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The Atlantic

Scott Pruitt Bypassed the White House to Give Big Raises to Favorite AidesScott Pruitt EPAIn early March, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt approached the White House with a request: He wanted substantial pay raises for two of his closest aides. The aides, Sarah Greenwalt and Millan Hupp, were part of the small group of staffers who had traveled with Pruitt to Washington from Oklahoma, where he had served as attorney general. Greenwalt, a 30-year-old who had w
6h
Ingeniøren

500.000 kilometer før en elbil er grønnere end en dieselbil... eller hvad?Om en elbil er grøn afgøres af, hvor strømmen kommer fra.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study suggests pasta can be part of a healthy diet without packing on the poundsCarbohydrates get a lot of bad press and blame for the obesity epidemic, but a new study suggests that this negative attention may not be deserved for pasta.
11h

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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Memory training needs to target specific difficulties to be effective, suggests studyA recent study suggests that training programs can help, but only if they are tailored towards an individual's specific memory difficulty, such as trouble remembering faces, voices or recent events.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

River's evolution unfolds with fresh mix of dating techniquesScientists have dated the fluvial terraces of the Lower Moulouya river in northeast Morocco. An unprecedented combination of dating methods has helped to construct a chronological framework to decipher environmental changes over the past 1.5 million years at a local and regional level.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

400-year-old documents reveal evidence of Japanese opium production and winemakingIn 2016, researchers reported that a Kyusyu lord ordered his people to produce wine in the 17th century. Further research has revealed that he also ordered the production of opium. It is thought that wine was used as gifts and medicine, and opium for medicine. The documents reveal that while the Japanese government was considering a ban on Christianity, the Hosokawa family seems to have actively i
now
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Coral reefs protect coasts from severe stormsCoral reefs can naturally protect coasts from tropical cyclones by reducing the impact of large waves before they reach the shore, according to scientists. Tropical cyclones wreak havoc on coastal infrastructure, marine habitats and coastal populations across the world. However, experts say that for coastlines facing a direct cyclone impact, a fringing reef can protect the beach from extensive ero
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genome of deadly, drug-resistant pathogen analyzedInfections by microbes like bacteria and fungi that don't respond to available antimicrobial treatments pose an increasingly dangerous public health threat around the world. In the United States alone, such infections kill 23,000 people annually. To better understand the molecular drivers behind resistance, researchers recently conducted a whole-genome analysis of an unusual bacterial strain cultu
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ionizing radiation found to soften tumor cell microenvironmentResearchers aim to unlock how irradiation -- part of radiation therapy in cancer treatment -- might alter the mechanical properties of the microenvironment. The team demonstrated that ionizing radiation can reduce the stiffness of both the extracellular matrix of an extracted tumor and an isolated matrix of collagen fibers. The results pave the way for irradiation to be used to create matrices wit
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Losing your nest egg can kill youA sudden loss of net worth in middle or older age is associated with a significantly higher risk of death, reports a new study. When people lose a big chunk of their total wealth during a two-year period, they are 50 percent more likely to die in the next 20 years. More than 25 percent of Americans had a wealth shock over the 20 years of the study. This is the first look at the long-term effects o
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Popular Science

Here's a great excuse to stop mowing your lawnAnimals Introducing the lazy way to make your yard into a pollinator haven. Around the world, bee populations have plummeted because of habitat loss and pesticide use. But green spaces within cities and towns can give bees a much-needed refuge.
16min
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Paul Nakasone Will Have to Balance NSA Needs With US Cyber Command BackgroundThe appointment of Paul Nakasone raises the question again: Should the NSA and Cyber Command be controlled by one man?
17min
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Monitor detects dangerously low white blood cell levelsMIT researchers have now developed a portable device that could be used to monitor patients' white blood cell levels at home, without taking blood samples.
19min
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Connection of sea level and groundwater missing link in climate responseAbout 250 million years ago, when the Earth had no ice caps and the water around the equator was too hot for reptiles, sea level still rose and fell over time. Now, an international team of researchers has developed a way to track sea-level rise and fall and to tease out what caused the changes in the absence of ice sheets.
19min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Memory training needs to target specific difficulties to be effective, suggests studyA recently published Baycrest study suggests that training programs can help, but only if they are tailored towards an individual's specific memory difficulty, such as trouble remembering faces, voices or recent events.
19min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ancient paper art, kirigami, poised to improve smart clothingIn a study published April 2 in the journal Advanced Materials, a University at Buffalo-led research team describes how kirigami has inspired its efforts to build malleable electronic circuits. Their innovation -- creating tiny sheets of strong yet bendable electronic materials made of select polymers and nanowires -- could lead to improvements in smart clothing, electronic skin and other applicat
19min
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Flare-responsive hydrogel developed to treat arthritisBWH bioengineers and physicians team up to develop a better delivery system for getting anti-inflammatory therapies to the sites where they are needed most.
19min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Losing your nest egg can kill youA sudden loss of net worth in middle or older age is associated with a significantly higher risk of death, reports a new study. When people lose a big chunk of their total wealth during a two-year period, they are 50 percent more likely to die in the next 20 years. More than 25 percent of Americans had a wealth shock over the 20 years of the study. This is the first look at the long-term effects o
19min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ionizing radiation found to soften tumor cell microenvironmentResearchers from Vanderbilt aim to unlock how irradiation -- part of radiation therapy in cancer treatment -- might alter the mechanical properties of the microenvironment. The team demonstrated that ionizing radiation can reduce the stiffness of both the extracellular matrix of an extracted tumor and an isolated matrix of collagen fibers. Appearing this week in APL Bioengineering, the results pav
19min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Use of solid fuels for heating, cooking in China associated with increased risk of deathUse of coal, wood or charcoal for cooking and heating in rural China was associated with a greater risk of death, with that risk decreased by having switched to gas, electricity or central heating, or using ventilation.
19min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sudden loss of wealth associated with increased risk of deathLoss of wealth over two years among middle-aged and older adults in the US was associated with an increased risk of death.
19min
Scientific American Content: Global

It's Not My Fault, My Brain Implant Made Me Do ItWhere does responsibility lie if a person acts under the influence of their brain implant? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
22min
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Why These Bumblebees Are Wearing Itty-Bitty QR CodesResearchers have been super-gluing little barcodes to bumblebees in order to track their movements in unprecedented detail.
23min
Ingeniøren

Patentkontor drukner i gode opfindelserEuropæiske firmaer udvikler og forsker på livet løs. Hittepåsomheden bliver belønnet af Den Europæiske Patentmyndighed, som melder om et rekordstort antal nye patenter.
35min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ionizing radiation found to soften tumor cell microenvironmentNearly half of all cancer patients receive radiation therapy to curb the growth of malignant cells. But little is known about how ionizing radiation affects the extracellular matrix (ECM), a patchwork of proteins and other biomolecules that surrounds cells and plays a vital role in their shape, movement and signaling functions. One team of researchers from Vanderbilt University aims to unlock how
38min
New on MIT Technology Review

Apple ditching Intel chips in Macs would be a smart, but damaging, moveApple Intel Macs
39min
The Atlantic

The Geography of OppressionEditor’s Note: Read The Atlantic ’s special coverage of Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in Memphis, but his death reverberated across the United States. Memphis did not feel the full flames of riots in April 1968, in part because of King’s organizing apparatus. But his message of nonviolence was not enough to hold back the tide of rage that brought million
39min
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Cell discovery could help with research on genetic diseasesCell discovery could help with research on genetic diseases Research carried out by the University of Kent has discovered the first data on an organelle that is really important in human cells in an ancient organism distantly related to humans.The discovery will enable scientists to study the breadth and depth of cell biology. This has implications for research into autoimmune diseases like Alzhei
40min
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Petrichor, the smell of rain (video)The smell that accompanies a spring shower is so evocative that it has its own word: petrichor. Watch as Reactions explores the unique chemistry behind the smell of rain: https://youtu.be/2txpbrjnLiY.
40min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Real-time monitoring could reduce First Nations water advisories by one third, study findsUniversity of Guelph researchers have found that drinking water advisories in First Nations communities caused by equipment malfunction, inadequate disinfection and high microbial counts could be reduced by introducing real-time monitoring systems.
40min
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Researchers develop nanoparticle films for high-density data storageNew nanoparticle-based films that are more than 80 times thinner than a human hair may provide materials that can holographically archive more than 1,000 times more data than a DVD in a 10-by-10-centimeter piece of film.
40min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mantle minerals offer clues to deep Earth's compositionScientists now have a clearer picture of the Earth's mantle, thanks to Michigan State University research published in the current issue of Nature Communications.
40min
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

Math can help uncover cancer's secrets | Irina KarevaIrina Kareva translates biology into mathematics and vice versa. She writes mathematical models that describe the dynamics of cancer, with the goal of developing new drugs that target tumors. "The power and beauty of mathematical modeling lies in the fact that it makes you formalize, in a very rigorous way, what we think we know," Kareva says. "It can help guide us to where we should keep looking,
42min
Quanta Magazine

Quantum Correlations Reverse Thermodynamic Arrow of TimeSome laws aren’t meant to be broken. Take the second law of thermodynamics, which states that entropy — a measure of disorder — never decreases in an isolated system. Glass shatters, cream disperses in coffee, eggs scramble — but never the reverse. This is why heat always moves from hot to cold: Doing so increases the overall entropy. The law is so fundamental to our physical reality that some ph
51min
New on MIT Technology Review

MIT severs ties to company promoting fatal brain uploadingA startup called Nectome collected $200,000 from people hoping to become digitally immortal through suicide.
53min
The Atlantic

Hollywood and the Limits of China's Box OfficeChina’s moviegoers have long figured into Hollywood accounting. More than a decade ago , the world’s most populous country started opening new theaters at a prodigious rate and began permitting the release of more and more American films. Even though U.S. studios make less money on movies released in China than they do, collectively, elsewhere around the globe, the Chinese market is still vital a
56min
The Atlantic

What a Picture From the Sky Reveals About OppressionIn honor of the MLK Special Issue, The Atlantic commissioned artist and photographer LaToya Ruby Frazier to photograph Chicago, Baltimore, and Memphis from the air—cities that bear MLK’s legacy. In her aerial photography, Frazier explains, the specter of oppression is writ large. “The history is written on that landscape and the body of its inhabitants,” says Frazier. “It became very clear to me
56min
Scientific American Content: Global

A Potential Benefit to Memories of TerrorismAmidst the horror there is altruism, which leaves a deep impression -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
59min
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Sulfur amino acid restriction could amount to new dietary approach to healthThe longevity and health improvements seen in animals on sulfur amino acid-restricted diets could translate to people, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers who recently conducted a review of published studies. More research is needed to confirm the benefits in people, the scientists said.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

This is the environmental footprint of the egg industryIn recent years, egg production has been in the spotlight for animal welfare issues. While in most European countries the number of farms with free-range hens increases, in Spain 93% of laying hens are still caged. Added to this are the effects that the industry generates on the environment. A team of Spanish scientists reveals the environmental cost of egg production in a typical farm in Spain.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

High levels of hazardous chemicals found in plastics collected from Lake GenevaThe first analysis of plastic litter from Lake Geneva finds toxic chemicals like cadmium, mercury and lead - - whose levels sometimes exceed the maximum permitted under EU law. The presence of chemicals that are now restricted or banned in plastic production reflects how old the plastic litter could be -- and indicates that like oceans, freshwater habitats are also affected by plastic pollution.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Human daily rhythms: Clocks vs. light/dark cycleFrom time use surveys in 17 European countries and two American countries (located from 35º to 61º latitude) this study characterizes laborer's primary activities and get them positioned along the daily and yearly cycle of light and dark.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A telescope larger than the Earth makes a sharp image of the formation of black hole jetsAn international team of researchers has imaged newly forming jets of plasma from a massive black hole with unprecedented accuracy. Radio images made with a combination of telescopes in space and on the ground resolve the jet structure merely a couple of hundred black hole radii or 12 light days from its launching site.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists create 'Swiss army knife' for electron beamsDESY scientists have created a miniature particle accelerator for electrons that can perform four different functions at the push of a button. The experimental device is driven by a Terahertz radiation source and can accelerate, compress, focus and analyze electron bunches in a beam. Its active structures measure just a few millimeters across. The developers present their 'Segmented Terahertz Elec
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cells are pretty much smarter than previously supposedCells' G protein-coupled receptor signaling system is capable to pass more than 2 bits of information per one interaction with external stimuli. It means cells receptors could recognize different concentrations -- at least four -- of incoming signal, rather than transmit just 'yes-or-no' information regarding the received signal as it was estimated earlier.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cation-mixing induced highly efficient sodium storage for layered cathodesAiming at solving the structural arrangement for layered sodium storage cathodes, Haoshen Zhou and Shaohua Guo's group from Nanjing University subtly introduced the cation-mixing into sodium layers to give rise to 'pinning effect,' thereby greatly stabilizing the layered framework for highly efficient sodium storage. The research results were recently reported in Science Bulletin as a cover story.
1h
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Resonances to 'taste' loins and hams without opening themResearchers from the University of Extremadura (Spain) have developed a methodology that allows us to know the properties of hams and whole loins using magnetic resonance imaging, the same non-invasive technique used in medicine. The method has already been made available to the meat industry.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Water purification breakthrough uses sunlight and 'hydrogels'Engineers at the University of Texas at Austin, have created a low-cost, clean and safe water purification device using only natural levels of sunlight and inexpensive gel technology which could be used by communities in drought-affected areas or victims of natural disasters with limited access to clean water.
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NYT > Science

Nonfiction: A Reckoning With an Imperfect Science in ‘Blue Dreams’Lauren Slater’s new book chronicles the history of mood-regulating drugs, weaving in her own lifelong struggle to get well and stay well.
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Ingeniøren

Kraftfulde droner kan være starten på et nyt norsk industrieventyrI Norge hopper Griff Aviation op og falder ned på, hvad droner normalt bruges til. Grifferne skal blandt andet kunne erstatte kranløft offshore.
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Futurity.org

Tadpoles eat like crazy before remodeling their gutsTadpoles are voracious eaters, chomping down all the vegetation in their paths. New research explains why. “If you watch some species of tadpole while they’re eating, they look like tiny piranhas.” “One of the findings from our work is that during the tadpole stage, before they initiate metamorphosis, they don’t have any of these homeostatic negative controls of food intake: they have their feedi
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Parkinson and binge eating: A new study investigates the reason whyThe results of a new study show that 'binge eating,' which affects some Parkinson patients, would be associated to an impairment of a cognitive function called 'working memory.' This deficit would cause the patients to gorge themselves on, since it would prevent them keeping in memory the long-term goal of a healthy eating behavior. The authors have also investigated reward sensitivity and its com
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Long-term caffeine worsens symptoms associated with Alzheimer's diseaseA study coordinated by the Institute of Neuroscience of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona and in collaboration with the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden provides evidence that a long-term consumption of caffeine has negative effects for Alzheimer's disease, worsening the neuropsychiatric symptoms appearing in the majority of those affected by the disorder. The research was recently published in
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How to cool a smartphoneNUST MISIS scientists have developed composites which conduct heat many times better than their counterparts and are even subject to simple and cheap processing. By using the newly obtained technology in modern electronics it is possible to solve the problem of PCB overheating. The research results were published in the Journal of Alloys and Compounds.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Great magma erup­tions had 2 sourcesResearch at Finnish Museum of Natural History may explain controversies related to great magma eruptions: the magmas had in fact two contrasting sources. One of them was the upper mantle, as suggested in previous research, whereas the other was most probably a deep mantle plume.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

High-speed and on-silicon-chip graphene blackbody emittersHigh-speed light emitters integrated on silicon chips can enable novel architectures for silicon-based optoelectronics. However, compound-semiconductor-based light emitters face major challenges for their integration with a silicon-based platform because of their difficulty of direct fabrication on a silicon substrate. Here, high-speed, highly-integrated graphene-based on-silicon-chip blackbody em
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study says meat protein is unhealthy, but protein from nuts and seeds is heart smartA study conducted by researchers in California and France has found that meat protein is associated with a sharp increased risk of heart disease while protein from nuts and seeds is beneficial for the human heart.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers analyze genome of deadly, drug-resistant pathogenInfections by microbes like bacteria and fungi that don't respond to available antimicrobial treatments pose an increasingly dangerous public health threat around the world. In the United States alone, such infections kill 23,000 people annually. To better understand the molecular drivers behind resistance, researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, Georgia, re
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

River's evolution unfolds with fresh mix of dating techniquesGriffith University has participated in the first international dating study of the fluvial terraces of the Lower Moulouya river in northeast Morocco.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tech's design goal: get users to click 'yes'Three years ago when Facebook Messenger users opened the app on an Android device, they were greeted by an adorable cartoon yeti. It was shown texting a big pink heart. Below it, a prompt read: "Text anyone in your phone."
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Futurity.org

Spear tips show scientists were wrong on Ice Age human travelA study of several fluted spear points from Alaska and western Canada prove that the Ice Age peopling of the Americas was much more complex than previously believed. The findings could change how we view the traveling patterns and routes of early humans from 14,000 to 12,000 years ago as they settled in numerous parts of North America, researchers say. Using digital methods of analyses utilized f
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Science : NPR

WATCH: See How Leeches Can Be A Surgeon's SidekickThe idea of using leeches to treat ailments is ancient — and no longer in favor. But now these blood-suckers are gaining new respect as a doctor's helper during surgery. (Image credit: KQED)
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The Physics Behind a Fake Flying Samurai BattleQuality is one sign of a video hoax, but physics gives you indisputable evidence.
1h
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A Nighttime Underwater Spectacle Off the Coast of the PhilippinesScott Tuason documents the extraordinary creatures he sees while blackwater diving.
1h
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6 Speaker Deals: Sony, JBL, Ultimate Ears, InsigniaWe've found awesome deals on some rockin' speakers.
1h
Big Think

Jordan Peterson: Conversation requires listening, not just talkingIn 12 Rules For Life, Jordan Peterson shows why listening is the most important aspect of any conversation. Read More
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The Atlantic

'Free-Range' Parenting's Unfair Double StandardEvery few decades, a new idea emerges about the “right” way to raise children. The 1990s saw the rise of the helicopter parent, those anxious middle- and upper-middle-class mothers and fathers who hover, imagining the worst-case scenario. Their fears led many states to pass laws aimed at keeping kids safe, including statutes that punish parents who leave their children at home alone or unattended
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The Scientist RSS

NIH Turned Down Investigators Who Provoked Ire From Alcohol IndustryAn email exchange and an unusual meeting suggest a connection between an institute's pursuit of industry support and the rejection of a grant application.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers propose key elements of antimicrobial stewardship for hospitals worldwideIn a study to be published in the journal Clinical Microbiology and Infection, researchers identify essential elements of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) that could be applicable to hospitals in both high-income and low-income countries.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Coral reefs protect coasts from severe stormsCoral reefs can naturally protect coasts from tropical cyclones by reducing the impact of large waves before they reach the shore, according to scientists.Tropical cyclones wreak havoc on coastal infrastructure, marine habitats and coastal populations across the world. However, Dr. Michael Cuttler, from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at the University of Western Australia, say
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

400-year-old documents reveal evidence of Japanese opium production and winemakingIn 2016, Kumamoto University researchers reported that a Kyusyu lord ordered his people to produce wine in the 17th century. Further research has revealed that he also ordered the production of opium. It is thought that wine was used as gifts and medicine, and opium for medicine. The documents reveal that while the Japanese government was considering a ban on Christianity, the Hosokawa family seem
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

River's evolution unfolds with fresh mix of dating techniquesGriffith University has participated in the first international dating study of the fluvial terraces of the Lower Moulouya river in northeast Morocco. An unprecedented combination of dating methods has helped to construct a chronological framework to decipher environmental changes over the past 1.5 million years at a local and regional level.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Predicting water storage beyond 2-5 years over global semiarid regionsScientists from Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences made skillful prediction for terrestrial water storage over one-third of land areas (excluding Antarctic, Greenland, and desert regions) beyond two to five years, especially for semiarid regions where deep soil water and aquifer have a long memory and a non-negligible variability. The hindcast skill can be further enhanc
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers analyze genome of deadly, drug-resistant pathogenInfections by microbes like bacteria and fungi that don't respond to available antimicrobial treatments pose an increasingly dangerous public health threat around the world. In the United States alone, such infections kill 23,000 people annually. To better understand the molecular drivers behind resistance, researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, Georgia, re
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

iOS 11.3 lets you monitor your iPhone battery and stop Apple from slowing it downApple has released the highly anticipated software update for the iPhone that promises to give you greater visibility into your own health—as well as the health of what could be a failing handset battery.
1h
Ingeniøren

Smartphonekamera får hjerneoperationer til at glide lettereKirurger har med succes benyttet en smartphone koblet for enden af et endoskop.
1h
Popular Science

Protect your privacy online with these data-guarding browser extensionsDIY How to fight web trackers. As you explore the internet, trackers can follow you, recording data about your online activities. Use these browser extensions to stop them in their...tracks.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tesla boosts Model 3 production but still short of goalEmbattled electric car maker Tesla said Tuesday it ramped up quarterly production on its Model 3 sedan, although it still fell short of its goal of 2,500 a week.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers are using machine learning to understand microbial relationshipsThe ecosystem in and around the Amazon River is the most bio-diverse in the world. But it has some competition when considering the roughly thirty feet of the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract. This microbiome—the sum total of microorganisms in a particular environment—has been the research focus of late for Carnegie Mellon Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) Professor Radu Marculescu.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In zebrafish, the cholera bacterium sets off a surprising flushResearchers experimenting with live zebrafish witnessed a 200-percent increase in the strength of intestinal contractions soon after exposure to the cholera-causing bacterium Vibrio cholerae, leading to expulsion of native gut bacteria.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In zebrafish, the cholera bacterium sets off a surprising flushResearchers experimenting with live zebrafish witnessed a 200 percent increase in the strength of intestinal contractions soon after exposure to the cholera-causing bacterium Vibrio cholerae, leading to expulsion of native gut bacteria.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Oldest Neanderthal wooden tools found in SpainArchaeological excavations in Northern Spain have revealed several episodes of Neanderthal occupations with preserved wooden remains. The excavation revealed two very well preserved wooden tools; one of them is a 15 cm long digging stick.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Deep inside Perseus A – A telescope larger than the Earth makes a sharp image of the formation of black hole jets in the core of a radio galaxyResearchers have imaged newly forming jets of plasma from a massive black hole with unprecedented accuracy. Radio images made with a combination of telescopes in space and on the ground resolve the jet structure merely a couple of hundred black hole radii or 12 light days from its launching site.
2h
Futurity.org

We’ll pay more for the foods we’re cravingWhen we’re craving unhealthy foods, we’re willing to pay more for them, new research indicates. The study also shows that we’re willing to pay disproportionately more for bigger portion sizes of the food items we crave. The research, which appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , identifies an obstacle to healthy living. “In other words, craving Snickers does not make you
2h
Dagens Medicin

Holbæk Sygehus får ny vicedirektørTil juni tiltræder Lone Bjørklund stillingen som vicedirektør med sundhedsfaglig ansvar på Holbæk Sygehus.
2h
Dagens Medicin

Jurist: Frifindelse i Svendborgsag sikrer ikke læger fremadrettetFrifindelsen i Svendborgsagen er så speget, at læger fortsat risikerer at blive dømt for grovere forsømmelse i kommende sager, hvis ikke der kommer klarere regler på området, advarer jurist.
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Dagens Medicin

Der mangler en plan for sundhedshuseTages det ikke alvorligt, kan det blive en ny kampplads mellem regioner og kommuner.
2h
Ingeniøren

Trump vil løsne krav til benzinslugereObama-administrationen krævede at nye biler i 2025 skulle kunne køre omtrent 40 procent længere på literen end biler solgt i 2010. Men nu vil Trump-administrationen løsne kravene.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Human daily rhythms: Clocks vs light/dark cycleA new study analyses daily primary activities of European laborers and the sources of social synchronization.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Smartphone app performs better than traditional exam in cardiac assessmentA smartphone application using the phone's camera function performed better than traditional physical examination to assess blood flow in a wrist artery for patients undergoing coronary angiography, according to a randomized trial.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Non-toxic filamentous virus helps quickly dissipate heat generated by electronic devicesScientists have discovered that the film constructed by assembling a nontoxic filamentous virus functions as a heat dissipation material, and that can be simply prepared by drying the virus aqueous solution at room temperature. This discovery is expected to elucidate the mechanism of new heat transport in electronics.
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Futurity.org

Calcium supplements may up risk of colon polypsCalcium supplements, taken with or without vitamin D, may increase the risk of small growths in the bowel called polyps, a new trial of more than 2,000 people shows. “This study examines the risk of a really interesting class of colon polyps called serrated polyps,” says lead author Seth D. Crockett, assistant professor of gastroenterology and hepatology in the University of North Carolina School
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spring forward: European grid fixes lag that slowed clocksOne excuse fewer for being late: electricity grid operators in Europe have fixed a glitch that had slowed down countless clocks across the continent for months.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: The cat in OrionWhat is the first creature that comes to mind when you look at the dark cloud in this image? Perhaps a dark kitten with a vivid white nose, front paws stretching towards the right of the frame and tail up towards the left? Or perhaps a fox, running with its mouth open and looking ahead, its vigilant eyes pointing to the right?
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Dagens Medicin

Efter 16 timers forhandling: Intet gennembrud i OK18Overenskomstforhandlingerne tordner fortsat derudaf. Lægerne håber på at nå en aftale, så konflikten afblæses.
2h
Scientific American Content: Global

How to Foster Diversity in Science through StorytellingMen’s scientific stories and receive greater coverage in media, whereas women’s contributions to progress are notoriously absent -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
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A Drag Queen’s Guide to Protecting Your Privacy on Facebook By Breaking the RulesThere are other things you can do besides deleting your account.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genes and environment have equal influence in learning for rich and poor kids, study findsMore than 40 years ago, psychologist Sandra Scarr put forth a provocative idea: that genetic influence on children's cognitive abilities is linked to their family's income. The wealthier the family, the more influence genes have on brain development, the thinking went.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Four EyesAncient monitor lizards had an extra set of 'eyes' on top of their heads.
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The Scientist RSS

Bioengineers Use Yeast to Manufacture DrugsThe yeast's output of noscapine, a cough suppressant naturally made by poppies, is 18,000-fold higher than previous attempts.
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The Scientist RSS

April 2018 TS CrosswordTry your hand at a sciency brain teaser.
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The Scientist RSS

April 2018 TS Crossword Puzzle AnswersSee how well you did.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study shows changes in anatomy would have made walking easier without reducing muscles for climbing in early homininsAn international team of researchers has found evidence that suggests evolutionary changes in anatomy would have made walking more economical without reducing utility of muscles for climbing in early hominins. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes studying bones and fossils from human ancestors and how they fit together to determine their
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cognitive system for the predictive maintenance of production facilitiesAt the Hanover Trade Fair from April 23 – 27, 2018, Fraunhofer will demonstrate the prototype of a new cognitive system for the predictive maintenance of production facilities. Intelligent battery-powered acoustic sensors process audio signals from machines and systems on the spot. From the information that is forwarded wirelessly to an evaluation unit, it is possible to draw conclusions about the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

From the quantum level to the car batteryNew developments require new materials. Until recently, these have been developed mostly by tedious experiments in the laboratory. Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Algorithms and Scientific Computing SCAI in Sankt Augustin are now significantly shortening this time-consuming and cost-intensive process with their "Virtual Material Design" approach and the specially developed Tremolo-X so
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

All-purpose talent in aircraft manufacturingIn aircraft manufacturing, much of the milling, drilling and assembly is still done by hand. This is because the raw components vary not only in size and design, but also in shape accuracy. Small differences are unavoidable in extremely lightweight and elastic materials, which poses a challenge for automated processing. Working with an industrial consortium, Fraunhofer researchers have now develop
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Human bony labyrinth used as an indicator of dispersal from AfricaAn international team of researchers has found that it is possible to use the human bony labyrinth of the ear as an indicator of dispersal from Africa. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of hundreds of ancient ear bones from around the world and the differences they found among them.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The environmental footprint of the egg industryIn recent years, egg production has been in the spotlight for animal welfare issues. While the number of European farms with free-range hens has increased, in Spain, 93 percent of laying hens are still caged. This also contributes to the industry's environmental burden. In the rest of the EU, the figure is much lower (40 percent) due to a growing concern for animal welfare. A team of Spanish scien
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA funds project to study feasibility of using robot bees to study Mars from a new perspectiveNASA has announced that it has awarded funding to a combined team of researchers from the University of Alabama and an unnamed team in Japan for development of a new kind of Mars explorer. The project team has been awarded $125,000 to develop what NASA calls Marsbees—a swarm of robot bees that could fly in the thin Martian atmosphere and deliver information from their sensors.
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Scientific American Content: Global

New England Is Sitting on a Bed of Hot RocksThe U.S. Northeast may be more geologically active than thought -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Live Science

NASA Has a Plan to Put Robot Bees on MarsThese Marsbees would flap their way around the Red Planet, mapping the terrain and collecting air samples.
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Popular Science

Rainbows are (literally) in the eye of the beholderScience Magical phenomena are even cooler when you understand the science behind them. Rainbows are perhaps the closest things we have to real magic. They appear like beautiful, ghostly apparitions in the sky just as the rain clears and the sun peeks out…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Transmitting measuring data wireless in real timeSensors continuously record measurements in plant and machinery to check that everything is running according to plan and to enable any errors in the industrial production environment to be recognized at an early stage. However, as a rule, evaluation of the data is decentralized and takes place after a time lag. In contrast to this, the 5G wireless standard permits direct, wireless measurement in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why good people turn bad onlineOn the evening of 17 February 2018, Professor Mary Beard posted on Twitter a photograph of herself crying. The eminent University of Cambridge classicist, who has almost 200,000 Twitter followers, was distraught after receiving a storm of abuse online. This was the reaction to a comment she had made about Haiti. She also tweeted: "I speak from the heart (and of course I may be wrong). But the crap
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Half of Earth's satellites restrict use of climate dataScientists and policymakers need satellite data to understand and address climate change. Yet data from more than half of unclassified Earth-observing satellites is restricted in some way, rather than shared openly.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research may explain controversies related to great magma eruptionsThe modern continents were formed when Pangea broke into pieces during the Mesozoic period. The splitting of Africa from Antarctica started with great magma eruptions that flooded over an area millions of square kilometres wide.
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Futurity.org

Big data can show us the ‘magic of cities’Big data can help determine how to increase human connection in cities via things like increased transportation, while reducing obstacles like crime and segregation, research suggests. Luis Bettencourt is a theoretical physicist by training, but rather than study black holes or string theory, he uses data to better understand cities in new and predictive ways. He’s spent his career studying compl
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study reveals who is spreading online conspiraciesDue to the Internet, conspiracy theories are on the rise and playing an increasingly significant role in global politics. Now new research from The Australian National University (ANU) has analysed digital data to reveal exactly who is propagating them and why.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why bodycam footage might not clear things upStephon Clark, an African-American man, was killed by Sacramento police in his grandmother's backyard last month, setting off protests and conflict over the police's actions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Market squid tell a tale of two krillIn good years, noisy fishing boats filled with freshly-netted market squid spill their slippery catch into processing plants on the California coast. During those years, market squid (Doryteuthis opalescens) are California's most productive fishery, accounting for up to $70 million in revenue and 110,000 metric tons of squid. But in other years, calamari is hard to find. Cyclical changes in ocean
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Dieselgate' impacted climate as well as human healthImproved diesel technology, combined with generally better fuel economy, has led to the widespread belief that diesel vehicles are more environmentally friendly than their petrol counterparts.
3h
The Atlantic

Doing Dishes Is the WorstEvery day, they slowly accumulate. Plates covered in sauces and crumbs. Bowls with a fine layer of sticky who-knows-what. Forks, knives, and spoons all gummed with bits of this and that. At the end of a long day of work, cooking, cleaning, and, for many, negotiating with small children, a couple has to face the big question: Who is going to do the dishes? A forthcoming report from the Council of
3h
The Atlantic

Where Have All the Rioters Gone?Editor’s Note: Read The Atlantic ’s special coverage of Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy. Image Above: National Guardsmen patrol the streets of Chicago, where riots broke out after King was killed. On August 5, 1966, someone struck Martin Luther King Jr. in the head with a rock . The assault happened not in Birmingham or in Memphis but in Chicago. Earlier that year, King had moved into a run-down
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Feed: All Latest

Content Marketing Networks Are Changing Because of #MeTooContent Marketing Networks, like Revcontent, draw eyeballs for ads with outrageous words and images. But post #MeToo, that strategy might be bad for business.
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Feed: All Latest

How to Stop Eye Strain: Tips, Tricks, and AppsThe aching eyes, sore muscles, and headaches caused by eye strain can be prevented by following these tips.
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Feed: All Latest

Witchblr, Kek, and the Widening Schism of Internet ReligionsBetween Tumblr witches and the Cult of Kek, neo-occultism is having quite a moment.
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Science : NPR

When Going Gluten-Free is Not Enough: New Tests Detect Hidden ExposureFor people with celiac disease, incidental ingestion of gluten can lead to painful symptoms and lasting intestinal damage. Two new studies suggest such exposure may be greater than many realize. (Image credit: JPM/Getty Images/Image Source)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Groundbreaking X-ray optics will enable future observatoriesAn X-ray telescope is characterized by four parameters: angular resolution, effective area, mass, and production cost. Researchers at NASA GSFC have developed a new X-ray mirror technology that is expected to improve one or more of these parameters by at least an order of magnitude, compared to the mirrors currently employed on missions such as the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Nuclear Spectro
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cell discovery could help with research on genetic diseasesResearch carried out by the University has discovered the first data on an organelle that is really important in human cells in an ancient organism distantly related to humans.
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New Scientist - News

Just half a degree less global warming would avert food shortageGovernments are dithering over whether to limit climate change to 1.5°C or 2°C, but it seems the stricter target would avoid food shortages and major economic losses
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New Scientist - News

Refusing to accept GM food is safe is like climate change denialEnvironmentalist Mark Lynas, who once destroyed GM crops and then made headlines by ending his opposition, is stepping up his call for reason to triumph
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dating website matches you based on your DNASick and tired of looking for love? There's now a website that does it for you, using your DNA.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Just like bats, humans can use echolocationIt sounds amazing, but we can all learn to use sound to detect our surroundings, just like bats or dolphins. No eyes required.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Garbage-collecting aqua drones and jellyfish filters for cleaner oceansA Roomba-like ocean trash collector modelled on a whale shark and a microplastic filter made from jellyfish slime could prevent litter from entering our oceans and help tackle a growing problem that poses threats to wildlife, deters tourists and impacts on coastal economies.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stretchable, twistable wires for wearable electronicsThe exercise-tracking power of a Fitbit may soon jump from your wrist and into your clothing.
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Science | The Guardian

Losing your first language? Here’s how to rediscover your voice | Monika SchmidExpats are often shaky in their mother tongue. But fear not: the fight in the brain known as language attrition can be stopped • Monika Schmid is a professor of linguistics at the University of Essex When a former PhD candidate recently asked me to write a reference for her, I found myself facing an unexpected dilemma. She is a wonderful person and a brilliant scientist whom any employer should c
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Understanding fast radio burstsAstronomers are detecting a mysterious, powerful form of radiation blipping across space, and nobody's quite sure why.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Preserving Aboriginal language with technology ​When a language dies, a whole swathe of cultural practices and perceptions die too. In Australia, people are using technology to preserve and celebrate language and culture.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why the business model of social media giants like Facebook is incompatible with human rightsFacebook has had a bad few weeks. The social media giant had to apologise for failing to protect the personal data of millions of users from being accessed by data mining company Cambridge Analytica. Outrage is brewing over its admission to spying on people via their Android phones. Its stock price plummeted, while millions deleted their accounts in disgust.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cambridge Analytica's secret psychographic tool is a ghost from the pastThe novel ways in which marketers and also political institutions can now harvest our social-media data and divide us into homogenous groups suited for mass-customised and targeted messages has been one of the hot issues unfolding from the aftermath of recent Facebook and Cambridge Analytica big-data scandal. Many articles have already sought to summarise the events, actions, participants, and the
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Science-Based Medicine

Pseudoscience: The Conspiracy Against ScienceAn excellent new book examines pseudoscience in 22 essays by prominent scientists from various fields.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Medical marijuana gets wary welcome from older adults, poll showsFew older adults use medical marijuana, a new national poll finds, but the majority support its use if a doctor recommends it, and might talk to their own doctor about it if they developed a serious health condition. And two-thirds say the government should do more to study the drug's health effects.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The culture and history of glaciers in the AlpsAs striking features of the natural environment, glaciers often play a role in the history and culture of the regions where they are found. In some places glaciers are revered: Quechua pilgrims travel into Peru's high Andes to visit sacred glaciers during the religious Quyllurit'i festival. But in pre-enlightenment Europe, glaciers were more often viewed with fear due to the destructive forces the
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Live Science

Giant, Clawed Dinosaurs Left These Footprints in Ancient LagoonDozens of purple and brown sea snails and limpets on Scotland's Isle of Skye have made a home in a rather unorthodox place: the water-filled, fossilized track marks left by dinosaurs about 170 million years ago, a new study finds.
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Live Science

Photos: Dinosaurs Sloshed Around Ancient LagoonResearchers have found about 50 dinosaur footprints in what used to be a warm, muddy lagoon on the Isle of Skye, in Scotland.
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Live Science

Antarctica's Underwater Ice Is Retreating 5 Times Faster Than It Should BeWhen you imagine an Antarctic glacier melting, you probably envision great walls of ice avalanching into the ocean. This is certainly happening — but it's only half the story.
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Feed: All Latest

The Comcast-NBC Merger Offers Little Guidance for AT&T-Time WarnerThe Justice Department is in court trying to block AT&T's planned purchase of Time Warner. Both sides cite Comcast's 2011 acquisition of NBC Universal, but the earlier deal is an imperfect model.
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Feed: All Latest

Mini Brains Just Got Creepier—They’re Growing Their Own VeinsThe more like real brains they became, the more useful these organdies are for studying complex behaviors and neurological diseases.
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Feed: All Latest

The Case for A Zuckberg-Free FacebookWIRED columnist Felix Salmon argues the time has come for Mark Zuckerberg to step aside and give Facebook the fresh start it needs.
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Feed: All Latest

Truckers Take on Trump Over Electronic Logging Device RulesDrivers unhappy about devices that track how much time they spend on the road are taking their grievances to Washington.
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Science : NPR

Why Is Your Boss Bad At His Job? It May Be The 'Peter Principle' At WorkWorkers with a strong sales record were likely to be promoted into managerial positions, yet they tended to be worse at managerial jobs than those who were low-performing workers. (Image credit: Camelia Dobrin/Getty Images/Ikon Images)
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Dagens Medicin

Ny ledende overlæge i Regionspsykiatrien HorsensRegionspsykiatrien Horsens har ansat Zywia Brouer som ny ledende overlæge.
4h
The Atlantic

Behind the Masterpiece: Van Morrison's Astral Weeks at 50Editor’s Note: This is part of The Atlantic’s ongoing series looking back at 1968. All past articles and reader correspondence are collected here . New material will be added to that page through the end of 2018. If I ventured in the slipstream Between the viaducts of your dream Where immobile steel rims crack And the ditch in the back roads stop Could you find me? Would you kiss-a my eyes? To la
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Birds get their internal compass from this newly ID’d eye proteinBirds can sense magnetic fields, thanks to internal compasses that likely rely on changes to proteins in the retina.
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Limits of Big Data in Medical ResearchIt could help large institutions reach new insights into disease—but also make it harder for small labs with original ideas to compete for grants. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Congestion pricing, public housing, and a sustainable New York CityNew York's mass transit system originally included a group of privately run contractors, which government had to take over once it regulated fares so low that the private companies went broke. New York City's public housing began as a partnership between the city and federal governments, and from the late 1930s to the 1960s was reasonably well-maintained and well-managed. The era of new public hou
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why prime numbers still fascinate mathematicians, 2,300 years laterOn March 20, American-Canadian mathematician Robert Langlands received the Abel Prize, celebrating lifetime achievement in mathematics. Langlands' research demonstrated how concepts from geometry, algebra and analysis could be brought together by a common link to prime numbers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why we made iWitnessed, an app to collect evidenceEyewitness evidence can be critical to investigations and trials. However, research shows that eyewitness memory can be inaccurate and vulnerable to distortion depending on what happens next – for example, inaccurate information encountered through leading questions, discussion with other witnesses, or journalists.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Dinosaur tracks on Skye 'globally important'Researchers find that the footprints belonged to sauropods and therapods from the Middle Jurassic period.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Defeating 'day zero' in Cape TownDay Zero: dam levels drop below safe limits and the city's water supply is cut off. It sounds like an apocalyptic nightmare, but for residents of Cape Town in South Africa it's fast becoming a reality. For drought-prone countries like Australia, it's not unforeseeable either. New advances in desalination, however, are offering alternative solutions for water security and for mining valuable scarce
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Hangout in spaceNASA astronaut Drew Feustel seemingly hangs off the International Space Station while conducting a spacewalk with fellow NASA astronaut Ricky Arnold (out of frame) on March 29, 2018.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Meet "Dracula," the Largest Pterosaur Found to DateA reconstruction of the reptile, found in Transylvania, is on display in Germany -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Connection of sea level and groundwater missing link in climate responseAbout 250 million years ago, when the Earth had no ice caps and the water around the equator was too hot for reptiles, sea level still rose and fell over time. Now, an international team of researchers has developed a way to track sea-level rise and fall and to tease out what caused the changes in the absence of ice sheets.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microbiome study suggests marine nematodes are not picky eatersThe ocean floors are literally crawling with nematode worms. A square meter of sediment can contain millions of worms from hundreds of species.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Long-lived soundwaves in crystalline solidsA new study published in Nature Physics describes how a team of scientists used a laser beam to gain access to long-lived soundwaves in crystalline solids as the basis for a potentially new approach to information processing and storage. One of Northern Arizona University's newest physicists, assistant professor Ryan Behunin, is a co-author of the study. In collaboration with scientists at Yale an
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gravitational waves created by black holes in the centre of most galaxiesGravitational waves may be produced in the heart of the galaxy, says a new study led by Ph.D. student Joseph Fernandez at Liverpool John Moores University. He sets out the work in a presentation on 3rd April at the European Week of Astronomy and Space Science in Liverpool.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

X-rays could sterilise alien planets in otherwise habitable zonesIntense radiation could strip away the ozone layer of Earth-like planets around other stars and render them uninhabitable, according to a new study led by Dr. Eike Guenther of the Thueringer Observatory in Germany.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Robot designed to defend factories against cyberthreatsIt's small enough to fit inside a shoebox, yet this robot on four wheels has a big mission: keeping factories and other large facilities safe from hackers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Your wood stove affects the climate more than you might thinkNorwegians love to heat with wood. The walls of houses around the Norwegian countryside in the winter are lined with stacks of wood and smoke rises from chimneys, especially on cold days. There was even a national "wood night program" on NRK, the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation, which ran for 12 hours and attracted international attention because of its unusual theme.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Using water molecules to read electrical activity in lipid membranesEvery human cell is encased in a five-nanometer-thick lipid membrane that protects it from the surrounding environment. Like a gatekeeper, the membrane determines which ions and molecules can pass through. In so doing, it ensures the cell's well-being and stability and allows it to communicate via electrical signals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Easing uncertaintyHeisenberg's uncertainty principle, the fundamental impossibility of simultaneously measuring properties such as position and momentum, is at the heart of quantum theory. Physicists at ETH Zurich have now demonstrated an elegant way to relax this intrinsic incompatibility using a mechanical oscillator formed by a single trapped ion, opening up a route for fundamental studies and practical uses ali
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Coral reefs protect coasts from severe stormsCoral reefs can naturally protect coasts from tropical cyclones by reducing the impact of large waves before they reach the shore, according to scientists.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Britain to ban ivory salesBritain will ban sales of ivory in a bid to help preserve the world's dwindling elephant population, the government announced Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Toshiba CEO promises turnaround in five years, beefed up ethicsNobuaki Kurumatani, the outsider tapped to lead scandal-tarnished Japanese electronics company Toshiba Corp., is promising a turnaround in five years by reshaping its operations and boosting profitability.
5h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Antarctica 'gives ground to the ocean'The White Continent is surrendering ocean floor as the undersides of its glaciers are melted.
5h
Ingeniøren

Problemerne hober sig op for TeslaEndnu et produktionsmål er forpasset, 123.000 biler skal have fikset styretøjet, en bil kørte galt, og Elon Musk kom med en noget malplaceret aprilsnar - det har ikke skortet på nyheder fra Tesla.
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The Atlantic

Rewriting My Grandfather’s MLK StoryOur stories, for all their intangibility, come to define who we are. My grandfather was reticent about race, so I grew up believing that his being Creole was simply a fact: the makeup of our blood; the additional boxes we checked on forms; the wiry curl of his hair and the slight wave in mine. He was born in Jim Crow Louisiana, married a Japanese woman in the 1950s, and became a successful doctor
5h
Ingeniøren

IKEA har ikke styr på databehandlerneEn afgørelse fra Datatilsynet viser, at IKEA Danmark ikke har styr på databehandleraftalerne eller tilsyn med virksomhederne, der behandler personalets personoplysninger.
5h
Ingeniøren

Snedigt Firefox-plugin skal begrænse Facebook-trackingFirefox har en løsning til Facebook-brugere, der er bekymret for datahøst.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Non-toxic filamentous virus helps quickly dissipate heat generated by electronic devicesThe researcher team of Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) discovered that the film constructed by assembling a nontoxic filamentous virus functions as a heat dissipation material, and that can be simply prepared by drying the virus aqueous solution at room temperature. This discovery is expected to elucidate the mechanism of new heat transport in electronics.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When we sign, we build phrases with similar neural mechanisms as when we speakDifferences between signed and spoken languages are significant, yet the underlying neural processes we use to create complex expressions are quite similar for both, a team of researchers has found.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genetic test may improve post-stent treatment, outcomeA test for specific genetic mutations successfully informed blood-thinner treatment selection following stent placement to open clogged blood vessels, leading to significantly fewer complications. Genetic testing identified patients with specific mutations that render the widely used blood thinner clopidogrel ineffective. Patients with the genetic mutations who received alternative medications wer
6h
Ingeniøren

Kølecontainer siger selv til, før den går i stykkerMaskinlæring skal forhindre rådne bananer til søs og spare væsentlige beløb.
6h
Science : NPR

Video: Can You Find The Mimics In America's Largest Insect Collection?Insects are nature's masters of disguise. Take a backstage tour of the largest insect collection in America to experience nature's most convincing mimics. (Image credit: NPR)
6h
Ingeniøren

Radikale: Vi skal producere lige så meget grøn el og varme, som vi forbruger
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Santos shares soar after Harbour Energy takeover bidShares in Australian energy giant Santos soared Tuesday after US private investment company Harbour Energy Tuesday made a Aus$13.5 billion (US$10.3 billion) all-cash offer for the firm.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Singaporean Airbnb hosts fined over unauthorised rentalsTwo Singaporean Airbnb hosts were Tuesday fined Sg$60,000 ($45,800) each for letting out apartments without official permission, the first such case in the city-state under new rules against short-term rentals.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gay dating app Grindr scorched for handling of HIV dataGrindr Data HIVGay dating app Grindr was under fire on Monday for sharing information about users' HIV status or locations with two companies enlisted to optimize its software.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

SpaceX launches cargo to space station using recycled rocket, spaceshipSpaceX blasted off a load of supplies Monday for the International Space Station aboard a rocket and a cargo ship that have both flown before, marking the second such flight for the California-based company.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Oil to solar: Saudis push to be renewable energy powerhouseSaudi engineers whip up a simulated sandstorm to test a solar panel's durability at a research lab, the heart of the oil-rich kingdom's multibillion dollar quest to be a renewable energy powerhouse.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fraud rap for cryptocurrency promoted by DJ Khaled, MayweatherSEC Centra ICOThe US Securities and Exchange Commission on Monday laid charges over a fraudulent cryptocurrency fundraiser that boxer Floyd Mayweather and rapper DJ Khaled touted on social media.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

As whales fade, movement they spawned tries to keep up hopeRegina Asmutis-Silvia, a biologist who has dedicated her career to saving right whales, is cleaning out a file cabinet from the early 1990s, and the documents inside tell a familiar story—the whales are dying from collisions with ships and entanglements in commercial fishing gear, and the species might not survive.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spotify to test how its music service plays on Wall StreetSpotify is about to find out whether investors view its music streaming service as a budding superstar or a flash in the pan.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Census data can level the playing field for small businessesLocal governments and small businesses could save thousands of dollars a year in consulting and research fees if they just used information that's already publicly available, according to research from the University of Waterloo.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Path to a booming Australian solar thermal energy marketA report out from the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA) this month published responses from industry stakeholders on the viability of a concentrated solar thermal (CST) energy market in Australia: Paving the way for concentrated solar thermal in Australia.
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Viden

Jubel over rumprojekt: Sætter Danmark på verdenskortetProjektet har været 20 år undervejs og er Danmarks dyreste.
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Ingeniøren

Umuligt at få overblik over, hvor meget dansk persondata sendes ud af EUVersion2 har forsøgt at undersøge, hvor meget persondata regionerne sender ud af EU, men det har været problematisk for flere regioner at svare. Og det burde det ikke være, siger Datatilsynet.
10h
Feed: All Latest

Zipline's Blood-Toting Drones Aim for American SkiesZipline is already making life-saving deliveries in Africa and Europe. Now it wants to start flying in its home country.
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Science | The Guardian

Dinosaur footprints found on SkyeTracks of meat-eating dinosaurs found on Scottish island, shedding light on behaviours during Middle Jurassic period It’s now a windswept island boasting pine martens, red deer and puffins. But 170 million years ago, some very different beasts were leaving their mark on the Isle of Skye. Researchers have unearthed a new site of about 50 tracks, some as big as a car tyre, from dinosaurs that roame
10h
New on MIT Technology Review

Zipline launches the world’s fastest commercial delivery droneThe California-based startup’s new machine takes to the skies just as the US is about to loosen rules governing drone operations.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Your wood stove affects the climate more than you might thinkHeating with wood has a significant warming effect on the climate, which is cause for concern. But at the same time, burning wood also causes significant cooling.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New receptor genes turn T-cells into powerful liver cancer foesMouse genes that make human T cells powerful at fighting liver cancer could one day help patients do the same, scientists report.Georgia Cancer Center scientists exposed mice genetically manipulated to respond to human antigens to a common antigen found in human liver cancer.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Census data can level the playing field for small businessesLocal governments and small businesses could save thousands of dollars a year in consulting and research fees if they just used information that's already publicly available, according to research from the University of Waterloo.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gender roles highlight gender bias in judicial decisionsJudges may be just as biased or even more biased than the general public in deciding court cases where traditional gender roles are challenged, according to a new study published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study explores safety of rear-facing car seats in rear impact car crashesExperts know that rear-facing car seats protect infants and toddlers in front and side impact crashes, but they are rarely discussed when it comes to rear-impact collisions. Because rear-impact crashes account for more than 25 percent of all accidents, researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center conducted a new study to explore the effectiveness of rear-facing car seats in this
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fewer recalls associated with higher rates of interval breast cancersLower screening mammography recall rates -- the rates at which women are called back for additional testing based on suspicious findings -- are associated with higher rates of breast cancers detected between screenings, or interval cancers, according to a major new study. Researchers said the study shows that establishing a minimum recall rate is a reasonable and potentially important goal for bre
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Smartphone app performs better than traditional exam in cardiac assessmentA smartphone application using the phone's camera function performed better than traditional physical examination to assess blood flow in a wrist artery for patients undergoing coronary angiography, according to a randomized trial published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
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Ingeniøren

Kattegæt: Niras fjernede jernbaner fra ti år gamle overslagNiras baserede deres skøn for en togfri Kattegatforbindelse på ti år gamle anlægsoverslag, hvor de i stort omfang blot kunne fjerne banerelaterede udgifter. Det førte til omtrent en halvering af det samlede overslag.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

In mice, long-lasting brain proteins offer clues to how memories last a lifetimeIn the tiny brain space where two nerve cells meet, chemical and electric signals shuttle back and forth, a messaging system that ebbs and flows in those synaptic spaces, sometimes in ways that scientists believe aid and abet learning and memory. But because most of the proteins found in those synapses die and renew themselves so rapidly, scientists have had a hard time pinning down how synapses a
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Two-pronged approach could curb many cases of lung cancerLung cancer, a leading killer, has been hard to target with drugs. A team took a metabolic approach, looking at what lung tumor cells need to live and grow. When they removed these factors, tumor growth was almost completely suppressed in a mouse model. Their findings suggest that a combination of existing drugs (IGF-1 inhibitors and inhibitors of protein breakdown) could provide an alternative to
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Yeast engineered to manufacture complex medicineBioengineers have figured out a way to make noscapine, a non-narcotic cough suppressant that occurs naturally in opium poppies, in brewer's yeast.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rare Scottish dinosaur prints give key insight into era lost in timeA series of rare dinosaur footprints discovered on the Isle of Skye in Scotland is helping experts establish details of an important period in dinosaur evolution.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New technique makes heart valve replacement safer for some high-risk patientsScientists have developed a novel technique that prevents coronary artery obstruction during transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), a rare but often fatal complication. The method, called Bioprosthetic Aortic Scallop Intentional Laceration to prevent Iatrogenic Coronary Artery obstruction (BASILICA), will increase treatment options for high-risk patients who need heart valve procedures.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New algorithm enables data integration at single-cell resolutionA team of computational biologists has developed an algorithm that can 'align' multiple sequencing datasets with single-cell resolution. The new method has implications for better understanding how different groups of cells change during disease progression, in response to drug treatment, or across evolution.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Potential of manipulating gut microbiome to boost efficacy of cancer immunotherapiesThe composition of bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract may hold clues to help predict which cancer patients are most apt to benefit from the personalized cellular therapies that have shown unprecedented promise in the fight against hard-to-treat cancers.
14h
Science : NPR

The Scarcity Trap: Why We Keep Digging When We're Stuck In A HoleHave you ever noticed that when something important is missing in your life, your brain can only seem to focus on that missing thing? Two researchers have dubbed this phenomenon "scarcity." (Image credit: Gary Waters /Getty Images/Ikon Images)
14h
New Scientist - News

Shrimp and lobster are as bad for the climate as eating beefFish and seafood are normally fairly environmentally friendly, but it takes so much fuel to catch some species that their carbon footprint is as big as that of red meat
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Legalized medical cannabis lowers opioid use, study findsU.S. states that have approved medical cannabis laws saw a dramatic reduction in opioid use, according to a new study.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Relationship between legal cannabis and opioid prescribing examinedAlternative methods of pain management have been a topic of discussion as the United States grapples with the opioid and heroin epidemic. New research finds that medical and adult-use cannabis laws were associated with lower opioid prescribing rates.
15h
Scientific American Content: Global

Rev Up Photosynthesis To Boost Crop YieldsPhotosynthesis actually is an inefficient process, but a biological chemist is trying to crank it up. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

X-rays could sterilize alien planets in (otherwise) habitable zonesIntense radiation could strip away the ozone layer of Earth-like planets around other stars and render them uninhabitable, according to a new study.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gravitational waves created by black holes in the cenetr of most galaxiesGravitational waves may be forged in the heart of the galaxy, says a new study.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

First age-map of the heart of the Milky WayThe first large-scale age-map of the Milky Way shows that a period of star formation lasting around 4 billion years created the complex structure at the heart of our galaxy.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Astronomers find 72 bright and fast explosionsGone in a (cosmological) flash: a team of astronomers found 72 very bright, but quick events in a recent survey and are still struggling to explain their origin.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Is the Milky Way getting bigger?The galaxy we inhabit, the Milky Way, may be getting even bigger, according to new research.
15h
BBC News - Science & Environment

'Send in the drones' to protect soilDrones should be used to locate and penalise farmers who let soil run off their fields, a report will say.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

We'll pay more for unhealthy foods we crave, neuroscience research findsWe'll pay more for unhealthy foods when we crave them, new neuroscience research finds. The study also shows that we're willing to pay disproportionately more for higher portion sizes of craved food items.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How a protein helps bacteria outsmart the human immune systemNew research has uncovered a mechanism by which the bacteria that cause Lyme disease fight innate immune responses, and observed a never-before-seen phenomena demonstrating the bacteria can spring back in the body weeks later. Understanding this type of bacteria, one of only a few pathogens that can actually persist in the body for long periods of time, has major implications for treatment of tick
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A Zika vaccine could virtually eliminate prenatal infections, model showsA Zika vaccine could have a substantial effect on mitigating and preventing future Zika virus outbreaks. Through a combination of direct protection and indirect reduction of transmissions, virtual elimination is achievable, even with imperfect vaccine efficacy and coverage, according to a new computer model.
16h
Futurity.org

4-eyed lizard offers clues to vision’s evolutionAn ancient monitor lizard with a fourth eye may signal a new wrinkle in eyesight’s evolution in vertebrates. “This tells us how easy it is, in terms of evolution, to self-assemble a complex organ under certain circumstances,” says Bhart-Anjan Bhullar, a paleontologist at Yale University and coauthor of a new study that appears in Current Biology . “Eyes are classically conceived of as these remar
16h
Futurity.org

Blocking amino acid found in asparagus stifles breast cancerAn amino acid called asparagine is key to breast cancer’s spread, report researchers who found that by restricting it in mice, they could stop cancer cells from invading other parts of the body. Most breast cancer patients don’t die from their primary tumor, but instead from metastasis, or the spread of cancer to the lungs, brain, bones, or other organs. To be able to spread, cancer cells first n
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rare Scottish dinosaur prints give key insight into era lost in timeA series of rare dinosaur footprints discovered on the Isle of Skye in Scotland is helping experts establish details of an important period in dinosaur evolution.
16h
Futurity.org

‘Test kitchen’ minerals may reveal Earth’s mantle mysteriesNew research gives scientists a clearer picture of the Earth’s mantle. Scientists think that the mantle is like marble cake, mixed up by swirling together bits of ocean floor and primordial rock. The biggest challenge of studying the planet’s middle, biggest layer—sandwiched between its iron core and thin surface that is host to living creatures—is that it can’t been seen. Think of it as a patien
16h
Futurity.org

Dust and starlight shape future exoplanet explorationNew research sheds light on which stars might be harboring exoplanets that would make the best candidates for future exploration, as well as how large the telescopes that astronomers would use to study them need to be. Imagine trying to see a firefly next to a distant spotlight, where the beams from the spotlight all but drown out the faint glow from the firefly. Add fog, and dim both lights. Is
16h
Futurity.org

What role should courts have in fighting climate change?A federal trial pitting two cities against major oil companies took a surprising turn when an oil company lawyer largely confirmed the science that connects the burning of oil to climate change damages—but not the blame. The case in San Francisco is weighing the question of whether climate change damages, including increasingly frequent droughts, floods, and other extreme weather, connected to th
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rare Scottish dinosaur prints give key insight into era lost in timeDozens of giant footprints discovered on a Scottish island are helping shed light on an important period in dinosaur evolution.
16h
Futurity.org

This contraction monitor could save lives in MalawiRice University seniors are developing an efficient and inexpensive uterine contraction monitor to help save the lives of mothers in labor and their newborns in resource-poor settings. A team of bioengineering students at Rice University designed, built, and programmed a sensor to monitor women in labor, as well as a unique test rig. They plan to validate the monitor’s accuracy with the help of f
16h
Live Science

MIT Just Cut Ties with Nectome, the '100-Percent-Fatal' Brain-Preserving CompanyMIT cut ties with the brain-preserving company citing a lack of research.
16h
Popular Science

Gravity and good timing helped the Hubble spot a star from the early universeSpace When the stars align, you can zoom way in. When looking back into the deep recesses of the universe, even huge objects like planets, stars, and galaxies can appear small. Magnification can help, but how do you…
17h
The Atlantic

Netanyahu's Incredible Flip-Flop on African MigrantsIsraeli Benjamin NetanyahuUpdated April 3 at 10:05 a.m. EST Benjamin Netanyahu made two major announcements on Monday, completely reversing his administration’s policy on the roughly 40,000 African asylum-seekers in Israel—twice. First, the Israeli prime minister declared that he had scrapped a plan to deport these migrants to third-party countries such as Rwanda or Uganda, instead taking in as many as 16,000 and routing
17h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Move the Story ForwardWhat We’re Following The Mexican Border: President Trump expressed his frustration with U.S–Mexican trade and immigration policies in a series of tweets that railed against the North American Free Trade Agreement, Democrats, and the Mexican government. Here’s what the tirade shows about his worldview and where it diverges from reality. As Congress proves reluctant to fund the president’s border-w
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

First age-map of the heart of the Milky WayThe first large-scale age-map of the Milky Way shows that a period of star formation lasting around 4 billion years created the complex structure at the heart of our galaxy. The results will be presented by Marina Rejkuba at the European Week of Astronomy and Space Science (EWASS) in Liverpool on Tuesday, April 3.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Is the Milky Way getting bigger?The galaxy we inhabit, the Milky Way, may be getting even bigger, according to Cristina Martínez-Lombilla, a Ph.D. candidate at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias in Tenerife, Spain, and her collaborators. She will present the work of her team in a talk on Tuesday, April 3, at the European Week of Astronomy and Space Science in Liverpool.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Astronomers find 72 bright and fast explosionsGone in a (cosmological) flash: a team of astronomers found 72 very bright, but quick events in a recent survey and are still struggling to explain their origin. Miika Pursiainen of the University of Southampton will present the new results on Tuesday, April 3, at the European Week of Astronomy and Space Science.
17h
NYT > Science

Now Read This: Discussion Questions for the PBS NewsHour-New York Times Book Club’s April Pick: ‘The Death and Life of the Great Lakes’Read Dan Egan’s wonderfully told story of history, science and reportage about the largest source of freshwater in the world, and join Now Read This.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Is the Milky Way getting bigger?The galaxy we inhabit, the Milky Way, may be getting even bigger, according to Cristina Martínez-Lombilla, a PhD candidate at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias in Tenerife, Spain, and her collaborators. She will present the work of her team in a talk on Tuesday 3 April at the European Week of Astronomy and Space Science in Liverpool.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronomers find 72 bright and fast explosionsGone in a (cosmological) flash: a team of astronomers found 72 very bright, but quick events in a recent survey and are still struggling to explain their origin. Miika Pursiainen of the University of Southampton will present the new results on Tuesday 3 April at the European Week of Astronomy and Space Science.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First age-map of the heart of the Milky WayThe first large-scale age-map of the Milky Way shows that a period of star formation lasting around 4 billion years created the complex structure at the heart of our galaxy. The results will be presented by Marina Rejkuba at the European Week of Astronomy and Space Science (EWASS) in Liverpool on Tuesday, 3rd April.
17h
The Atlantic

'I Married a Jew,' 80 Years LaterIn a recent Washington Post opinion piece that was lambasted on social media, a writer named Carey Purcell wrote that she was done dating Jewish men after two previous relationships ended poorly. “I’ve optimistically begun interfaith relationships with an open mind twice, only to become the last woman these men dated before settling down with a nice Jewish girl,” she explains. “At almost every ev
17h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Eggsecutive TimeToday in 5 Lines In a series of tweets, President Trump blasted the Justice Department and FBI, and proclaimed that “DACA is dead because the Democrats didn’t care or act.” China retaliated against U.S. tariffs on steel and aluminum imports by increasing tariffs by as much as 25 percent on a variety of U.S.-made products. The move sent stocks tumbling . Thousands of teachers in Kentucky and Oklah
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Using water molecules to read electrical activity in lipid membranesResearchers were able to map out in real time how charges are transported across and along membranes simply by observing the behavior of adjacent water molecules. Their noninvasive and label-free method represents a valuable new tool in the effort to understand how cells -- and neurons in particular -- function.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

NASA survey seen as steppingstone for astronomyBy studying dust in the habitable zones of nearby stars, the HOSTS Survey is helping to determine how big future telescopes should be, which stars are likely candidates for harboring Earth-like planets and what the average star system looks like.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Injectable bandage createdA penetrating injury from shrapnel is a serious obstacle in overcoming battlefield wounds that can ultimately lead to death. Given the high mortality rates due to hemorrhaging, there is an unmet need to quickly self-administer materials that prevent fatality due to excessive blood loss.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Spear point study offers new explanation of how early humans settled North AmericaCareful examination of numerous fluted spear points found in Alaska and western Canada prove that the Ice Age peopling of the Americas was much more complex than previously believed.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Experts define global criteria for hospital programs to tackle antimicrobial resistanceA group of international experts, led by researchers from the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy (CDDEP) in India and the Université de Lorraine in France, has now for the first time defined a standardized set of actions that are relevant for all hospitals around the world to preserve the effectiveness of antimicrobials and limit the emergence of antimicrobial resistance.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Treating women subsistence farmers for intestinal worms improved fitness and could boost food productionA new study in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) found that treating women subsistence farmers with just a single dose of a cheap deworming medication significantly improved their physical stamina for the grueling agriculture work needed for their family's survival. The results of treatment could be twofold: improved health for farming women and increased food production by women who have the
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A Zika vaccine could virtually eliminate prenatal infectionsA Zika vaccine could have a substantial effect on mitigating and preventing future Zika virus outbreaks. Through a combination of direct protection and indirect reduction of transmissions, virtual elimination is achievable, even with imperfect vaccine efficacy and coverage. The research is published in Annals of Internal Medicine.
18h
Science : NPR

EPA Moves To Weaken Landmark Fuel Efficiency RulesThe EPA is rejecting landmark fuel efficiency rules for automobiles, a key part of President Obama's efforts to address climate change. The move could lead to another legal battle with California. (Image credit: Julio Cortez/AP)
18h
Live Science

Meet 'Norman,' the Darkest, Most Disturbed AI the World Has Ever SeenA team of computer programmers trained a neural network to be a "psychopath." What could possibly go wrong?
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Vegetation controls the future of the water cycleResearchers have found that vegetation plays a dominant role in Earth's water cycle, that plants will regulate and dominate the increasing stress placed on continental water resources in the future.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Reorganization of brain outputs in deaf catsCats deaf from an early age have increased outgoing connections from the auditory cortex to a midbrain region responsible for directing the animal to a particular location in its environment. The study is the first to examine the reorganization of outputs from the sensory cortex following hearing loss.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Proper data analysis might be among Hurricane Maria's casualtiesThe ability to use statistics to guide decision-making may be collateral damage of Hurricane Maria's devastating blow to Puerto Rico, according to a demographer.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Major differences in billing complexity among US health insurersOne frequently proclaimed advantage of single-payer health care is its potential to reduce administrative costs, but new research calls that assumption into question.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hospital payment reform fix?Hospital payment experiment in Maryland failed to deliver on the promise of shifting care from hospitals toward less expensive outpatient and primary care settings. Researchers say that weak incentives for physicians may have limited the program's effectiveness.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Uncovering a mechanism causing chronic graft-vs-host disease after bone marrow transplantMicroRNA-17-92 is required for the T-cell and B-cell pathogenicity that drives chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) after allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT), report investigators. Data from cGVHD mouse models showed that, by determining T-cell and B-cell differentiation and function, miR-17-92 is responsible for cGVHD development. Inhibiting miR-17 is a potential therapeutic strategy for
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

When drugs are wrong, skipped or make you sick: The cost of non-optimized medicationsRising drug prices have gotten a lot of attention lately, but the actual cost of prescription medications is more than just the bill. Researchers estimate that illness and death resulting from non-optimized medication therapy costs $528.4 billion annually, equivalent to 16 percent of total U.S. health care expenditures in 2016.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Online physician reviews don't reflect responses in patient satisfaction surveysPhysicians who receive negative reviews online do not receive similar responses in rigorous patient satisfaction surveys, according to new research.
18h
New on MIT Technology Review

Your own devices will give the next Cambridge Analytica far more power to influence your voteGreater connectivity, more data, and auto-generated content will make today’s manipulation techniques look primitive.
18h
NYT > Science

Calling Car Pollution Standards ‘Too High,’ E.P.A. Sets Up Fight With CaliforniaThe agency announced a plan to relax Obama-era greenhouse gas rules and signaled that it aimed to make California, which sets its own standards, fall in line.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Potential of manipulating gut microbiome to boost efficacy of cancer immunotherapiesThe composition of bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract may hold clues to help predict which cancer patients are most apt to benefit from the personalized cellular therapies that have shown unprecedented promise in the fight against hard-to-treat cancers.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Digital life team creates animated 3-D models of sea turtles from live specimensResearchers have released new online full-color animated models of a loggerhead and a green sea turtle through a collaboration with sea turtle rescue and research institutions.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New insight about how viruses use host proteins to their advantageViruses have a very limited set of genes and therefore must use the cellular machineries of their hosts for most parts of their growth. A new study has discovered a specific host protein that many viruses use for their transport within the cell. The discovery opens up new possibilities to develop a broad spectrum anti-viral therapy.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Estuaries may experience accelerated impacts of human-caused CO2Rising anthropogenic, or human-caused, carbon dioxide in the atmosphere may have up to twice the impact on coastal estuaries as it does in the oceans because the human-caused CO2 lowers the ecosystem's ability to absorb natural fluctuations of the greenhouse gas, a new study suggests.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Does metal use slow when a country's wealth grows? Maybe notIn a new study, researchers found that GDP remains intrinsically linked with metal use even as affluence grows -- a relationship that might threaten long-term global access to critical metals and hopes for a low-carbon future.
19h
Popular Science

Scientists found a ‘new organ,’ but it might not be what you’re expectingHealth The interstitium helps hold our organs together, but it might do more than that. In a report out last week in the journal Scientific Reports , doctors identified what they think could be a previously unrecognized organ. The structure is a network of…
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Building lithium-sulfur batteries with paper biomassA major byproduct in the papermaking industry is lignosulfonate, a sulfonated carbon waste material, which is typically combusted on site, releasing CO2 into the atmosphere after sulfur has been captured for reuse.
19h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Ardi walked the walk 4.4 million years agoAncient hominid evolved upright stance without sacrificing climbing ability.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Medicare program linked with reduced black-white disparities in hospital readmissionsA Medicare program that penalizes hospitals for high readmission rates was associated with a narrowing of readmission disparities between black and white patients and between minority-serving hospitals and other hospitals in the US, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Proper data analysis might be among Hurricane Maria's casualtiesThe ability to use statistics to guide decision-making may be collateral damage of Hurricane Maria's devastating blow to Puerto Rico, according to a Penn State demographer.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study uncovers major differences in billing complexity among US health insurersOne frequently proclaimed advantage of single-payer health care is its potential to reduce administrative costs, but new research from the Vancouver School of Economics calls that assumption into question.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Payment reform fix?Hospital payment experiment in Maryland failed to deliver on the promise of shifting care from hospitals toward less expensive outpatient and primary care settings.Researchers say that weak incentives for physicians may have limited the program's effectiveness.
19h
Viden

Danmarks dyreste rumprojekt sendes ud i rummetSe med, når et 314 kilo tungt observatorium sendes afsted til den internationale rumstation med en Falcon 9 raket fra den legendariske affyringsrampe på Cape Canaveral i Florida.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Late-winter storms ease California's dive back into droughtStorms hitting at the end of California's rainy season have eased the state's plunge back into drought.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cellphones gaining acceptance inside US schoolsCellphones are still absent from most U.S. schools but new data shows them steadily gaining acceptance as administrators bow to parents' wishes to keep tabs on their kids and teachers find ways to work them into lessons.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Review: Book shows Apollo 8 was a big risk for 3 astronauts"Rocket Men" (Random House), by Robert Kurson
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trump rolls back Obama-era fuel efficiency rulesThe Trump administration rolled back Obama-era pollution and fuel efficiency rules for cars and light trucks on Monday, saying they were too stringent.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spear points prove early inhabitants liked to travelCareful examination of numerous fluted spear points found in Alaska and western Canada prove that the Ice Age peopling of the Americas was much more complex than previously believed, according to a study done by two Texas A&M University researchers.
19h

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