Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Complex life evolved out of the chance coupling of small moleculesComplex life, as we know it, started completely by chance, with small strands of molecules linking up, which eventually would have given them the ability to replicate themselves.
13h
Gizmodo
Linda Hamilton and Arnold Schwarzenegger Are Returning for the New Terminator Film Image: Distrub Films US Linda Hamilton and Arnold Schwarzenegger are both returning for the sixth Terminator film. James Cameron, who made the first two films, is producing, with Tim Miller (Deadpool) directing. The Hollywood Reporter held an event in Los Angeles Tuesday night where the news was revealed. Advertisement Cameron helped craft the story with Miller and a writers room that included Da
7h
Ingeniøren
Efter 14 års atomskrot-undersøgelser: Pind sender Geus tilbage til tegnebrættetMinisteren vil udskyde beslutningen om, hvor det danske atomaffald skal finde hvile. I stedet vil han begynde forfra. Nu skal Geus lave nye boringer i 500 meters dybde.
1h

LATEST

EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Getting to the heart of the matter: Nanogels for heart attack patientsHeart disease and heart-related illnesses are a leading cause of death around the world, but treatment options are limited. Now, one group reports in ACS Nano that encapsulating stem cells in a nanogel could help repair damage to the heart.
9min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cell phone data coupled with sewage testing show drug use patternsThe drugs people inhale, inject or ingest ultimately end up in some form down the toilet. So scientists have started monitoring drug use through sewage-based epidemiology. But this approach hasn't taken into account the variation in number of people who add to wastewater in a given area at a given time. Now one team reports in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology a way to account for commutes a
6min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ensuring broccoli sprouts retain their cancer-fighting compoundsRaw broccoli sprouts, a rich source of potential cancer-fighting compounds, have become a popular health food in recent years. But conventional heat treatment used to kill bacteria on produce can reduce levels of the broccoli sprouts' helpful phytochemicals. Now researchers report in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that high pressure processing could wipe out harmful bacteria while
6min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lipid vesicles replace blood in new bacteria testAs schools around the U.S. start back up, so do trips to the doctor's office. But is that raw sore throat due to bacteria, which can be fought off with antibiotics, or a virus? Getting a definitive diagnosis of bacterial infections like Strep throat can take days. Now, one group reports in ACS Sensors that they have developed a new test that will provide results in just hours.
6min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tablets can teach kids to solve physical puzzlesResearchers replicated a previous study to confirm that 4- to 6-year-old children can transfer learning of a puzzle from a touchscreen device to the physical version. This contradicts most previous research and suggests that different types of screen learning media could have different effects on whether children can transfer learned skills to the physical world.
6min
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
How the Internet of cells has biologists buzzing Networks of nanotubes may allow cells to share everything from infections and cancer to dementia-linked proteins. Nature 549 322 doi: 10.1038/549322a
9min
Science-Based Medicine
Quackademic Medicine at UC IrvineUC Irvine Medicine School opens a center for integrative medicine, selling out to promote quackery in medicine.
9min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Opinion: A 'cleanish' energy target gets us nowhereIt seems that the one certainty about any clean energy target set by the present government is that it will not drive sufficient progress towards a clean, affordable, reliable energy future. At best, it will provide a safety net to ensure that some cleanish energy supply capacity is built.
10min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Some of the best parts of autonomous vehicles are already hereFully automated cars are still many years away. Amid the government activity and potential for social benefits, it's important not to lose sight of smaller improvements that could more immediately save lives and reduce injuries and economic costs of highway crashes.
16min
Popular Science
The best cameras for filming in slow motion Gadgets Catch all the action—not just what you can see with your naked eye. Video running at the speed of molasses reveals hidden movements our feeble peepers can't typically see.
17min
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Primordial SculptureThis lifelike replica of the one-centimeter, 500-million-year-old arthropod Agnostus pisiformis was reconstructed from the animal's ancient fossils.
18min
Ingeniøren
Dansk dragt digitaliserer din kropDet kræver ikke andet end en enkel, fleksibel dragt at få lavet troværdig animation og VR. Dragten er et billigt alternativ til dyr studietid og er en kombination af ingeniørkundskab og smart design.
20min
Feed: All Latest
*Dishonored: Death of the Outsider* Review: Ending the Franchise With Some Much-Needed AngerIn the series' final installment, you go hunting for the trickster deity who started it all.
22min
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'Freeways' Is a Mobile Game That Lets You Play Traffic EnginnerJustin Smith's game will drive you crazy and make you appreciate hardworking highway builders.
22min
Ars Technica
Digital transformation: How machine learning could help change business Enlarge (credit: Cultura RM Exclusive/KaPe Schmidt/GettyImages ) Machine learning (ML) based data analytics is rewriting the rules for how enterprises handle data. Research into machine learning and analytics is already yielding success in turning vast amounts of data—shaped with the help of data scientists—into analytical rules that can spot things that would escape human analysis in the past—wh
25min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Getting to the heart of the matter: Nanogels for heart attack patientsHeart disease and heart-related illnesses are a leading cause of death around the world, but treatment options are limited. Now, one group reports in ACS Nano that encapsulating stem cells in a nanogel could help repair damage to the heart.
27min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cell phone data coupled with sewage testing show drug use patternsThe drugs people inhale, inject or ingest ultimately end up in some form down the toilet. So scientists have started monitoring drug use through sewage-based epidemiology. But this approach hasn't taken into account the variation in number of people who add to wastewater in a given area at a given time. Now one team reports in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology a way to account for commutes a
27min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ensuring broccoli sprouts retain their cancer-fighting compoundsRaw broccoli sprouts, a rich source of potential cancer-fighting compounds, have become a popular health food in recent years. But conventional heat treatment used to kill bacteria on produce can reduce levels of the broccoli sprouts' helpful phytochemicals. Now researchers report in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that high pressure processing could wipe out harmful bacteria while
27min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lipid vesicles replace blood in new bacteria testAs schools around the U.S. start back up, so do trips to the doctor's office. But is that raw sore throat due to bacteria, which can be fought off with antibiotics, or a virus? Getting a definitive diagnosis of bacterial infections like Strep throat can take days. Now, one group reports in ACS Sensors that they have developed a new test that will provide results in just hours.
27min
Big Think
Sleeping With Your Dog May Help You Get a Better Night's Rest A new study from the Mayo Clinic says that letting dogs in the bedroom may not disrupt sleep quality. Read More
30min
Futurity.org
Cats and cockroaches may ward off asthma in kids For some children who live in inner-city areas, exposure to certain pet and pest allergens in infancy may lower the risk of developing asthma by age 7. A new study published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology , that included children living in inner-city St. Louis, Baltimore, Boston, and New York City, also linked a mother’s mental health to her child’s risk of developing asthma. “
33min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers take on atmospheric effects of Arctic snowmeltResearchers at the University of Alaska Fairbanks' Geophysical Institute are exploring the changing chemistry of the Arctic's atmosphere to help answer the question of what happens as snow and ice begin to melt.
33min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Saving amphibians from a deadly fungus means acting without knowing all the answersThe calls of frogs on warm nights in the spring are a welcome sound, telling listeners that the seasons are changing and summer is coming. Today, however, ponds that once echoed with the chirps, chuckles and calls of frogs and toads are falling silent around the world.
33min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
3-D printers—a revolutionary frontier for medicineMission control on earth receives an urgent communication from Mars that an astronaut has fractured his shinbone. Using a handheld scanning device, the crew takes images of his damaged tibia and transmits them to earth.
33min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Foster tadpoles trigger parental instinct in poison frogsPoison frogs, especially male poison frogs, are very caring parents. After the tadpoles hatch, the males piggyback their offspring to distant pools spread around the rainforest where they can feed and develop. In a recent study, a team of researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna, the University of Vienna and Harvard University show that this parental behaviour can be triggered experimentally. When unrela
40min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Convergent evolution of mimetic butterflies confounds classificationDavid Lohman, associate professor of biology at The City College of New York's Division of Science, is co-author of a landmark paper on butterflies "An illustrated checklist of the genus Elymnias Hübner, 1818 (Nymphalidae, Satyrinae)." Lohman and his colleagues from Taiwan and Indonesia revise the taxonomy of Asian palmflies in the genus Elymnias in light of a forthcoming study on the butterflies'
40min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Perth's urban sprawl affecting sex life of plantsA Perth researcher is using CSI-style paternity testing in the lab to track pollen and measure how much the urban sprawl is affecting plants ability to reproduce.
40min
Science | The Guardian
Leon Mestel obituaryAstronomer and astrophysicist who inspired generations of students and discovered the cooling law for white dwarf stars Leon Mestel, who has died aged 90, taught generations of astronomers the importance of magnetic fields inside stars and, on the larger scale, across galaxies. He discovered the cooling law for white dwarf stars, showed how magnetic fields in forming stars allowed them to dispose
40min
Gizmodo
Suck Up the Savings on this Dyson Small Ball Vacuum, Today Only Refurb Dyson Small Ball Multi-Floor , $220 Dyson vacuums dominated the nominations in our Kinja Co-Op for best vacuum, but they can be prohibitively expensive. Today though, refurbs of the popular Dyson Small Ball Multi Floor are down to $220 on Amazon , one of the best prices we’ve seen. The Dyson Small Ball includes a brush that automatically adjusts when you move from carpets to hard floors, a
43min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Novel small antibody fragment—a valuable tool in crystallographyAntibodies are a powerful weapon system in defending our body against invaders such as bacteria and viruses. Each antibody consists of four amino acidpolypeptide chains: two heavy chains and two light chains joined to form a Y-shaped molecule. Antibodies recognize a specific antigen unique to its target as they possess the antigen-binding sites located at the upper tips of the Y. While antibody-ba
46min
Science : NPR
Bemoaning Budget Cuts, Health Care Navigators Say Feds Don't Get It The federal government has sharply cut funding to groups that help people enroll in health plans. But the groups say federal officials don't understand how much help and follow-up some people need. (Image credit: Eric Gay/AP)
53min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Theoretical discovery of transparent particles that break the previously accepted limit of visibilityTransparent particles with extraordinarily high refractive indices can become almost invisible at wavelengths longer than the particle size, an A*STAR-led theoretical study has shown. The discovery challenges the accepted wisdom around the limits of light scattering and visibility, and could lead to a new class of 'invisible' materials.
58min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Drones can almost see in the darkUZH researchers have taught drones how to fly using an eye-inspired camera, opening the door to them performing fast, agile maneuvers and flying in low-light environments. Possible applications could include supporting rescue teams with search missions at dusk or dawn.
58min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gravity waves influence weather and climateGravity waves form in the atmosphere as a result of destabilizing processes, for example at weather fronts, during storms or when air masses stroke over mountain ranges. They can occasionally be seen in the sky as bands of cloud. For weather forecast and climate models, however, they are mostly "invisible" due to their short wavelength. The effects of gravity waves can only be taken into considera
58min
Scientific American Content: Global
This Is Why Science Loves TwinsThey help with tough issues like facial recognition technology and nature vs nurture -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Viden
Flere vil få demens - men hjælpen er på vejKroppen beskytter hjernen så effektivt, at det er svært at nå ind til den med behandling. Men hjerneforsker tror på, at det snart bliver muligt at snyde medicin forbi barrieren.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Despite legal abortion in Great Britain, women cite access barriers, new research findsSome women are seeking abortion services outside the formal healthcare system in Great Britain, where abortion is legally available, citing reasons such as access barriers, privacy concerns and controlling circumstances, according to new research from Abigail Aiken, an assistant professor at the LBJ School of Public Affairs at The University of Texas at Austin. Aiken examined the demographics and
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
More mouths can be fed by boosting number of plant poresEnvironmental studies have shown that 40% of the atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) passes through plant stomata every year. Thus, controlling stomatal development and function is considered as a key for increasing crop plant productivity and water-use efficiency. Stomata are pores found in plant leaves that are responsible for gas exchange with the surrounding environment. As it has been reported t
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Naked molecules dancing in liquid become visibleCapturing the movement of molecules is not an easy task. Scientists at the Center for Soft and Living Matter, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) were able to observe the movement of molecules stored inside a graphene pocket without the need to stain them. Published in Advanced Materials, this study paves the way for observing the dynamics of life building blocks, like proteins and DNA, a
1h
Dagens Medicin
PLO-aftalen: En god begyndelse, men langtfra fuldendtAftalen mellem PLO og regionerne rummer ingen afgørende nybrud. Det bedste ved aftalen er faktisk, at den overhovedet er der: Nu kan fraværet af en aftale ikke længere bremse udviklingen af det nære sundhedsvæsen.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wildlife pays the price of Kenya's illegal grazing"It's devastating. I've been following them every day of my life for the last year," said Dedan Ngatia, a wild dog researcher in Kenya's central Laikipia region. "They're all dead."
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video: Preserving life on a sand barFighting coastal erosion is one of many sustainability efforts conducted by University of Virginia researchers with the Virginia Coast Reserve Long Term Ecological Research program on Virginia's Eastern Shore.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands brace for Hurricane MariaHurricane Maria closed in on the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico Wednesday as forecasters warned of a "potentially catastrophic" storm that has already killed at least two people in the Caribbean.
1h
Scientific American Content: Global
Great Lakes Defenders Have a Shocking Idea to Stave Off Invasive CarpThe U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has proposed electric and sound barriers to repel Asian carp approaching Lake Michigan -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Feed: All Latest
These Startups Want to Be Tinder for Your RolodexShapr and BumbleBizz want to adapt the dating app model for business. But it's hard to sell networking with the same tools used to sell sex.
1h
Feed: All Latest
Apple Watch Series 3 Review: The Apple Watch Fulfills Its DestinyNow that it has LTE built in, the Apple Watch finally makes good on its promise to save you from your phone.
1h
Feed: All Latest
Apple Becomes a Chipmaker to One-Up Smartphone FoesApple's iPhone X and Apple Watch 3 rely on new, company-designed chips.
1h
Feed: All Latest
Tech Firms Open to Changing Law to Combat Sex TraffickingBill would change part of the Communications Decency Act, which protects site operators for content posted by others.
1h
Feed: All Latest
Graphic Design Is About to Be Upended By AIApple's 1984 Macintosh revolutionized graphic design—but that was nothing compared to the coming wave of websites that'll design themselves.
1h
Feed: All Latest
Silicon Valley Eats Its Young with "Disruption"A decade of genre-busting innovation from Silicon Valley has us primed for transformative companies. But those expectations are killing fledgling startups.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researcher explores learning habits of skateboardersThere's a common misconception that education must be a formal process that involves a content-based curriculum and teacher-led instruction. But learning takes place all around us and, many times, kids are their own teachers.
1h
Feed: All Latest
The Ellen Pao Effect Is What Happens After Lean InEllen Pao's Reset is ushering in a new corporate code. We should listen.
1h
Scientific American Content: Global
A Challenge to the Textbooks on How We Learn about Our SurroundingsNew experiments provide an alternative to a long-reigning theory of the way we form memories of experiences -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research to help students overcome study roadblocksNew research is helping academics understand factors hindering students from achieving academic success in the transition from secondary school to university.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New nerve degeneration molecule identifiedA discovery in a transparent roundworm has brought scientists one step closer to understanding why nerves degenerate.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Expert discusses advances in aircraft air qualityProfessor Peter Childs from the Dyson School of Design Engineering discusses air quality in aircraft cabins in his Q&A.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Northern Lights over Canada from the ISSThe spectacular aurora borealis, or the "northern lights," over Canada is sighted from the International Space Station near the highest point of its orbital path. The station's main solar arrays are seen in the left foreground.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wind, warm water revved up melting Antarctic glaciersA NASA study has located the Antarctic glaciers that accelerated the fastest between 2008 and 2014 and finds that the most likely cause of their speedup is an observed influx of warm water into the bay where they're located.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New revelations from Superstorm Sandy dataFive years ago next month, four days before Superstorm Sandy made landfall in New Jersey, Rutgers University-New Brunswick marine scientists launched a data-collecting, submersible robot glider in front of the massive storm.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Seaweed-fueled cars? Maybe one day, with help of new techCars and trucks might one day run on biofuel made from seaweed with the help of two technologies being developed at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Technique could make it easier to use mRNA to treat disease or deliver vaccinesBy delivering strands of genetic material known as messenger RNA (mRNA) into cells, researchers can induce the cells to produce any protein encoded by the mRNA. This technique holds great potential for administering vaccines or treating diseases such as cancer, but achieving efficient delivery of mRNA has proven challenging.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bats anticipate optimal weather conditionsMillions of animals fly, swim or walk around the Earth every year. To ensure that they reach their destination, they need to perceive precise changes in environmental conditions and choose the right moment to set off on their journey. Bats, too, are influenced by environmental factors. Every spring, common noctules in southern Germany set off for their summer territories. Researchers at the Max Pl
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Solar anticsThe sun's recent activity has caught the interest of scientists and space weather forecasters worldwide, highlighting the need to keep a watchful eye on our star and its awesome power.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
One-third of PhDs lose interest in academic careers, but not for lack of jobsThere are growing concerns that the challenges of landing a faculty job are discouraging young science and engineering Ph.D.s from pursuing careers in academia. The assumption is the majority aspire to a faculty career but drop out of the academic pipeline because there just aren't enough tenure-track jobs to go around.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ricin only lethal in combination with sugarThe plant toxin ricin is one of the most poisonous naturally occurring proteins, making it an extremely dangerous bioweapon. Ricin attacks have made headlines a number of times over the years, including the spectacular "umbrella murder" in London in the 1970s, or the ricin letters addressed to Barack Obama in 2014. There is no antidote.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
More local water for Los Angeles could mean a drier Los Angeles RiverLocal leaders are working to make greater Los Angeles more reliant on local water in order to prepare for a hotter and more crowded future. A UCLA study published today is a reminder that achieving water independence would require a delicate balancing act—in particular for how the region manages the Los Angeles River.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ageing star blows off smoky bubbleAstronomers have used ALMA to capture a strikingly beautiful view of a delicate bubble of expelled material around the exotic red star U Antliae. These observations will help astronomers to better understand how stars evolve during the later stages of their life-cycles.
2h
Dagens Medicin
PLO er klar med dato for medlemsmøder og urafstemning Hvis PLO's repræsentantskab godkender overenskomstaftalen for almen praksis på det ekstraordinære møde mandag d. 25. september, vil der blive afholdt medlemsmøder og urafstemning for PLO's medlemmer. Få et overblik over datoerne her.
2h
Live Science
What It's Like to Climb Up the Face of a 600-Foot-Tall DamPreventing dam catastrophes is painstaking, hot work.
2h
The Atlantic
A Peek at the Glowing Red Shell Around an Aging Star About 2,700 years ago, a distant star in our galaxy expelled a bunch of material at high speed, creating a thin shell around itself. Now, thanks to powerful telescopes, astronomers can take a picture of it. U Antliae, one of the members of the constellation Antlia, is located in the southern hemisphere of the sky. U Antliae is a carbon star, which means its atmosphere contains more carbon than ox
2h
The Atlantic
Why ESPN Is More Political Than Before Bryan Curtis reports a striking scene in “ Jemele Hill and the Fight for the Future of ESPN ,” his essay on America’s premier sports network and its relationship with politics. The staff of SportsCenter , a group under fire for producing shows that are “too political,” are gathered together to decide the contents of the 6 p.m. broadcast. “ESPN’s transformation is usually described as swapping a h
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ageing star blows off smoky bubbleAstronomers have used ALMA to capture a strikingly beautiful view of a delicate bubble of expelled material around the exotic red star U Antliae. These observations will help astronomers to better understand how stars evolve during the later stages of their life-cycles.
2h
Dagens Medicin
Sundhedsminister er åben for nye ejerskabsformer i almen praksis Sundhedsministeren er ikke afvisende overfor at nytænke ejerskabsforholdene i almen praksis. Men den diskussion giver ikke mening oven på en netop indgået overenskomstaftale, lyder det fra Danske Regioner.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team develops gas-sensing technology that could revolutionize environmental and medical diagnosticsRelying on nanotechnology, scientists from Russia and Germany led by Skoltech research scientist Fedor Fedorov have developed an innovative solution for detecting traces of gas in the air.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New infrared imaging technique reveals molecular orientation of proteins in silk fibresA large international collaboration has used a specialised technique on the infrared microspectroscopy (IRM) beamline at the Australian Synchrotron to determine the structure of proteins in individual silk fibres that has potential use in the design of new biomaterials with desirable properties.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Possible explanation for the galaxy's cosmic radiationCassiopeia A is a famous supernova remnant, the product of a gigantic explosion of a massive star about 350 years ago. Although discovered in radio observations 50 years ago, we now know that its emitted radiation spans from radio through high-energy gamma rays. It is also one of the few remnants for which the birth date and the type of supernova are known. It was a type IIb, the result of a core
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists have invented a new way to weigh intergalactic black holesAstrophysicists from Moscow State University have found a new way to estimate the mass of supermassive black holes outside our galaxy, even if they are barely detectable. The results of the study were published in Astronomy and Astrophysics.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A study switches from genetic to metabolic analysis to reconstitute evolutionary processWith 72 species currently identified, Espeletia is a plant genus endemic to the paramo, a moist alpine biome unique to the northern Andes. This genus, which inhabits the world's most diverse high-altitude ecosystem, is an outstanding example of adaptive success.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Casting into the past helps reveal fishing's futureIntensive fishing and climate change pose an unprecedented threat to biodiversity in the world's oceans, but reconstructing how the past 500 years of human activity on the seas has transformed marine life could help to reveal what the future holds beneath the waves.
2h
Ingeniøren
Robot-Sally udfordrer truckens dominansTrucks er snart et sjældent syn i danske ­virksomheder. I løbet af de kommende år bliver de udkonkurreret af AGV’er som Sally, der selv finder rundt på fabriks­gulvet.
3h
NYT > Science
Mexicans Dig Through Quake Rubble Overnight as Death Toll Passes 200“The priority at this moment is to keep rescuing people who are still trapped,” Mexico’s president said.
3h
NYT > Science
Building a Better Coral ReefAs reefs die off, researchers want to breed the world’s hardiest corals in labs and return them to the sea to multiply. The effort raises scientific and ethical questions.
3h
Ingeniøren
Fremtidens svin skal parteres efter CT-scanningTeknologisk Institut er efter mange års udvikling klar til at scanne svine- og oksekød i det rette miljø.
3h
Ars Technica
Man held website hostage for $10,000, failed, redirected it to porn, got busted Enlarge (credit: Richard Lewis ) An Arizona man was sentenced Monday to four years of federal probation after he pled guilty to effectively holding a corporate website hostage and redirecting it to a gay porn site for several days in 2015. The defendant, Tavis Tso, was also ordered to pay over $9,000 in restitution. According to Tso’s June 2017 plea deal with federal prosecutors, the story began
3h
The Atlantic
The Cyber Threat To Germany's Elections Is Very Real One afternoon in early September, a small group of journalists, policy makers, and visitors in Berlin gathered for a lunch panel discussion, titled “Who’s hacking the election—how do we stop the attackers?” Hans-Georg Maassen, the head of the Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution (BfV), Germany’s domestic-security agency, was the guest of honor. In his remarks, he warned of the da
3h
Ingeniøren
Flere store firmaer søger ingeniører på Fyn og i Jylland På dagens lange listen finder du job for it-professionelle, naturvidenskabere og ingeniører. Der er bud efter både erfarne fagfolk, nyuddannede og tilbud om studiejob samt praktikpladser til studerende. https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/flere-store-firmaer-soeger-fagfolk-paa-fyn-jylland-10146 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
3h
The Atlantic
How to Raise the Rarest Kiwi FRANZ JOSEF, NEW ZEALAND—When I first see the kiwi chick, I briefly wonder if I’m actually looking at a real animal. It’s a grapefruit-sized sphere of fluff with an adorably short version of an adult’s long beak. When it sits still in its dark, red-lit enclosure, it looks indistinguishable from some of the plush toys that fill New Zealand’s gift shops. Unlike the chicks of most birds, the kiwi’s
3h
Ingeniøren
Nyt dansk center for 3D-printMedlemmerne af et nyt videncenter for 3D-print, der åbner i slutningen af september i Kolding, forpligter sig til mere end bare at modtage nyhedsbreve. Til gengæld kan de forvente at få indflydelse på de maskiner, der købes hjem, lover centret.
3h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Sharks can live a lot longer than researchers realized Errors in past studies could undermine conservation plans. Nature 549 316 doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22626
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
California condor takes flight in wild after near extinctionIn a remote, rugged valley overlooking the Pacific Ocean, researchers closely monitor an endangered icon: the California condor.
4h
Ingeniøren
Miniaturemodeller skal standse lækager fra vandrørPå Aalborg Universitet vil forskere bygge sig ud af problemer med læk fra vandsystemer. I et nyt laboratorium vil forskere finde huller i vandrør med miniaturemodeller af storbyers infrastruktur.
4h
Viden
Fedme-plaster afprøvet på mus: 'Brænder' kærligheds-håndtag vækEt plaster kan med nanoteknologi ændre fedtceller, så de nedbryder fedt til varme i stedet for til energi.
5h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Owls hold secret to ageless earsBarn owls keep their acute sense of hearing into old age, scientists have discovered.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Foundation to create special reserve for albino orangutanA conservation group in Indonesia says it wants to create a 5-hectare "forest island" for the world's only known albino orangutan after rescuing it from villagers earlier this year.
5h
Big Think
See the Sun Set on Europe An impossible map of all the sunset shadows across Europe Read More
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Internal watchdog says EPA mismanaging toxic site cleanupsCleanups at some U.S. hazardous waste sites have stopped or slowed down because the Environmental Protection Agency does not manage its Superfund staff effectively to match its workload, an internal government watchdog said Tuesday.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Key California farm district rejects governor's tunnels planA group of powerful California farmers pulled their support Tuesday from a pair of massive, $16 billion tunnels that would have re-engineered the state's water system in a decisive move that dealt a major blow to the project pushed by Gov. Jerry Brown.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Maria lashes US Virgin Islands as Puerto Rico prepares for impactHurricane Maria slammed into the US Virgin Islands Tuesday, lashing the archipelago with rain as Puerto Rico braced for the Category Five storm's expected landfall on Wednesday.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The godfather of eco-bling: Brando's Tahitian paradiseAn exotic island paradise in French Polynesia bought by Marlon Brando in the sixties is using its Hollywood image to tackle environmental issues—with a little help from its jet-set visitors.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Treatment of heart attack patients depends on history of cancerTreatment of heart attack patients depends on their history of cancer, according to research published today in European Heart Journal: Acute Cardiovascular Care.1 The study in more than 35 000 heart attack patients found they were less likely to receive recommended drugs and interventions, and more likely to die in hospital if they had cancer than if they did not.
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The Guardian's Science Weekly
The cybercrime arms race: fighting back against the hackers - Science Weekly podcastNicola Davis speaks with two experts on the frontline of cybercrime to find out how the changing digital landscape is leaving us all vulnerable to cyber attacks
5h
Science | The Guardian
The cybercrime arms race: fighting back against the hackers - Science Weekly podcast Nicola Davis speaks with two experts on the frontline of cybercrime to find out how the changing digital landscape is leaving us all vulnerable to cyber attacks Subscribe & Review on Apple Podcasts , Soundcloud , Audioboom , Mixcloud & Acast , and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter On Friday 12 May, a ransomware cyber-attack casued havoc among computer systems in nearly 100 countries. Of
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scramble for survivors as quake flattens Mexico City buildingsWhen the earthquake hit, it sent panicked people running into the street but many weren't so lucky. The dust settled minutes later to reveal a landscape of flattened buildings and rubble in the heart of Mexico City.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Saudi Arabia to unblock internet calling appsSaudi Arabia will lift its ban on internet calling applications on Wednesday, authorities said, easing restrictions online as the conservative kingdom faces new criticism over censorship.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Could condors return to northern California?In 2003, Northern California's Yurok Tribe initiated efforts to reintroduce California Condors on their lands. While wild condors have not existed in the region for more than a hundred years, a new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications suggests that hunters transitioning from lead to non-lead ammunition may allow these apex scavengers to succeed there once again.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Social environment matters for duck penis sizeMost birds lack genitalia, but male ducks are known for their long, spiraling penises, which have evolved through an ongoing cat-and-mouse game with females. A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances looks at whether these impressive organs are affected by the social environment—that is, whether male ducks that face more competition grow bigger penises. While this appears to be true for so
6h
Science | The Guardian
Businesses on the couch: the co-founders in couples' therapy Boardroom bust-ups can put friendships on the line. Business partners reveal why they get professional help to resolve their issues There are plenty of good reasons to set up a business with a co-founder rather than go it alone. A co-founder is another committed financial partner and someone who is likely to bring a vitally different skillset and will be a source of support when the going gets to
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
This dance is taken: Hundreds of male frog species change colors around mating timeSome of nature's most vibrant colors occur in frogs, who peek out from rainforests and marshes in startling shades of blue, yellow and red. But for hundreds of species, only males flaunt flashy colors—and sometimes only for a few hours, days or weeks each year.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pulling, not pushing, silk could revolutionize how greener materials are manufacturedNew insights into how animals spin silk could lead to new, greener ways of producing synthetic fibres, according to academics at the University of Sheffield.
6h
Ingeniøren
Version2-undersøgelse: Hver fjerde læser har kopieret sit nøglekort En undersøgelse blandt Version2 og Ingeniørens læsere viser, at 24 procent har kopieret eller affotograferet deres eget NemID nøglekort. 13 procent har kopieret eller affotograferet andres. https://www.version2.dk/artikel/hver-fjerde-laeser-har-kopieret-sit-noeglekort-1080599 Version2
7h
cognitive science
You Are Your Memories submitted by /u/NaiveSkeptic [link] [comments]
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Science | The Guardian
Barn owls don't lose their hearing with age, scientists find Findings leave researchers hopeful that understanding hearing preservation in birds could lead to new treatment possibilities for deaf humans If ageing humans had ears like those of barn owls they would never need hearing aids, scientists have shown. The birds, whose sensitivity to sound helps them locate prey, suffer no hearing loss as they get older. Like other birds – but unlike mammals, inclu
7h
Big Think
Turn off Your Mind, Relax, and Float. Sensory Deprivation and What It Can Do for You.You may have heard of a new kind of therapy from your more “new age” friends, “ Sensory Deprivation Tanks ”. While it sounds like a form of torture that might have been used at Guantanamo Bay, many people swear to its benefits. Boldly going into the void to gaze into the abyss for an hour or two. ... Read More
7h
Gizmodo
Jerk Humans Immediately Shoot First Wild Bison Seen in Germany for Over 250 Years Photo: AP The World Wildlife Fund said on Friday it will be pursuing charges against a local official who, upon receiving a report of the first sighting of a wild bison in Germany in over 250 years, promptly ordered hunters to shoot the animal dead. According to the Local , police say a man spotted the bison near the river Oder in the town of Lebus on September 13th before reporting what he had s
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Early guidance can help future moms fight fear of childbirthCaesarean deliveries in most developed countries, including Canada, are at least 10 to 20 per cent higher than recommended by the World Health Organization, and many efforts to decrease unnecessary C-sections have failed. But a new University of British Columbia study suggests that providing women with early knowledge about pregnancy and childbirth could help reduce these numbers.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What will become of English in a post-Brexit European Union?How might the Brexit process affect the status of the English language within the European Union? Without Britain, will English even cease to be a language of the Union? A new article in World Englishes explores these questions.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How do human impacts on wetlands affect animals?A new Biological Reviews study provides a comprehensive assessment of how changes to wetlands affect animals, and the authors use their findings to provide recommendations for managing wetlands to maximise their biodiversity.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fish may use different behaviors to protect against parasitesNew research indicates that fish may adapt their behavior to defend against parasite infection. The findings are published in the Journal of Zoology.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
PTSD linked with increased Lupus riskIn a study published in Arthritis & Rheumatology, trauma exposure and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in civilian women were strongly associated with increased risk of developing lupus, an autoimmune disease.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Radavirsen performs well in early influenza trialA phase 1 clinical trial published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology found that radavirsen--an antisense oligomer that inhibits the production of certain influenza proteins -- is safe and well-tolerated in healthy individuals. Additional studies on radavirsen's potential as a treatment for influenza are warranted.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Certain bone deficits may increase fracture risk in individuals with diabetesType 2 diabetes is associated with increased fracture risk despite normal or high bone mineral density. In a new study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, modest deficits in cortical bone -- the dense outer surface of bone that forms a protective layer around the internal cavity -- were demonstrated in older adults with type 2 diabetes compared with non-diabetics.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Obesity may adversely affect sperm qualityThe journal Andologia has published the first report of abnormal sperm parameters in obese men based on computer aided sperm analysis.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Seniors with Type 2 diabetes may have increased risk for fractureThough seniors with type 2 diabetes (T2D) tend to have normal or higher bone density than their peers, researchers have found that they are more likely to succumb to fractures than seniors without T2D. In a new study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, researchers from Hebrew SeniorLife's Institute for Aging Research found older adults with type 2 diabetes had deficits in cortic
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
This dance is taken: Hundreds of male frog species change colors around mating timeSome of nature's most vibrant colors occur in frogs, who peek out from rainforests and marshes in startling shades of blue, yellow and red. But for hundreds of species, only males flaunt flashy colors -- and sometimes only for a few hours, days or weeks each year. Scientists report that the males of at least 178 species of frogs undergo a temporary color change during their breeding season. Their
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Could condors return to northern California?In 2003, Northern California's Yurok Tribe initiated efforts to reintroduce California condors on their lands. While wild condors have not existed in the region for more than a hundred years, a new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications suggests that hunters transitioning from lead to non-lead ammunition may allow these apex scavengers to succeed there once again.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Social environment matters for duck penis sizeMost birds lack genitalia, but male ducks are known for their long, spiraling penises, which have evolved through an ongoing cat-and-mouse game with females. A new study looks at whether these impressive organs are affected by the social environment -- that is, whether male ducks that face more competition grow bigger penises. While this appears to be true for some species, in others the relations
8h
Science | The Guardian
'They want a devout generation': how education in Turkey is changing As pupils begin their new school year, they will find evolution removed from texts and less time spent on Atatürk’s secular ideals After 25 years of teaching, Ayşe Kazancı decided to retire early. The social sciences teacher, who asked that a pseudonym be used to avoid repercussions from the government, had long faced difficulties because of her activism, joining teachers’ union strikes and advoc
8h
Gizmodo
When Male Ducks Hang Out Together Their Dicks Get Longer A male and female Lesser Scaup. (Image: Kurt Bauschardt/ Flickr ) Male ducks have some of the weirdest junk in nature—a ludicrously long, corkscrew-shaped member that evolved on account of an ongoing battle of the sexes. New research shows that the social environment in which the male duck finds himself in has a pronounced effect on the length of his penis, a finding that may finally put the “siz
8h
New on MIT Technology Review
Facial Recognition Is Only the Beginning: Here’s What to Expect Next in Biometrics on Your PhoneFuture generations will scoff at your passcode.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How do human impacts on wetlands affect animals?A new Biological Reviews study provides a comprehensive assessment of how changes to wetlands affect animals, and the authors use their findings to provide recommendations for managing wetlands to maximise their biodiversity.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What will become of English in a post-Brexit European Union?How might the Brexit process affect the status of the English language within the European Union? Without Britain, will English even cease to be a language of the Union? A new article in World Englishes explores these questions.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fish may use different behaviors to protect against parasitesNew research indicates that fish may adapt their behaviour to defend against parasite infection. The findings are published in the Journal of Zoology.
8h
Science : NPR
Once Teased For Her Love Of Bugs, 8-Year-Old Co-Authors Scientific Paper Sophia Spencer was extremely fond of bugs, especially grasshoppers. Her peers didn't always appreciate her interest. Entomologists on Twitter, on the other hand, were huge fans of her passion. (Image credit: Courtesy of Nicole Spencer)
8h
Ingeniøren
Vejdirektoratet: Bilisterne kan ikke vente ni år på, at Hofor skybrudssikrer LyngbyvejHofors udmelding om at der først i 2026 vil være kapacitet i kloakerne til at holde Lyngbyvej tør under skybrud, møder skarp kritik fra Vejdirektoratet.
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Gizmodo
Celebrate the 50th Anniversary of The Prisoner With This Cool Retro Poster All Images: Vice Press It’s been 50 years since the classic British science fiction series The Prisoner debuted on television. Since then the show been remade, re-aired, copied, and referenced, but never duplicated. Though it wasn’t on the air for long, The Prisoner is a show worth celebrating, and these officially licensed posters do just that. The posters are by artist Chris Weston, a lifelong
9h
Ingeniøren
Store danske virksomheder: Sådan modtager vi nyuddannede Tre af de virksomheder, der deltager i Ingeniørens Jobtræf 2017, lægger ikke skjul på, at nye kandidater skal have fagligheden i orden for at få job. Men de kigger også efter andre kompetencer https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/artikel/store-danske-virksomheder-saadan-modtager-vi-nyuddannede-5205 Emner Arbejdsmarked Jobfinder
9h
Gizmodo
Amazon: OK, So We May Have Emailed a Bunch of People About Their Non-Existent Baby Registries A section of the email Amazon mistakenly sent to customers. Photo Courtesy Maya Kosoff On Tuesday, numerous Amazon users noticed something strange: They’d received emails from the retailer notifying them “someone great recently purchased a gift from your baby registry!” Strange because few of the customers who had received the emails were pregnant or had newborns, let alone had an active baby reg
9h
Gizmodo
Sex Doll-Sharing Service Taqu Suspended After Angering Chinese Communist Party A sex doll named “Roxxxy” on display at the Adult Entertainment Expo in Las Vegas in 2010. Photo: AP Damn! Just when someone has a great, not at all weird and disturbing idea, the man has to come in and crush it. Per BBC , Chinese company Taqu ( branded as Touch in English), which was launching a rental service for sex dolls, quickly folded just two days after announcing its launch on Thursday. T
11h
Feed: All Latest
Got a PS4? Add Virtual Reality for Only $300The most affordable VR bundle is $100 off right now with a coupon code.
11h
The Atlantic
The New Series on the Vietnam War, and the Mysteries of Historical Resonance The Ken Burns / Lynn Novick 18-hour series on The Vietnam War began its run on PBS on Sunday night and continues through this week and next. I felt about as familiar with that era as I could imagine—with its tensions at the time, with the journalism and literature that came out of it, with the historical assessments, with the war’s role in music and movies and others parts of pop culture and publ
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Prime candidate to explain cosmic ray sea runs short of energyThe very high-energy part of the spectrum of Cassiopeia A results from the cosmic rays within the remnant. Until now, this range of energy could not be measured with sufficient precision. An international team led by scientists from the Institute for Space Sciences, the Institut de Fisica d'Altes Energies and the Institute of Cosmos Sciences of the University of Barcelona, in Spain, has finally su
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple, Amazon go different ways but reach the same conclusion: The tech businesses owe nothing to the U.S. cityIn journalism, the competition to pick the new editor of a magazine or newspaper is often called a "bakeoff." (The oven is now preheating at Vanity Fair, following the announcement that Graydon Carter, the magazine's editor since 1992, will step down at the end of the year.) It also seems a pretty good way to describe the unusually public process Amazon and its founder, Jeff Bezos, have cooked up
12h
NatureNews - Most recent articles - nature.com science feeds
Pair of deadly Mexico quakes puzzles scientists Latest big tremor could be linked to major earthquake earlier this month. Nature News doi: 10.1038/nature.2017.22650
12h
Ars Technica
Apache bug leaks contents of server memory for all to see—Patch now (credit: Hanno Böck ) There's a bug in the widely used Apache Web Server that causes servers to leak pieces of arbitrary memory in a way that could expose passwords or other secrets, a freelance journalist has disclosed . The vulnerability can be triggered by querying a server with what's known as an OPTIONS request. Like the better-known GET and POST requests, OPTIONS is a type of HTTP method th
12h
Gizmodo
With SnapDice, the Dice Are the Game We’ve been (constantly) playing with SnapDice for a few weeks now. The “game” combines metal dice with a wooden tray that contains a powerful magnet, with a focus on materials and design. Because there are so many wood and dice options, pricing is all over the place, but whatever you choose, you can save by preordering . Whether you choose to play dice games with SnapDice, make up your own, or us
12h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Fighting Words What We’re Following Trump at the UN: In his first speech before the United Nations General Assembly, President Trump declared the U.S. ready and willing to “totally destroy North Korea” in defense of itself or its allies— a dangerous assertion , since the effects of using force in North Korea would be serious and tragic. He also implied that he may withdraw from the nuclear deal with Iran that t
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pulling, not pushing, silk could revolutionize how greener materials are manufacturedNew insights into how animals spin silk could lead to new, greener ways of producing synthetic fibres, according to academics at the University of Sheffield.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Complex life evolved out of the chance coupling of small moleculesVery simple ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules (compounds similar to Deoxyribonucleic acid(DNA)) can join other RNA molecules to themselves though a chemical reaction called ligation. The random joining together of different pieces or RNA could give rise to a group of molecules able to produce copies of themselves and so kick start the process of life. Wits researchers discovered exactly how this wa
13h
Gizmodo
Looks Like That Much-Anticipated Watchmen Show Is Now in the Works Tuesday afternoon, writer and producer Damon Lindelof posted the above image on his Instagram. The caption read “Day One.” And if you know comics, the connection is obvious. Lindelof has begun work on the Watchmen TV series. The statue in the picture is from issue eight of the original comics, written by Alan Moore and drawn by Dave Gibbons. It’s the statue given to Hollis Mason, the first Nite O
13h
Ars Technica
Steam has a “review bomb” problem—but will today’s new feature fix it? Enlarge / Have you struggled to understand Steam review bomb incidents? Do these incredibly unclear line charts help at all? (credit: Valve Software ) Steam, the largest digital PC game storefront in the West, continues to struggle with user-contributed game reviews. Valve launched the feature in 2013, and since then, it has seen various updates to deal with issues such as false and gamed reviews
13h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Old barn owls aren’t hard of hearingA new study suggests that older barn owls hear just as well as younger ones.
13h
Gizmodo
Secretary of Interior Installs Big Buck Hunter in Cafeteria to Celebrate Conservation Photo: AP Like most of Trump’s cabinet, Secretary of Interior Ryan Zinke is uniquely unqualified for his job. He doesn’t really give a shit about conserving federal lands—his primary mission. And today he demonstrated his own weird internal logic by installing Big Buck Hunter, an arcade game where you’re given plastic shotguns to blast computer-generated animals, in the employee cafeteria as a to
13h
The Atlantic
Photos of the Earthquake in Mexico City Earlier today, a magnitude 7.1 earthquake shook Mexico City, rattling skyscrapers and sending millions into the streets. At the moment, Reuters is reporting at least 60 deaths across several Mexican states. Coincidentally, today was the 32nd anniversary of the devastating 1985 Mexico City earthquake, an occasion that led to many first responders and volunteers already being gathered outside, taki
13h
Ars Technica
Meet the really cheap Google Home Mini and really expensive Chromebook Pixel 3 Droid Life Android fansite Droid Life is on fire today with a big series of leaks of Google's upcoming hardware launches. After showing off pictures and pricing for the Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL, the site has details on the new " Google Home Mini ," a second smartphone-powered Daydream VR headset , and a new flagship Chromebook Pixel . First up is the new "Google Home Mini," a smaller version of the
13h
Ars Technica
Most-wanted criminal arrested after posting Instagram video of himself Enlarge (credit: Thomas Trutschel/Getty Images ) A Texas outlaw on the Lone Star State's 10 most-wanted list was arrested Tuesday in Los Angeles after he posted a video to Instagram of himself showing off his arsenal of weapons. Christopher Ricardo Gonzalez, 18, was arrested after Dallas authorities tracked his location to a Los Angeles suburb, where he was taken into custody around 2am with the
13h
Big Think
Scientists Design First-Ever Microchip That Stores Light as Sound Imagine data delivered by light. This is an important benchmark toward the development of a whole new computer. Read More
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetic risk profile predicts survival for people with severe lung diseaseAn international Yale-led research team has shown that a risk profile based on 52 genes accurately predicts survival for patients with a severe lung disease. If confirmed in further studies, the finding could transform the way patients are treated for the condition, which is on the rise in older adults.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
India has avoided 1 million child deaths since 2005, new study concludesIndia has avoided about 1 million deaths of children under age five since 2005, driven by significant reductions in mortality from pneumonia, diarrhea, tetanus and measles, according to new research published today.
13h
Live Science
Officer's Failed Drug Test: How Long Does Marijuana Stay in Hair?A NYPD officer recently said she failed a marijuana drug test because officials tested hair from a weave she wore. But how does marijuana get into hair, and how long does it stay there?
13h
Gizmodo
The 'Godfather' of Autonomous Driving: We Gotta Wreck the Sky Photo: Flickr/TechCrunch Have you ever gazed up at the sweeping blue sky and thought, God, it’s boring up there ? It seems like Sebastian Thrun—who launched Google’s self-driving car program and is the CEO of the flying car startup Kitty Hawk —sure has. On Tuesday, he shared his vision of a sky clogged with tons and tons of glorious soaring metal at TechCrunch Disrupt. “I can’t envision a future
13h
Ars Technica
Without opioids, our collective life expectancy would be 2.5 mos longer Enlarge / Record seizure of fentanyl in Queens NY could kill 32 million people. (credit: NYPD ) In a startling announcement , authorities in New York and New Jersey reported Monday that they had confiscated a whopping 122 kilograms (nearly 270 pounds) of opioids worth more than $30 million in a pair of recent busts. One of the seizures yielded 64 kilograms (more than 140 pounds) of the extremely
13h
The Atlantic
Republican Donors Are Helping Cover Trump's Legal Bills President Trump, whose surname became a byword for gilded opulence in the 1980s and 1990s, is reportedly leaning on his reelection campaign and the Republican National Committee to pay legal fees stemming from the Russia investigation. Reuters reported on Tuesday that Trump’s legal team had received payments from both organizations, although it was not immediately clear how much has been disburse
14h
Ars Technica
“Potentially catastrophic” Hurricane Maria set to strike Puerto Rico Enlarge / Hurricane Maria's satellite appearance on Tuesday evening. (credit: NOAA ) Only one Category 5 hurricane has ever made landfall on the island of Puerto Rico, an unincorporated territory of the United States. That was the 1928 Okeechobee hurricane that crossed the island with sustained winds of 160mph and caused more than 300 deaths on the island. Later, that storm would become the secon
14h
Ars Technica
The Pixel 2 XL price jumps $80, now starts at $849 Droid Life Google is hard at work getting the Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL ready for its October 4 launch party . But, in the meantime, pricing and even more pictures of Google's upcoming flagship smartphone have leaked. Droid Life has the details on the Pixel 2 XL, which the report says is the phone's official name. After Google's shut down of the "value oriented" Nexus brand, the first Pixel phone wa
14h
Science | The Guardian
Too few antibiotics in pipeline to tackle global drug-resistance crisis, WHO warns Nowhere near enough new drugs are currently in development says report, which calls for urgent investment and responsible use of existing antibiotics Too few antibiotics are in the pipeline to tackle the global crisis of drug resistance, which is responsible for the rise of almost untreatable infections around the world, the World Health Organisation (WHO) warns. Among the alarming diseases that
14h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Meet The Diesel Brothers' Ultimate Tow Rig! #DieselBrothers | Mondays at 9p For less than $25K, the crew modifies a stock pickup to be able to haul heavier loads more efficiently. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/diesel-brothers/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DieselBrothersTV https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twitter: https:/
14h
The Scientist RSS
Publishers Legal Action Advances Against Sci-HubThe pirate site plans to ignore the lawsuits from Elsevier and the American Chemical Society.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video streaming pioneer Roku aims to raise up to $252 million with IPORoku Inc., the leading maker of devices for streaming internet video on televisions, hopes to raise up to $252 million with an initial public stock offering.
14h
Science : NPR
A Girl's Love For Bugs Goes Viral Canadian Sophia Spencer, 8, loves bugs. A tweet her mom sent out about that made headlines and led to a paper the girl co-authored in a science journal.
14h
The Atlantic
The Smartphone App That Tells You An Earthquake Is About to Hit Updated at 8:04 a.m. ET More than 200 people are dead after a magnitude 7.1 earthquake struck Mexico on Tuesday, the anniversary of the 1985 quake that killed at least 5,000 people. It was the second major earthquake in the region this month. Just 12 days ago, Mexico City’s earthquake-warning sirens blared ahead of an 8.1-magnitude temblor—and many Mexicans reacted as they are by now accustomed t
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Western cities try to stop hungry bears from causing havocOn a recent morning that was chilly with the first nip of fall, Brenda Lee went looking for knocked-over trash cans. She drove her car slowly through alleyways on the west side of this Colorado city, close to where streets end and the Rocky Mountains begin. The damage wasn't hard to find.
15h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Elton Don Today in 5 Lines During his first address before the United Nations General Assembly, President Trump threatened to “totally destroy North Korea” and referred to North Korean leader Kim Jong Un as “rocket man.” A bipartisan group of governors, including Brian Sandoval of Nevada and Bill Walker of Alaska, wrote a letter urging senators to vote against the new Republican proposal to repeal the Affo
15h
Gizmodo
A Big Leak Just Revealed Google's 4 Most Important Devices 2 Weeks Early Even though Google’s big October 4 event is still a couple weeks out, it seems we’ve just gotten a really good look at the four most important devices we expect the company to announce there. The leaks come courtesy of Droid Life , and include info and prices on a new, smaller version of the Google Home smart speaker, a new premium 2-in-1 Chromebook, and both the big and small versions of the Pix
15h
Live Science
In Photos: Hurricane Maria Seen from SpaceHurricane Maria peaked as a massive Category 5 storm as it rolled across the Caribbean in September 2017. See photos of Hurricane Maria from space by satellites in our gallery here.
15h
Live Science
Brain-Computer Interface Allows Users to Compose Music With Only Their ThoughtsBrain signals are recorded with an electroencephalogram worn on the head like a swim cap, which allows the wearer to select musical notes and tones displayed on a computer screen.
15h
Live Science
E.T. Art? Crop Circles Look 'Alien' from SpaceSeen from space, these discs look more like modern art than potatoes.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Equifax says 100,000 Canadians' data hackedThe personal information of 100,000 Canadians may have been compromised in a hack of Equifax revealed earlier in the month, the credit data company said Tuesday.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Foot pain? New study says look at hip and knee for complete diagnosisA study by researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery and Harvard Medical School suggests new guidelines may be in order for evaluating and treating lower extremity pain. Investigators set out to determine if there was a relation between foot pain and lower extremity joint pain, and they found a significant association between foot pain and knee or hip pain.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Threatened Amazon reserve already being mined: GreenpeaceA huge nature reserve in Brazil's Amazon rainforest that the government wants to open to foreign mining companies already suffers from illegal mining activity, Greenpeace said Tuesday.
15h
Live Science
War Games: Xbox 360 Controllers Will Operate Submarine PeriscopesMicrosoft usually sells its Xbox 360 controllers to gamers who play "Call of Duty" or "Halo," but now these controllers have an entirely new customer: the U.S. Navy.
15h
Feed: All Latest
Donald Trump’s United Nations Speech Stokes North Korea TensionsAt the United Nations Tuesday, Donald Trump's incendiary North Korea remarks pushed the word even further from a peaceful outcome.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
If Google invests in Lyft, what does that mean for Uber?Uber was the indisputable No. 1 player in the domestic on-demand transportation industry. And by its workforce size, passenger count and capital raised, it still is.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lack of trust less of a barrier to clinical trial participation, say minority populationsSignificantly fewer African-Americans, Hispanics, Asians and non-Hispanic whites say 'lack of trust' is a reason why individuals do not participate in clinical trials, indicating a more favorable perception of this research. In a recent public opinion survey commissioned by Research!America, the percentage of respondents citing 'lack of trust' as a reason declined by as much as 15% among minority
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
PET imaging tracks Zika virus infection, disease progression in mouse modelFor the first time, scientists have used Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging to study brain inflammation following Zika virus infection in mice, according to a study recently published online in Molecular Imaging and Biology. Traditional methods of infectious disease research using animal models provide limited information about disease progression until the study's endpoint, when investiga
15h
Big Think
Here’s Why Calorie Restriction Makes Us Live Longer This is the 1 st study to show evidence of a relationship between methylation drift and lifespan. Read More
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Can cycling be safer if bikes are smarter and 'talk' to cars?Jake Sigal wants to make biking safer. To do that, Sigal and his Detroit-area software company, Tome, plan to make bicycles, or their accessories, smarter and allow them to communicate with the cars and trucks that occupy the same streets, sometimes leading to fatal interactions.
15h
Ars Technica
We’re building roads to withstand last century’s climate Enlarge (credit: Wikimedia Commons ) Does it make sense to build something that will almost certainly end up wrecked before its useful lifetime is over? In most contexts, the answer is clearly "no," since doing so is a waste of money and resources. But lots of people seem to have a blind spot when it comes to planning ahead for climate change. North Carolina, for example, went through a protracte
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Giant antennas in New Mexico search for cosmic discoveriesEmploying an array of giant telescopes positioned in the New Mexico desert, astronomers have started a massive surveying project aimed at producing the most detailed view ever made of such a large portion of space using radio waves emitted from throughout the Milky Way and beyond.
16h
Ars Technica
Dealmaster: Get a Dell desktop PC with 16GB of RAM for $600 Greetings, Arsians! Courtesy of our friends at TechBargains , we have another round of deals to share. Today's roundup includes several discounts on Dell desktops and laptops, including an Inspiron 3650 desktop with a Core i7 (6th-gen) chip, 16GB of RAM, and a 2TB hard drive for $600. We also have some fairly sizable savings on Sony's PlayStation VR headset, 4K TVs from LG and Sony, and some Wi-F
16h
Popular Science
Hurricane Maria proves how difficult it is to predict a storm’s devastation Science It exploded from a tropical storm to a category five in just 27 hours. Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands are in the path of the second monstrous hurricane to tear through the Caribbean this month.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Four things to know about Apple's iOS 11 software updateHolding off on upgrading your trusty old iPhone? You won't need a spiffy iPhone 8 in order to get new maps, photos and other features with a free software update Apple began rolling out Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Equifax says it had a security breach earlier in the yearEquifax, under pressure from a massive data breach, says it had a separate incident earlier this year. That may mean even more scrutiny as the company deals with the aftermath of a security failure that exposed the information of 143 million Americans.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
End-of-summer Arctic sea ice extent is eighth lowest on recordArctic sea ice appeared to have reached its yearly lowest extent on Sept. 13, NASA and the NASA-supported National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at the University of Colorado Boulder have reported. Analysis of satellite data by NSIDC and NASA showed that at 1.79 million square miles (4.64 million square kilometers), this year's Arctic sea ice minimum extent is the eighth lowest in the consisten
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Big Think
More Than Just Sanctuary, Migrants Need Social Citizenship Social citizenship is both a feeling of belonging and a definable set of commitments and obligations associated with living in a place; it is not second-class national citizenship. Read More
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The Atlantic
The Two Republicans Who Will Likely Determine Obamacare's Fate The fate of the GOP’s 11th-hour effort to repeal the Affordable Care Act likely will come down to two familiar faces in the health-care debate: Senators John McCain of Arizona and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska. And in the last 24 hours, the fence-sitting Republicans were pulled in opposite directions by their state’s governors. On Tuesday afternoon, Governor Bill Walker of Alaska joined a bipartisan g
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The Atlantic
How Much Longer Will the Iran Deal Last Under Trump? President Trump’s contempt for his predecessor’s chief foreign policy accomplishment, the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), or the nuclear deal with Iran, is no secret. On the campaign trail, he routinely called it one of the “worst” and “stupidest” agreements in history, and he pledged to dismantle it. Now, in his first speech before the UN General Assembly, Trump has suggested that if
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Ars Technica
Author of key Internet freedom law opposes new sex trafficking bill Sen. Ron Wyden is a critic of SESTA. (credit: Ron Wyden ) The United States Senate is moving toward passage of a bill that would—for the first time—water down a landmark 1996 law that shields website operators from lawsuits and state prosecution for user-generated content. And one of the authors of that 1996 law, Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.), argued Tuesday that this would be a mistake. The Stop Enabl
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Emerging disease further jeopardizes North American frogsA deadly amphibian disease called severe Perkinsea infections, or SPI, is the cause of many large-scale frog die-offs in the United States, according to a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New technique promises tunable laser devicesWhispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a phenomenon similar to an effect observed in circular galleries, such as in some cathedrals or museums, where sound waves travel across the gallery and are reflected and refocused tightly enough that a whisper on one side can be heard on the othe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study suggests risks vary widely in drone-human impactsNew Virginia Tech research suggests there's wide variation in the risk that unmanned aircraft pose to people on the ground.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video: Sushi's sublime secretsSushi is sublime. Just fresh fish and seasoned rice in its simplest form served one on top of the other, or rolled up with some veggies in a seaweed wrapper. What creates the subtle interplay of flavors in your tuna nigiri?
16h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
What we're missing in the debate about immigration | Duarte GeraldinoBetween 2008 and 2016, the United States deported more than three million people. What happens to those left behind? Journalist Duarte Geraldino picks up the story of deportation where the state leaves off. Learn more about the wider impact of forced removal as Geraldino explains how the sudden absence of a mother, a local business owner or a high school student ripples outward and wreaks havoc on
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Big Think
Need Help Suing Equifax? Use This Chatbot to File for up to $25,000 By using the DoNotPay chatbot, you may be able to quickly file a small-claims case against Equifax for up to $25,000. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Security cameras are vulnerable to attacks using infrared light: studyBen-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) researchers have demonstrated that security cameras infected with malware can receive covert signals and leak sensitive information from the very same surveillance devices used to protect facilities.
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Gizmodo
How to Stop Pirate Bay and Other Sites From Hijacking Your CPU to Mine Cryptocoins Image Sources: Pixabay , Pixabay CC This past weekend, the popular torrenting site The Pirate Bay caught some flack for testing out a new system that used visitors’ CPU power to generate cryptocurrency profits for itself. This tactic has been around for years, but the high profile implementation signals that it’s probably time to start blocking this crap. Here’s how it’s done. First of all, you n
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cognitive science
Ambitious Project to Probe how Brain Makes Decisions submitted by /u/NaiveSkeptic [link] [comments]
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The Scientist RSS
Scientific Society Gives Money to Harvey VictimsThe American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology is offering small grants to aid scientists and students hit by Hurricane Harvey.
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Gizmodo
BioLite Made an Awesome FirePit, and You Can Save By Preordering BioLite , maker of our favorite camping stoves and lighting , is back with a FirePit we’ve been psyched about since we saw it in action back in December. Their Kickstarter launched today and is already... on fire. The BioLite FirePit is easy to transport, minimizes smoke, is see-through for maximum fire viewing, uses wood or charcoal, and doubles as a hibachi grill. The secret here is an advanced
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Popular Science
Fake diamonds helped scientists find the hottest temperature ever recorded on Earth Science It all went down 36 million years ago. This is not exactly the geologists’ standard test—but it is incredibly accurate.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
End-of-summer Arctic sea ice extent is eighth lowest on recordArctic sea ice appeared to have reached its yearly lowest extent on Sept. 13, NASA and the NASA-supported National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at the University of Colorado Boulder have reported. Analysis of satellite data by NSIDC and NASA showed that at 1.79 million square miles (4.64 million square kilometers), this year's Arctic sea ice minimum extent is the eighth lowest in the consisten
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists from MSU have invented a new way to 'weigh' intergalactic black holesAstrophysicists from Moscow State University have found a new way to estimate the mass of supermassive black holes outside our galaxy, even if these holes are barely detectable. The results of the study were published in the Astronomy and Astrophysics journal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Emerging disease further jeopardizes North American frogsA deadly amphibian disease called severe Perkinsea infections, or SPI, is the cause of many large-scale frog die-offs in the United States, according to a new study by the US Geological Survey.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
BU: HPV vaccine associated with improved fertility in some womenMore than 40 percent of American teens are now getting vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV). But, despite HPV infection being associated with reduced semen quality and lower pregnancy rates, there is still public concern about whether the HPV vaccine itself could affect future fertility.
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The Atlantic
A Radical Rebuke of Barack Obama's Foreign Policy Legacy Donald Trump’s first speech to the United Nations can best be understood as a response to his predecessor’s final one. On September 20, 2016, Barack Obama told the UN General Assembly that “at this moment we all face a choice. We can choose to press forward with a better model of cooperation and integration. Or we can retreat into a world sharply divided, and ultimately in conflict, along age-old
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Live Science
More than 200 Dead After 7.1-Magnitude Earthquake Strikes Central MexicoA magnitude-7.1 earthquake that struck central Mexico yesterday (Sept. 20) left more than 200 people dead, with residents working through the night searching for survivors in piles of rubble from collapsed buildings, according to news reports.
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Ars Technica
Unwanted ads on Breitbart lead to massive click fraud revelations, Uber claims Enlarge (credit: Bloomberg / Getty Images News ) Uber has sued an advertising firm, Fetch Media, over allegations that the British firm and its Japanese parent company, Dentsu, fraudulently billed Uber tens of millions of dollars for various fake online ads. According to the lawsuit , which was filed Monday afternoon in federal court in San Francisco, Uber first realized that something was wrong
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Gizmodo
A Destructive 7.1 Magnitude Earthquake Just Rocked Mexico City [Updating] Remains of a damaged building stands after an earthquake in Mexico City, Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017. (Image: AP) On the anniversary of its catastrophic 1985 earthquake, Mexico City has been hit by another powerful seismic event. No reports of casualties have been reported, but videos posted to social media suggest that damage is widespread. Image: USGS The 7.1 magnitude tremor struck at 1:14pm local
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Futurity.org
Altering gut bacteria can shield liver from medicine Modulating gut bacteria could enhance the therapeutic value of a drug, research with the Alzheimer’s medication tacrine suggests. Enzymes in the liver break down pharmaceutical drugs into their metabolites, which the body then excretes in feces and urine. Drugs can also undergo chemical reactions mediated by bacteria within the gut. “To date, the influence of microbes on the fate of drugs is only
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NYT > Science
Islands Seek International Funding for Hurricane RecoveryIn a special United Nations session, leaders of islands battered by hurricanes made worse by climate change appealed to wealthy countries for aid.
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Live Science
Hurricane Irma's Wake: Caribbean's Scars Will Likely Last YearsThe Caribbean is still reeling after Hurricane Irma, and now the region is being pummeled by Hurricane Maria. How will this part of the world recover?
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Futurity.org
Teen aggression often linked to family neglect Nearly half of all teenagers investigated for neglect by child welfare agencies and exhibiting signs of aggression experience a separation from their family, research in Ontario, Canada finds. This is because the parents are not willing or able to remain their caregivers. The research also shows that, in addition to suffering from various kinds of maltreatment, the vast majority of children and y
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispersWhispering gallery mode resonators rely on a phenomenon similar to an effect observed in circular galleries, and the same phenomenon applies to light. When light is stored in ring-shaped or spherical active resonators, the waves superimpose in such a way that it can result in laser light. This week in APL Photonics, investigators report a new type of dye-doped WGM micro-laser that produces light w
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gulf spill oil dispersants associated with health symptoms in cleanup workersWorkers who were likely exposed to dispersants while cleaning up the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill experienced a range of health symptoms including cough and wheeze, and skin and eye irritation, according to scientists at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The study appeared online Sept. 15 in Environmental Health Perspectives and is the first research to examine dispersant-related health
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The Atlantic
What Total Destruction of North Korea Means Speaking before the UN General Assembly today, President Donald Trump announced that, unless North Korea gives up its nuclear weapons and ballistic missile programs, “the United States will have no choice but to totally destroy” the country. He sounded almost excited as he threatened, “Rocket Man is on a suicide mission for himself and for his regime.” North Korea is a serious problem, and not on
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The Atlantic
Toys Aren’t Us In a year of constant bad news across the retail sector , Toys “R” Us has become a little engine that couldn’t, filing for bankruptcy in a federal court in Virginia Monday night. As part of its bankruptcy plan, the company will continue to operate most of its stores through the holiday season, when the company has traditionally pulled in the most revenue. The bankruptcy marks a new phase for a ch
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Science | The Guardian
Our hurricane-hit islands deserve aid. The rules that block it are wrong | Guy HewittHurricane Maria has wrought terrible destruction in the Caribbean, yet OECD guidelines say that the islands are ineligible for assistance • Hurricane Maria – live updates In a manner reminiscent of Stephen King’s Bazaar of Bad Dreams , dark clouds of despair and destruction hover yet again over the Caribbean with the passage of Hurricane Maria . The most recent version of our recurring ecological
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Big Think
Ketogenic Diets Have "Profound Effect on Brain Function," Studies Find Molecular biologists are hopeful about the results, but a long road lies ahead—so far this diet has only worked proven wonders on mice. Read More
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Ars Technica
Setback for group seeking “hockey stick” climate scientists’ e-mails Enlarge / The gloves came off long ago. (credit: John McArthur ) Those prone to rejecting the conclusions of climate science sometimes fixate on weird things. For years, there has been a concerted effort to prove that a specific paleoclimate record—often referred to as “the hockey stick” because of the sharp rise at the end—was somehow fraudulent. It doesn't seem to matter that many other researc
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Gizmodo
How Star Wars Is Expanding Its Online Presence With a New Science-Based Show Bacta tanks are just one of the many topics explored on a new Star Wars show. All Images: Lucasfilm The Star Wars movies may get all the big headlines, but theaters are far from the only place the franchise is expanding. Official online video content has been growing in recent years and that continues today with the launch of a brand new show—one that highlights the power of Star Wars beyond just
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Feed: All Latest
Zack Snyder Left *Justice League*—Then He Made an iPhone MovieThe director's new 4-minute short was released today.
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Live Science
Halloween 2017: A Guide to the When, Why, What and HowHere's everything you've ever wanted to know about Halloween, including how the holiday started and evolved, and why we celebrate it when we do.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Security cameras are vulnerable to attacks using infrared light -- Ben Gurion U. studyThe cyber team led by Dr. Mordechai Guri, head of research and development for BGU's Cyber Security Research Center (CSRC), shows how IR can be used to create a covert communication channel between malware installed on an internal computer network and an attacker located hundreds of yards outside or even miles away with direct line of sight. The attacker can use this channel to send commands and r
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Landmark study suggests risks vary widely in drone-human impactsNew Virginia Tech research suggests there's wide variation in the risk that unmanned aircraft pose to people on the ground.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Red cosmetic powder used in Hindu ceremonies contains unsafe lead levelsSindoor -- a cosmetic powder sold in the United States and used during Hindu religious and cultural ceremonies -- has unsafe levels of lead, according to a Rutgers University study. Researchers from the School of Public Health say at a minimum there is a need to monitor sindoor lead levels and make the public aware of the potential hazards.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Managing negative emotions can help pregnant smokers quitA new study by scientists in the University at Buffalo's Research Institute on Addictions has shown that pregnant smokers are more likely to quit if they can learn to manage negative emotions that lead to smoking.
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Popular Science
This scorching black exoplanet takes in all the light it can and gives almost nothing back Space As black as day. Exoplanet WASP-12b absorbs about 94 percent of its sun's rays and reflects almost none of it back.
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Ars Technica
Man who made “Pepe” wants his frog back, and he’ll use copyright to get it Enlarge / A man holds a sign of Pepe the frog, an alt-right icon, during a rally in Berkeley, California in April 2017. (credit: JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images ) Matt Furie created the cartoon character Pepe the Frog in 2005 as a kind of peaceful stoner animal for his comic "Boys Club." By 2008, the frog had become a meme at 4chan. In the 2016 election cycle, though, Pepe became something complete
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Futurity.org
Belief in success predicts how kids do in math and reading When kids believe they can achieve success in math and reading, they are more likely to achieve high test scores in those subjects, new research suggests. “…there is more to understanding how children achieve than just examining prior performance…” Researchers used two US data sets—with one being a nationally represented study—and one UK data set to measure self-concept and standardized assessmen
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Viden
Udryddelsen af små ukendte dyr kan blive katatrofalForskere ser flere tegn på, at klimaforandringerne kan udrydde essentielle livsformer. Effekten er potentielt katastrofal, og måske venter endda en ny masseudryddelse.
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The Scientist RSS
Largest and Smallest Animals At Highest Risk of Extinction, Study FindsResearchers recommend greater conservation efforts towards non-mammals and small creatures.
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Inside Science
A Magnet From the Bizarro World A Magnet From the Bizarro World French scientists have created a material with convention-defying magnetic properties. 1024px-Ferrofluid_Magnet_under_glass.jpg A blob of magnetic fluid that helps to visualize the magnetic field lines generated by the magnet underneath. Image credits: Gregory F. Maxwell Rights information: CC BY-SA 3.0 Physics Tuesday, September 19, 2017 - 14:00 Yuen Yiu, Staff Wr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sushi's sublime secrets (video)Sushi is sublime. Just fresh fish and seasoned rice in its simplest form served one on top of the other, or rolled up with some veggies in a seaweed wrapper. But creates the subtle interplay of flavors in your tuna nigiri? Take a deep dive into the chemistry of rice, fish and seaweed in this video from Reactions: https://youtu.be/6F_OWtoTTrA
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cell model of the brain provides new knowledge on developmental diseaseBy reprogramming skin cells into nerve cells, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden are creating cell models of the human brain. In a new study published in Molecular Psychiatry the researchers describe how cells from patients with the severe developmental disease lissencephaly differ from healthy cells. The method can provide vital new knowledge on difficult-to-study congenital diseases.
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Science | The Guardian
Testosterone Rex triumphs as Royal Society science book of the year Psychologist Cordelia Fine’s dissection of the myths that sustain assumptions about sexual difference acclaimed by judges as ‘a cracking critique’ A book that rubbishes the idea of “fundamental” differences between men and women has become the 30th winner of the prestigious Royal Society prize for science book of the year. Related: Testosterone Rex by Cordelia Fine review – the question of men’s
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The Atlantic
Is Trump's 'Wiretap' Claim Vindicated? Viewed from the most obvious angle, the latest scoops about special counsel Robert Mueller investigating Paul Manafort are at best neutral news for the president and more likely bad news. The new reports say that U.S. officials got warrants to surveil Manafort, Trump’s former campaign chairman, before and after the 2016 election under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, and that Mueller to
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Live Science
Why Today's Teens Aren't in Any Hurry to Grow UpShould parents be worried that many teens are putting off traditional rites of passage like working, driving and dating?
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Ars Technica
iOS 11 is now available for download on supported devices Enlarge / iOS 11, which will ship with the iPhone 8, has a renovated app store. As expected , Apple has begun rolling iOS 11 out to iPhones and iPads today in most regions. You can probably download it right now, and, if not, you’ll be able to fetch it very shortly. Devices as far back as the iPhone 5S, the iPad Air, and the iPad mini 2 can update to iOS 11. But the iPhone 5 and 5C, as well as th
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Gizmodo
Thunderstorm Turns Into a Nuclear Reactor and Blasts Radiation Everywhere Image: Ricardo Faria /Flickr Thunderclouds rolled into the Japanese beach town of Uchinada early one December morning in 2015. The scientists expected the storms; they’d staked out the location specifically for studying something normally only seen by satellites. Sometime after 5am, a flash of lightning struck a wind turbine. And along came a more perplexing weather phenomenon, too: The thunderst
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Feed: All Latest
Udacity Launches an Online Course for Flying Car EngineersSebastian Thrun's online education company wants to prepare more people for the future of flying.
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Feed: All Latest
Waymo and Intel Combine to Power the Future of Self-Driving CarsThe rich Google self-driving car spinoff and the global chipmaker make excellent dance partners.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Self-driving Uber fleet returns to service following crashUber has resumed self-driving vehicle service in Pittsburgh following a crash.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Clear tactics, but few easy solutions, for hospitals combating ransomwareHospitals facing the prospect of ransomware attacks like the one that afflicted British hospitals in May can take many concrete steps to better protect themselves, but some of the most important measures -- such as a national policy not to pay ransoms -- may be tougher to formulate.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Monk parakeets invade MexicoIn a new paper published in PLOS ONE, researchers describe a recent, rapid, and ongoing invasion of monk parakeets in Mexico, and the regulatory changes that affected the species' spread.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Screening for cervical abnormalities in women offered HPV vaccinationHuman papillomavirus (HPV) testing detects a higher number of precancerous cervical lesions than cytology-based Pap smears in a female population including a proportion offered HPV vaccination, according to a new study published in PLOS Medicine by Karen Canfell of Cancer Council New South Wales, Australia, researchers at the Victorian Cytology Service, Melbourne, Australia, and colleagues.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Home blood pressure monitoring for hypertension best combined with intensive supportPeople who monitor their own blood pressure at home are most likely to see a benefit if they combine it with individually tailored intensive support, according to a new systematic literature review and meta-analysis published this week in PLOS Medicine by in PLOS Medicine by Richard McManus of the University of Oxford, UK, and colleagues.
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The Atlantic
A Photo Trip Through Yellowstone National Park Yellowstone National Park, now 145 years old, was the first national park established in the world. In 2016, the 2.2-million-acre park was visited by a record 4.2 million people who came to experience the wilderness, explore countless geothermal features, witness the gorgeous vistas, and try to catch a glimpse of the resident wildlife. Gathered here are a handful of compelling photos from Yellows
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The Atlantic
What Ole Miss Can Teach Universities About Grappling With Their Pasts Next month, students at the University of Oxford will return for their fall semester, known as the “Michaelmas” term—named after the Feast of Saint Michael and All Angels—to a campus strewn with the sort of colonial- and slave-era tinder that has helped fuel the outrage and protests on university campuses across America. A statue of Cecil Rhodes, tucked in a niche of an Oriel College building on
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Gizmodo
Here Are The First Concrete Numbers Showing How Rarely Twitter Takes Action On Abusive Behavior Reports Photo: Getty Twitter has struggled to rein in harassment on its platform for years, but in January, the company pledged to finally get serious about the problem. “We didn’t move fast enough last year; now we’re thinking about progress in days and hours not weeks and months,” Ed Ho, Twitter’s general manager of consumer product and engineering, promised . Twitter has rolled out a slew of updates s
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Gizmodo
Hopeful Martians Emerge From 8-Month Experiment To Find Earth Horrific As Ever Image: Hi-SEAS Before Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos and other space enthusiasts can ship humans to Mars as easily as an Amazon Prime delivery, we need to figure out they’ll fare on a foreign planet. Luckily, NASA and the University of Hawaii have been all over this, funding several successful iterations of an experiment called Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation (HI-SEAS), in which a crew of “
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research redefines proteins' role in the development of spinal sensory cellsA recent study led by Samantha Butler at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA has overturned a common belief about how a certain class of proteins in the spinal cord regulate the formation of nervous system cells -- called neurons -- during embryonic development.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain powered: Increased physical activity among breast cancer survivors boosts cognitionIt is estimated that up to 75 percent of breast cancer survivors experience problems with cognitive difficulties following treatments, perhaps lasting years. Currently, few science-based options are available to help. University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers report in a pilot study of 87 female breast cancer survivors an increase in physical activity more than doubled the
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Opioid Crisis is Squeezing Small-Town FinancesEmergency calls, coroner bills and childcare costs add up -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Monk parakeets invade MexicoThanks to the international pet trade, populations of exotic animals are popping up in unexpected places worldwide. One of these successful invaders is the monk parakeet: a small, green parrot native to South America that now flies free in cities across North America, Europe, and elsewhere around the world.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Science denial not limited to political rightIn the wake of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, many claims have been made that science denial, particularly as it relates to climate change, is primarily a problem of the political right.
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Gizmodo
Move Over Fidget Spinner, the Infinity Box is Here. Infinity Box , $16 with code KMOXHS92 Update: Sold out Fidget spinners and fidget boxes are old news. The infinity cube is the new gadget to keep your hands busy. It’s sort of like a Rubik’s cube that collapses into a flat rectangle and can be folded in an infinite number of combinations. Like its predecessors, it’s small enough to fidget away in one hand and continue working with the other. Adve
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NYT > Science
Chemical Industry Ally Faces Critics in Bid for Top E.P.A. PostMichael L. Dourson, who has long run a premier firm for the chemical industry, is set for a confirmation hearing before a Senate panel.
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Gizmodo
Everything You Need to Know About the Klingons, Star Trek's Ever-Changing Space Warriors Image: CBS Klingons are one of the most iconic Star Trek alien races. In 51 years they’ve evolved from deceptive villains to honorable allies—and now, with the arrival of Star Trek: Discovery this week, they’re becoming spiritual warriors once again, at odds with our heroes. Here’s everything you need to know about the past, present, and future of Qo’noS’s finest. From Enemy, to Ally, to Enemy Fr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Science denial not limited to political rightA new study from social psychologists at the University of Illinois at Chicago suggests people of all political backgrounds can be motivated to participate in science denial.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sleep deprivation is an effective anti-depressant for nearly half of depressed patientsSleep deprivation - typically administered in controlled, inpatient settings - rapidly reduces symptoms of depression in roughly half of depression patients, according the first meta-analysis on the subject in nearly 30 years, from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.
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cognitive science
Consciousness Creep submitted by /u/NaiveSkeptic [link] [comments]
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nine stray elephants electrocuted in BotswanaNine elephants were electrocuted in a freak accident in Botswana after one of them knocked into an electricity pole and the high-voltage power line fell on them, a local official said Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Political polarization? Don't blame the web, study saysDespite the popular narrative that the web is to blame for rising political polarization, a study by a Brown University economist has found that recent growth in polarization is greatest for demographic groups in which individuals are least likely to use the internet and social media. This means that data does not support the claim that the internet is the most significant driver of partisanship.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EU to launch cybersecurity 'safety labels'The European Union unveiled plans Tuesday to step up its response to cyber attacks, including a new intelligence-sharing agency, cyber war games and product safety labels.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Method to estimate abundance, trends in North Atlantic right whales confirms declineNOAA Fisheries researchers and colleagues at the New England Aquarium have developed a new model to improve estimates of abundance and population trends of endangered North Atlantic right whales, which have declined in numbers and productivity in recent years. The findings are published in the journal Ecology and Evolution.
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Gizmodo
All of the Best Augmented Reality Tricks Your iPhone Can Do Right Now [Updated] GIF iOS 11 is finally available today for your iPhone and iPad, and among the many new features included in the update is Apple’s ARKit framework allowing developers to more easily create augmented reality apps and experiences. Here are some of the best ones you’ll want to try out after updating. To date, augmented reality has been more of a novelty than a genuinely useful tool on your smartphone
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Twitter touts victories in war on extremist contentTwitter on Tuesday touted victories in the battle against tweets promoting extremist violence, saying it has been vanquishing those kinds of accounts before governments even ask.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Method to estimate abundance, trends in North Atlantic right whales confirms declineNOAA Fisheries researchers and colleagues at the New England Aquarium have developed a new model to improve estimates of abundance and population trends of endangered North Atlantic right whales, which have declined in numbers and productivity in recent years. Between 1990 and 2010 abundance increased to 482 animals, but since 2010 the numbers have declined to 458 in 2015, with 14 known deaths thi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Political polarization? Don't blame the web, Brown study saysDespite the popular narrative that the web is to blame for rising political polarization, a study by a Brown University economist has found that recent growth in polarization is greatest for demographic groups in which individuals are least likely to use the internet and social media. This means that data does not support the claim that the internet is the most significant driver of partisanship.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers use Wikipedia to give AI context cluesA team of BYU computer scientists is teaching artificial intelligence agents how to interact with the world in a way that makes sense.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A study switches from genetic to metabolic analysis to reconstitute evolutionary processA new method for analyzing a living being chemical compositions is tested in Andean plants and attest the genesis of species by means of geographic isolation. Scientific article published August 2017 by Brazilian researchers is based on the analysis of chemical compounds which express specific biogeographic trends at the evolutionary process, validating a Smithsonian hypothesis on the evolution of
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Popular Science
11 new iOS 11 features to try DIY Augmented reality, a redesigned App Store, and other new tricks your iPhone just learned. Apple's latest mobile operating system is here, and the new iOS 11 comes packed with new features. These are the updates to look out for on your phone or tablet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees Tropical Depression Norma's small area of strengthInfrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite has revealed that the area of strongest storms within now Tropical Depression Norma has diminished.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What's the latest on gut microbiota? Concordia microbiology undergrads publish their findingsHow many undergraduate classes in microbiology—or any scientific field, for that matter—can say they're published in a peer-reviewed journal?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA data shows Otis devoid of precipitation, now a remnantFormer Hurricane Otis was not showing any thunderstorm development or precipitation on satellite imagery on Sept. 19. As a result, the National Hurricane Center declared Otis a remnant low pressure area.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research suggests Mercury's poles are icier than scientists thoughtThe scorching hot surface of Mercury seems like an unlikely place to find ice, but research over the past three decades has suggested that water is frozen on the first rock from the sun, hidden away on crater floors that are permanently shadowed from the sun's blistering rays. Now, a new study led by Brown University researchers suggests that there could be much more ice on Mercury's surface than
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Futurity.org
We need a mosquito emoji for public health The world really needs a mosquito emoji, and not just so hikers and backyard barbequers can complain in text messages and Facebook posts. Two public health workers say an emoji representing the blood-sucking insect would help health professionals around the world communicate with those threatened by the often-fatal diseases it carries. (Credit: Aphelandra Messer/Johns Hopkins) “A mosquito emoji w
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Viden
5 store og 10 små nyheder, der transformerer din iPad
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Viden
Nyt iOS ude: Skal du opdatere din iPhone eller iPad?Medmindre du har en meget ny Apple-dims, så slå koldt vand i blodet, før du installerer iOS 11.
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Gizmodo
Waters Exposed By Massive Antarctic Iceberg Now a Protected Area A gorgeous natural color image of A68 captured on September 11, 2017. (Image: Jesse Allen, using data from the Land Atmosphere Near real-time Capability for EOS (LANCE)). Two months ago, an iceberg half the size of Jamaica tore itself loose from Antarctica’s Larsen C Ice Shelf . As it slowly drifts north, this massive berg is exposing an area that’s been covered in ice for the past 120,000 years.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA looks within category 5 Hurricane Maria before and after first landfallSatellite data is enabling forecasters to look inside and outside of powerful Hurricane Maria. A NASA animation of satellite imagery shows Hurricane Maria's first landfall on the island of Dominica. NASA's GPM satellite provided a 3-D look at the storms within that gave forecasters a clue to Maria strengthening into a Category 5 storm, and NASA's Aqua satellite gathered temperature data on the fri
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA tracking Jose meandering off US East CoastJose has been a named storm for nearly two weeks now as it continues to slowly move northward off the U.S. East Coast east of the Outer Banks of North Carolina. NASA's GPM satellite and NOAA's GOES East satellites have provided a look at the rainfall and movement of this long-lived storm.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UK oil and gas reserves may last only a decade, study suggestsThe Scottish and UK oil industries are entering their final decade of production, research suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers discover molecular 'add-ons' that customize protein interfacesResearchers in the United States and Germany have just discovered a previously overlooked part of protein molecules that could be key to how proteins interact with each other inside living cells to carry out specialized functions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Winner takes all: Success enhances taste for luxury goods, study suggestsFootballers in flashy cars, City workers in Armani suits, reality TV celebrities sipping expensive champagne while sitting in hot tubs: what drives people to purchase luxury goods? New research suggests that it may be a sense of being a 'winner' - but that contrary to expectations, it is not driven by testosterone.
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Gizmodo
You Can Now Download iOS 11 Photo: Apple Apple teased us with the next version of iOS in June, revealing a bunch of new features at WWDC that wouldn’t be ready until today—unless of course you love the thrill of a potentially buggy public beta , which has been available since the end of June. But if you like to play it safe, or if you simply never bothered getting your hands on the update early, today is the day my friends.
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Gizmodo
A DNA Test Giveaway at a Baltimore Ravens Game Turned Into a Fiasco Image: Orig3n You may have never wondered what’s in the DNA of a football fan, but the Baltimore Ravens planned to find out. As part of a bizarre game-day promotion on Sunday, the Ravens partnered with consumer genetic testing company Orig3n to give away free DNA test kits to 55,000 fans as they entered the stadium. But the plan was hastily abandoned just a few hours before kick off, amid concern
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Running roaches, flapping moths create a new physics of organismsSand-swimming lizards, slithering robotic snakes, dusk-flying moths and running roaches all have one thing in common: They're increasingly being studied by physicists interested in understanding the shared strategies these creatures have developed to overcome the challenges of moving though their environments.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research sparks new way to predict movie-goers' facial expressionsResearchers in SFU's School of Computing Science have been working with Disney Research to develop a new way to assess and predict the facial expressions of movie goers. This method could help to make artificial data created in animation look more realistic.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
One-way track for microwaves based on mechanical interferenceDevices that allow to route microwave signals are essential engineering tools. In particular, isolators, which let signals flow in one direction but block them in the other, are needed to protect sensitive equipment from harm. Now, scientists at EPFL and the University of Cambridge have demonstrated a new principle for developing such tools by harnessing the motion of microscopic drums. The study
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop a rapid, automatable, chip-based platform to analyze live cellsFluorescence microscopy gives researchers incredible power to illuminate the tiniest structures and capture the real-time activities of live cells by tagging biological molecules with a veritable rainbow of fluorescent dyes. This power comes at a cost: The technology can be expensive and time-consuming and, so far, has resisted attempts at automation.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Genetic Engineering Holds the Power to Save Humanity or Kill ItThe same technology that allows researchers to design viruses and vaccines for specific genetic targets also allows them to design organisms that can spread and kill.
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Ars Technica
Hidden Switch game is actually a tribute to former Nintendo president [Updated] Enlarge This weekend, Switch owners learned their consoles are apparently holding a hidden copy of the NES game Golf , along with a built-in NES emulator designed to run it. But Switch hacker yellows8 and others who have been able to run that emulator say they've only been able to do so via "unofficial" methods that let them run jailbroken Switch binaries independently. Now that the emulator is w
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The Atlantic
How One Woman Brought the 'Mother's Curse' to Canada The first King’s Daughters—or filles du roi —arrived in New France in 1663, and 800 more would follow over the next decade. Given their numbers, they were not literally the king’s daughters of course. They were poor and usually of common birth, but their passage and dowry were indeed paid by King Louis XIV for the purpose of empire building: These women were to marry male colonists and have many
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Feed: All Latest
The Best Toronto International Film Festival Movies to Look Forward ToThis year's festival was a standout, and proved there's plenty of quality heading to theaters later this year.
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Feed: All Latest
Bored With Your Fitbit? These Cancer Researchers Aren'tScientists are publishing more studies and enrolling more clinical trials using Fitbit devices than any other wearable fitness tracker out there.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers' work pushes battery tech forwardUniversity of Central Florida Assistant Professor Yang Yang's research group has developed two promising energy storage technologies in its work with sustainable energy systems.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rogue wave analysis supports investigation of the El Faro sinkingA new analysis done to support the investigation into the 2015 sinking of the El Faro cargo ship has calculated the likelihood of a massive rogue wave during Hurricane Joaquin in October of that year - and demonstrated a new technique for evaluating the probability of rogue waves over space and time.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Interactive tool offers window into history of Arab-Americans in NYCResearchers at North Carolina State University are unveiling an interactive site that allows scholars and the public to better understand the long history of Syrian and Lebanese immigrants to the United States. Focused on New York City in the early 20th century, the tool highlights the growth of Arab-American communities in the city and their integration into American life.
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
North-south polarization of European electricity consumption under future warming [Sustainability Science]There is growing empirical evidence that anthropogenic climate change will substantially affect the electric sector. Impacts will stem both from the supply side—through the mitigation of greenhouse gases—and from the demand side—through adaptive responses to a changing environment. Here we provide evidence of a polarization of both peak load and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Injectable biomimetic liquid crystalline scaffolds enhance muscle stem cell transplantation [Applied Biological Sciences]Muscle stem cells are a potent cell population dedicated to efficacious skeletal muscle regeneration, but their therapeutic utility is currently limited by mode of delivery. We developed a cell delivery strategy based on a supramolecular liquid crystal formed by peptide amphiphiles (PAs) that encapsulates cells and growth factors within a...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Differential diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease using spectrochemical analysis of blood [Biochemistry]The progressive aging of the world’s population makes a higher prevalence of neurodegenerative diseases inevitable. The necessity for an accurate, but at the same time, inexpensive and minimally invasive, diagnostic test is urgently required, not only to confirm the presence of the disease but also to discriminate between different types...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Loquacious-PD facilitates Drosophila Dicer-2 cleavage through interactions with the helicase domain and dsRNA [Biochemistry]Loquacious-PD (Loqs-PD) is required for biogenesis of many endogenous siRNAs in Drosophila. In vitro, Loqs-PD enhances the rate of dsRNA cleavage by Dicer-2 and also enables processing of substrates normally refractory to cleavage. Using purified components, and Loqs-PD truncations, we provide a mechanistic basis for Loqs-PD functions. Our studies indicate...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Role of remodeling and spacing factor 1 in histone H2A ubiquitination-mediated gene silencing [Biochemistry]Posttranslational histone modifications play important roles in regulating chromatin-based nuclear processes. Histone H2AK119 ubiquitination (H2Aub) is a prevalent modification and has been primarily linked to gene silencing. However, the underlying mechanism remains largely obscure. Here we report the identification of RSF1 (remodeling and spacing factor 1), a subunit of the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Binding mechanism and dynamic conformational change of C subunit of PKA with different pathways [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The catalytic subunit of PKA (PKAc) exhibits three major conformational states (open, intermediate, and closed) during the biocatalysis process. Both ATP and substrate/inhibitor can effectively induce the conformational changes of PKAc from open to closed states. Aiming to explore the mechanism of this allosteric regulation, we developed a coarse-grained model...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Osmotaxis in Escherichia coli through changes in motor speed [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Bacterial motility, and in particular repulsion or attraction toward specific chemicals, has been a subject of investigation for over 100 years, resulting in detailed understanding of bacterial chemotaxis and the corresponding sensory network in many bacterial species. For Escherichia coli most of the current understanding comes from the experiments with...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Multiple proteolytic events in caspase-6 self-activation impact conformations of discrete structural regions [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Caspase-6 is critical to the neurodegenerative pathways of Alzheimer’s, Huntington’s, and Parkinson’s diseases and has been identified as a potential molecular target for treatment of neurodegeneration. Thus, understanding the global and regional changes in dynamics and conformation provides insights into the unique properties of caspase-6 that may contribute to achieving...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structure of the Ebola virus envelope protein MPER/TM domain and its interaction with the fusion loop explains their fusion activity [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Ebolavirus (EBOV), an enveloped filamentous RNA virus causing severe hemorrhagic fever, enters cells by macropinocytosis and membrane fusion in a late endosomal compartment. Fusion is mediated by the EBOV envelope glycoprotein GP, which consists of subunits GP1 and GP2. GP1 binds to cellular receptors, including Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) protein, and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Dual role of mitochondria in producing melatonin and driving GPCR signaling to block cytochrome c release [Cell Biology]G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are classically characterized as cell-surface receptors transmitting extracellular signals into cells. Here we show that central components of a GPCR signaling system comprised of the melatonin type 1 receptor (MT1), its associated G protein, and β-arrestins are on and within neuronal mitochondria. We discovered that the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Effect of cell cycle arrest on intermediate metabolism in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum [Cell Biology]The inhibitor NU 2058 [6-(cyclohexylmethoxy)-9H-purin-2-amine] leads to G1-phase cell cycle arrest in the marine diatom, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, by binding to two cyclin-dependent kinases, CDKA1 and CDKA2. NU 2058 has no effect on photosynthetic attributes, such as Fv/Fm, chlorophyll a/cell, levels of D2 PSII subunits, or RbcL; however, cell cycle arrest...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
MicroRNA-277 targets insulin-like peptides 7 and 8 to control lipid metabolism and reproduction in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes [Developmental Biology]Hematophagous female mosquitoes transmit numerous devastating human diseases, including malaria, dengue fever, Zika virus, and others. Because of their obligatory requirement of a vertebrate blood meal for reproduction, these mosquitoes need a lot of energy; therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms linking metabolism and reproduction is of particular importance. Lipids are...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Escherichia coli responds to environmental changes using enolasic degradosomes and stabilized DicF sRNA to alter cellular morphology [Genetics]Escherichia coli RNase E is an essential enzyme that forms multicomponent ribonucleolytic complexes known as “RNA degradosomes.” These complexes consist of four major components: RNase E, PNPase, RhlB RNA helicase, and enolase. However, the role of enolase in the RNase E/degradosome is not understood. Here, we report that presence of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
CK1{alpha} ablation in keratinocytes induces p53-dependent, sunburn-protective skin hyperpigmentation [Medical Sciences]Casein kinase 1α (CK1α), a component of the β-catenin destruction complex, is a critical regulator of Wnt signaling; its ablation induces both Wnt and p53 activation. To characterize the role of CK1α (encoded by Csnk1a1) in skin physiology, we crossed mice harboring floxed Csnk1a1 with mice expressing K14–Cre–ERT2 to generate...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Mutation in human CLPX elevates levels of {delta}-aminolevulinate synthase and protoporphyrin IX to promote erythropoietic protoporphyria [Medical Sciences]Loss-of-function mutations in genes for heme biosynthetic enzymes can give rise to congenital porphyrias, eight forms of which have been described. The genetic penetrance of the porphyrias is clinically variable, underscoring the role of additional causative, contributing, and modifier genes. We previously discovered that the mitochondrial AAA+ unfoldase ClpX promotes...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Methylation-dependent DNA discrimination in natural transformation of Campylobacter jejuni [Microbiology]Campylobacter jejuni, a leading cause of bacterial gastroenteritis, is naturally competent. Like many competent organisms, C. jejuni restricts the DNA that can be used for transformation to minimize undesirable changes in the chromosome. Although C. jejuni can be transformed by C. jejuni-derived DNA, it is poorly transformed by the same...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Dendritic space-filling requires a neuronal type-specific extracellular permissive signal in Drosophila [Neuroscience]Neurons sometimes completely fill available space in their receptive fields with evenly spaced dendrites to uniformly sample sensory or synaptic information. The mechanisms that enable neurons to sense and innervate all space in their target tissues are poorly understood. Using Drosophila somatosensory neurons as a model, we show that heparan...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Schwann cells use TAM receptor-mediated phagocytosis in addition to autophagy to clear myelin in a mouse model of nerve injury [Neuroscience]Ineffective myelin debris clearance is a major factor contributing to the poor regenerative ability of the central nervous system. In stark contrast, rapid clearance of myelin debris from the injured peripheral nervous system (PNS) is one of the keys to this system’s remarkable regenerative capacity, but the molecular mechanisms driving...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Efficient stimulus-secretion coupling at ribbon synapses requires RIM-binding protein tethering of L-type Ca2+ channels [Neuroscience]Fast neurotransmitter release from ribbon synapses via Ca2+-triggered exocytosis requires tight coupling of L-type Ca2+ channels to release-ready synaptic vesicles at the presynaptic active zone, which is localized at the base of the ribbon. Here, we used genetic, electrophysiological, and ultrastructural analyses to probe the architecture of ribbon synapses by...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Dissection of the Drosophila neuropeptide F circuit using a high-throughput two-choice assay [Neuroscience]In their classic experiments, Olds and Milner showed that rats learn to lever press to receive an electric stimulus in specific brain regions. This led to the identification of mammalian reward centers. Our interest in defining the neuronal substrates of reward perception in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster prompted us...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Discovery of peptide ligands through docking and virtual screening at nicotinic acetylcholine receptor homology models [Pharmacology]Venom peptide toxins such as conotoxins play a critical role in the characterization of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) structure and function and have potential as nervous system therapeutics as well. However, the lack of solved structures of conotoxins bound to nAChRs and the large size of these peptides are barriers...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
A chloroplast thylakoid lumen protein is required for proper photosynthetic acclimation of plants under fluctuating light environments [Plant Biology]Despite our increasingly sophisticated understanding of mechanisms ensuring efficient photosynthesis under laboratory-controlled light conditions, less is known about the regulation of photosynthesis under fluctuating light. This is important because—in nature—photosynthetic organisms experience rapid and extreme changes in sunlight, potentially causing deleterious effects on photosynthetic effici
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Receptor-mediated chitin perception in legume roots is functionally separable from Nod factor perception [Plant Biology]The ability of root cells to distinguish mutualistic microbes from pathogens is crucial for plants that allow symbiotic microorganisms to infect and colonize their internal root tissues. Here we show that Lotus japonicus and Medicago truncatula possess very similar LysM pattern-recognition receptors, LjLYS6/MtLYK9 and MtLYR4, enabling root cells to separate...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Harris et al., Young children communicate their ignorance and ask questions [Correction]COLLOQUIUM Correction for “Young children communicate their ignorance and ask questions,” by Paul L. Harris, Deborah T. Bartz, and Meredith L. Rowe, which was first published July 25, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1620745114 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114:7884–7891). The authors note that on page 7887, right column, second full paragraph, lines 9–11,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Schuth et al., Effective intermediate-spin iron in O2-transporting heme proteins [Correction]BIOPHYSICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY Correction for “Effective intermediate-spin iron in O2-transporting heme proteins,” by Nils Schuth, Stefan Mebs, Dennis Huwald, Pierre Wrzolek, Matthias Schwalbe, Anja Hemschemeier, and Michael Haumann, which was first published July 24, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1706527114 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114:8556–8561). The authors note that Fig. 6 appeared...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for KonDo et al., Toll ligand Spatzle3 controls melanization in the stripe pattern formation in caterpillars [Correction]GENETICS Correction for “Toll ligand Spätzle3 controls melanization in the stripe pattern formation in caterpillars,” by Yûsuke KonDo, Shinichi Yoda, Takayuki Mizoguchi, Toshiya Ando, Junichi Yamaguchi, Kimiko Yamamoto, Yutaka Banno, and Haruhiko Fujiwara, which was first published July 17, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1707896114 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114:8336–8341). The authors note...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Human mobility in early Europe Burial of a nonlocal female in the Lech River valley area of southern Germany. Image courtesy of Stadtarchäologie Augsburg, Augsburg, Germany. Human mobility, which includes large-scale population replacements, during the Neolithic–Bronze Age transition in central Europe likely helped spread technological advancements and cultural practices. Yet,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Elucidating the fate of the OH-adduct in toluene oxidation under tropospheric boundary layer conditions [Physical Sciences]Ji et al. (1) published a study examining the mechanism of the initial stages of OH-initiated oxidation of toluene. Their results challenge the mechanisms used in atmospheric chemistry models [e.g., Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) (2)] derived from chamber experiments at atmospheric conditions, and previous experimental (3, 4) and theoretical studies...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Newland et al.: The dominant phenolic pathway for atmospheric toluene oxidation [Physical Sciences]Ji et al. (1) reassess the atmospheric oxidation mechanism of toluene: Their experimental work shows a larger-than-expected branching ratio for cresols but negligible formation of ring-opening products and is corroborated by theoretical calculations revealing that the phenolic pathway is kinetically and thermodynamically favored over the primary peroxy radical (RO2) formation....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Autoimmune disease variants regulate GSDMB gene expression in human immune cells and whole blood [Biological Sciences]There are four gasdermin (GSDM) proteins, including GSDMA, GSDMB, GSDMC, and GSDMD, in the human genome (1). Genome-wide association studies have reported genetic variants at 17q12.2.1 loci, including GSDMA, GSDMB, and ORDML3 genes, to be associated with kinds of autoimmune diseases, including asthma, type 1 diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD),...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to HU et al.: On the interpretation of gasdermin-B expression quantitative trait loci data [Biological Sciences]We recently published structural and biochemical studies of gasdermin-B (GSDMB) (1), a protein that regulates the maintenance of the epithelial cell barrier as well as cell proliferation and differentiation processes (2, 3). GSDMB amplification and GSDMB overexpression lead to a poor response to HER2-targeted therapy in HER2-positive breast cancer (4)....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
From understanding of color perception to dynamical systems by manifold learning [Applied Mathematics]Comprehending Color Let us start with a seemingly unrelated field to that described in the article by Yair et al. (1) in PNAS. The field of psychophysics deals with the relationships between physical stimuli and mental phenomena. An excellent example is the scientific community’s early efforts to study the human...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Shocking superantigens promote establishment of bacterial infection [Microbiology]Streptococcus pyogenes, also referred to as group A Streptococcus (GAS), is an exclusive human pathogen causing diseases ranging from uncomplicated infections of the throat and skin to severe invasive infections, such as necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS). Asymptomatic carriage, particularly in the naso- and oropharyngeal mucosa, is...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Cooperation between hearing and vision in people with cochlear implants [Neuroscience]The cochlear implant (CI) is the single most successful neuroprosthetic device available today, often restoring functional hearing in many of those who were profoundly deaf (1). Unlike traditional hearing aids that serve to amplify ambient sound, the CI bypasses the transduction process and provides direct electrical signals to the nerve...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reconstruction of normal forms by learning informed observation geometries from data [Applied Mathematics]The discovery of physical laws consistent with empirical observations is at the heart of (applied) science and engineering. These laws typically take the form of nonlinear differential equations depending on parameters; dynamical systems theory provides, through the appropriate normal forms, an “intrinsic” prototypical characterization of the types of dynamical regimes...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Effects of thymic selection on T cell recognition of foreign and tumor antigenic peptides [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The advent of cancer immunotherapy has generated renewed hope for the treatment of many malignancies by introducing a number of novel strategies that exploit various properties of the immune system. These therapies are based on the idea that cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) directly recognize and respond to tumor-associated neoantigens (TANs)...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
A classical view on nonclassical nucleation [Chemistry]Understanding and controlling nucleation is important for many crystallization applications. Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) is often used as a model system to investigate nucleation mechanisms. Despite its great importance in geology, biology, and many industrial applications, CaCO3 nucleation is still a topic of intense discussion, with new pathways for its growth...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Subnational mobility and consumption-based environmental accounting of US corn in animal protein and ethanol supply chains [Sustainability Science]Corn production, and its associated inputs, is a relatively large source of greenhouse gas emissions and uses significant amounts of water and land, thus contributing to climate change, fossil fuel depletion, local air pollutants, and local water scarcity. As large consumers of this corn, corporations in the ethanol and animal...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Self-report captures 27 distinct categories of emotion bridged by continuous gradients [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Emotions are centered in subjective experiences that people represent, in part, with hundreds, if not thousands, of semantic terms. Claims about the distribution of reported emotional states and the boundaries between emotion categories—that is, the geometric organization of the semantic space of emotion—have sparked intense debate. Here we introduce a...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Rome’s urban history inferred from Pb-contaminated waters trapped in its ancient harbor basins [Anthropology]Heavy metals from urban runoff preserved in sedimentary deposits record long-term economic and industrial development via the expansion and contraction of a city’s infrastructure. Lead concentrations and isotopic compositions measured in the sediments of the harbor of Ostia—Rome’s first harbor—show that lead pipes used in the water supply networks of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Female exogamy and gene pool diversification at the transition from the Final Neolithic to the Early Bronze Age in central Europe [Anthropology]Human mobility has been vigorously debated as a key factor for the spread of bronze technology and profound changes in burial practices as well as material culture in central Europe at the transition from the Neolithic to the Bronze Age. However, the relevance of individual residential changes and their importance...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Mesoscale martensitic transformation in single crystals of topological defects [Applied Physical Sciences]Liquid-crystal blue phases (BPs) are highly ordered at two levels. Molecules exhibit orientational order at nanometer length scales, while chirality leads to ordered arrays of double-twisted cylinders over micrometer scales. Past studies of polycrystalline BPs were challenged by the existence of grain boundaries between randomly oriented crystalline nanodomains. Here, the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Ultrafast fluorescent decay induced by metal-mediated dipole-dipole interaction in two-dimensional molecular aggregates [Applied Physical Sciences]Two-dimensional molecular aggregate (2DMA), a thin sheet of strongly interacting dipole molecules self-assembled at close distance on an ordered lattice, is a fascinating fluorescent material. It is distinctively different from the conventional (single or colloidal) dye molecules and quantum dots. In this paper, we verify that when a 2DMA is...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Molecular mechanism of water reorientational slowing down in concentrated ionic solutions [Biochemistry]Water dynamics in concentrated ionic solutions plays an important role in a number of material and energy conversion processes such as the charge transfer at the electrolyte–electrode interface in aqueous rechargeable ion batteries. One long-standing puzzle is that all electrolytes, regardless of their “structure-making/breaking” nature, make water rotate slower at...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Stachel-independent modulation of GPR56/ADGRG1 signaling by synthetic ligands directed to its extracellular region [Biochemistry]Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs) play critical roles in diverse biological processes, including neurodevelopment and cancer progression. aGPCRs are characterized by large and diverse extracellular regions (ECRs) that are autoproteolytically cleaved from their membrane-embedded signaling domains. Although ECRs regulate receptor function, it is not clear whether ECRs play a direct...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Epigenetic control via allosteric regulation of mammalian protein arginine methyltransferases [Biochemistry]Arginine methylation on histones is a central player in epigenetics and in gene activation and repression. Protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) activity has been implicated in stem cell pluripotency, cancer metastasis, and tumorigenesis. The expression of one of the nine mammalian PRMTs, PRMT5, affects the levels of symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) at...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Molecular mechanism of substrate recognition and transport by the AtSWEET13 sugar transporter [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Sugar Will Eventually be Exported Transporters (SWEETs) are recently identified sugar transporters that can discriminate and transport di- or monosaccharides across a membrane following the concentration gradient. SWEETs play key roles in plant biological processes, such as pollen nutrition, nectar secretion, seed filling, and phloem loading. SWEET13 from Arabidopsis thaliana...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Discrete modes of social information processing predict individual behavior of fish in a group [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Individual computations and social interactions underlying collective behavior in groups of animals are of great ethological, behavioral, and theoretical interest. While complex individual behaviors have successfully been parsed into small dictionaries of stereotyped behavioral modes, studies of collective behavior largely ignored these findings; instead, their focus was on inferring single,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Thyroid hormone receptor beta and NCOA4 regulate terminal erythrocyte differentiation [Cell Biology]An effect of thyroid hormone (TH) on erythropoiesis has been known for more than a century but the molecular mechanism(s) by which TH affects red cell formation is still elusive. Here we demonstrate an essential role of TH during terminal human erythroid cell differentiation; specific depletion of TH from the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Smad7 enables STAT3 activation and promotes pluripotency independent of TGF-{beta} signaling [Cell Biology]Smad7 is a negative feedback product of TGF-β superfamily signaling and fine tunes a plethora of pleiotropic responses induced by TGF-β ligands. However, its noncanonical functions independent of TGF-β signaling remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that Smad7 activates signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Proteoliposome-based full-length ZnT8 self-antigen for type 1 diabetes diagnosis on a plasmonic platform [Chemistry]Identified as a major biomarker for type 1 diabetes (T1D) diagnosis, zinc transporter 8 autoantibody (ZnT8A) has shown promise for staging disease risk and disease diagnosis. However, existing assays for ZnT8 autoantibody (ZnT8A) are limited to detection by soluble domains of ZnT8, owing to difficulties in maintaining proper folding of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Maximal aggregation of polynomial dynamical systems [Computer Sciences]Ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with polynomial derivatives are a fundamental tool for understanding the dynamics of systems across many branches of science, but our ability to gain mechanistic insight and effectively conduct numerical evaluations is critically hindered when dealing with large models. Here we propose an aggregation technique that rests...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Cbf{beta} governs osteoblast-adipocyte lineage commitment through enhancing {beta}-catenin signaling and suppressing adipogenesis gene expression [Developmental Biology]The mechanism underlying how transcription factors regulate mesenchymal stem cell lineage commitment remains unclear. To determine the role of core-binding factor subunit beta (Cbfβ) in osteoblast lineage commitment, we generated three mouse models by deleting Cbfβ at different osteoblast lineage stages. We demonstrated that the Cbfβf/fPrx1-Cre, Cbfβf/fCol2α1-Cre, and Cbfβf/fOsx-Cre mice...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
First critical repressive H3K27me3 marks in embryonic stem cells identified using designed protein inhibitor [Developmental Biology]The polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) histone methyltransferase plays a central role in epigenetic regulation in development and in cancer, and hence to interrogate its role in a specific developmental transition, methods are needed for disrupting function of the complex with high temporal and spatial precision. The catalytic and substrate...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
An epigenetic switch repressing Tet1 in gonadotropes activates the reproductive axis [Developmental Biology]The TET enzymes catalyze conversion of 5-methyl cytosine (5mC) to 5-hydroxymethyl cytosine (5hmC) and play important roles during development. TET1 has been particularly well-studied in pluripotent stem cells, but Tet1-KO mice are viable, and the most marked defect is abnormal ovarian follicle development, resulting in impaired fertility. We hypothesized that...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
CNS-resident progenitors direct the vascularization of neighboring tissues [Developmental Biology]Organ growth requires the coordinated invasion and expansion of blood vessel networks directed by tissue-resident cells and morphogenetic cues. A striking example of this intercellular communication is the vascularization of the central nervous system (CNS), which is driven by neuronal progenitors, including neuroepithelial cells and radial glia. Although the importance...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Endodermal germ-layer formation through active actin-driven migration triggered by N-cadherin [Developmental Biology]Germ-layer formation during gastrulation is both a fundamental step of development and a paradigm for tissue formation and remodeling. However, the cellular and molecular basis of germ-layer segregation is poorly understood, mostly because of the lack of direct in vivo observations. We used mosaic zebrafish embryos to investigate the formation...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Beyond sixfold coordinated Si in SiO2 glass at ultrahigh pressures [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]We investigated the structure of SiO2 glass up to 172 GPa using high-energy X-ray diffraction. The combination of a multichannel collimator with diamond anvil cells enabled the measurement of structural changes in silica glass with total X-ray diffraction to previously unachievable pressures. We show that SiO2 first undergoes a change...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Abrupt climate changes during Termination III in Southern Europe [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]The Late Quaternary glacial–interglacial transitions represent the highest amplitude climate changes over the last million years. Unraveling the sequence of events and feedbacks at Termination III (T-III), including potential abrupt climate reversals similar to those of the last Termination, has been particularly challenging due to the scarcity of well-dated records...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Active molecular iodine photochemistry in the Arctic [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]During springtime, the Arctic atmospheric boundary layer undergoes frequent rapid depletions in ozone and gaseous elemental mercury due to reactions with halogen atoms, influencing atmospheric composition and pollutant fate. Although bromine chemistry has been shown to initiate ozone depletion events, and it has long been hypothesized that iodine chemistry may...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Eighty years of food-web response to interannual variation in discharge recorded in river diatom frustules from an ocean sediment core [Ecology]Little is known about the importance of food-web processes as controls of river primary production due to the paucity of both long-term studies and of depositional environments which would allow retrospective fossil analysis. To investigate how freshwater algal production in the Eel River, northern California, varied over eight decades, we...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Biodiversity promotes primary productivity and growing season lengthening at the landscape scale [Ecology]Experiments have shown positive biodiversity-ecosystem functioning (BEF) relationships in small plots with model communities established from species pools typically comprising few dozen species. Whether patterns found can be extrapolated to complex, nonexperimental, real-world landscapes that provide ecosystem services to humans remains unclear. Here, we combine species inventories from a large-s
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Opinion: Why we need an international agreement on marine plastic pollution [Environmental Sciences]Plastic pollution is strewn across beaches and in oceans, bays, and estuaries. Tiny particles of plastic debris (often called microplastics) are so pervasive in aquatic ecosystems that we find them in seafood (1) and table salt (2). Marine organisms ingest or are entangled by plastic, sometimes with fatal consequences. Research...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Petroleum dynamics in the sea and influence of subsea dispersant injection during Deepwater Horizon [Environmental Sciences]During the Deepwater Horizon disaster, a substantial fraction of the 600,000–900,000 tons of released petroleum liquid and natural gas became entrapped below the sea surface, but the quantity entrapped and the sequestration mechanisms have remained unclear. We modeled the buoyant jet of petroleum liquid droplets, gas bubbles, and entrained seawater,...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Synchronous volcanic eruptions and abrupt climate change ~17.7 ka plausibly linked by stratospheric ozone depletion [Environmental Sciences]Glacial-state greenhouse gas concentrations and Southern Hemisphere climate conditions persisted until ∼17.7 ka, when a nearly synchronous acceleration in deglaciation was recorded in paleoclimate proxies in large parts of the Southern Hemisphere, with many changes ascribed to a sudden poleward shift in the Southern Hemisphere westerlies and subsequent climate impacts....
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Identification of individuals by trait prediction using whole-genome sequencing data [Genetics]Prediction of human physical traits and demographic information from genomic data challenges privacy and data deidentification in personalized medicine. To explore the current capabilities of phenotype-based genomic identification, we applied whole-genome sequencing, detailed phenotyping, and statistical modeling to predict biometric traits in a cohort of 1,061 participants of diverse ancestry....
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Increasing the breadth and potency of response to the seasonal influenza virus vaccine by immune complex immunization [Immunology and Inflammation]The main barrier to reduction of morbidity caused by influenza is the absence of a vaccine that elicits broad protection against different virus strains. Studies in preclinical models of influenza virus infections have shown that antibodies alone are sufficient to provide broad protection against divergent virus strains in vivo. Here,...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Gallbladder-derived surfactant protein D regulates gut commensal bacteria for maintaining intestinal homeostasis [Immunology and Inflammation]The commensal microbiota within the gastrointestinal tract is essential in maintaining homeostasis. Indeed, dysregulation in the repertoire of microbiota can result in the development of intestinal immune–inflammatory diseases. Further, this immune regulation by gut microbiota is important systemically, impacting health and disease of organ systems beyond the local environment of...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Localized CD47 blockade enhances immunotherapy for murine melanoma [Immunology and Inflammation]CD47 is an antiphagocytic ligand broadly expressed on normal and malignant tissues that delivers an inhibitory signal through the receptor signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα). Inhibitors of the CD47–SIRPα interaction improve antitumor antibody responses by enhancing antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) in xenograft models. Endogenous expression of CD47 on a variety...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Treg-specific IL-27R{alpha} deletion uncovers a key role for IL-27 in Treg function to control autoimmunity [Immunology and Inflammation]Dysregulated Foxp3+ Treg functions result in uncontrolled immune activation and autoimmunity. Therefore, identifying cellular factors modulating Treg functions is an area of great importance. Here, using Treg-specific Il27ra−/− mice, we report that IL-27 signaling in Foxp3+ Tregs is essential for Tregs to control autoimmune inflammation in the central nervous system...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Combined circulating tumor DNA and protein biomarker-based liquid biopsy for the earlier detection of pancreatic cancers [Medical Sciences]The earlier diagnosis of cancer is one of the keys to reducing cancer deaths in the future. Here we describe our efforts to develop a noninvasive blood test for the detection of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. We combined blood tests for KRAS gene mutations with carefully thresholded protein biomarkers to determine...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
CDK8/19 Mediator kinases potentiate induction of transcription by NF{kappa}B [Medical Sciences]The nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) family of transcription factors has been implicated in inflammatory disorders, viral infections, and cancer. Most of the drugs that inhibit NFκB show significant side effects, possibly due to sustained NFκB suppression. Drugs affecting induced, but not basal, NFκB activity may have the potential to provide therapeutic...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Nitric oxide blocks the development of the human parasite Schistosoma japonicum [Medical Sciences]Human schistosomiasis, caused by Schistosoma species, is a major public health problem affecting more than 700 million people in 78 countries, with over 40 mammalian host reservoir species complicating the transmission ecosystem. The primary cause of morbidity is considered to be granulomas induced by fertilized eggs of schistosomes in the...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Detection of immune responses after immunotherapy in glioblastoma using PET and MRI [Medical Sciences]Contrast-enhanced MRI is typically used to follow treatment response and progression in patients with glioblastoma (GBM). However, differentiating tumor progression from pseudoprogression remains a clinical dilemma largely unmitigated by current advances in imaging techniques. Noninvasive imaging techniques capable of distinguishing these two conditions could play an important role in the...
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Nasopharyngeal infection by Streptococcus pyogenes requires superantigen-responsive V{beta}-specific T cells [Microbiology]The globally prominent pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes secretes potent immunomodulatory proteins known as superantigens (SAgs), which engage lateral surfaces of major histocompatibility class II molecules and T-cell receptor (TCR) β-chain variable domains (Vβs). These interactions result in the activation of numerous Vβ-specific T cells, which is the defining activity of a...
19h

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