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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Finding order in disorder demonstrates a new state of matterPhysicists have identified a new state of matter whose structural order operates by rules more aligned with quantum mechanics than standard thermodynamic theory. In a classical material called artificial spin ice, which in certain phases appears disordered, the material is actually ordered, but in a "topological" form.
2h
Viden

I aften sker det: Danmarks dyreste rumprojekt sendes ud i rummet- Nu bliver det os, der kører med klatten i international rumforskning, siger lederen af projektet.
11h
Ingeniøren

Liftoff: Danmarks største rumprojekt sendes op til ISS i aftenKlimaobservatoriet Asim skal efter års forsinkelse af sted med en SpaceX-raket klokken 22:30 dansk tid.
12h

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Big Think

Black atheists matter: how women freethinkers take on religionChristianity has played a central role in African-American life from the late 18th century to the present. Black churches raised funds for fugitive slaves, served as schoolhouses, and provided space for political meetings and activities, among other functions. Leaders of black congregations such as ... Read More
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Spear points prove early inhabitants liked to travelCareful examination of numerous fluted spear points found in Alaska and western Canada prove that the Ice Age peopling of the Americas was much more complex than previously believed, according to a study done by two Texas A&M University researchers.
3min
Popular Science

Last week in tech: All the technology news with none of the April Fool’s nonsenseTechnology It was a good week for Apple news and a very bad week for Tesla. Be sure to check out the latest episode of the Last Week in Tech podcast!
5min
Science : NPR

To Treat Pain, PTSD And Other Ills, Some Vets Try Tai ChiIn hopes of reducing some veterans' reliance on pills for physical pain and psychological trauma, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs is taking a look at alternative therapies. (Image credit: Blake Farmer/Nashville Public Radio)
8min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When drugs are wrong, skipped or make you sick: The cost of non-optimized medicationsRising drug prices have gotten a lot of attention lately, but the actual cost of prescription medications is more than just the bill. Researchers at Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at University of California San Diego estimate that illness and death resulting from non-optimized medication therapy costs $528.4 billion annually, equivalent to 16 percent of total U.S. health ca
17min
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Researchers develop injectable bandageA penetrating injury from shrapnel is a serious obstacle in overcoming battlefield wounds that can ultimately lead to death.Given the high mortality rates due to hemorrhaging, there is an unmet need to quickly self-administer materials that prevent fatality due to excessive blood loss.
17min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Liquid biopsy technology to improve prostate cancer treatmentProstate cancer is the second most common cancer in men and the fifth leading cause of death from cancer in men worldwide, according to 2012 numbers. While several viable treatment options for prostate cancer exist, many men affected with prostate cancer will not respond to first-line treatments. Researchers have now developed a new technology for liquid biopsy to identify which patients may not r
21min
The Atlantic

The Gap Between Trump's Tweets and RealityPresident Trump’s prolific comments on social media and elsewhere, along with his improvisatory approach, mean that while it’s easy to find his words, discerning his actual views and perspective can be challenging. On Sunday and Monday, the president offered a series of heated tweets about immigration policy, NAFTA , and U.S. relations with Mexico. Reading the tweets in order brings some clarity,
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The Scientist RSS

OSU Professor Falsified Data on Eight Papers, ResignsChing-Shih Chen's research involved anticancer therapeutics that were being tested in clinical trials.
29min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Agricultural fires can double Delhi pollution during peak burning seasonResearchers have demonstrated that in October and November, a peak burning season in nearby Punjab, about half of all pollution in Delhi can be attributed to agricultural fires on some days.
35min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Eating more protein may not benefit older menA randomized, clinical trial has found that higher protein intake did not increase lean body mass, muscle performance, physical function or other well-being measures among older men.
35min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New trigger for onset of colon cancer: May lead to better therapiesA new function of a colon cancer gene has been found to bring several activators of this disease to a halt. This discovery changes long-held views on exactly how this key gene acts, and may lead to identification of additional drug targets, and better designed targeted therapies for colon cancer patients that can kill cancer cells but spare the normal cells in the colon.
35min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Extinct monitor lizard had four eyes, fossil evidence showsResearchers have evidence that an extinct species of monitor lizard had four eyes, a first among known jawed vertebrates. Today, only the jawless lampreys have four eyes.
35min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Breakthrough in determining ages of different microbial groupsScientists have made a significant breakthrough in how we understand the first three-quarters of life on Earth by creating new techniques for investigating the timing and co-evolution of microbial groups.
35min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sandcastles and surprising origins of basic cellular functionsCells comprising a tissue can pack into disorderly geometries much as do grains of sand in a sandcastle. The finding provides insights into organ formation in an embryo, healing of a wound, and even invasion of cells into surrounding tissue, as occurs in cancer.
35min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists discover new method for measuring cellular ageScientists have developed a straightforward, computational way to measure cellular age, a feat that may lead to better, simpler screening and monitoring methods for cancer and other diseases.
35min
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Uncovering a mechanism causing chronic graft-vs-host disease after bone marrow transplantMicroRNA-17-92 is required for the T-cell and B-cell pathogenicity that drives chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) after allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT), report investigators at The Medical University of South Carolina in an article prepublished online March 12, 2018 by Blood. Data from cGVHD mouse models showed that, by determining T-cell and B-cell differentiation and function, miR
38min
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UMD researcher uncovers protein used to outsmart the human immune systemA UMD researcher has uncovered a mechanism by which the bacteria that causes Lyme disease fights innate immune responses, and observed a never-before-seen phenomena demonstrating the bacteria can spring back in the body weeks later. Understanding this bacteria, one of only a few pathogens that can actually persist in the body for long periods of time, has major implications for treatment of tick-b
38min
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Using water molecules to read electrical activity in lipid membranesEPFL researchers were able to map out in real time how charges are transported across and along membranes simply by observing the behavior of adjacent water molecules. Their noninvasive and label-free method represents a valuable new tool in the effort to understand how cells -- and neurons in particular -- function.
38min
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'Molecular scissors' could be key to cutting off diseases including HIV infectionOne way to fight diseases including HIV infection and autoimmune disorders could involve changing how a naturally occurring enzyme called SAMHD1 works to influence the immune system, new research suggests.
38min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Earth's stable temperature past suggests other planets could also sustain lifeResearch about temperatures on the early Earth have ranged from a virtually ice-covered surface to a very hot planet that could not support most of today's lifeforms. New computer simulations show fairly moderate average temperatures and more stable ocean pH -- which helps explain how life evolved here, and might emerge on other planets.
38min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Two-pronged approach could curb many cases of lung cancerLung cancer, a leading killer, has been hard to target with drugs. A team at Boston Children's Hospital took a metabolic approach, looking at what lung tumor cells need to live and grow. When they removed these factors, tumor growth was almost completely suppressed in a mouse model. Their findings suggest that a combination of existing drugs (IGF-1 inhibitors and inhibitors of protein breakdown) c
38min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New insight about how viruses use host proteins to their advantageViruses have a very limited set of genes and therefore must use the cellular machineries of their hosts for most parts of their growth. A new study, led by scientists at Uppsala University, has discovered a specific host protein that many viruses use for their transport within the cell. The discovery opens up new possibilities to develop a broad spectrum anti-viral therapy. The paper is published
38min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In mice, long-lasting brain proteins offer clues to how memories last a lifetimeIn the tiny brain space where two nerve cells meet, chemical and electric signals shuttle back and forth, a messaging system that ebbs and flows in those synaptic spaces, sometimes in ways that scientists believe aid and abet learning and memory. But because most of the proteins found in those synapses die and renew themselves so rapidly, scientists have had a hard time pinning down how synapses a
38min
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Stanford researchers engineer yeast to manufacture complex medicineStanford University bioengineers have figured out a way to make noscapine, a non-narcotic cough suppressant that occurs naturally in opium poppies, in brewer's yeast.
38min
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New study shows vegetation controls the future of the water cycleColumbia Engineering researchers have found that vegetation plays a dominant role in Earth's water cycle, that plants will regulate and dominate the increasing stress placed on continental water resources in the future. 'This could be a real game-changer for understanding changes in continental water stress going into the future,' says Professor Pierre Gentine. In this paper, he demonstrates veget
38min
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We'll pay more for unhealthy foods we crave, neuroscience research findsWe'll pay more for unhealthy foods when we crave them, new neuroscience research finds. The study also shows that we're willing to pay disproportionately more for higher portion sizes of craved food items.
38min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study suggests estuaries may experience accelerated impacts of human-caused CO2Rising anthropogenic, or human-caused, carbon dioxide in the atmosphere may have up to twice the impact on coastal estuaries as it does in the oceans because the human-caused CO2 lowers the ecosystem's ability to absorb natural fluctuations of the greenhouse gas, a new study suggests.
38min
Live Science

The Chinese Space Station Narrowly Missed Landing in the World's Largest 'Spacecraft Cemetery'Welcome to the actual middle of nowhere — home of the world's largest spaceship cemetery.
39min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Intel shares dive on report Apple making own Mac chipsApple Intel MacsIntel shares dove on Monday after Bloomberg reported that Apple intends to switch to chips of its own for Mac computers in two years.
52min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Combination immunotherapy improves survival in mouse models of mesotheliomaInvestigators have found that combined treatment with two cancer immunotherapy drugs -- one a novel immune modulator and one that focuses and activates the anti-tumor immune response -- significantly prolonged survival in mouse models of the aggressive cancer malignant mesothelioma.
57min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Novel PET imaging agent could help guide therapy for brain diseasesResearchers have developed a new PET imaging agent that could help guide and assess treatments for people with various neurological diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and multiple sclerosis. The agent targets receptors in nerve cells in the brain that are involved in learning and memory.
57min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hanging by a thread: Why bent fibers hold more waterInspired by the large droplets that form on a leaf tip or other thin filament, a team of researchers have found the exact angle at which a bent fiber holds the most fluid.
57min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Biological ballet: Development of a new imaging technique reveals complex protein movements in the cell membraneWhat do ballet and cell biology have in common? Perhaps more than you might think.
57min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Antarctica retreating across the sea floorAntarctica’s great ice sheet is losing ground as it is eroded by warm ocean water circulating beneath its floating edge, a new study has found.
57min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Where you live, walk, and eat in New York City are important for controlling diabetesIn the first study to directly examine the relationship between environment and individual's ability to control their diabetes, researchers found there is a link between the neighborhood food, built and economic environment where you live and the ability to achieve glycemic control. Results are consistent with the premise that areas with greater resources to support healthy eating and physical act
57min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Easing uncertainty: How Heisenberg's uncertainty principle can be relaxedHeisenberg's uncertainty principle -- the fundamental impossibility of simultaneously measuring entities such as position and momentum exactly -- is at the heart of quantum theory. Physicists have now demonstrated an elegant way to relax this intrinsic incompatibility using a mechanical oscillator formed by a single trapped ion, opening up a route for fundamental studies and practical uses alike.
57min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Modeling future earthquake and tsunami risk in southeast JapanGeoscience researchers unveil new, GPS-based methods for modeling earthquake-induced tsunamis for southeast Japan along the Nankai Trough. A Nankai-induced tsunami is likely to hit there in the next few decades, and has the potential to displace four times the number of people affected by the massive Tohoku tsunami of 2011, according to new research.
57min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New insight about how viruses use host proteins to their advantageViruses have a very limited set of genes and therefore must use the cellular machineries of their hosts for most parts of their growth. A new study, led by scientists at Uppsala University, has discovered a specific host protein that many viruses use for their transport within the cell. The discovery opens up new possibilities to develop a broad spectrum anti-viral therapy. The paper is published
58min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers engineer yeast to manufacture complex medicineStanford University bioengineers have figured out a way to make noscapine, a non-narcotic cough suppressant that occurs naturally in opium poppies, in brewer's yeast.
58min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study suggests estuaries may experience accelerated impacts of human-caused CO2Rising anthropogenic, or human-caused, carbon dioxide in the atmosphere may have up to twice the impact on coastal estuaries as it does in the oceans because the human-caused CO2 lowers the ecosystem's ability to absorb natural fluctuations of the greenhouse gas, a new study suggests.
58min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study shows vegetation controls the future of the water cyclePredicting how increasing atmospheric CO2 will affect the hydrologic cycle, from extreme weather forecasts to long-term projections on agriculture and water resources, is critical both to daily life and to the future of the planet. It is commonly thought that hydrologic change is driven by precipitation and radiation changes caused by climate change, and that as the land surface adjusts, rising te
58min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Earth's stable temperature past suggests other planets could also sustain lifeTheories about the early days of our planet's history vary wildly. Some studies have painted the picture of a snowball Earth, when much of its surface was frozen. Other theories have included periods that would be inhospitably hot for most current lifeforms to survive.
58min
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Indie Title 'Small Talk' Is the Cartoony Party Game of My DreamsA lot of games try to capture the way the world works—but precious few try to distill how it feels.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

SpaceX readies second launch using recycled rocket, spaceshipSpaceX Dragon NASASpaceX is poised Monday to send supplies to astronauts on the International Space Station aboard a rocket booster and a cargo ship that have both flown before.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Does metal use slow when a country's wealth grows? Maybe not, study showsIt is widely believed that a nation's metal use plateaus when that country's gross domestic product (GDP) reaches a threshold of $15,000 per person; with rising affluence, the theory goes, nations achieve a new level of resource efficiency.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA survey seen as steppingstone for astronomyImagine trying to see a firefly next to a distant spotlight, where the beams from the spotlight all but drown out the faint glow from the firefly. Add fog, and both lights are dimmed. Is the glow from the firefly still visible at all?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hanging by a thread: Why bent fibers hold more waterOn your next stroll through the woods, take a look at the dew droplets hanging from the leaves. If you see moisture on a cypress or juniper tree with their distinct bifurcated leaves, you'll likely see those water droplets defying the rules of physics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Does metal use slow when a country's wealth grows? Maybe notIn a new study, a Yale-led team of researchers found that GDP remains intrinsically linked with metal use even as affluence grows -- a relationship that might threaten long-term global access to critical metals and hopes for a low-carbon future.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Finding order in disorder demonstrates a new state of matterPhysicists have identified a new state of matter whose structural order operates by rules more aligned with quantum mechanics than standard thermodynamic theory.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Even DNA that doesn't encode genes can drive cancerThe vast majority of genetic mutations associated with cancer occur in non-coding regions of the genome, yet it's unclear how they may influence tumor development or growth. Researchers have identified nearly 200 mutations in non-coding DNA that play a role in cancer. Each mutation could represent a new cancer drug target.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

First direct observations of methane's increasing greenhouse effect at the Earth's surfaceScientists have directly measured the increasing greenhouse effect of methane at the Earth's surface for the first time. A research team has tracked a rise in the warming effect of methane - one of the most important greenhouse gases for the Earth's atmosphere - over a 10-year period.
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The Atlantic

The Rituals and Traditions of Easter and Holy WeekLast week, Christians around the world celebrated Holy Week and Easter, commemorating the final days of Jesus Christ—his return to Jerusalem, his crucifixion, and his resurrection. Families attended church services, hooded penitents took part in processions, and children hunted for Easter eggs. In Catholic passion plays, participants depicted Jesus's trial and death, while other local rituals dre
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New technique makes heart valve replacement safer for some high-risk patientsScientists have developed a novel technique that prevents coronary artery obstruction during transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), a rare but often fatal complication. The method, called Bioprosthetic Aortic Scallop Intentional Laceration to prevent Iatrogenic Coronary Artery obstruction (BASILICA), will increase treatment options for high-risk patients who need heart valve procedures. Th
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The Atlantic

Saudi Crown Prince: Iran's Supreme Leader 'Makes Hitler Look Good'This much, at least, can be said for Mohammed bin Salman, the putatively reformist crown prince of Saudi Arabia: He has made all the right enemies. Among those who would celebrate his end are the leaders of ISIS, al-Qaeda, Hezbollah, and Hamas, as well as Yemen’s Houthi rebels, and the entire clerical and military leadership of the Islamic Republic of Iran. As a bonus, there are members of his ow
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Live Science

Why the 'Condom Snorting Challenge' Is Not Just Gross — It's DangerousSome teens are reportedly inhaling condoms up their nostrils, which is not only gross but potentially dangerous.
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Viden

Forsker bag dansk rumprojekt: 'Jeg håber ikke, raketten springer i luften'Torsten Neubart har ventet i 20 år på at sende sin baby afsted til rummet. Nu sker det i aften.
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Big Think

Chinese space station Tiangong 1 ends in a fiery demise“Earth orbits the Sun in a shooting gallery.” — Neil deGrasse Tyson Read More
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Big Think

Why was Martin Luther King Jr. a socialist?We often bicker and argue over what our national heroes believed in. Why did Dr. King believe in moving towards socialism? Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hanging by a thread: Why bent fibers hold more waterInspired by the large droplets that form on a leaf tip or other thin filament, a team of researchers from Utah State University, University of Liège, Belgium, and Brigham Young University have found the exact angle at which a bent fiber holds the most fluid.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UA-led NASA survey seen as steppingstone for astronomyBy studying dust in the habitable zones of nearby stars, the HOSTS Survey -- led by University of Arizona astronomers and performed with Arizona telescopes -- is helping to determine how big future telescopes should be, which stars are likely candidates for harboring Earth-like planets and what the average star system looks like.
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Live Science

Here's Why an Ancient Lizard Had 4 EyesAbout 49 million years ago, a long-tailed monitor lizard perceived the world not with two but with four eyes, a new study finds.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Why getting back to the moon is so damn hardThe $20 million Lunar X Prize was supposed to send startups into space. The cost turned out to be far higher than the reward—but the competitors were never really in it for the trophy.
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Scientific American Content: Global

If Democrats Retake Congress, Could House Climate Committee Come Back?Previous incarnation oversaw clean energy spending, investigated Deepwater Horizon spill -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Big Think

Russian submarines are lurking near the underwater cables that power the internetIn recent months, Russian ships have been spotted near the underwater cables that enable telecommunications service between North America and overseas nations. Read More
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Reorganization of brain outputs in deaf catsCats deaf from an early age have increased outgoing connections from the auditory cortex to a midbrain region responsible for directing the animal to a particular location in its environment. The study, published in JNeurosci, is the first to examine the reorganization of outputs from the sensory cortex following hearing loss.
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New on MIT Technology Review

The president of France is promoting AI, European style
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Blog » Languages » English

Monthly Stats for Eyewire: March 2018It’s a snowy day here at HQ… that’s April in Boston for you! As for March, it snowed new millionaires and we achieved an astonishing new marathon record of 4 hours 38 minutes! In fact, we also managed two marathons in the same month with the special NEI Marathon. And we completed 33 cells, whee! Check out the other stats below. New Scouts: Just_someone_curious New Millionaire Milestones: 25M – ga
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The Inside Story of Reddit's RedesignGoodbye, dystopian Craigslist. There's a new Reddit, and it's all grown up.
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Feed: All Latest

Google Bans All Cryptomining Extensions From the Chrome StoreChrome Web StoreAs cryptojacking takes over the web, Google will put a stop to cryptomining extensions that prey on unsuspecting installers.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

The 3,000-year history of the hoodie | Paola AntonelliThe hoodie is a lot more than just a comfy sweatshirt. Design curator Paola Antonelli takes us through its history.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

Why the pencil is perfect | Caroline WeaverWhy are pencils shaped like hexagons, and how did they get their iconic yellow color? Pencil shop owner Caroline Weaver takes us inside the fascinating history of the pencil.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

How the progress bar keeps you sane | Daniel EngberThe progress bar makes waiting more exciting... and mitigates our fear of death. Journalist Daniel Engber explores how it came into existence.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

How the jump rope got its rhythm | Kyra Gaunt"Down down, baby, down down the roller coaster..." Hip-hop owes a lot of the queens of double dutch. Ethnomusicologist Kyra Gaunt takes us on a tour of the fascinating history of the jump rope.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

How the button changed fashion | Isaac MizrahiHow the simple button changed the world, according to fashion designer Isaac Mizrahi.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

The hidden ways stairs shape your life | David RockwellStairs don't just get you from point A to point B. Architect David Rockwell explains how they shape your movement -- and your feelings.
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Quanta Magazine

Why Winning in Rock-Paper-Scissors (and in Life) Isn’t EverythingRock-Paper-Scissors works great for deciding who has to take out the garbage. But have you ever noticed what happens when, instead of playing best of three, you just let the game continue round after round? At first, you play a pattern that gives you the upper hand, but then your opponent quickly catches on and turns things in her favor. As strategies evolve, a point is reached where neither side
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Novel PET imaging agent could help guide therapy for brain diseasesResearchers have developed a new PET imaging agent that could help guide and assess treatments for people with various neurological diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and multiple sclerosis. The agent targets receptors in nerve cells in the brain that are involved in learning and memory. The study is featured in the April issue of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Combination immunotherapy improves survival in mouse models of mesotheliomaMassachusetts General Hospital investigators have found that combined treatment with two cancer immunotherapy drugs -- one a novel immune modulator and one that focuses and activates the anti-tumor immune response -- significantly prolonged survival in mouse models of the aggressive cancer malignant mesothelioma.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Even DNA that doesn't encode genes can drive cancerThe vast majority of genetic mutations associated with cancer occur in non-coding regions of the genome, yet it's unclear how they may influence tumor development or growth. Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center identified nearly 200 mutations in non-coding DNA that play a role in cancer. Each mutation could represent a new cancer drug target
3h
Scientific American Content: Global

Where Marijuana Is Legal, Opioid Prescriptions FallTwo new studies support this correlation -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
The Atlantic

Letters: Is There a Difference Between a Frat and a Gang?What’s the Difference Between a Frat and a Gang? In a recent essay on TheAtlantic.com, Ibram X. Kendi drew parallels between collegiate sexual assault and urban violence, arguing that America stereotypes, rationalizes, and polices fraternity and gang violence differently. Let me preface this by saying that this is not a defense of fraternities. Having been a member of a Greek organization myself,
3h
New on MIT Technology Review

Only 14 percent of the world has to worry about robots taking their jobs (...yay?)
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Finding order in disorder demonstrates a new state of matterPhysicists have identified a new state of matter whose structural order operates by rules more aligned with quantum mechanics than standard thermodynamic theory.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers find new trigger for onset of colon cancer, which may lead to better therapiesA new function of a colon cancer gene has been found to bring several activators of this disease to a halt. This discovery changes long-held views on exactly how this key gene acts, and may lead to identification of additional drug targets, and better designed targeted therapies for colon cancer patients that can kill cancer cells but spare the normal cells in the colon.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Eating more protein may not benefit older menA randomized, clinical trial conducted by Brigham and Women's Hospital investigator Shalender Bhasin, M.D., and colleagues has found that higher protein intake did not increase lean body mass, muscle performance, physical function or other well-being measures among older men.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Josie crawling south of FijiNASA obtained an infrared look at Tropical Cyclone Josie as it continued moving very slowly south of Fiji. NASA's Aqua satellite found very cold cloud top temperatures and strong storms.
3h
Popular Science

2,300 years after mathematicians first noticed prime numbers, they're still intriguedScience Making us scratch our heads for millennia. To study primes, mathematicians strain whole numbers through one virtual mesh after another until only primes remain. This sieving process produced tables of millions of…
3h
Science : NPR

Is Humanity Unusual In The Cosmos?Commentator Adam Frank talks with Harvard astrophysicist Avi Loeb about exo-civilizations, techno-signatures, and the search for alien life — living or long-gone. (Image credit: ESO)
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Josie crawling south of FijiNASA obtained an infrared look at Tropical Cyclone Josie as it continued moving very slowly south of Fiji. NASA's Aqua satellite found very cold cloud top temperatures and strong storms.
3h
cognitive science

A paper in Psychological Science finds no evidence for stereotype threat analyzing tournament chess games in which women play men.submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
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Scientific American Content: Global

Beguiling Dark-Matter Signal Persists 20 Years onPhysicists at experiment in Italy continue to see a data fluctuation that they say represents dark matter—but the mystery deepens -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook CEO defends advertising-supported business modelThe CEO of Facebook is defending its advertising-supported business model.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Digital life team creates animated 3-D models of sea turtles from live specimensThe Digital Life team at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, creators of an online catalog of high-resolution, full-color 3D models of living organisms, announce today that they have released two new, online full-color animated models of a loggerhead and a green sea turtle through a collaboration with sea turtle rescue and research institutions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Modeling future earthquake and tsunami risk in southeast JapanGeoscience researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, Smith College and the Japanese Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology this week unveiled new, GPS-based methods for modeling earthquake-induced tsunamis for southeast Japan along the Nankai Trough. A Nankai-induced tsunami is likely to hit there in the next few decades, says lead author Hannah Baranes at UMass Amherst, and
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Agricultural fires can double Delhi pollution during peak burning seasonIt's become a deadly autumn tradition in northern India: after the rains of the late summer monsoon subside, farmers set fires to their fields to clear stubble after the harvest and send choking smoke rolling across the countryside. New Delhi, already thick with pollution, can grind to a halt for days. Last year, the chief minister of the Delhi state likened the city to "a gas chamber."
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, April 2018An ORNL-led team cultivated a novel oral microbe in adults with periodontitis; ORNL partnered with FCA US and Nemak to develop a new cast aluminum alloy for engine cylinder heads, which could lead to better fuel efficiency; ORNL studies cast doubt on 40-year-old theory describing how plastic polymers behave during processing.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Modeling future earthquake and tsunami risk in southeast JapanGeoscience researchers at UMass Amherst, Smith College and the Japanese Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology unveil new, GPS-based methods for modeling earthquake-induced tsunamis for southeast Japan along the Nankai Trough. A Nankai-induced tsunami is likely to hit there in the next few decades, says lead author Hannah Baranes at UMass Amherst, and has the potential to displace four tim
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Extinct monitor lizard had four eyes, fossil evidence showsResearchers reporting in Current Biology on April 2 have evidence that an extinct species of monitor lizard had four eyes, a first among known jawed vertebrates. Today, only the jawless lampreys have four eyes.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Single-cell mRNA cytometry via sequence-specific nanoparticle clustering and trappingProstate cancer is the second most common cancer in men and the fifth leading cause of death from cancer in men worldwide, according to 2012 numbers. While several viable treatment options for prostate cancer exist, many men affected with prostate cancer will not respond to first-line treatments. Researchers in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences at the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, Univer
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spaceflight activates cell changes with implications for stem cell-based heart repairA new study of the effects of spaceflight on the development of heart cells identified changes in calcium signaling that could be used to develop stem cell-based therapies for cardiac repair. The impact of simulated microgravity and environmental factors on the International Space Station on cardiovascular progenitor cell development and signaling is reported in an upcoming special issue of Stem C
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study examines energy and nutrient digestibility in wheat co-products fed to growing pigsWith feed costs and the worldwide demand for meat growing, livestock producers are increasingly turning to co-products from the ethanol and human food industries. Research from the University of Illinois is helping to determine the feed value of wheat middlings and red dog, two co-products of the wheat milling process that can be included in diets fed to pigs and other livestock.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA sees Iris the Zombie Storm reborn near QueenslandDuring the week of March 26 Tropical Cyclone Iris weakened to a low pressure area and since then it has been lingering off the coast of Queensland, Australia. On April 2, strengthened by the warm waters of the Coral Sea, Southern Pacific Ocean Iris re-generated into a tropical cyclone. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of the zombie storm after it was "re-born."
3h
cognitive science

How a Defence of Christianity Revolutionized Brain Sciencesubmitted by /u/NaiveSkeptic [link] [comments]
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Agricultural fires can double Delhi pollution during peak burning seasonResearchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have demonstrated that in October and November, a peak burning season in nearby Punjab, about half of all pollution in Delhi can be attributed to agricultural fires on some days.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Easing uncertaintyHeisenberg's uncertainty principle -- the fundamental impossibility of simultaneously measuring entities such as position and momentum exactly -- is at the heart of quantum theory. Physicists at ETH Zurich have now demonstrated an elegant way to relax this intrinsic incompatibility using a mechanical oscillator formed by a single trapped ion, opening up a route for fundamental studies and practica
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Online physician reviews don't reflect responses in patient satisfaction surveysPhysicians who receive negative reviews online do not receive similar responses in rigorous patient satisfaction surveys, according to new Mayo Clinic research in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Single-cell mRNA cytometry via sequence-specific nanoparticle clustering and trappingUniversity of Toronto researchers developed a liquid biopsy technology to improve prostate cancer treatment.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Extinct monitor lizard had four eyes, fossil evidence showsResearchers reporting in Current Biology on April 2 have evidence that an extinct species of monitor lizard had four eyes, a first among known jawed vertebrates. Today, only the jawless lampreys have four eyes.
3h
Scientific American Content: Global

Physicians, Depression and BurnoutWhen I applied for medical school, I knew I was signing up for hard work—but I had not expected this -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Scientific American Content: Global

Chinese Space Station Tiangong 1 Falls to EarthThe space station disintegrated in the atmosphere over the South Pacific -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hubble uses cosmic lens to discover most distant star ever observedAstronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have found the most distant star ever discovered. The hot blue star existed only 4.4 billion years after the Big Bang. This discovery provides new insight into the formation and evolution of stars in the early universe, the constituents of galaxy clusters and also on the nature of dark matter.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Where you live, walk, and eat in New York City are important for controlling diabetesIn the first study to directly examine the relationship between environment and individual's ability to control their diabetes, researchers found there is a link between the neighborhood food, built and economic environment where you live and the ability to achieve glycemic control. Results are consistent with the premise that areas with greater resources to support healthy eating and physical act
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA sees Iris the zombie storm reborn near QueenslandDuring the week of March 26 Tropical Cyclone Iris weakened to a low pressure area and since then it has been lingering off the coast of Queensland, Australia. On April 2, strengthened by the warm waters of the Coral Sea, Southern Pacific Ocean Iris regenerated into a tropical cyclone. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of the zombie storm after it was 'reborn.'
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hubble uncovers the farthest star ever seenMore than halfway across the universe, an enormous blue star nicknamed Icarus is the farthest individual star ever seen.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cosmic lens helps Hubble capture image of most distant star ever seenStar Lensing HubblePeering through the gravitational lens of a massive galaxy cluster 5 billion light years from Earth, astronomers have discovered a single, blue supergiant star 9 billion light years away, farther than any other normal star seen before. The star, dubbed Icarus, was magnified more than 2,000 times when it passed directly behind a sun-like star in the lensing cluster. This demonstrates a new way of s
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Biomimetic chemistry: DNA mimic outwits viral enzymeNot only can synthetic molecules mimic the structures of their biological models, they can also take on their functions and may even successfully compete with them, as an artificial DNA sequence now shows.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ice-free Arctic summers could hinge on small climate warming rangeA range of less than one degree Fahrenheit (or half a degree Celsius) of climate warming over the next century could make all the difference when it comes to the probability of future ice-free summers in the Arctic, new research shows.
4h
Live Science

This 4,000-Year-Old Mummy Just Solved a Century-Old MysteryA team of forensic scientists has managed to extract DNA from a 4,000-year-old mummy, and their finding has solved a century-old mystery of its ransacked tomb.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Better fitness in pre-pregnant women linked with less risk of gestational diabetesA new study finds that women who are considering pregnancy would benefit from greater fitness. Using 25 years of data on pre-pregnant women, the researchers report that higher levels of pre-pregnancy fitness are associated with a reduced risk of developing gestational diabetes.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Solution to 50-year-old mystery could lead to gene therapy for common blood disordersIn a landmark study that could lead to new therapies for sickle cell anemia and other blood disorders, researchers have used CRISPR gene editing to introduce beneficial natural mutations into blood cells to boost their production of fetal hemoglobin. The research solves a 50-year-old mystery about how these mutations -- which are naturally carried by a small percentage of people -- operate and alt
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Self-rating mental health as 'good' predicts positive future mental healthResearchers have found that when a person rates their current mental health as 'positive' despite meeting criteria for a mental health problem, it can predict good mental health in the future, even without treatment.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cattle: Unraveling the immunopathogenesis of Johne's diseaseA research team has unraveled the immunopathogenesis of Johne's disease, a chronic bovine disease that has caused endemics in Japan and many other countries, placing financial burdens on cattle farmers.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Infant death study reveals dangerous sleep practices among babysitters, relatives, othersBabies who died during their sleep while being watched by someone other than parents often had been placed in unsafe sleep positions, such as on their stomachs, or in unsafe locations, such as a couch, a new study has found.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New compound helps activate cancer-fighting T cellsChemists have created a new lipid antigen that helps stimulate disease-fighting T cells in the immune system, opening up new paths for the development of better cancer therapy drugs and vaccines.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Farthest star ever seen in the universe detectedAn international team of researchers including the Kavli IPMU have observed the most distant individual star, 9 billion light years from Earth.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

First direct observations of methane's increasing greenhouse effect at the Earth's surfaceScientists have directly measured the increasing greenhouse effect of methane at the Earth's surface for the first time. A research team from the US Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) tracked a rise in the warming effect of methane -- one of the most important greenhouse gases for the Earth's atmosphere -- over a 10-year period at a DOE field observation si
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists discover new method for measuring cellular ageA team led by scientists at Van Andel Research Institute and Cedars-Sinai have developed a straightforward, computational way to measure cellular age, a feat that may lead to better, simpler screening and monitoring methods for cancer and other diseases.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Biological ballet: Imaging technique reveals complex protein movements in cell membraneOIST researchers developed a new imaging technique for observing individual protein molecules for a long time, providing new insights into how cells move.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sandcastles and surprising origins of basic cellular functionsCells comprising a tissue can pack into disorderly geometries much as do grains of sand in a sandcastle. The finding provides insights into organ formation in an embryo, healing of a wound, and even invasion of cells into surrounding tissue, as occurs in cancer.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Do men outnumber women in academic neurology programs?Men outnumbered women at all faculty levels in top-ranked academic neurology programs, findings that are consistent with previous studies of both neurology and other specialties.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Associations between acid-suppressing medications, antibiotics in infancy and later allergic diseaseThe use of acid-suppressing medications or antibiotics in the first six months of infancy was associated with an increased risk for the subsequent development of allergic diseases in childhood.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Studies examine relationship between legal cannabis use, opioid prescriptionsTwo studies examine the relationship between legal cannabis use and opioid prescriptions. One study examines state implementation of medical and adult-use marijuana laws with opioid prescribing rates and spending among Medicaid enrollees, while a second study examines prescribing patterns for opioids in Medicare Part D and the implementation of state medical cannabis laws.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New algorithm enables data integration at single-cell resolutionA team of computational biologists has developed an algorithm that can 'align' multiple sequencing datasets with single-cell resolution. The new method has implications for better understanding how different groups of cells change during disease progression, in response to drug treatment, or across evolution.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Aquaplaning in the geological undergroundScientists propose a mechanism that explains how the biggest earthquake ever happened and how more than 50 years later another large earthquake in the same region released some of the stress that had built up in the depth. Water pressure in the underground plays a crucial role in both cases.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Antarctica retreating across the sea floorAntarctica's great ice sheet is losing ground as it is eroded by warm ocean water circulating beneath its floating edge, a new study has found. Scientists have tracked the movement of Antarctica's grounding line using European Space Agency's CryoSat-2 across 16,000 km of the coastline.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Breakthrough in determining ages of different microbial groupsAn international team of scientists, which includes the University of Bristol, have made a significant breakthrough in how we understand the first three-quarters of life on earth by creating new techniques for investigating the timing and co-evolution of microbial groups.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cosmic lens helps Hubble capture image of most distant star ever seenPeering through the gravitational lens of a massive galaxy cluster 5 billion light years from Earth, astronomers have discovered a single, blue supergiant star 9 billion light years away, farther than any other normal star seen before. The star, dubbed Icarus, was magnified more than 2,000 times when it passed directly behind a sun-like star in the lensing cluster. This demonstrates a new way of s
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Solution to 50-year-old mystery could lead to gene therapy for common blood disordersIn a landmark study that could lead to new therapies for sickle cell anemia and other blood disorders, UNSW Sydney-led researchers have used CRISPR gene editing to introduce beneficial natural mutations into blood cells to boost their production of fetal hemoglobin. The research solves a 50-year-old mystery about how these mutations -- which are naturally carried by a small percentage of people --
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Biomimetic chemistry: DNA mimic outwits viral enzymeNot only can synthetic molecules mimic the structures of their biological models, they can also take on their functions and may even successfully compete with them, as an artificial DNA sequence designed by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich chemist Ivan Huc now shows.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ice-free Arctic summers could hinge on small climate warming rangeA range of less than one degree Fahrenheit (or half a degree Celsius) of climate warming over the next century could make all the difference when it comes to the probability of future ice-free summers in the Arctic, new University of Colorado Boulder research shows.
4h
Live Science

Legalizing Marijuana Could Have This Unexpected BenefitAccess to medical marijuana may have cut patients' need for this other drug.
4h
Science | The Guardian

Hubble space telescope captures image of most distant star ever seenIcarus is a blue supergiant, a rare type of star that is larger than the Sun and far more luminous It might look like a tiny speck amid a bejewelled vista of the universe, but scientists say a pinprick of light in an image captured by the Hubble space telescope is the most distant individual star ever seen that is not a supernova. The team behind the find say the light was emitted from the star –
4h
The Atlantic

Could Trump Actually Use Military Funding for His Border Wall?President Trump can’t seem to find the funds to fulfill his signature campaign pledge of building a border wall—and his Plan C could get even more complicated. On the campaign trail, Trump insisted that Mexico would pay for the wall, a proposal that the Mexican government quickly shut down . Once in office, Trump looked to Congress to foot the bill, but lawmakers—many of whom are unconvinced ther
4h
The Atlantic

The Zanily Aging Rock Stars of the AughtsDiane Keaton once said that with age comes a sense of freedom. Judi Dench once said that with age comes silliness, adding, “I don’t know what wisdom means.” And Jack White now sings, “The rock ‘n’ roller, the young and older / Rolling back to the stroller,” which might mean he agrees with those ladies. The vision of maturation as a journey to DGAF kookiness may help decode vexing new albums by tw
4h
New Scientist - News

Human genome sequencing is starting to live up to the hypeEighteen years on from the first human genome sequence, we are finally getting a glimpse of what genetically tailored medicine might look like
4h
New Scientist - News

Tackling inequality means first understanding the problemResearch shows it’s not actually inequality we care about – it’s unfairness. But that fact shouldn’t be interpreted as supporting the status quo
4h
New Scientist - News

DNA from another mystery human ancestor lingers in some peopleSome modern Yoruba people in West Africa carry DNA that suggests an ancient species of hominin lingered longer than we thought
4h
Popular Science

How to avoid sharing fake photos of the space station that just crashed into EarthTiangong-1 Chinese EarthSpace And other Tiangong-1 facts. Remember that Chinese space station called Tiangong-1? You know. The broken one. The one that was set to plunge out of the sky sometime over Easter weekend? The one…
4h
Live Science

Volcanoes, Swamps and the South Pole: NASA Scientists Take Research to ExtremesFor some NASA scientists, the extreme environments they study aren't on a distant planet or moon — they're right here on Earth.
4h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

How the hyperlink changed everything | Margaret Gould StewartThe hyperlink is the LEGO block of the internet. Here's the bizarre history of how it came to be, as told by user experience master Margaret Gould Stewart.
4h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

How we can teach computers to make sense of our emotions | Raphael ArarHow can we make AI that people actually want to interact with? Raphael Arar suggests we start by making art. He shares interactive projects that help AI explore complex ideas like nostalgia, intuition and conversation -- all working towards the goal of making our future technology just as much human as it is artificial.
4h
The Atlantic

John Legend and Jesse Williams on Art and ActivismThe Atlantic 's Adrienne Green sat down with Jesse Williams and John Legend for the MLK special edition of the magazine to discuss their stances on racial injustice, the struggle for civil rights, and how artists can move the needle on both counts. “Artists, in many ways, are stewards—a barometer for what's to come in terms of where people's consciousness is,” says Williams in the video. “We have
4h
The Atlantic

Jesse Williams and John Legend Talk Race in AmericaMemphis King J. JacksonEditor’s Note: Read The Atlantic ’s special coverage of Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy. J ohn Legend and Jesse Williams are known mainly as, respectively, a Grammy-winning R&B singer and a lead actor on ABC’s long-running medical drama Grey’s Anatomy . But they are also outspoken about racial injustice and the continuing struggle for civil rights. Legend, 39, has headlined benefit concerts and f
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First direct observations of methane's increasing greenhouse effect at the Earth's surfaceScientists have directly measured the increasing greenhouse effect of methane at the Earth's surface for the first time. A research team from the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) tracked a rise in the warming effect of methane - one of the most important greenhouse gases for the Earth's atmosphere - over a 10-year period at a DOE field observation si
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New algorithm enables data integration at single-cell resolutionA team of computational biologists has developed an algorithm that can 'align' multiple sequencing datasets with single-cell resolution. The new method, published today in the journal Nature Biotechnology, has implications for better understanding how different groups of cells change during disease progression, in response to drug treatment, or across evolution.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sandcastles and surprising origins of basic cellular functionsCells comprising a tissue can pack into disorderly geometries much as do grains of sand in a sandcastle. In doing so they can freeze into a fixed shape—as in a sandcastle—or flow like sand poured from a beach bucket. The finding, reported by researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Northeastern University, and MIT, provides insights into organ formation in an embryo, healing of a
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Biomimetic chemistry—DNA mimic outwits viral enzymeNot only can synthetic molecules mimic the structures of their biological models, they can also take on their functions and may even successfully compete with them, as an artificial DNA sequence designed by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich chemist Ivan Huc now shows.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Antarctica retreating across the sea floorAntarctica's great ice sheet is losing ground as it is eroded by warm ocean water circulating beneath its floating edge, a new study has found.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Breakthrough in determining ages of different microbial groupsAn international team of scientists, which includes the University of Bristol, have made a significant breakthrough in how we understand the first three-quarters of life on earth by creating new techniques for investigating the timing and co-evolution of microbial groups.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ice-free Arctic summers could hinge on small climate warming rangeA range of less than one degree Fahrenheit (or half a degree Celsius) of climate warming over the next century could make all the difference when it comes to the probability of future ice-free summers in the Arctic, new University of Colorado Boulder research shows.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gravitational lensing by sun-like star in massive cluster reveals blue supergiant 9 billion light years awayStar Lensing HubbleThanks to a rare cosmic alignment, astronomers have captured the most distant normal star ever observed, some 9 billion light years from Earth.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Imaging technique reveals complex protein movements in cell membraneWhat do ballet and cell biology have in common? Perhaps more than you might think.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Aquaplaning in the geological underground—Water pressure as a critical factor for mega-earthquakesScientists have proposed a mechanism that explains the biggest-ever earthquake and how more than 50 years later, another large earthquake in the same region released some of the stress that had built up. Water pressure underground plays a crucial role in both cases.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study examines energy and nutrient digestibility in wheat co-products fed to growing pigsWith feed costs and the worldwide demand for meat growing, livestock producers are increasingly turning to co-products from the ethanol and human food industries. Research from the University of Illinois is helping to determine the feed value of wheat middlings and red dog, two co-products of the wheat milling process that can be included in diets fed to pigs and other livestock.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Self-rating mental health as 'good' predicts positive future mental healthResearchers have found that when a person rates their current mental health as 'positive' despite meeting criteria for a mental health problem, it can predict good mental health in the future, even without treatment.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Better fitness in pre-pregnant women linked with less risk of gestational diabetesA new study from a University of Iowa-led research team finds that women who are considering pregnancy would benefit from greater fitness. Using 25 years of data on pre-pregnant women, the researchers report that higher levels of pre-pregnancy fitness are associated with a reduced risk of developing gestational diabetes.
5h
Big Think

5 ways Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. changed American history50 years after his assassination, a look back at five ways Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. changed the U.S. Read More
5h
Feed: All Latest

You've Never Seen the French Alps Like This BeforeBritish photographer Dan Holdsworth uses geological mapping software to render three-dimensional point clouds of glaciers.
5h
The Atlantic

Is King All That We Are Allowed to Become?From September 1957 until the end of 1958, Martin Luther King Jr. was both the president of the newly formed Southern Christian Leadership Conference and an advice columnist. For those 16 months, King answered questions from readers of Ebony magazine, the premiere lifestyle magazine for African Americans, under the title “Advice for Living.” Predictably, many of the questions have to do with civi
5h
The Atlantic

The Covers Behind KINGThis article is a sample of the exclusive stories written for members of The Masthead, the membership program from The Atlantic ( find out more ). This year marks the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.’s death. To honor his legacy, The Atlantic published a special edition of the magazine. Featuring rarely published speeches by King; contemporary voices including Bernice King, John Lewis,
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Spaceflight activates cell changes with implications for stem cell-based heart repairA new study of the effects of spaceflight on the development of heart cells identified changes in calcium signaling that could be used to develop stem cell-based therapies for cardiac repair.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New compound helps activate cancer-fighting T cellsAn international research team led by University of Connecticut chemist Amy Howell has created a new lipid antigen that helps stimulate disease-fighting T cells in the immune system, opening up new paths for the development of better cancer therapy drugs and vaccines.
5h
Futurity.org

How U.S. ‘energy revolution’ shakes up global marketRecent years have seen huge increases in American oil and gas production, with dramatic consequences for the US economy and international energy markets. But how has this new production affected global prices? And, will it alter the relationship between the US and traditional energy producers, particularly in the Middle East? And how have concerns about climate change affected energy policies in
5h
Science | The Guardian

Planet of the apis: Nasa develops plan to launch 'Marsbees'A new breed of robotic bees co-created by Japanese scientists could be dispatched to the red planet to look for signs of life, or rather flatulence Name: Marsbees Age: Embryonic. Continue reading...
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

People with diabetes visit the dentist less frequently despite link between diabetes, oral healthAdults with diabetes are less likely to visit the dentist than people with prediabetes or without diabetes, finds a new study led by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing and East Carolina University's Brody School of Medicine.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Infant death study reveals dangerous sleep practices among babysitters, relatives, othersBabies who died during their sleep while being watched by someone other than parents often had been placed in unsafe sleep positions, such as on their stomachs, or in unsafe locations, such as a couch, a new study has found.
5h
Popular Science

How missiles got smartScience Projecting the evolution of the projectile From Tesla's remote-controlled boats, to torpedos guided on wires, all the way to missiles that can pick their own targets from afar.
5h
Ingeniøren

Sikorsky CH-53K King Stallion: Sådan ser det ud, når 17 megawatt-helikopteren løfter 16 tonSikorsky King Stallions enorme hovedrotor presses til det yderste.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Unraveling the immunopathogenesis of Johne's diseaseA research team has unraveled the immunopathogenesis of Johne's disease, a chronic bovine disease that has caused endemics in Japan and many other countries, placing financial burdens on cattle farmers.
5h
The Atlantic

The Atomic-Bomb Core That Escaped World War IIIn 1946, shortly after the end of World War II, the physicist Louis Slotin stood in front of a low table at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, concentrating intensely on the object in front of him. His left thumb was hooked into a hole on the top of a heavy beryllium dome, fingers bracing the side as he carefully cantilevered it on its leftmost edge. In his right hand he held a flathead screwdri
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook needs 'a few years' to fix problems: ZuckerbergMark Zuckerberg FacebookFacebook will likely need "a few years" to fix the problems uncovered by the revelations on the hijacking of private user data, chief executive Mark Zuckerberg said in an interview released Monday.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

People use emotion to persuade, even when it could backfireWe intuitively use more emotional language to enhance our powers of persuasion, according to new research. The research shows that people tend toward appeals that aren't simply more positive or negative but are infused with emotionality, even when they're trying to sway an audience that may not be receptive to such language.
6h
Futurity.org

Software makes knitting machines more like 3D printersA new software system can translate a wide variety of 3D shapes into stitch-by-stitch instructions that allow a computer-controlled knitting machine to automatically produce those shapes. “Knitting machines could become as easy to use as 3D printers.” The ability to generate knitting instructions without human expertise could make on-demand machine knitting possible, computer scientists say. The
6h
The Scientist RSS

Canadian Scientists Least Likely to Share Data: SurveyAmericans and Australians aren't far behind, according to a questionnaire of researchers.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Climate change could raise food insecurity riskWeather extremes caused by climate change could raise the risk of food shortages in many countries, new research suggests.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Higher blood pressure before pregnancy may increase miscarriage riskHigher blood pressure prior to conception may increase the risk of miscarriage, even in women not diagnosed with hypertension. The study involved women who had already experienced at least one pregnancy loss and were trying again. If confirmed, the findings imply that lowering heart disease risk factors in young adulthood may also improve reproductive health.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Heart defects in infant may predict heart problems in birth mother later in lifeWomen who give birth to infants with congenital heart defects may be at increased risk of heart problems including heart attack and heart failure later in life.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Links between eating red meat and distal colon cancer in womenA new study suggests that a diet free from red meat significantly reduces the risk of a type of colon cancer in women living in the United Kingdom. When comparing the effects of certain diets to cancer development in specific subsites of the colon, scientists found that those regularly eating red meat compared to a red meat-free diet had higher rates of distal colon cancer -- cancer found on the d
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Flood risk denial in US coastal communitiesCultural anthropologists are working to identify flood-prone locations, key individuals, and intervention strategies that lead to community-based mitigation in US coastal communities.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Protein analysis enables precise drug targetingResearchers from MIPT and several US and Chinese universities have solved the structure of one of the most important nervous system proteins in complex with a number of drug molecules. The discovery opens up opportunities for developing new medications with regulated action and fewer side effects. The paper was published in the journal Cell.
6h
Science-Based Medicine

The Nation indulges in fear mongering about cell phones and cancerAn article published last week in the Nation likens wireless telephone companies to tobacco and fossil fuel episodes in their tactics of spreading fear, misinformation, and doubt regarding the science of cell phone radiation and health. To produce this narrative, the investigation's authors rely on unreliable sources and cherry pick scientific studies, ignoring the scientific consensus that cell p
6h
Big Think

What is ‘phubbing’ and how does it affect your relationships?File under: “What… you’re SURPRISED by these results?!” Read More
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers conduct chemical analysis of globular cluster NGC 5824Italian researchers have investigated the chemical composition of NGC 5824, a massive globular cluster in the Milky Way galaxy. Their analysis, based on observational data provided by the Very Large Telescope array, offers some hints into the nature of this cluster. The study was published March 26 in a paper on arXiv.org.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flood risk denial in US coastal communitiesRising sea levels have worsened the destruction that routine tidal flooding causes in the nation's coastal communities. On the U.S. mainland, communities in Louisiana, Florida and Maryland are most at risk.
6h
Futurity.org

How super-slow waves keep your brain coordinatedThe ultra-slow waves that pass through our brains are directly linked to consciousness and play a central role in how the complex brain coordinates itself, new research suggests. “When the wave goes up, areas become more excitable; when it goes down, they become less so.” If you keep a close eye on an MRI scan of the brain, you’ll see a wave pass through the entire brain like a heartbeat once eve
6h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Why the Nobel Prize might need a makeoverIn Losing the Nobel Prize, astrophysicist Brian Keating discusses the downsides of science’s top honor.
6h
Scientific American Content: Global

#FluMining social media to predict outbreaks -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Popular Science

The flu season is almost over. So how bad was it?Health At times it seemed more perilous than usual. Flu season is still technically not over, but the tail end is the perfect time to look back and ask: how bad was it? So—now that you’ve likely already forgotten how…
7h
Futurity.org

Where the brain shakes may be key to concussionConcussions and other mild traumatic brain injuries seem to arise when an area deep inside the brain shakes more rapidly and intensely than surrounding areas, report researchers. The study combines data from football players with computer simulations of the brain. They also found that the mechanical complexity of the brain means there is no straightforward relationship between different bumps, sp
7h
Live Science

Top 11 Deadliest Natural Disasters in HistoryEarthquakes, cyclones, floods... The deadliest natural disasters have a combined estimated death toll of nearly 10 million people.
7h
The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Original FinResearchers identify the genetics underlying the development of dorsal fins in ancient fish.
7h
The Scientist RSS

USDA Will Not Regulate CRISPR-Edited CropsRestrictions will remain on transgenic plants, which contain artificially inserted genes from other species.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Flood risk denial in US coastal communitiesCultural anthropologist David Casagrande along with his colleagues are working to identify flood-prone locations, key individuals, and intervention strategies that lead to community-based mitigation in US coastal communities. He will present some of his findings at The annual meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology (SFAA) in Philadelphia next week in a session called 'Sustainable Futures o
7h
Live Science

How Expensive It Is to Have Kids? These 5 Charts Reveal the Hefty Price TagToday, roughly one in five women in the U.S. doesn't have children. Thanks in part to this decline in birthrate, for the first time in U.S. history, there may soon be more elderly people than children.
7h
Feed: All Latest

A Flawed Study Shows How Little We Understand Crispr's EffectsFlaws in a study about unintended gene editing snips have led to its retraction. But that’s not the end of the story.
7h
The Atlantic

The Passing of the Libertarian MomentSenator Rand Paul is a man out of time. It was only a few years ago that the editors of Reason magazine held him up as the personification of what they imagined to be a “ libertarian moment ,” a term that enjoyed some momentary cachet in the pages of The New York Times , The Atlantic , Politico (where I offered a skeptical assessment), and elsewhere. But rather than embodying the future of the Re
8h
Ingeniøren

Spørg Scientariet: Er det usundt at have planter i soveværelset?En læser er i tvivl, om hun skal smide sine planter i soveværelset ud, fordi de bruger ilt og udvikler skimmelsvampe. Professor på KU svarer.
8h
NYT > Science

Saving a Fussy Predator in Europe, With Help From 50,000 RabbitsAfter nearing extinction 20 years ago, the Iberian lynx has made a comeback in southern Spain and Portugal, thanks to a vast recovery program funded by the European Union.
8h
Live Science

1,500-Year-Old Coin Stash Leaves Archaeologists with MysteryThe coin stash was found in a collapsed building in the ancient city of Corinth.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Italy's robot concierge a novelty on the way to better AIRobby Pepper can answer questions in Italian, English and German. Billed as Italy's first robot concierge, the humanoid will be deployed all season at a hotel on the popular Lake Garda to help relieve the desk staff of simple, repetitive questions.
8h
Live Science

Artificial Chameleon Skin Is Weird and CoolIt doesn't swell when dipped in "bodily fluids." Hmm.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists solve structure of intellectual disability proteinScientists at the University of Dundee have identified the effects of a mutation that gives rise to a form of intellectual disability.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists invent cheaper and greener wastewater treatmentA new energy-efficient process developed at Murdoch University is set to revolutionise wastewater treatment by significantly reducing the industry's electricity consumption.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Black skies and raging seas—how the First Fleet got a first taste of Australia's unforgiving climateThe women screamed as the huge waves crashed loudly on the wooden deck. Horrified, they watched the foaming torrent wash away their blankets. Many dropped to their knees, praying for the violent rocking to stop. The sea raged around them as the wind whipped up into a frenzy, damaging all but one of the heavily loaded ships.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researcher is thirsty for sustainable EvergladesSmall-scale droughts can have big effects on the Florida Everglades. Ph.D. student Anteneh Abiy is digging deep into these abnormally low rainfall events. He doesn't have to do go too far into weather data to begin his work. 2017 was drier than usual. The Everglades received 6 inches of rainfall less than the annual average.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Island-hopping study shows the most likely route the first people took to AustraliaThe First Australians were among the world's earliest great ocean explorers, undertaking a remarkable 2,000km maritime migration through Indonesia which led to the discovery of Australia at least 65,000 years ago.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mapping the modern death sentenceResearchers at the University of Virginia School of Law have collaborated on a new website that uses a data-driven, interactive map to illustrate the rapid decline of the issuance of the death sentence in the United States since 1991.
8h
Feed: All Latest

Watch SpaceX Launch Its Resupply Mission to the ISSSpaceX Dragon NASAThe most significant thing about Monday's cargo run may be that there is little novelty to it whatsoever
8h
Feed: All Latest

The Tricky Business of Measuring ConsciousnessWIRED columnist Jason Pontin on an audacious theory of sentience that offers a new way to understand consciousness.
8h
Feed: All Latest

How GrubHub Analyzed 4,000 Dishes to Predict Your Next OrderOnline food-delivery service spent eight years resolving a classic problem of unstructured data.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Hubble's curious case of a calcium-rich supernovaThis image, captured by the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows the spiral galaxy NGC 5714, about 130 million light-years away in the constellation of Boötes (the Herdsman). NGC 5714 is classified as an Sc spiral galaxy, but its spiral arms—the dominating feature of spiral galaxies—are almost impossible to see, as NGC 5714 presents itself at an almost pe
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

With buildings and infrastructure, it pays to take a life-cycle perspectiveIn the face of limited funding to address massive infrastructure needs, and with climate action at top of mind, it is more important than ever for engineers, designers, and policy makers to understand the full economic and environmental costs of infrastructure project decisions—and not just impacts relating to material choice or from initial construction, but the impacts of choices across the enti
8h
Latest Headlines | Science News

How honeybees’ royal jelly might be baby glue, tooA last-minute pH shift thickens royal jelly enough to stick queen larvae to the ceiling of hive cells.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

Why Aren't There More Women Leaders in Science?One major factor is the significant gender inequity that exists in the recruitment, promotion and retention of female faculty and staff scientists -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astrophysicists calculate the original magnetic field in our cosmic neighbourhoodIn the first fractions of a second after the birth of our universe, not only elementary particles and radiation, but also magnetic fields were generated. A team led by the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics in Garching has now calculated what these magnetic fields should look like today in the universe – in great detail and in 3-D.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rings and gaps in a developing planetary systemThe discovery of an exoplanet has most often resulted from the monitoring of a star's flicker (the transiting method) or its wobble (the radial velocity method). Discovery by direct imaging is rare because it is so difficult to spot a faint exoplanet hidden in the glare of its host star. The advent of the new generation of radio interferometers (as well as improvements in near-infrared imaging), h
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How your WiFi can protect against intrudersThe applications of wireless networks go far beyond logging onto the free Airport WiFi while you wait to board your flight, or binge watching the latest Netflix series on a rainy Sunday afternoon.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

Bats Are Migrating Earlier, and It Could Wreak Havoc on FarmingClimate change may be partially to blame for the creatures’ shifting schedules -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
The Guardian's Science Weekly

A Neuroscientist Explains: where perception ends and hallucination begins - podcastWhen it comes to perceiving the world around us, how much of it is due to ‘bottom-up’ sensory data and how much comes from the ‘top-down’ predictions we make? Most importantly; how can the delicate dance between the two lead to hallucinations?
9h
NYT > Science

The F.B.I. and the Mystery of the Mummy’s HeadA museum wasn’t sure whose head they had put on display. That’s when the F.B.I.’s forensic scientists were called in to crack the agency’s oldest case.
9h
NYT > Science

At 12, His Science Video Went Viral. At 14, He Fears He Was Too Rude.Marco Zozaya critiqued those linking vaccines and autism, but he struggles like many science communicators with social media platforms that may favor a style that inflames.
9h
Science | The Guardian

A Neuroscientist Explains: where perception ends and hallucination begins - podcastWhen it comes to perceiving the world around us, how much of it is due to ‘bottom-up’ sensory data and how much comes from the ‘top-down’ predictions we make? Most importantly; how can the delicate dance between the two lead to hallucinations? Subscribe and review on iTunes and Acast , and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter A Neuroscientist Explains is back for its second season. In each
9h
Science | The Guardian

Is there a law of physics to explain odd socks in the washing?The long-running series in which readers answer other readers’ questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific concepts Is there a law of physics to explain why I always end up with odd socks after I have done the washing? Jonathan East Continue reading...
9h
Ingeniøren

Techtopia #46: Robotbilens dilemmaPodcast: Robotter tager i stigende grad beslutninger, der kræver en moralsk retningslinje. Så hvilken moral programmerer man en robot til?
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A novel test bed for non-equilibrium many-body physicsThe behavior of electrons in a material is typically difficult to predict. Novel insight comes now from experiments and simulations performed by a team led by ETH physicists who have studied electronic transport properties in a one-dimensional quantum wire containing a mesoscopic lattice.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Calculating the impacts of natural events on wildlifeA new method could help scientists understand how wildlife populations are affected by major natural events such as hurricanes, severe winters, and tsunamis. The approach suggests the 2011 tsunami had an unexpectedly limited impact on organisms living in the intertidal zone of the Japanese shoreline.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Protein analysis enables precise drug targetingResearchers from MIPT and several U.S. and Chinese universities have solved the structure of one of the most important nervous system proteins in complex with a number of drug molecules. The discovery opens up opportunities for developing new medications with regulated action and fewer side effects. The paper was published in the journal Cell.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Elevated blood pressure before pregnancy may increase chance of pregnancy lossElevated blood pressure before conception may increase the chances for pregnancy loss, according to an analysis by researchers at the National Institutes of Health. The authors conclude that lifestyle changes to keep blood pressure under control could potentially reduce the risk of loss. The study appears in Hypertension.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Heart defects in infant may predict heart problems in birth mother later in lifeWomen who give birth to infants with congenital heart defects may be at increased risk of heart problems including heart attack and heart failure later in life.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Higher blood pressure before pregnancy may increase miscarriage riskHigher blood pressure prior to conception may increase the risk of miscarriage, even in women not diagnosed with hypertension. The study involved women who had already experienced at least one pregnancy loss and were trying again. If confirmed, the findings imply that lowering heart disease risk factors in young adulthood may also improve reproductive health.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nuclear waste might be a thing of the pastMatthew Fortunato starts his days mixing chemicals in radiochemistry professor Konstantinos Kavallieratos' lab. It is a task he knows well. With a practiced hand, he collects just the right amount of powders and liquids and blends them together in a flask. He is not distracted by the intense, fishy smell or the bubbling of the liquid. He is focused. His movements are quick and precise.
10h
Science : NPR

You May Live Longer By Severely Restricting Calories, Scientists SayScientists have long been fascinated with whether dramatically restricting the amount of food we eat can help us live longer. New research suggests it might, but the question is, is it worth it? (Image credit: VisualField/Getty Images)
10h
Science : NPR

Failure To Save A Child In Wartime Inspires Wound-Healing TechAs a soldier, Kit Parker saw horrific injuries. As a scientist, he led an effort to create high-tech dressings that speed healing and reduce scarring. (Image credit: Courtesy of Michael Rosnach/Harvard University)
10h
NYT > Science

‘I Can’t Stop’: Schools Struggle With Vaping ExplosionSchool and health officials struggling with a sudden influx of easily concealed e-cigarettes fear vaping is creating a new generation of nicotine addicts.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Alibaba acquisition values meal-deliverer Ele.me at $9.5 bnChinese e-commerce giant Alibaba said Monday it was acquiring full ownership of leading food-delivery firm Ele.me in a deal that values the Shanghai-based start-up at $9.5 billion.
11h
Viden

Rejsen er slut: Kinesisk rumfartøj brænder op over StillehavetHovedparten af rumfartøjet brændte op i mødet med atmosfæren over Stillehavet.
12h
New Scientist - News

Estonia to give genetic testing and advice to 100,000 residentsEstonia is to become the first nation to give state-sponsored genetic advice on health and disease risks, and plans to extend the scheme to all its residents
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Saks Fifth Avenue data breached: parent firmA hack at Saks and Lord & Taylor stores in North America has compromised customer payment data, their parent company announced on Sunday.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Two degrees no longer seen as global warming guardrailLimiting global warming to two degrees Celsius will not prevent destructive and deadly climate impacts, as once hoped, dozens of experts concluded in a score of scientific studies released Monday.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China's 'space dream': A Long March to the moonThe plunge back to Earth of a defunct Chinese space laboratory will not slow down Beijing's ambitious plans to send humans to the moon.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China space lab mostly burns up on re-entry in south PacificTiangong-1 Chinese EarthChina's defunct Tiangong 1 space station mostly burned up on re-entry into the atmosphere over the central South Pacific on Monday, Chinese space authorities said.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Elon Musk makes light of Tesla's woes in April 1 Twitter prankTesla Autopilot ModelElon Musk, the flamboyant boss of Tesla and SpaceX, took to Twitter on April Fool's day to joke the electric car-maker, which has been rocked by bad news, was going bankrupt.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Links between eating red meat and distal colon cancer in womenA new study suggests that a diet free from red meat significantly reduces the risk of a type of colon cancer in women living in the United Kingdom. When comparing the effects of certain diets to cancer development in specific subsites of the colon, scientists found that those regularly eating red meat compared to a red meat-free diet had higher rates of distal colon cancer -- cancer found on the d
13h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Dumping pesticides, using ducks insteadBernard Poujol believes ducks are the future for rice farms, but he hasn't quite perfected his technique.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

People use emotion to persuade, even when it could backfireWe intuitively use more emotional language to enhance our powers of persuasion, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The research shows that people tend toward appeals that aren't simply more positive or negative but are infused with emotionality, even when they're trying to sway an audience that may not be receptive to s
15h
Big Think

Random fact roundup: Puppies, monarchy, and Abraham LincolnWhat do puppies, world monarchies, and Abraham Lincoln have in common? Why, they're all part of our awesome series (drumroll, please) Random Fact Roundup! Read More
15h
Scientific American Content: Global

Mysteries of Life in the UniverseHow did life begin on Earth? Does it exist elsewhere? What would those life forms be like? These fundamental questions about the nature of life and our own cosmic significance are endlessly... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
16h
New on MIT Technology Review

DNA tests for IQ are coming, but it might not be smart to take oneScientists have linked hundreds of genes to intelligence. One psychologist says it’s time to test school kids.
16h
Science-Based Medicine

Cell phones and cancer: random chance in clinical trialsThe full results of the National Toxicology Program's study of cell phones and cancer are finally in. They are somewhat complicated, but ultimately do not support the idea that cell phones can cause cancer.
16h
New Scientist - News

Chinese space station Tiangong-1 has finally fallen from the skyTiangong-1 Chinese EarthAfter two years of spiralling closer and closer to Earth, the Chinese space station Tiangong-1 has come crashing through the atmosphere over the Pacific Ocean
17h
NYT > Science

Tiangong-1, China’s First Space Station, Crashes Into the PacificTiangong-1 Chinese SpaceChina lost control of the craft in 2016, and sky watchers had been waiting months for it to re-enter the atmosphere, unsure where or when it would land.
18h
Live Science

Chinese Space Station Comes Tumbling to Earth Over Pacific OceanAfter weeks of uncertainty about when and where it would crash, the Chinese space station Tiangong-1 has tumbled to Earth.
18h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Tiangong-1: Defunct China space lab comes down over South PacificTiangong-1 Chinese EarthChina's defunct Tiangong-1 space lab mostly burnt up on re-entering the Earth's atmosphere.
18h
Science | The Guardian

Tiangong-1 crash: Chinese space station comes down in Pacific OceanTributes on Weibo as officials say craft, which had been out of control since 2016, mostly burnt up on re-entry As China’s Tiangong-1 space station hurtled toward Earth on Monday, burning up as it entered the atmosphere, Chinese residents wished the spacecraft a final farewell. “Goodbye Tiangong-1. You are our hero,” one user wrote on the Chinese microblog Weibo, under the hashtag “Goodbye Tiango
18h
Science : NPR

The Scarcity Trap: Why We Keep Digging When We're Stuck In A HoleHave you ever noticed that when something important is missing in your life, your brain can only seem to focus on that missing thing?Two researchers have dubbed this phenomenon scarcity. (Image credit: Gary Waters /Getty Images/Ikon Images)
18h
Big Think

Your own blood could become a mosquito's worst enemyMosquitos kill about 725,000 people a year... making them the deadliest animal in the world. Our own blood could kill them, thanks to a new study of an old drug. Read More
19h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Mission to demonstrate space junk techA UK-led project aims to showcase how space debris could be removed from orbit.
19h
NeuWrite West

Women’s visibility in science and academiaThis article is part of an ongoing blog series, titled Inequality in STEM: a Dive Into the Data . In this series, we cover recent research exploring and quantifying inequality in STEM. We'll discuss different aspects of inequality, including barriers to career advancement and a chilly social climate, as well as the efficacy of various interventions to combat bias. Our goal with these pieces is to
20h
Futurity.org

Can ‘HoneyBot’ keep factories safe from hackers?It’s small enough to fit inside a shoebox, yet this robot on four wheels has a big mission: protecting factories and other large facilities from hackers. It’s the HoneyBot. The diminutive device lures in digital troublemakers who have set their sights on industrial facilities and then tricks them into giving up valuable information to cybersecurity professionals. The decoy robot arrives as more a
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Climate change could raise food insecurity riskWeather extremes caused by climate change could raise the risk of food shortages in many countries, new research suggests.
20h
Futurity.org

New models better predict how much methane cows makeResearchers have found a way to predict methane emissions from dairy cattle using more accurate models. Because feed dry-matter intake is the key factor for methane production prediction, the new models require readily available feed-related variables. The study involved individual data from more than 5,200 lactating dairy cows, assembled through a collaboration of animal scientists from 15 count
20h
Futurity.org

‘Social jet lag’ can lead to lower gradesStudents whose circadian rhythms are out of sync with their class schedules may get lower grades due to “social jet lag,” a condition where peak alertness times are at odds with work, school, or other demands, a new study suggests. “We found that the majority of students were being jet-lagged by their class times…” For the study, researchers tracked the personal daily online activity profiles of
20h
Futurity.org

How long does it take to make a friend?It takes more than 200 hours before someone can be considered a close friend, according to a new study that explores how long it typically takes to move through the deepening stages of friendship. That means time spent hanging out, joking around, playing video games, and the like, says Jeffrey Hall, associate professor of communication studies at the University of Kansas. Hours spent working toge
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate change could raise food insecurity riskWeather extremes caused by climate change could raise the risk of food shortages in many countries, new research suggests.
20h
Futurity.org

Supernova shot ‘runaway star’ into space at high speedAstronomers may have found why a yellow supergiant star is moving through space at such high speed. As they report in a paper accepted to the Astronomical Journal , the team tracked one yellow supergiant star cruising along at about 300,000 miles per hour, a velocity that would get you from Earth to the moon in about 48 minutes. Kathryn Neugent, a University of Washington doctoral student in astr
21h
Big Think

Easter Sunday: A history of dying-and-rising godsToday millions are celebrating the resurrection of Christ, yet there were many gods before him with similar stories. Read More
22h

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