Feed: All Latest
What Did Cambridge Analytica Really Do for Trump's Campaign?News that Cambridge Analytica CEO sought Wikileaks help on Clinton emails amplifies questions about firm's role in Trump campaign.
21min
Ars Technica
Inspired by brain’s visual cortex, new AI utterly wrecks CAPTCHA security Enlarge / A representation of how physically close feature recognition units are built hierarchically to create an object hypothesis. (credit: Vicarious AI) Computer algorithms have gotten much better at recognizing patterns, like specific animals or people's faces, allowing software to automatically categorize large image collections. But we've come to rely on some things that computers can't do
57min
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Party Lines What We’re Following Presidential Priorities: President Trump declared the opioid crisis a national public-health emergency in a speech that showed compassion for those struggling with addiction and outlined additional recommendations made by his commission on opioids. The declaration will grant more flexibility for state and federal resources to be used to address addiction, but will make few ad
3min

LATEST

EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Should keeping reptiles and amphibians as pets be restricted?Keeping exotic pets, such as reptiles and amphibians, has become increasingly popular, but concerns over public health and safety, animal welfare and conservation have sparked debate. Several articles published by Veterinary Record today analyze arguments for and against the growing trade in -- and keeping of -- reptiles and amphibians.
19min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sharp rise in children admitted to intensive care in England and Wales since 2009The number of children admitted to intensive care in England and Wales has risen sharply since 2009, but is not explained by either population growth or the rising birth rate, finds research published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.However, this trend will put further strain on an already overstretched NHS, warn the researchers.
18min
Science | The Guardian
Afternoon heart surgery has lower risk of complications, study suggests Heart attacks and heart failure less common in patients having heart operations in the afternoon as opposed to the morning, say researchers Patients undergoing open heart surgery in the afternoon have a lower risk of potentially fatal complications than those undergoing operations in the morning, new research suggests. The study found that events including heart attacks and heart failure were les
24min
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
The Kilchers Spring Into Action As A Chimney Fire Threatens Otto And Charlotte's Home #AlaskaTLF | Sundays at 9p Otto throws himself into the heart of the hearth to save his family's home. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/alaska-the-last-frontier/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Check out The Last Frontier live cams: http://bit.ly/alaskalivecams Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlaskaTLF https://www.facebook.com
1h
Feed: All Latest
Torn Between the iPhone X vs iPhone 8? Psychologists Have a Name for ThatIf you're an Apple fan, you're probably hemming and hawing between the iPhone 8 and the iPhone X. Here's why.
1h
The Atlantic
Confusion in Catalonia If anyone was expecting clarity on the fate of Catalonia’s independence bid from the Catalan president’s scheduled address on Thursday—or indeed clarity on the direction of Spain’s 40-year-old democracy—they didn’t get it. But by this point in the drama, which is stretching into the fourth week since the Spanish region held and passed an independence referendum declared unconstitutional, inconsis
1h
New on MIT Technology Review
How Tweets Translate into VotesTwitter can’t win you an election, right? Wrong, say political scientists who have measured its effect for the first time.
1h
Gizmodo
The 10 Best Deals of October 26, 2017 We see a lot of deals around the web over on Kinja Deals , but these were our ten favorites today. Head over to our main post for more deals, and follow us on Twitter and Facebook to never miss a chance to save. You can also join our Kinja Deals Community Facebook group to connect with your fellow deal hunters. #1: Last Chance to Save on Super Mario Odyssey Super Mario Odyssey , $48 for Prime Mem
1h
Scientific American Content: Global
Astronomers Spot First-Ever Space Rock from Another StarAs it departs the inner solar system, scientists are racing to study the object before it fades from view -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Gizmodo
The Rumor That Amazon Will Sell Prescription Drugs Just Got Serious Photo: Getty The St. Louis Dispatch just dropped a helluva news nugget . Citing public records, the paper reports that Amazon “has gained approval to become a wholesale distributor from a number of state pharmaceutical boards.” That might mean that Amazon wants to sell prescription drugs. Then again, it might not. These public records show that Amazon has already received approval for wholesale p
1h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: ‘We Cannot Allow This to Continue’ Today in 5 Lines President Trump declared the opioid crisis a national public-health emergency, saying in a speech that “as Americans, we cannot allow this to continue.” The House passed the Senate’s version of the 2018 budget resolution, setting in motion Republicans’ tax-reform plan. MSNBC said political reporter Mark Halperin would leave his role as a contributor at the network, after five wom
1h
Science : NPR
Scientists Spot First Alien Space Rock In Our Solar System Astronomers are eager to learn more about the visitor as it zooms through, like how far-off planets form: "You'd love to see if it looks like stuff in our solar system." (Image credit: Brooks Bays / SOEST Publication Services / UH Institute for Astronomy)
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Seven Los Alamos scientists honored as APS FellowsSeven scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory were tapped this year as new Fellows of the American Physical Society (APS), a significant honor for the Laboratory and its people. The honorees are Christopher J. Fontes, Han Htoon, Toshihiko Kawano, John W. Lewellen, Laura Beth Smilowitz, Stuart A. Trugman and Vivien Zapf.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Global trade entrenches poverty trapsA theorem published this week suggests that greater engagement in the international exchange can actually reinforce productivity-impeding practices that keep countries in poverty.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Kidney transplantation may prolong the survival of patients on long-term dialysisIn a recent analysis of individuals on dialysis for at least 10 years, those who then received a kidney transplant lived longer than those who stayed on dialysis. Transplant recipients were at higher risk of death for 180 days after transplantation, however, and they did not derive survival benefit until 657 days after transplantation.
1h
Ars Technica
Bloodhound SSC finally runs, breaks 210mph in first runway test Bloodhound SSC On Tuesday, what might well be the world's fastest-ever car completed its first public test at a runway in Newquay, England. Bloodhound SSC is designed to shatter the existing land speed record , aiming for a top speed of over 1,000 mph (1,600km/h). Achieving that goal will require more space than is possible on a runway in the UK, but today's shakedown test saw RAF Wing Commander
1h
Ars Technica
Doctors warn new parents: Step away from the vaginal fluid swabs Enlarge (credit: Getty | BSIP ) To slather, or not to slather—that is the question that has been roiling doctors, scientists, and new parents recently. And a new ruling by a doctor’s group stands to muck up the debate further. Amid the birth of microbiome research, some scientists have advocated for smearing bacteria-laden vaginal secretions on any newborns who missed out—namely those born via Ca
1h
The Atlantic
What's Still Missing From Trump's Plan to Tackle the Opioid Crisis “Together, we will face this challenge as a national family.” On Thursday, President Trump gave a forceful—and at times surprising—speech outlining the White House’s new response to the opioid crisis and the announcement of a national public health emergency. The speech, delivered in tandem with a speech from First Lady Melania Trump to survivors of drug abuse, at times featured uncharacteristic
1h
Gizmodo
Saudi Arabia's Robot Love Is Getting Weird Image: Hanson Robotics / YouTube In the latest example of “Philip K Dick-inspired nightmare becomes real life,” Saudi Arabia just became the first nation to grant citizenship to a robot . The robot’s name is Sophia. It is artificially intelligent, friends with CNBC’s Andrew Ross Sorkin, and, arguably, a glimpse into the dark future that will kill us all. You see, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has b
1h
Big Think
The Jealousy Brain Circuit Has Been Discovered in Monkeys. Here’s What It Means for Us. The results of this study could have implications for autism, addiction, and domestic violence. Read More
1h
Ars Technica
Singing, racing, and sporty electric cars dominate Nissan’s Tokyo Motor Show Thank Tesla, blame Dieselgate: whatever the reason, the fact remains that the auto industry is finally taking electrification seriously. And Nissan has been doing it better—and longer—than most when it comes to electric vehicles. On sale since 2010, the Leaf is the world's best-selling EV. Now in its second generation , there's a long-range version in the works scheduled for 2019. There might als
2h
The Atlantic
Arpaio Tells Bannon He Wants to Head the Marshal's Service FOUNTAIN HILLS, Ariz.—Almost as soon as Senator Jeff Flake announced that he would not seek reelection, reporters began calling Joe Arpaio. As Flake took a stand against Trumpism, Frank Sinatra’s “My Way” blared from the former Maricopa County Sheriff’s flip phone, the song Trump danced to at his Inauguration. All day, reporters called to ask if he could he win Flake’s seat. “Of course,” said Arp
2h
New on MIT Technology Review
Why Artificial Intelligence Should Be More Canadian
2h
Science | The Guardian
Spacewatch: gas fuelled rocket 'a step further' to sending crew to Mars Blue Origin test-fires rocket engine that scientists expect to take on extra methane made in space – so solving the dilemma of how to return home from the red planet Blue Origin, the US private space launch company, has successfully test fired the world’s most powerful methane-burning rocket engine. Rockets such as this, fuelled by natural gas, will be essential for the first crewed missions to M
2h
Big Think
Addictive Behavior Isn’t Just for Addicts. We’re All Hooked. Infographics that show how we’re all addicted to something. Read More
2h
Dana Foundation
Inside the Mind of a Bully A student pushes his classmate on the playground. An employee makes rude comments to a coworker. One sister pulls the other sister’s hair. We’ve all experienced or witnessed bullying in our lives, but what makes someone bully? What are the effects of bullying? The theme of the 2017 public lecture at Mount Sinai, sponsored by The Friedman Brain Institute and Mentoring in Neuroscience Discovery at
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New targets for anti-malaria drugsThe deadliest malaria parasite needs two proteins to infect red blood cells and exit the cells after it multiplies, a finding that may provide researchers with potential new targets for drug development, according to researchers.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Assaults decrease by 3 percent the Monday after Daylight SavingAssaults decrease by 3 percent the Monday after the switch to Daylight Saving Time in the spring. In the fall, the opposite takes place, with violence rising by about the same percentage.
2h
Popular Science
The coloring of a raccoon-eyed dinosaur could reveal its habitat Animals Now we can understand more about dinosaurs’ environments based on their appearance. This particular dinosaur had a dark back, a striped tail, and a lighter underbelly that ended quite high up on the dino’s sides. Oh, and a mask.
2h
The Atlantic
Climate Policy Can Help Avert Modern Liberalism’s “Doom Loop” What new responsibilities should a rich and liberal democracy take on in the 21st century? If you ask almost any American progressive, they will talk about the need to regulate greenhouse-gas emissions and lessen the blow of climate change. Lately, a growing number of conservatives have glommed onto another policy. They suggest that such a democracy should also be pronatalist: It should take chil
2h
New Scientist - News
Mussel-inspired plastic could make self-repairing body armourMussels grip onto rock using stretchy fibres with self-repairing molecular bonds. Mimicking the trick has inspired an extremely tough and elastic new material
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Computational simulations suggest multiple sclerosis is a single diseaseNew research supports the idea that multiple sclerosis (MS), which has widely varying symptoms and progression in different patients, is nonetheless a single disease with common underlying mechanisms.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Manipulating mitochondrial networks could promote healthy agingManipulating mitochondrial networks inside cells -- either by dietary restriction or by genetic manipulation that mimics it -- may increase lifespan and promote health, according to new research.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pregnancy poses no greater risk to breast cancer survivorsA recent study indicates that pregnancy does not incur a greater risk of relapse for survivors of breast cancer.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Discovery of a potential therapeutic target to combat trypanosomesUsing cryo-electron microscopy, researchers have analyzed the structure of trypanosomes parasites in details and revealed one of their potential weak points, which has remained undetected until now. This discovery opens the path to the development of new safer therapies that are less toxic and more specific against trypanosomes, the parasites causing the Chagas disease and the African sleeping sic
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Junk food almost twice as distracting as healthy foodWhen we haven't eaten, junk food is twice as distracting as healthy food or non-food items.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Bandit-masked' feathered dinosaur hid from predators using multiple types of camouflageResearchers have revealed how a small feathered dinosaur used its color patterning, including a bandit mask-like stripe across its eyes, to avoid being detected by its predators and prey.
2h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
The awful logic of land mines -- and an app that helps people avoid them | Carlos BautistaFifty years of armed conflict in Colombia has left the countryside riddled with land mines that maim and kill innocent people who happen across them. To help keep communities safe from harm, TED Resident Carlos Bautista is developing an app to track land mines -- and direct travelers away from them. Learn more about how this potentially life-saving tool could promote peace in countries plagued by
2h
Science : NPR
AI Model Fundamentally Cracks CAPTCHAs, Scientists Say The report says the model has defeated tests used to tell humans from bots. It uses reasoning to explain the jumbled letters. (Image credit: Vicarious AI)
2h
Latest Headlines | Science News
New dinosaur sported a curious set of chompersMatheronodon provincialis, a newly described dinosaur, munched on tough plants with big scissors for teeth.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Does population size affect rates of violence?A new article in Current Anthropology argues small-scale societies are likely to be victims, rather than perpetrators, of violence
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is Alzheimer's disease a disorder of energy metabolism?McLean Hospital researchers found a connection between disrupted energy production and the development of late-onset Alzheimer's disease.
2h
Live Science
How Do You Make a Conscious Robot?You've likely heard of conscious thought and subconscious thought, but humans may in fact possess three levels of consciousness, a new review suggests — and this concept could help scientists develop truly conscious artificial intelligence (AI) someday.
2h
Big Think
An Ambitiously Short History of Ambition (via Shakespeare & Aliens) It is said that we still love Shakespeare because his characters enacted universal features of human nature. But what should we make of the fact that he found fault in ambition, while we don't now (mostly). Noticing that gap can offer some universal history lessons. Read More
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Envisioning a new engineering field: Understanding atomic-scale patternsThe phenomenon that forms interference patterns on television displays when a camera focuses on a pattern like a person wearing stripes has inspired a new way to conceptualize electronic devices. Researchers are showing how the atomic-scale version of this phenomenon may hold the secrets to help advance electronics design to the limits of size and speed.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Preventing a form of hereditary hearing lossA research advance may stop the progression of hearing loss and lead to significant preservation of hearing in people with Usher syndrome type III, a form of hereditary hearing loss linked to defects in the sensory "hair" cells in the inner ear. USH3 is caused by a mutation in the clarin-1 gene.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Global road-building explosion could be disastrous for people and nature, say scientistsThe global explosion of new roads is rife with economic, social, and environmental dangers, according to a new study.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First close-ups of finger-like growths that trigger battery firesScientists have captured the first atomic-level images of finger-like growths called dendrites that can pierce the barrier between battery compartments and trigger short circuits or fires. Dendrites and the problems they cause have been a stumbling block on the road to developing new types of batteries that store more energy so electric cars, cell phones, laptops and other devices can go longer be
3h
Ars Technica
Hulu’s Runaways may actually do justice to the brilliant comics A preview for the first season of Hulu's The Runaways shows us that our heroes are fighting the scariest bad guys of all: parents. When Marvel debuted Runaways back in 2003, it took the superhero genre in a compelling new direction. Not only did it have teenage characters who were more than sidekicks or mini versions of adults, but it also upped the stakes by pulling a Game of Thrones and killing
3h
Gizmodo
God Creates Dinosaurs. God Destroys Dinosaurs. God Creates Man. Man Buys Poster. Dinosauria Poster , $30 with code SALEONTOLOGY You were so preoccupied with whether or not you could buy this poster for 20% off with code SALEONTOLOGY that you didn’t stop to think if you should. Hold on to your butts.
3h
Ars Technica
Days after activists sued, Georgia’s election server was wiped clean Enlarge / Georgia voters at a voting machine during the US presidential election at the Athens-Clarke County Fleet building in Athens, Georgia on November 8, 2016. (credit: TAMI CHAPPELL/AFP/Getty Images) A server and its backups, believed to be key to a pending federal lawsuit filed against Georgia election officials, was thoroughly deleted according to e-mails recently released under a public r
3h
Gizmodo
Georgia Wiped Its Election Server While Advocates Fought for Security Investigation Supporters watch returns come in on their phones while attending the election night party of Democratic candidate for 6th congressional district Jon Ossoff in Atlanta, Tuesday, June 20, 2017. (AP Photo/David Goldman) A server that held data central to Georgia’s elections was wiped this summer, destroying the potential for a forensic investigation to determine whether or not the server was comprom
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why insects can develop from unfertilized egg cellsA scientist from the Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Biology, has, together with his Russian colleague, explained frequent occurrence of parthenogenesis -- development of organisms from unfertilized egg cells -- in insects. Studying this phenomenon is needed to successfully control species that cause damage to agriculture. The results were published in the Journal of Zoological Syste
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Proposed NASA mission employs 'lobster-eye' optics to locate source of cosmic ripplesA novel optics system that mimics the structure of a lobster's eyes would enable a conceptual Explorer-class mission to precisely locate, characterize, and alert other observatories to the source of gravitational waves, which are caused by some of the most powerful events in the universe.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers look to patterns to envision new engineering fieldThe phenomenon that forms interference patterns on television displays when a camera focuses on a pattern like a person wearing stripes has inspired a new way to conceptualize electronic devices. Researchers at the University of Illinois are showing how the atomic-scale version of this phenomenon may hold the secrets to help advance electronics design to the limits of size and speed.
3h
New on MIT Technology Review
This AI Technique Was Kept Quiet so Spammers Wouldn’t Misuse It
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA finds winds shear still affecting Tropical Storm SaolaNASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite and NASA's Aqua satellite imagery showed wind shear was still affecting Tropical Storm Saola.as it moved through the Philippine Sea.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists detect comets outside our solar systemScientists, working closely with amateur astronomers, have spotted the dusty tails of six exocomets -- comets outside our solar system -- orbiting a faint star 800 light years from Earth.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The Bakhshali manuscript: The world's oldest zero?Last month, the Bodleian Library at Oxford University announced that a Sanskrit manuscript housed in the library for the last century contains the oldest known written zero, although not a 'true' zero. An international group of historians of Indian mathematics has now challenged those findings.
3h
Ars Technica
Apple will invest $1 billion in TV, but don’t expect Game of Thrones Enlarge (credit: Apple) According to Bloomberg , Apple is taking a markedly different path with its streaming TV series than the likes of HBO Now or Showtime. The sources for the report—which include Hollywood producers and other industry insiders who have met with the company in recent months—paint a picture of a very conservative corporation making slow progress. They say that Apple has express
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Case Western Reserve research advance may prevent a form of hereditary hearing lossA research advance co-led by Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine's Kumar Alagramam, PhD, may stop the progression of hearing loss and lead to significant preservation of hearing in people with Usher syndrome type III, a form of hereditary hearing loss linked to defects in the sensory "hair" cells in the inner ear. USH3 is caused by a mutation in the clarin-1 gene.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers look to patterns to envision new engineering fieldThe phenomenon that forms interference patterns on television displays when a camera focuses on a pattern like a person wearing stripes has inspired a new way to conceptualize electronic devices. Researchers at the University of Illinois are showing how the atomic-scale version of this phenomenon may hold the secrets to help advance electronics design to the limits of size and speed.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Security flaw could have let hackers turn on smart ovensA security flaw in LG's smart home devices gave hackers a way to control the household appliances of millions of customers, including the ability to turn on ovens, a computer security firm revealed on Thursday.
3h
Gizmodo
Historians May Have Been Wrong About This Ancient Roman Vase for Centuries The Portland Vase, Photo: Carole Raddato/Flickr New research shows that the British Museum’s most famous artifact—the Portland Vase—was manufactured by a different technique than the one traditionally assumed by historians and archaeologists. For centuries, experts in antiquities have said that the Portland Vase, along with other Roman cameo glass artifacts, were manufactured by the ancient Roman
3h
The Atlantic
China's Xi Jinping Era China’s Communist Party meets every five years to outline, among other things, its goals for the next half decade, lay out its plans for political succession, and state its economic goals. The idea is to maintain stability through continuity while advancing the kinds of programs that have transformed China into the world’s second-largest economy. This year, though, the party congress, which just
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Underwater defense: New ways to protect divers in the deepSpecial Operations divers like Navy SEALs take on life-threatening risks such as enemy combatants and harsh environments. But another hazard is silent and unseen—oxygen toxicity, the result of breathing lethal levels of oxygen that occur at depth and pressure.
3h
Ars Technica
Dealmaster: Get up to $300 in credit when you pre-order an iPhone X Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our friends at TechBargains , we have another round of deals to share. With pre-orders for Apple's new iPhone X (that's "ten," not "ex") set to open at midnight, today's list includes a roundup of the savings the four major US carriers are promising for those who want the new handset. Each carrier is promising up to $300 or so off for those who trade in an old devi
3h
Ars Technica
Florida’s top court stops 1960s band from earning pre-1972 copyright royalties The Turtles in 1967. (credit: Chris Walter/WireImage) Members of 1960s rock band The Turtles have lost a major legal battle in their quest to collect copyright royalties from their old hit songs. The Florida Supreme Court held today (PDF) that the state doesn't recognize any copyrights in pre-1972 music recordings, despite the band's arguments to the contrary. All seven justices concurred in the
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bacteria have a sense of touchAlthough bacteria have no sensory organs in the classical sense, they are still masters in perceiving their environment. A research group has now discovered that bacteria not only respond to chemical signals, but also possess a sense of touch. The researchers demonstrate how bacteria recognize surfaces and respond to this mechanical stimulus within seconds. This mechanism is also used by pathogens
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The nose reveals our relationship with our emotionsAn alexithymic individual has difficulty, to a greater or lesser degree, in relating to emotions. New research seeks to shed light on new aspects of the condition using olfactory tests. The results demonstrate that one of the characteristics of alexithymia is the altered physiological response to olfactory stimuli. The tests also showed that there are differences in reactions between subjects char
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fundamental rules for how the brain controls movementResearchers have for the first time confirmed how neurons control muscle movement.
3h
Live Science
What Exactly Does It Mean to Die from 'Natural Causes'?Legendary musician Fats Domino died this week at age 89, and officials reported his death was due to "natural causes." But what exactly does it mean to die from natural causes?
3h
Gizmodo
All of the Crazy Shit in This Pitch for a Magic Leap Event GIF Image Source: Magic Leap As recently as September, ultra-secretive augmented reality startup Magic Leap entertained holding a splashy event to reveal more about its mysterious technology, according to a confidential document detailing a proposed event concept obtained by Gizmodo. The document outlines a pitch for a strange live-streamed office tour, complete with product-revealing Easter eggs
3h
New on MIT Technology Review
An Electric Semi Definitely Won’t Work—But Seven in a Row MightPlatooning might make the economics reasonable for short-haul electric trucking.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How cities can best fight climate changeWhat are the best ways for U.S. cities to combat climate change? A new study co-authored by an MIT professor indicates it will be easier for cities to reduce emissions coming from residential energy use rather than from local transportation—and this reduction will happen mostly thanks to better building practices, not greater housing density.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Knowledge of larval fish just a drop in the oceanA year-long survey of the taxonomic diversity of Red Sea fish larvae has revealed how the community changes throughout the year and has also established a baseline for future studies.
4h
Ars Technica
What happened to Las Vegas shooter’s hard drive? It’s a mystery Enlarge / Vehicles drive past a Las Vegas billboard featuring a Federal Bureau of Investigation tip line number on Interstate 515. On October 1, Stephen Paddock killed 58 people and injured more than 450 after he opened fire on a large crowd at the Route 91 Harvest country music festival. (credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images) Local and federal investigators still have not come up with a motive that
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Learning from mussels: New way to make stronger, more stretchy polymersA wide range of polymer-based materials, from tire rubber and wetsuit neoprene to Lycra clothing and silicone, are elastomers valued for their ability to flex and stretch without breaking and return to their original form.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA finds winds shear still affecting Tropical Storm SaolaNASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite and NASA's Aqua satellite imagery showed wind shear was still affecting Tropical Storm Saola.as it moved through the Philippine Sea.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hormones help tadpoles trade size for survival in a warming climate, says UC studyUC research links hormones and changing climate to altered evolution for spadefoot toad species.
4h
Popular Science
'HDR' is the most confusing term in consumer tech right now Technology You're going to bump into it whether you're buying a TV, a camera, or a smartphone. Don't get confused by conflicting meanings for the same term: HDR.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bat poop: A reliable source of climate changePeople have long known that bat guano - the polite term for what the flying mammals leave on the floors of caves where they live worldwide - is a valuable source of fuel and fertilizer, but now newly published research from University of South Florida geoscientists show that the refuse is also a reliable record of climate change.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Small asteroid or comet 'visits' from beyond the solar systemA small, recently discovered asteroid - or perhaps a comet - appears to have originated from outside the solar system, coming from somewhere else in our galaxy. If so, it would be the first "interstellar object" to be observed and confirmed by astronomers.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dawn finds possible ancient ocean remnants at CeresMinerals containing water are widespread on Ceres, suggesting the dwarf planet may have had a global ocean in the past. What became of that ocean? Could Ceres still have liquid today? Two new studies from NASA's Dawn mission shed light on these questions.
4h
Viden
Digital politistat: 5 teknologier, der overvåger alle kinesereFra bycykler til bankudskrifter. Kina er ved at udvikle den perfekte politistat, der spionerer om alt mod sine borgere.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Late Tiassic terrestrial ecosystem changesThe Norian Chinle Formation in the Southwestern United States provides a snapshot into an ancient terrestrial ecosystem with its famous petrified tree trunks and various plant and vertebrate remains. The fossil plant assemblages, including spores and pollen grains, provide useful information on past vegetation and the response of the vegetation to climate changes.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Misplaced monarchs: Clusters of butterflies stuck up northMonarch butterflies, those delicate symbols of spring and summer, should mostly be in Texas by now, winging their way to Mexico for the winter.
4h
The Atlantic
Thailand Bids Farewell to Its King in an Elaborate Funeral Ceremony A full year after the death of Thailand’s King Bhumibol Adulyadej, the official period of mourning is over and a complex five-day-long royal funeral ceremony began yesterday, attended in person by thousands and watched by millions on TV or other devices. King Bhumibol was a revered figure in Thailand, who enjoyed widespread popularity as he reigned for 70 years. Over the past year, an intricate t
4h
Scientific American Content: Global
Camouflage Plumage Patterns Offer Clue to Dinosaur's HabitatFeathered carnivore was dark on top and light underneath, with a raccoon-like face. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Science | The Guardian
Saudi Arabia to invest $1bn in Virgin space companies Investment of £760m into Richard Branson’s space companies will enable ‘next generation of human spaceflight’ Saudi Arabia will plough around $1bn (£760m) into Sir Richard Branson’s Virgin space companies. The cash injection will be made to Virgin Galactic, The Spaceship Company and Virgin Orbit – with the option of $480m (£364m) of extra investment. Continue reading...
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nonoperative treatment of appendicitis is increasing, may raise death riskAbout twice as many US adults with appendicitis are being treated without an operation compared with 20 years ago, and nonoperative management of an infected appendix is tied to a higher death rate in the hospital, according to new study findings.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Belly fat measurement predicts adverse outcomes in emergency surgery patientsA patient's waist measurement can reliably predict their risk of complications and death after emergency general surgery procedures, according to new findings presented at the American College of Surgeons Clinical Congress 2017.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biologists discover bacteria's 'sense of touch'A study led by scientists at Indiana University, published Oct. 26 in the journal Science, reports a new method to understand how bacteria sense contact with surfaces, an action that triggers the formation of destructive and disease-causing biofilms.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bacteria have a sense of touchAlthough bacteria have no sensory organs in the classical sense, they are still masters in perceiving their environment. A research group at the University of Basel's Biozentrum has now discovered that bacteria not only respond to chemical signals, but also possess a sense of touch. In their recent publication in Science, the researchers demonstrate how bacteria recognize surfaces and respond to t
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists get first close-ups of finger-like growths that trigger battery firesScientists from Stanford University and the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have captured the first atomic-level images of finger-like growths called dendrites that can pierce the barrier between battery compartments and trigger short circuits or fires. Dendrites and the problems they cause have been a stumbling block on the road to developing new types of batteries tha
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new weapon against malariaMalaria is a parasitic disease transmitted between humans through the bite of a mosquito. By identifying two proteases essential for the parasite's survival and dissemination as well as a molecule capable of inhibiting them, researchers at UNIGE and UNIBE bring a new hope in the fight against malaria. Their discovery could lead to the development of drugs blocking not only the parasite development
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
AAAS launches SciLine, new service for journalists to enhance science coverageThe American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) announces the launch of SciLine, a new service that will provide journalists with high-quality scientific expertise and context -- on demand and on deadline.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NIH study identifies new targets for anti-malaria drugsThe deadliest malaria parasite needs two proteins to infect red blood cells and exit the cells after it multiplies, a finding that may provide researchers with potential new targets for drug development, according to researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health. Their study appears in the latest issue of Science.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new player helping viruses hijack their hostsA particular long noncoding RNA gives viruses a replication boost as they infect their hosts, helping them alter their host cell's metabolism to their advantage, scientists report.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Taking a tip from mussels to make materials both strong and flexibleA network of loosely-linked polymers mimicking a mussel's adhesive qualities offers a way to make materials that are both strong and flexible, elements that have been widely sought but hard to produce.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain-inspired vision model cracks website protection system, with much less training compared to deep learningScientists have created a computer model that can 'solve' CAPTCHA, the widespread text-based system used by websites to check whether a user is human, with very little training data.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Global road-building explosion could be disastrous for people and nature, say scientistsGlobal Road-building Explosion Could Be Disastrous for People and Nature, say ScientistsThe global explosion of new roads is rife with economic, social, and environmental dangers, according to a study in Science led by Professor William Laurance from James Cook University.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Learning from musselsA marine bivalve inspires UCSB researchers to find a new way to make stronger, more stretchy polymers.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Computational simulations suggest multiple sclerosis is a single diseaseNew research supports the idea that multiple sclerosis (MS), which has widely varying symptoms and progression in different patients, is nonetheless a single disease with common underlying mechanisms. The findings are published in PLOS Computational Biology.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hush little virus, don't say a word: How Princeton scientists investigate sleeping virusesFour in five adults are infected with herpes simplex virus, say researchers, but most don't show symptoms like cold sores because the virus infection is 'latent' -- sleeping -- within the nervous system. While many virus researchers are interested in understanding what causes these sleeping viruses to wake up, or reactivate, Princeton scientists are trying to understand what prevents the infection
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astronomers discover sunscreen snow falling on hot exoplanetAstronomers at Penn State have used the Hubble Space Telescope to find a blistering-hot giant planet outside our solar system where the atmosphere "snows" titanium dioxide—the active ingredient in sunscreen. These Hubble observations are the first detections of this "snow-out" process, called a "cold trap," on an exoplanet. This discovery, and other observations made by the Penn State team, provid
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Deeper understanding of ISIS propaganda can help in the fight against terrorismThough their time in active service may be done, many American veterans are finding new ways to serve their country from home. Douglas Wilbur, a retired major in the U.S. Army and a doctoral student in the School of Journalism at the University of Missouri, is continuing the fight against ISIS by studying the Islamic militant organization's propaganda texts and communication strategies. His work c
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cowpea protected from a devastating pest, free for smallholder African farmersAcross Africa, armies of hungry caterpillars destroy the flowers and pods of cowpeas; casualties can reach 80 percent of this staple food crop if no measures are taken. But the real victims are smallholder African farmers who feed their families on farms smaller than five acres. Next year, they will have the option to grow cowpeas that are resistant to one of these pests.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
James Webb Space Telescope's laser-focused sightAbout 1 million miles away from the nearest eye surgeon, NASA's James Webb Space Telescope will be able to perfect its own vision while in orbit.
4h
Ars Technica
The first motorcycle to use Apple CarPlay has been announced Enlarge (credit: Honda) Apple CarPlay is moving beyond the car and into the motorcycle. Honda this week announced its new 2018 Gold Wing, the first bike to come equipped with Apple’s infotainment system . It will arrive next February and start at $23,500. As noted by CNET’s Road Show blog , CarPlay’s implementation on the Gold Wing is a bit different from what it looks like on a four-wheeled auto
4h
Gizmodo
Report: Equifax Warned of Vulnerability Six Months Before Attack, Took No Action It didn’t seem possible, but Equifax may have screwed the pooch even harder than previously thought. Several months before the devastating data breach, which compromised the personal data of more than 145 million Americans, the company was apparently warned about a vulnerability in its public-facing infrastructure that would allow virtually anyone to view the data. It reportedly took no action. T
4h
Live Science
Dinosaur with Raccoon-Like Mask Hid in Broad DaylightA "masked" dinosaur that lived 130 million years ago was a master at disguise who could hide even in broad daylight from its predators, relatives of the fearsome Tyrannosaurus rex, a new study finds.
4h
Inside Science
BRIEF: Robots Break Popular ‘I Am Not a Robot’ Tests BRIEF: Robots Break Popular ‘I Am Not a Robot’ Tests A new machine learning model can efficiently identify the distorted text many websites use to block bots. CAPTCHA_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: metrue via Shutterstock Technology Thursday, October 26, 2017 - 14:00 Catherine Meyers, Editor (Inside Science) -- Humans, it turns out you’re not as special as you think. A new computer model can effic
4h
The Atlantic
Trump’s Critics Can Sense the GOP Slipping Away From Them On Tuesday, Jeff Flake announced his retirement from the Senate, pairing it with a blistering attack on President Trump. That inspired Steve Kornacki to recall the moment in summer 2016 when Trump and Flake had their first run-in. In the midst of a tense meeting with Republican senators, here’s what happened, per The Washington Post : “You’ve been very critical of me,” Trump said after Flake intr
4h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Dinosaur sported 'bandit mask'A dinosaur from China had a "bandit mask" pattern in the feather on its faces, fossil analysis has shown.
4h
Gizmodo
How Mortician Caitlin Doughty Traveled the World on the Wings of Death Images via W.W. Norton/Caitlin Doughty For most Americans, the options of what you can have done to your body after you die likely seem limited. Cremation, embalming your body and then burying it—there are variations on those themes, but the basics remain. But mortician Caitlin Doughty has spent her life trying to change how we consider death and educate us about the ways we can care for our dead
4h
Ars Technica
Ajit Pai submits plan to allow more media consolidation Enlarge / FCC Chairman Ajit Pai at The American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research on May 5, 2017 in Washington, DC. (credit: Getty Images | Chip Somodevilla) The Federal Communications Commission will vote next month on ending a rule that prevents joint ownership of newspapers and TV or radio stations in the same geographical market. The change is part of a larger overhaul of media
4h
New on MIT Technology Review
Patreon Introduces Tools to Let Anyone with a Website Put Up a Paywall
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Discovery of a potential therapeutic target to combat trypanosomesYaser Hashem's team at the Laboratoire Architecture et Réactivité de l'ARN at CNRS's has discovered a new potential therapeutic target - located in the ribosome - to combat trypanosomes parasites. Using cryo-electron microscopy, researchers at the Institut de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (CNRS/Université de Strasbourg) have analyzed the structure of these parasites in details and revealed on
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The Guanches originated from North Africa, shows DNA-studyWhen and how the Guanches arrived to the Canary Islands have remained poorly understood, not least since they lacked boats and the knowledge of how to navigate the surrounding seas. In fact, when Europeans colonized the islands in the 15th century CE they discovered a culture that much resembled Late Stone Age (Neolithic) cultures from Europe and the Mediterranean. This has led to a great deal of
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Closest look yet at killer T-cell activity could yield new approach to tackling antibiotic resistanceIn a study that could provide a roadmap for combatting the rising threat of drug-resistant pathogens, researchers have discovered the specific mechanism the body's T cells use to kill bacteria.
4h
New Scientist - News
Ban on weedkiller glyphosate won’t save anyone from cancerUnfounded health fears mean Europe is on the brink of banning the herbicide, risking greater soil damage and higher carbon emissions
4h
New Scientist - News
Brain-zap therapy may throw people with depression into a rageStimulating the brain to treat depression can spark a fit of fury in a small number of people, psychiatrists warn
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Astronomers discover sunscreen snow falling on hot exoplanetAstronomers have used the Hubble Space Telescope to find a blistering-hot giant planet outside our solar system where the atmosphere 'snows' titanium dioxide -- the active ingredient in sunscreen. These observations are the first detections of this 'snow-out' process, called a 'cold trap,' on an exoplanet. The research provides insight into the complexity of weather and atmospheric composition on
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The sea turtle that refused to be beaten by the stormWhen Eleanor the sea turtle was caught in a tropical storm off the coast of Florida, she coped surprisingly well. In fact, she hardly needed to use any extra energy during the four days the storm raged -- and neither was she injured.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Global road-building explosion could be disastrous for people and nature, say scientistsThe global explosion of new roads is rife with economic, social, and environmental dangers, according to a study in Science led by Professor William Laurance from James Cook University.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Learning from mussels: A marine bivalve inspires researchers to make stronger polymersA wide range of polymer-based materials, from tire rubber and wetsuit neoprene to Lycra clothing and silicone, are elastomers valued for their ability to flex and stretch without breaking and return to their original form.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bacteria have a sense of touchAlthough bacteria have no sensory organs in the classical sense, they are still masters in perceiving their environment. A research group at the University of Basel's Biozentrum has now discovered that bacteria not only respond to chemical signals, but also possess a sense of touch. In their recent publication in Science, the researchers demonstrate how bacteria recognize surfaces and respond to t
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new weapon against malaria: Scientists have discovered a new target to block the parasite responsibleMalaria is a parasitic disease transmitted between humans through the bite of the female anopheles mosquito. Endemic in large tropical zones, Plasmodium falciparum kills more than 500'000 people per year, about 80% of which are children under the age of five. Although therapeutic strategies have been implemented for a long time, they have so far remained moderately effective. By identifying two pr
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists get first close-ups of finger-like growths that trigger battery firesScientists from Stanford University and the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have captured the first atomic-level images of finger-like growths called dendrites that can pierce the barrier between battery compartments and trigger short circuits or fires. Dendrites and the problems they cause have been a stumbling block on the road to developing new types of batteries tha
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biologists discover bacteria's 'sense of touch'A study led by researchers at Indiana University, published Oct. 26 in the journal Science, reports a new method to determine how bacteria sense contact with surfaces, an action that triggers the formation of biofilms—multicellular structures that cause major health issues in people and threaten critical infrastructure, such as water and sewer systems.
4h
Science current issue
Comment on "The extent of forest in dryland biomes" Bastin et al . (Reports, 12 May 2017, p. 635) claim to have discovered 467 million hectares of new dryland forest. We would argue that these additional areas are not completely "new" and that some have been reported before. A second shortcoming is that not all sources of uncertainty are considered; the uncertainty could be much higher than the reported value of 3.5%.
4h
Science current issue
Nip misinformation in the bud
4h
Science current issue
News at a glance
4h
Science current issue
Echoes of Ebola as plague hits Madagascar
4h
Science current issue
Neandertals gave 'lost African DNA back to moderns
4h
Science current issue
'Base editors open new way to fix mutations
4h
Science current issue
NASA weighs trimming WFIRST to hold down costs
4h
Science current issue
Revamp animal research rules, report urges
4h
Science current issue
The electron is still round--for now
4h
Science current issue
Medicine's future?
4h
Science current issue
Roads to riches or ruin?
4h
Science current issue
Plasmepsins on the antimalarial hit list
4h
Science current issue
The bacterium has landed
4h
Science current issue
The art of empty space
4h
Science current issue
Designing tougher elastomers with ionomers
4h
Science current issue
A peptide mimic of an antibody
4h
Science current issue
Ethics of maternal vaccination
4h
Science current issue
The invaders
4h
Science current issue
Small beginnings
4h
Science current issue
Endurance: A Year in Space, A Lifetime of Discovery
4h
Science current issue
Assembling the brain from deep within
4h
Science current issue
Overriding sleep
4h
Science current issue
Sleep on it
4h
Science current issue
Editorial retraction
4h
Science current issue
France's risky vaccine mandates
4h
Science current issue
Missed opportunities in Yachay
4h
Science current issue
Meditation and yoga associated with changes in brain
4h
Science current issue
AAAS adopts scientific freedom and responsibility statement
4h
Science current issue
AAAS Statement on Scientific Freedom and Responsibility
4h
Science current issue
Neuroscience: In search of new concepts
4h
Science current issue
The emperors new wardrobe: Rebalancing diversity of animal models in neuroscience research The neuroscience field is steaming ahead, fueled by a revolution in cutting-edge technologies. Concurrently, another revolution has been underway—the diversity of species utilized for neuroscience research is sharply declining, as the field converges on a few selected model organisms. Here, from the perspective of a young scientist, I naively ask: Is the great diversity of questions in neuroscien
4h
Science current issue
Big data and the industrialization of neuroscience: A safe roadmap for understanding the brain? New technologies in neuroscience generate reams of data at an exponentially increasing rate, spurring the design of very-large-scale data-mining initiatives. Several supranational ventures are contemplating the possibility of achieving, within the next decade(s), full simulation of the human brain.
4h
Science current issue
What constitutes the prefrontal cortex? During evolution, the prefrontal region grew in size relative to the rest of the cortex. It reached its largest extent in the human brain, where it constitutes 30% of the total cortical area. This growth was accompanied by phylogenetic differentiation of the cortical areas. It has been argued that the human brain holds prefrontal regions that are both qualitatively and functionally unique. Presen
4h
Science current issue
Space and time in the brain Nothing is more intuitive, yet more complex, than the concepts of space and time. In contrast to spacetime in physics, space and time in neuroscience remain separate coordinates to which we attach our observations. Investigators of navigation and memory relate neuronal activity to position, distance, time point, and duration and compare these parameters to units of measuring instruments. Although
4h
Science current issue
What is consciousness, and could machines have it? The controversial question of whether machines may ever be conscious must be based on a careful consideration of how consciousness arises in the only physical system that undoubtedly possesses it: the human brain. We suggest that the word "consciousness" conflates two different types of information-processing computations in the brain: the selection of information for global broadcasting, thus ma
4h
Science current issue
Non-close-packed nanoparticle arrays
4h
Science current issue
Broadly reactive drugs for flu
4h
Science current issue
Combining stiffness and stretchiness
4h
Science current issue
Frozen in time
4h
Science current issue
Plasmodium parasite entrance and exit
4h
Science current issue
Progress for PAH
4h
Science current issue
Is it a bird, a plane? No, it's a robot!
4h
Science current issue
Elucidating a bacterial sense of touch
4h
Science current issue
Squeezing through a hole
4h
Science current issue
Bacterial toxin acetylates lysine residues
4h
Science current issue
Building the right roads in the right places
4h
Science current issue
The good side of ceramides
4h
Science current issue
An ultrasound bioprobe for biological imaging
4h
Science current issue
Temperate forest dynamics and climate
4h
Science current issue
Inflammation and cardiac reprogramming
4h
Science current issue
Drone technology for whale health
4h
Science current issue
Coupling up for enhanced reactions
4h
Science current issue
Figuring the shape of the electron
4h
Science current issue
A bump in the high road
4h
Science current issue
Mobile elements' joyride
4h
Science current issue
Potent peptidic fusion inhibitors of influenza virus Influenza therapeutics with new targets and mechanisms of action are urgently needed to combat potential pandemics, emerging viruses, and constantly mutating strains in circulation. We report here on the design and structural characterization of potent peptidic inhibitors of influenza hemagglutinin. The peptide design was based on complementarity-determining region loops of human broadly neutrali
4h
Science current issue
Toughening elastomers using mussel-inspired iron-catechol complexes Materials often exhibit a trade-off between stiffness and extensibility; for example, strengthening elastomers by increasing their cross-link density leads to embrittlement and decreased toughness. Inspired by cuticles of marine mussel byssi, we circumvent this inherent trade-off by incorporating sacrificial, reversible iron-catechol cross-links into a dry, loosely cross-linked epoxy network. The
4h
Science current issue
Atomic structure of sensitive battery materials and interfaces revealed by cryo-electron microscopy Whereas standard transmission electron microscopy studies are unable to preserve the native state of chemically reactive and beam-sensitive battery materials after operation, such materials remain pristine at cryogenic conditions. It is then possible to atomically resolve individual lithium metal atoms and their interface with the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI). We observe that dendrites in c
4h
Science current issue
Size effect in ion transport through angstrom-scale slits In the field of nanofluidics, it has been an ultimate but seemingly distant goal to controllably fabricate capillaries with dimensions approaching the size of small ions and water molecules. We report ion transport through ultimately narrow slits that are fabricated by effectively removing a single atomic plane from a bulk crystal. The atomically flat angstrom-scale slits exhibit little surface c
4h
Science current issue
Tunable porous nanoallotropes prepared by post-assembly etching of binary nanoparticle superlattices Self-assembly of inorganic nanoparticles has been used to prepare hundreds of different colloidal crystals, but almost invariably with the restriction that the particles must be densely packed. Here, we show that non–close-packed nanoparticle arrays can be fabricated through the selective removal of one of two components comprising binary nanoparticle superlattices. First, a variety of binary nan
4h
Science current issue
Plasmepsins IX and X are essential and druggable mediators of malaria parasite egress and invasion Proteases of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum have long been investigated as drug targets. The P. falciparum genome encodes 10 aspartic proteases called plasmepsins, which are involved in diverse cellular processes. Most have been studied extensively but the functions of plasmepsins IX and X (PMIX and PMX) were unknown. Here we show that PMIX is essential for erythrocyte invasion, actin
4h
Science current issue
A multistage antimalarial targets the plasmepsins IX and X essential for invasion and egress Regulated exocytosis by secretory organelles is important for malaria parasite invasion and egress. Many parasite effector proteins, including perforins, adhesins, and proteases, are extensively proteolytically processed both pre- and postexocytosis. Here we report the multistage antiplasmodial activity of the aspartic protease inhibitor hydroxyl-ethyl-amine–based scaffold compound 49c. This scaf
4h
Science current issue
N{varepsilon}-Fatty acylation of Rho GTPases by a MARTX toxin effector The multifunctional autoprocessing repeats-in-toxin (MARTX) toxins are a family of large toxins that are extensively distributed in bacterial pathogens. MARTX toxins are autocatalytically cleaved to multiple effector domains, which are released into host cells to modulate the host signaling pathways. The Rho guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) inactivation domain (RID), a conserved effector domain
4h
Science current issue
Second messenger-mediated tactile response by a bacterial rotary motor When bacteria encounter surfaces, they respond with surface colonization and virulence induction. The mechanisms of bacterial mechanosensation and downstream signaling remain poorly understood. Here, we describe a tactile sensing cascade in Caulobacter crescentus in which the flagellar motor acts as sensor. Surface-induced motor interference stimulated the production of the second messenger cycli
4h
Science current issue
Obstruction of pilus retraction stimulates bacterial surface sensing It is critical for bacteria to recognize surface contact and initiate physiological changes required for surface-associated lifestyles. Ubiquitous microbial appendages called pili are involved in sensing surfaces and facilitating downstream behaviors, but the mechanism by which pili mediate surface sensing has been unclear. We visualized Caulobacter crescentus pili undergoing dynamic cycles of ex
4h
Science current issue
New Products
4h
Science current issue
Webinar | Unlocking the elusive mind: The role of protein biomarkers in understanding neurodegenerative disease
4h
Science current issue
Sponsored Collection | Sharper Images: Exploring Confocal and Superresolution Microscopy
4h
Science current issue
Lessons from learning disabilities
4h
Science current issue
Response to Comment on "The extent of forest in dryland biomes" Schepaschenko et al . question our findings, claiming that we did not refer to all existing maps and that we did not account for all sources of uncertainty. In our response, we detail our selection criteria for reference maps, which clarify why the work of Schepaschenko et al . was not used, and we explain why our uncertainty assessment is complete and how it was misunderstood by Schepaschenko et
4h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Nobel Prize–winning technique illuminates the fibers that set off battery firesScientists get a closer look at the filaments that ruin lithium-ion batteries from the inside out.
4h
Gizmodo
Trump Is Going to Declare the Opioid Crisis a 'Public Health Emergency' Image: AP On Thursday, President Trump will announce a major move in the battle against America’s opioid crisis: He will direct that the Department of Health and Human Services declare the opioid crisis a public health emergency. The action has been long-anticipated as use of opioids has rapidly escalated to a full-blown epidemic. A recent federal count found that deaths from the use of fentanyl
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
James Webb Space Telescope's laser-focused sightAbout 1 million miles away from the nearest eye surgeon, NASA's James Webb Space Telescope will be able to perfect its own vision while in orbit.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
TGen-USC study finds 'Precision Medicine' may not always be so precisePrecision Medicine in oncology, where genetic testing is used to determine the best drugs to treat cancer patients, is not always so precise when applied to some of the world's more diverse populations, according to a study led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope, and the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC).
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Closest look yet at killer T-cell activity could yield new approach to tackling antibiotic resistanceIn a study that could provide a roadmap for combatting the rising threat of drug-resistant pathogens, researchers have discovered the specific mechanism the body's T cells use to kill bacteria.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cowpea protected from a devastating pest, free for smallholder African farmersAcross Africa, armies of hungry caterpillars destroy the flowers and pods of cowpeas; casualties can reach 80 percent of this staple food crop if no measures are taken. But the real victims are smallholder African farmers who feed their families on farms smaller than five acres. Next year, they will have the option to grow cowpeas that are resistant to one of these pests.
4h
New on MIT Technology Review
Could We Build a Machine with Consciousness?
4h
Live Science
Raccoons Ace Cognition Test (But Sometimes They Cheat)In cognition tests, clever raccoons demonstrated that they would not hesitate to bend the rules to get their rewards.
4h
New on MIT Technology Review
This Is the Reason Ethereum ExistsThe world’s second-most-valuable cryptocurrency is also its most interesting—but in order to understand it, you must first understand its origins.
5h
Popular Science
Holy Harp Trap, Batman! The gear researchers use to study bats Environment They have gadgets and gizmos aplenty The suite of tools that researchers use to track, understand, and hopefully save bats, America’s favorite (and admittedly the planet’s only) flying mammal.
5h
Gizmodo
If You Missed It Last Week, Anker's Latest Robotic Vacuum Is $40 Off Again Eufy Robotic Vacuum Cleaner , $200 with code MMSM8QWT The bestselling , top-rated , and audience-f avorite robotic vacuum just came out with a new and improved model , and you can suck up yours today for just $200 with code MMSM8QWT, matching a launch deal we saw last week. It has the features you guys loved about the first model - remote control, a slim body to reach under furniture, and large d
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Three new lung cancer genetic biomarkers are identified in Dartmouth studySNPs (single-nucleotide polymorphisms) are variations in our DNA that determine our susceptibility to developing some diseases. Using the largest genome-wide SNP-smoking interaction analysis reported for lung cancer, a research team led by Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center's Yafang Li, PhD, has identified three novel SNPs. The results from their study reinforce that gene-smoking interactions
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mistakes in how proteins of the ear are built contribute to early hearing lossResearchers found mutations in a master-switch protein called Epithelial Splicing Regulatory Protein 1 in individuals with a type of congenital hearing loss. In general, what connects most of the unexplained hearing-loss cases is that protein building in the cochlea during development goes awry. The cochlea has the all-important job of transforming mechanical energy in the form of sound waves into
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists detect comets outside our solar systemScientists from MIT and other institutions, working closely with amateur astronomers, have spotted the dusty tails of six exocomets -- comets outside our solar system -- orbiting a faint star 800 light years from Earth.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: How cities can best fight climate changeA new study co-authored by an MIT professor indicates it will be easier for cities to reduce emissions coming from residential energy use rather than from local transportation -- and this reduction will happen mostly thanks to better building practices, not greater housing density.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Health care access improves with state-level medicaid expansionA new study has shown that low-income US residents living in Medicaid expansion states are significantly more likely to have health insurance and to receive a routine check-up compared to low-income residents of non-expansion states.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Russian scientists have found flaws in popular theories of gravityTaking black holes (as a real object) as a test material, scientists from the Ural Federal university (UrFU, Yekaterinburg) found out that a popular theory of gravity which had seemed to work perfectly at the cosmological level (a subclass of Horndeski theory) is hardly applicable to the real world. They presented their study in the Classical and Quantum Gravity journal.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Assaults decrease by 3 percent the Monday after Daylight SavingAssaults decrease by 3 percent the Monday after the switch to Daylight Saving Time in the spring, according to findings from researchers Rebecca Umbach, Greg Ridgeway and Adrian Raine of the University of Pennsylvania. In the fall, the opposite takes place, with violence rising by about the same percentage.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Astronomers discover sunscreen snow falling on hot exoplanetAstronomers at Penn State have used the Hubble Space Telescope to find a blistering-hot giant planet outside our solar system where the atmosphere 'snows' titanium dioxide -- the active ingredient in sunscreen. These observations are the first detections of this 'snow-out' process, called a 'cold trap,' on an exoplanet. The research provides insight into the complexity of weather and atmospheric c
5h
New on MIT Technology Review
Walmart Is Unleashing Shelf-Scanning Robots to Peruse Its Aisles
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How harmful are nano-copper and anti-fungal combinations in the waterways?A recently published article in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, "Effects of Micronized and Nano-Copper Azole on Marine Benthic Communities" explores the risks to the smallest creatures in aquatic communities posed by increased use of the anti-fouling wood treatment. Copper salts have a long history of use as a wood preservative. Recently, copper nanoparticles are being mixed in formulation
5h
The Atlantic
The Inequality Beneath the Sexual-Harassment Headlines The Weinstein Effect strikes again. Following The New York Times and The New Yorker ’s revelations about the film executive and alleged serial sexual harasser Harvey Weinstein, Lockhart Steele of Vox Media, the screenwriter James Toback , the critic Leon Wieseltier, and, on Thursday, Mark Halperin of MSNBC have found themselves outed and, in some cases, fired for alleged past behavior. Preceding
5h
Gizmodo
This Tech Activist Wants to Donate Your Spare Change to Bail Relief Photo: AP Right now, 450,000 people are incarcerated in America without being convicted of a crime. Charged with bails they can’t afford, they sit in jail awaiting their trials. Backlogs are extensive and overcrowding is common. Some wait weeks, others wait months, and some even die in custody before getting their day in court. Enter “ Appolition ,” an app concept aimed at crowdfunding bail relie
5h
Science | The Guardian
Galloway Viking Hoard acquired by National Museums of Scotland Hoard is richest Viking-age collection of precious metal found in UK or Ireland and diverse with objects from across Europe The spectacular Galloway Viking Hoard has been acquired by National Museums Scotland after raising almost £2m in just five months. The hoard consists of more than 100 pieces of gold, silver, ingots and jewellery gathered up from across the Viking world and was found more tha
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists find a role for Parkinson's gene in the brainA new study published in the journal Neuron sheds light on the normal function of LRRK2, the most common genetic cause for late-onset Parkinson's disease. The study was supported by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the National Institutes of Health.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Blood flow in the developing heart guides maturation of heart valvesCongenital heart valve defects are the most common type of birth defects, the majority of which have no clear genetic cause, suggesting that epigenetic factors play an important role. Now, researchers have found that the shear force of blood flow against the cells lining the early heart valve sends signals for heart 'cushion' cells to become fully formed valves.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
IOF study reveals low dietary calcium intake in Asia and Latin AmericaA new study led by an International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) research committee has found that daily average calcium intake among adults varies widely around the world. Critically low intake was found in certain Asian, African and Latin American countries.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Junk food almost twice as distracting as healthy foodWhen we haven't eaten, junk food is twice as distracting as healthy food or non-food items.
5h
Gizmodo
The 11 Scariest Movies Currently Streaming on Hulu, Netflix, and Amazon Prime The Wailing. Image: Well Go USA The big streaming services always have a ton of horror movies on offer, but not all of them are especially fright-inducing. In honor of Halloween, put all the Sharknado and Gingerdead Man sequels aside in favor of actually scaring the bejesus out of yourself. Each of these 11 movies will haunt your nightmares. Hulu High Tension Before he was lured to the US to rema
5h
Ars Technica
In shift to content distribution, Roku may stream to third-party devices Enlarge / Roku Express main menu. Just like in other Roku units. A report from Variety suggests Roku's shift from hardware to software is moving quickly. While Roku isn't looking to abandon hardware entirely, the report claims the company is looking to stream content to third-party devices as well. The first phase of this plan will likely take place on mobile devices, possibly through Roku's exis
5h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: A Turkey-Sized Dinosaur With a Raccoon-Like Bandit MaskBy analyzing Sinosauropteryx specimens found in China, paleontologists found that certain camouflage patterns have a deep evolutionary history.
5h
NYT > Science
Isabella L. Karle Dies at 95; Findings on Molecules Helped Husband Win NobelHer husband was disappointed that her work, which aided in the development of drugs for illnesses, was not cited by the Nobel committee.
5h
Viden
Internettet i Kina bliver mindre frit hvert årMere kontrol over internettet. Det er en af konklusionerne efter den store partikongres i Kina, der netop er slut.
5h
Ingeniøren
Eksponentialismen erobrede Operaen i KøbenhavnHenning Larsen og Mærsk McKinney Møllers operabygning var i denne uge omdannet til højborg for den 'eksponentielle' fremtid. Men som det gælder for alle -ismer, skal man også passe på med betingelsesløst at hengive sig til eksponentialismen.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Outpatient antibiotics raise risk for acquiring C. difficile infection in the communityOutpatient antibiotic use is a primary risk factor for acquiring Clostridium difficile infection in the community, reinforcing the need for appropriate prescribing in this setting, a new study confirms.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How 'sleeper cells' in cancerous tumors can be destroyedIn many metastasized types of cancer, disseminated tumors grow back despite successful chemotherapy. As a research team has now discovered, this is because of isolated cancer cells that survive the chemotherapy due to a phase of dormancy. If these "sleeper cells" possess specific defects, however, they can be destroyed. This could increase the efficacy of chemotherapy for certain patients.
5h
Live Science
Why Bats Are So Good at Gulping Down (Halloween) PreyImagine eating all of the candy you acquire on Halloween each year in a single night. If you're a bat and winter’s approaching, this challenge is no problem.
5h
Gizmodo
These Endangered Wildlife Photos Are Artistic Masterpieces Image Tim Flach Human’s impact on nature is unmistakeable, from vast swaths of lost forest to heaps of trash on beaches. Looking at these images might be upsetting, but still demonstrate what we’ve done. They don’t demonstrate what we might lose. Scientists warn that we’re potentially amidst a sixth mass extinction event, thanks to human activity. Humans are indirectly and directly responsible fo
5h
New on MIT Technology Review
Patreon Introduces Tools to Let Anyone Put Up Paywall Access to Their Website
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers use a pump-induced disease to define underlying molecular mechanismA Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center research study investigated a pump-induced disease and defined the molecular mechanism that triggers it. Researchers presented the study of the functional effects of specific mutations of the Na/K pump found in tumors that induce primary aldosteronism (Conn's syndrome).
5h
Ars Technica
Who needs a CPU? Phase change memory acts as an analog computer Enlarge (credit: IBM Research ) Historically, one of the larger bottlenecks to computing performance hasn't been processor speed; it has been getting data and instructions to and from the processor. Working with memory isn't only a performance bottleneck, as the multiple layers of caches and high-speed memory add significantly to a computer's power budget. Other systems, like the extremely power-
5h
New Scientist - News
Good news: A robot has been hired to care for our old folkA care bot's deployment in the UK has come under fire, but I would have welcomed robotic help for my elderly mother, says author Paul Kitcatt
6h
The Atlantic
The Video Game That Could Shape the Future of War As far as video games go, Operation Overmatch is rather unremarkable. Players command military vehicles in eight-on-eight matches against the backdrop of rendered cityscapes—a common setup of games that sometimes have the added advantage of hundreds of millions of dollars in development budgets. Overmatch does have something unique, though: its mission. The game’s developers believe it will chang
6h
The Atlantic
The Darkness of Stranger Things 2 The impeccable trick Stranger Things pulled off in its first season was how seamlessly it wove together the opposing qualities of comfort and fear. Set in November 1983, the Netflix show quickly entranced viewers last summer with its aesthetic and conceptual familiarity—the kids on bikes fighting a monster, the throwback cultural touchstones, the childlike sense of wonder. Stranger Things was, by
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dynamic catalytic converters for clean air in the cityReducing pollutant emission of vehicles and meeting stricter exhaust gas standards are major challenges when developing catalytic converters. A new concept might help to efficiently treat exhaust gases after the cold start of engines and in urban traffic and to reduce the consumption of expensive noble metal.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cloth caps more effective than disposable caps at preventing contamination in the ORSurgeon's caps that expose small amounts of the ears and hair are not inferior to the bouffant-style, disposable scrub hats that cover those features, one of the first studies testing the effectiveness of different operating room (OR) head coverings in preventing airborne contamination has found.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Imported candy at top of contaminated food list in CaliforniaFollowing a state law mandating testing, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) issued more alerts for lead in candy than for the other top three sources of food-borne contamination combined, according to the first analysis of outcomes of the 2006 law.
6h
Quanta Magazine
The Unforgiving Math That Stops Epidemics As the annual flu season approaches, medical professionals are again encouraging people to get flu shots. Perhaps you are among those who rationalize skipping the shot on the grounds that “I never get the flu” or “if I get sick, I get sick” or “I’m healthy, so I’ll get over it.” What you might not realize is that these vaccination campaigns for flu and other diseases are about much more than your
6h
Ars Technica
Saudi Arabia invests $1 billion in Richard Branson’s space plane and rocket Saudi Press Agency On Thursday, the government of Saudi Arabia made a big splash in the aerospace community by announcing its intentions to invest $1 billion in Virgin Galactic and that company's efforts to develop a commercial tourism space plane and a small-satellite launcher. In addition, the Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman Al-Saud also discussed creating a space-centric entertainment i
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Deeper understanding of ISIS propaganda can help in the fight against terrorismDouglas Wilbur, a retired major in the U.S. Army and a doctoral student in the School of Journalism at the University of Missouri, is continuing the fight against ISIS by studying the Islamic militant organization's propaganda texts and communication strategies. His work could help the military in the fight against terrorism.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discovery of a potential therapeutic target to combat trypanosomesUsing cryo-electron microscopy, French researchers at the Institut de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (CNRS/Université de Strasbourg) have analyzed the structure of trypanosomes parasites in details and revealed one of their potential weak points, which has remained undetected until now. This discovery opens the path to the development of new safer therapies that are less toxic and more specifi
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Northeastern researchers discover fundamental rules for how the brain controls movementIn recently published findings, researchers at Northeastern's Center for Complex Network Research have for the first time confirmed how neurons control muscle movement.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
American College of Chest Physicians unveils new lung cancer screening guidelines at CHEST 2017Each year, more people die of lung cancer than of colon, breast and prostate cancers combined, and low-dose CT (LDCT) screening for lung cancer has become a standard practice mostly due to the results of the National Lung Cancer Screening Trial. Evidence continues to evolve, in turn informing the benefits and risks of LDCT in clinical practice.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cleveland Clinic leads development of new guidelines for radiation in breast cancerCleveland Clinic researcher Chirag Shah, M.D., led the development of updated guidelines for the appropriate and safe utilization of accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI). The guidelines are published online in the journal, Brachytherapy.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How harmful are nano-copper and anti-fungal combinations in the waterways?A recently published article in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, 'Effects of Micronized and Nano-Copper Azole on Marine Benthic Communities' explores the risks to the smallest creatures in aquatic communities posed by increased use of the anti-fouling wood treatment.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Knowledge of larval fish just a drop in the oceanA combination of morphological and molecular approaches gives researchers a first glimpse of Red Sea larval fish communities.
6h
Live Science
'Dancing with the Dead' Ritual Could Help Plague SpreadThe current plague outbreak in Madagascar has killed more than 100 people, and officials say that a centuries-old tradition may increase the risk of further spread, according to news reports.
6h
Ars Technica
Twitter drops hammer and sickle on RT, Sputnik ad buys over election shenanigans Enlarge / "They will love this promoted tweet, da?" (credit: Kremlin official photo) In a blog post published today, a spokesperson for Twitter announced that the company has decided to block paid advertisement posts by Russian media outlets RT and Sputnik. "Twitter has made the policy decision to off-board advertising from all accounts owned by Russia Today (RT) and Sputnik, effective immediatel
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mimicking biological process, hydrogel signals and releases proteinsAn artificial system using a DNA-laced hydrogel can receive a chemical signal and release the appropriate protein, according to researchers. Further stimulation by the chemical signal continues to trigger a response.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Transplanted hematopoietic stem cells reverse damage caused by neuro-muscular disorderA single infusion of wildtype hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) into a mouse model of Friedreich's ataxia (FA) measurably halted cellular damage caused by the degenerative disease, researchers report.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The oceans were colder than we thoughtA team of researchers has discovered a flaw in the way past ocean temperatures have been estimated up to now. Their findings could mean that the current period of climate change is unparalleled over the last 100 million years.
6h
Live Science
Where Are All the Intelligent Aliens? Maybe They're Trapped in Buried OceansMaybe intelligent life is widespread throughout the galaxy, but most of it lives in deep, dark subsurface oceans that are cut off from the rest of the cosmos.
6h
The Atlantic
Could a Controversial Bill Sink Criminal-Justice Reform in Congress? If Congress follows through on its plan to take up criminal-justice reform next year, legislators and advocates could wrestle once again with an obscure proposal that would reshape federal criminal laws—that is, if it doesn’t imperil the reform effort first. A bill drafted by a group of Senate Republicans earlier this year would tweak the mens rea requirement in federal statutes, adding a default
6h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Bloodhound car tested ahead of 1,000mph record attemptThe 'world's fastest car' goes through its first public tests ahead of a land speed record attempt.
6h
Gizmodo
Twitter Is Very Sorry for Asking Russian State Media for So Much Money Photo: Getty In belated response to an American intelligence report that concluded RT and Sputnik tried to influence the 2016 election, Twitter announced on Thursday that it is removing all advertising from accounts owned by the Russian state-sponsored news outlets. The company also promised to donate $1.9 million to help fund outside research into how the platform can be used during elections, a
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dutch know-how may have gone into arms of mass destructionThe Dutch government has admitted that technology from the Netherlands may have been used to develop weapons of mass destruction in Iran, Pakistan or Syria.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pregnancy poses no greater risk to breast cancer survivorsA recent study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute indicates that pregnancy does not incur a greater risk of relapse for survivors of breast cancer.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
For college men, low awareness of HPV risk -- Education may help increase vaccination rateMale collegiate athletes have high rates of risk factors for infection with the cancer-causing human papillomavirus (HPV), but have low HPV vaccination rates and low awareness of their personal health risks, according to a study in the November issue of The Nurse Practitioner, published by Wolters Kluwer.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Late Tiassic terrestrial ecosystem changesThe Norian Chinle Formation in the Southwestern United States provides a snapshot into an ancient terrestrial ecosystem with its famous petrified tree trunks and various plant and vertebrate remains. The fossil plant assemblages, including spores and pollen grains, provide useful information on past vegetation and the response of the vegetation to climate changes.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
FRAX online risk assessments reach 20 million milestoneA new study confirms that intervention strategies based on FRAX fracture probabilities are highly effective, and more reliable than the use of BMD alone both in terms of identifying high-risk individuals for treatment and in avoiding intervention in those at low risk. The increasing use of FRAX probabilities worldwide to assess patients is reflected in the milestone of 20 million global calculatio
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bat Poop: A Reliable Source of Climate ChangeIsotopes found in bat guano over the last 1,200 years provide scientists with information on how the climate was and is changing.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Good long-term improvement after 'reverse' shoulder replacement in patients under 60For younger patients with severe damage to the rotator cuff muscles, a 'reverse' shoulder replacement provides lasting improvement in shoulder function, according to a study in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in partnership with Wolters Kluwer.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers greenlight gas detection at room temperatureRussian researchers proposed sensors capable of operating at room temperature. Their new nanocomposite sensors are based on zinc and indium oxides, and their efficiency is maximized by green light illumination. The proposed device could be used to detect combustible, explosive, or poisonous substances in the atmosphere even at low concentrations.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The Guanches originated from North Africa, shows DNA-studyThe aboriginal inhabitants of the Canary Islands, commonly known as the Guanches, originated from North Africa. A team of international researchers led by Stockholm University, and including Liverpool John Moores University's Dr Linus Girdland-Flink, has now confirmed this long-held hypothesis. The result has been achieved by sequencing ancient DNA extracted from the University of Edinburgh's coll
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Citizen scientist spots comet tails streaking past distant starCitizen scientist Thomas Jacobs was the first to spot tell-tale signs that a comet was orbiting a distant star monitored by the Kepler Space Observatory. Professor Saul Rappaport (Massachusetts Institute of Technology; MIT) and his team then collaborated with Jacobs to report the discovery in new research published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UC San Diego researchers solve mystery of oxygenation connections in the brainUsing an advanced form of optical microscopy, scientists have uncovered how oxygen levels -- even those in different brain hemispheres -- connect to share signals when the body rests. Their results have immediate impact on human health and medicine applications, including higher resolution imaging methods to study connections within the brain.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Manipulating mitochondrial networks could promote healthy agingManipulating mitochondrial networks inside cells -- either by dietary restriction or by genetic manipulation that mimics it -- may increase lifespan and promote health, according to new research from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mending hearts in three dimensionsResearchers from Kyoto University iCeMS and Osaka University have made biodegradable aligned nanofibers as a scaffold for culturing cardiomyocytes (CMs) derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs).
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Diversity and immigration increase productivity in microbial communitiesNatural selection quickly turns a melting pot of microorganisms into a highly efficient community, new research shows.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
3-D axon assemblies pave the way for drug discoveryJapanese and American scientists have together designed a microdevice that efficiently promotes the formation of axon fascicles from stem cell-derived neurons. The 3-D structures are common in the body, but have proven difficult to prepare in the lab. The microdevice is expected to be a resourceful tool for drug discovery against neurodegeneration.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Bandit-masked' feathered dinosaur hid from predators using multiple types of camouflageResearchers from the University of Bristol have revealed how a small feathered dinosaur used its color patterning, including a bandit mask-like stripe across its eyes, to avoid being detected by its predators and prey.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Iconic Sinosauropteryx dinosaur had bandit mask, lived in open terrainWhile fossils have allowed researchers to reconstruct much about dinosaurs' many impressive forms, it wasn't until more recently that scientists realized they could discern from preserved skin and feathers many details of dinosaurs' color patterns, too. Now researchers reporting in Current Biology on Oct. 26 who've carefully examined three specimens of the iconic Sinosauropteryx dinosaur from Chin
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate change may slowly starve bamboo lemursReporting in Current Biology on Oct. 26, researchers provide evidence to suggest that as Earth's climate changes, bamboo lemurs will gradually be forced to eat culm for longer periods. Ultimately, they suggest that, based on an analysis of anatomical, behavioral, paleontological, and climate data, the lemurs could slowly starve.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel technology provides powerful new means for studying neural circuitsWith 'trans-Tango,' a technology developed at Brown University and described in a new study in Neuron, scientists can bridge across the connections between neurons to trace -- and in the future control -- brain circuits.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Messaging app Line skyrockets in Tokyo trade as profits jumpMessaging app Line surged in Tokyo trade Thursday, posting its biggest gain since it was first traded on Japan's premier stock exchange in 2016 as the company reported better-than-expected earnings.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Some people with cystic fibrosis might live longer because of genetic mutationsGenetic mutations to an 'epithelial sodium pathway' could protect against cystic fibrosis and its debilitating effects on the lungs, a new study suggests.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Psychological toll of shame in military personnelFeelings of shame may make the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) more severe in current and former members of the Armed Services, suggests new research.
6h
Gizmodo
Here's How Engines Lose Power Over Time GIF gif: Engineering Explained/ YouTube As soon as your car leaves the factory and is properly broken in, it’s probably cranking out the most power it will ever make in stock form. That’s because, over time, certain components wear down; here’s how that happens. For an engine to run well, it needs the right supply of fuel, proper intake and exhaust flows, good compression, and a healthy spark to
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Diversity and immigration increase productivity in microbial communitiesNatural selection quickly turns a melting pot of microorganisms into a highly efficient community, new research shows.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Bandit-masked' feathered dinosaur hid from predators using multiple types of camouflageResearchers from the University of Bristol have revealed how a small feathered dinosaur used its colour patterning, including a bandit mask-like stripe across its eyes, to avoid being detected by its predators and prey.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Twitter bars ads from Russia's RT, SputnikTwitter announced Thursday it was banning advertisements from Russia-based media outlets RT and Sputnik, in response to US intelligence findings that the groups sought to spread misinformation during the 2016 presidential elections.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Citizen scientist spots comet tails streaking past distant starCitizen scientist Thomas Jacobs was the first to spot tell-tale signs that a comet was orbiting a distant star monitored by the Kepler Space Observatory. Professor Saul Rappaport (Massachusetts Institute of Technology; MIT) and his team then collaborated with Jacobs to report the discovery in new research published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change may slowly starve bamboo lemursMadagascar's Cat-sized greater bamboo lemurs are considered one of the most endangered primate species on Earth. They almost exclusively eat a single species of bamboo, including the woody trunk, known as culm. But they prefer the more nutritious and tender bamboo shoots and use their specialized teeth to gnaw on culm only when necessary, during the dry season.
6h
Feed: All Latest
Meet the High Schooler Shaking Up Artificial IntelligenceOne author of a new paper on artificial intelligence is a 17-year-old high school senior.
6h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Climate change may threaten these bamboo-eating lemursLonger dry spells and more nutrient-poor bamboo might eventually doom the greater bamboo lemur, a critically endangered species.
6h
Gizmodo
Adorable Cretaceous-Era Dinosaur Sprouted Raccoon-Like Bandit’s Eyes Artist’s depiction of Sinosauropteryx. (Image: Bristol University) By analyzing the bones of a small, feathered dinosaur known as Sinosauropteryx, paleontologists have mapped its unique color patterning. Incredibly, this creature featured a bandit mask-like stripe across its eyes, similar to some mammals and birds living today. Sinosauropteryx (pronounced “Sine-oh-sore-op-tear-icks”) was first di
6h
Scientific American Content: Global
What the White House's Opioid Emergency Declaration MeansThe move makes it easier for treatment to be prescribed remotely, but does not allocate more money for the crisis -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SK Hynix posts record profits on rising demandSouth Korean chipmaker SK Hynix posted record profits in the third quarter, it said Thursday, fuelled by strong demand for its memory chips coupled with rising global prices.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bayer books bumper Q3 as Monsanto merger waits in wingsGerman chemicals and pharmaceuticals giant Bayer said Thursday it booked a huge windfall gain in the third quarter, but the group is still waiting for approval of its mega-merger with US seeds and pesticides maker Monsanto.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nokia shares dive as company warns of tough marketShares in Finnish telecoms giant Nokia have taken a tumble after it warned of tougher competition in China and a weaker global market.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Social media companies agree to third congressional hearingFacebook, Twitter and Google say they will send representatives to a Senate Judiciary subcommittee hearing next week on Russian meddling in the 2016 election.
6h
Gizmodo
Developer Shows How iPhone Apps Can Theoretically Spy on You With Basic Camera Permissions Image Source: Apple A warning to all: On Wednesday, a developer who works for Google published a demonstration app on GitHub that he claims shows off the creepy ways a rogue iPhone app can photograph you at any time without your knowledge if you grant it camera permissions. Felix Krauss is the founder of Fastlane , a developer toolset that Google acquired earlier this year. In a blog post on his
7h
The Atlantic
Mike Pence Promises to Defend Christians in the Middle East Vice President Mike Pence has recently been on a circuit of conservative Christian conferences discussing religious persecution in the Middle East. He addressed Christians United for Israel in July , spoke at Franklin Graham’s conference on international religious freedom in May , and regularly incorporates the issue into his public statements. On Wednesday, he continued this tour with a speech a
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Comcast beats 3Q profit forecastsComcast is reporting third-quarter net income of $2.65 billion, easily topping Wall Street expectations.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ford's net income jumps in 3Q on truck salesPickup trucks helped Ford Motor Co. to a strong finish in the third quarter despite lower global sales.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientific evaluation of rhino diets improves zooA recently published study in the journal Pachyderm highlights the ongoing effort of accredited zoos to address challenges and improve the sustainability of endangered species populations in their care. The study, co-authored by scientists from San Diego Zoo Global and Mars Hill University, evaluated fertility issues in captive-born southern white rhinos and determined that diets including soy and
7h
Ars Technica
Reddit conducts wide-ranging purge of offensive subreddits Enlarge / Instead of thinking about horrible subreddits, look at this adorable kitten instead. (credit: Joaquim Gaspar ) Reddit has long been the most permissive of the major social media sites. Whereas Facebook tries to ensure that all content on the site is suitable for a general audience, Reddit willingly hosts content that is sexually explicit, violent, or disturbing in a variety of other way
7h
Gizmodo
Thursday's Best Deals: Camera Accessories Gold Box, Bluetooth Headphones, LED Flashlights, and More See our deals this Thursday on camera accessories , bluetooth headphones , LED flashlights , the final day for the Super Mario Odyssey discount , and much more. Bookmark Kinja Deals and follow us on Twitter to never miss a deal. Top Tech Deals Camera Accessories Gold Box The best camera is the one you have with you, but that’s much more likely to be your DSLR if you take advantage of today’s Amaz
7h
Ars Technica
Gordon Murray’s new car company has got me excited Enlarge / A cutaway of the forthcoming TVR Griffith, showing the iStream construction. Put yourself in Gordon Murray 's shoes. You've designed some of the most successful Formula 1 cars of all time. You followed that up with a couple of road cars—the Light Car Company Rocket and the McLaren F1—that were hailed as genius but only built in tiny numbers. So what's next? Rethinking the entire way car
7h
Gizmodo
Stranger Things and the History of the Trope of 'Coming Back Wrong' Still: Netflix via YouTube Stranger Things returns this week, showing what happened to Will Byers one year after returning to his family and friends. Unfortunately for Will, something happened during his time in the Upside Down–he came back wrong. io9 video explores the source of this phenomenon in the latest Tropes In History. Coming Back Wrong is what happens when characters are negatively chan
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The sea turtle that refused to be beaten by the stormWhen Eleanor the sea turtle was caught in a tropical storm off the coast of Florida, she coped surprisingly well. In fact, she hardly needed to use any extra energy during the four days the storm raged - and neither was she injured.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mutation in fallopian tube lesions may help catch ovarian cancer years earlierScreening for tumor cells in the fallopian tubes of women at high-risk for ovarian cancer may help detect the cancer years before it develops further, suggests a new study published online this week in Nature Communications. The new study traces the origins of high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma, the most frequent type of ovarian cancer that is often diagnosed at advanced stages, back to fallopian
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The nose reveals our relationship with our emotionsAn alexithymic individual has difficulty, to a greater or lesser degree, in relating to emotions. New research seeks to shed light on new aspects of the condition using olfactory tests. The results demonstrate that one of the characteristics of alexithymia is the altered physiological response to olfactory stimuli. The tests also showed that there are differences in reactions between subjects char
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The most exotic fluid has an unexpectedly low viscosityCollisions of lead nuclei in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) particle accelerator take place at such great energies that quarks that are normally confined inside nucleons are released and, together with the gluons that hold them together, form a stream of particularly exotic fluid: quark-gluon plasma. A new, more detailed theoretical model for this plasma, presented by a group of physicists from P
7h
Ars Technica
Bad Rabbit used NSA “EternalRomance” exploit to spread, researchers say The Bad Rabbit ransom page. Despite early reports that there was no use of National Security Agency-developed exploits in this week's crypto-ransomware outbreak, research released by Cisco Talos suggests that the ransomware worm known as " Bad Rabbit " did in fact use a stolen Equation Group exploit revealed by Shadowbrokers to spread across victims' networks. The attackers used EternalRomance, a
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Far from harpoons, whales star in Iceland ecotourism boomIceland's whales have traditionally ended up as steaks on a plate. But times are changing, and as tourists stream to the North Atlantic island, whales are now the stars of a flourishing ecotourism scene.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The Bakhshali manuscript: The world's oldest zero?Last month, the Bodleian Library at Oxford University announced that a Sanskrit manuscript housed in the library for the last century had been dated using radiocarbon techniques. Oxford's radiocarbon dating laboratory announced that the three of the birch-bark folios of the Bakhshali Manuscript could be dated to roughly 300 CE, 700 CE and 900 CE.
7h
The Atlantic
The Border-Wall Prototypes Are Up—Now What? Nine months into his presidency, Donald Trump is getting a glimpse of what his border wall, which he made a cornerstone of his campaign, might look like. Over the course of 30 days, six contractors from across the country worked on eight separate prototypes. The samples, which are located in the San Diego area, differ in the materials they’re made of, as well as in height and design: Four of them
7h
Futurity.org
Your sense of smell changes throughout the day Smell sensitivity varies over the course of a day, new research suggests. The pattern, according to the data collected by studying 37 teens, tracks with the body’s internal day-night cycle, or circadian rhythm. “This finding is very important for olfactory perception science,” says Rachel Herz, lead author of the study and an adjunct assistant professor of psychiatry and human behavior at the War
7h
Scientific American Content: Global
The Pitfalls of Growing a Monster PumpkinSquashing the competition at a giant pumpkin weigh-off requires patience, persistence—and a little bit of luck. ​ -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New Mexico moves to defuse outrage over science standardsNew Mexico's public education secretary said the state will adopt widely used school science standards in their entirety in response to public outrage over proposed changes that omitted references to global warming, evolution and the Earth's age.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The importance of addressing poor nutrition in patients with liver failurePoor nutrition is common in patients with liver failure, or cirrhosis, and it can lead to muscle wasting, weakness, fatigue, and worse outcomes before and after patients undergo liver transplantation.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The Bakhshali manuscript: The world's oldest zero?Last month, the Bodleian Library at Oxford University announced that a Sanskrit manuscript housed in the library for the last century contains the oldest known written zero, although not a 'true' zero. An international group of historians of Indian mathematics has now challenged those findings.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Details uncovered in development of immune cell implicated in cancer, autoimmune diseasesScientists understand new details about the development of Th17, a type of immune cell that is believed to play a complex role in cancer, and is also implicated in autoimmune diseases.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More early stage lung cancer patients survive the diseaseWith the advancement of surgical and radiation therapy strategies for stage 1 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), more patients are being treated, resulting in higher survival rates, according to a study published online today in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sidetracked by a donut?Sugary, fatty foods are a distraction -- more so than low-calorie foods and everyday objects -- even if you are busy with a task that isn't remotely related to food, or are not even thinking about eating. This is according to Corbin Cunningham and Howard Egeth of Johns Hopkins University in the US, in the journal Psychonomic Bulletin & Review which is published by Springer.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The sea turtle that refused to be beaten by the stormWhen Eleanor the sea turtle was caught in a tropical storm off the coast of Florida, she coped surprisingly well. In fact, she hardly needed to use any extra energy during the four days the storm raged -- and neither was she injured.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers identify a test to target cancer drugDoctors are developing a more personalised approach to the treatment of bowel cancer, thanks to research which has found a way of screening tumours for their susceptibility to drug therapy.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cataract surgery in older women associated with decreased risk of deathIn older women with cataracts in the Women's Health Initiative, cataract surgery was associated with a lower risk for overall and cause-specific death, although whether this association is explained by the intervention of cataract surgery is unclear, according to a study published by JAMA Ophthalmology.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Deep-depletion: A new concept for MOSFETsDiamond is largely recognized as the ideal material in wide bandgap development, but realizing its full potential in field-effect transistors has been challenging. Researchers incorporate a new approach by using the deep-depletion regime of bulk-boron-doped diamond MOSFETs. The new proof of concept enables the production of simple diamond MOSFET structures from single boron-doped epilayer stacks.
7h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
How we'll earn money in a future without jobs | Martin FordMachines that can think, learn and adapt are coming -- and that could mean that we humans will end up with significant unemployment. What should we do about it? In a straightforward talk about a controversial idea, futurist Martin Ford makes the case for separating income from traditional work and instituting a universal basic income.
7h
Live Science
Why Women Who Arch Their Backs Are More Alluring to MenMen appear to be more drawn to women who slightly curve their backs, revealing what could be an evolutionary tactic used by females to imply they are willing to mate, a new study from Portugal finds.
7h
Ars Technica
Big hard disks may be breaking the bathtub curve (credit: Alpha six ) Low-cost cloud backup and storage company Backblaze has published its latest set of hard disk reliability numbers for the second quarter of 2017. While the company has tended to stick with consumer-oriented hard disks, a good pricing deal has meant that it also now has several thousand enterprise-class disks , allowing for some large-scale comparisons to be drawn between the
7h
Scientific American Content: Global
Auto and Utility Industries Team Up to Tackle EmissionsVehicle manufacturers and utilities plan to find ways to cut the U.S. transportation system's energy use in half by 2050 -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pope gets philosophical with ISS crew in space chatPope Francis chatted with six astronauts at the International Space Station (ISS) on Thursday, kicking off the rare interview with a philosophical question on "man's place in the universe".
7h
Ars Technica
Verizon creates new $10 monthly charge to remove video throttling Enlarge (credit: Verizon ) Verizon Wireless customers will soon regain the ability to stream mobile video at the highest resolution, but it's going to cost extra. Starting November 3, Verizon Wireless customers will have the option of paying another $10 a month to remove the cap on video resolution. This is the latest in a series of changes at Verizon related to unlimited data plans and video qua
7h
Popular Science
This lonely human skull might belong to an ancient tsunami victim Environment The 6,000-year-old remains are still rather mysterious. The authors think that it is possible that this person might be the earliest known tsunami victim, though proving cause of death is difficult when you only have a…
7h
Futurity.org
Californians used less water with drought in the news As newspaper coverage of the California drought increased, so did water conservation in the San Francisco Bay Area, according to a new study that links real water consumption data with public attention. “A number of water utilities that we work with observed unprecedented and unexpected water conservation levels during the recent drought in California compared to previous ones,” says hydrologist
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Wobbling galaxies: New evidence for dark matter makes it even more exoticAstronomers have discovered that the brightest galaxies within galaxy clusters 'wobble' relative to the cluster's center of mass. This unexpected result is inconsistent with predictions made by the current standard model of dark matter. With further analysis it may provide insights into the nature of dark matter, perhaps even indicating that new physics is at work.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Deep-depletion: A new concept for MOSFETsSilicon has provided enormous benefits to the power electronics industry. But performance of silicon-based power electronics is nearing maximum capacity.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Low-cost clocks for landing on the moonA European clock accurate to a trillionth of a second is set to be used on satellites and missions to the moon.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanoparticles with pulse laser controlled antibacterial propertiesSilver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are known to have excellent antibacterial properties and are considered by many to be a strong contender in the critical search for an answer to antibiotic-resistant bacteria. They block enzymes and can cause bacteria to have irregularly shaped membranes, producing results ranging from inhibited growth to cell death. However, a collaboration of researchers from Kumamot
7h
Feed: All Latest
Watch Artist Shawna Peterson Bend Glass Tubes to Make Neon ArtA visit with an artist who creates illuminating art out of neon tubes.
7h
NeuWrite San Diego
Engaged teaching and learning: Ready, set, action!When I first signed up for formal training in best teaching practices from UCSD’s Center for Engaged Teaching, I thought I would learn good techniques for imparting knowledge to students. What I actually learned about was how to help students build their own knowledge, particularly through incorporating active learning in the classroom. Here are some […]
8h
Gizmodo
Deadspin Second Woman: George H.W. Deadspin Second Woman: George H.W. Bush Groped Me | Jezebel Emma Stone Is Latest Celeb to Reportedly Be Dating an SNL Employee | The Root Hey, I Can Play This Game Too, Guys | Earther What the Hell Happened to the March for Science? | Splinter John Kelly Is Not a Good Person |
8h
The Atlantic
'We, Too, Were Forced to Seek Refuge' Since August, Burma has sharply escalated its systematic assault against a Muslim minority people there called the Rohingya, in a ravaging campaign of murder and rape which the top United Nations human rights official considers a “textbook example of ethnic cleansing.” On October 23, the State Department spokesperson denounced “atrocities” and “violent, traumatic abuses,” though so has so far avo
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Cloudy with a chance of protonsESA's Gaia mission, in orbit since December 2013, is surveying more than a thousand million stars in our Galaxy, monitoring each target star about 70 times over a five-year period and precisely charting their positions, distances, movements and brightness.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Irish America more distant from its cultural roots, study findsIrish America has become more distant from its cultural roots and there is a need to regenerate community and identity among the diaspora in the United States, according to a report by the UCD Clinton Institute.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Individual with complete spinal cord injury regains voluntary motor functionA man with a complete spinal cord injury, who had lost motor function below the level of the injury, has regained the ability to move his legs voluntarily and stand six years after his injury.
8h
The Economist: The world this week
Politics this week
8h
The Economist: The world this week
KAL's cartoon
8h
The Economist: The world this week
Business this week
8h
Science | The Guardian
Bloodhound supersonic car has first public test drive – video A British supersonic car currently under development has its first public test drive at Cornwall airport in Newquay, south-west England. The Bloodhound reached a speed of around 200mph on the 1.7-mile runway. The team behind the vehicle say it is part fighter jet, part Formula One car and part spaceship. The goal is for it to reach a speed of 1,000mph on a run in South Africa next year Continue r
8h
Gizmodo
Things You Can Do on the Dark Web That Aren't Illegal Illustration: Angelica Alzona/GMG The dark web isn’t just for buying drugs and hiring assassins . It’s a massive network of websites and communities that exists outside of mainstream internet culture, and there’s plenty to do on the dark web without breaking any laws—from book clubs to crisis preparation. Here’s a look at some of the weirdest and most subversive dark web sites that won’t lead a t
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientific evaluation of rhino diets improves zooA recently published study in the journal Pachyderm highlights the ongoing effort of accredited zoos to address challenges and improve the sustainability of endangered species populations in their care. The study, co-authored by scientists from San Diego Zoo Global and Mars Hill University, evaluated fertility issues in captive-born southern white rhinos and determined that diets including soy and
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Politicians who use violent rhetoric are driving greater polarizationScroll through Twitter or watch an NFL game and you'll quickly remember we live in a time of unprecedented political polarization. Who's to blame for the lack of unity? According to researchers, politicians' penchant for using violent language isn't helping.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Shares soar as Twitter eyes profit by year-end (Update)Twitter said Thursday it hopes to post its first-ever profit by the end of the year, delivering a stronger-than-expected update which sent its shares flying higher.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New challenge to centuries-old theories on Roman glassNew research from The Australian National University (ANU) is challenging centuries-old theories on how ancient Roman cameo glass was made and suggests the British Museum's most famous Roman glasswork is wrongly classified.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The hi-tech archaeological scientistsThe lone fedora-clad archaeologist armed only with his trusty whip on a swashbuckling adventure to discover ancient relics from lost civilizations makes for a great movie plotline, but archaeology doesn't really work that way.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Self-driving in snow: Waymo to start tests in MichiganWaymo's autonomous vehicles are heading to Michigan for some cold-weather testing.
8h
Viden
High-tech ørkenby bliver 300 gange større end KøbenhavnSaudi Arabien planlægger megaby til 3000 milliarder kroner, der skal strække sig over tre lande og udelukkende drives af grøn energi.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tiny chip-based methane spectrometer could help reduce greenhouse gas emissionsThe process of extracting natural gas from the earth or transporting it through pipelines can release methane into the atmosphere. Methane, the primary component of natural gas, is a greenhouse gas with a warming potential approximately 25 times larger than carbon dioxide, making it very efficient at trapping atmospheric heat energy. A new chip-based methane spectrometer, that is smaller than a di
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sustainable seafood top of menu for new research groupA new research group will focus on how seafood can be safely and sustainably produced for the world's growing population.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Virtual soccer management game yields real-life lessons in economics, human behaviorA study using a soccer management game to explore more than a half-million participants' monetary choices confirmed it's possible to use a virtual world to mimic real-world behavior on a grand scale. The results open the door to the predictive use of game worlds in policymaking, commercial and other real-life applications, said co-author Edward Castronova, a professor in The Media School at Indian
8h
Gizmodo
Ancient Skull Fragment Likely Belongs to Oldest Known Tsunami Victim Image: Arthur Durband A 6,000-year-old skull found in Papua New Guinea is the earliest record of a human killed in a tsunami, according to new research published this week. Back in 1929, Australian geologist Paul Hossfeld uncovered a partial human skull outside the coastal town of Aitape in Papua New Guinea. An international team of scientists recently returned to the site in an effort to find ou
8h
Futurity.org
We like emotional user reviews, but not rants or gushing Although some emotion makes user reviews more persuasive, online shoppers often ignore reviews they perceive to be overly emotional, researchers report. “Ranting about a bad experience may be cathartic for the author, but it is counterproductive for reviewers…” Online reviews play an increasingly important role in consumer behavior as more Americans opt to purchase items online. Previously, studi
8h
The Atlantic
When Kids Have to Act Like Parents, It Affects Them for Life Laura Kiesel was only 6 years old when she became a parent to her infant brother. At home, his crib was placed directly next to her bed, so that when he cried at night, she was the one to pick him up and sing him back to sleep. She says she was also in charge of changing his diapers and making sure he was fed every day. For the majority of her early childhood, she remembers, she tended to his nee
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Comcast's cable customers tumble as cord-cutting picks upComcast's video upswing could be sputtering out.
8h
Science | The Guardian
Universities! Here's your treachery-free post-Brexit syllabus A Tory MP and the Daily Mail have revealed that UK universities are hotbeds of anti-Brexit thinking. A new and improved syllabus will put a stop to all that Universities! What are they like? If they’re not taking money from people who don’t even use them like no other public service ever, they’re championing anti-Brexit thinking ! Just because they rely on things like knowledge and education and
8h
Futurity.org
Sea levels could bring greater storm damage to NYC A warming climate that causes rising sea levels could lead to greater future storm damage to New York City, new research suggests. The research also finds, however, that the paths of stronger future storms may shift offshore, changing the coastal risk for the city. “Sea level is rising and higher sea level increases the damages from coastal storms…” “If we cause large sea-level rise, that dominat
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cell-like lipid vesicles which can be populated with natural cell proteinsEvery cell needs a shell. The cell interior is separated from its surroundings by a membrane made up of fat molecules, helping to create the environment needed for the cell to survive. Development of artificial cells is similarly reliant on a chemically and mechanically stable shell. Within the framework of the MaxSynBio network, researchers from the Max Planck Society and the Universities of Heid
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Clean energy can advance Indigenous reconciliationCanada's remote communities need reliable and affordable energy to operate their schools and businesses and heat their homes. But the current situation is woefully inadequate.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The theory that humans emerged in Africa is often questioned—that's good for scienceFor nearly a century now the African root of human evolutionary theory has remained strong and unbowed. It is proved by a tremendous fossil record that documents the diversity of hominoids – apes and their relatives – across the continent through tens of millions of years.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Kazan Federal University ionosonde registered an earthquake in ChileThe Cyclone ionosonde (creatied by Dr. Akchurin, Head of the Near Space Studies Lab of SAU AstroChallenge) can detect earthquakes at distances as big as 15,000 kilometers. The paper also states that earthquake signatures for mid-latitude KFU ionosonde can be up to 3 times more prominent than on a low-latitude ionosonde in Japan.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How much does life weigh?ETH researchers have developed a scale for measuring cells. It allows the weight of individual living cells, and any changes in this weight, to be determined quickly and accurately for the first time. The invention has also aroused significant interest both in and outside the field of biology.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tiny chip-based methane spectrometer could help reduce greenhouse gas emissionsScientists from IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, N.Y., developed the new methane spectrometer, which is smaller than today's standard spectrometers and more economical to manufacture.
8h
Gizmodo
Twitter Admits It Accidentally Inflated User Growth for Three Years Image: Getty Today Twitter revealed that while it’s actually growing now—it added four million monthly Tweeters over the last three months—the company has made a crucial error: It accidentally inflated user growth in its reports for the previous three years. On Thursday morning, Twitter released its quarterly earnings in a letter to shareholders . In the report, the company wrote that it recently
8h
Gizmodo
Watch 245 People Jump and Swing Off a Bridge Like a Giant Dangling Snake GIF No longer confined by the limitations of a printed book, the Guinness Book of World Records has infinitely expanded to include almost every kind of questionable achievement humanity can attempt. Even grabbing 244 friends, jumping off a bridge , and swinging by a rope is enough to gain you pseudo-fame—at least until 246 people try the same thing. This record-setting stunt took place in Hortola
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why hot weather records continue to tumble worldwideIt sometimes feels like we get a lot of "record-breaking" weather. Whether it's a heatwave in Europe or the "Angry Summer" in Australia, the past few years have seen temperature records tumble.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study makes inroads toward farming gooseneck barnaclesA study led by a University of Oregon marine biologist has moved the seafood industry one step closer to farming gooseneck barnacles, a pricey delicacy in Spain and a common sight on the West Coast.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Development of a highly-accurate computational model of human metabolismA Korean research team from KAIST developed a computational framework that enables the reconstruction of a comprehensive computational model of human metabolism, which allows for an accurate prediction of personal metabolic features (or phenotypes).
8h
Gizmodo
Sony's Crazy A7R Mark III Is Way More Camera Than You Probably Need, But That's What Makes It So Fun All photos: Sam Rutherford/Gizmodo When it comes to mirrorless cameras, especially pro-grade ones, Sony’s full-frame Alphas are king. Panasonic’s Lumix GH5 and Olympus’ OM-D E-M1 Mark II come close, but both of those have Micro Four Thirds sensors, which for a lot of picky people puts them out of the running. And when Sony released the A9 earlier this spring, we said said shooting with Sony’s $4,
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Yellowstone spawned twin super-eruptions that altered global climateA new geological record of the Yellowstone supervolcano's last catastrophic eruption is rewriting the story of what happened 630,000 years ago and how it affected Earth's climate. This eruption formed the vast Yellowstone caldera observed today, the second largest on Earth.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A drier south: Europe's drought trends match climate change projectionsResearchers published new findings that suggest European drought trends are lining up with climate change projections, pointing to decreases in drought frequency in the north and increases in drought frequency in the south.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Piezoelectrics stretch their potential with a method for flexible stickingThin-film piezoelectrics, with dimensions on the scale of micrometers or smaller, offer potential for new applications where smaller dimensions or a lower voltage operation are required. Researchers have demonstrated a new technique for making piezoelectric microelectromechanical systems by connecting a sample of lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric thin films to flexible polymer substrates.
8h
Ingeniøren
Spådom: 125 milliarder IoT-enheder i 2030Stor vækst i industriel IoT, intelligente hjem og intelligente byer frem mod 2021.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Attitudes to medium-density living are changing in Sydney and MelbourneAustralia is increasingly linked to a fast-growing global population. The populations of Sydney and Melbourne are both expected to exceed 8.5 million by 2061. What will Australia's cities look like then? Will they still be among the world's lowest-density cities?
8h
Feed: All Latest
Telemedicine Is Forcing Doctors to Learn 'Webside' MannerIn a modern twist on bedside manner, doctors are learning to communicate empathy even when their patients are hundreds of miles away.
8h
Futurity.org
Cactus genomes reveal complex family tree When scientists sequenced the complete genomes of four columnar cacti, they were surprised to find that their family relationships are not as straightforward as their shapes suggest. The cactus family tree and the giant cacti in particular—the giant saguaro, organ pipe, senita, and cardón, also called the Mexican giant cactus—have been very difficult to trace. Found only in the Americas, cacti ha
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Small droplets are a surprise: They disappear more slowly than they 'should'Seemingly, we already know everything there is to know about evaporation. However, we've had another surprise: it turns out that small drops are stragglers and they evaporate more slowly than their larger counterparts, according to physicists from the Warsaw Institutes of the Polish Academy of Sciences.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Doctors need cultural trainingGeneral practioners in Norway show little competency in understanding different cultures, a new study shows.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
For older adults, keeping your heart healthy may protect against disabilityRecently, a team of researchers studied older Latin Americans to examine the relationship between the American Heart Association's definition of 'ideal cardiovascular health' and disability. Their study was published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Association.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dynamic catalytic converters for clean air in the cityReducing pollutant emission of vehicles and meeting stricter exhaust gas standards are major challenges when developing catalytic converters. A new concept might help to efficiently treat exhaust gases after the cold start of engines and in urban traffic and to reduce the consumption of expensive noble metal. It is based on the interaction between platinum and the cerium oxide carrier to control c
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hubble discovers 'wobbling galaxies'Using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers have discovered that the brightest galaxies within galaxy clusters 'wobble' relative to the cluster's centre of mass. This unexpected result is inconsistent with predictions made by the current standard model of dark matter. With further analysis it may provide insights into the nature of dark matter, perhaps even indicating that new physics i
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Outpatient antibiotics raise risk for acquiring C. difficile infection in the communityOutpatient antibiotic use is a primary risk factor for acquiring Clostridium difficile infection in the community, reinforcing the need for appropriate prescribing in this setting, a new study published in Open Forum Infectious Diseases confirms. The findings also suggest that a recent visit to the emergency department, independent of antibiotic use, may also be a risk factor for the infection, wh
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Reflecting light off satellite backs up Wheeler's quantum theory thought experimentA team of researchers with Università degli Studi di Padova and the Matera Laser Ranging Observatory in Italy has conducted experiments that add credence to John Wheeler's quantum theory thought experiment. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the group describes their experiment and what they believe it showed.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Twisted' light could illuminate new path for wireless communicationsScientists have taken an important step towards using 'twisted' light as a form of wireless, high-capacity data transmission which could make fibre-optics obsolete.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How glaciers disappeared from Scotland at the end of the last Ice AgeResearch led by a Stirling academic has revealed how glaciers disappeared from Scotland at the end of the last Ice Age.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The oceans were once colder than previously believedA team of EPFL and European researchers has discovered a flaw in the way past ocean temperatures have been estimated up to now. Their findings could mean that the current period of climate change is unparalleled over the last 100 million years.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dynamic catalytic converters for clean air in the cityReducing pollutant emission of vehicles and meeting stricter exhaust gas standards are major challenges when developing catalytic converters. A new concept might help to efficiently treat exhaust gases after the cold start of engines and in urban traffic and to reduce the consumption of expensive noble metal. It is based on the interaction between platinum and the cerium oxide carrier to control c
8h
Scientific American Content: Global
Kid Fears in Adults: Separation AnxietyThe term “separation anxiety” usually conjures the image of a tearful toddler, or worse, a whimpering dog, but millions of grown-ups live with separation anxiety, too -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Ars Technica
Waymo starts testing in Michigan to master snow and ice Enlarge (credit: Waymo) Waymo announced on Thursday that it is bringing its Chrysler Pacifica minivans to the Detroit area to test how the company's technology performs in the region's harsh winters. "Our ultimate goal is for our fully self-driving cars to operate safely and smoothly in all kinds of environments," Waymo CEO John Krafcik writes. Krafcik says that Waymo has been doing cold-weather
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Making fluorescent chips using an inkjet printerEvery mealtime it's the same thing. Your child clutching their stomach and complaining about tummy ache. You as parents are at your wits' end, and nothing you try from your home medicine cabinet is having any effect. Could it be that your child is suffering from celiac disease – gluten intolerance? Previously, you would have had to go to a specialist doctor to find an answer to these sorts of ques
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
And suddenly, the dam broke, letting the grains of light gush forth…Physicists from the University of Lille, in collaboration with the University of Ferrara in Italy, have introduced a river into an optical laboratory… They have just observed the rupture of a photon barrier in an optical fibre, a phenomenon directly comparable with the rupture of a dam placed on the bed of a river.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study takes a unique approach to new generation of smart drug delivery carriersImagine a tiny capsule, smaller than the tip of a needle, that could be programmed to release medicine at a specific location in your body and is inexpensive, easy to make, and more effective than the traditional pharmaceuticals we know today.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
X-ray Rabi oscillations between nuclei observed in coupled cavitiesX-rays interact weakly with matter. This is their greatest strength for many applications, but also a fundamental weakness for others. In particular the fields of nonlinear optics and quantum optics, mainstays for both fundamental science and technological applications with light, require a strong interaction. Thus, efforts in various directions are undertaken to intensify the light-matter interac
9h
Popular Science
Everything you need to cure your smartphone addiction DIY Step away from the phone. Is your smartphone addiction turning you into a real-world recluse? Restore some balance with our suggestions, tricks, and app recommendations.
9h
Gizmodo
What the Hell Happened to the March for Science? Photo: AP April 22nd was supposed to be a victory lap and the birth of a new movement. That day, the March for Science saw a million scientists and science lovers descend on Washington, D.C. and cities and hamlets around the world, the physical manifestation of a viral online campaign. It was the first time scientists had ever mobilized en masse as the centerpiece of movement, spurred by the Trum
9h
New on MIT Technology Review
Drone Innovation May Finally Take Off in America
9h
Ars Technica
SLS rocket advancing, but its launch date may slip to 2020 NASA NASA will soon set a new date for the maiden flight of its massive Space Launch System rocket , which will send the Orion spacecraft on a test flight around the Moon. Previously, this flight had been scheduled for 2018, but NASA officials acknowledged earlier this year that the launch date would slip into 2019. Now, there is the possibility of further delays, although NASA isn't saying this
9h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
China announces plans to fast-track drug approval Policies are expected to speed up access to medicines and boost the country’s pharmaceutical industry. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22888
9h
Live Science
This Tiny Detail Revealed a Painting Was Looted by the NazisA small, repaired hole in the painting allowed researchers to confirm the artwork as Nazi loot.
9h
Science : NPR
Skull Is Potentially From The Oldest Known Victim Of A Tsunami Researchers say they've determined that a skull discovered in 1929 likely belonged to an individual who was killed in a tsunami 6,000 years ago. (Image credit: Channel 7 TV Sydney via AP)
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How climate change affects the building blocks for healthIn August last year, a third of the residents of the North Island township Havelock North fell acutely ill with gastroenteritis after their water was contaminated with campylobacter.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers use innovative lab to study storm shelter designsStorm shelters are an expensive and time-consuming add-on when building a home. To save time and money, sometimes homeowners and builders skimp on the protection they provide from high-winds from tornadoes or hurricanes.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers create new 'letters' to enhance DNA functionsJust like how letters are strung together to form words, our DNA is also strung together by letters to encode proteins. The genetic alphabet contains only 4 natural letters - A, C, G and T, which hold the blueprint for the production of proteins that make our bodies work. Now, researchers from the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (IBN) of the Agency for Science, Technology and Resear
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Concise guide to pharmacology simplifies drug discovery researchThe Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2017/18 is now available in the British Journal of Pharmacology. Published by Wiley on behalf of the British Pharmacological Society, the 440 page guide includes overviews of key properties for close to 1,700 human drug targets, identifies 3,500 ligands including more than 2,400 synthetic organic molecules and over 50 antibodies.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nanoparticles with pulse laser controlled antibacterial propertiesSilver nanoparticles have excellent antibacterial properties and are considered by many to be a strong contender in the critical search for an answer to antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Researchers from Kumamoto University, Japan have discovered how to activate their bactericidal effect at will using pulsed laser irradiation. This is promising development in the fight against antibacterial resistanc
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Individual with complete spinal cord injury regains voluntary motor functionA research participant at the University of Louisville with a complete spinal cord injury, who had lost motor function below the level of the injury, has regained the ability to move his legs voluntarily and stand six years after his injury.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Development of a highly-accurate computational model of human metabolismKAIST team developed a computational framework that enables the reconstruction of a comprehensive computational model of human metabolism, which allows for an accurate prediction of personal metabolic features.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Osaka university roll the dice on perovskite interfacesOsaka University-led researchers developed a robust Monte Carlo-based refinement computerized approach to precisely and accurately model perovskite oxide interfaces from complex surface X-ray diffraction data.
9h
Dagens Medicin
Patientstyrelsen inviterer 13 læger til møde om styrelsens aktivistiske linje 13 læger har udtryk bekymring for Styrelsen for Patientsikkerheds aktivistiske linje med politianmeldelser. Nu har styrelsen inviteret dem til møde med direktøren.
9h
Ingeniøren
Nu gælder de nye drikkevandsregler – men branchen savner vejledningDe omdiskuterede ændringer i drikkevandsbekendtgørelsen træder i kraft torsdag. Men på trods af at Miljøstyrelsen meddeler, at de vil vejlede om implementeringen af ændringerne, har branchen endnu ikke modtaget noget. Danva kalder det 'problematisk'.
9h
Ingeniøren
Test: Googles eget antivirus-system til Android flopper fuldstændigt Google Play Protect og mange andre sikkerhedsapps til Android lover at tilbyde brugerne beskyttelse mod malware. Men de gør det langt fra lige godt. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/googles-eget-antivirus-system-android-svag-test-1082117 Version2
9h
Futurity.org
For African Americans, alcoholism and depression linked to 1 gene A single gene variant is strongly associated with both developing alcoholism and depression in African Americans, researchers report. “The strength of the findings was unexpected…” The gene variant is involved in brain development, according to the new genome-wide association study. The SEMA3A gene variant, discovered in the analysis of entire genomes of more than 7,800 subjects, had not previous
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spin-polarized surface states in superconductorsWhen it comes to entirely new, faster, more powerful computers, Majorana fermions may be the answer. These hypothetical particles can do a better job than conventional quantum bits (qubits) of light or matter. Why? Because of the spooky way Majorana fermions interact with each other at a distance. When two fermions interact, they usually dissipate energy, whereas two Majoranas are entangled and pr
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Modern civilization doesn't diminish violenceModern civilization may not have dulled mankind's bloodlust, but living in a large, organized society may increase the likelihood of surviving a war, a Florida State University anthropology professor said.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Testing chimps in Tanzania over decades suggests personality types are stableA team of researchers affiliated with institutions in the U.S., the U.K. and Tanzania has found evidence that suggests personality traits in chimpanzees are relatively stable over long periods of time. In their paper published in the journal Scientific Data, the group describes the history of the testing, the types of tests given and what they revealed.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Don't blame California wildfires on a 'perfect storm' of weather eventsLate evening on Oct. 8, a series of fires ignited in Northern California's famous Wine Country region. The fires would produce the most damaging wildfire event in California's history. Forty two people died and over 8,000 structures were destroyed.
9h
Gizmodo
AMD's New Chips Could Finally Offer a Good Alternative to Intel in Laptops Image: AMD AMD buddy, we’ve missed you. A few years ago there was a genuine choice between laptops with Intel inside and those with AMD. Then Intel continued to update and improve its processors while AMD did not. It was a big bummer if you wanted options when picking out a laptop, and it was particularly painful for cheap laptop fans, as AMD-based laptops tend to be less costly than their Intel
9h
Gizmodo
Last Chance: Get Mario Odyssey For $48 With Prime, Plus Switch Consoles In Stock Super Mario Odyssey , $48 for Prime Members Nintendo Switch , $300 Nintendo Switch - Super Mario Odyssey Edition , $380 Super Mario Odyssey comes out tomorrow ( and it’s great! ), so here’s a friendly reminder that if you have Amazon Prime, you can preorder it for $12 off (discount shown at checkout). Don’t have a Switch yet? Amazon just got a new shipment of the Super Mario Odyssey edition . You
9h
The Atlantic
The Alien Majesty of Kubrick's Barry Lyndon Every time I watch Barry Lyndon , my eye is immediately drawn to the candles. They’re in dozens of scenes in Stanley Kubrick’s 1975 classic historical drama, sometimes as the only form of light—a miraculous achievement of cinematography that required special camera lenses borrowed from NASA. With any Kubrick work, there’s a magisterial sense of control and overreach present in every frame, an app
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Imaging probe printed onto tip of optical fiberCombining speed with incredible precision, a team of Molecular Foundry scientists and industry users developed a way to print extremely small devices on the tip of a glass fiber as thin as a human hair. These tiny devices precisely squeeze and manipulate light in ways that are unachievable by conventional optics. The team's approach, called fiber nanoimprinting, builds tips 30 times faster than to
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ransomware like Bad Rabbit is big businessOctober is Cybersecurity Awareness month, which is being observed in the United States, Europe, and elsewhere around the world. Ironically, it began with updates about a large-scale hack, and is ending with a large-scale ransomware outbreak.
9h
Futurity.org
How Neanderthal DNA shows up at ‘crossroads’ today When the ancestors of modern humans migrated out of Africa, they passed through a Middle East-Turkey crossroad before heading deeper into Asia and Europe. It’s believed this area is where they encountered and interbred with a different hominid species: the Neanderthals. Genomic evidence from past studies shows that this ancient interbreeding occurred and scientists believe that Western Asia is th
9h
Gizmodo
Super Mario Odyssey: The Kotaku Review For Mario, 3D used to mean freedom. In 1996, Super Mario 64 broke Nintendo’s mascot from the shackles of having to run in a straight line, letting the player choose their own path. But for quite some time now—no matter how 3D the graphics may have been—Mario’s adventures have reverted back to running on a straight line. With Super Mario Odyssey , that changes once more, and it’s a glorious thing.
9h
Gizmodo
More Rumors of a Major Battle to Come in Star Wars: The Last Jedi Arnold Schwarzenegger teases the next Terminator movie. Pixar’s Coco casts an Agent of SHIELD. See Thor’s new team in action in a new Ragnarok featurette. Plus, tons of behind the scenes pictures from Justice League , and John Carpenter will be back in the director’s chair for a new Syfy Horror anthology. Spoilers ahead! Star Wars: The Last Jedi Rumors of an attack on Ahch-To by Kylo Ren and his
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Smell sensitivity varies with circadian rhythm, study suggestsA person's ability to smell may vary throughout the day in accordance with their circadian rhythm, according to new evidence in a small study by Brown University researchers who are looking at how sleep may influence eating patterns in teens.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Japanese earthquake zone strongly influenced by the effects of frictionAn international research team led by Kyushu University (Japan) identified that subduction-related friction and pre-existing fault structures in the Eurasian/Philippine Sea plate boundary significantly influences earthquake location and rupturing behavior. The degree of friction decreases towards the Nankai Trough, resulting in non-uniform stress accumulation that has influenced the location of hi
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stopping children getting unnecessary antibiotics for colds and sore throatsA collaboration between UK, Canadian and Chinese scientists has helped to reduce the over-prescription of unneeded antibiotics to children in rural China, according to research published today in Lancet Global Health.
9h
Feed: All Latest
Qualcomm Life Bets Healthcare's Wireless Future Will Use 5G and VRThe company aims to build a new class of wireless, always-connected medical devices.
9h
Ars Technica
Nvidia GTX 1070 Ti takes fight to AMD RX Vega 56 for $450 Specs at a glance: Nvidia GTX 1070 Ti CUDA CORES 2432 TEXTURE UNITS 152 ROPS 64 CORE CLOCK 1607MHz BOOST CLOCK 1683MHz MEMORY BUS WIDTH 256-bit MEMORY BANDWIDTH 256GB/s MEMORY SIZE 8GB GDDR5 Outputs 3x DisplayPort 1.4, 1x HDMI 2.0b with support for 4K60 10/12b HEVC Decode, 1x dual-link DVI Release date November 2 PRICE Founders Edition: £419/$449/€469 Following weeks of leaks and rumours Nvidia h
9h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Bog med gode råd om børns spisevaner hitterOmkring 6000 har siden i sommer downloadet bogen Madmodige Børn, der er skrevet af et hold...
9h
New on MIT Technology Review
This Robot Gives You Arms to Lift a Half-Ton
9h
Science : NPR
When The State Sinks, Science Is The Anchor As history has shown, political and ideological repression passes — but scientific knowledge remains, says astrophysicist Marcelo Gleiser. (Image credit: LeoRossi/Getty Images/iStockphoto)
9h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Bitter CRISPR patent war intensifies Gene-editing pioneers prepare for next stage of intellectual-property disputes in the United States and Europe. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22892
9h
Dagens Medicin
KL om regeringens genoptræningsgaranti: Kvaliteten falder Hvis regeringen giver borgerne garanti om genoptræning inden for syv dage efter udskrivelse, falder kvaliteten, lyder det fra Kommunernes Landsforening. Lægeforeningen peger på, at genoptræningsplaner fra sygehusene er afgørende for succes.
9h
Viden
Nye prøver: Klimaforandringer er værre end antagetFortidshavene var tilsyneladende langt koldere end hidtil troet. I givet fald er opvarmningen i dag uden sidestykke i 100 millioner år.
9h
Gizmodo
Google's Pixelbook Made Me Alter My Existence All photos: Alex Cranz/Gizmodo I had to change how I think because of Google’s new $1,000 Pixelbook . This gorgeous 2-in-1 is some of my favorite hardware for the price, but it’s loaded with Chrome OS, the worst operating system you could put on your computer. If you’ve grown up a power user of MacOS, Windows, or Linux, then Chrome OS feels like getting cut off at the knees , and hardware can’t p
9h
Ars Technica
AMD’s Ryzen CPU with Vega graphics threatens to blow Kaby Lake out of the water Enlarge / Ryzen processor with Vega graphics. The blue part on the right is the GPU; the dark, complicated bit on the left is the CPU. Around the edge are memory controllers, multimedia engines, power management, and other bits and pieces. (credit: AMD) AMD announced today its first two processors to combine its new Zen CPU architecture with its Vega graphics . The new chips, aimed at lightweight
9h
Ars Technica
Super Mario Odyssey review: Mario’s densest, deepest adventure yet Enlarge / "May you be as joyful as a Mario in boxer shorts and an oversized boxing glove hat" -Ancient proverb A few weeks ago, I got dragged down a rabbit-hole discussion of what defines a "core" Mario game . One proposed definition relied on Mario trying to reach an explicit "goal point" or exit at the end of the level. While a core Mario game could have secondary goals (like collecting red coi
9h
Ars Technica
Google Pixelbook review: Prepared today for the possible reality of tomorrow (video link) Chromebooks may be most popular in the classroom, but Google wants to ride that train out of schools and into the next phase of students' lives. The Pixelbook is the manifestation of that idea, the piece of hardware that combines Google's revamped design aesthetic and Internet-based software with the needs and wants of a younger generation. Google stopped selling the original Chromeb
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
Curiosity Mars Rover Tests Drill after Long DelayDormant since late 2016, the rover’s rock-boring drill could soon come back online -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Feed: All Latest
'Super Mario Odyssey' Review: Nintendo's Surreal, Candy-Colored TriumphNintendo has always had a knack for making fun out of the uncanny. Super Mario Odyssey takes that to an extreme, and it's all the better for it.
9h
Feed: All Latest
Google Pixelbook Review: The Mack Daddy of All ChromebooksThis lightweight, powerful computer is unlike any Chromebook you've used before.
9h
Ars Technica
Three female engineers sue Uber for sex and race discrimination Enlarge / Uber's office in Queens, New York. (credit: Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images) A new lawsuit claims Uber pays female engineers, and some engineers of color, less than male, white, and Asian-American counterparts. The complaint (PDF) claims that Uber's biannual "stack ranking" system is invalid, arbitrary, and forces different outcomes between employees "regardless of whether there are
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physics still can't identify matter that makes up the majority of the universeThe past few decades have ushered in an amazing era in the science of cosmology. A diverse array of high-precision measurements has allowed us to reconstruct our universe's history in remarkable detail.
10h
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Fear CenterA set of neurons in the brain's central amygdala plays a key role in forming memories of aversive experiences, scientists find in mice.
10h
Live Science
Trump Orders Release of 2,800 JFK Assassination Files, Holds Back OthersHistorians and conspiracy theorists alike are eager for the release.
10h
NYT > Science
Review: ‘Bill Nye: Science Guy,’ a Portrait of a Fighter for FactsThis revealing documentary follows Mr. Nye as he crusades on behalf of space exploration and against creationists and climate-change deniers.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Strengthening passive sampling of nonpolar chemicalsPassive sampling is a valuable technique for monitoring concentration levels of hydrophobic persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the marine environment. New guidelines for the determination of partition coefficients between passive samplers and water have recently become available in new report.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bayesian probability-based computer program rolls the dice on perovskite interfacesPerovskites are a type of mineral and class of materials, and have been attracting a great deal of attention for their potential applications to technologies such as those used in solar cells. These unique materials have well-ordered structures and show many interesting properties that could be useful in other areas of electronics. Such a variety of properties in the same structural backbone allow
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How much does life weigh?ETH researchers have developed a scale for measuring cells. It allows the weight of individual living cells, and any changes in this weight, to be determined quickly and accurately for the first time. The invention has also aroused significant interest both in and outside the field of biology.
10h
Popular Science
Why are we so bad at producing the right flu vaccines? Health And how can we improve? The flu is a sneaky little devil, but we're slowly getting better at predicting its evolution.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How a trauma psychologist discovered a wellspring of sexual harassment complaintsSince allegations of former Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein's abhorrent treatment of women have come to public light, we once again have an opportunity to talk about sexual harassment. These negative experiences are prevalent, pervasive and problematic for women in the workplace. And such ill treatment not only has a toxic impact on the female recipient, but has reverberating dysfunctional eff
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The challenge to fly non-stop from Australia to anywhere in the worldAustralian airline Qantas has the aircraft it needs to fly non-stop from Perth to London, but its goal is to offer even longer flights than that.
10h
Feed: All Latest
Review: Turtle Beach Ear Force Stealth 600 (PS4/Xbox One)Looking for an affordable, console-friendly headset? Grab the Turtle Beach Stealth 600s.
10h
Feed: All Latest
A Bug in a Popular Maritime Platform Left Ships ExposedThe AmosConnect 8 web platform has vulnerabilities that could allow data to be exposed—underscoring deeper problems with maritime security.
10h
Feed: All Latest
President Trump Moves to Fill America's Skies with DronesThe president signed a memo directing the FAA to figure out how to get commercial UAVs into American skies.
10h
New Scientist - News
Gaming addiction probably isn’t a real condition, study suggestsVery few gamers really meet the proposed criteria for internet gaming disorder – instead they may play excessively to fill gaps in other areas of their life
10h
Gizmodo
Today Is Napoleon Hill Day, Named for the Greatest Self-Help Scammer of All Time Napoleon Hill sitting in an office in 1937 (Library of Congress) Walk into any bookstore in America and you’ll find plenty of titles written by Napoleon Hill in the financial self-help section. He practically invented the genre in the 1930s with his most famous book Think And Grow Rich . And for that, Virginia has declared today Napoleon Hill Day. But many people have no idea that the man was a c
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study shows commercial harvest of snapping turtles is leading to population declineCrawling through neck-high mud on riverbanks is a dirty job, but someone has to do it for the sake of Virginia's snapping turtles.
10h
Gizmodo
Amazon's Blowing Out a Bunch of Handy Photography Accessories, Today Only The best camera is the one you have with you, but that’s much more likely to be your DSLR if you take advantage of today’s Amazon Gold Box . Inside , you’ll find a variety of photography accessories, most notably a bunch of Case Logic camera bags and slings to carry all of your cameras, lenses, and gear. Options start around $30, so there’s a bag for every level of photographer in here. A few are
11h
Live Science
10 Halloween Horrors Come to LifeHere is the science behind 10 Halloween horrors come to life.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers find link between media attention to drought and household water savingsWith increased drought coverage from newspapers, water conservation increased in the San Francisco Bay Area during the drought that ended in 2016. That's according to a new study from Stanford researchers that links real water consumption data with the public attention garnered by California's recent droughts.
11h
Dagens Medicin
En til ti mutationer ændrer raske celler til en kræftsygdomBritiske forskere har beregnet, hvor mange mutationer af raske celler der skal til for at starte en kræftsygdom.
11h
Dagens Medicin
Ny lovende immunterapi afprøves på Rigshospitalet
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Post-Ferguson study finds area was over-policed, reports improvements in policing qualityThe fact that crime rates in Ferguson, Mo., remained steady even as the number of traffic stops and arrests fell—and that the de-policing occurred disproportionately in non-white areas—suggests that cops had previously been "over-policing," research from the University of Colorado Boulder and others finds.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists detect comets outside our solar systemScientists from MIT and other institutions, working closely with amateur astronomers, have spotted the dusty tails of six exocomets—comets outside our solar system—orbiting a faint star 800 light years from Earth.
11h
The Atlantic
What the New JFK Papers Will Reveal About Excessive Secrecy On Thursday, the United States government is scheduled to release as many as 100,000 pages of heretofore secret documents pertaining to the 1963 assassination of President John F. Kennedy. “The documents have either never been disclosed or been made public only in redacted form, and are due to be released by the National Archives and Records Administration under a law passed in 1992 after the Oli
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Changing the face of Indian farmingIndian agriculture is expected to feed a growing and increasingly urbanised population. But if everyone wants to move to towns and cities, who is left to farm the land?
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Photochemical nitrogen fixation—opening new vistas toward a sustainable energy futureHow can a photocatalyst convert nitrogen to ammonia using water and light? With international collaboration, researchers from China and Singapore have looked into state-of-the-art engineering of photocatalysts for nitrogen (N2) fixation toward understanding ammonia (NH3) synthesis. The work has been reported in Materials Horizons.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Urban heat and cool island effects controlled by agriculture and irrigationAs Earth's climate continues to warm, the urban heat island effect raises concerns that city-dwellers will suffer more heat stress than their rural counterparts. However, new research suggests that some cities actually experience a cooling effect.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ocean acidification research makes a strong case for limiting climate changeExperiments and analyses carried out by more than 250 scientists from 20 German institutions clearly indicate that ocean acidification and warming, along with other environmental stressors, impair life in the ocean. A brochure summarises major outcomes of the project for policymakers and the public. Members of the project Biological Impacts of Ocean Acidification (BIOACID) will also be present at
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
Was the Extreme 2017 Hurricane Season Driven by Climate Change?Global warming already appears to be making hurricanes more intense -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
The Atlantic
Why Nerds and Nurses Are Taking Over the U.S. Economy Manufacturing will fall. Retail will wobble. Automation will inch along but stay off the roads, for now. The rich will keep getting richer. And more and more of the country will be paid to take care of old people. That is the future of the labor market, according to the latest 10-year forecast from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. These 10-year forecasts—the products of two years’ work from about
11h
New Scientist - News
What drove the WHO to make Robert Mugabe a goodwill ambassador?The new head of the World Health Organization caused a backlash by handing Zimbabwe's despotic leader a role. Why did he make such a misstep, wonders Luke Allen
11h
Feed: All Latest
Apple's Core ML Could Surface Your iOS SecretsApple's Core ML is a boon for developers, but security experts worry that it also could make it easier for bad actors to snoop on your private data.
11h
Feed: All Latest
Nissan's New Electric Car Concept Comes With Canto, a Singing Pedestrian Warning SystemIt might sound like the warm-up room of an '80s synth rock convention, but the feature is meant to warn walkers that a very quiet electric car is coming.
11h
Feed: All Latest
*Stranger Things'* Lab to Stuff Co.: Which Evil Org Is For You?Most of them are morally questionable, but some have decent benefits packages.
11h
Feed: All Latest
This Massive Health Study on Booze Is Funded by the Alcohol IndustryOne of the biggest and best studies of alcohol's effects on health is underway. But funding from the alcohol industry is already undercutting its results.
11h
Latest Headlines | Science News
As ice retreats, frozen mosses emerge to tell climate change talePlants long entombed beneath Canadian ice are now emerging, telling a story of warming unprecedented in the history of human civilization.
11h
Ingeniøren
SpaceX-konkurrent vil opsende tre raketter i 2018Raketfirmaet Vector vil tilbyde satellitopsendelser til bare en tyvendedel af SpaceX’ pris.
11h
Ingeniøren
Ny testmetode viser, hvad der får kunstig intellligens til at tage fejlAmerikanske forskere har udviklet en testmetode, der kan afsløre, hvornår kunstig intelligens i eksempelvis selvkørende biler foretager potentielt fatale fejlslutninger.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Combining cassava flour in the bread dough might assure access to food in the futureIn coming decades, the rise in global temperatures due to climate change may hinder the production of wheat in many temperate regions where the crop is grown today. The raw material for bread, one of the world's most consumed foods, may become scarce and more expensive as a result.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Earthquake risk elevated with detection of spontaneous tectonic tremor in Anza GapScientists at the University of California, Riverside have detected spontaneous tectonic tremor—a signature of slow earthquakes deep below the earth's surface—in the Anza Gap region of the San Jacinto Fault. Tectonic tremors are believed to increase the likelihood of a moderate to large, damaging earthquake occurring close to the earth's surface by altering the stress along the fault.
11h
Science | The Guardian
Beyond Genghis Khan: how looting threatens to erase Mongolia's history Mongolia’s cold, dry climate can result in incredible archaeological finds, but a harsh economic downturn means looting has risen to disastrous levels It’s a sunny, late summer day in northern Mongolia’s Darkhad Basin – a large glacial lake basin nestled against the country’s Russian border. To the south stretch the grasslands of the Eastern Eurasian Steppe; to the north, the Siberian boreal fore
12h
Gizmodo
There's a Different Way to Get Smart Lights: Replace Your Switches, Not Your Bulbs All images: Sam Rutherford/Gizmodo Smart homes have finally improved enough that having a home that responds to your every wish and command is almost within reach. The problem, is that unless you are a Hollywood movie star or the offspring of an oil baron, retooling your house to smarten it up is too expensive to do all once, which means you’re going to need to tackle things piece by piece. And o
12h
Scientific American Content: Global
A Nearby Neutron Star Collision Could Cause Calamity on EarthFrom certain death to a scientific goldmine, here’s the spectrum of possibilities that we might expect from merging black holes, colliding neutron stars or detonating supernovae in our galactic... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
Ingeniøren
IT i Praksis: Misforstået hvis offentlig digitalisering bliver lig blockchain, AI og VR Mange småforsøg giver risiko for, at man ikke bliver god til noget, lyder advarsel fra Dansk IT. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/offentlige-myndigheder-har-kig-paa-blockchain-droner-vr-digitalisering-handler-ikke-de-mest Version2
12h
The Atlantic
There Are Currently 4 Black CEOs in the Fortune 500 Early next year, Ken Chenault will step down as the CEO of American Express, a position he has held for more than 16 years. His retirement won’t just change the uppermost ranks of the company he’s led—it will also whittle the number of black CEOs in Fortune 500 companies down to three, continuing a downward trend among the nation’s biggest corporations. When Chenault took over at American Express
12h
The Atlantic
House Republicans Take a Practice Run at Compromise Updated on October 26 at 11:41 a.m. If congressional Republicans are going to enact their ambitious and complicated tax overhaul, they’re eventually going to have to agree to things many of them don’t particularly like in service of the larger goal. That may involve eliminating some loopholes but not others, making some people pay more so most others can pay less, or increasing a deficit they vow
12h
Ingeniøren
Jobopslag: Stor mangel på ingeniører i Jylland og på Fyn Flere store virksomheder, organisationer og kommuner jagter kompetent arbejdskraft. Find drømmejobbet på Fyn eller i Jylland med Jobfinder månedlige liste. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/stor-mangel-paa-ingenioerer-it-folk-jylland-paa-fyn-9468 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
12h
Science | The Guardian
To those who take antibiotics – the resistance crisis is not your fault | Hannah FlynnA new government campaign suggesting that growing antimicrobial resistance is the fault of patients is lazy and dishonest Singing and dancing pills are the latest weapon to be pulled out of the NHS’s public health armoury, in a last-ditch battle to beat antibiotic resistance. The animated capsules are featured in Public Health England’s Keep Antibiotics Working campaign, which was unveiled earlier
13h
Ingeniøren
Kronik: Vigtige råstoffer går tabt i den cirkulære økonomi Affald Genanvendelse
13h
Science | The Guardian
Pope discusses life's biggest questions with International Space Station crew Pontiff becomes second pope to speak to astronauts orbiting the Earth with live streamed video call from the Vatican The Earth is a fragile thing that could even destroy itself, Pope Francis told astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS) on Thursday, saying they had an opportunity to see the planet “from the eyes of God”. The voice of Pope Francis was heard in the heavens when he made a
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UBC researcher prescribes specific exercise dosage for those with spinal cord injuryAn international committee, led by UBC Okanagan researcher Kathleen Martin Ginis, has come up with exercise recommendations specifically tailored for people with spinal cord injuries. These will be presented at the International Spinal Cord Society Annual Scientific Meeting in Dublin, Ireland this week.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The oceans were colder than we thoughtA team of EPFL and European researchers has discovered a flaw in the way past ocean temperatures have been estimated up to now. Their findings could mean that the current period of climate change is unparalleled over the last 100 million years.
13h
The Atlantic
Why the Virginia Governor's Race Could Echo Across the Country The Virginia gubernatorial contest has unexpectedly become a test case of the explosive politics of race in the Donald Trump era. The outcome could tug the Republican Party much further toward Trump-style racial provocation and polarization next year. Or it could warn the GOP that such positioning carries too high a political price among white swing voters and minorities. Republican nominee Ed Gi
13h
Dagens Medicin
Vævsprøver danner grundlag for mere målrettet behandling af lymfekræft Diagnostisk værktøj, som patologiafdelingen på Herlev Hospital har medvirket til at udvikle, kan forbedre diagnostik og behandling af patienter med lymfekræft.
13h
Science : NPR
Court To Rule On Whether Relapse By An Addicted Opioid User Should Be A Crime The high court in Massachusetts is weighing legal and scientific evidence to decide whether a woman convicted of larceny violated the terms of her probation by relapsing into drug use. (Image credit: Jesse Costa/WBUR)
13h
Ingeniøren
Spørg Scientariet: Hvor længe holder mine nye vinduer?En læser vil gerne vide, hvor længe han kan regne med at beholde sine nye vinduer. Det svarer Velfac på.
13h
Ingeniøren
EU kan fordoble VE i 2030 uden ekstraomkostningerBillig el fra havmøller og nye solceller sætter mere fart på omstilling til VE end forventet. Hvis potentialet udnyttes optimalt, kan andelen øges til 34 hele procent i 2030.
13h
Science : NPR
Monsanto Attacks Scientists After Studies Show Trouble For Weedkiller Dicamba Scientists are accusing the seed and pesticide giant of denying the risks of its latest weedkilling technology. Monsanto has responded by attacking some of those critics. (Image credit: Dan Charles/ NPR)
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Can't find a coupon code? This startup does all the work for youRyan Hudson was trying to order pizza online for his two children when he was prompted to enter a coupon code at checkout.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Saving Indonesia's birds-of-paradise one village at a timeDeep in Indonesia's easternmost province, a group of birdwatchers wait in earnest hoping to glimpse the renowned birds-of-paradise. Once plentiful in Papua's jungles, rampant poaching and deforestation have devastated populations.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chile to ban plastic bags in coastal regionsChile's President Michelle Bachelet signed a bill Wednesday that seeks to ban plastic bags in more than 100 coastal areas in a bid to halt the accumulation of ocean plastic.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Yellowstone spawned twin super-eruptions that altered global climateA new geological record of the Yellowstone supervolcano's last catastrophic eruption is rewriting the story of what happened 630,000 years ago and how it affected Earth's climate. This eruption formed the vast Yellowstone caldera observed today, the second largest on Earth.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New evidence for dark matter makes it even more exoticGalaxy clusters are the largest known structures in the Universe, containing thousands of galaxies and hot gas. But more importantly, they contain the mysterious dark matter, which accounts for 27 percent of all matter and energy. Current models of dark matter predict that galaxy clusters have very dense cores, and those cores contain a very massive galaxy that never moves from the cluster's cente
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook's election role is likely to increaseNegative headlines. Congressional inquiries. Corporate apologies. The heightening scrutiny surrounding Facebook after it allowed Russian trolls and inflammatory political ads to spread on its network is the kind of thing companies would do anything to avoid.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fly hunter has described 30 new speciesChironomids are also called non-biting midges or lake flies. Xiaolong Lin is a PhD candidate at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology's (NTNU) University Museum in Trondheim. He devotes almost all his time to investigating these flies.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mimicking biological process, hydrogel signals and releases proteinsAn artificial system using a DNA-laced hydrogel can receive a chemical signal and release the appropriate protein, according to Penn State researchers. Further stimulation by the chemical signal continues to trigger a response.
15h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Ancient skull 'oldest tsunami victim'The person is likely to have died in Papua New Guinea about 6,000 years ago, scientists say.
15h
BBC News - Science & Environment
How the river Ganges was taken to LondonNeil MacGregor explains how an extraordinary journey was made possible by the largest silver objects ever produced.
16h
Science-Based Medicine
AAFP: Functional Medicine lacks supporting evidence; includes “harmful” and “dangerous” treatmentsThe American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) found Functional Medicine lacking in evidence and said some treatments are harmful and dangerous. The AAFP is right and should stick to its conclusions.
17h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Ichthyosaur fossil discovered for first time in IndiaThe fossil, which is 152 million years old, is the first ichthyosaur found in India.
17h
Ingeniøren
Ekspert: Nyt register med danskeres DNA vil kunne misbruges Allerede i designfasen rejser der sig en række bekymringer angående det nye Nationale Genom Center, der skal være et komplet DNA-register over danskerne. Det er ikke tydeligt, hvordan data skal beskyttes - eller hvem der har adgang. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/nationale-genom-center-vil-samle-danskernes-dna-staar-naesten-ingen-sikkerheden-udkastet Version2
17h
Science | The Guardian
Too scared to speak up? How to be more confident Some people exude self-assurance, while others dread putting themselves forward. But is lack of confidence societal or genetic, and what tricks can we use to overcome it? Above the entrance to Manchester Grammar School lies a coat of arms and a Latin inscription: “Sapere Aude” . Ian Thorpe, then the school’s development officer, translated it for me – “Dare to Be Wise” – as we stood in the front
17h
Gizmodo
Uber Hit With Yet Another Lawsuit, This Time Alleging Sexual Discrimination Photo: AP Uber, the international ride-sharing company which has been frantically trying to stabilize its course after former CEO Travis Kalanick resigned in June amid allegations he oversaw widespread sexual harassment, is facing another lawsuit. Per Reuters , three female Latina engineers—Ingrid Avendano, Roxana del Toro Lopez and Ana Medina—filed a lawsuit in Superior Court in San Francisco on
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fly hunter has described 30 new speciesXiaolong Lin jokes that he likes non-biting midges because they don't bite. But he has also dedicated his academic career to describing new species, and has already discovered 30 species previously unknown to science.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The importance of addressing poor nutrition in patients with liver failurePoor nutrition is common in patients with liver failure, or cirrhosis, and it can lead to muscle wasting, weakness, fatigue, and worse outcomes before and after patients undergo liver transplantation.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Imported candy at top of contaminated food list in CaliforniaFollowing a state law mandating testing, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) issued more alerts for lead in candy than for the other top three sources of food-borne contamination combined, according to the first analysis of outcomes of the 2006 law by researchers at UC San Francisco and CDPH.
18h
Big Think
These Big Corporations Are Fighting Climate Change despite Paris Accord Wavering CDP releases its 2017 A List that reveals more companies making serious efforts to combat climate change. Read More
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers engineer CRISPR to edit single RNA letters in human cellsThe scientists who first harnessed CRISPR for mammalian genome editing have engineered a new molecular system for efficiently editing RNA in human cells. RNA editing, which can alter gene products without making changes to the genome, has profound potential as a tool for both research and disease treatment.
19h
Ingeniøren
Medarbejdere i offentlige virksomheder spænder ben for it-projekter Kun hver sjette offentlige virksomhed vurderer, at deres medarbejdere har de nødvendige digitale kvalifikationer til at følge den digitale udvikling, viser ny undersøgelse. Konsekvensen er, at offentlige investeringer i velfærdsteknologier og it-platforme kan være spildt. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/manglende-oplaering-offentlige-resulterer-spild-skattekroner-10786 Emner Arbejdsmarke
19h
Ingeniøren
Madaffaldet skal sorteres fra, hvis Danmark skal nå affaldsmålFlere kommuner vil sortere organisk affald frem mod 2022 for at nå den nationale målsætning om at genanvende 50 procent af affaldet i 2022.
19h
Live Science
Bananas: Health Benefits, Risks & Nutrition FactsBananas are packed with nutrients and are good for your heart, your eyes, your diet and your mood.
20h
Gizmodo
US Air Force Tweets Santa Isn't Real Photo: AP 2017 has been what some might call a “real doozy” of a year, but it’s still got some brutal surprises up its sleeve. On Wednesday, the United States Air Force publicly denied the existence of Santa Claus, who in exactly two months was ostensibly scheduled to deliver presents to the nation’s children. After Whiteman Air Force Base in Missouri and Minot Air Force Base in North Dakota bega
20h
Live Science
There and Back Again: Scientists Beam Photons to Space to Test Quantum TheoryResearchers have taken a famous quantum-physics experiment to new heights by sending light, in the form of photons, to space and back, demonstrating the dual-particle-wave nature of light over much greater distances than scientists can achieve on Earth.
20h
Live Science
Winter: The Coldest SeasonThe winter solstice brings shifts in temperature and icy weather as the sun dips to its lowest point in the sky.
20h
Gizmodo
Verizon Will Totally Let You Stream 1080p Videos Now, If You Pay $20 Extra on Its 'Unlimited' Plan Photo: AP Verizon will soon begin charging customers on their “unlimited” data plans an additional $10 per month per line for access to 1080p or higher resolution streaming video on smartphones. That’s just months after adjusting those plans to cap video resolution at 480p for phones on the baseline $75/month plan, or up to 720p on phones for an additional $10/month surcharge. The “Premium Stream
21h
Ars Technica
Robert Scoble: I didn’t sexually harass women, as I lacked power over them Enlarge / Robert Scoble, as seen in 2013. (credit: Thomas Hawk ) In a Wednesday blog post , Robert Scoble, the Silicon Valley pundit who was recently publicly accused of sexual assault and harassment, now claims that he didn’t sexually harass anyone because they were never his employees. "I don’t have employees, I don’t cut checks for investment," he wrote. "None of the women who came forward wer
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New evidence for dark matter makes it even more exoticLooking at massive galaxy clusters, EPFL astronomers have observed that their brightest galaxies within them 'wobble' -- an unexpected phenomenon in current models. The discovery, published in MNRAS, adds to the body of evidence of dark matter beyond the Standard Cosmological Model (ΛCDM).
21h
Ars Technica
Puerto Rico power woes continue, a month after Hurricane Maria Enlarge / Image of Tesla's solar+storage system outside of Hospital del Niño. (credit: Tesla) Two weeks ago, battery makers Tesla and Sonnen pledged to build microgrids and deliver batteries to hospitals and other critical infrastructure in Puerto Rico in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, which wiped out power to nearly all of the island’s electricity customers. Today, Tesla tweeted that Hospital
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cloth caps more effective than disposable caps at preventing contamination in the OROne of the first studies testing the effectiveness of different operating room (OR) head coverings in preventing airborne contamination has found that surgeon's caps that expose small amounts of the ears and hair are not inferior to the bouffant-style, disposable scrub hats that cover those features.
21h
New Scientist - News
Early menopause is more likely if you’ve ever been underweightWomen who’ve been underweight are 30 per cent more likely to undergo menopause before the age of 45, putting them at risk of heart disease and other conditions
22h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Bloodhound supersonic carries out first public runsThe British-led Bloodhound vehicle carries out some slow-speed trials in Newquay, Cornwall.
22h
Scientific American Content: Global
Smog Casts a Shadow on China's Solar FarmsThe wintertime smog in China's northeastern provinces is so severe it blocks more than 20 percent of sunlight from reaching the region's solar panels. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
22h
Live Science
What on Earth? Freaky Moth with Hairy 'Butt Appendages' Stuns FacebookA moth that looks like it crawled out of a shadowy underworld is freaking out Facebook users, including some who are wondering whether the creature in the post is even real.
22h
Gizmodo
Report: The Raid's Gareth Evans Is in Talks to Direct a Solo Deathstroke Movie Image: DC Comics. Deathstroke #1 Art by Joe Bennett, Mark Morales, and Jeremy Cox For the past few years, Deathstroke has been linked to the standalone Batman movie. But now, it seems like Warner Bros. has bigger plans for the character—and they’re placing him in the hands of the director of The Raid in the process. Both The Wrap and The Hollywood Reporter are reporting that Gareth Evans is curre
22h
Gizmodo
These are Totes the Best Tote Bags GIF Peak Design Everyday Tote Everyone needs a great tote bag. We’ve rounded up the best we’ve toted around so far, and once you’re done reading, we want to hear about your favorite in the comments. Everlane Zip Tote Simple, affordable, great-looking, and generally great. You probably already own an Everyone Zip Tote . Along with their Weekender , the Everlane Zip Tote has been one of the best va
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A higher risk of breast cancer does not motivate many women to have screening checksAccording to new findings presented at the American College of Surgeons Clinical Congress 2017, the vast majority of women in one health system who are at higher risk of breast cancer choose not to get MRI screenings, even when the service was available to them at no cost.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Partnerships between rural hospitals and academic surgery departments can reduce costsA research team from Texas Tech University Health Sciences, Odessa, Texas, has developed a novel methodology to reduce rural area surgical costs, improve quality of care, and increase revenue for academic surgical programs.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Improving readability of discharge instructions leads to fewer patient follow-up callsA Minnesota research team that previously found patient discharge instructions are written at a higher-than-recommended grade level found that by editing the templates of their discharge instructions and making them easier to read, they received fewer phone calls from patients once those patients left the hospital.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds women underweight in teens, mid-30s are at greater risk of early menopauseA new study from epidemiologists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst published today reports, based on a study of nearly 80,000 women, that underweight women and those who were underweight as teenagers or in their mid-30s are at greater risk of early menopause compared to lean or normal weight women. Early menopause is defined as naturally occurring menopause before age 45.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Underweight women are at greater risk of early menopauseUnderweight women and women who were underweight as teenagers or in their mid-30s are at greater risk of experiencing an early menopause compared to lean or normal weight women, according to a study of nearly 80,000 women published in Human Reproduction journal.
23h
Futurity.org
Fact checkers use this method to spot sketchy info A new report compares how effectively three different groups of “expert” readers—fact checkers, historians, and undergraduate students—evaluate the credibility of information online. Of the three groups, the fact checkers proved to be fastest and most accurate, while historians and students were easily deceived by unreliable sources. “We purposely sought out people who are experts, and we assumed
23h
New Scientist - News
We may have just seen the first comet from another solar systemAn icy comet just hurtled past the sun on a strange path that suggests it came from outside our solar system, making it the first such interloper we've ever spotted
23h
Gizmodo
Ransomware Markets Are Exploding, Study Finds Photo: AP The black market economy fueling ransomware distribution is booming, according to new research. In an October report , researchers at anti-malware service Carbon Black identified a 2,502 percent increase in ransomware software sales from 2016 to 2017. The study involved monitoring 21 of the top dark web marketplaces. The data gathered was then extrapolated to produce estimates for the m
23h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Appeals to Civility What We’re Following Flake’s Decision: On Tuesday, Jeff Flake, the junior Republican senator from Arizona, joined a long list of conservative leaders who have condemned President Trump’s brand of politics when he announced his plans to drop out of his state’s 2018 race. But how much of an impact will his departure have? Flake had staked his reelection bid on the hope that voters would choose his
1d
Futurity.org
Is a field trip in virtual reality ever as good? Rapid advancements in virtual reality and augmented reality have recently opened up a new genre of “electronic field trips” that mimic hikes, dives, and treks through nature. But spontaneous encounters—and the feeling they evoke—would be next to impossible to reproduce in a VR setting. It’s the kind of unpredictable thing nature does best, inspiring awe and wonder—and hopefully a love of learning
1d
Futurity.org
Daydreaming is a sign you’re intelligent and creative Daydreaming may indicate intelligence and creativity, according to new research. “People with efficient brains may have too much brain capacity to stop their minds from wandering,” says Eric Schumacher, an associate psychology professor from Georgia Tech and coauthor of a new study. “Our findings remind me of the absent-minded professor…” Schumacher and his students and colleagues, including lead
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cerebral palsy survey in Uganda fills knowledge gapCerebral palsy is more common and has higher mortality in Uganda than in high income countries. The underlying brain injury often occurs after the first month after birth, probably caused by malaria, a new population based study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and Makerere University in Uganda reports. The study, which is published in The Lancet Global Health, is the largest of i
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
China's out of control 'silent killer' affects one-third of adultsMore than one-third of adults in China have high blood pressure -- often dubbed the 'silent killer' for its lack of symptoms -- but only about one in 20 have the condition under control. These findings are published Oct. 25 in the Lancet's special issue on China by researchers at Yale and the Chinese National Center for Cardiovascular Disease.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Should we scrap the target of a maximum 4-hour wait in emergency departments?As waiting times increase, should we scrap the target of a maximum four-hour wait in emergency departments? Experts debate the issue in The BMJ today.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NHS must plan for long-term disruption and effects on staff after mass casualty eventsUK hospitals should plan for long-term disruption and enduring effects on staff after mass casualty events, such as the Westminster Bridge terrorist attack and the Manchester Arena bombing, say experts in The BMJ today.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Retain UK healthcare as a primarily publicly funded service, argues leading doctorIn The BMJ today, she argues that a mixed public-private healthcare system 'ultimately reduces the effectiveness of healthcare for everyone' and says 'it makes sense on grounds of equity, effectiveness and cost-efficiency to retain UK healthcare as a primarily publicly funded, delivered and accountable service.'
1d
Gizmodo
Robert Scoble's Flawed Understanding of Sexual Harassment [Updated] Photo: Flickr Multiple women have come forward accusing tech evangelist Robert Scoble of sexual harassment and assault . His former Rackspace colleague Michelle Greer and journalist Quinn Norton both accused Scoble of groping them in the early 2010s. Scoble responded to the accusations in an interview with USA Today , alleging that the sexual harassment happened at a time when he was struggling w
1d
Ars Technica
PragerU sues YouTube, says it censors conservative videos Enlarge / A graphic illustrating one of PragerU's videos, "Does God Exist?" A conservative media company has sued YouTube, saying that the online video giant illegally censors the short videos it produces. PragerU was founded in 2011 by Dennis Prager, a prominent conservative writer and radio talk show host. The organization is a nonprofit that espouses conservative viewpoints on various issues b
1d
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Can Tony Beets Find Help Getting His Old Dredge #2 Up And Running? #GoldRush | Friday 9p Tony Beets brings local mining legend Sheamus Christie to inspect Dredge #2. Can Tony convince him to help get it running again? Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https:/
1d
Blog » Languages » English
Grim’s Haunted Mansion: Marathon Results! Congrats, Eyewirers! You made it through Grim’s library of low-budget thrills and chills in 9 hours 33 minutes. The same probably could not be said for lesser mortals. Give yourselves a round of applause; you’ve made dear Grim very proud! And do join us for this competition’s closing ceremony at 4 PM EDT on 10/27.
1d
Gizmodo
The 10 Best Deals Of October 25, 2017 We see a lot of deals around the web over on Kinja Deals , but these were our ten favorites today. Head over to our main post for more deals, and follow us on Twitter and Facebook to never miss a chance to save. You can also join our Kinja Deals Community Facebook group to connect with your fellow deal hunters. #1: iPhone X Accessories iPhone X preorders go live on Friday, but you can get a head
1d


Ingeniøren

Forskere og tech-giganter: 10 nødvendige regler før verden er klar til kunstig intelligens Når softwareudviklere skaber kunstig intelligens, skal der være mere gennemsigtighed, højere etiske rammer og mere kontrol - både før den frigives, men i ligeså høj grad efter, mener eksperter fra New York University, Google og Microsoft. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/ti-anbefalinger-foer-verden-klar-kunstig-intelligens-1082041 Version2
6d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Efforts to revive coal industry unlikely to work, may slow job growthCurrent federal efforts to revive the coal industry will likely do more harm than good to fragile Appalachian communities transitioning from coal as a major source of employment, according to a study conducted by Indiana University researchers.
6d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tropical forest reserves slow down global warmingNational parks and nature reserves in South America, Africa and Asia, created to protect wildlife, heritage sites and the territory of indigenous people, are reducing carbon emissions from tropical deforestation by a third, and so are slowing the rate of global warming, a new study shows.
6d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How often does your heart skip a beat? The answer may explain why fewer blacks have AF than whitesRecent studies have determined that blacks have a lower risk of atrial fibrillation (AF) compared with whites despite having a higher prevalence of risk factors such as hypertension and heart failure. A new study found evidence that blacks experience statistically significantly fewer premature atrial contractions but with similar frequencies of premature ventricular contractions. Both are common c
6d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study suggests 21 percent increase in childhood peanut allergy since 2010New late-breaking research being presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Annual Scientific Meeting suggests that peanut allergy in children has increased 21 percent since 2010, and that nearly 2.5 percent of US children may have an allergy to peanuts.
6d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Almost half of food allergies in adults appear in adulthoodNew late-breaking research being presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Annual Scientific Meeting shows that almost half of all food-allergic adults surveyed reported one or more adult-onset food allergies.
6d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New treatments help those with mild, moderate and severe eczemaAlthough many adults with eczema develop the disease in childhood and carry it through life, a large number are first diagnosed in adulthood -- a trend being discussed at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting. There are new treatments available to ease the symptoms.
6d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Allergists examine 'webside manner'Allergists are looking for ways to leverage technology to improve access to top quality medical care and maximize the patient experience. They want to preserve the doctor patient relationship while translating bedside manner to 'webside manner.'
6d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Eczema plus family history can mean a longer hospital stay for kids with asthmaResearch being presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology's Annual Scientific Meeting examines the relationship between medical history and allergic reactions in children, and how long they stayed in the hospital after an asthma attack.
6d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dogs may protect against childhood eczema and asthmaTwo studies being presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting show there may be even more reason to love your dog as they may provide a protective effect against ezcema and asthma.
6d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What pediatricians tell parents about early peanut introduction to prevent allergyGuidelines to help parents introduce peanut-containing products to infants to prevent peanut allergies aren't being discussed by pediatricians.
6d
New on MIT Technology Review

This Doctor Diagnosed His Own Cancer with an iPhone UltrasoundCan a smartphone-enabled ultrasound machine become medicine’s next stethoscope?
6d
Ingeniøren

Hver ottende ingeniør får job, før de afslutter studiet 12,8 procent af alle IDAs studiemedlemmer får en ansættelseskontrakt, før de får et eksamensbevis. Fornuftigt af virksomhederne at hyre de unge, mener IDA. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/hver-ottende-ingenior-far-job-de-afslutter-studiet-10789 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
6d
Ingeniøren

Skandalen om signalprogrammet vokser: Ny jernbane til 9 milliarder vil ligge halvtom henDet står nu klart, at der højst kan køre ét tog i timen, når den nye jernbane mellem København og Ringsted åbner. Politikere svinger mellem vantro og galgenhumor.
6d
Live Science

Puerto Rico: Geography, History and Other FactsPuerto Rico is an archipelago in the Caribbean Sea and an unincorporated U.S. territory.
6d
The Atlantic

Radio Atlantic: Reporting on Open Secrets, with Jodi Kantor and Katie Benner Allegations of sexual harassment (and more) by powerful men in numerous industries have been leading news reports across America. On-the-record accounts of disturbing behavior are proliferating. Several leaders of prominent companies have been forced out of their positions. Does this represent a lasting shift in attitudes toward scandalous conduct, or will the public's interest in these matters s
6d
The Atlantic

Trump Reverses Course on the Release of JFK Files The Fox Mulders of the world will have to wait a little longer for the full official account of John F. Kennedy’s assassination. President Trump ordered the National Archives not to release part of the final batch of federal documents on the 1963 slaying of his predecessor on Thursday night, citing national-security concerns. The directive ran counter to Trump’s announcement earlier this month th
6d
Big Think

Greetings from Saufend-on-Sji, in Polish-occupied England A phonetic map to help Warsaw Pact soldiers find their way around the Home Counties Read More
6d
Popular Science

The first genetically engineered humans might not have their DNA tweaked at all Health The new technique offers a less permanent way to edit the genome. Researchers have been working on a way to make gene editing safer. One approach, described this week in the journal Science , works by editing the far less permanent…
6d
Futurity.org

Scientists invent tiny scale to weigh single cells Researchers have developed a scale for measuring individual cells. The invention offers a quick, accurate way to determine any changes in a cell’s weight, something that hasn’t be available before. The cell scale measures with a resolution of milliseconds and trillionths of a gram. “The cell hangs on the underside of a tiny cantilever for the measurements.” The cells, which usually weigh about tw
6d
Gizmodo

MYMUG is the Evolution of Ceramic You've Been Waiting For GIF MYMUG MYMUG is the latest stop on the road to coffee vessel perfection, and you can save by preordering . We don’t even touch plastic at this point, our love for double-walled glass is matched only by the glass’ fragility, and many readers have commented in their sensitivity to the metallic taste that... metal can add. The MYMUG is made in America, available in 4 sizes, microwave and dishwash
6d
Ars Technica

Microsoft 1Q18: Office 365 is booming, Azure continues to climb (credit: Julien GONG Min ) Microsoft has posted its results for the first quarter of its 2018 financial year. Revenue was $24.5 billion, an increase of 12 percent year on year, with an operating income of $7.7 billion, up 15 percent, a net income of $6.6 billion, up 16 percent, and earnings per share of $0.84, up 17 percent. Microsoft currently has three reporting segments: Productivity and Busin
6d


Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.