conservation groups to offer a reward for information about the killing of a federally protected gray wolf. (Image credit: ODFW (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife))
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: The Love Fest Continues Today in 5 Lines President Trump told reporters that he did not “specifically” authorize the mission in Niger that resulted in the deaths of four U.S. service members in early October. Trump characterized his meeting with Republican senators on Tuesday as a “love fest” and dismissed criticism from Senators Bob Corker and Jeff Flake. Ivanka Trump visited Capitol Hill to advocate for the expansion
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Feinstein Institute study looks at impact of a popular pre-heart transplant therapy on the kidneyScientists, nephrologists and cardiac surgeons from The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research and Northwell Health's Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiology and Cardio-Thoracic Surgery examined the impact of a popular pre-heart transplant therapy on the kidney in a study published today by The Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.
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The Atlantic

Fats Domino: Remembering a Rock and Roll Pioneer Fats Domino lands near the top of the list in any debate about who invented rock and roll, but in reality, the great pianist and singer’s work demonstrates the futility of searching for a single creator or moment of genesis. Domino, who died Tuesday at 89, was one of the musicians who came from the jazz and blues tradition, added a slightly harder beat and feel to their music, and produced the so
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Live Science

Don't Stick Magnets in Your Nose: Boy's Case Shows RisksMagnets can be dangerous toys for children — if swallowed, they can stick together, creating holes in the body, and lead to a medical emergency.
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Live Science

What Is Leptospirosis? Dozens of Cases Suspected in Puerto RicoDozens of people in Puerto Rico are suspected to have contracted leptospirosis, a bacterial illness, in the wake of Hurricane Maria, and several people have died from the disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Transplanted hematopoietic stem cells reverse damage caused by neuro-muscular disorderResearchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report that a single infusion of wildtype hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) into a mouse model of Friedreich's ataxia (FA) measurably halted cellular damage caused by the degenerative disease.
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The Atlantic

European Mayors Leading the Anti-Trump Charge Mayors aren’t usually as powerful as a national leader, but when it comes to lambasting a head of state, they’ve got the ability to be much more forceful. This week, President Trump got a taste of that force as mayors lobbed criticism at him from across the Atlantic. At the opening plenary of the CityLab Paris summit Monday, Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo praised world leaders committed to tackling cli
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Yellowstone spawned twin super-eruptions that altered global climateA new geological record of the Yellowstone supervolcano's last catastrophic eruption is rewriting the story of what happened 630,000 years ago and how it affected Earth's climate. This eruption formed the vast Yellowstone caldera observed today, the second largest on Earth.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Post-concussion brain changes persist even after pre-teen hockey players return to playYoung hockey players who have suffered concussions may still show changes in the white matter of the brain months after being cleared to return to play, researchers have found through sophisticated Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) techniques.
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Billboard Touts New York As Refuge From Silicon Valley Tech CultureA billboard in the heart of Silicon Valley declaims the evils of the region and touts the virtues of New York.
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cognitive science

A very small insight for 4th dimension w.r.t consciousness submitted by /u/Shivankar_ [link] [comments]
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Popular Science

Concussions make lasting changes to the brain, even after you feel fine Health We don’t know what those changes actually mean. A growing number of studies show that neurological changes linger even after clinical symptoms of a concussion clear up.
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Ars Technica

BMW’s smallest crossover yet: The X2 You used to know where you were with BMW. It made dependable, fun-to-drive sedans, with the occasional foray into GT cars like the 6 and 8 Series. But then the car buying public went mad, and everyone decided they really wanted a wagon. But they wouldn't buy actual wagons, apparently because of the association with mom's station wagon from the '70s. And they wouldn't buy hatchbacks, either, becau
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mimicking biological process, hydrogel signals and releases proteinsAn artificial system using a DNA-laced hydrogel can receive a chemical signal and release the appropriate protein, according to Penn State researchers. Further stimulation by the chemical signal continues to trigger a response.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Post-concussion brain changes persist even after pre-teen hockey players return to playYoung hockey players who have suffered concussions may still show changes in the white matter of the brain months after being cleared to return to play, researchers at Western University have found through sophisticated Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) techniques.
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Science | The Guardian

Skull found in Papua New Guinea was world's 'oldest-known tsunami victim' Skull fragment from coastal site believed to date from 6,000 years ago Scientists say sediments in which bone found bear hallmarks of giant wave A mysterious partial skull unearthed in Papua New Guinea in 1929 that once was thought to belong to an extinct human species now turns out to have another unique distinction. Scientists believe it belongs to the oldest known human tsunami victim. Researc
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Gizmodo

Sorry, Genetically Engineered 'Diet Bacon' Is Still Not a Thing Image: PNAS On Monday, Chinese scientists published a paper heralding a truly remarkable feat: Using the genome-editing technique CRISPR, they created 12 healthy pigs with about 24 percent less body fat than usual. The implications of their research is potentially huge. The pigs have a gene that allows them to better regulate body temperature by burning up fat, which could save farmers millions i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Sink' or swim for salt marshesThe world's coastal ecosystems—areas such as tidal marshes and mangrove forests—have the potential to store and sequester large amounts of carbon, collectively known as blue carbon.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Immune cells help rebuild damaged nervesImmune cells are normally associated with fighting infection but in a new study, scientists have discovered how they also help the nervous system clear debris, clearing the way for nerve regeneration after injury. Researchers have recently shown certain immune cells -- neutrophils -- can clean up nerve debris, while previous models have attributed nerve cell damage control to other cells entirely.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mature B lymphocytes accelerate the healing of diabetic ulcers, other skin injuriesA research team has found a surprising potential solution to a persistent clinical problem -- the healing of chronic wounds. The researchers report that application of mature B lymphocytes -- best known for producing antibodies -- greatly accelerated the healing of acute and chronic wounds in both diabetic and nondiabetic mice.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Women more likely to die in the first year after a heart attackHeart attacks pose a greater threat to women than to men. A team has determined that in the first year after a heart attack women are subject to a significantly higher mortality risk than men with similar case histories. The scientists are urging doctors to provide intensive support to female heart attack patients, above all in the first 365 days after the event.
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Inside Science

Balloon Watches for Sharks and Hurricane Damage Balloon Watches for Sharks and Hurricane Damage Tethered balloons equipped with sophisticated cameras can survey threats and damage from an elevated perspective. Cape-Cod-Aerial-View.jpg Aerial view of Cape Cod shoreline and waters Image credits: Courtesy of Altametry Rights information: This image may be used by news outlets to accompany this Inside Science story. Technology Wednesday, October 2
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A drier south: Europe's drought trends match climate change projectionsOn the same day that global leaders wrapped up an international water and climate summit in Rome, researchers published new findings that suggest European drought trends are lining up with climate change projections.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

This is the lightest robot that can fly, swim and take off from waterLightweight, insect-inspired robot can swim, fly and leap from the surface of water.
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Gizmodo

San Juan Mayor Condemns Fishy Puerto Rican Energy Contract Awarded to Tiny Montana Firm Image via AP San Juan Mayor Carmen Yulín Cruz harshly criticized the recent news that tiny Montana-based firm Whitefish Energy has been awarded a no-bid contract worth hundreds of million of dollars to repair Puerto Rico’s devastated electrical grid. Calling the contract “alarming” in an interview with Yahoo published on Wednesday, Cruz accused the process of having lacked any “due diligence” and
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Ars Technica

Microsoft has stopped making the Kinect, and that makes me sad Microsoft is no longer building any Kinect devices for consoles or PCs, writes Fast Co. Design . Since their 2010 introduction on the Xbox 360 and through major updates for Xbox One and PC , the sensors combined a depth-sensing camera, a regular video camera, and a microphone array into a device that Microsoft hoped would usher in a new wave of games and apps packed with voice and motion-based co
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A drier south: Europe's drought trends match climate change projectionsResearchers published new findings that suggest European drought trends are lining up with climate change projections, pointing to decreases in drought frequency in the north and increases in drought frequency in the south.
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Gizmodo

No, the Famous Windows XP Hill Is Not on Fire As you may have heard, California is recovering after a rash of deadly wildfires that forced a state of emergency in Los Angeles County last month and killed dozens up north. But with tragedy comes hoaxes. And though a jaw-dropping image of men golfing near an inferno in Washington last month was real , claims that the hill from the Windows XP desktop background is burning are a big, fat lie. Las
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Ancient Skull May Be History’s Earliest Known Tsunami VictimThe 6,000-year-old Aitape skull, found in Papua New Guinea in 1929, was excavated from sediments that contain telltale signs of ocean water left behind by a tsunami.
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Gizmodo

Prove To Your Parents That Film Degree Is Worth Something With This $54 Remote Control Dolly GIF Andoer Track Dolly , $54 with code XCKJ8LFL File this one under niche, but really cool. For $54, you get a tiny dolly that can move your GoPro, smartphone, or DSLR around in a circle around a small object, or in a straight line. It comes with a remote, and can move at three different speeds. Now get out there and make the next American Vandal.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Mega-carnivore' dinosaur roamed southern Africa 200 million years agoAn international team of scientists has discovered the first evidence that a huge carnivorous dinosaur roamed southern Africa 200 million year ago.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Can open and honest scientists win public trust?With the increased politicization of science, more and more people continue to be skeptical of research, especially when it comes to hot-button topics such as climate change and vaccines. Now researchers wondered whether it would be better for scientists to acknowledge some of their personal or social values up front when reporting on their studies in order to gain trust.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Blood test can effectively rule out breast cancer, regardless of breast densityVidessa® Breast, a multi-protein biomarker blood test for breast cancer, is unaffected by breast density and can reliably rule out breast cancer in women with both dense and non-dense breast tissue, outlines a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Method of accelerating the maturation of stem cells to form neurons discoveredResearchers have developed a promising technique that will facilitate the differentiation of stem cells into neurons.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Models clarify physics at photocathode surfacesAdvances in materials science have improved the composition of materials used in photocathode production that can operate at visible wavelengths and produce a beam with reduced transverse electron momentum spread; however, the surface roughness of the photocathode continues to limit beam properties. Researchers created computer models to bridge the gap to provide a better picture of the physics at
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How to turn damaged heart tissue back into healthy heart muscle: New details emergeResearchers show how their new research platform helped them discover new cell subpopulations and crucial cellular players in the process of turning damaged heart tissue back into healthy heart muscle. The research platform could be used to study other biological processes and create tailored therapies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Technique offers advance in testing micro-scale compressive strength of cementResearchers have, for the first time, used a 'micropillar compression' technique to characterize the micro-scale strength of cement, allowing for the development of cement with desirable strength properties for civil engineering applications.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New genes on 'deteriorating' Y chromosomeDecoding Y chromosomes is difficult even with latest sequencing technologies. The question which genes lie on the chromosome and where they came from is hotly debated. Using a new analysis method, scientists have made a crucial breakthrough. They showed that genetic material in fruit flies is often transferred to the Y chromosome from other chromosomes. Although largely a result of 'accidents', so
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers find immune cells help rebuild damaged nervesImmune cells are normally associated with fighting infection but in a new study, scientists have discovered how they also help the nervous system clear debris, clearing the way for nerve regeneration after injury. In a study published in the Journal of Neuroscience, researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine showed certain immune cells--neutrophils--can clean up nerve debr
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Ars Technica

Report: Tesla fires hundreds more workers in its SolarCity unit Enlarge (credit: Marufish ) SolarCity, the solar energy company Tesla acquired last year , has fired hundreds of additional workers, according to six anonymous sources who talked to CNBC . These dismissals are in addition to hundreds more that were reported earlier this month , and they are on top of previously announced layoffs, CNBC reports. All told, around 1,200 people at Tesla and SolarCity
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

CRISPR hacks enable pinpoint repairs to genome Precision tools expand the number of ‘base editors’ available for manipulating DNA and RNA. Nature 550 439 doi: 10.1038/550439a
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The US Kaspersky Security Software Ban Needs to Be Backed Up With EvidenceIf the US government is going to ban Kaspersky's software, it owes it to the rest of the world's security to say why.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

T. rex’s silly-looking arms were built for slashingTyrannosaurus rex may have used its small arms for slashing prey.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Sexual Harassment: 4 Psychological Traits of PerpetratorsFrom Clarence Thomas to basically all of Uber to Harvey Weinstein, sexual harassment is as rampant as it is repugnant. This week, Savvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen examines the psychology of... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

6,000-year-old skull could be from the world's earliest known tsunami victimScientists have discovered what they believe is the skull of the earliest known tsunami victim, a person who lived 6,000 years ago in Papua New Guinea. The skull itself was found almost a hundred years ago, but recent analysis of the sediments found with the skull reveals that they bear distinctive hallmarks of tsunami activity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Neuroscientists improve human memory by electrically stimulating brainNeuroscientists have discovered precisely where and how to electrically stimulate the human brain to enhance people's recollection of distinct memories.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Double decker' antibody technology fights cancerScientists have created a new class of antibody-drug conjugates for cancer therapy, outlines a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers engineer complex TCR immunotherapy that may target relapsing leukemiaResearchers have developed a novel way to genetically engineer T cells that may be effective for treating and preventing leukemia relapse. The findings provide the basis for launching a first-in-human clinical trial of this new immunotherapy, which relies on engineered T-cell receptors, or TCRs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

It's all about the mix: Plastic and metal-organic frameworks partner for sensing, storageA marriage between 3-D printer plastic and a versatile hybrid material for detecting and storing gases could lead to inexpensive sensors and fuel cell batteries alike.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Oysters close their shells in response to low-frequency soundsOysters rapidly close their shells in response to low-frequency sounds characteristic of marine noise pollution, according to a study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Does timing of IVF to avoid weekend procedures affects pregnancy success?It's unclear whether there is a need to retrieve a woman's eggs on weekends, in connection with in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmatic sperm injection (IVF/ICSI) treatment in couples wishing to conceive.
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Gizmodo

Nazi Groups Kicked Off Reddit as Next Wave of Community Bans Begins Screenshot: Reddit.com/r/Nazi As of approximately one hour ago, Reddit has begun a wave of new community bans, reminiscent of the culling during interim CEO Ellen Pao’s reign in 2015 that saw a handful of hate-based groups removed from the site. This time, Reddit’s leadership is taking aim at content and groups that incite violence, and the first groups to fall are Nazi and Nazi-sympathizing subr
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Science : NPR

Scientists Work To Overcome Legacy Of Tuskegee Study, Henrietta Lacks An influential Harlem church is trying to help the National Institutes of Health overcome reluctance by some African-Americans to participate in a medical study of 1 million diverse Americans. (Image credit: Elias Williams for NPR)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Haloperidol as adjunctive therapy superior to placebo for acute gastroparesis symptomsHaloperidol is an effective first-line agent in combination with standard analgesic and antiemetic agents for the treatment of gastroparesis in the emergency department.
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Quanta Magazine

Colliding Neutron Stars Could Settle Cosmology’s Biggest Controversy To many cosmologists, the best thing about neutron-star mergers is that these events scream into space an otherwise close-kept secret of the universe. Scientists combined the gravitational and electromagnetic signals from the recently detected collision of two of these stars to determine, in a cleaner way than with other approaches, how fast the fabric of the universe is expanding — a much-contes
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Gizmodo

Kinect, One of Microsoft's Most Revolutionary Ideas, Is Dead, But It Will Live on in iPhone X Image: Microsoft Microsoft has killed off the Kinect seven years after the company first introduced the Xbox accessory that paved the way for 3D-tracking and virtual-assistant technologies that will soon be ubiquitous. But its groundbreaking approach to depth-sensing will live on through several products, including the iPhone X. Fast Company first reported Wednesday morning that Microsoft has cea
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Immigrant parents, refugees face greater mental health challenges; Kids' learning at riskCanadian immigrant parents, refugees, women and minorities are at greater risk of mental health issues and socioeconomic challenges, with their children more likely to suffer learning setbacks before kindergarten, a pair of studies have shown.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Continuous EEG better at identifying oxygen-deprived newborns most at riskContinuously recording the brain's electrical signals and examining how those impulses evolve over time is a more reliable way to identify infants at risk for brain injury, compared with doing snapshot evaluations, according to a prospective cohort study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Flu forecasting tool uses evolution to make earlier predictionsA new flu forecasting tool aims to make better predictions by combining data about how the virus spreads with an estimate of how much the current virus evolved compared to recent years. The new model accurately predicted the total number of cases for each season in the US from 2002 to 2016, and produced an accurate, real-time prediction for the 2016-17 season before it started last year.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Discovery lights path for Alzheimer's researchA newly invented probe that lights up when it binds to a misfolded amyloid beta peptide -- the kind suspected of causing Alzheimer's disease -- has identified a specific binding site on the protein that could facilitate better drugs to treat the disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Scars' left by icebergs record West Antarctic ice retreatThousands of marks on the Antarctic seafloor, caused by icebergs which broke free from glaciers more than ten thousand years ago, show how part of the Antarctic Ice Sheet retreated rapidly at the end of the last ice age as it balanced precariously on sloping ground and became unstable.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Comet mission reveals 'missing link' in our understanding of planet formationThe missing link in our understanding of planet formation has been revealed by the first ever spacecraft to orbit and land on a comet, say scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Machine learning detects marketing and sale of opioids on TwitterUsing advanced machine learning, a cross disciplinary team of researchers developed technology that mined Twitter to identify entities illegally selling prescription opioids online.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Marine microbiology: Scavenging to survive below the seafloorMicroorganisms living in the sediments buried below the seafloor obtain their nutrients by using secreted enzymes to degrade adsorbed detritus. A new study shows that in order to survive for long time scales, microorganisms eat one another after they die.
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New Scientist - News

Oysters can ‘hear’ the ocean even though they don’t have earsThese seemingly oblivious shellfish are highly sensitive to sounds, which could help them monitor incoming tides, hear thunder and spot approaching predators
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New Scientist - News

Oysters can ‘hear’ the ocean even though they don’t have earsThese seemingly oblivious shellfish are highly sensitive to sounds, which could help them monitor incoming tides, hear thunder and spot approaching predators
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New Scientist - News

Light’s quantum weirdness survives after going to space and backPhotons act both like waves and particles, and their dual nature has now been seen even after bouncing them off a satellite in low Earth orbit
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Awesome Kindle Deal: 3 Amazon Kindles On Sale This Week3 Amazon Kindles, including the Paperwhite, are $30 cheaper this week.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Information re-sharing on social network sites in the age of fake newsRecent research, Information Re-Sharing on Social Network Sites in the Age of Fake News, conducted by Dr. Mehrdad Koohikamali, assistant professor in the School of Business at the University of Redlands, and Dr. Anna Sidorova, associate professor of information technology and decision sciences at University of North Texas, looks at resharing behavior on social network sites (SNS) and how the perce
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

A death sentence, Hawking's thesis and China's ambitions The week in science: 20–26 October 2017. Nature 550 434 doi: 10.1038/550434a
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

First living human cells added to brain database Measurements show how neurons behave in healthy living tissue. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22889
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google and Cisco join forces in the cloudGoogle and network equipment maker Cisco on Wednesday partnered to provide businesses services in the internet cloud, joining forces in a market dominated by Amazon and Microsoft.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Can open and honest scientists win public trust?With the increased politicization of science, more and more people continue to be skeptical of research, especially when it comes to hot-button topics such as climate change and vaccines.
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New on MIT Technology Review

What Does Work Look Like in 2026? New Statistics Shine Light on Automation’s Impacts
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Using high-nicotine e-cigarettes may boost vaping and smoking in teensVaping higher concentrations of nicotine is linked to how much and how often teens smoke and vape months later, a new study finds.
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Ars Technica

US Government Accountability Office argues for acting on climate change Enlarge / A recent drought in Texas, which led to agricultural losses, has been tied to our warming planet. (credit: Bob Nichols, USDA ) The US Government Accountability Office is a nonpartisan organization that performs analysis and investigations for the Senate and House. Recently, two senators—Maine Republican Susan Collins and Washington Democrat Maria Cantwell—asked it to look into what has
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Information re-sharing on social network sites in the age of fake newsRecent research, Information Re-Sharing on Social Network Sites in the Age of Fake News, looks at resharing behavior on social network sites (SNS) and how the perception of the three dimensions of information quality -- reliability, relevance, and enjoyment -- could influence users' intention to re-share the content they see on SNSs.
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Scientific American Content: Global

It's Not Just O'Reilly and Weinstein: Sexual Violence Is a "Global Pandemic"The issue transcends national borders and class boundaries to touch the lives of roughly 33 percent of all women worldwide -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Clear talk for first respondersFor first responders, such as firefighters, police officers and emergency medical technicians, a successful outcome to a mission—and perhaps the difference between life and death for them and those they are helping—depends on their communications system. Recognizing this critical need, first responders and emergency management officials have been calling for high-speed, LTE (Long-Term Evolution) c
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ancient skull likely to belong to world's oldest tsunami victimA new geological analysis of the site where a 6000-year old human skull was discovered in Papua New Guinea in 1929 has revealed that the person most likely died in a catastrophic tsunami.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sexual function concerns not always reflected in prostate cancer treatment choicesA study led by UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers found that preference for preserving sexual function was not strongly reflected in the treatment choices of men with low-risk prostate cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UCLA neuroscientists improve human memory by electrically stimulating brainUCLA neuroscientists have discovered precisely where and how to electrically stimulate the human brain to enhance people's recollection of distinct memories.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Method of accelerating the maturation of stem cells to form neurons discoveredResearchers at the University Medical Center of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have developed a promising technique that will facilitate the differentiation of stem cells into neurons.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New property found in unusual crystalline materialsResearchers have discovered an unexpected property of some nanostructured metals, could lead to new ways of 'tuning' their properties.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Investing in conservation pays off, study findsGovernments and donors have spent billions of dollars since the 1992 Rio Earth Summit attempting to slow the pace of species extinctions around the world. Now, a new article provides the first clear evidence that those efforts are working.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Physicists have breakthrough on brittle smart phone screensNew 'potato stamp' technique combining silver and graphene may create cheaper, more flexible and eco-friendly screens.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New RoboBee flies, dives, swims and explodes out the of waterA new, hybrid RoboBee can fly, dive into water, swim, propel itself back out of water, and safely land. Floating devices allow this multipurpose air-water microrobot to stabilize on the water's surface before an internal combustion system ignites to propel it back into the air. This latest-generation RoboBee, which is 1,000 times lighter than any previous aerial-to-aquatic robot, could be used for
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Alvarezsaurid dinosaur from the late Cretaceous found in UzbekistanBones from an Alvarezsaurid dinosaur were discovered in Uzbekistan and could shed light on the evolution and origin of the species, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

First Jurassic ichthyosaur fossil found in IndiaA new near-complete fossilized skeleton is thought to represent the first Jurassic ichthyosaur found in India.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hacking the bacterial social networkScientists have determined the molecular structures of a highly specialized set of proteins that are used by a strain of E. coli bacteria to communicate and defend their turf.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Helicobacter pylori: Dodging the bulletHelicobacter pylori is a widespread bacterial pathogen that infects the lining of the stomach, where it can cause ulcers and even cancer. As a new study shows, its genetic variability complicates efforts to develop an effective vaccine.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New fractal-like concentrating solar power receivers are better at absorbing sunlightEngineers have developed new fractal-like, concentrating solar power receivers for small- to medium-scale use that are up to 20 percent more effective at absorbing sunlight than current technology.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Urologists voice concerns about Opioid dependence in postoperative patientsResearchers investigated to what extent patients who had undergone urological surgery later became opioid dependent or overdosed. Although the overall risk was low (0.09%, about 1 in 1,111 patients), several risk factors for ODO were identified.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Do tanning salons comply with state laws restricting access to minors?Researchers posed as minors to investigate compliance rates in 42 states and the District of Columbia with laws restricting tanning bed use by minors and they report an overall noncompliance rate of 37 percent, according to an article.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Can good design be cost-effective: Team builds massive database of mobile-app designsScroll through your smartphone screen and you'll no doubt see a small sea of apps for everything from watching sports to tracking the movements of the stock market.
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Out of the Syrian crisis, a data revolution takes shape Aid organizations have been piloting a nimble approach to cut through the fog of war. Nature 550 444 doi: 10.1038/550444a
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Viden

Pakkelevering når nye højder: Nu låser Amazon sig selv ind i folks hjemNy Amazon-service giver kureren mulighed for at levere pakker inde i hjemmet, selv når der ikke er nogen hjemme.
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Gizmodo

Here Are All The Cars Reported To Have Exploding Sunroof Problems Photo: Kia Sunroofs on dozens of newer car models from around the world are shattering spontaneously, leaving owners perplexed and seeking answers. But while even experts don’t know entirely why this is happening, we do know which cars are yielding the most complaints to regulatory agencies. Canadian news site Global News writes about a couple driving to a doctor’s appointment with their three-mo
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Precise DNA editing made easy: New enzyme to rewrite the genomeA new type of DNA editing enzyme lets scientists directly and permanently change single base pairs of DNA from A*T to G*C. The process could one day enable precise DNA surgery to correct mutations that cause human diseases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Students fortify concrete by adding recycled plasticBy exposing plastic flakes to small, harmless doses of gamma radiation, then pulverizing the flakes into a fine powder, scientists can mix the plastic with cement paste to produce concrete that is up to 20 percent stronger than conventional concrete.
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Ars Technica

Human water use is draining the world’s saline lakes Enlarge / The two brown, rocky areas near the water's edge used to be islands. (credit: NASA ) Saline lakes, like the Caspian Sea, the Dead Sea, the Salton Sea , and of course the Great Salt Lake, have served as recreational playgrounds and tourist attractions, supported thriving fishing and shipping industries, and yielded minerals to be extracted for commercial and industrial applications. A sl
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Some people with cystic fibrosis might live longer because of genetic mutationsResearch suggests that genetic mutations to an 'epithelial sodium pathway' could protect against cystic fibrosis and its debilitating effects on the lungs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blood test can effectively rule out breast cancer, regardless of breast densityA new study published in PLOS ONE demonstrates that Videssa® Breast, a multi-protein biomarker blood test for breast cancer, is unaffected by breast density and can reliably rule out breast cancer in women with both dense and non-dense breast tissue.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can open and honest scientists win public trust?With the increased politicization of science, more and more people continue to be skeptical of research, especially when it comes to hot-button topics such as climate change and vaccines. Michigan State University researchers wondered whether it would be better for scientists to acknowledge some of their personal or social values up front when reporting on their studies in order to gain trust.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Medicare patients in poorest US counties more likely to incur higher out-of-pocket hospitalization expensesWhen Medicare beneficiaries are admitted to the hospital, their care is normally covered by Part A benefits with a fixed deductible. However, when the hospital stay is 'for observation,' Part B benefits take over, bringing with them cost-sharing and potentially large out-of-pocket expenses. In a study published in The American Journal of Medicine, researchers found that patients in low-income US c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New RoboBee flies, dives, swims and explodes out the of waterA new, hybrid RoboBee can fly, dive into water, swim, propel itself back out of water, and safely land. Floating devices allow this multipurpose air-water microrobot to stabilize on the water's surface before an internal combustion system ignites to propel it back into the air. This latest-generation RoboBee, which is 1,000 times lighter than any previous aerial-to-aquatic robot, could be used for
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Mega-carnivore' dinosaur roamed southern Africa 200 million years agoAn international team of scientists has discovered the first evidence that a huge carnivorous dinosaur roamed southern Africa 200 million year ago.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain tumors share common tricks to surviveDifferent types of brain tumors may use strikingly similar approaches to generate and use energy to survive in the brain.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study shows routine genomic surveillance of MRSA can detect unsuspected outbreaksGenomic surveillance has revealed the first complete picture of MRSA spread across the east of England. Researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine tracked MRSA-positive people and showed the complete picture of MRSA transmission within and between hospitals, and in GPs surgeries and communities. It showed that routine genomic surveilla
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Aitape skull likely belongs to world's oldest tsunami victimNew research from the University of Notre Dame suggests the bone fragment belongs to the world's oldest known tsunami victim -- an important piece in the conversation about how modern populations can adapt to rising sea levels.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

6,000-year-old skull could be from the world's earliest known tsunami victimScientists have discovered what they believe is the skull of the earliest known tsunami victim, a person who lived 6,000 years ago in Papua New Guinea. The skull itself was found almost a hundred years ago, but recent analysis of the sediments found with the skull reveals that they bear distinctive hallmarks of tsunami activity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Invasive species jeopardize already threatened island animalsResearchers have identified which of the approximately 465,000 islands worldwide are home to both highly threatened terrestrial vertebrates and invasive species that may endanger their survival. This distribution map could help conservationists decide how to prioritize prevention, control and eradication.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genome sleuthing tracks the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteriaesearchers tracked the spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) during a one-year period in the East of England, and observed evidence for transmission of the bacteria in the community resulting from clinically unrecognized episodes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ancient skull likely to belong to world's oldest tsunami victimA new geological analysis of the site where a 6000-year old human skull was discovered in Papua New Guinea in 1929 has revealed that the person most likely died in a catastrophic tsunami. The researchers found the place where the Aitape Skull was unearthed was a coastal lagoon that was inundated by a large tsunami about 6000 years ago, similar to the one that struck nearby with such devastating ef
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pharma gifts to providers result in more branded, expensive prescriptionsPhysicians and other health care providers who received 'gifts' from pharmaceutical companies were much more likely to prescribe a higher number of drugs per patient, including more costly prescriptions for branded medicines, compared to prescriptions written by medical providers who did not accept gifts, according to research published in PLOS ONE.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blocking key pathways is a way to defeat cancer stem cellsScientists from the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences in Japan and international collaborators have found that in humanized mice, a cocktail of drugs blocking certain key pathways is effective in eliminating acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a disease which is estimated to kill more than 250,000 people a year around the world.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Want to save 41 percent of the planet's highly threatened vertebrates? Work on islandsNew research discovers that nearly half the Earth's highly threatened vertebrates occur on islands. However, effective management of invasive species, a primary driver of extinctions on islands, could benefit 95 percent of the 1189 threatened island species identified.The paper, published in Science Advances, describes the analysis of a database that maps the global distribution of highly threaten
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Targeting mitochondria in pulmonary hypertensionInvestigators at the University of Alberta and the Imperial College of Medicine have shown that the generic drug, Dichloroacetate (DCA), can decrease the blood pressure in the lungs of pulmonary arterial hypertension patients and improve their ability to walk, without significant side effects at the doses tested.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Flu forecasting tool uses evolution to make earlier predictionsA new flu forecasting tool built by scientists at the University of Chicago aims to make better predictions by combining data about how the virus spreads with an estimate of how much the current virus evolved compared to recent years. The new model accurately predicted the total number of cases for each season in the US from 2002 to 2016, and produced an accurate, real-time prediction for the 2016
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Comet mission reveals 'missing link' in our understanding of planet formationThe missing link in our understanding of planet formation has been revealed by the first ever spacecraft to orbit and land on a comet, say German scientists. The study is published in a recent edition of the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists working toward reversible kind of gene editingScientists are altering a powerful gene-editing technology in hopes of one day fighting diseases without making permanent changes to people's DNA.
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Live Science

Woman's Scalp Was Torn from Her Head in Horrifying AccidentIn an awful accident, a woman in Japan had her entire scalp pulled off her head, according to a new report of the woman's case.
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Scientific American Content: Global

New Gene-Editing "Pencil" Erases Disease-Causing ErrorsThis tool could, in theory, fix genetic mistakes that lead to about 15,000 illnesses -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uber rides into credit card market with no-fee cardUber already has a home on your phone. Now it wants a place in your purse or wallet.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cells' mechanical memory could hold clues to cancer metastasisIn the body, cells move around to form organs during development; to heal wounds; and when they metastasize from cancerous tumors. A mechanical engineer found that cells remember the properties they had in their first environment for several days after they move to another in a process called mechanical memory.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Timing could matter to how responsive cancer cells are to treatmentThe timing of when DNA damage occurs within these different checkpoints matters to a cell’s fate, report scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Now we know why babies shouldn't sleep face downA developmental abnormality in babies -- especially in premature babies and in boys -- has for the first time been directly linked to cases of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Universities should actively support open scholarship, expert urgesUniversities should take action to support the sharing of educational resources, argues author Erin McKiernan. Open scholarship not only benefits society at large, but also fulfills universities' core missions of knowledge dissemination, community engagement, and public good. It may also increase institutions' visibility, funding, and recruitment power, and lead to better learning outcomes.
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Gizmodo

The Most Mind-Boggling 'Sexy' Costumes of Halloween 2017 All images: Yandy Halloween is one week away, and you know what that means: It’s time for the annual collection of utterly confusing Halloween costumes that are meant to be sexy, but are mostly just... confusing. Note: The criteria for inclusion on this list isn’t that the outfit is “slutty.” We’re not going for “all this skin shameful” as much as we are “what is going on here?” Our focus is on c
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New Scientist - News

La Niña forecast may mean even worse Atlantic hurricanes in 2018The Pacific Ocean is likely to enter a La Niña state in the next few months, which could mean a more active Atlantic hurricane season next year
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New Scientist - News

We all get poorer every time a climate disaster strikesLong-term economic effects of global warming could be far greater than thought, making many countries poorer and hurting even those of us spared direct impacts
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New Scientist - News

WHO reverses decision to elect Robert Mugabe as ambassadorThe decision to rescind the appointment of the Zimbabwe president has raised questions over the leadership of the WHO’s first African director general Tedros Adhanom
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New Scientist - News

Dawn spacecraft approved to spend another year studying CeresNASA has extended the mission of the Dawn probe around the icy dwarf planet Ceres. It will dip toward Ceres's surface and study its tenuous atmosphere
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New Scientist - News

Twitter is tightening its rules around online sexual harassmentThe social media company is cracking down on non-consensual upskirt shots and letting the crowd police abuse, but some think the policies are inconsistent
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New Scientist - News

We’ve evolved an even more powerful form of CRISPR gene editingBy evolving an entirely new gene editing enzyme, biologists have created a highly precise tool for changing the code of DNA that should also be safer too
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Ars Technica

Google launches the Android 8.1 Developer Preview Enlarge Google just launched the developer preview of Android 8.1 . The headline feature of the OS update seems to be a new "Neural Networks API" (NNAPI), which Google says "provides apps with hardware acceleration for on-device machine learning operations." "Hardware acceleration" sounds a lot like an API that will make use of the " Pixel Visual Core ," the extra Google-designed SoC present in t
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Yes, Oysters Can ‘Hear.’ They Probably Wish We’d Clam Up.Researchers found shellfish in a tank closed their shells when they heard frequencies similar to noises made by cargo ships and underwater oil exploration.
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NYT > Science

C.D.C. Panel Recommends a New Shingles VaccineGSK’s Shingrix is considered much more effective than the older vaccine, Zostavax. Health officials urged consumers over age 50 to be vaccinated.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Mega-carnivore' dinosaur roamed southern Africa 200 million years agoAn international team of scientists has discovered the first evidence that a huge carnivorous dinosaur roamed southern Africa 200 million year ago.
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The Atlantic

A Victory Against ISIS in the Philippines Leaves a City Destroyed Five months ago, a group of pro-ISIS militants attacked and took control of parts of the southern Philippine city of Marawi. More than 1,000 people have been killed in the siege that has raged since then, as Philippine government troops waged war against the pro-ISIS occupiers—local terrorist groups called the Maute Group and Abu Sayyaf. Airstrikes and thousands of government troops involved in s
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Light’s weird dual nature weathers trip to space and back“Delayed-choice” experiment performed in space reaffirms the idea that light can behave like a wave or a particle.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Continuous EEG better at identifying oxygen-deprived newborns most at riskContinuously recording the brain's electrical signals and examining how those impulses evolve over time is a more reliable way to identify infants at risk for brain injury, compared with doing snapshot evaluations, according to a prospective cohort study led by Children's National Health System research-clinicians.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

It's all about the mixA marriage between 3-D printer plastic and a versatile hybrid material for detecting and storing gases could lead to inexpensive sensors and fuel cell batteries alike.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mature B lymphocytes accelerate the healing of diabetic ulcers, other skin injuriesA Massachusetts General Hospital research team has found a surprising potential solution to a persistent clinical problem -- the healing of chronic wounds. The researchers report that application of mature B lymphocytes -- best known for producing antibodies -- greatly accelerated the healing of acute and chronic wounds in both diabetic and nondiabetic mice.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can good design be cost-effective?Designing apps for maximum utility is mostly a hit or miss process, according to Illinois Computer Science Professor Ranjitha Kumar. There are only limited guides to what works and what doesn't. Kumar would like to change that, and she believes it is possible with the recent release of Rico, a huge database of mobile app designs collected by her and a group of other researchers.
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Gizmodo

Scientists Confirm Light's Crazy Quantum Mechanical Properties in Space Image: Quantum Future Research Group, University of Padova—DEI, Padova, Italy, 2017 Here’s the thing about quantum mechanics: it works on Earth, but how do we know that it works elsewhere—like in space? That requires testing it over and over again, building wild experiments that send particles all over the planet. After some new results, things still seem to check out. A key property of quantum m
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Secure payment without leaving a traceWhether paying for public transport via a smartphone app or whether using a prepaid card for the public swimming pool, many people open 'electronic purses' every day. However, most of them are not aware of the fact that by doing so, they largely lose privacy. Researchers have now developed a secure and anonymous system for daily use.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Looking for errors in a 'black box'Researchers are shining a light into the black box of deep learning systems with DeepXplore, the first automated white-box testing of such systems. Evaluating DeepXplore on real-world datasets, the researchers were able to expose thousands of unique incorrect corner-case behaviors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Weak social ties a killer for male whalesMale killer whales are more likely to die if they are not at the center of their social group, new research suggests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fireworks in spaceSome of the most exciting things that we've seen from looking at gene expression in space is that we really see an explosion, like fireworks taking off, as soon as the human body gets into space.
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Live Science

This 6,000-Year-Old Skull May Be from Earliest Known Tsunami VictimA 6,000-year-old skull found in what is now Papua New Guinea may be the first evidence of a tsunami victim.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Alvarezsaurid dinosaur from the late Cretaceous found in UzbekistanBones from an Alvarezsaurid dinosaur were discovered in Uzbekistan and could shed light on the evolution and origin of the species, according to a study published October 25, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Alexander Averianov of Zoological Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia and Hans-Dieter Sues of the Smithsonian Institution, USA.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Want to save 41 percent of the planet's highly threatened vertebrates? Work on islandsNew research discovers that nearly half the Earth's highly threatened vertebrates occur on islands. However, effective management of invasive species, a primary driver of extinctions on islands, could benefit 95 percent of the 1,189 threatened island species identified.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Oysters close their shells in response to low-frequency soundsOysters rapidly close their shells in response to low-frequency sounds characteristic of marine noise pollution, according to a study published October 25, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Jean-Charles Massabuau from University of Bordeaux, France, and colleagues.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First Jurassic ichthyosaur fossil found in IndiaA new near-complete fossilized skeleton is thought to represent the first Jurassic ichthyosaur found in India, according to a study published October 25, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Guntupalli Prasad from the University of Delhi, India, and colleagues.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Aitape skull likely belongs to world's oldest tsunami victimIn 1929, Australian geologist Paul Hossfeld stumbled upon a partial human skull in a mangrove outside the coastal town of Aitape in Papua New Guinea. Originally thought to belong to Homo erectus, the skull was subsequently dated to the mid-Holocene period, about 6,000 years ago. Now, new research suggests the bone fragment belongs to the world's oldest known tsunami victim—an important piece in th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Secure payment without leaving a trace: Scientists have developed safe protocol to guarantee privacyNo matter whether payment of the public passenger transport ticket is made via a smartphone app or whether a prepaid card is used for the public swimming pool or a bonus card for the supermarket: Many people already open their "electronic purses" every day. However, most of them are not aware of the fact that by doing so, they largely lose privacy. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

French scientists in uproar over changes to medical-research clusters Biomedical-research agency accused of attempting to undermine autonomy of university–hospital groups. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22877
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Scientific American Content: Global

Space-Based Test Proves Light's Quantum WeirdnessLasers bounced off satellites replicate classic “delayed choice” experiment -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Gizmodo

Powerful Lobby Group Wants to Keep AI Unregulated Photo: AP The Information Technology Industry Council (ITI)—a Washington D.C.-based lobby group that boasts Google, Amazon, and Microsoft among its many clients—is telling governments to think twice about establishing laws to regulate AI. But given mounting safety, ethical, and social justice concerns, is that such a good idea? On Tuesday, ITI released its “ AI Policy Principles ,” in which the l
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Viden

Hvem taler: Kan du høre forskel på menneske og maskine?Computerstemmer nærmer sig menneskeligt niveau ved hjælp af kunstig intelligens.
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Science | The Guardian

Medieval love of squirrel fur may have helped spread leprosy, study reveals Skull yields new evidence of link between human and animal leprosy – with red squirrel fur traded with Viking Scandinavia thought to be a factor Scientists have found evidence that the medieval taste for the beautiful fine fur of red squirrels, traded with Viking Scandinavia, may have been a factor in the spread of leprosy. The link between human and animal leprosy had already been suggested when
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New screenings for US-bound passengers on global airlinesFive global long-haul airlines will begin new security interviews of all passengers on U.S.-bound flights starting Thursday at the request of American officials, the companies said Wednesday.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers unveil tool to debug 'black box' deep learning algorithmsResearchers have developed a tool to automatically error-check the thousands to millions of neurons in a deep learning neural network. It works by feeding confusing, real-world inputs into the network to expose rare instances of flawed reasoning by clusters of neurons.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Conservation spending predicts rise and fall of global biodiversityIn the decade after the 1992 Earth Summit, at least $14 billion was devoted to biodiversity conservation around the globe. According to new research published in Nature, it was money well spent, preventing a 29 percent decline in threatened bird and mammal species.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Comet mission reveals 'missing link' in our understanding of planet formationThe missing link in our understanding of planet formation has been revealed by the first ever spacecraft to orbit and land on a comet, say German scientists. The study is published in a recent edition of the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study identifies risk and protective factors for depressive symptoms in African-American menAfrican-American men report an average of eight depressive symptoms in a month, with family support, mastery, self-esteem, chronic stressors and discrimination among the factors that are significant to their psychological health, according to a new study led by researchers at Georgia State University.
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Popular Science

This terrifyingly tentacled moth reminds us that nature is freakier than any nightmare Animals Hard nope. The world is full of great and terrible wonders. These are mostly terrible.
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Gizmodo

Kaspersky Confirms It Downloaded Classified Docs, Blames NSA Contractor’s Dumb Mistake Photo: Associated Press On Wednesday, anti-virus maker Kaspersky Lab continued its defense against accusations that it aided Russian intelligence in stealing classified docs from the NSA. The company released the results of its investigation of the incident and, if the report proves to be accurate, it certainly doesn’t make the NSA look good. Kaspersky’s investigation into the incident follows re
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Live Science

Einstein's Hidden 'Formula' for Happiness Sells for $1.5 MillionTwo advice-filled notes Albert Einstein wrote to a bellboy in Japan 95 years ago, including one that advocated for "a calm and modest life," fetched more than $1.5 million at an auction on Tuesday (Oct. 24).
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NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds

Wait for Trump's science adviser breaks modern-era record Top White House science job stays empty more than nine months after president took office. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22878
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trump OKs test program to expand domestic drone flightsAmericans could see a lot more drones flying around their communities as the result of a Trump administration test program to increase government and commercial use of the unmanned aircraft.
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The Scientist RSS

Base Editing Now Able to Convert Adenine-Thymine to Guanine-CytosineWith the arrival of a new class of single-nucleotide editors, researchers can target the most common type of pathogenic SNP in humans.
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The Scientist RSS

RNA Editing Possible with CRISPR-Cas13Scientists extend the capabilities of the CRISPR-Cas system to include precise manipulations of RNA sequences in human cells.
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Viden

Sprøjteorgasmer: Lidt tis og meget tabuNår kvinder ”sprøjter” ved orgasme, er det meste urin. Accepter det og nyd det, opfordrer sexologisk overlæge.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In Honolulu, it's not okay to cross the street reading a smartphoneIf you're in laid-back Honolulu, be advised that from Wednesday crossing the street with your nose in a smartphone can cost you up to $35.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Machine learning detects marketing and sale of opioids on TwitterUsing advanced machine learning, a cross-disciplinary team of University of California San Diego researchers developed technology that mined Twitter to identify entities illegally selling prescription opioids online.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Helicobacter pylori: Dodging the bulletHelicobacter pylori is a widespread bacterial pathogen that infects the lining of the stomach, where it can cause ulcers and even cancer. As a new study shows, its genetic variability complicates efforts to develop an effective vaccine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Timing could matter to how responsive cancer cells are to treatment, study suggestsIn a new study published in Cell Systems, UNC Lineberger's Jeremy Purvis, Ph.D., and colleagues report that the timing of when DNA damage occurs within these different checkpoints matters to a cell's fate.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Marine microbiology: Scavenging to survive below the seafloorMicroorganisms living in the sediments buried below the seafloor obtain their nutrients by using secreted enzymes to degrade adsorbed detritus. A new study shows that in order to survive for long time scales, microorganisms eat one another after they die.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cells' mechanical memory could hold clues to cancer metastasisIn the body, cells move around to form organs during development; to heal wounds; and when they metastasize from cancerous tumors. A mechanical engineer at Washington University in St. Louis found that cells remember the properties they had in their first environment for several days after they move to another in a process called mechanical memory.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New enzyme rewrites the genomeA new type of DNA editing enzyme, developed in HHMI Investigator David Liu's lab, lets scientists directly and permanently change single base pairs of DNA from A*T to G*C. The process could one day enable precise DNA surgery to correct mutations that cause human diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Investing in conservation pays off, study findsGovernments and donors have spent billions of dollars since the 1992 Rio Earth Summit attempting to slow the pace of species extinctions around the world. Now, a new paper in Nature provides the first clear evidence that those efforts are working.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How to turn damaged heart tissue back into healthy heart muscle: New details emergePublishing their work in Nature, UNC School of Medicine researchers show how their new research platform helped them discover new cell subpopulations and crucial cellular players in the process of turning damaged heart tissue back into healthy heart muscle. The research platform could be used to study other biological processes and create tailored therapies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers extend power of gene editing by developing a new class of DNA base editorsScientists have developed a new class of genome editing tool. This new 'base editor' can directly repair the type of single-letter changes in the human genome that account for approximately half of human disease-associated point mutations. These mutations are associated with disorders ranging from genetic blindness to sickle-cell anemia to metabolic disorders to cystic fibrosis.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Scars' left by icebergs record West Antarctic ice retreatThousands of marks on the Antarctic seafloor, caused by icebergs which broke free from glaciers more than ten thousand years ago, show how part of the Antarctic Ice Sheet retreated rapidly at the end of the last ice age as it balanced precariously on sloping ground and became unstable.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Global biodiversity conservation does save species, but could be done smarterA new analysis reveals that billions of dollars spent on habitat and species conservation worldwide have resulted in substantial reductions in the loss of biodiversity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New frontiers for CRISPR: Editing RNAA new version of the gene editing tool CRISPR can target and edit RNA, scientists report, yielding several advantages over its DNA-editing counterpart.
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Ars Technica

Yet another destination for coal exports to dry up with Italy’s 2025 phase-out Enlarge / GENOA, ITALY - MARCH 15: Coal piles sit in the storage yard at the Genoa port on March 15, 2016 in Genoa, Italy. (Photo by Jacopo Raule/Getty Images) (credit: Getty Images) On Tuesday, Italy’s economic development minister said the country will commit to phasing out coal in its energy mix, ending all use by 2025 according to Argus Media . The country follows the UK, Canada, and France i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Paris city bikes go electricTen years after Paris launched the wildly popular Velib bicycle-sharing scheme, the grey two-wheelers that have spawned imitators worldwide are getting a makeover.
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Gizmodo

Breakthrough Technique Could Revolutionize the Way Scientists Fix Genetic Diseases Image: AP The genome editing technology CRISPR revolutionized genetic engineering by allowing scientists to cut and paste tiny snippets of DNA with more precision than ever before. Now, one of the groups responsible for that technology has harnessed the power of CRISPR to also edit RNA, a molecule that, like DNA, is essential in the coding, regulation, and expression of genes. This development co
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Why thousands of Bittell Reservoir fish are moving homeHundreds of thousands of fish are being taken out of one of the Midlands' largest reservoirs.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

'Incredible' editing of life's building blocksThe studies could lead to new treatments for inherited diseases.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

WaterworldAn exec producer of Blue Planet II reveals why not all of the series was filmed in the wild.
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Big Think

Scientists Propose a Radical Theory About Why the World Has Three Dimensions Scientists propose an out-of-the-box theory about why the world has no more than three dimensions. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Holy Call: Pope Francis phoning space station ThursdayPope Francis is making his first phone call off the planet—and into space.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers extend power of gene editing by developing a new class of DNA base editorsScientists at Harvard University and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard have developed a new class of genome editing tool. This new "base editor" can directly repair the type of single-letter changes in the human genome that account for approximately half of human disease-associated point mutations. These mutations are associated with disorders ranging from genetic blindness to sickle-cell ane
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Scars' left by icebergs record West Antarctic ice retreatThousands of marks on the Antarctic seafloor, caused by icebergs which broke free from glaciers more than ten thousand years ago, show how part of the Antarctic Ice Sheet retreated rapidly at the end of the last ice age as it balanced precariously on sloping ground and became unstable. Today, as the global climate continues to warm, rapid and sustained retreat may be close to happening again, and
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Continuing scourge of microplastics in water to be gauged by new researchA 2015 U.S. federal law banning tiny plastic beads in some exfoliating products left many sources of microplastics unaddressed. Today, microplastics—bits of plastic under 5 millimeters in size—in cosmetics, cleaning products and clothes still pollute U.S. waters and build up in oceans.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers engineer CRISPR to edit single RNA letters in human cellsThe Broad Institute and MIT scientists who first harnessed CRISPR for mammalian genome editing have engineered a new molecular system for efficiently editing RNA in human cells. RNA editing, which can alter gene products without making changes to the genome, has profound potential as a tool for both research and disease treatment.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Investing in conservation pays off, study findsGovernments and donors have spent billions of dollars since the 1992 Rio Earth Summit attempting to slow the pace of species extinctions around the world. Now, a new paper in Nature provides the first clear evidence that those efforts are working.
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Feed: All Latest

Single Base Editing Could Sharpen Crispr's Genetic ScalpelCrispr-Cas9's off-target effects can rewire DNA the wrong way. A new class of more targeted gene editors could help.
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The Atlantic

Is It Possible to Predict the Next Pandemic? It’s been two years since an epidemic of Zika began in Brazil, three since the largest Ebola outbreak in history erupted in West Africa, eight since a pandemic of H1N1 flu swept the world, and almost a hundred since a different H1N1 flu pandemic killed 50 million people worldwide. Those viruses were all known, but no one knew when or where they’d trigger epidemics. Other diseases, like SARS, MERS
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Science | The Guardian

'Chemical surgery' can correct genetic mutations behind many diseases – study Fresh DNA base editing breakthrough brings hope of potential treatment for huge number of diseases that arise as a result of a single genetic ‘misspelling’ A breakthrough in “chemical surgery” that can correct a type of genetic mutation behind a host of diseases has been unveiled by researchers. Scientists are hopeful that the approach could offer new ways to understand – and even one day tackle
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Ingeniøren

Forskernes nye gen-værktøj: Nu kan de ændre basepar og bekæmpe langt flere sygdommeEn ny variant af genredigeringsteknikken Crispr, der let kan rette punktmutationer i gener, viser lovende resultater - faktisk så gode, at nogle forskere allerede nu taler om faren ved at benytte den på fostre.
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Ars Technica

Apple calls report of reduced iPhone X Face ID specs “completely false” Enlarge Apple lowered the specifications for the components that make up the iPhone X’s Face ID sensor to help its supply chain manufacture the upcoming phone faster, according to a new Bloomberg report , but Apple has publicly denied the claim. The report generally highlights the struggles with Apple’s new facial recognition system during the iPhone X manufacturing process. It says the company g
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New on MIT Technology Review

CRISPR 2.0 Is Here, and It’s Way More PreciseIt could one day be used to treat a range of inherited diseases.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

New CRISPR gene editors can fix RNA and DNA one typo at a timeNew gene editors can correct common typos that lead to disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New software lets your car tell you what it needsNew software could tell drivers when their cars need a tuneup, a new air filter, wheel balancing or a tire replacement, just by using a smartphone.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Side-effect after antibiotics: Bacterial toxins can be made in the gutYou get an infection, you are given penicillin -- and then you could get hemorrhagic diarrhea. This rare but extremely unpleasant side reaction can be related to the enterotoxin tilivalline produced by a regular intestinal bacterium. Scientists have now scrutinized the toxin's biosynthetic pathway.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Previous screening results important for decision about smear tests after age 60Being screened again after the age of 60 reduces the risk of cervical cancer in women who have previously had abnormal smear tests and in women who did not have smear tests in their 50s, researchers show. Their study is important for setting guidelines on the age at which screening can be discontinued.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Deforestation linked to palm oil production is making Indonesia warmer, study findsIn the past decades, large areas of forest in Sumatra, Indonesia, have been replaced by cash crops like oil palm and rubber plantations. New research shows that these changes in land use increase temperatures in the region. The added warming could affect plants and animals and make parts of the country more vulnerable to wildfires.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Excessive Summertime Heat Is Rising across the U.S.Two thirds of Americans have endured more days of extreme summer heat over the past 10 years -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Viden

Spidsmusen skrumper sin hjerne efter sæsonHjerne, kranie, rygsøjle og indre organer skrumper, så spidsmusen kan overleve vinteren.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Broad experience a double-edged sword for entrepreneurs seeking investors, study showsPrior studies have shown that having a wealth of experience is beneficial for entrepreneurs seeking investors. But whether venture capitalists look favorably on a wide breadth of founder experience depends on their perception of the market environment, according to new research from the University of Notre Dame.
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Ars Technica

The Pixel 2’s custom camera SoC uses Intel technology (credit: Ron Amadeo/Intel) Google's Pixel 2 smartphone doesn't just have one of the best smartphone cameras ever; it also has custom silicon dedicated to the camera that isn't even active yet. Besides the Snapdragon 835, the Pixel 2 has a whole other SoC for image processing called the "Pixel Visual Core." The chip represents Google's first-ever consumer SoC, but Google didn't build the chip on i
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Amazon Key and Cloud Cam: Price, Specs, DetailsAmazon Cloud Cam and Amazon Key ($250) literally open your home to strangers.
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Science : NPR

Scientists And Surgeons Team Up To Create Virtual Human Brain Cells By rushing live brain cells from the operating room to the lab, scientists have been able to create three-dimensional reconstructions of cells that reveal their electrical behavior and shape. (Image credit: Allen Institute)
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The Atlantic

Why Do We Need Separate Chicken-Pox and Shingles Vaccines? For most of the time that humans have walked on Earth and scratched at itchy, red rashes, there was no reason to think chicken pox and shingles are related. They look so different. Chicken pox usually strikes small children. It manifests as red bumps, eventually distributed over the whole body. In the 18th century, a German doctor dubbed chicken pox “varicella,” a diminutive of his name for small
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Immigrant parents, refugees face greater mental health challenges; kids' learning at riskCanadian immigrant parents, refugees, women and minorities are at greater risk of mental health issues and socioeconomic challenges, with their children more likely to suffer learning setbacks before kindergarten, a pair of studies by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto have shown.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New property found in unusual crystalline materialsResearchers at MIT and elsewhere discover an unexpected property of some nanostructured metals, could lead to new ways of 'tuning' their properties.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The psychological toll of shame in military personnelFeelings of shame may make the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) more severe in current and former members of the Armed Services.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study indicates home monitoring effectively detects potentially fatal fetal heart issuesAs reported in the Journal of Perinatology, researchers from Children's Hospital Colorado recently confirmed that it is feasible for at-risk pregnant women to use commercially available Doppler fetal heart rate monitors for home monitoring to detect heart arrhythmias in their developing fetuses.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Secure payment without leaving a traceWhether paying for public transport via a smartphone app or whether using a prepaid card for the public swimming pool: Many people open 'electronic purses' every day. However, most of them are not aware of the fact that by doing so, they largely lose privacy. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have developed a secure and anonymous system for daily use.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pilot study shows fluorescent imaging with antibody safely used in glioblastoma patientsIn its first test in humans, the antibody cetuximab proved to be safe and feasible for infrared fluorescent imaging of tumors during brain surgery.
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Ars Technica

How lobbyists convinced lawmakers to kill a broadband privacy bill Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Thomas Jackson) When a California state legislator proposed new broadband privacy rules that would mirror the federal rules previously killed by Congress , broadband industry lobbyists got to work. The lobbyists were successful in convincing the state legislature to let the bill die without passage last month, leaving Internet users without stronger rules protectin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA finds heavy rain, wind shear and towering clouds in Tropical Storm SaolaNASA satellites have provided various views of Tropical Storm Saola as it tracks toward Japan in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The GPM and Suomi NPP satellites found heavy rainfall, towering thunderstorms and a tropical cyclone still being affected by vertical wind shear.
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Gizmodo

Everything You Need to Remember Before You See Thor: Ragnarok All Images: Disney Thor: Ragnarok is the third film in the God of Thunder’s franchise, the fifth film in Marvel Phase Three, and the 17th film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. So even though it’s something of a stand-alone story, you could probably still use a refresher on everything that’s happened in the MCU that leads into the movie—and the mythological event that spells not just the end of A
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New software lets your car tell you what it needsImagine hopping into a ride-share car, glancing at your smartphone, and telling the driver that the car's left front tire needs air, its air filter should be replaced next week, and its engine needs two new spark plugs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Novel catalyst for rechargeable metal-air batteriesScientists have introduced a novel catalyst to accelerate the commercialization of metal-air batteries. The new catalyst possesses the structure of nanofiber-based perovskite materials and exhibits excellent electrochemical performance, close to that of today's precious metal catalysts, yet it is still inexpensive.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why arched backs are attractiveResearchers have provided scientific evidence for what lap dancers and those who twerk probably have known all along -- men are captivated by the arched back of a woman. A team used 3-D models and eye-tracking technology to show how the subsequent slight thrusting out of a woman's hips can hold a man's gaze.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why Alzheimer's drugs work in the lab but not in patientsScientists have found that some potential gamma-secretase inhibitors such as semagacestat, which have been used in large clinical trials that ended in failure, do not function as true inhibitors as originally expected, but rather cause accumulation of toxic intraneuronal amyloid-beta. They proved this by introducing an original method to measure direct intracellular products of gamma-secretase. Th
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Non-native species do not make native fish more vulnerable to pollution in Mediterranean riversThe presence of exotic fish in rivers does not alter the native fish response to the environmental pollution, according to an article.
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Ars Technica

US states, cities moving to restrict vaping Enlarge (credit: Tolga Akmen/Getty Images) Citing public health risks, New York is banning vaping in public indoor places—which is already the case for traditional cigarettes. The new law , following a host of similar regulations tied to e-cigarettes across the nation, kicks in next month after Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed legislation Monday. "These products are marketed as a healthier alternative to
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The Atlantic

Jeff Flake Lays Another Straw on the Camel's Back “Why didn’t he do it before?” “Why doesn’t he stay and fight?” “Why does he still vote with the president on taxes and judges?” Those are the questions asked when a Republican official breaks with President Trump. They are fair questions too, as far as they go, and they will only become fairer over time. October 2017 is already late to recognize Donald Trump for what he is and what he is doing, a
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The Atlantic

Using AI to Find a Cosmic Looking Glass Imagine you’re Edwin Hubble in 1923, about to prove that the Milky Way is just one galaxy in a universe filled with them. You have just spotted a faraway variable star. You write down a note about that star on a photographic plate: “VAR!” Or imagine it’s 1977, and you’re reading a printout from a radio telescope that listens for aliens, red pen in hand, when you find a long, strange, still-unexpl
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The Scientist RSS

LabQuiz: Is Your Way the PCR Highway?The road to PCR was paved... with pavement.
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Live Science

Was Chilean Poet Pablo Neruda Murdered?Forensic scientists rejected cancer as Pablo Neruda's immediate cause of death, which may fuel speculations that the Chilean poet was assassinated.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Not at home? Amazon wants to come in and drop off packagesWould you let a stranger in your house to drop off a package? Amazon hopes so.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds 3 million Americans carry a loaded handgun dailyApproximately 9 million handgun owners in the United States carry loaded handguns on a monthly basis, while 3 million report carrying on a daily basis.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA finds heavy rain, wind shear and towering clouds in Tropical Storm SaolaNASA satellites have provided various views of Tropical Storm Saola as it tracks toward Japan in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The GPM and Suomi NPP satellites found heavy rainfall, towering thunderstorms and a tropical cyclone still being affected by vertical wind shear.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pesky pollutants that persist, courtesy of natureIn the late 1970s, the United States banned the production of an assortment of synthetic pesticides, insulators, coolants and flame retardants due to their toxicity and the fact that they stick around for a long time. But according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, nature makes compounds similar to these toxic human-made
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Ars Technica

Bungie denies reports that innocuous apps led to PC Destiny 2 bans [Updated] That arrow better not inject any outside code into Destiny 2 ... Update: In addition to the denials mentioned below, Bungie has put out a sweeping statement on what it says were 400 bans issued to PC Destiny 2 players since the game's launch yesterday. All of those bans, the company said, were enacted after a manual investigation that determined players "were using tools that pose a threat to the
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Scientific American Content: Global

A Start-Up Wants to Calm You Down with a Cardiac Drug You Pop Like a MintA company called Kick wants to market to the masses a heart medication that would be used for reversing stage fright. Some medical professionals are getting agitated -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Role of gut microbiome in posttraumatic stress disorder: More than a gut feelingThe bacteria in your gut could hold clues to whether or not you will develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after experiencing a traumatic event.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Living close to green spaces is associated with better attention in childrenHow do green spaces affect cognitive development in children? A new study concludes that children with more greenness around their homes may develop better attention capacities.
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New Scientist - News

A 300-kilometre space rock has vanished since we saw it in 1995Don’t feel so bad for losing your keys. Astronomers somehow lost a huge space rock first seen 22 years ago – and it’s far from the first cosmic object to go missing
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