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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Behaviors, movements, and transmission of droplet-mediated respiratory diseases during transcontinental airline flights [Applied Biological Sciences]With over 3 billion airline passengers annually, the inflight transmission of infectious diseases is an important global health concern. Over a dozen cases of inflight transmission of serious infections have been documented, and air travel can serve as a conduit for the rapid spread of newly emerging infections and pandemics....
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Popular Science

Electric aircraft could soon become an industry standardAviation The aviation industry is on the verge of a major shift in propulsion, experts say. Siemens Innovation Day offered the U.S. a first look at the company's electric GA aircraft, a Magnus LSA fitted with a 55-kW Siemens electric motor.
36min
Ingeniøren

Ministerium bryder loven: Signalprogrammets granskning mørklagtFå indblik i en lang, kompliceret og ifølge to eksperter ulovlig proces, der sikrer, at den over 300 sider lange granskning af signalprogrammet kan holdes uden for offentlighedens lys i næsten et halvt år.
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LATEST

The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: The Writing on the WallToday in 5 Lines Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen announced that President Trump will sign a proclamation for the deployment of National Guard troops to the U.S.-Mexico border. Nielsen added that replacements and updates to the border wall would qualify as “new wall.” The White House said the U.S. will remain in Syria, a day after Trump said he wants to “bring the troops back home.” F
11min
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Facebook Exposed 87 Million Users to Cambridge AnalyticaRacebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg says the fixes to Facebook's data-sharing woes will be a "multi-year" process.
11min
Live Science

Could Boeing's 'Starliner' Spacecraft Be a Next Step for Reaching the Moon and Beyond?The space travel of science fiction could be closer than you think.
13min
Science : NPR

DNA Test Reveals Fertility Doctor Used His Own Sperm To Impregnate PatientKelli Rowlette first thought the results were a mistake when she learned her dad was not her dad. But she learned her mother's OB-GYN had lied and inseminated her using his semen and not a donor's. (Image credit: Jose A. Bernat Bacete/Getty Images)
21min
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Facebook's New Data-Sharing Policies Are Crashing TinderUsers can't log into the dating app after Facebook adjusted its app integration policies.
23min
The Scientist RSS

Organic Fertilizers Rife With Microplastics: StudyConverting biowaste to plant food is an overlooked source of tiny plastic pollutants, researchers say.
36min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lizards, mice, bats and other vertebrates are important pollinators tooAlthough less familiar as flower visitors than insect pollinators, vertebrate pollinators are more likely to have coevolved tight relationships of high value to the plants they service, supplying essential reproductive aid for which few or no other species may substitute.
46min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Montana State study: LGBQ students less likely to stay in STEM majorsMontana State University education professor Bryce Hughes' paper, 'Coming Out in STEM: factors affecting retention of sexual minority STEM students,' was published March 14 in Science Advances. Hughes found students who identified as lesbian, gay, bisexual or queer were 7 percent less likely than their heterosexual peers to complete their STEM degree.
46min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Outpatient treatment for cancer condition offers effective new approach for patientsA novel approach to treating fluid build-up around the lungs of cancer patients could deliver a more effective home-based treatment for thousands of people who might be approaching the end of their lives, according to a new study led by the University of Bristol and North Bristol NHS Trust.
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Science | The Guardian

Tax sugar, alcohol and tobacco to help the poor, say expertsOn the eve of the UK introduction of a sugary drinks levy, experts urge global adoption of ‘sin taxes’ to deter unhealthy habits and check the spread of disease So called “sin taxes” on sugary drinks, alcohol and tobacco not only work, but will help rather than unduly penalise the poor, according to a major new international analysis. Just a day before the UK brings in a levy on sugary drinks, ex
47min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Personal outreach to landowners is vital to conservation program successVirginia Tech College of Natural Resources and Environment research published in the scientific journal PLOS ONE shows that private landowners trust conservation agencies more and have better views of program outcomes when they accompany conservation biologists who are monitoring habitat management on their land.
56min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rare coastal martens under high risk of extinction in coming decadesThe coastal marten, a small but fierce forest predator, is at a high risk for extinction in Oregon and northern California in the next 30 years due to threats from human activities, according to a new study.
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Live Science

A Third of Young Millennials Are Confused About This Incontrovertible FactYounger people seem perplexed about whether Earth is round or flat.
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Live Science

Can Eating Pasta Really Help You Lose Weight?Is this mainstay of Italian cuisine really good for your waistline?
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Big Think

Facebook removes 200+ accounts linked to Russian “troll factory”Facebook announced Tuesday that it had removed more than 200 pages and accounts tied to the Russia-based Internet Research Agency, which has been accused of meddling in the U.S. presidential election. Read More
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The Atlantic

The Wild Card in the Russia Spy CaseRussia has been working overtime this past month to absolve itself of alleged involvement in the poisoning of former spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia on British soil. It has claimed that it does not possess Novichok, the military-grade nerve agent used in the attack. It has accused the United Kingdom and its allies of spearheading an anti-Russia “ crusade .” It has even gone so far as to
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Using astronomy to save a speciesScientists have been developing a technique to count animals that is usually used to map stars.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Self-healing metal oxides could protect against corrosionResearchers find a solid protective coating material that can flow like a liquid to repair any cracks that develop.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Old and healthy: Researchers find novel genes for longevity in mammalsThe genetic basis of lifespan determination is poorly understood. Most research has been done on short-lived animals, and it is unclear if these insights can be transferred to long-lived mammals like humans. By comparing genes of long- and short-lived rodents, researchers have now identified several novel genes possibly influencing longevity and healthy aging in mammals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Obesity impacts liver health in kids as young as 8 years oldA new study found that weight gain, obesity can put children as young as age 8 at risk for a serious liver disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Practicing Tai Chi helps improve respiratory function in patients with COPDCurrently, pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is used where available to improve exercise capacity and quality of life, but the treatment requires access to trained staff and specialized facilities. A new study in the journal CHEST® looked at Tai Chi as a lower cost, more easily accessed treatment option. Investigators found that this slow, methodical form of exercise is equivalent to PR for improving
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Personal outreach to landowners is vital to conservation program successResearch published in PLOS ONE shows that private landowners trust conservation agencies more and have better views of program outcomes when they accompany conservation biologists who are monitoring habitat management on their land.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rare coastal martens under high risk of extinction in coming decadesThe coastal marten, a small but fierce forest predator, is at a high risk for extinction in Oregon and northern California in the next 30 years due to threats from human activities.
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The Atlantic

It's Really Hard to Say What the U.S. Wants in SyriaUS Islamic State D. TrumpLast week President Trump told an audience in Ohio, as an aside, that U.S. troops would leave Syria “like, very soon.” This was news to his national-security team, as the U.S. military was, at about the same time , reportedly planning to send dozens more troops to the country. Certainly Brett McGurk, the special presidential envoy for the global coalition to counter the Islamic State, did not ind
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The Scientist RSS

Bats Identified as Source of Pig-Killing Coronavirus in ChinaThe virus caused an outbreak that began in Guangdong Province and left nearly 25,000 piglets dead.
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Big Think

Online conspiracy theorists are more diverse (and ordinary) than most assumeConspiracy theorising may be a symptom of a breakdown of trust in institutions like the government and the media. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook scandal affected more users than thought: up to 87MFacebook Mark ZuckerbergFacebook revealed Wednesday that tens of millions more people might have been exposed in the Cambridge Analytica privacy scandal than previously thought and said it will restrict the user data that outsiders can access.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cocoa bean roasting can preserve both chocolate health benefits, tasteManipulating the temperature and the length of time under which cocoa beans are roasted can simultaneously preserve and even boost the potency of some bioactive and antioxidant compounds while protecting desired sensory aspects of chocolate, according to Penn State researchers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New 'NanoZymes' use light to kill bacteriaResearchers from RMIT University have developed a new artificial enzyme that uses light to kill bacteria.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Frogs' and 'mushrooms' bubble up in quantum fluidsQuantum fluids may mix in very weird ways, according to new computer simulations of exotic states of matter known as Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs).
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Live Science

What's in a Fat Cell?It's a crucial component of the human body.
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Live Science

500 Million Years Ago, a Sea Worm Hosted a Poop Picnic for His Shelled FriendsAbout 500 million years ago, a sea worm ate dinner and left behind the mother lode of turds. Then, the worm left its burrow on the seafloor, and some shelled critters discovered the droppings and died — fossilized for eternity around the poopy picnic.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

An international study is the first large survey on epilepsyResearch with multicentric approach analyzed with neuroimaging technique more than 3,800 volunteers in search of anatomical alterations specific to each epilepsy subtype. In the long term, research aims at identifying markers to improve treatment -- about one-third of epilepsy patients is refractory to conventional drugs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Frogs' and 'mushrooms' bubble up in quantum fluidsQuantum fluids may mix in very weird ways, according to new computer simulations of exotic states of matter known as Bose-Einstein condensates.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cocoa bean roasting can preserve both chocolate health benefits, tasteManipulating the temperature and the length of time under which cocoa beans are roasted can simultaneously preserve and even boost the potency of some bioactive and antioxidant compounds while protecting desired sensory aspects of chocolate, according to Penn State researchers.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New 'NanoZymes' use light to kill bacteriaResearchers from RMIT University have developed a new artificial enzyme that uses light to kill bacteria. The artificial enzymes could one day be used in the fight against infections, and to keep high-risk public spaces like hospitals free of bacteria like E. coli and Golden Staph.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Are people with Parkinson's disease depressed or demoralized?People with Parkinson's disease who show signs of depression may actually have a condition called demoralization, according to a study published in the April 4, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. That study found demoralization may be common in Parkinson's disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Smart ink adds new dimensions to 3-D printingNew smart ink turns 3-D-printed structures into objects that can change shape and color.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Magnetic hot spots on neutron stars survive for millions of yearsA study of the evolution of magnetic fields inside neutron stars shows that instabilities can create intense magnetic hot spots that survive for millions of years, even after the star's overall magnetic field has decayed significantly.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Astrophysicists map the infant universe in 3-D and discover 4,000 early galaxiesAstronomers have announced one of the largest 3-D maps of the infant universe.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Relaxation response may reduce blood pressure by altering expression of a set of genesA new study has identified genes associated with the body's response to relaxation techniques and sheds light on the molecular mechanisms by which certain interventions may work to lower blood pressure.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mutation of worm gene, swip-10, triggers age-dependent death of dopamine neuronsLooking at dopamine neurons in a tiny worm's brain, scientists have identified a novel pathway that sustains the health of these cells. The normal actions of swip-10 to protect dopamine neurons are indirect, derived from the gene's action in support cells called glia, adjacent to the dopamine neurons. Glial cells are known to play a critical role in shaping neuronal development, structure, and fun
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The Atlantic

How the Howard University Protests Hint at the Future of Campus PoliticsStudents at Howard University occupied the campus’s Johnson Administration Building in protest in 1968. They did so again in 1989. Those occupations lasted four and five days, respectively, and ended with varying degrees of success. Now, current Howard students are in day seven of an occupation of their own. It is the longest takeover of the building in the institution’s history. The dynamics cur
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Incorporating natural processes to exploit ecological forces and drive recovery of coral reef ecosystems is imperativeGlobal declines of coral reefs—particularly in the Caribbean—have spurred efforts to grow corals in underwater nurseries and transplant them to enable recovery. However, current approaches rarely incorporate the key ecological reef processes critical to facilitating restoration and improving the odds of success.
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NYT > Science

California Family Gets $1.6 Million After 3-Year-Old Was Scarred by BedbugsIt was the largest ever payout for a single family in the United States for a bedbug case, the family’s lawyer said.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Facilitating coral restorationGlobal declines of coral reefs -- particularly in the Caribbean -- have spurred efforts to grow corals in underwater nurseries and transplant them to enable recovery. However, current approaches rarely incorporate the key ecological reef processes critical to facilitating restoration and improving the odds of success.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Get moving to get happierPhysical activity has long been known to reduce depression and anxiety, and is commonly prescribed to prevent or cure negative mental health conditions.
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Same, Only DifferentA column about the surprising cultural, structural, philosophical, and mystical features common to mathematics and food -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

'Most' People on Facebook May Have Had Their Accounts ScrapedFacebook Privacy DataUpdated on April 4 at 5:14 p.m. ET It seems like an innocuous enough feature. Until Wednesday, anybody on Facebook could enter a phone number or email address and find the Facebook profile associated with it. Useful if you’re searching for “John Smith” or its global equivalents. But now imagine that someone has a list of email addresses or phone numbers that have been gathered outside of Facebook
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Popular Science

There's one magic substance that will help with America's gut problemsHealth Because you're almost certainly not getting enough of it. Despite a broad-spectrum recommendation for roughage, researchers can’t say for certain why it’s so good for us, what diseases it actually helps prevent, or how exactly…
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Are high-risk anticholinergic medicines prescribed too often for older adults?A team of researchers decided to study how frequently healthcare providers prescribe potentially inappropriate medications like anticholinergics in light of recommendations like those from the AGS Beers Criteria. Their study was published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study shows hope for hearing lossUSC and Harvard scientists found a new way to fix cells deep inside the ear, which could help millions of people who suffer hearing loss.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Diverse metals mix it up in novel nanoparticlesResearchers have learned to combine up to eight different metals in a single tiny, uniformly mixed nanoparticle.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scoliosis surgery in children with cerebral palsy -- quality of life benefits outweigh risksFor children with severe cerebral palsy (CP), surgery for scoliosis (sideways curvature of the spine) significantly improves the quality of life (QoL) for them and their caregivers, reports a study in the April 4, 2018, issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in partnership with Wolters Kluwer.
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Police Say YouTube Policies Motivated Shooter Nasim AghdamYouTube Nasim AghdamSan Bruno police identified the attacker as Nasim Najafi Aghdam, a woman in her late thirties from San Diego.
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Feed: All Latest

Experimental Controllers Could Change Gaming for GoodNew methods of controller use are merging the gaming world and the real one—and Nintendo is leading the charge.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team identifies hidden clues to ancient supercontinents, confirms PannotiaAn Ohio University geologist who first proposed the now-accepted supercontinent cycle theory in the 1980s has rallied to the cause of one of those supercontinents, Pannotia, that is in danger of being overlooked.
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New on MIT Technology Review

This stem-cell implant could halt an incredibly common cause of blindnessThe dream of a stem-cell revolution hasn’t yet materialized—but a small study appears to have used the technology to ward off macular degeneration.
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New Scientist - News

Eye implant improves vision in people with age-related blindnessA patch of cells implanted at the back of the eye has stabilised and in some cases improved the vision of four people with dry age-related macular degeneration
2h
Popular Science

A realistic guide to the current crop of tech rumorsGadgets Catch up on all the technology gossip without all the hype. Keep it real with your tech rumors.
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Feed: All Latest

Fin7: The Billion-Dollar Hacking Group Behind a String of Big BreachesFin7, also known as JokerStash, Carbanak, and other names, is one of the most successful criminal hacking groups in the world.
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The Atlantic

April Blooms: Spring Is on the WayAs the Northern Hemisphere begins to warm and the spring equinox has passed, flowers and trees finally appear to be in bloom. Gathered here today, a small collection of images from the past few weeks from North America, Asia, and Europe, of tulips, sunshine, and cherry blossoms—surely signs of warmer days to come.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ohio professor identifies hidden clues to ancient supercontinents, confirms PannotiaAn Ohio University geologist who first proposed the now-accepted supercontinent cycle theory in the 1980s has rallied to the cause of one of those supercontinents, Pannotia, that is in danger of being overlooked.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Anemia: When cells fail to produce enough protein factoriesEvery day, stem cells in our bone marrow produce billions of new red blood cells. Any disruption in this process can result in serious disease. Researchers have succeeded in furthering our understanding of how blood cells are formed. Their insights into the molecular foundations of this process may help break new ground in the treatment of certain types of anemia.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Breakthrough made in atomically thin magnetsResearchers have become the first to control atomically thin magnets with an electric field, a breakthrough that provides a blueprint for producing exceptionally powerful and efficient data storage in computer chips, among other applications.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Making headway in infant leukemia researchAround 600 children under the age of 15 are diagnosed with leukemia each year in Germany. The effects are especially dramatic if this severe illness develops at birth or shortly afterwards. Research has now discovered another molecular cause for a particularly aggressive type of leukemia in infants.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How live vaccines enhance the body's immune responseResearchers have discovered a new mechanism by which live vaccines induce immunity. Molecules produced exclusively by live microorganisms are recognized by specialized receptors of the immune system, subsequently triggering a protective immune response. The new findings may help improve the safety and efficacy of vaccines.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Marker for cancer stem cellsCells with stem-cell characteristics appear to be especially important in the formation and metastasis of tumors. Scientists have now developed a universal fluorescent probe for these 'cancer stem cells.' This dye also selectively kills off the cells.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sleep deficiency increases risk of a motor vehicle crashIndividuals may be unaware of their degree of impairment from sleep deficiency, which raises the question of whether these individuals are at an increased risk of motor vehicle crash.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Rockoons' may soon make launching satellites into space more accessibleA Purdue University-affiliated startup is seeking to open up access to space for microsatellite companies by modernizing a launch technique first used in the 1950s.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

GPM satellite probes Tropical Cyclone Iris weakening near Australian coastThe Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite analyzed Tropical Cyclone Iris' heavy rainfall as it lingered near the Queensland coast. Iris has since weakened and is moving away from the coast.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers developing renewable energy approach for producing ammoniaResearchers at the University of Notre Dame are developing a renewable energy approach for synthesizing ammonia, an essential component of fertilizers that support the world's food production needs. The Haber-Bosch process developed in the early 1900s for producing ammonia relies on non-renewable fossil fuels and has limited applications for only large, centralized chemical plants.
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The Atlantic

Why Big Business Isn't Defending Amazon Against TrumpIn big, bold letters, the homepage of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s website describes the organization’s mission: “Standing up for American Enterprise.” But the huge business federation—like its counterparts, the Business Roundtable and other major corporate lobbies—was conspicuously silent when Donald Trump launched a salvo of tweets earlier this week accusing Amazon of dodging taxes, bilking t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Telomerase-expressing liver cells regenerate the organLiver stem cells that express high levels of telomerase, a protein often associated with resistance to aging, act in mice to regenerate the organ during normal cellular turnover or tissue damage, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Human-engineered changes on Mississippi River increased extreme floodsA new study has revealed for the first time the last 500-year flood history of the Mississippi River. It shows a dramatic rise in the size and frequency of extreme floods in the past century -- mostly due to projects to straighten, channelize, and bound the river with artificial levees.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Molecular details of protein crystal nucleation uncoveredResearchers have for the first time uncovered the molecular details of protein crystal nucleation, a process with great medical and scientific relevance. The team also developed a new methodology to study a broad class of systems that have remained elusive to date.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Increase of plant species on mountain tops is accelerating with global warmingOver the past 10 years, the number of plant species on European mountain tops has increased by five-times more than during the period 1957-66. Data on 302 European peaks covering 145 years shows that the acceleration in the number of mountain-top species is unequivocally linked to global warming.
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cognitive science

Practices and pitfalls in inferring neural representationssubmitted by /u/sprockervp [link] [comments]
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Dozen black holes found at galactic centreMilky Way Black HolesA dozen black holes may lie at the centre of our galaxy, the Milky Way, researchers say.
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Big Think

Why does the conspiracy theory of Martin Luther King's assassination persist?"People need to see something of a balance between effect and cause... that if something has a huge evil effect, it should be the result of a huge evil cause." Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Satellites, supercomputers, and machine learning provide real-time crop type dataCorn and soybean fields look similar from space - at least they used to. But now, scientists have proven a new technique for distinguishing the two crops using satellite data and the processing power of supercomputers.
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Baleen Whales Intermingled as They Evolved, and Share DNA With Distant CousinsGenome sequencing of six species of baleen whales shows how they have evolved into more of a network and have a wide range of genetic diversity, according to a new study.
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Big Think

Facebook removes 200+ accounts linked to Russian “troll factory”Facebook announced Tuesday that it had removed more than 200 pages and accounts tied to the Russia-based Internet Research Agency, which has been accused of meddling in the U.S. presidential election. Read More
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Scientific American Content: Global

Antarctic Glaciers Lost Stunning Amount of Ground in Recent YearsLinked to a warming ocean, ice retreat was more rapid than even at the end of the last Ice Age -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Efforts to contain Mississippi floods may have made them worseIntensive management of the Mississippi River has increased the size of its largest floods, suggests a new study.
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: In Footprints on Scotland’s Isle of Skye, Signs of a Dinosaur PlaygroundAncient footprints left by long-necked sauropods offer a snapshot of the mid-Jurassic period, which has yielded relatively few fossil remains.
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The Scientist RSS

Postnatal Zika Infection Causes Brain Damage in Infant MacaquesThe findings highlight the need for long-term monitoring of children exposed to the virus, say scientists.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physicists zoom in on mysterious 'missing' antimatterWhen the Universe arose some 13.7 billion years ago, the Big Bang generated matter and antimatter particles in mirroring pairs. So the reigning physics theory goes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Treating vision lossAge-related macular degeneration (AMD) affects more than 1.75 million individuals in the United States. Because the population is aging, that number will increase to almost 3 million by 2020. Between 80 and 90 percent of cases in this country are the dry version of the condition, for which no effective treatment exists.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Notre Dame researchers developing renewable energy approach for producing ammoniaAmmonia is an essential component of fertilizers that support the world's food production needs, and currently production relies on non-renewable fossil fuels and has limited applications for only large, centralized chemical plants.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Post-Ebola cataract surgery can safely restore visionCataract surgery can be safely performed on Ebola virus disease survivors with impaired vision, Emory Eye Center ophthalmologists and 40 colleagues around the world report.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UTHealth finds unprecedented psychological distress months after HarveyFour months after Hurricane Harvey soaked the Houston area and displaced more than a third of the population, an alarming 52 percent of Harris County residents said they were still struggling to recover, according to a new report from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Boosting natural defenses to fight antibiotic-resistant pneumoniaAntibiotic resistance is a growing threat in bacterial pneumonia. While immune-stimulating treatments can help the body fight the invaders, they can also cause inflammation that damages and weakens lung tissue. But new research suggests a way to enhance bacterial killing without the inflammation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers test stem cell-based retinal implant for common cause of vision lossPhysicians and researchers at the USC Roski Eye Institute have collaborated with other California institutions to show that a first-in-kind stem cell-based retinal implant is feasible for use in people with advanced dry age-related macular degeneration.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers advise long-term monitoring of infants infected with Zika after birthPostnatal Zika infection of infant rhesus macaques results in persistent abnormalities in brain structure and function as well as behavior and emotions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Organic fertilizers are an overlooked source of microplastic pollutionOrganic fertilizers from biowaste fermentation act as a vehicle for microplastic particles to enter the terrestrial environment, with the amount of microplastic particles differing based on pre-treatment methods and plant type, a new study shows.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Retinal implant halts vision loss from macular degenerationA bioengineered retinal implant is safe for use in humans and may be effective in treating vision loss caused by a type of macular degeneration, a progressive blinding disease where no therapeutic options currently exist for advanced stages of the condition.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Shrimp-inspired camera may enable underwater navigationThe underwater environment may appear to the human eye as a dull-blue, featureless space. However, a vast landscape of polarization patterns appear when viewed through a camera that is designed to see the world through the eyes of many of the animals that inhabit the water.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Climate change and recreational activities at Walden Pond have altered its ecosystemClimate change and recreational activity at Walden Pond may have altered the ecology of this iconic lake during the past 1,800 years, affecting the water quality and plankton community, according to a study published April 4, 2018, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by J. Curt Stager from Paul Smith's College, USA, and colleagues.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hubble makes the first precise distance measurement to an ancient globular star clusterAstronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have for the first time precisely measured the distance to one of the oldest objects in the universe, a collection of stars born shortly after the big bang.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Breakthrough made in atomically thin magnetsCornell researchers have become the first to control atomically thin magnets with an electric field, a breakthrough that provides a blueprint for producing exceptionally powerful and efficient data storage in computer chips, among other applications.
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New Scientist - News

Our obsession with a ‘free’ internet led to Facebook data rowIf you’re not paying, you’re the product, so the saying goes. It's time to re-evaluate our pact with the tech giants that has driven the market in our data
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New Scientist - News

The centre of our galaxy may be swarming with 10,000 black holesMilky Way Black HolesWe knew that the centre of the Milky Way was home to a supermassive black hole. But now we’ve also spotted evidence of 10,000 smaller black holes flanking it
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New Scientist - News

Mind-reading headset lets you Google just with your thoughtsA mind-reading device can answer questions in your head. It works by picking up signals sent from your brain when you think about saying something
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Photosynthetic protein structure that harvests and traps infrared lightScientists have solved the structure of a photosynthetic protein to reveal how it converts near-infrared light into an electrical charge. The new study gives a pioneering insight into the efficiency and limits of the life-giving process, photosynthesis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ancient origins of viruses discoveredNew research has found that many of the viruses infecting us today have ancient evolutionary histories that date back to the first vertebrates and perhaps the first animals in existence.
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Feed: All Latest

With Some Structure, Stem Cells Might Still Stop Vision LossPoorly regulated stem cell treatments have blinded some macular degeneration patients. But a new technique is showing therapeutic promise.
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NeuWrite West

Belonging & Belongings: Who’s in the Room Depends on What’s in the RoomThis article is part of an ongoing blog series, titled Inequality in STEM: a Dive Into the Data . In this series, we cover recent research exploring and quantifying inequality in STEM. We'll discuss different aspects of inequality, including barriers to career advancement and a chilly social climate, as well as the efficacy of various interventions to combat bias. Our goal with these pieces is to
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Science : NPR

Center Of The Milky Way Has Thousands Of Black Holes, Study ShowsThe supermassive black hole lurking at the center of our galaxy appears to have a lot of company, according to a new study that suggests the monster is surrounded by about 10,000 other black holes. (Image credit: Spitzer Space Telescope/NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (SSC/Caltech))
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The Atlantic

What Motivated the YouTube Shooter?YouTube Nasim AghdamOn Tuesday, a woman armed with a 9-millimeter handgun entered the YouTube headquarters in San Bruno, California, during lunchtime. She found a courtyard where employees were eating, and she began shooting, injuring three people before killing herself. One of the victims remains in critical condition. Police have identified the suspect as Nasim Aghdam, a 39-year-old woman from Southern California.
3h
The Atlantic

This Camera Can See the Mantis Shrimp's Invisible WorldTo the human eye, adapted for land, the underwater landscape can appear too dim, too blurry, and too blue. It’s easy to get lost. To mantis shrimp, however, the ocean environment is richly textured and varied. For a small glimpse of the mantis shrimp’s view of the ocean, humans can now look through a mantis-shrimp-inspired camera from a team led by Viktor Gruev, an engineer at the University of I
3h
New on MIT Technology Review

Big organizations may like killer robots, but workers and researchers sure don’t
3h
Big Think

Religion offered us social capital, why atheism needs to catch upOne of the tangible benefits of religion is the community it can foster. What happens when those social connections start to decay? Read More
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate change and recreational activities at Walden Pond have altered its ecosystemClimate change and recreational activity at Walden Pond may have altered the ecology of this iconic lake during the past 1800 years, affecting the water quality and plankton community, according to a study published April 4, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by J. Curt Stager from Paul Smith's College, USA, and colleagues.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Newly discovered hormone helps keep plants from dehydratingResearchers have discovered a small hormone that helps plants retain water when none is available in the soil. The study shows how the peptide CLE25 moves from the roots to the leaves when water is scarce and helps prevent water loss by closing pores in the leaf surface.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tens of thousands of black holes may exist in Milky Way's centerMilky Way Black HolesAstrophysicists have discovered a dozen black holes gathered around Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), the supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. The finding is the first to support a decades-old prediction, opening up myriad opportunities to better understand the universe.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New coronavirus emerges from bats in China, devastates young swineA newly identified coronavirus that killed nearly 25,000 piglets in 2016-17 in China emerged from horseshoe bats near the origin of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), which emerged in 2002 in the same bat species. The new virus, called swine acute diarrhea syndrome coronavirus (SADS-CoV), doesn't appear to infect people, unlike SARS-CoV.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Early stimulation improves performance of bioengineered human heart cellsResearchers are now able to use induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) to form a model of human adult-like cardiac muscle by introducing electric and mechanical stimulation at an early stage.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Microscopic revelations point to new blood infection therapiesResearchers at the University of Calgary's Cumming School of Medicine (CSM) have for the first time been able to observe -- live and in real-time -- how the human body responds to often lethal fungal blood infections in the lung. In the study, the fungal infection Candida albicans was introduced to mice or human models of the lung vasculature and as blood was pumped over that system, researchers r
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Satellites, supercomputers, and machine learning provide real-time crop type dataCorn and soybean fields look similar from space -- at least they used to. But now, scientists have proven a new technique for distinguishing the two crops using satellite data and the processing power of supercomputers.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Watch Live Today: Scripting the "Quantum Age" with Tools Fashioned from Subatomic ParticlesQuantum matter researcher Rob Moore discusses how novel materials harnessing the quantum properties of atoms and electrons will define the next generation of technology -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Scientific American Content: Global

Zika Exposure Even after Birth May Lead to Brain DamageA monkey study heightens concerns about widespread harm from the virus -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Freedom and flexibility: Thinking outside the cell for functional genomicsOver the past two decades, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a DOE Office of Science User Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, has transitioned from a high-throughput genome sequencing center to a national user facility that provides researchers around the world with access to sequencing and computational analysis capabilities on projects relevant to t
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists explain what happens when nanoparticles collideHelmets that do a better job of preventing concussions and other brain injuries. Earphones that protect people from damaging noises. Devices that convert "junk" energy from airport runway vibrations into usable power.
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Science : NPR

A Novel Virus Killed 24,000 Piglets In China. Where Did It Come From?At first, tests were positive for porcine epidemic diarrhea virus. Then something strange happened. The pigs stopped testing positive for that virus — but kept getting sick. (Image credit: xPacifica /Getty Images)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fragile X imaging study reveals differences in infant brainsFor the first time, researchers have used MRIs to show that babies with the neurodevelopmental condition fragile X syndrome had less-developed white matter compared to infants that did not develop the condition. Imaging various sections of white matter from different angles can help researchers focus on the underlying brain circuitry important for proper neuron communication.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

GPM satellite probes Tropical Cyclone Iris weakening near Australian coastThe Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite analyzed Tropical Cyclone Iris' heavy rainfall as it lingered near the Queensland coast. Iris has since weakened and is moving away from the coast.
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Popular Science

I'm creating a song using cool music tech. We tackled drums, now it's time for guitar.Gadgets Somnium's guitars allow you to swap out guitar pickups in seconds. Over the next few months, I’m going to explore some new pieces of music tech that embrace change, but also preserve what I love about music making: the human performance…
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The Scientist RSS

Bowhead Whales Impress Researchers With Their Song DiversityA group of around 300 whales produced 184 distinct songs over just a few years, according to a new study.
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The Atlantic

Silicon Valley 'Has No Words'I always wince when I see someone lament that “there are no words” to express something. Words: These are the tools humans possess, before all others, for expression. To claim that they have no power is to forsake the mutual compassion that communication affords. And so I winced on Tuesday, upon seeing nearly identical responses to the YouTube shooting from Google CEO Sundar Pichai and YouTube CE
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hubble makes the first precise distance measurement to an ancient globular star clusterAstronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have for the first time precisely measured the distance to one of the oldest objects in the universe, a collection of stars born shortly after the big bang.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How did gonorrhea become a drug-resistant superbug?UNC School of Medicine researchers have identified mutations to the bacterium Neisseria gonnorrhoeae that enable resistance to ceftriaxone that could lead to the global spread of ceftriaxone-resistant 'superbug' strains.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The great acceleration reaches new heightsAn international team of researchers, including researchers at Edysan laboratorie (CNRS / Université de Picardie Jules Verne) has observed an acceleration in the increase of biodiversity on mountain peaks in Europe. This is a new indicator of the 'great acceleration': an increasingly rapid inflation of different parameters around the world (glacier retreat, coral bleaching, etc.) seen in recent ye
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ancient origins of viruses discoveredResearch published today in Nature has found that many of the viruses infecting us today have ancient evolutionary histories that date back to the first vertebrates and perhaps the first animals in existence.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Increase of plant species on mountain tops is accelerating with global warmingOver the past 10 years, the number of plant species on European mountain tops has increased by five-times more than during the period 1957-66. Data on 302 European peaks covering 145 years shows that the acceleration in the number of mountain-top species is unequivocally linked to global warming.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Photosynthetic protein structure that harvests and traps infrared lightScientists from the University of Sheffield have solved the structure of a photosynthetic protein to reveal how it converts near-infrared light into an electrical charge. The new study gives a pioneering insight into the efficiency and limits of the life-giving process, photosynthesis.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Molecular details of protein crystal nucleation uncoveredA team of researchers led by Dr. Mike Sleutel from the VIB-VUB Center for Structural Biology in collaboration with scientists from the Institute for Complex Molecular Systems of the Eindhoven University of Technology, and the CNRS in Grenoble, have for the first time uncovered the molecular details of protein crystal nucleation, a process with great medical and scientific relevance. The team also
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Adult-like human heart muscle grown from patient-specific stem cellsResearchers have developed a radically new approach to growing in the lab adult-like human heart muscle from human induced pluripotent stem cells in only four weeks. They compressed the development timeframe into a faster, more complete transition to cardiac maturity than any other team has done so far. They formed cardiac tissues from early-stage iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes, soon after the initia
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Early stimulation improves performance of bioengineered human heart cellsResearchers are now able to use induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) to form a model of human adult-like cardiac muscle by introducing electric and mechanical stimulation at an early stage.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New coronavirus emerges from bats in China, devastates young swineA newly identified coronavirus that killed nearly 25,000 piglets in 2016-17 in China emerged from horseshoe bats near the origin of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), which emerged in 2002 in the same bat species. The new virus, called swine acute diarrhea syndrome coronavirus (SADS-CoV), doesn't appear to infect people, unlike SARS-CoV. The NIAID-funded work was a colla
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study suggests tens of thousands of black holes exist in Milky Way's centerA Columbia University-led team of astrophysicists has discovered a dozen black holes gathered around Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), the supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. The finding is the first to support a decades-old prediction, opening up myriad opportunities to better understand the universe.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Newly discovered hormone helps keep plants from dehydratingResearchers at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) in Japan have discovered a small hormone that helps plants retain water when none is available in the soil. Published in the journal Nature on April 4, the study shows how the peptide CLE25 moves from the roots to the leaves when water is scarce and helps prevent water loss by closing pores in the leaf surface.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Telomerase-expressing liver cells regenerate the organ, Stanford researchers findLiver stem cells that express high levels of telomerase, a protein often associated with resistance to aging, act in mice to regenerate the organ during normal cellular turnover or tissue damage, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Human-engineered changes on Mississippi River increased extreme floodsA new study has revealed for the first time the last 500-year flood history of the Mississippi River. It shows a dramatic rise in the size and frequency of extreme floods in the past century -- mostly due to projects to straighten, channelize, and bound the river with artificial levees.
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Viden

Blomstrende bjergtoppe: Antallet af plantearter vokser hastigt på tinderneDet skyldes den globale opvarmning, viser 145 års data. Og på sigt kan det få katastrofale følger for mange arter.
4h
New Scientist - News

Congestion charge can cut childhood asthma attacks by halfA congestion charge in Stockholm not only cut levels of air pollution, it halved the number of children admitted to hospital with asthma attacks
4h
New Scientist - News

Miniature human brains with their own blood vessels grown in labMini brains with a blood supply have been made in the lab for the first time. They may lead to a better understanding of the brain, and new injury treatments
4h
New Scientist - News

Robots won’t take as many of our jobs as we feared, says reportNew OECD report says that the risk of jobs being handed over to artificial intelligence is a lot lower than previously forecast
4h
Live Science

The Most Precise Measurement of Antimatter Yet Deepens the Mystery of Why We ExistThe incredibly precise measurement could help explain why the universe exists.
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Feed: All Latest

Too Much Engineering Makes Mississippi River Floods WorseNew research confirms that the river's worst floods aren't just the result of bad weather—they're the result of bad engineering.
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Blog » Languages » English

Eyewire is in the cloud!Eyewire made a safe journey into the cloud. You should now be able to go back online. This was a big move, so if you experience any new bugs please let us know and we will get right on it. Tips on how to report bugs here . Happy Eyewiring! For Science! Art by Tyler Scagliarini
4h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Births of endangered Suffolk punch foals celebratedTwo Suffolk punch horses are being put forward for a charity's breeding programme.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ancient origins of viruses discoveredResearch published today in Nature has found that many of the viruses infecting us today have ancient evolutionary histories that date back to the first vertebrates and perhaps the first animals in existence.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Newly discovered hormone helps keep plants from dehydratingResearchers at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) in Japan have discovered a small hormone that helps plants retain water when none is available in the soil. Published in the journal Nature on April 4, the study shows how the peptide CLE25 moves from the roots to the leaves when water is scarce and helps prevent water loss by closing pores in the leaf surface.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Molecular details of protein crystal nucleation uncoveredA team of researchers led by Dr. Mike Sleutel from the VIB-VUB Center for Structural Biology in collaboration with scientists from the Institute for Complex Molecular Systems of the Eindhoven University of Technology, and the CNRS in Grenoble, have for the first time uncovered the molecular details of protein crystal nucleation, a process with great medical and scientific relevance. The team also
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Increase of plant species on mountain tops is accelerating with global warmingIt is not as lonely at the top as it used to be. At least not for plants which, due to global warming, are increasingly finding habitats on mountain tops that were formerly reserved for only the toughest and most hardy species. Over the past 10 years, the number of plant species on European mountain tops has increased by five times more than during the period 1957-66. Data on 302 European peaks co
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Photosynthetic protein structure that harvests and traps infrared lightScientists from the University of Sheffield have solved the structure of a photosynthetic protein to reveal how it converts near-infrared light into an electrical charge.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New coronavirus emerges from bats in China, devastates young swineA newly identified coronavirus that killed nearly 25,000 piglets in 2016-17 in China emerged from horseshoe bats near the origin of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), which emerged in 2002 in the same bat species. The new virus is named swine acute diarrhea syndrome coronavirus (SADS-CoV). It does not appear to infect people, unlike SARS-CoV which infected more than 8,00
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study suggests tens of thousands of black holes exist in Milky Way's centerMilky Way Black HolesA Columbia University-led team of astrophysicists has discovered a dozen black holes gathered around Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), the supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. The finding is the first to support a decades-old prediction, opening up myriad opportunities to better understand the universe.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Human-engineered changes on Mississippi River increased extreme floodsA new study has revealed for the first time the last 500-year flood history of the Mississippi River. It shows a dramatic rise in the size and frequency of extreme floods in the past century—mostly due to projects to straighten, channelize, and bound the river with artificial levees.
5h
cognitive science

New Brain Maps with Unmatched Detail May Change Neurosciencesubmitted by /u/NaiveSkeptic [link] [comments]
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Latest Headlines | Science News

A new coronavirus is killing pigs in ChinaGenetic evidence identifies a previously unknown coronavirus that’s causing problems in pigs.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

A dozen new black holes found in Milky Way’s centerTwelve small black holes spotted in the Milky Way’s center suggest thousands more in the galaxy’s inner region.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Crash! Scientists explain what happens when nanoparticles collideHelmets that do a better job of preventing concussions and other brain injuries. Earphones that protect people from damaging noises. Devices that convert 'junk' energy from airport runway vibrations into usable power. New research on the events that occur when tiny specks of matter called nanoparticles smash into each other could one day inform the development of such technologies.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Healthy red blood cells owe their shape to muscle-like structuresThe findings could shed light on sickle cell diseases and other disorders where red blood cells are deformed.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Breakthrough made in atomically thin magnetsCornell researchers have become the first to control atomically thin magnets with an electric field, a breakthrough that provides a blueprint for producing exceptionally powerful and efficient data storage in computer chips, among other applications.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global

Astronomers Spy Swarms of Black Holes at Our Galaxy's CoreAnticipated but never before seen, the existence of tens of thousands of these dark objects at the galactic center could have far-reaching implications for astrophysics -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
NeuWrite West

Can we have it all? Balancing family with an academic careerIn 2000 Mary Ann Mason became the first female Dean of Graduate Studies at UC Berkeley and encountered an auspicious demographic shift—51% of the incoming graduate class was female. [i] Unfortunately, the same trend did not hold true for faculty. While the total number of women faculty had also been increasing (though not at the same rate as students), the gap between tenured male and female facu
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Quanta Magazine

New Brain Maps With Unmatched Detail May Change NeuroscienceSitting at the desk in his lower-campus office at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, the neuroscientist Tony Zador turned his computer monitor toward me to show off a complicated matrix-style graph. Imagine something that looks like a spreadsheet but instead of numbers it’s filled with colors of varying hues and gradations. Casually, he said: “When I tell people I figured out the connectivity of tens
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook revamps privacy policy in heels of scandalFacebook Mark ZuckerbergFacebook's new privacy policy aims to explain the data it gathers on users more clearly—but doesn't actually change what it collects and shares.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

From car engines to exoplanetsChemical models developed to help limit the emission of pollutants by car engines are being used to study the atmospheres of hot exoplanets orbiting close to their stars. The results of a collaboration between French astronomers and applied combustion experts will be presented by Dr Oliva Venot and Dr Eric Hébrard at the European Week of Astronomy and Space Science (EWASS) 2018 in Liverpool.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

First land plants were parasitized by microbesSainsbury Laboratory researchers have found that the relationship between plants and filamentous microbes not only dates back millions of years, but that modern plants have maintained this ancient mechanism to accommodate and respond to microbial invaders.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A new way to atomically thin materialsMetallic conductivity and hydrophilicity of MXenes have established them as electrodes in rechargeable batteries and supercapacitors, as well as other applications, including photothermal cancer therapy, electromagnetic shielding, water purification and gas sensing. Researchers have now introduced a new production method. Instead of using conventional, yet more expensive, titanium aluminum carbide
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Scientific American Content: Global

Resisting Technology, Appalachian StyleAre people in Appalachia deprived of the benefits of technology, or are they protecting themselves from harmful effects of its misuse? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian

Apple poaches Google's AI chief in push to save SiriScottish-born John Giannandrea joined search firm in 2010 and helped it become market leader Apple has poached Google’s AI chief, John Giannandrea, to run its machine learning and AI operations, in the clearest sign yet that the iPhone creator is attempting to fix the problems that saw its early lead in the field crumble. Scottish-born Giannandrea, who joined Google in 2010 after his startup, Met
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How genes shape behaviorSome species of roundworms are just one millimeter long. Their brains have only 302 neurons, compared to our own 86 billion, and lack any recognizable breathing system. They share only 35 percent of their DNA with human beings.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New method allows scientists to watch brain cells interacting in real timeAn advance by UCLA neuroscientists could lead to a better understanding of astrocytes, a star-shaped brain cell believed to play a key role in neurological disorders like Lou Gehrig's, Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study shows how moms' brains are hard-wired to gather youngA mother's 'basic instinct' to grab her wandering offspring and return them to the nest depends on a specific set of brain cell signals, a new study in mice finds.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Acupressure for menstrual painCan acupressure achieve a sustained reduction in menstrual pain? Is an app-based self-care program particularly attractive to young women? These questions addressed in a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Prescribing antipsychotic medication for children with autismA new study has suggested that children with intellectual difficulty or autism are more likely to be given antipsychotic medication from a younger age than those without intellectual disability and have higher rates of hospitalisation for depression and for injury and also are at risk of other medical side effects.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Shaping behavior, not changing minds, more effective in boosting vaccination ratesA comprehensive review of scientific literature surrounding the psychology of vaccinations has shown that shaping behavior rather than trying to change minds is far more effective at persuading people to get immunized.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nanoparticles may cause DNA damage to brain cells across a cellular barrierNew research by scientists shows that when cellular barriers are exposed to metal nanoparticles, cellular messengers are released that may cause damage to the DNA of developing brain cells. The discovery may have implications for the development of potential drug targets in the treatment of neurodegenerative conditions, including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease.
5h
Big Think

You could be your own twinHuman chimerism seems to be a rare condition where twins swap DNA, but it may be more common than you think. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate change could impact critical food supplies for migratory birdsClimate change could disrupt a critical fueling-up stage for migratory birds just as they're preparing to depart on their autumn journeys to Central America, according to research published in the journal Ecology Letters.
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The Atlantic

Chappaquiddick Is a Damning Portrayal of a Real-Life TragedyThe 1969 Chappaquiddick incident—in which the late Senator Ted Kennedy took a late-night drive with his brother’s campaign staffer Mary Jo Kopechne, drove off a bridge in Martha’s Vineyard, and fled the crash site without reporting Kopechne’s drowning for 10 hours—is the definition of an abuse of political privilege. Kennedy eventually ended up with a two-month suspended sentence for leaving the
5h
The Atlantic

How the House Intelligence Committee BrokeIn the summer of 1977, Massachusetts Representative Tip O’Neill made an optimistic pitch to his leery colleagues as they prepared to vote against a resolution that would establish the House of Representatives’ first Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence: The panel would be “nonpartisan,” he promised . “There will be nothing partisan about its deliberations.” Four decades later, that promise
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lighting the way to targeted therapies and fewer side effectsSide effects from drugs working in non-target locations within the body can cause debilitating symptoms, often resulting in patients stopping their course of treatment early. But according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, researchers are developing strategies to reduce side effects by turning drugs on and off with light
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Connecting hearing helper molecules to the ear boneResearchers at USC and Harvard have developed a new approach to repair cells deep inside the ear—a potential remedy that could restore hearing for millions of elderly people and others who suffer hearing loss.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Robotics takes mass spec to the third dimension for forensics, pharma applicationsWithin the past decade, many advancements have been made in the 3-D market from printing to movies. Now scientists report in ACS' Analytical Chemistry that by combining a robotic arm and mass spectrometry, they can analyze the surface of irregularly shaped 3-D objects, potentially opening up new branches of forensics and pharmaceutics.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nanoparticles may cause DNA damage to brain cells across a cellular barrierNew research by scientists shows that when cellular barriers are exposed to metal nanoparticles, cellular messengers are released that may cause damage to the DNA of developing brain cells. The discovery may have implications for the development of potential drug targets in the treatment of neurodegenerative conditions, including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. The research was carrie
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Marker for cancer stem cells—Fluorescent probe identifies tumor-initiating cellsCells with stem-cell characteristics appear to be especially important in the formation and metastasis of tumors. Scientists have now developed a universal fluorescent probe for these "cancer stem cells". As reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, this dye also selectively kills off the cells.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Algae, impurities darken Greenland ice sheet and intensify meltingThe Dark Zone of the Greenland ice sheet has major impact on the surface melt of this immense store of ice. A new study -- based on drone surveys -- suggests that ice algae, dust and soot from wildfires and combustion are the main cause.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Giant clue in the search for Earth 2.0In a new study published today in the Astrophysical Journal, researchers from New York University Abu Dhabi and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, CA, share new findings about how the presence of "giant" planets (between 10 and 1000 times as large as the Earth) affects potentially habitable neighbors that would be discovered with the next generation of ground-based and space-borne
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Science : NPR

Suffering From Nature Deficit Disorder? Try Forest BathingPositive scientific results aside, the idea of shinrin-yoku shouldn't be surprising: Who hasn't felt an inner sense of well-being when walking along a forest trail? asks commentator Marcelo Gleiser. (Image credit: Andrew Clark/Getty Images/EyeEm)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research shows first land plants were parasitised by microbesRelationship between plants and filamentous microbes not only dates back millions of years, but modern plants have maintained this ancient mechanism to accommodate and respond to microbial invaders.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Unprecedented collaring effort aims to protect Tanzania's threatened elephantsIn Tanzania, the government, with support from WWF, has launched the country's largest ever elephant collaring effort to protect its dwindling elephant population. With almost 90 per cent of the elephants lost over the last 40 years in the Selous Game Reserve, a World Heritage site, enhancing rangers' ability to guard the remaining ones from poaching is essential to rebuilding the population.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Air Force looking to additive manufacturing to expand hypersonic flight capabilitiesThe Air Force is testing materials produced through ceramic additive manufacturing to advance their potential future use in hypersonic flight vehicles.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Algae, impurities darken the Greenland ice sheet and increase meltingThe Dark Zone of Greenland ice sheet is a large continuous region on the western flank of the ice sheet; it is some 400 kilometers wide stretching about 100 kilometres up from the margin of the ice.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Innovative camera technology to be launched into space to unravel the mysteries of lightningA University of Bath scientist will see over 15 years of work realised today (Monday 2 April), when a scientific experiment his research has contributed towards will be sent into space for the first time.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bowhead whales, the 'jazz musicians' of the Arctic, sing many different songsFour winters of audio recordings of bowhead whales singing under the ice off Greenland show a surprise variety in this animal's repertoire. Bowhead whales' vocalization patterns are very different from the only other whale known to make distinct songs, the humpback.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Timing of stress-hormone pulses controls weight gainNew research provides the first molecular understanding of why people gain weight due to chronic stress, disrupted circadian rhythms and treatment with glucocorticoid drugs: it's all in the timing of the dips and rises of a class of hormones called glucocorticoids -- predominantly the 'stress hormone' cortisol, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Smokers have worse diets than non-smokersSmokers have worse quality diets than former smokers or non-smokers, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Artificial intelligence helps predict likelihood of life on other worldsDevelopments in artificial intelligence may help us to predict the probability of life on other planets. The study uses artificial neural networks (ANNs) to classify planets into five types, estimating a probability of life in each case, which could be used in future interstellar exploration missions.
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The Atlantic

Walmart's Future Workforce: Robots and FreelancersOver the past few weeks, Walmart executives have sketched a picture of the company’s future that features more self-checkouts and a grocery-delivery business —soon escalating to 100 cities from a pilot program in six cities. Personal shoppers will fill plastic totes with avocados and paper towels from Walmart store shelves, and hand off packages to crowdsourced drivers idling in the parking lot.
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The Atlantic

“I Knew I Couldn’t Work Because of My Status”When Cristina Jiménez was 13 years old, her family moved to the United States from Ecuador. Three years later, her peers started getting jobs at the mall. But Jiménez was undocumented; that was not an option for her. She opted instead to babysit and work as a “helper” to a social worker in her apartment building. I recently talked with Jiménez, who is now the cofounder and president of United We
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

From car engines to exoplanetsChemical models developed to help limit the emission of pollutants by car engines are being used to study the atmospheres of hot exoplanets orbiting close to their stars. The results of a collaboration between French astronomers and applied combustion experts will be presented by Dr Oliva Venot and Dr Eric Hébrard at the European Week of Astronomy and Space Science (EWASS) 2018 in Liverpool.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

More communication needed regarding disposal of pet pharmaceuticalsNew research found that more than 60 percent of veterinary care professionals do not counsel their clients when it comes to the environmental stewardship aspect of medicine disposal.
6h
The Atlantic

Does It Matter If Trump Is a 'Target' or a 'Subject' of Mueller's Probe?Trump Robert MuellerCan President Trump breathe easy? The Washington Post reported Tuesday night that Trump is a subject of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, but not a target of the investigation. There’s something there for both sides—Trump supporters can argue that the president isn’t a target, and his critics can point out that the president remains und
6h
Popular Science

I’m a scientist who's suing the EPA. Here's why.Environment The EPA is broken, but we still have a chance to fix it. From where I sit as both a scientist and former EPA adviser, the motivation behind Scott Pruitt’s actions is as clear as day: He isn’t reforming the agency; he’s trying…
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Live Science

'Stingray' Spy Devices Are Eavesdropping in Washington, D.C.: Here's HowGovernment officials admitted that rogue spying devices are being used in Washington, D.C., to intercept people's cellphone data. What exactly are these devices?
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Scientific American Content: Global

Neandertal Face Shape Was All Over the AirThe jutting midface of Neandertals seems to have evolved to help get large volumes of air into an active body that needed lots of oxygen. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Frequency of skin cancer screening among indoor tannersSkin cancer screening is underused by indoor tanners.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tourniquet practice adopted from the military saves lives and limbs in civiliansNew study results demonstrate that the use of tourniquets improves survival in civilian trauma victims.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Are children of married first cousins at increased risk of common mood disorders, psychoses?Being a child of married first cousins was associated with a higher likelihood of receiving medicine for common mood disorders and psychoses.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

One in 3 older patients die following emergency department intubationA new study by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital investigated the outcomes for patients aged 65 and older after emergency department intubation across a variety of conditions and disease. Their results are published in Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Self-healing metal oxides could protect against corrosionResearchers find a solid protective coating material that can flow like a liquid to repair any cracks that develop.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sleep deficiency increases risk of a motor vehicle crashIndividuals may be unaware of their degree of impairment from sleep deficiency, which raises the question of whether these individuals are at an increased risk of motor vehicle crash. A team of researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital addressed this question and their results are published in BMC Medicine.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Using lung MRI to see where and why Canadians with asthma have poor disease controlResearchers at Western University and McMaster University are developing an innovative lung imaging method that provides a unique window on asthma that is aimed at guiding and personalizing treatment for Canadians with severe, poorly controlled asthma.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fragile X imaging study reveals differences in infant brainsFor the first time, UNC School of Medicine researchers have used MRIs to show that babies with the neurodevelopmental condition fragile X syndrome had less-developed white matter compared to infants that did not develop the condition. Imaging various sections of white matter from different angles can help researchers focus on the underlying brain circuitry important for proper neuron communication
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Viden

Stjæler robotten dit arbejde i fremtiden?Færre danskere end frygtet skal være bange for at miste jobbet til en robot, men alle skal være klar til forandringer, siger nye tal.
6h
Ingeniøren

Snakkesalige wifi-enheder kan afsløre overraskende meget om brugerenDen norske sikkerhedsmyndighed, NSM, advarer om rundspredning af personlige informationer ved opkobling til wifi-netværk.
6h
New on MIT Technology Review

Trump revealed the high-tech Chinese products hit by his tariffs—so China struck right back
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Driverless cars are already here, but the roads aren't ready for themThe recent deaths of a woman struck by a car Uber was testing in driverless mode and of a man whose Tesla Model X crashed when his hands were off the steering wheel because he was letting the car do some of the driving may shift the debate over autonomous vehicles.
7h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

To eliminate waste, we need to rediscover thrift | Andrew DentThere's no such thing as throwing something away, says Andrew Dent -- when you toss a used food container, broken toy or old pair of socks into the trash, those things inevitably end up in ever-growing landfills. But we can get smarter about the way we make, and remake, our products. Dent shares exciting examples of thrift -- the idea of using and reusing what you need so you don't have to purchas
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Climate change could impact critical food supplies for migratory birdsClimate change could disrupt a critical fueling-up stage for migratory birds just as they're preparing to depart on their autumn journeys to Central America, according to research published in the journal Ecology Letters.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Connecting hearing helper molecules to the ear boneHearing loss is a common affliction associated with advancing age and exposure to very loud noises, affecting two-thirds of adults over age 70. But living with hearing loss may not be inevitable. Scientists report in the ACS journal Bioconjugate Chemistry a novel approach to the restoration of hearing that delivers stimulants of cell growth and connectivity directly to damaged ear cells.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In promoting vaccination, behavioral strategies more effective than persuasionFaced with outbreaks of influenza and other vaccine-preventable diseases, parents, educators, healthcare providers, and policymakers around the world often want to know how to persuade people to get their vaccinations. But a comprehensive review of the scientific findings from research on vaccination behavior shows that the most effective interventions focus directly on shaping patients' and paren
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Robotics takes mass spec to the third dimension for forensics, pharma applicationsWithin the past decade, many advancements have been made in the 3-D market from printing to movies. Now scientists report in ACS' Analytical Chemistry that by combining a robotic arm and mass spectrometry, they can analyze the surface of irregularly shaped 3-D objects, potentially opening up new branches of forensics and pharmaceutics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nanoparticles may cause DNA damage to brain cells across a cellular barrierNew research by scientists shows that when cellular barriers are exposed to metal nanoparticles, cellular messengers are released that may cause damage to the DNA of developing brain cells. The discovery may have implications for the development of potential drug targets in the treatment of neurodegenerative conditions, including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study examines prescribing antipsychotic medication for children with autismA new study by Swansea University has suggested that children with intellectual difficulty or autism are more likely to be given antipsychotic medication from a younger age than those without intellectual disability and have higher rates of hospitalisation for depression and for injury and also are at risk of other medical side effects.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Algae, impurities darken Greenland ice sheet and intensify meltingThe Dark Zone of the Greenland ice sheet has major impact on the surface melt of this immense store of ice. A new study in Nature Communications -- based on drone surveys -- suggests that ice algae, dust and soot from wildfires and combustion are the main cause.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Great white shark follows police off Australian coastThey were patrolling off the South Australian coast when they noticed something behind them.
7h
New Scientist - News

Suit that gives you electric shocks makes VR more realisticThe Teslasuit is fitted with components that produce electric shocks that make your muscles twitch and is designed to help you immerse yourself more deeply in virtual reality video games
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why flexible working is key if shared parental leave is to have a lasting impact on the gender pay gapAll large companies in the UK have been rushing to report their gender pay gap by an April 5 deadline, when new rules came into force to tackle the stubborn gap between the salaries of men and women.
7h
The Atlantic

How DACA Helps Curb Teen PregnancyD ACA , or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, is the Obama-era policy that allows 1.3 million undocumented immigrants who came to the United States as children to stay and work here legally. Those who meet the criteria are protected from deportation for a period of two years, which can be renewed. The Trump administration plunged this program into a state of uncertainty last September. First
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Science | The Guardian

The blowhole section: if whales make jazz, what about the rest of the animal kingdom?Scientists are comparing the songs sung by bowhead whales to the music of Thelonious Monk. But from cicada techno to bonobo gabber, they have competition for who’s top of the pops Move over Thelonious, there’s a new jazzer in town. New research from the University of Washington shows that unlike humpback whales, which sing similar songs each season in unison (zzz), bowhead whales have a freeform,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What meeting your spouse online has in common with arranged marriageMost Americans who get married today believe they are choosing their own partners after falling in love with them. Arranged marriages, which remain common in some parts of the world, are a rarity here.
7h
Futurity.org

Taboo talk in Mali marriages overlaps with healthy choicesCouples who flouted cultural norms and discussed family planning were not only more likely to use contraception but also to adopt other healthy behaviors, research in Mali shows. The healthy actions ranged from getting HIV testing during pre-natal care to seeking treatment for a child’s cough. Only 30 percent of the participants in a survey of 4,409 women of reproductive age said they had spoken
7h
Futurity.org

After 50, death risk climbs in wake of ‘wealth shock’Adults in their 50s and older who suffer a catastrophic loss of wealth have a 50-percent higher risk of dying than those who do not have such loss, according to a new study. The effect can last for two decades, and whether participants are very wealthy or have only modest savings makes no difference. The study, which appears in the Journal of the American Medical Association , looks at negative w
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Island emus’ size related to size of island homesEmus that lived isolated on Australia’s offshore islands until the 19th century, including Kangaroo Island, King Island and Tasmania, were smaller versions of their larger mainland relatives – and their overall body size correlated to the size of the islands they inhabited.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Marker for cancer stem cellsCells with stem-cell characteristics appear to be especially important in the formation and metastasis of tumors. Scientists have now developed a universal fluorescent probe for these 'cancer stem cells.' As reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, this dye also selectively kills off the cells.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Shaping behavior, not changing minds, more effective in boosting vaccination ratesA comprehensive review of scientific literature surrounding the psychology of vaccinations has shown that shaping behavior rather than trying to change minds is far more effective at persuading people to get immunized.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new way to atomically thin materialsMetallic conductivity and hydrophilicity of MXenes have established them as electrodes in rechargeable batteries and supercapacitors, as well as other applications, including photothermal cancer therapy, electromagnetic shielding, water purification and gas sensing. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, researchers have now introduced a new production method. Instead of using conventional, yet more ex
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mental disorder rates differ by immigration status and ethnicity of American adolescentsImmigrant youth from specific racial-ethnic groups in the USA tend to have lower rates of certain mental disorders compared to their non-immigrant peers, reports a study published in the April 2018 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP).
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Street dogs to benefit from app that keeps canine health on trackImproved care for the world's 200 million street dogs is the goal of a new smartphone app devised by an international team of animal welfare experts.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Diabetes awareness 'major concern' for UK AsiansSouth Asians living in the UK feel cut off and excluded from education or self-help programmes, preventing them from managing their diabetes properly, according to new research published in the journal Ethnicity and Health.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Today's youth reject capitalism, but what do they want to replace it?Today's youth are increasingly unhappy with the way their elders are running the world.
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The Atlantic

Why Whales Got So BigThe first time I came face to face with a sea lion, I nearly screamed. I was snorkeling, and after a long time spent staring down at colorful corals, I looked up to see a gigantic bull, a couple of feet in front of my mask. Its eyes were opalescent. Its long canines hinted at its close evolutionary ties to land-based predators like bears and dogs. And most unnervingly of all, it was huge . Mammal
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Futurity.org

CRISPR and DNA ‘barcode’ track cancer growthScientists have found a way to modify pairs of cancer-related genes in the lungs of mice and then precisely track individual cells of the resulting tumor. The combined technique could dramatically speed up cancer research and drug development, finally allowing scientists to mimic and study the genetic diversity of cells found in tumors outside of the lab. “Human cancers don’t have only one tumor-
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Global warming can turn monarch butterflies' favorite food into poisonResearchers have discovered a new relationship between climate change, monarch butterflies and milkweed plants. It turns out that warming temperatures don't just affect the monarch, Danaus plexippus, directly, but also affect this butterfly by potentially turning its favorite plant food into a poison.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

High-speed and on-silicon-chip graphene blackbody emittersHigh-speed light emitters integrated on silicon chips can enable novel architectures for silicon-based optoelectronics. However, compound-semiconductor-based light emitters face major challenges for their integration with a silicon-based platform because of their difficulty of direct fabrication on a silicon substrate. Here, high-speed, highly-integrated graphene-based on-silicon-chip blackbody em
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Video: The sweet smell of life supportWhen NASA astronaut Kjell Lindgren blasted off from Kazakhstan in July of 2015 for his first expedition aboard the International Space Station, he had some lofty expectations:
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Enhanced therapeutic vaccine platform achieves 2 proof-of-concepts in veterinary medical useChronical allergic diseases of dogs and horses can now be treated with an innovative vaccine. It was developed by an international research team led by he University of Bern and in cooperation with the University of Zurich, together with private enterprise companies. The findings obtained in horses and dogs could lead to similar therapeutic vaccines for humans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research shows first land plants were parasitized by microbesSainsbury Laboratory researchers have found that the relationship between plants and filamentous microbes not only dates back millions of years, but that modern plants have maintained this ancient mechanism to accommodate and respond to microbial invaders.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How does HIV escape cellular booby traps?Utilizing the humanized mouse model, researchers find that simian immunodeficiency virus, SIV, evolved to infect humans as HIV via Vpu evolving to inhibiting tetherin.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How live vaccines enhance the body's immune responseResearchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin's university hospital, have discovered a new mechanism by which live vaccines induce immunity. Molecules produced exclusively by live microorganisms are recognized by specialized receptors of the immune system, subsequently triggering a protective immune response. The new findings may help improve the safety and efficacy of vaccines. Re
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Anemia: When cells fail to produce enough protein factoriesEvery day, stem cells in our bone marrow produce billions of new red blood cells. Any disruption in this process can result in serious disease. Researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin and Harvard Medical School have succeeded in furthering our understanding of how blood cells are formed. Their insights into the molecular foundations of this process may help break new ground in the tr
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Avoid south-facing birdhouses -- for the nestlings' sakeTen-day-old baby birds are able to maintain their regular body temperature despite nest box temperatures of 50C° or above. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden can now show that nestlings pay a high price for regulating their body temperature: they grow less. Therefore, the recommendation when putting up a nest box should be to avoid hot, south-facing locations and choosing a spot in the shade
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

US power sector carbon emissions intensity drops to lowest on recordMitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems (MHPS) and Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) today announced the release of the 2018 Carnegie Mellon Power Sector Carbon Index, at CMU Energy Week, hosted by the Wilton E. Scott Institute for Energy Innovation. The Index tracks the environmental performance of US power producers and compares current emissions to more than two decades of historical data collected nat
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tuning in to magnetic inkA new ink containing iron-oxide nanoparticles can be turned into fully printed and versatile components for cellular networks.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New findings from NYU Abu Dhabi and JPL about how 'giant' planets impact neighbors' habitabilityIn a new study published today in The Astrophysical Journal, researchers from New York University Abu Dhabi and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, share new findings about how the presence of 'giant' planets (between 10 and 1000 times as large as the Earth) affects potentially habitable neighbors that would be discovered with the next generation of ground-based and spa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Telematics technology steering toward smarter EU roadsIf we are to have truly smart cities our transport systems will have to be more cost-effective, safer and sustainable. Perhaps most of all they will need to be more integrated, as the EU-funded project MFDS demonstrates.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NGO threatens Shell with lawsuit over climate 'destruction'An environmental campaign group on Wednesday threatened to take Anglo-Dutch oil giant Royal Dutch Shell to court should it fail to comply with climate targets set out under the Paris Agreement.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hawaiian-language newspapers illuminate an 1871 hurricaneA major hurricane struck the islands of Hawai'i and Maui on August 9, 1871 and wrought widespread destruction from Hilo to Lahaina. A recent study by two scientists, a Hawaiian language expert, and an educator from the University of Hawai'i at Manoa (UH Manoa) revealed how historical Hawaiian-language newspapers expand knowledge of this and other natural disasters of the past. The storm of 1871 wa
7h
Dagens Medicin

Arbejdsgruppe vil gøre vejledning for journalføring mere overskueligArbejdsgruppen for journalføring har holdt første møde. Gruppen skal fremover diskutere, om den nuværende bekendtgørelse kan erstattes af en mere overordnet tekst, der understøttes af vejledninger imod hver målgruppe.
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Dagens Medicin

Nødberedskab sikrer akutte patienter under strejkeNødberedskabet under en strejke er på plads, hvor ingen akut- eller kræftpatienter rammes. Forhandlingerne for et nødberedskab under en lockout er nu i gang.
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Feed: All Latest

Cheap PS4 and PS4 Pro Bundles and Deals (2018)If you're hunting for a PS4 or PS4 Pro, these are the cheapest bundles you're going to find.
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Ingeniøren

Internationale forskere boykotter universitet af frygt for kapløb om dræberrobotterOver 50 af klodens førende forskere inden for kunstig intelligens og robotudvikling skrinlægger alt samarbejde med sydkoreansk universitet, der samarbejder med våbenproducent.
8h
The Atlantic

The Last March of Martin Luther King Jr.US Rights MemphisIn the months leading up to his assassination 50 years ago, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. made some of his most searing pronouncements against white supremacy, the Vietnam War, and U.S. imperialism. But more than at any other time in his life, King’s final focus was on poverty and economic injustice. By the winter of 1968, Dr. King and his organization were embarking on one of their boldest projects
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Making headway in infant leukemia researchAround 600 children under the age of 15 are diagnosed with leukemia each year in Germany. The effects are especially dramatic if this severe illness develops at birth or shortly afterwards. Research carried out at the Division of Genetics at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) with support from the Institute for Human Genetics has now discovered another molecular cause for a pa
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Acupressure for menstrual painCan acupressure achieve a sustained reduction in menstrual pain? Is an app-based self-care program particularly attractive to young women? These questions addressed in a new study by researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, the results of which have been published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology*.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Island emus' size related to size of island homesEmus that lived isolated on Australia's offshore islands until the 19th century, including Kangaroo Island, King Island and Tasmania, were smaller versions of their larger mainland relatives -- and their overall body size correlated to the size of the islands they inhabited.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hawaiian-language newspapers illuminate an 1871 hurricaneA major hurricane struck the islands of Hawai'i and Maui on Aug. 9, 1871, and wrought widespread destruction from Hilo to Lahaina. A recent study by two scientists, a Hawaiian language expert, and an educator from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa (UH Mānoa) revealed how historical Hawaiian-language newspapers expand knowledge of this and other natural disasters of the past.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Warming oceans could put seabirds out of sync with preySeabirds may struggle to find food for their chicks as they are unable to shift their breeding seasons as the climate warms, a new study suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US Power Sector Carbon Intensity drops below 1,000 lb/MWh for lowest emissions intensity on recordMitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems (MHPS) and Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) today announced the release of the 2018 Carnegie Mellon Power Sector Carbon Index, at CMU Energy Week, hosted by the Wilton E. Scott Institute for Energy Innovation. The Index tracks the environmental performance of U.S. power producers and compares current emissions to more than two decades of historical data collected n
8h
Live Science

What on Earth Is This Fiery Blob?At first glance, it looks like a fiery monster out of "The Incredibles" movie. Or maybe a giant, irritated zit popping up above the Earth's surface. But it's neither. Rather, it's an incredibly rare, 65-foot-tall (20 meters) lava-dome fountain.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Employee satisfaction improves UK company financial performanceA new study led by the University of East Anglia (UEA) using data from recruiting site Glassdoor has for the first time revealed a strong link between a satisfied workforce – in the form of higher Glassdoor company ratings – and the financial performance of UK companies.
8h
Popular Science

You don't need to be a pro to sell your photos onlineDIY Earn a little cash from stock photography websites. If you have a passion for photography, you don't have to wait for your big break. You can earn a little money by selling your pictures on stock photo sites.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Mark Zuckerberg doesn’t like the EU’s strict new data rules enough to use them everywhere
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sales of diesel cars in Germany drop after court permits banGerman officials say there's been a sharp drop in sales of new diesel cars, following a court decision that allows cities to ban the use of heavily polluting vehicles.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Body-worn cameras will help reduce police use of force, but the problem runs much deeperProfessional policing is one of the great inventions of modernity. Police are there to help people feel safe. A police force is therefore a vital institution in the realisation of the fundamental democratic values of freedom, security, safety and justice. But, from time to time, incidents occur that cause the public to challenge these fundamental assumptions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

House panel says Facebook's Zuckerberg to testify April 11Mark Zuckerberg FacebookFacebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg will testify before a House oversight panel on April 11 amid a privacy scandal that has roiled the social media giant, the panel announced Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A certain protein could possibly be the key to understanding navigation in birdsA team of researchers at Lund University has found evidence that suggests a certain protein plays a prominent role in bird navigation. They have published their findings in Journal of the Royal Society Interface.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The time it takes to learn a new language depends on what you want to do with itIf you go by the ads for some language learning apps, you can "have a conversation in a new language in three weeks."
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Consumers who engage with trends may be less open to advertising than othersOne common assumption in digital marketing is that individuals who are mindful of what's trending on social media, and propagate these trends, will be responsive to social media advertising and marketing, thus sharing branded messages with their network on a wide scale. As a result, firms increasingly try to mesh their brand or product with an emerging trend to get the attention of those who propa
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Updated ASTRO guideline for palliative lung RT recommends concurrent chemo for some stage III ptsThe American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) today issued an update to its clinical guideline for the use of palliative-intent radiation therapy for patients with incurable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Reflecting new evidence from randomized clinical trials, the guideline now recommends the addition of concurrent chemotherapy to radiation therapy for certain patients with incurable s
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The plant hormone auxin coordinates wood formationAn international research team investigated the genetic regulation of stem cell division in plant stems. During their investigations, they revealed that the key gene coordinating stem cells, WOX4, is controlled by the vital plant hormone auxin via auxin response proteins. The results are valuable for both fundamental biology and ecology. Since the studied mechanism allows controlling wood formatio
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

More communication needed regarding disposal of pet pharmaceuticalsNew research found that more than 60 percent of veterinary care professionals do not counsel their clients when it comes to the environmental stewardship aspect of medicine disposal .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tuning in to magnetic inkA new ink containing iron-oxide nanoparticles can be turned into fully printed and versatile components for cellular networks.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stick bugs alter decomposition rates by modifying litter bacteriaBugs the size of tiny twigs have a large impact on the rainforest, according to a new study led by University of Dayton researcher Chelse Prather and published in the current issue of the prominent journal Ecology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mechanical engineer's method to control growth of carbonate-based crystals featured in PNASGrowing crystals just got a little easier thanks to work by an international team from Virginia Tech, Harvard University, and AMOLF, operated by the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter Institute AMOLF) in Netherlands.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Did you know that a satellite crashes back to earth about once a week, on average?This past weekend, a lot of attention was focused on the Tiangong-1 space station. For some time, space agencies and satellite trackers from around the world had been predicting when this station would fall to Earth. And now that it has safely landed in the Pacific Ocean, many people are breathing a sigh of relief. While there was very little chance that any debris would fall to Earth, the mere po
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Our legacy of liveable cities won't last without a visionary response to growthAustralia's major cities are growing more rapidly than ever before, gaining three million residents in a decade. Concerns about the risks to their long-term liveability and health are growing too. Is the consistent placing of Australian cities at the top of most liveable city rankings a reason for complacency?
8h
The Atlantic

How 'Roseanne' Divides the LeftRoseanne Barr TrumpLast week, ABC’s reboot of the television sitcom Roseanne generated spectacular ratings, and heated conversation about its title character’s support for President Trump, a political stance shared by the show’s talented creator, Roseanne Barr. Nowhere were participants more divided than on the left. Two women, themselves creative powerhouses, illustrate that fissure. Comedian Sarah Silverman “love
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Computer simulations show Viking's sunstone to be very accurateA pair of researchers with ELTE Eötvös Loránd University in Hungary has run computer simulations that suggest that tales of Vikings using a sunstone to navigate in cloudy weather might be true. In their paper published in Royal Society Open Science, Dénes Száz and Gábor Horváth describe the factors that contributed to their simulations and what they found by running them.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mutation of worm gene, swip-10, triggers age-dependent death of dopamine neuronsLooking at dopamine neurons in a tiny worm's brain, scientists have identified a novel pathway that sustains the health of these cells. The normal actions of swip-10 to protect dopamine neurons are indirect, derived from the gene's action in support cells called glia, adjacent to the dopamine neurons. Glial cells are known to play a critical role in shaping neuronal development, structure, and fun
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Relaxation response may reduce blood pressure by altering expression of a set of genesA new study led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), and the Benson-Henry Institute for Mind Body Medicine at MGH identified genes associated with the body's response to relaxation techniques and sheds light on the molecular mechanisms by which these interventions may work to lower blood pressure. The findings were published today
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Terns face challenges when they fly south for winterThe common tern is most widespread tern species in North America, but its breeding colonies in interior North America have been on the decline for decades despite conservation efforts. The problem, at least in part, must lie elsewhere -- and a new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances presents some of the best information to date on where these birds go when they leave their nesting lakes ea
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Consumers who engage with trends may be less open to advertising than othersOne common assumption in digital marketing is that individuals who are mindful of what's trending on social media, will be responsive to social media advertising. As a result, firms increasingly try to mesh their brand with an emerging trend to get the attention of those who propagate these trends. A new study by researchers from London Business School, MIT Sloan School of Management, and Cass Bus
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tungsten oxide nanoparticles fight against infection and cancerRussian and Ukrainian scientists produced a new type of tungsten oxide nanoparticles and analysed their effect on living organisms. While these nanoparticles show low toxicity to normal mammalian cells, they can be fatal to bacteria, fungi and even cancer cells. Their antibacterial effect can be induced by UV irradiation on demand - a feature which can be useful for designing auto-cleaning and dis
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook data harvesting—what you need to knowFacebook Data Cambridge AnalyticaFacebook makes most of its money from advertising, and – as the Cambridge Analytica scandal continues to haunt Mark Zuckerberg's company – users are demanding to know how their data is being wrangled and harvested.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronomers discover a 'super-Earth' exoplanet orbiting a low-mass starUsing microlensing method, an international team of astronomers has detected a new "super-Earth" alien world circling a low-mass star about five times less massive than our sun. The finding is detailed in a paper published March 28 on the arXiv pre-print repository.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why we should all cut the Facebook cord—or should we?Facebook Data Cambridge AnalyticaI wrote my dissertation on the political economy of scholarly communication, and the transformative potentials of what were then emerging internet technologies.
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Ingeniøren

Danmarks største rumprojekt er ankommet til ISSDen 13. april bliver klimaobservatoriet Asim monteret på rumstationen, så jagten på kæmpelyn kan gå ind.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Five key lessons other cities can learn from Cape Town's water crisisPostponing Day Zero in Cape Town for 2018 comes as no surprise. There was no sense to it once the day had been pushed into the winter rainfall period. It also didn't make sense for the Western Cape and Cape Town governments to continue drafting detailed logistical plans for points of water distribution in the event that taps were turned off across the city.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

When it rains, it pours—the effects of stormwater runoffThe lovely smell that follows a spring rain as you sit on your porch and enjoy the sound of drips pattering on the lawn is so loved that it has earned the distinct honor of its own word: "petrichor." Somewhat less romantic is the source of the smell: a mix of plant oil and bacterial by-product. Despite that, when I was young, living in Conesus, New York, I learned to love rainy days. There is some
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

It's time for third-party data brokers to emerge from the shadowsFacebook Data Cambridge AnalyticaFacebook announced last week it would discontinue the partner programs that allow advertisers to use third-party data from companies such as Acxiom, Experian and Quantium to target users.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Minding the gap ahead of future fuelsOil expert Tadeusz Patzek aims to ensure that efficient recovery of oil and gas remains feasible whilst scientists find alternative green energy sources.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Supercomputer simulations shed light on the heliospheric interface"Three-dimensional Features of the Outer Heliosphere Due to Coupling between the Interstellar and Heliospheric Magnetic Field. V. The Bow Wave, Heliospheric Boundary Layer, Instabilities, and Magnetic Reconnection" originally appeared this past August in the Astrophysical Journal, a publication of the American Astronomical Society. But the paper, whose co-authors include two researchers at The Uni
8h
The Atlantic

The Deft Inventions of The Parking Lot AttendantOpen Nafkote Tamirat’s debut novel and you might think you are reading a strange time-travel fantasy. On the first page, an unnamed teenage narrator finds herself in an isolated, decaying island colony, referred to only as B——. “My first memory,” she says, “is of vomiting upon contact with the ginger-drenched air.” She spends her days searching for the unknown source of the smell. Then again, giv
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Dagens Medicin

Herlev og Gentofte Hospital ansætter ny ledende overlæge i GastroenhedenBenedicte Vibjerg Wilson er ansat som ny ledende overlæge i Gastroenheden på Herlev og Gentofte Hospital.
8h
Dagens Medicin

Nyt professorat i betændelsestilstande i lunger og blodkarGrith Lykke Sørensen er udnævnt til professor i et nyt professorat i betændelsestilstande i lunger og blodkar på Institut for Molekylær Medicin på Syddansk Universitet.
8h
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As Shared Scooters Invade, San Francisco Decides Who Belongs WhereSan Francisco is just the latest city dealing with a horde of new vehicles—from dockless bikes to electric scooters—and struggling to figure out how to best allocate limited space.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Still believe an asteroid killed the dinosaurs? Think again—new theory suggestsSome experts have long believed that a massive asteroid was a primary cause of dinosaurs' extinction some 65 million years ago, but new analysis from a University at Albany psychology professor suggests that the dinosaurs were in trouble long before the asteroid hit.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Terns face challenges when they fly south for winterThe Common Tern is most widespread tern species in North America, but its breeding colonies in interior North America have been on the decline for decades despite conservation efforts. The problem, at least in part, must lie elsewhere—and a new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances presents some of the best information to date on where these birds go when they leave their nesting lakes each
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

A Glacier in Pakistan Surges with Clocklike RegularityEvery two decades the Khurdopin glacier moves more than 1,000 times faster than usual -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The hypothesis of cultural third placesMany cultural places are being transformed through the mutations of digital world, reduced public financing and the rise of the knowledge-based economy.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Deadly Indonesia oil spill caused by burst pipe: companyAn oil spill off Borneo island that led to five deaths and the declaration of a state of emergency was caused by a ruptured undersea pipe, Indonesia's national oil company Pertamina said Wednesday.
9h
Futurity.org

How eggshells stay strong until the chick wants outAn eggshell’s amazing nanostructure explains how it manages to resist fracture from the outside, while still letting a hatching chick break through. The finding, reported in Science Advances , could have important implications for food safety. Birds have benefited from millions of years of evolution to make the perfect eggshell, a thin, protective bio-mineralized chamber for embryonic growth that
9h
Ingeniøren

Bille-coating er 20 gange mere hvid end papirNy, supertynd coating kan gøre fødevarer og maling meget lysere ved at udnytte den måde, et tæt netværk af molekyler spreder lyset på i blandt andet Cyphochilus-billen.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Machine learning algorithm suggests ancient hominin remains not part of ritualistic burialAn international team of researchers has used a machine learning algorithm to assess whether hominin bones found in caves were placed there as part of a burial service by early human ancestors. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes the factors they fed into the algorithm, and what it revealed.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

Do Fitness Trackers Lead to Better Fitness?Many fitness researchers and coaches believe that there is a disconnect between the wearable "fitness tracker" market and how people are using them -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pulling valuable metals from e-waste makes financial senseElectronic waste -- including discarded televisions, computers and mobile phones -- is one of the fastest-growing waste categories worldwide. For years, recyclers have gleaned usable parts, including metals, from this waste stream. That makes sense from a sustainability perspective, but it's been unclear whether it's reasonable from an economic viewpoint. Now researchers report in ACS' journal Env
9h
Popular Science

California needs to stop saying everything causes cancerHealth Coffee is just the beginning. You may have heard that coffee gives you cancer. Or that everything gives you cancer—if you live in California. The reason: Proposition 65. California is now on the…
9h
The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Cell DropletsProteins and RNA aggregate into 'membraneless organelles' due to liquid-liquid phase separation.
9h
Feed: All Latest

The Cryptocurrency Industry Might Actually Benefit From an Ad BanGoogle, Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, Snap, and MailChimp have all decided to shut out cryptocurrency advertising, but some blockchain enthusiasts say that might not be such a bad thing.
9h
The Atlantic

Dear Therapist: Will I Ever Get Over My Wife's Death?Editor’s Note: Every Wednesday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com. Dear Therapist, I am a fairly successful international attorney. My wife of 47 years died last December. It has been the worst three months of my life, and my depression does not go away. How long will this go on? I still e
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pulling valuable metals from e-waste makes financial senseElectronic waste—including discarded televisions, computers and mobile phones—is one of the fastest-growing waste categories worldwide. For years, recyclers have gleaned usable parts, including metals, from this waste stream. That makes sense from a sustainability perspective, but it's been unclear whether it's reasonable from an economic viewpoint. Now researchers report in ACS' journal Environme
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study reveals more than 100 tiny plastics in every mealWe could be swallowing more than 100 tiny plastic particles with every main meal, a Heriot-Watt study has revealed.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global

Physics InfernoA poem describes what could happen to those who don’t follow the metaphorical equivalents of nature's most basic laws -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Science : NPR

GMO Yeast Mimics Flavors Of Hops, But Will Craft Brewers Bite?Some beer-brewing scientists have developed a genetically modified yeast that produces the same hoppy aromas and flavors beer drinkers like, without the hops. But some craft brewers are skeptical. (Image credit: Mint Images/Getty Images/Mint Images RF)
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Piecing together our planet pixel by pixelAt first glance, the high-resolution images of the polygons look like the lacy skin of a cantaloupe melon – perhaps not what would be expected of images of the Arctic tundra. But this characteristic feature of the tundra is a perfect focus for remote sensing technologies and for studying the rapidly changing landscape of the region.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Human factors research accelerates mission planningThe key to a successful flight mission is planning – sometimes several hours of it. Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) specialists in human factors and human computer interfaces are working with PMA-281, Strike Planning and Execution Systems in Patuxent River, Maryland, to streamline the current mission planning process and identify user interface requirements supporting multi-domain mission m
10h
Science-Based Medicine

The Pertussis ResurgenceA new analysis shows that the resurgence of pertussis is largely due historical patterns of vaccination. This and other data show the importance of full vaccine compliance in preventing returning epidemics of this deadly disease.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New NASA X-plane construction begins nowNASA's aeronautical innovators are ready to take things supersonic, but with a quiet twist.
10h
New Scientist - News

Virtuoso bowhead whales constantly make up new songsBowhead whales are such talented singers they can make two sounds simultaneously, and they invent new songs every year
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Viden

Dansk rumprojekt er landet på ISSKapslen med rumobservatoriet ASIM er nu ankommet til Den Internationale Rumstation, hvor astronauterne har grebet den med en robotarm.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: NASA's Low-boom Flight Demonstration missionAeronautical innovations are part of a government-industry partnership to collect data that could make supersonic flight over land possible, dramatically reducing travel time in the United States or anywhere in the world.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physicists show why it's hard to clog a drain with soft particlesNow scientists have shown that when the objects are squishy instead of solid, the reverse is true. The journal Physical Review E published the findings by physicists at Emory University, demonstrating that when soft particles feel a larger pressure, they squish together and the arch breaks, and so clogging is less likely.
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Dagens Medicin

Samlet ledelse kan skabe sammenhængHer er et forslag til sundhedsministeren og innovationsministeren til at skabe sammenhæng i sundhedsvæsenet: Etablér sundhedsklynger organiseret med afsæt i (akut)hospitalerne, og ledet af en praktiserende læge, en stærk hjemmesygeplejerske og en person fra hospitalsledelsen. Klyngeledelsen refererer til regionen og har stor indflydelse på klyngens hospital.
10h
Dagens Medicin

Sundhedsminister: Regionerne skal lade læger bruge Spinraza-kattelemRegionerne må ikke stille sig i vejen for læger, der vil ordinere dyre lægemidler, som Medicinrådet har afvist at godkende som standardbehandling, siger sundhedsminister Ellen Trane Nørby (V).
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study asks why students with more to gain from charter schools are less likely to applyLow-achieving, non-white and poor students stand to gain the most academically from attending charter schools but are less likely to seek charter school enrollment than higher-achieving, more advantaged students who generally live closer to charter schools, according to research from the University of California, Berkeley.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cargo-packed Dragon arrives at space stationSpaceX's unmanned Dragon cargo ship arrived Wednesday at the International Space Station, packed with food, gear and science experiments for the astronauts living in orbit.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Self-healing metal oxides could protect against corrosionResearchers have found that a solid oxide protective coating for metals can, when applied in sufficiently thin layers, deform as if it were a liquid, filling any cracks and gaps as they form.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Dragon lifts offThe latest Dragon cargo vehicle was launched to the International Space Station on 2 April, taking with it ESA's Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Titanium carbide flakes obtained by selective etching of titanium silicon carbideMetallic conductivity and hydrophilicity of MXenes have established them as electrodes in rechargeable batteries and supercapacitors, as well as other applications, including photothermal cancer therapy, electromagnetic shielding, water purification and gas sensing. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, researchers have now introduced a new production method. Instead of using conventional, yet more ex
10h
Live Science

Snow Monkeys Love Hot Baths Just Like Humans Do, and Now We Know WhyJapanese snow monkeys seem to love hot baths just like humans do.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research team develops cost-effective technique for mass production of high-quality grapheneA research team led by the National University of Singapore (NUS) have developed an economical and industrially viable strategy to produce graphene. The new technique addresses the long-standing challenge of an efficient process for large-scale production of graphene, and paves the way for sustainable synthesis of the material.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Found the oldest Neanderthal wooden tools in the Iberian PeninsulaArchaeological excavations at the Aranbaltza site in the Basque Country coast (Northern Spain) have revealed several episodes of neandertal occupations with preserved wooden remains. The fieldwork is led by Joseba Rios-Garaizar, archaeologist from the Spanish Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH). In 2015, the excavation revealed two very well preserved wooden tools,
10h
Feed: All Latest

How to Build a PCBuilding your own computer yourself is a lost art—one due for a revival.
10h
Feed: All Latest

Meet the Astronomer Who Has Chronicled the Field for 16 YearsFor 16 years, Virginia Trimble read every astronomy paper in 23 journals. Now, her review papers are part of the canon.
10h
Latest Headlines | Science News

When deciding whether to bank your baby’s umbilical cord blood, consider these caveatsDespite all the excitement, the cells found in cord blood may not be as useful as advertised.
10h
The Atlantic

Does Legion Have a Soul?This article contains mild spoilers through Season 2, Episode 3 of Legion. In the first few minutes of Legion ’s second-season premiere, a sushi-bar mini-boat delivers a plate of waffles, a human licks her wrists as if she’s a cat grooming herself, and some creature wearing a basket over its head communicates through the robotic voices of what appear to be girls with mustaches. Yet the gosh-wow,
10h
Live Science

Tiny, Lab-Grown Minibrains Sprout Blood VesselsScientists have coaxed a minibrain into growing blood vessels and capillaries.
11h
Live Science

Neanderthals' Big Noses Get an Airy ExplanationNeanderthal bites weren't especially impressive, but their breathing was.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global

How the Word "but" Could Save the WorldIt makes narratives more compelling—and if those narratives help the public appreciate science, that's a very good thing -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Scientific American Content: Global

Urban Bungle: Atlanta Cyber Attack Puts Other Cities on NoticeThe city has spent the past two weeks restoring online services disrupted by ransomware that held encrypted data hostage -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Dagens Medicin

Læger i Valby fik 325 nye patienter på seks dageAntallet af lægepraksisser i Københavns Kommune, som er åben for nye patienter, er styrtdykket på få måneder. Det medfører stort pres på de få åbne klinikker, mens en stor del af de nyoprettede ydernumre fortsat ikke er i drift.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researcher documents exact locations, times of Ansel Adams' Texas photosLegendary photographer Ansel Adams created many stunning black-and-white landscape images during his lifetime, and one of his most striking masterpieces is "Denali and Wonder Lake" (formerly known as Mount McKinley and Wonder Lake).
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Advanced driver aids aren't just for luxury carsAutomakers have come a long way from safety features such as seat belts and air bags that are meant to prevent injuries in a crash. Today, manufacturers are adding advanced driver aids that can fend off an accident in the first place. And there's a good chance that your next new car will have them.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A tricky job assessing the vulnerability of agricultureThere's still a lot we don't know about the vulnerability of our agriculture to climate change. This is according to a recent doctoral thesis from Linköping University. The thesis also shows that current methods for assessing climate change vulnerability have problems and require improvement.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists create 'Swiss army knife' for electron beamsDESY scientists have created a miniature particle accelerator for electrons that can perform four different functions at the push of a button. The experimental device is driven by a terahertz radiation source and can accelerate, compress, focus and analyse electron bunches in a beam. Its active structures measure just a few millimetres across. The developers from the Center for Free-Electron Laser
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Who's smarter in the classroom -- men or women?A first-of-its-kind study by researchers at Arizona State University shows that in the college biology classroom, men perceive themselves as smarter, even when compared to women whose grades prove they are just as smart. The study, published April 4 in the journal Advances in Physiology Education, shows that gender greatly impacts students' perceptions of their own intelligence, particularly when
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Ingeniøren

Spørg Scientariet: Hvorfor har vi stadig dybe, farlige grøfter ved vejen?En læser undrer sig over, hvorfor de dybe grøfter i vejkanten ikke for længst er fyldt op, så uheldige trafikanter ikke bliver slået ihjel af dem. Det svarer Vejdirektoratet på.
11h
Dagens Medicin

Ny test skal give et mere præcist billede af prostatakræftForskere fra Aarhus Universitetshospital arbejder på at udvikle en ny test, der kan genkende forandringer i gen-reguleringen hos mænd med prostatakræft. Håbet er, at testen med stor præcision kan identificere sygdom og f.eks. i fremtiden anvendes til at udpege mænd med restsygdom og tilbagefald.
11h
The Atlantic

How Martin Luther King Jr. Recruited John LewisUS Rights MemphisEditor’s Note: Read The Atlantic ’s special coverage of Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy. Image above ( from left ): Ralph Abernathy, James Forman, Martin Luther King Jr., Jesse Douglas, and John Lewis. King leads the five-day, 54-mile march for voting rights in 1965, from Selma, Alabama, to Montgomery. Lewis was 25 years old at the time. John Lewis, now a Georgia congressman , was the teenage son
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Who's smarter in the classroom—men or women? New study shows it's all about perceptionIf you believe it, you can achieve it. You've probably heard this motivational phrase more than once. But what if your beliefs about your own intelligence compared to others come down to your gender?
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

MRI technique detects the properties of packaged meatsResearchers from the University of Extremadura (Spain) have developed a methodology to learn the properties of hams and whole loins using magnetic resonance imaging, the same non-invasive technique used in medicine. The method has already been made available to the meat industry.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cation mixing induces highly efficient sodium storage for layered cathodesSodium is one of the most abundant elements, widely distributed on the Earth and in the ocean. Thus, sodium-ion batteries attract much attention for application in large-scale energy storage. The most popular cathodes for SIBs, i.e., the layered sodium-containing oxides, usually exhibit reversible host rearrangement between P-type and O-type stacking upon charge/discharge. Such a host rearrangemen
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How to cool a smartphoneNUST MISIS scientists have developed composites that conduct heat many times better than their counterparts and are even subject to simple and cheap processing. By using the newly obtained technology in modern electronics, it is possible to solve the problem of PCB overheating. The research results were published in the Journal of Alloys and Compounds.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

High-speed and on-silicon-chip graphene blackbody emittersHigh-speed light emitters integrated on silicon chips can enable novel architectures for silicon-based optoelectronics. However, compound-semiconductor-based light emitters face major challenges for their integration with a silicon-based platform because of their difficulty of direct fabrication on a silicon substrate. Here, high-speed, highly-integrated graphene-based on-silicon-chip blackbody em
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Futurity.org

Poll: Older adults are okay with medical marijuanaFew older adults use medical marijuana, but the majority support its use if a doctor recommends it, according to a new poll of 2,007 people ages 50 to 80. Further, many say they might talk to their doctor about it if they developed a serious health condition. Four out five of poll respondents between the ages of 50 and 80 say they support allowing medical marijuana if a physician recommends it. F
12h
Ingeniøren

Nasas støjsvage supersoniske fly klar til test om få årFra 2022 regner Nasa med at teste X-flyet over udvalgte amerikanske byer, og erfaringer skal bane vejen for lynhurtig flyvning over land med varer og passagerer. Lockheed Martin har netop fået kontrakt på at bygge flyet.
12h
Ingeniøren

Efter skarp it-sikkerhedskritik af Region Syd: Nu skal download af programmer godkendesEfter kritik fra Rigsrevisionen af mangelfuld styring af, hvem og hvor mange der har priviligerede rettigheder til download af programmer, vil Region Syd nu stramme op.
12h
NYT > Science

5 Plants and Animals Utterly Confused by Climate ChangeGlobal warming is causing spring to arrive early and autumn to come late in many places, and not all species are adapting at the same rate.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physicists demonstrate demixing behavior of rotating particlesPhysicists from Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg and Heinrich-Heine Universität Düsseldorf have demonstrated that demixing occurs in systems made up of macroscopic particles rotating in opposite directions and that particles turning in either a clockwise or counter-clockwise direction form homogeneous groups. The researchers used miniature robots manufactured using 3-D printing me
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vegetables may help protect elderly women from hardening of neck arteriesEating more cabbage, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower and broccoli was associated with less carotid artery wall thickness among elderly women.
12h
Science : NPR

A Tale Of 2 Whale SongsOceanographer Kate Stafford of the University of Washington talks about a new study on the differences between the whale songs of bowhead whales and humpback whales.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

400-year-old documents reveal evidence of Japanese opium production and winemakingResearch from the Eisei Bunko Research Center of Kumamoto University reveals that Tadatoshi Hosokawa, a 17th-century lord of Kyusyu, Japan, ordered his people to produce not only wine but also opium for medical purposes.
12h
The Atlantic

When Terrorists and Criminals Govern Better Than GovernmentsThe Taliban claims to adhere to a strict interpretation of Islamic law, but that didn’t stop them from learning to love the poppy. The Islamic State developed an unforgiving set of laws to govern its caliphate, even as it engaged in widespread smuggling of antiquities and the synthetic drug Captagon. The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (the FARC) were once puritanically anti-drugs but turn
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Predicting water storage beyond 2-5 years over global semiarid regionsDecadal climate prediction aims to improve near-term (10-30 years) climate change projection by using the experiences of weather forecasting and seasonal climate prediction. It has raised wide concern since the implementation of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5), and the climate community is now trying to turn the decadal prediction from pure research to a quasi-real-time opera
12h
Dagens Medicin

Praksislæge rykker ind i Københavns LufthavnI efteråret rev han kontrakten med Region Hovedstaden i stykker og gav afkald på den goodwill, han havde betalt en million kroner for. I dag driver Behroz Firoozfard privat lægeklinik i Kastrup Lufthavn.
12h
Dagens Medicin

Ulven kommerManglen på praktiserende læger er en realitet, og den forårsager stor skade. Så vi må holde op med at råbe ‘ulven kommer’.
12h
Ingeniøren

IoT-iværksætter har ramt plet med betonsensorerIoT-iværksætteren Sensohive lagde ud med at udvikle sensorer til gartnerier, men har fundet en niche som sensorleverandør til betonelementfabrikker. Med kunder i 22 lande vil den fynske virksomhed nu rykke sin trådløse løsning ud på byggepladserne.
13h
Science | The Guardian

Have I already met my soulmate? You asked Google – here’s the answer | Rosie WilbyEvery day millions of people ask Google life’s most difficult questions. Our writers answer some of the commonest queries If you’re typing “have I already met my soulmate?” into Google, the chances are you’re in a similarly ambiguous emotional place to the one I found myself in six years ago. Had I messed up my sole chance at passionate romantic happiness with “the one that got away”? Would I die
13h
The Atlantic

The Debt MLK Owed to India's Anti-Colonial FightIn February of 1949, a group of stevedores gathered under a mango tree in the Brazilian port of Salvador to prepare for carnival celebrations. They needed a theme for their contingent. Searching far and wide, the mostly Afro-Brazilian workers settled on an extravagant international gesture. The Indian independence leader Mohandas Gandhi had been assassinated almost exactly a year earlier. Gandhi’
13h
Ingeniøren

Frankrig vil bruge milliarder på AI-kapløb med Kina og USADen franske regering vil over de næste fem år bruge 1,5 mia. euro på forskning og udvikling af kunstig intelligens. Dermed vil man indgå i et Europæisk kapløb mod Kina og USA.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Replica of bedroom in '2001: a Space Odyssey' on display in WashingtonFilm buffs can now visit a replica of the bedroom depicted in the penultimate scene of "2001: A Space Odyssey" on the 50th anniversary of its release.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Island emus' size related to size of island homesEmus that lived isolated on Australia's offshore islands until the 19th century, including Kangaroo Island, King Island and Tasmania, were smaller versions of their larger mainland relatives – and their overall body size correlated to the size of the islands they inhabited.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

India's Jet Airways to buy 75 Boeing jets in multi-billion dollar orderIndian airline Jet Airways has entered an agreement to buy 75 Boeing 737 MAX aircraft in a deal that could be worth more than $7 billion.
13h
Dagens Medicin

Ledere landet over: Kom nu ud af buskenI kan ikke regne med, at jeres menige medarbejdere under personligt strafansvar både tager skraldet, når noget går galt , og samtidig kæmper værdikampen for jer for at lovliggøre de rammer, I tilbyder landets sundhedsansatte.
13h
Ingeniøren

Kemikalie-cocktail i røgbomber skal blokere sensorerDet amerikanske militærs kemikere er på hårdt arbejde, når de skal udvikle røgbomber. For sensorer er i dag i stand til at opfange mere og mere, og derfor må kemikerne bruge nye kemikalier for at kunne skjule soldater for fjenden.
14h
Science | The Guardian

On fossil poo and picky eaters: a new study sheds light on New Zealand's past ecosystemAdvanced DNA techniques shows the critical role extinct birds played in New Zealand’s ecosystem. Extinction is a sad process, as it means the irreversible loss of a species. However, as species do not exist in a vacuum, the effects of extinction do not simply extend only to the loss of species X or Y, but ripple through a whole ecosystem. Particularly for island ecosystems, which have a limited n
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Neanderthal nose: All the better to breathe withNeanderthals had large, protruding noses to warm and humidify cold, dry air, a study into the distinct design of our extinct European cousin's face suggested Wednesday.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

3 shot in YouTube office attack; suspect 'hated' companyYouTube Nasim AghdamA woman suspected of shooting three people at YouTube headquarters before killing herself was furious with the company because it had stopped paying her for videos she posted on the platform, her father said late Tuesday.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Serious monkey business at Malaysia school for macaquesA pig-tailed macaque yanked at a coconut on a piece of string until it fell to the floor, a small victory for the simian student at a Malaysian school that trains monkeys to harvest fruit for farmers.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spotify soars in $26 billion stock debutSpotify soared Tuesday to a value of more than $26 billion in its long-awaited stock debut as the market delivered a ringing endorsement of the future of music streaming.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Share buybacks: good, bad or ugly?Share buybacks are all the rage among the world's companies, to the delight of many shareholders but not of critics who say they are lazy, short-sighted and mostly designed to enrich corporate fat cats.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flavoured, low-alcohol Scotch? Distilleries test whisky's limitsDemand for more variety in Scotch whisky from fast-growing emerging markets and the request for lower alcohol varieties among health-conscious drinkers are challenging a closely guarded centuries-old tradition.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scholarly snowball: Deep learning paper generates big online collaborationBioinformatics professors Anthony Gitter and Casey Greene set out in summer 2016 to write a paper about biomedical applications for deep learning, a hot new artificial intelligence field striving to mimic the neural networks of the human brain.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Global South experts urge developing countries to lead on solar geoengineering researchWriting in Nature today, a group of 12 scholars from across the developing world made an unprecedented call for developing countries to lead on the research and evaluation of solar radiation management (SRM) geoengineering.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Smart ink adds new dimensions to 3-D printingResearchers at Dartmouth College have developed a smart ink that turns 3D-printed structures into objects that can change shape and color. The innovation promises to add even more functionality to 3D printing and could pave the way to a new generation of printed material.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Smart ink adds new dimensions to 3-D printingNew smart ink turns 3-D-printed structures into objects that can change shape and color.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Childhood exposure to flame retardant chemicals declines following phase-outExposure to flame retardants once widely used in consumer products has been falling, according to a new study by researchers at the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health at Columbia's Mailman School of Public Health. The researchers are the first to show that levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) measured in children significantly decreased over a 15-year period between 19
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Obesity impacts liver health in kids as young as 8 years oldA new study found that weight gain, obesity can put children as young as age 8 at risk for a serious liver disease.
17h
Ingeniøren

Veterinæreksperter godkender vildsvinehegnDanmark er på forkant ved at sætte et hegn op i kampen mod afrikansk svinepest, siger DTU Veterinærinstituttet.
19h
Blog » Languages » English

Eyewire Scheduled Downtime April 4, 2018 at 10AM ETAs mentioned in our previous post , we are migrating Eyewire to the cloud to provide better site stability. Eyewire will be experiencing downtime Wednesday, April 4 starting at 10AM ET. We expect Eyewire to be back online at 1PM ET. Thank you for your patience and understanding! For Science!
19h
Science | The Guardian

Bowhead whales: jazz artists of the deep whose calls rival birdsongBowheads serenade each other off Greenland with a vast repertoire of improvised jazz-like song, study says How do bowhead whales in the unbroken darkness of the Arctic’s polar winter keep busy during breeding season? They sing, of course. Continue reading...
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Viden

Dansk rumprojekt skudt succesfuldt afstedRumobservatoriet Asim fik taget succesfuld afsked med Kennedy Space Center.
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Live Science

Deforestation: Facts, Causes & EffectsDeforestation, the permanent destruction of forests in order to make the land available for other uses, is considered to be a contributing factor to global climate change.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Three-month-old infants can learn abstract relations before language comprehensionThree-month-old babies cannot understand words and are just learning to roll over, yet they are already capable of learning abstract relations. In a new study, researchers show for the first time that 3-month-old infants can learn same and different relations.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists merge statistics, biology to produce important new gene computational toolResearchers have come up with a computational tool that increases the reliability of measuring how strongly genes are expressed in an individual cell.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How flu virus interacts with antibodies in the lungsScientists have discovered a new aspect of the flu virus and how it interacts with antibodies in the lungs. This research could lead to a new approach for developing vaccines to prevent the flu, as well as novel treatments for people who are already infected.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How to reprogram memory cells in the brainLong-term memory of specific places is stored in the brain in so-called place cells. Neuroscientists have now 'reprogrammed' such place cells in free-roaming mice, by sending electrical impulses directly to individual neurons.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

The whales who love to sing in the darkA new study reveals the surprising complexity of bowhead whale song.
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cognitive science

Very slow brain waves, long considered an artifact of brain scanning techniques, may be more important than anyone had realized. Researchers have found that very slow waves are directly linked to state of consciousness and may be involved in coordinating activity across distant brain regions.submitted by /u/SophiaDevetzi [link] [comments]
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bowhead whales, the 'jazz musicians' of the Arctic, sing many different songsFour winters of audio recordings of bowhead whales singing under the ice off Greenland show a surprise variety in this animal's repertoire. Bowhead whales' vocalization patterns are very different from the only other whale known to make distinct songs, the humpback.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Smokers have worse diets than non-smokersSmokers have worse quality diets than former smokers or non-smokers, according to a study published in the open-access journal BMC Public Health.
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Futurity.org

Can you write the most common lowercase ‘G’?Despite seeing it millions of times in pretty much every picture book, novel, newspaper, and email message, people are essentially unaware of the more common version of the lowercase print letter “g,” researchers have found. “They don’t entirely know what this letter looks like, even though they can read it…” Most people don’t even recall that two forms of the letter—one usually handwritten, the
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Spotify Subscriptions Helped The Streaming Company Win ListenersThe streaming company proved it could get the Napster generation to subscribe. But will Spotify's paywall make it profitable?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bowhead whales, the 'jazz musicians' of the Arctic, sing many different songsSpring is the time of year when birds are singing throughout the Northern Hemisphere. Far to the north, beneath the ice, another lesser-known concert season in the natural world is just coming to an end.
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Futurity.org

Injectable bandage could save lives on the battlefieldResearchers have created an injectable bandage to stop bleeding and promote wound healing. A penetrating injury from shrapnel is a serious obstacle in overcoming battlefield wounds that can ultimately lead to death. Given the high mortality rates due to hemorrhaging, there is an unmet need to quickly self-administer materials that prevent fatality due to excessive blood loss. The new bandage uses
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Futurity.org

Why whooping cough is making a comebackThe resurgence of whooping cough is the result of factors—including a phenomenon known as the honeymoon period—that began in the middle of the last century, long before the latest vaccines were introduced in the late 1990s, a new study suggests. Researchers and public health officials have struggled to explain the resurgence of the highly contagious respiratory disease in the United States since
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Live Science

Brain-Uploading Company Has No Immediate Plans to Upload BrainsNectome wants to "back up" your brain before you die, a deadly process. But following backlash, its founders say it has no plans to do so anytime soon.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scholarly snowball: Deep learning paper generates big online collaborationMore than 40 online collaborators contributed to a study about biomedical applications for deep learning, a hot new artificial intelligence field striving to mimic the neural networks of the human brain. 'Opportunities and obstacles for deep learning in biology and medicine,' was published April 4, 2018, in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Artificial intelligence helps to predict likelihood of life on other worldsDevelopments in artificial intelligence may help us to predict the probability of life on other planets, according to new work by a team based at Plymouth University. The study uses artificial neural networks (ANNs) to classify planets into five types, estimating a probability of life in each case, which could be used in future interstellar exploration missions. The work is presented at the Europe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Magnetic hot spots on neutron stars survive for millions of yearsA study of the evolution of magnetic fields inside neutron stars shows that instabilities can create intense magnetic hot spots that survive for millions of years, even after the star's overall magnetic field has decayed significantly. The results will be presented by Dr. Konstantinos Gourgouliatos of Durham University at the European Week of Astronomy and Space Science (EWASS) in Liverpool on Wed
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Global South experts urge developing countries to lead on solar geoengineering researchWriting in Nature today, a group of 12 scholars from across the developing world made an unprecedented call for developing countries to lead on the research and evaluation of solar radiation management (SRM) geoengineering.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Astrophysicists map the infant universe in 3-D and discover 4,000 early galaxiesAstronomers today announce one of the largest 3-D maps of the infant universe, in a presentation at the European Week of Astronomy and Space Science in Liverpool. A team led by Dr. David Sobral of Lancaster University made the chart using the Subaru telescope in Hawaii and the Isaac Newton telescope in the Canary Islands.
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Live Science

Female Mass Killers: Why They're So RareThe female YouTube mass shooter is a rare outlier among mass killers and terrorists who are mostly men. Here's why scientists say most mass violence is carried out by men.
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New Scientist - News

Ten ‘one-stop shop’ cancer diagnosis centres planned for EnglandEngland is to get specialist cancer diagnosis centres, which aim to more quickly diagnose people who have non-specific symptoms like weight loss and fatigue
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Futurity.org

Our brains treat signed and spoken languages alikeWhile the differences between sign language and speech are significant, the underlying neural processes we use to create complex expressions for both are quite similar, new research suggests. For both signers and speakers, phrase building engaged the same parts of the brain with similar timing… “This research shows for the first time that despite obvious physical differences in how signed and spo
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Science | The Guardian

New research sheds light on Neanderthals' distinctive featuresStudy appears to rule out theory that Neanderthals’ facial shape was adapted for a powerful bite With their prominent noses, protruding faces and swept-back cheekbones, Neanderthals were nothing if not striking. Now researchers say they have unpicked why our big-browed cousins had such distinctive features. Previous research has suggested a number of possible explanations for Neanderthals’ facial
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Futurity.org

Listen: Can bonuses for doctors cut childbirth deaths?More than 800 women die in childbirth every day in the developing world—often because doctors know what to do, they just don’t do it. There’s even a name for this: the “know-do gap.” “We know for a fact doctors don’t do as much as they know—the know-do gap in healthcare is a well-documented phenomenon,” says Duke University assistant professor Manoj Mohanan. “It exists because there are little in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astrophysicists map the infant universe in 3-D and discover 4,000 early galaxiesAstronomers today announce one of the largest 3D maps of the infant Universe, in a presentation at the European Week of Astronomy and Space Science in Liverpool. A team led by Dr David Sobral of Lancaster University made the chart using the Subaru telescope in Hawaii and the Isaac Newton telescope in the Canary Islands. Looking back in time to 16 different epochs between 11 and 13 billion years ag
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Artificial intelligence helps to predict likelihood of life on other worldsDevelopments in artificial intelligence may help us to predict the probability of life on other planets, according to new work by a team based at Plymouth University. The study uses artificial neural networks (ANNs) to classify planets into five types, estimating a probability of life in each case, which could be used in future interstellar exploration missions. The work is presented at the Europe
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Magnetic hot spots on neutron stars survive for millions of yearsA study of the evolution of magnetic fields inside neutron stars shows that instabilities can create intense magnetic hot spots that survive for millions of years, even after the star's overall magnetic field has decayed significantly. The results will be presented by Dr Konstantinos Gourgouliatos of Durham University at the European Week of Astronomy and Space Science (EWASS) in Liverpool on Wedn
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Popular Science

From tornadoes to farts: Eight science books to check out this monthEntertainment There's something for everyone. April showers bring you plenty of time to stay safe, dry, and warm inside with a good book while you wait for warmer weather to get here.
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: The Collective StruggleWhat We’re Following Silicon Valley Shooting: A shooter reportedly attacked the headquarters of YouTube, in San Bruno, California. Here’s what we know. The initial reports of the shooting came from employees who described the events on Twitter in real time—while observers followed an all-too-familiar sequence of shock at the news, hope for a false alarm, and dread of the final outcome. In Washing
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The Atlantic

The Cascade of Diminishing HopesThe mental exercise almost always starts the same way for me: with a tweet. For other people, it might be an email or a TV bulletin or a Snap. Whatever the medium, it’s a report that there’s an active shooter somewhere: at a school, government building, office, sporting event, concert, or a theater. Nearly six years ago, after the massacre in Aurora, Colorado, Garance Franke-Ruta wrote in The Atl
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The Atlantic

A Rapper From a 'Forgotten' Country“I remember going to school and counting bodies on the way back,” says Taher Raad in Tara Milutis’s new film, Taher from Iraq . “I watched a lot of friends and family die. It made human life very cheap—it was just another number added to the news.” Born and raised in Baghdad, Raad hoped to express his country’s plight through his music. Although he succeeded in making a name for himself in the ci
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

X-rays could sterilize alien planets in (otherwise) habitable zonesIntense radiation could strip away the ozone layer of Earth-like planets around other stars and render them uninhabitable, according to a new study led by Dr. Eike Guenther of the Thueringer Observatory in Germany. Dr. Guenther sets out the work in a presentation on 3rd April at the European Week of Astronomy and Space Science in Liverpool.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gravitational waves created by black holes in the center of most galaxiesGravitational waves may be forged in the heart of the galaxy, says a new study led by Ph.D. student Joseph Fernandez at Liverpool John Moores University. He sets out the work in a presentation on April 3 at the European Week of Astronomy and Space Science in Liverpool.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Here, there and everywhere: Across the universe with the BeatlesIn 'Here, There and Everywhere,' inspired by the book 'La scienza dei Beatles' ('The science of the Beatles'), Viviana Ambrosi shows how the Fab Four can bring the study of celestial objects and the exploration of the universe closer to a large public audience. This is set out in a presentation on April 3 at the European Week of Astronomy and Space Science in Liverpool.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Here, there and everywhere: Across the universe with the BeatlesThe Beatles are one of the greatest cultural phenomena to come from the 20th Century, yet many people are unaware of their impact on science.
23h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Fraught PruittToday in 5 Lines President Trump continued his tirade against Amazon , tweeting that the company is costing taxpayers “many billions of dollars” through subsidized rates at the U.S. Post Office. During a meeting with the heads of Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania, Trump claimed “nobody has been tougher on Russia” than he has , and said he planned to have the military guard the U.S.-Mexico border unt
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The Atlantic

A Shooting at YouTube HeadquartersUpdated on April 3 at 6:37 p.m. ET News of a reported shooting at the YouTube offices in California unfolded in real time on social media Tuesday as employees live-tweeted what was happening. Vadim Lavrusik, a product manager at YouTube, was one of the first people to report the shooting at the company’s headquarters in San Bruno, tweeting at about 1 p.m. local time: Active shooter at YouTube HQ.
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YouTube Shooting Spree Injures 4, Kills 1YouTube Nasim AghdamPolice say 1 dead and 4 wounded in shooting at YouTube headquarters in San Bruno, California, Tuesday afternoon.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Germs with unusual antibiotic resistance widespread in U.S.Health departments found more than 220 instances of germs with 'unusual' antibiotic resistance genes in the United States last year, according to a new report. Germs with unusual resistance include those that cannot be killed by all or most antibiotics, are uncommon in a geographic area or the U.S., or have specific genes that allow them to spread their resistance to other germs.
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Popular Science

Apple thinks putting on a VR headset could help fight nausea in the carTechnology Maybe you could fight zombies from a self-driving vehicle, too. Once cars drive themselves, how will their bored human passengers spend their time—and fight off motion sickness?
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Popular Science

Worried pasta will make you fat? Spaghettaboutit.Health Although pasta science points to it being healthier than other processed carbs, there's not much else to say about it. The cream-soaked, free-bread-basket excesses of fancy “Italian” dining of the past few decades have given pasta a bad name—one that Big Pasta has invested serious money…
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Science : NPR

Michigan OKs Nestlé Water Extraction, Despite 80K+ Public Comments Against ItMany public comments cited a clash between corporate greed and the welfare of people and the environment. Nestlé is seeking to pump 576,000 gallons of water each day from a well in western Michigan. (Image credit: Steven M. Herppich /AFP/Getty Images)
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Sexual Misconduct by Staff Widespread at UK Universities: ReportIn a survey of more than 1,000 current and former students, 41 percent indicate experiences with faculty and other employees ranging from sexualized comments to rape.
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The Scientist RSS

Scott Pruitts Questionable Practices ExposedThe EPA administrator had a sweet rental deal from a DC lobbyist, took pricey flights, and engineered whopping pay raises for aides.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study links outdoor recreation with water quality concernsPeople who camp, hike, fish or participate in other forms of outdoor recreation generally have a higher level of concern about water quality than those who don't, according to a recent study co-authored by Portland State University professor Melissa Haeffner.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA hires Lockheed Martin to build quiet, supersonic planeNASA has inked a deal with Lockheed Martin to develop a supersonic "X-plane" that could break the sound barrier without a sonic boom, officials said Tuesday.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Portland State study links outdoor recreation with water quality concernsPeople who camp, hike, fish or participate in other forms of outdoor recreation generally have a higher level of concern about water quality than those who don't, according to a recent study co-authored by Portland State University professor Melissa Haeffner.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

For women with kidney cancer, belly fat mattersBelly fat affects the odds of women surviving kidney cancer but not men, according to a new study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings suggest that kidney cancer may develop and progress differently in women than men.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Perseus cluster: Scientists surprised by relentless cosmic cold frontA gigantic and resilient "cold front" hurtling through the Perseus galaxy cluster has been studied using data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This cosmic weather system spans about two million light years and has been traveling for over 5 billion years, longer than the existence of our Solar System.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UN food agency urges 'agroecology' to fight famineCurrent food production methods are harming the planet while failing to provide millions of the world's poor with enough to eat, the UN food agency warned Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US targets waiver letting California steer emissions limitsScott Pruitt, administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, turned his sights this week on a nearly half-century-old federal waiver that allows California to pursue its own, tough tailpipe emission standards, and allows other states to opt in to California's standards rather than federal ones if they choose.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists merge statistics, biology to produce important new gene computational toolThe cells in our bodies express themselves in different ways. One cell might put a chunk of genetic code to work, while another cell ignores the same information entirely. Understanding why could spur new stem cell therapies, or lead to a more fundamental understanding of how organisms develop. But zeroing in on these cell-to-cell differences can be challenging.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Partner's finances impact well-being, even in young love: studyFor married couples, money is a common source of stress and conflict that can take a major toll on relationship quality.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Debt matters: Women use credit to bridge income gaps, while men are less cautiousWhen it comes to attitudes about money matters, gender often makes a difference. Take high-risk investments—research shows women tend to be more cautious than their male counterparts.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Apps to keep children safe online may be counterproductiveMobile apps designed to help parents keep their children safe from online predators may actually be counterproductive, harming the trust between a parent and child and reducing the child's ability to respond to online threats, conclude two new studies from the University of Central Florida.
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Big Think

Rare cosmic alignment provides glimpse of most distant star ever observedAstronomers were using images taken by Hubble Space Telescope to study a supernova when they detected an unusually strong source of light later determined to be a star. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study reveals cost of 2017 salmon fisheries closureLast year's closure of the commercial ocean salmon troll fishery off the West Coast is estimated to have cost $5.8 million to $8.9 million in lost income for fishermen, with the loss of 200 to 330 jobs, according to a new model that determines the cost of fisheries closures based on the choices fishermen make.
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Science | The Guardian

Terrawatch: scientists turn to drones to find raw materialsIn Germany, scientists are using drones equipped with sensors to locate metals needed for wind turbines and solar panels We know that renewable energy can help the world to wean itself off fossil fuels, but keeping up with green-energy demand is creating another problem. Countries such as Germany, which has committed itself to a low-carbon future, are finding themselves short of the raw materials
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Australian vine can boost soybean yield, study saysGrowing in its native Australia, the unobtrusive perennial vine Glycine tomentella could easily be overlooked. But the distant relative of soybean contains genetic resources that can substantially increase soybean yield, according to a new study from the University of Illinois.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Professor makes legal case for schools to challenge cyberbulliesStudent bullying on the internet could be headed for a showdown with a 50-year-old U.S. Supreme Court case that granted expansive
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers use supercomputers to estimate radiation risks for low Earth orbitsAlongside the well-known hazards of space—freezing temperatures, crushing pressures, isolation—astronauts also face risks from radiation, which can cause illness or injure organs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New satellite method enables undersea estimates from spaceBigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences researchers have developed a statistical method to quantify important ocean measurements from satellite data, publishing their findings in the journal Global Biogeochemical Cycles. The study was made available online in December 2017, ahead of publication in January 2018.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

APNewsBreak: US suspects cellphone spying devices in DCFor the first time, the U.S. government has publicly acknowledged the existence in Washington of what appear to be rogue devices that foreign spies and criminals could be using to track individual cellphones and intercept calls and messages.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spotify wins more fans in stock market debut as shares surgeSpotify picked up more fans on Wall Street on Tuesday as investors gave the unprofitable company a warm welcome in its stock market debut.
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Blog » Languages » English

The April Fools Downtime Was No Joke. Here’s What Happened and How We’ll Prevent It In The Future.On April 1, 2018, Eyewire experienced a catastrophic failure on one of our database nodes at the MIT data center. We migrated all Eyewire services to another node and the process took several hours, after which we came back online. In order prevent further interruptions from local servers, we’re migrating Eyewire to the cloud. We’ve been planning this move for a while and will be accelerating the
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cost of 2017 salmon fisheries closureLast year's closure of the commercial ocean salmon troll fishery off the West Coast is estimated to have cost $5.8 million to $8.9 million in lost income for fishermen, with the loss of 200 to 330 jobs, according to a new model that determines the cost of fisheries closures based on the choices fishermen make.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

High number of concussion-related symptoms in performing artsA recent study shows a stunning number of participants not only experienced concussion-related symptoms and head impacts but also continued performing either without reporting the incident or without receiving the recommended care. These participants were not taking part in any sporting contest at the time, however. They are theater personnel.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Debt matters: Women use credit to bridge income gaps, while men are less cautiousA new study on attitudes about debt shows that men have greater tolerance for using debt to buy luxury items, while women are more accepting of debt used in appropriate ways, including to bridge income gaps.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Apps to keep children safe online may be counterproductiveMobile apps designed to help parents keep their children safe from online predators may actually be counterproductive, harming the trust between a parent and child and reducing the child's ability to respond to online threats, conclude two new studies.
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Science : NPR

A Look At The Ethical Questions EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt Is FacingA new report in The Atlantic says that Scott Pruitt, head of the Environmental Protection Agency, bypassed the White House to grant raises to two of his closest aids. Reporter Robinson Meyer speaks with NPR's Audie Cornish about his reporting and other ethics questions Pruitt is facing.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UCLA scientists merge statistics, biology to produce important new gene computational toolUCLA researchers have come up with a computational tool that increases the reliability of measuring how strongly genes are expressed in an individual cell.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Three-month-old infants can learn abstract relations before language comprehensionThree-month-old babies cannot understand words and are just learning to roll over, yet they are already capable of learning abstract relations. In a new study, Northwestern University researchers show for the first time that 3-month-old infants can learn same and different relations.
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Live Science

New 'Nightmare' Bacteria Are Popping Up All Over the USResearchers identified more than 200 cases of "nightmare" bacteria with new or rare antibiotic-resistance genes in the U.S. last year.
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NYT > Science

ScienceTake: Hot Springs Lower Stress in Japan’s Popular Bathing MonkeysPhotogenic snow monkeys have been a long time tourist attraction, but only recently have scientists investigated their unusual behavior.
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NYT > Science

The Story Behind Japan’s Bathing MonkeysFor the famed snow monkeys, a troop of Japanese macaques that live near Nagano, soaking in hot springs eases the stress of cold winters. But how did they come to adopt this habit?
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Big Think

Religious and supernatural belief linked with poor understanding of the physical worldA study published in Applied Cognitive Psychology suggests that believers struggle to understand the physical world. Read More
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

My $500 house in Detroit -- and the neighbors who helped me rebuild it | Drew PhilpIn 2009, journalist and screenwriter Drew Philp bought a ruined house in Detroit for $500. In the years that followed, as he gutted the interior and removed the heaps of garbage crowding the rooms, he didn't just learn how to repair a house -- he learned how to build a community. In a tribute to the city he loves, Philp tells us about "radical neighborliness" and makes the case that we have "the p
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Professor makes legal case for schools to challenge cyberbulliesStudent bullying on the internet could be headed for a showdown with a 50-year-old U.S. Supreme Court case that granted expansive First Amendment rights to kids in public school. When it does, one expert is ready to make the case for challenging the offenders, arguing for new standards under which school officials can punish cyberbullying.
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2001: A Space Odyssey Predicted the Future—50 Years AgoStanley Kubrick's iconic film gave us Hal and other sci-fi elements. Here's how they stack up against reality.
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New NASA X-Plane Could Bring Supersonic Flight to the MassesLockheed Martin's Low Boom Demonstrator joins the ranks of NASA's famed X-planes—and could bring back the age of supersonic civilian aviation that ended when the Concorde retired in 2003.
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Live Science

NASA's Supersonic X-Plane Will Tear Through the Sound Barrier with 'a Gentle Thump'The sleek, single-pilot plane will reduce the roaring sonic boom of supersonic travel to a quiet thump, NASA says.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ohio University study shows high number of concussion-related symptoms in performing artsA recent study released by the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine shows a stunning number of participants not only experienced concussion-related symptoms and head impacts but also continued performing either without reporting the incident or without receiving the recommended care. These participants were not taking part in any sporting contest at the time, however. They are theate
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Peer influence, better HIV counseling could encourage boys in Africa to be circumcisedWith research showing that male circumcision reduces the odds of getting HIV through heterosexual sex by 60 percent, more boys and young men -- primarily those between the ages of 10 and 19 -- are having the procedure done, largely in eastern and southern African nations where circumcision is rarely performed at birth.
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Science : NPR

Federal Efforts To Control Rare And Deadly Bacteria WorkingThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's efforts to control drug-resistant bacteria finds that the percentage of bacteria carrying this resistance is declining. But it wants more data. (Image credit: Science Photo Library/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra)
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In reducing deaths from heart disease and stroke, Kaiser Permanente outpaces nationDeath rates from heart disease and stroke in adults under age 65 are lower and dropping faster for Kaiser Permanente patients in Northern California than in the rest of the United States, according to new research published today in the American Journal of Medicine.
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The Atlantic

The Larger Concerns Behind the Teachers' StrikesOklahoma Teachers FundingOne demand of the striking Oklahoma teachers has gotten a lot of attention: They want higher salaries . Superficially that demand may seem like a somewhat selfish concern—a question of their own bank accounts, not students’ needs. But the teachers’ complaints go far beyond compensation, and when viewed in the context of their other demands, it’s clear that the strike gets at the heart of some of
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Are we ready for the deadly heat waves of the future?As heat waves become more common, cities try to respond.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study reveals cost of 2017 salmon fisheries closureLast year's closure of the commercial ocean salmon troll fishery off the West Coast is estimated to have cost $5.8 million to $8.9 million in lost income for fishermen, with the loss of 200 to 330 jobs, according to a new model that determines the cost of fisheries closures based on the choices fishermen make.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Professor makes legal case for schools to challenge cyberbulliesStudent bullying on the internet could be headed for a showdown with a 50-year-old U.S. Supreme Court case that granted expansive First Amendment rights to kids in public school. When it does, University of Illinois journalism professor Benjamin Holden, through a two-part legal study - part of which was published this week - is ready to make the case for challenging the offenders, arguing for new
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For Apple, Quitting Intel Won't Come EasyIt makes all the sense in the world that Apple wants to leave Intel behind. Where it gets tricky is how it gets there.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New satellite method enables undersea estimates from spaceResearchers have developed a statistical method to quantify six important ocean particles from satellite data.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Partner's finances impact well-being, even in young loveHow a young adult's boyfriend or girlfriend manages money may have an impact on the young adult's overall well-being and life outcomes, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genes can help predict children's risk of type 1 diabetesA type 1 diabetes genetic score can identify infants at risk for pre-symptomatic type 1 diabetes and could be used to enroll children into type 1 diabetes prevention trials, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Protein derived from parasite has potential to alleviate debilitating diseaseMedical researchers have turned the tables on Schistosoma haematobium, a parasitic worm that freeloads in humans, by using a protein derived from the parasite as a therapeutic molecule to reduce bleeding and pain associated with chemotherapy-induced hemorrhagic cystitis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Double-drug strategy blocks escape route for most lung cancersA one-two combo punch using two currently available drugs could be an effective treatment for the majority of lung cancers, a study shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ancient sea worm eats, poops and leaves behind evidence of Cambrian biodiversityResearchers have uncovered details of the Cambrian food web on an ocean floor that once played home to a scattering of bivalved arthropods, hyoliths and trilobites.
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New on MIT Technology Review

The city of Seoul dreams of its own government-backed cryptocurrency
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The Atlantic

The Riots That Followed the Assassination of Martin Luther King Jr.Fifty years ago today, Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his “I've Been to the Mountaintop” speech in Memphis, Tennessee, one day before his assassination. King’s Memphis speech focused on the ongoing sanitation workers’ strike, and he reaffirmed his commitment to fight injustice with nonviolent protest, despite government injunctions and threats on his life. King stated he just wanted to carry ou
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Debt matters: Women use credit to bridge income gaps, while men are less cautiousA new study on attitudes about debt shows that men have greater tolerance for using debt to buy luxury items, while women are more accepting of debt used in appropriate ways, including to bridge income gaps.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A letter we've seen millions of times, yet can't writeDespite seeing it millions of times in pretty much every picture book, every novel, every newspaper and every email message, people are essentially unaware of the more common version of the lowercase print letter 'g,' Johns Hopkins researchers have found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Microbiome study suggests marine nematodes are not picky eatersResearchers report that the likelihood that nematode worms have similar microbial profiles does not correlate with how closely they are related.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Considering an employee for an overseas assignment?A new study shows that expatriates' personality characteristics have a lot to do with how well they adjust and whether they succeed and provide a return on a company's considerable investment in an individual.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Australian vine can boost soybean yield, study saysGrowing in its native Australia, the unobtrusive perennial vine Glycine tomentella could easily be overlooked. But the distant relative of soybean contains genetic resources that can substantially increase soybean yield, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How to fight side effects of hormone therapy for prostate cancerMen on hormone therapy for prostate cancer may benefit significantly from hitting the gym with fellow patients and choosing more veggies and fewer cheeseburgers, a new study suggests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Anticipating the dangers of spaceAstronauts and future space tourists face risks from radiation, which can cause illness and injure organs. Researchers used supercomputers to investigate the radiation exposure related to the Manned Orbital Laboratory mission, planned for the 1960s and 70s, during which a dangerous solar storm occurred. They also explored the historical limitations of radiation research and how such limitations co
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Inner ear provides clues to human dispersalSlight differences can be found in the inner ear of different populations of modern humans. Paleoanthropologists have found that these differences can provide information about the global dispersal of humans from Africa.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Monitor detects dangerously low white blood cell levelsResearchers have now developed a portable device that could be used to monitor patients' white blood cell levels at home, without taking blood samples.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dispatch from the field II: Students describe an elusive spider while stationed in BorneoStudents taking part in a recent ecology field course in Borneo described the first male of an elusive species of orb-weaving spider known for its striking red and blue colors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Safety of rear-facing car seats in rear impact car crashesExperts know that rear-facing car seats protect infants and toddlers in front and side impact crashes, but they are rarely discussed when it comes to rear-impact collisions. Because rear-impact crashes account for more than 25 percent of all accidents, researchers conducted a new study to explore the effectiveness of rear-facing car seats in this scenario.
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Science : NPR

EPA Chief Pruitt Faces Mounting Scrutiny For Ethics ViolationsEnvironmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt is fending off accusations that he misused taxpayer funds and maintained improper ties to companies regulated by the EPA. (Image credit: Andrew Harnik/AP)
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New on MIT Technology Review

Self-driving trucks are coming—and this law just made things even worse for truckers
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Big Think

Two new studies confirm medical marijuana staves off opiate abuseOne possible solution to the opioid epidemic is already accessible in several states, with more to come. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Astro-ecology: Saving endangered animals with software for the starsA collaboration between astrophysicists and ecologists is helping to monitor rare and endangered species and stop poaching. Astrophysical software and techniques are applied to thermal infrared imagery captured by drones to automatically detect and identify animals -- even at night, when most poaching activity occurs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Preprints accelerated between Ebola and Zika epidemicsPreprints -- scientific manuscripts that are posted at a recognized online repository before peer review -- have the potential to speed up the reporting of scientific research in infectious disease outbreaks.
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Feed: All Latest

Spotify Shunned an IPO. Now It's Just Another Public CompanyThe music-streaming service listed its shares Tuesday without the traditional bankers or ceremony.
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Live Science

Meet the Higgs Bubble That Will Destroy the Universe. Maybe.Scientists have calculated an end date for the universe. Presuming there are no surprises, of course.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Apps to keep children safe online may be counterproductiveMobile apps designed to help parents keep their children safe from online predators may actually be counterproductive, harming the trust between a parent and child and reducing the child's ability to respond to online threats, conclude two new studies from the University of Central Florida.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Partner's finances impact well-being, even in young loveHow a young adult's boyfriend or girlfriend manages money may have an impact on the young adult's overall well-being and life outcomes, according to a new study led by the University of Arizona.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New satellite method enables undersea estimates from spaceBigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences researchers have developed a statistical method to quantify six important ocean particles from satellite data.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genes can help predict children's risk of type 1 diabetesA type 1 diabetes genetic score can identify infants at risk for pre-symptomatic type 1 diabetes and could be used to enroll children into type 1 diabetes prevention trials, according to a study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Anette Ziegler of the Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Germany, and colleagues.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Preprints accelerated between Ebola and Zika epidemicsPreprints -- scientific manuscripts that are posted at a recognized online repository before peer review -- have the potential to speed up the reporting of scientific research in infectious disease outbreaks, argue Michael Johansson and colleagues in an Essay in PLOS Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Protein derived from parasite has potential to alleviate debilitating diseaseA Children's-led research team has turned the tables on Schistosoma haematobium, a parasitic worm that freeloads in humans, by using a protein derived from the parasite as a therapeutic molecule to reduce bleeding and pain associated with chemotherapy-induced hemorrhagic cystitis.
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Viden

Kan man booste forelskelsen med 36 spørgsmål?36 særlige spørgsmål skulle skabe særlig nærhed og intimitet. Vi har testet to pars reaktion.
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Scientific American Content: Global

"Nightmare Bacteria" Widespread in U.S. HospitalsSuch pathogens are resistant to nearly every drug -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Population trends in Vermivora warblers are linked to strong migratory connectivity [Ecology]Migratory species can experience limiting factors at different locations and during different periods of their annual cycle. In migratory birds, these factors may even occur in different hemispheres. Therefore, identifying the distribution of populations throughout their annual cycle (i.e., migratory connectivity) can reveal the complex ecological and evolutionary relationships that...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Diversification of AID/APOBEC-like deaminases in metazoa: multiplicity of clades and widespread roles in immunity [Immunology and Inflammation]AID/APOBEC deaminases (AADs) convert cytidine to uridine in single-stranded nucleic acids. They are involved in numerous mutagenic processes, including those underpinning vertebrate innate and adaptive immunity. Using a multipronged sequence analysis strategy, we uncover several AADs across metazoa, dictyosteliida, and algae, including multiple previously unreported vertebrate clades, and versions
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Expansions, diversification, and interindividual copy number variations of AID/APOBEC family cytidine deaminase genes in lampreys [Immunology and Inflammation]Cytidine deaminases of the AID/APOBEC family catalyze C-to-U nucleotide transitions in mRNA or DNA. Members of the APOBEC3 branch are involved in antiviral defense, whereas AID contributes to diversification of antibody repertoires in jawed vertebrates via somatic hypermutation, gene conversion, and class switch recombination. In the extant jawless vertebrate, the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Duplicated TLR5 of zebrafish functions as a heterodimeric receptor [Immunology and Inflammation]Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) of mammals, birds, and reptiles detects bacterial flagellin and signals as a homodimeric complex. Structural studies using truncated TLR5b of zebrafish confirm the homodimeric TLR5–flagellin interaction. Here we provide evidence that zebrafish (Danio rerio) TLR5 unexpectedly signals as a heterodimer composed of the duplicated gene products...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Innate responses to gene knockouts impact overlapping gene networks and vary with respect to resistance to viral infection [Immunology and Inflammation]Analyses of the levels of mRNAs encoding IFIT1, IFI16, RIG-1, MDA5, CXCL10, LGP2, PUM1, LSD1, STING, and IFNβ in cell lines from which the gene encoding LGP2, LSD1, PML, HDAC4, IFI16, PUM1, STING, MDA5, IRF3, or HDAC 1 had been knocked out, as well as the ability of these cell...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Data-driven model for the assessment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission in evolving demographic structures [Medical Sciences]In the case of tuberculosis (TB), the capabilities of epidemic models to produce quantitatively robust forecasts are limited by multiple hindrances. Among these, understanding the complex relationship between disease epidemiology and populations’ age structure has been highlighted as one of the most relevant. TB dynamics depends on age in multiple...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Ultrastructure of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 nanowires revealed by electron cryotomography [Microbiology]Bacterial nanowires have garnered recent interest as a proposed extracellular electron transfer (EET) pathway that links the bacterial electron transport chain to solid-phase electron acceptors away from the cell. Recent studies showed that Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 produces outer membrane (OM) and periplasmic extensions that contain EET components and hinted at...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Haemophilus influenzae genome evolution during persistence in the human airways in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [Microbiology]Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) exclusively colonize and infect humans and are critical to the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In vitro and animal models do not accurately capture the complex environments encountered by NTHi during human infection. We conducted whole-genome sequencing of 269 longitudinally collected cleared and persistent...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Endogenous superoxide is a key effector of the oxygen sensitivity of a model obligate anaerobe [Microbiology]It has been unclear whether superoxide and/or hydrogen peroxide play important roles in the phenomenon of obligate anaerobiosis. This question was explored using Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a major fermentative bacterium in the human gastrointestinal tract. Aeration inactivated two enzyme families—[4Fe-4S] dehydratases and nonredox mononuclear iron enzymes—whose homologs, in contrast, remain act
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Multiplicative mixing of object identity and image attributes in single inferior temporal neurons [Neuroscience]Object recognition is challenging because the same object can produce vastly different images, mixing signals related to its identity with signals due to its image attributes, such as size, position, rotation, etc. Previous studies have shown that both signals are present in high-level visual areas, but precisely how they are...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Sensorineural hearing loss degrades behavioral and physiological measures of human spatial selective auditory attention [Neuroscience]Listeners with sensorineural hearing loss often have trouble understanding speech amid other voices. While poor spatial hearing is often implicated, direct evidence is weak; moreover, studies suggest that reduced audibility and degraded spectrotemporal coding may explain such problems. We hypothesized that poor spatial acuity leads to difficulty deploying selective attention,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

mTOR signaling in VIP neurons regulates circadian clock synchrony and olfaction [Neuroscience]Mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling controls cell growth, proliferation, and metabolism in dividing cells. Less is known regarding its function in postmitotic neurons in the adult brain. Here we created a conditional mTOR knockout mouse model to address this question. Using the Cre-LoxP system, the mTOR gene was specifically...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Flexible egocentric and allocentric representations of heading signals in parietal cortex [Neuroscience]By systematically manipulating head position relative to the body and eye position relative to the head, previous studies have shown that vestibular tuning curves of neurons in the ventral intraparietal (VIP) area remain invariant when expressed in body-/world-centered coordinates. However, body orientation relative to the world was not manipulated; thus,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Schema learning for the cocktail party problem [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]The cocktail party problem requires listeners to infer individual sound sources from mixtures of sound. The problem can be solved only by leveraging regularities in natural sound sources, but little is known about how such regularities are internalized. We explored whether listeners learn source “schemas”—the abstract structure shared by different...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Lu et al., High-order above-threshold dissociation of molecules [Correction]PHYSICS Correction for “High-order above-threshold dissociation of molecules,” by Peifen Lu, Junping Wang, Hui Li, Kang Lin, Xiaochun Gong, Qiying Song, Qinying Ji, Wenbin Zhang, Junyang Ma, Hanxiao Li, Heping Zeng, Feng He, and Jian Wu, which was first published February 13, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1719481115 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 115:2049–2053)....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Gay-Antaki and Liverman, Climate for women in climate science: Women scientists and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Correction]ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES Correction for “Climate for women in climate science: Women scientists and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change” by Miriam Gay-Antaki and Diana Liverman, which was first published February 12, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1710271115 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 115:2060–2065). The authors note that the following statement should be added to...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Place et al., MicroRNA-373 induces expression of genes with complementary promoter sequences [Correction]GENETICS Correction for “MicroRNA-373 induces expression of genes with complementary promoter sequences,” by Robert F. Place, Long-Cheng Li, Deepa Pookot, Emily J. Noonan, and Rajvir Dahiya, which was first published January 28, 2008; 10.1073/pnas.0707594105 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 105:1608–1613). The authors wish to note the following: “The corresponding authors...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Froidure et al., AtsPLA2-{alpha} nuclear relocalization by the Arabidopsis transcription factor AtMYB30 leads to repression of the plant defense response [Correction]PLANT BIOLOGY Correction for “AtsPLA2-α nuclear relocalization by the Arabidopsis transcription factor AtMYB30 leads to repression of the plant defense response,” by Solène Froidure, Joanne Canonne, Xavier Daniel, Alain Jauneau, Christian Brière, Dominique Roby, and Susana Rivas, which was first published August 9, 2010; 10.1073/pnas.1009056107 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Infectious disease transmission on airplanes Flu transmission on airplanes. Image courtesy of iStock.com/supershabashnyi. More than a dozen cases of transmission of infectious diseases on board airline flights have been documented, and air travel can potentially facilitate the rapid spread of emerging infections. Despite the public health concerns surrounding inflight disease...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Altruism or association? [Biological Sciences]Wang and Lu (1) claim to report evidence of a genetic polymorphism of altruistic and nonaltruistic alleles in a natural population of Tibetan ground tits, Pseudopodoces humilis. Their argument assumes that observed heritable variation in altruistic behavior reflects an underlying genetic difference in altruism. However, the authors do not show...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Gilbert: On the relationship between association and altruism [Biological Sciences]Gilbert (1) contends that the observed heritability and fitness consequence of helping behavior in ground tits (2) should be explained by mechanisms involved in individual association, instead of by those underlying altruism per se. This contention rests largely on the association theory proposed by Gilbert himself, which was believed to...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Assessment of E-cigarette impact on smokers: The importance of experimental conditions relevant to human consumption [Biological Sciences]We read with great interest the work of Lee et al. (1), in which the authors measured DNA damage induced by nitrosamines in vitro in different cell types and in vivo in various organs of E-cigarette smoke-exposed mice. The authors conclude that E-cigarette smoke might contribute to lung and bladder...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Li Volti et al.: E-cigarette smoke exposure and effect in mice and human cells [Biological Sciences]We wish to emphasize that in our study (1) the E-cigarette smoke (ECS) was generated by E-juice (nicotine,10 mg/mL) in an E-cigarette (E-cig) machine operated at 4.2 V, the same voltage as a commercial E-cig pen (2). The ECS concentration was 130 mg/m3 (measured) and the nicotine concentration in the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Donald Lynden-Bell (1935-2018) [Retrospectives]Donald Lynden-Bell was lucky in his heredity and his environment. His great-grandfather knew the famous astronomer John Herschel. His father, an army Colonel, inherited a telescope and introduced Donald to the wonders of the sky. At his school, Marlborough College, Donald was exceedingly well taught. He came up to Clare...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Protonation underlies tonic vs. use-dependent block [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Eukaryotic voltage gated sodium-selective channels (VGSCs) enable influx of Na+ into excitable cells in response to a change in the transmembrane potential. This movement of ions causes the membrane depolarization occurring during the rising phase of the action potential and, as such, underlies propagation of electrical signals in neurons. The...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Identifying migratory birds’ population bottlenecks in time and space [Ecology]The annual disappearance and reappearance of billions of migratory animals from seasonal environments across the planet is a stunning natural phenomenon. Naturalists have marveled for more than 2,000 y at these migrations, at least since Aristotle pondered birds’ seasonal disappearance. Birds are the preeminent seasonal commuters because of their physiological...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Value of ecosystem-based management [Sustainability Science]Taking the pulse of an ecosystem is not quite as straightforward as taking the pulse of a person, especially when that ecosystem is the Chesapeake Bay. At 195 miles long and 3,237 square miles in area, the size and complexity of the bay’s coupled social and ecological systems has challenged...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Hormone modulates protein dynamics to regulate plant growth [Plant Biology]Endosomal traffic in the plant endomembrane system is a fundamental and complex process that controls many essential cellular, developmental, and physiological functions in plants, including cellular polarization, cytokinesis, metal ion homeostasis, pathogen defense, and hormone transport (1). The secretory and endocytic pathways represent two major anterograde protein transport routes for...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Agricultural origins on the Anatolian plateau [Anthropology]This paper explores the explanations for, and consequences of, the early appearance of food production outside the Fertile Crescent of Southwest Asia, where it originated in the 10th/9th millennia cal BC. We present evidence that cultivation appeared in Central Anatolia through adoption by indigenous foragers in the mid ninth millennium...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Live births from artificial insemination of microfluidic-sorted bovine spermatozoa characterized by trajectories correlated with fertility [Agricultural Sciences]Selection of functional spermatozoa plays a crucial role in assisted reproduction. Passage of spermatozoa through the female reproductive tract requires progressive motility to locate the oocyte. This preferential ability to reach the fertilization site confers fertility advantage to spermatozoa. Current routine sperm selection techniques are inadequate and fail to provide...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Muscle-tendon length and force affect human tibialis anterior central aponeurosis stiffness in vivo [Applied Biological Sciences]The factors that drive variable aponeurosis behaviors in active versus passive muscle may alter the longitudinal stiffness of the aponeurosis during contraction, which may change the fascicle strains for a given muscle force. However, it remains unknown whether these factors can drive variable aponeurosis behaviors across different muscle-tendon unit (MTU)...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Immunization with outer membrane vesicles displaying conserved surface polysaccharide antigen elicits broadly antimicrobial antibodies [Applied Biological Sciences]Many microbial pathogens produce a β-(1→6)–linked poly-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (PNAG) surface capsule, including bacterial, fungal, and protozoan cells. Broadly protective immune responses to this single conserved polysaccharide antigen in animals are possible but only when a deacetylated poly-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (dPNAG; <30% acetate) glycoform is administered as a conjugate to a carrier protein
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Identification and biosynthesis of thymidine hypermodifications in the genomic DNA of widespread bacterial viruses [Biochemistry]Certain viruses of bacteria (bacteriophages) enzymatically hypermodify their DNA to protect their genetic material from host restriction endonuclease-mediated cleavage. Historically, it has been known that virion DNAs from the Delftia phage ΦW-14 and the Bacillus phage SP10 contain the hypermodified pyrimidines α-putrescinylthymidine and α-glutamylthymidine, respectively. These bases derive from t
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Coordination to lanthanide ions distorts binding site conformation in calmodulin [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The Ca2+-sensing protein calmodulin (CaM) is a popular model of biological ion binding since it is both experimentally tractable and essential to survival in all eukaryotic cells. CaM modulates hundreds of target proteins and is sensitive to complex patterns of Ca2+ exposure, indicating that it functions as a sophisticated dynamic...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Protonation state of inhibitors determines interaction sites within voltage-gated sodium channels [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Voltage-gated sodium channels are essential for carrying electrical signals throughout the body, and mutations in these proteins are responsible for a variety of disorders, including epilepsy and pain syndromes. As such, they are the target of a number of drugs used for reducing pain or combatting arrhythmias and seizures. However,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Conformation-dependent partitioning of yeast nutrient transporters into starvation-protective membrane domains [Cell Biology]The eukaryotic plasma membrane is compartmentalized into domains enriched in specific lipids and proteins. However, our understanding of the molecular bases and biological roles of this partitioning remains incomplete. The best-studied domain in yeast is the membrane compartment containing the arginine permease Can1 (MCC) and later found to cluster additional...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Dimeric sorting code for concentrative cargo selection by the COPII coat [Cell Biology]The flow of cargo vesicles along the secretory pathway requires concerted action among various regulators. The COPII complex, assembled by the activated SAR1 GTPases on the surface of the endoplasmic reticulum, orchestrates protein interactions to package cargos and generate transport vesicles en route to the Golgi. The dynamic nature of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

A pex1 missense mutation improves peroxisome function in a subset of Arabidopsis pex6 mutants without restoring PEX5 recycling [Cell Biology]Peroxisomes are eukaryotic organelles critical for plant and human development because they house essential metabolic functions, such as fatty acid β-oxidation. The interacting ATPases PEX1 and PEX6 contribute to peroxisome function by recycling PEX5, a cytosolic receptor needed to import proteins targeted to the peroxisomal matrix. Arabidopsis pex6 mutants exhibit...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

PDGFR{alpha}+ pericryptal stromal cells are the critical source of Wnts and RSPO3 for murine intestinal stem cells in vivo [Developmental Biology]Wnts and R-spondins (RSPOs) support intestinal homeostasis by regulating crypt cell proliferation and differentiation. Ex vivo, Wnts secreted by Paneth cells in organoids can regulate the proliferation and differentiation of Lgr5-expressing intestinal stem cells. However, in vivo, Paneth cell and indeed all epithelial Wnt production is completely dispensable, and the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Division-independent differentiation mandates proliferative competition among stem cells [Developmental Biology]Cancer-initiating gatekeeper mutations that arise in stem cells would be especially potent if they stabilize and expand an affected stem cell lineage. It is therefore important to understand how different stem cell organization strategies promote or prevent variant stem cell amplification in response to different types of mutation, including those...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Spatially disaggregated population estimates in the absence of national population and housing census data [Social Sciences]Population numbers at local levels are fundamental data for many applications, including the delivery and planning of services, election preparation, and response to disasters. In resource-poor settings, recent and reliable demographic data at subnational scales can often be lacking. National population and housing census data can be outdated, inaccurate, or...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Earliest isotopic evidence in the Maya region for animal management and long-distance trade at the site of Ceibal, Guatemala [Anthropology]This study uses a multiisotope (carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and strontium) approach to examine early animal management in the Maya region. An analysis of faunal specimens across almost 2,000 years (1000 BC to AD 950) at the site of Ceibal, Guatemala, reveals the earliest evidence for live-traded dogs and possible captive-reared...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Coevolution of landesque capital intensive agriculture and sociopolitical hierarchy [Anthropology]One of the defining trends of the Holocene has been the emergence of complex societies. Two essential features of complex societies are intensive resource use and sociopolitical hierarchy. Although it is widely agreed that these two phenomena are associated cross-culturally and have both contributed to the rise of complex societies,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Construction and evolution of an Escherichia coli strain relying on nonoxidative glycolysis for sugar catabolism [Applied Biological Sciences]The Embden–Meyerhoff–Parnas (EMP) pathway, commonly known as glycolysis, represents the fundamental biochemical infrastructure for sugar catabolism in almost all organisms, as it provides key components for biosynthesis, energy metabolism, and global regulation. EMP-based metabolism synthesizes three-carbon (C3) metabolites before two-carbon (C2) metabolites and must emit one CO2 in the synthesis.
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Science and Culture: Wearable tech meets tattoo art in a bid to revolutionize both [Applied Physical Sciences]Engineer and artist Cindy Hsin-Liu Kao was browsing through Vogue a few years ago when an article about temporary metallic-colored tattoos caught her eye. Staring at the glittering shapes that wrapped like jewelry around a model’s wrist, Kao wondered if they were conductive. She envisioned the possibilities: on-skin user interfaces...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Frictional lubricity enhanced by quantum mechanics [Applied Physical Sciences]The quantum motion of nuclei, generally ignored in the physics of sliding friction, can affect in an important manner the frictional dissipation of a light particle forced to slide in an optical lattice. The density matrix-calculated evolution of the quantum version of the basic Prandtl–Tomlinson model, describing the dragging by...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Full superconducting dome of strong Ising protection in gated monolayer WS2 [Applied Physical Sciences]Many recent studies show that superconductivity not only exists in atomically thin monolayers but can exhibit enhanced properties such as a higher transition temperature and a stronger critical field. Nevertheless, besides being unstable in air, the weak tunability in these intrinsically metallic monolayers has limited the exploration of monolayer superconductivity,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Retinal isomerization and water-pore formation in channelrhodopsin-2 [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) is a light-sensitive ion channel widely used in optogenetics. Photoactivation triggers a trans-to-cis isomerization of a covalently bound retinal. Ensuing conformational changes open a cation-selective channel. We explore the structural dynamics in the early photocycle leading to channel opening by classical (MM) and quantum mechanical (QM) molecular simulations....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Primary processes in the bacterial reaction center probed by two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy [Biophysics and Computational Biology]In the initial steps of photosynthesis, reaction centers convert solar energy to stable charge-separated states with near-unity quantum efficiency. The reaction center from purple bacteria remains an important model system for probing the structure–function relationship and understanding mechanisms of photosynthetic charge separation. Here we perform 2D electronic spectroscopy (2DES) on...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Ligand channel in pharmacologically stabilized rhodopsin [Biophysics and Computational Biology]In the degenerative eye disease retinitis pigmentosa (RP), protein misfolding leads to fatal consequences for cell metabolism and rod and cone cell survival. To stop disease progression, a therapeutic approach focuses on stabilizing inherited protein mutants of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) rhodopsin using pharmacological chaperones (PC) that improve receptor...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

ASK family kinases mediate cellular stress and redox signaling to circadian clock [Cell Biology]Daily rhythms of behaviors and physiologies are generated by the circadian clock, which is composed of clock genes and the encoded proteins forming transcriptional/translational feedback loops (TTFLs). The circadian clock is a self-sustained oscillator and flexibly responds to various time cues to synchronize with environmental 24-h cycles. However, the key...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Energy dissipation and fluctuations in a driven liquid [Chemistry]Minimal models of active and driven particles have recently been used to elucidate many properties of nonequilibrium systems. However, the relation between energy consumption and changes in the structure and transport properties of these nonequilibrium materials remains to be explored. We explore this relation in a minimal model of a...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Directed nucleation and growth by balancing local supersaturation and substrate/nucleus lattice mismatch [Chemistry]Controlling nucleation and growth is crucial in biological and artificial mineralization and self-assembly processes. The nucleation barrier is determined by the chemistry of the interfaces at which crystallization occurs and local supersaturation. Although chemically tailored substrates and lattice mismatches are routinely used to modify energy landscape at the substrate/nucleus interface...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Core Concept: Organoids have opened avenues into investigating numerous diseases. But how well do they mimic the real thing? [Developmental Biology]In 2007, Hans Clevers and his colleagues uncovered a new type of stem cell. After nearly a decade of searching, they’d identified a stem-cell population in the mouse intestine that refreshes the organ’s lining every few days (1). Now they needed to figure out how to grow the cells in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Monoterpenyl esters in juvenile mountain pine beetle and sex-specific release of the aggregation pheromone trans-verbenol [Ecology]A recent outbreak of mountain pine beetle (MPB) has spread over more than 25 million hectares of pine forests in western North America, affecting pine species of sensitive boreal and mountain ecosystems. During initial host colonization, female MPB produce and release the aggregation pheromone trans-verbenol to coordinate a mass attack...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Microscopic dynamics and failure precursors of a gel under mechanical load [Engineering]Material failure is ubiquitous, with implications from geology to everyday life and material science. It often involves sudden, unpredictable events, with little or no macroscopically detectable precursors. A deeper understanding of the microscopic mechanisms eventually leading to failure is clearly required, but experiments remain scarce. Here, we show that the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Precise Cas9 targeting enables genomic mutation prevention [Genetics]Here, we present a generalized method of guide RNA “tuning” that enables Cas9 to discriminate between two target sites that differ by a single-nucleotide polymorphism. We employ our methodology to generate an in vivo mutation prevention system in which Cas9 actively restricts the occurrence of undesired gain-of-function mutations within a...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Xio is a component of the Drosophila sex determination pathway and RNA N6-methyladenosine methyltransferase complex [Genetics]N6-methyladenosine (m6A), the most abundant chemical modification in eukaryotic mRNA, has been implicated in Drosophila sex determination by modifying Sex-lethal (Sxl) pre-mRNA and facilitating its alternative splicing. Here, we identify a sex determination gene, CG7358, and rename it xio according to its loss-of-function female-to-male transformation phenotype. xio encodes a conserved...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Genetic mapping of species differences via in vitro crosses in mouse embryonic stem cells [Genetics]Discovering the genetic changes underlying species differences is a central goal in evolutionary genetics. However, hybrid crosses between species in mammals often suffer from hybrid sterility, greatly complicating genetic mapping of trait variation across species. Here, we describe a simple, robust, and transgene-free technique to generate “in vitro crosses” in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Precision medicine screening using whole-genome sequencing and advanced imaging to identify disease risk in adults [Medical Sciences]Reducing premature mortality associated with age-related chronic diseases, such as cancer and cardiovascular disease, is an urgent priority. We report early results using genomics in combination with advanced imaging and other clinical testing to proactively screen for age-related chronic disease risk among adults. We enrolled active, symptom-free adults in a...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Monoclonal antibody targeting the {beta}-barrel assembly machine of Escherichia coli is bactericidal [Microbiology]The folding and insertion of integral β-barrel membrane proteins into the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is required for viability and bacterial pathogenesis. Unfortunately, the lack of selective and potent modulators to dissect β-barrel folding in vivo has hampered our understanding of this fundamental biological process. Here, we characterize a...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Biofilm Lithography enables high-resolution cell patterning via optogenetic adhesin expression [Microbiology]Bacterial biofilms represent a promising opportunity for engineering of microbial communities. However, our ability to control spatial structure in biofilms remains limited. Here we engineer Escherichia coli with a light-activated transcriptional promoter (pDawn) to optically regulate expression of an adhesin gene (Ag43). When illuminated with patterned blue light, long-term viable...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Converting Escherichia coli into an archaebacterium with a hybrid heterochiral membrane [Microbiology]One of the main differences between bacteria and archaea concerns their membrane composition. Whereas bacterial membranes are made up of glycerol-3-phosphate ester lipids, archaeal membranes are composed of glycerol-1-phosphate ether lipids. Here, we report the construction of a stable hybrid heterochiral membrane through lipid engineering of the bacterium Escherichia coli....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Local growth rules can maintain metabolically efficient spatial structure throughout growth [Physics]A ubiquitous feature of bacterial communities is the existence of spatial structures. These are often coupled to metabolism, whereby the spatial organization can improve chemical reaction efficiency. However, it is not clear whether or how a desired colony configuration, for example, one that optimizes some overall global objective, could be...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Emulsion patterns in the wake of a liquid-liquid phase separation front [Physics]Miscible liquids can phase separate in response to a composition change. In bulk fluids, the demixing begins on molecular-length scales, which coarsen into macroscopic phases. By contrast, confining a mixture in microfluidic droplets causes sequential phase separation bursts, which self-organize into rings of oil and water to make multilayered emulsions....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Analysis of oscillatory rocking curve by dynamical diffraction in protein crystals [Physics]High-quality protein crystals meant for structural analysis by X-ray diffraction have been grown by various methods. The observation of dynamical diffraction in protein crystals is an interesting topic because dynamical diffraction generally occurs in perfect crystals such as Si crystals. However, to our knowledge, there is no report yet on...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Gibberellin DELLA signaling targets the retromer complex to redirect protein trafficking to the plasma membrane [Plant Biology]The plant hormone gibberellic acid (GA) is a crucial regulator of growth and development. The main paradigm of GA signaling puts forward transcriptional regulation via the degradation of DELLA transcriptional repressors. GA has also been shown to regulate tropic responses by modulation of the plasma membrane incidence of PIN auxin...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

LHCSR1-dependent fluorescence quenching is mediated by excitation energy transfer from LHCII to photosystem I in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii [Plant Biology]Photosynthetic organisms are frequently exposed to light intensities that surpass the photosynthetic electron transport capacity. Under these conditions, the excess absorbed energy can be transferred from excited chlorophyll in the triplet state (3Chl*) to molecular O2, which leads to the production of harmful reactive oxygen species. To avoid this photooxidative...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Inequality and redistribution behavior in a give-or-take game [Political Sciences]Political polarization and extremism are widely thought to be driven by the surge in economic inequality in many countries around the world. Understanding why inequality persists depends on knowing the causal effect of inequality on individual behavior. We study how inequality affects redistribution behavior in a randomized “give-or-take” experiment that...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Facial color is an efficient mechanism to visually transmit emotion [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Facial expressions of emotion in humans are believed to be produced by contracting one’s facial muscles, generally called action units. However, the surface of the face is also innervated with a large network of blood vessels. Blood flow variations in these vessels yield visible color changes on the face. Here,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The role of consolidation in learning context-dependent phonotactic patterns in speech and digital sequence production [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Speakers implicitly learn novel phonotactic patterns by producing strings of syllables. The learning is revealed in their speech errors. First-order patterns, such as “/f/ must be a syllable onset,” can be distinguished from contingent, or second-order, patterns, such as “/f/ must be an onset if the vowel is /a/, but...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Neuron numbers increase in the human amygdala from birth to adulthood, but not in autism [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Remarkably little is known about the postnatal cellular development of the human amygdala. It plays a central role in mediating emotional behavior and has an unusually protracted development well into adulthood, increasing in size by 40% from youth to adulthood. Variation from this typical neurodevelopmental trajectory could have profound implications...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Land use strategies to mitigate climate change in carbon dense temperate forests [Sustainability Science]Strategies to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions through forestry activities have been proposed, but ecosystem process-based integration of climate change, enhanced CO2, disturbance from fire, and management actions at regional scales are extremely limited. Here, we examine the relative merits of afforestation, reforestation, management changes, and harvest residue bioenergy use in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Long-term nutrient reductions lead to the unprecedented recovery of a temperate coastal region [Sustainability Science]Humans strongly impact the dynamics of coastal systems, yet surprisingly few studies mechanistically link management of anthropogenic stressors and successful restoration of nearshore habitats over large spatial and temporal scales. Such examples are sorely needed to ensure the success of ecosystem restoration efforts worldwide. Here, we unite 30 consecutive years...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Preprints accelerated between Ebola and Zika epidemicsPreprints—scientific manuscripts that are posted at a recognized online repository before peer review—have the potential to speed up the reporting of scientific research in infectious disease outbreaks, argue Michael Johansson and colleagues in an Essay in PLOS Medicine: "The scientific community should not ask why preprints are posted during outbreaks, we should ask why they are not posted...".
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How to fight side effects of hormone therapy for prostate cancerMen on hormone therapy for prostate cancer may benefit significantly from hitting the gym with fellow patients and choosing more veggies and fewer cheeseburgers, a new study suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Inner ear provides clues to human dispersalSlight differences can be found in the inner ear of different populations of modern humans. Paleoanthropologists from UZH have found that these differences can provide information about the global dispersal of humans from Africa.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Anticipating the dangers of spaceAstronauts and future space tourists face risks from radiation, which can cause illness and injure organs. Researchers from Texas A&M, NASA and the University of Texas Medical Branch used supercomputers to investigate the radiation exposure related to the Manned Orbital Laboratory mission, planned for the 1960s and 70s, during which a dangerous solar storm occurred. They also explored the historic
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Australian vine can boost soybean yield, study saysGrowing in its native Australia, the unobtrusive perennial vine Glycine tomentella could easily be overlooked. But the distant relative of soybean contains genetic resources that can substantially increase soybean yield, according to a new study from the University of Illinois.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Double-drug strategy blocks escape route for most lung cancersA one-two combo punch using two currently available drugs could be an effective treatment for the majority of lung cancers, a study by scientists with UT Southwestern's Simmons Cancer Center shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Connection of sea level and groundwater missing link in climate responseAbout 250 million years ago, when the Earth had no ice caps and the water around the equator was too hot for reptiles, sea level still rose and fell over time. Now, an international team of researchers has developed a way to track sea-level rise and fall and to tease out what caused the changes in the absence of ice sheets.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Spa therapy helps Japan's snow monkeys cope with the coldJapanese macaques, also known as snow monkeys, have been enjoying regular baths in the hot spring at Jigokudani in Japan for decades -- and have even become a popular tourist attraction. New findings indicate how behavioral flexibility can help counter cold-climate stress and have likely implications for reproduction and survival.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Long-term caffeine worsens anxiety symptoms and fear of the new associated with Alzheimer’s diseaseScientists provide evidence that a long-term consumption of caffeine has negative effects for Alzheimer’s disease, worsening the neuropsychiatric symptoms appearing in the majority of those affected by the disorder.
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Viden

Sundhedsrobotterne kommerKunstig intelligens kan diagnosticere prostatakræft. Men hvor meget må robotterne på vores hospitaler?
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Live Science

This Injectable Bandage Is Made of Pastry Gel. It Could Save Your Life One Day.There are a lot of ways to die from a traumatic injury, but many of them come down to this: So much blood spills out that your body just stops working.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Considering an employee for an overseas assignment?A new study from Florida Atlantic University shows that expatriates' personality characteristics have a lot to do with how well they adjust and whether they succeed and provide a return on a company's considerable investment in an individual.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Seafloor erosion now occurring like coastal land lossScientists have discovered that the seafloor from the Mississippi River Delta to the Gulf of Mexico is eroding like the land loss that is occurring on the Louisiana coast.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Surprise can be an agent of social changeSurprising someone -- whether it's by a joke or via a gasp-inducing plot twist -- can be a memorable experience, but a less heralded effect is that it can provide an avenue to influence people.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Answers to 100-year-old mystery point to potential breast cancer therapiesA team of researchers at has identified a long sought after connection between how cancer cells use the sugar glucose to generate energy -- the Warburg pathway -- and cancer growth.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mifepristone may halt growth of intracranial tumor that causes hearing lossResearchers have shown that mifepristone, a drug currently FDA-approved for chemical abortion, prevents the growth of vestibular schwannoma (also known as acoustic neuroma) cells. This sometimes-lethal intracranial tumor typically causes hearing loss and tinnitus.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sulfur amino acid restriction could amount to new dietary approach to healthThe longevity and health improvements seen in animals on sulfur amino acid-restricted diets could translate to people, according to researchers who recently conducted a review of published studies. More research is needed to confirm the benefits in people, the scientists said.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A tricky job assessing the vulnerability of agricultureThere's still a lot we don't know about the vulnerability of our agriculture to climate change.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Environmental footprint of the egg industryIn recent years, egg production has been in the spotlight for animal welfare issues. While in most European countries the number of farms with free-range hens increases, in Spain 93% of laying hens are still caged. Added to this are the effects that the industry generates on the environment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Resonances to 'taste' loins and hams without opening themResearchers have developed a methodology that allows us to know the properties of hams and whole loins using magnetic resonance imaging, the same non-invasive technique used in medicine. The method has already been made available to the meat industry.< Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is commonly used in medicine to look at organs and structures inside the human body. Now researchers have applied
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gender roles highlight gender bias in judicial decisionsJudges may be just as biased or even more biased than the general public in deciding court cases where traditional gender roles are challenged, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Medical marijuana gets wary welcome from older adults, poll showsFew older adults use medical marijuana, a new national poll finds, but the majority support its use if a doctor recommends it, and might talk to their own doctor about it if they developed a serious health condition. And two-thirds say the government should do more to study the drug's health effects.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Already “AI first,” Google just decided to up the algorithmic anteGoogle John Giannandrea
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How muscles regulate their oxygen consumptionA new study shows that an enzyme called FIH determines how muscles consume oxygen. Without the enzyme, the need for oxygen increases during physical exercise. The finding is of potential significance to elite athletes, who have been found to have higher levels of FIH in their muscles than others.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New metasurface model shows potential to control acoustic wave reflectionTypically, when a soundwave strikes a surface, it reflects back at the same fundamental frequency with a different amplitude. A new model shows that when a sound wave hits a nonlinear elastic metasurface, the incident fundamental frequency does not bounce back. Instead, the metasurface converts that energy into the wave's second harmonic resonance. Developing this metasurface could help architects
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

When we sign, we build phrases with similar neural mechanisms as when we speakDifferences between signed and spoken languages are significant, yet the underlying neural processes we use to create complex expressions are quite similar for both, a team of researchers has found.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Telescope larger than the Earth produces image of black hole jet formation in the core of a radio galaxyAn international team of researchers has imaged newly forming jets of plasma from a massive black hole with unprecedented accuracy. Radio images made with a combination of telescopes in space and on the ground resolved the jet structure a couple of hundred black hole radii, or 12 light days from its origin point.
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Live Science

7 Strange Signs You're Having an Allergic ReactionMost allergies involve a runny nose and watery eyes, but black spots on your skin and a bright red butt can also be signs of an allergic reaction.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Microbiome study suggests marine nematodes are not picky eatersUC Riverside researchers report in Molecular Ecology that the likelihood that nematode worms have similar microbial profiles does not correlate with how closely they are related. Holly Bik, an assistant professor in UCR's Department of Nematology, led the study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A letter we've seen millions of times, yet can't writeDespite seeing it millions of times in pretty much every picture book, every novel, every newspaper and every email message, people are essentially unaware of the more common version of the lowercase print letter 'g,' Johns Hopkins researchers have found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Astro-ecology: Saving endangered animals with software for the starsA collaboration between astrophysicists and ecologists at Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU) is helping to monitor rare and endangered species and stop poaching. Astrophysical software and techniques are applied to thermal infrared imagery captured by drones to automatically detect and identify animals -- even at night, when most poaching activity occurs. The project will be presented by Clai
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fox says Disney may buy Sky News in fresh takeover twistRupert Murdoch's 21st Century Fox on Tuesday proposed selling rolling TV channel Sky News to Disney in order to finally seal control of pan-European satellite broadcaster Sky.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Conservationists use astronomy software to save speciesResearchers use astronomical techniques used to study distant stars to survey endangered species.
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Viden

Kaffe og bordtennis skal løse verdens ældrebyrdeFinsk tech-landsby blander stor medicinalvirksomhed med små start-ups for at gøre fremtidens hospitaler mere digitale
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Popular Science

How Popular Science covered '2001: A Space Odyssey' in 1968Entertainment "But by the time 2001 A.D. rolls around, things may be more fantastic than the picture shows." An astronaut lost in space... moon cities... a voyage to Jupiter. And take a look, too, behind the scenes of the new movie.
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Scientific American Content: Global

EPA to Roll Back Car-Efficiency Rules, Despite Science That Supports ThemAgency’s statement relies heavily on auto industry talking points -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astro-ecology: Saving endangered animals with software for the starsA collaboration between astrophysicists and ecologists at Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU) is helping to monitor rare and endangered species and stop poaching. Astrophysical software and techniques are applied to thermal infrared imagery captured by drones to automatically detect and identify animals - even at night, when most poaching activity occurs. The drones can survey large areas of d
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New on MIT Technology Review

Trump’s feud with Amazon could have wider effects on the US economy
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ancient sea worm eats, poops and leaves behind evidence of Cambrian biodiversityIn the Mackenzie Mountains of Canada, University of Kansas researcher Julien Kimmig has uncovered details of the Cambrian food web on an ocean floor that once played home to a scattering of bivalved arthropods, hyoliths and trilobites.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tropical Cyclone Josie's deadly flooding rainfall examined with IMERGTropical cyclone Josie didn't make landfall in Fiji but its heavy rainfall resulted in deadly flooding. NASA calculated the rainfall that Josie left in its wake as it moved south of Fiji and began weakening.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Eyes on Spotify as music innovator debuts on stock marketSpotify on Tuesday makes its long-awaited debut on the stock market as the streaming platform that has shaken up the music industry hopes to strike a chord with investors.
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NYT > Science

Now Read This: Discussion Questions for the PBS NewsHour-New York Times Book Club’s April Pick: ‘The Death and Life of the Great Lakes’Read Dan Egan’s wonderfully told story of history, science and reportage about the largest source of freshwater in the world, and join Now Read This.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Seafloor map shows why Greenland’s glaciers melt at different ratesA new high-res look at the seafloor shows how ledges and dips affects whether relatively warm ocean water reaches the ice.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tropical Cyclone Josie's deadly flooding rainfall examined with IMERGTropical cyclone Josie didn't make landfall in Fiji but its heavy rainfall resulted in deadly flooding. NASA calculated the rainfall that Josie left in its wake as it moved south of Fiji and began weakening.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ancient sea worm eats, poops and leaves behind evidence of Cambrian biodiversityUniversity of Kansas researcher Julien Kimmig has uncovered details of the Cambrian food web on an ocean floor that once played home to a scattering of bivalved arthropods, hyoliths and trilobites.
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Tesla Starts to Climb Out of Model 3 Production HellThe latest numbers from Elon Musk's automaker show slow but encouraging progress in its fight to deliver history's most anticipated car.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New receptor genes turn T-cells into powerful liver cancer foesMouse genes that make human T cells powerful at fighting liver cancer could one day help patients do the same, scientists report. Scientists exposed mice genetically manipulated to respond to human antigens to a common antigen found in human liver cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pasta can be part of a healthy diet without packing on the poundsCarbohydrates get a lot of bad press and blame for the obesity epidemic, but a new study suggests that this negative attention may not be deserved for pasta.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Census data can level the playing field for small businessesLocal governments and small businesses could save thousands of dollars a year in consulting and research fees if they just used information that's already publicly available.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Molecular scissors' could be key to cutting off diseases including HIV infectionOne way to fight diseases including HIV infection and autoimmune disorders could involve changing how a naturally occurring enzyme called SAMHD1 works to influence the immune system, new research suggests.
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Science : NPR

Time Travel With Your Fridge?If the history of thermodynamics can teach us anything, it is that modest entropy reversals have not taken us back in time at all. But it is more fun to think otherwise, says guest Jimena Canales. (Image credit: Orlagh Murphy/Getty Images/Ikon Images)
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The Scientist RSS

Dinosaur Footprints Give Clues to Middle JurassicOne hundred seventy million years ago, sauropods and theropods trekked across what is now Scotland's Isle of Skye.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook asks users if they think it's 'good for the world'Facebook is asking users whether they think it's "good for the world" in a poll sent to an unspecified number of people.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US auto sales spring to life in March (Update)The American consumer returned in force to automobile showrooms in March, lifting an industry that had been plodding along in a post-sales boom hangover.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Half of European flights face delays after computer failureEuropean air travellers faced mass disruption on Tuesday with up to half of all flights delayed after the system that manages air traffic for the continent broke down.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Deadly olive tree disease detected in CorsicaA deadly bacterial disease with no known cure that ravaged olive groves in southern Italy three years ago has been detected in the French island of Corsica, industry officials said Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study shows seafloor erosion now occurring like coastal land lossScientists have discovered that the seafloor from the Mississippi River Delta to the Gulf of Mexico is eroding like the land loss that is occurring on the Louisiana coast. During the 20th century, thousands of dams were built on Mississippi River tributaries stopping the flow of fine silt, clay and other sediment from reaching the delta and seafloor to offset erosion. Without this sediment, land —
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Reversal of fortunesScientists have discovered that the seafloor from the Mississippi River Delta to the Gulf of Mexico is eroding like the land loss that is occurring on the Louisiana coast. This research was published recently in the journal Marine Geology.
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Blog » Languages » English

Reporting Bugs: Helpful TipsHi friends! We get a variety of bug reports from time to time at Eyewire. When it comes to bugs more information is always better. This guide will help you give the most informative bug report you can, so that we have the best chance to triage your bug in a timely manner. Tip 1: Let us know your operating system This information will help us learn if your bug is specific to a compatibility issue
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Iris at Queensland coastWhen NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Iris near the coast of Queensland, Australia it measured cloud top temperatures and found strong storms with the potential for creating heavy rainfall.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Global warming can turn Monarch Butterflies' favorite food into poisonLSU researchers have discovered a new relationship between climate change, monarch butterflies and milkweed plants. It turns out that warming temperatures don't just affect the monarch, Danaus plexippus, directly, but also affect this butterfly by potentially turning its favorite plant food into a poison.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Resurgence of pertussis explainedA team of researchers has found that the resurgence of pertussis, more commonly known as whooping cough, in the US is a predictable consequence of incomplete coverage with a highly effective vaccine. This finding goes against pervasive theories on why we are seeing a steady increase in the disease even though the vaccine is given at an early age.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Attacking flu viruses from two sidesResearchers have discovered a new way in which certain antibodies interact with the flu virus. This previously unknown form of interaction opens up new possibilities for developing better vaccines and more efficient medication to combat the flu.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Meat protein is unhealthy, but protein from nuts and seeds is heart smartA study has found that meat protein is associated with a sharp increased risk of heart disease while protein from nuts and seeds is beneficial for the human heart.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists create 'Swiss army knife' for electron beamsScientists have created a miniature particle accelerator for electrons that can perform four different functions at the push of a button. The experimental device is driven by a Terahertz radiation source and can accelerate, compress, focus and analyze electron bunches in a beam. Its active structures measure just a few millimeters across.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

In zebrafish, the cholera bacterium sets off a surprising flushResearchers experimenting with live zebrafish witnessed a 200 percent increase in the strength of intestinal contractions soon after exposure to the cholera-causing bacterium Vibrio cholerae, leading to expulsion of native gut bacteria.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Great magma erup­tions had two sourcesNew research may explain controversies related to great magma eruptions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Earth's stable temperature past suggests other planets could also sustain lifeResearch about temperatures on the early Earth have ranged from a virtually ice-covered surface to a very hot planet that could not support most of today's lifeforms. New computer simulations show fairly moderate average temperatures and more stable ocean pH -- which helps explain how life evolved here, and might emerge on other planets.
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Popular Science

You’re extremely gullible and there’s probably not much you can do about itScience Why humans stink at finding falsehoods. Research from cognitive psychology shows that people are naturally poor fact-checkers and it is very difficult for us to compare things we read or hear to what we…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spa therapy helps Japan's snow monkeys cope with the coldJapanese macaques, also known as snow monkeys, have been enjoying regular baths in the hot spring at Jigokudani in Japan for decades - and have even become a popular tourist attraction. A team of researchers led by Rafaela Takeshita of Kyoto University in Japan have now published the first study to scientifically validate the benefits of this behaviour. These findings indicate how behavioural flex
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dispatch from the field II: Students describe an elusive spider while stationed in BorneoA mystery has long shrouded the orb-weaving spider genus Opadometa, where males and females belonging to one and the same species look nothing alike. Furthermore, the males appear to be so elusive that scientists still doubt whether both sexes are correctly linked to each other even in the best-known species.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

How physicists will remember Stephen HawkingResearchers reflect on Stephen Hawking's contributions to the field and the cosmological puzzles he left behind.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NAS review: More research needed to develop optimal assessment, treatment standardsA recent JAMA review article stresses that more clinical studies on neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) are needed in order to develop and implement optimal assessment, diagnosis and treatment guidelines.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Iris at Queensland coastWhen NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Iris near the coast of Queensland, Australia, it measured cloud top temperatures and found strong storms with the potential for creating heavy rainfall.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scripps Research discovery paves way for better flu prevention, treatmentScientists at the Scripps Research Institute have discovered a new aspect of the flu virus and how it interacts with antibodies in the lungs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Attacking flu viruses from two sidesUZH researchers have discovered a new way in which certain antibodies interact with the flu virus. This previously unknown form of interaction opens up new possibilities for developing better vaccines and more efficient medication to combat the flu.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genetic material once considered junk actually could hold key to cancer drug responseMaterial left out of common processes for sequencing genetic material in cancer tumors may actually carry important information about why only some people respond to immunotherapy, possibly offering better insight than the type of material that is being sequenced, according to a study by Mount Sinai researchers published on April 3 in Cell Reports.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study reveals a way to make prostate cancer cells run out of energy and dieScientists at CSHL have discovered that cells lacking the tumor-suppressor protein PTEN -- a feature of many cancers, especially prostate cancer -- are particularly vulnerable to drugs that impair their energy-producing mitochondria. Such drugs induce them to literally eat themselves to death, the research shows. Timing of the administration of such agents is critical, however.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Timing of stress-hormone pulses controls weight gain, Stanford study findsNew research provides the first molecular understanding of why people gain weight due to chronic stress, disrupted circadian rhythms and treatment with glucocorticoid drugs: it's all in the timing of the dips and rises of a class of hormones called glucocorticoids -- predominantly the 'stress hormone' cortisol, according to a new study by Stanford University School of Medicine researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study shows how muscles regulate their oxygen consumptionA new study by researchers from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden shows that an enzyme called FIH determines how muscles consume oxygen. Without the enzyme, the need for oxygen increases during physical exercise. The finding is of potential significance to elite athletes, who have been found to have higher levels of FIH in their muscles than others. The study is published in the esteemed scientific
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new metasurface model shows potential to control acoustic wave reflectionAn international team of researchers showed how a nonlinear elastic metasurface could convert a wave's fundamental frequency to its second harmonic. Structural factors in metasurfaces, like the spatial arrangement of its molecules and its composition, underpin its optical, elastic and acoustic properties. Developing this metasurface could help architects reduce noise from performance halls to city
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mantle minerals offer clues to deep Earth's compositionScientists now have a clearer picture of the Earth's mantle, thanks to Michigan State University research published in the current issue of Nature Communications.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop nanoparticle films for high-density data storageAs we generate more and more data, the need for high-density data storage that remains stable over time is becoming critical. New nanoparticle-based films that are more than 80 times thinner than a human hair may help to fill this need by providing materials that can holographically archive more than 1000 times more data than a DVD in a 10-by-10-centimeter piece of film. The new technology could o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Video: Petrichor, the smell of rainThe smell that accompanies a spring shower is so evocative that it has its own word: petrichor.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Real-time monitoring could reduce First Nations water advisories by one third, study findsUniversity of Guelph researchers have found that the majority of drinking water advisories in First Nations communities across Canada are precautionary, and that installing real-time monitoring systems could reduce the number of these advisories by more than one-third.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ancient paper art, kirigami, poised to improve smart clothingLike a yoga novice, electronic components don't stretch easily. But that's changing thanks to a variation of origami that involves cutting folded pieces of paper.
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The Atlantic

What Mueller's Most Conspicuous Silence SuggestsRobert Mueller D. TrumpBut the emails! It’s not just an increasingly worn rejoinder to any story of chaos and disaster in the Trump administration. It’s also an interesting question to ask about Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation. The internal scale of the probe remains unknown to anyone outside, but based on what Mueller has revealed publicly in court documents, we can get a good idea of some of what he is
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Attacking flu viruses from two sidesUniversity of Zurich researchers have discovered a new way in which certain antibodies interact with the flu virus. This previously unknown form of interaction opens up new possibilities for developing better vaccines and more efficient medication to combat the flu.
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Live Science

Woman's Bones Vanish Before Doctors' EyesIn a series of X-rays, a woman's bones seemed to be disappearing before doctors' eyes — the result of an extremely rare condition.
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Live Science

Most Distant Star Ever Seen Is 9 Billion Light-Years AwayAstronomers have observed a star that's so far away, its light took 9 billion years to reach us here on Earth — about 4.5 billion years before our solar system even existed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

It's an ecological trapLSU researchers have discovered a new relationship between climate change, monarch butterflies and milkweed plants. It turns out that warming temperatures don't just affect the monarch, Danaus plexippus, directly, but also affect this butterfly by potentially turning its favorite plant food into a poison.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study explains resurgence of pertussisA team of researchers including scientists from the University of Georgia has found that the resurgence of pertussis, more commonly known as whooping cough, in the US is a predictable consequence of incomplete coverage with a highly effective vaccine. This finding goes against pervasive theories on why we are seeing a steady increase in the disease even though the vaccine is given at an early age.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Paper: Surprise can be an agent of social changeSurprising someone -- whether it's by a joke or via a gasp-inducing plot twist -- can be a memorable experience, but a less heralded effect is that it can provide an avenue to influence people, said Jeffrey Loewenstein, a professor of business administration at the Gies College of Business at Illinois.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mifepristone may halt growth of intracranial tumor that causes hearing lossMassachusetts Eye and Ear researchers have shown that mifepristone, a drug currently FDA-approved for chemical abortion, prevents the growth of vestibular schwannoma (also known as acoustic neuroma) cells. This sometimes-lethal intracranial tumor typically causes hearing loss and tinnitus. The findings, published online today in Scientific Reports, suggest that mifepristone is a promising drug can
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

High levels of hazardous chemicals found in plastics collected from Lake GenevaThe first-ever chemical analysis of plastic collected from beaches around Lake Geneva detected cadmium, mercury and lead—sometimes in very high concentrations that exceed the maximum permitted under EU law. The abundance of toxic chemicals that are now restricted or banned in plastic production reflects how old the plastic litter could be, reports the study published in Frontiers in Environmental
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Water purification breakthrough uses sunlight and 'hydrogels'According to the United Nations, 30,000 people die each week from the consumption and use of unsanitary water. Although the vast majority of these fatalities occur in developing nations, the U.S. is no stranger to unanticipated water shortages, especially after hurricanes, tropical storms and other natural disasters that can disrupt supplies without warning.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Flare-responsive hydrogel developed to treat arthritisBioengineers and physicians team up to develop a better delivery system for getting anti-inflammatory therapies to the sites where they are needed most.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

High levels of hazardous chemicals found in plastics collected from Lake GenevaThe first analysis of plastic litter from Lake Geneva finds toxic chemicals like cadmium, mercury and lead - - whose levels sometimes exceed the maximum permitted under EU law. The presence of chemicals that are now restricted or banned in plastic production reflects how old the plastic litter could be -- and indicates that like oceans, freshwater habitats are also affected by plastic pollution.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cell discovery could help with research on genetic diseasesBiologists have discovered the first data on an organelle that is very important in human cells in an ancient organism distantly related to humans. The discovery will enable scientists to study the breadth and depth of cell biology. This has implications for research into autoimmune diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mantle minerals offer clues to deep Earth's compositionScientists now have a clearer picture of the Earth's mantle.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nanoparticle films for high-density data storageNew nanoparticle-based films that are more than 80 times thinner than a human hair may provide materials that can holographically archive more than 1,000 times more data than a DVD in a 10-by-10-centimeter piece of film.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Real-time monitoring could reduce First Nations water advisories by one thirdResearchers have found that drinking water advisories in First Nations communities caused by equipment malfunction, inadequate disinfection and high microbial counts could be reduced by introducing real-time monitoring systems.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ancient paper art, kirigami, poised to improve smart clothingScientists describe how kirigami has inspired its efforts to build malleable electronic circuits. Their innovation -- creating tiny sheets of strong yet bendable electronic materials made of select polymers and nanowires -- could lead to improvements in smart clothing, electronic skin and other applications that require pliable circuitry.
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New Scientist - News

Ultrasonic micro-explosions can harvest gold from old SIM cardsWe waste $22 billion in gold from electronics that are tossed out instead of recycled. A new technique uses ultrasound to harvest that precious metal from SIM cards
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The Atlantic

King's Message of Nonviolence Has Been DistortedEditor’s Note: Read The Atlantic’s special coverage of Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy. In 1956, after journalist William Worthy nearly sat on a loaded gun in an armchair in Martin Luther King Jr.’s house during the Montgomery Bus Boycott, he could hardly know that his report on the incident would become a mere footnote in King’s journey to nonviolence. Much like Worthy’s discovery of King’s weap
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The Atlantic

China Cares a Whole Lot About Pigs in IowaChinese US TradeOn the bank of the Des Moines River in downtown Des Moines sits the World Food Prize Hall of Laureates. The brainchild of Norman Borlaug, the father of the Green Revolution, the $250,000 annual World Food Prize recognizes those who have made outstanding contributions to global food security. For the most part, the building’s walls are decorated with portraits of agricultural researchers who helpe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Answers to 100-year-old mystery point to potential breast cancer therapiesA team of researchers at has identified a long sought after connection between how cancer cells use the sugar glucose to generate energy -- the Warburg pathway -- and cancer growth.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dispatch from the field II: Students describe an elusive spider while stationed in BorneoStudents taking part in a recent ecology field course in Borneo described the first male of an elusive species of orb-weaving spider known for its striking red and blue colors. Despite being stationed in the field, they managed to compile their manuscript and submit it to the technologically advanced open-access Biodiversity Data Journal. A few days post-submission, their article was published alo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Artificial molecules that mimic DNAFrench researchers have developed an artificial sequence mimicking the surface features of DNA for the first time. This artificial molecule is able to inhibit the activity of several DNA-binding enzymes, including the one used by HIV to insert its genome into that of its host cell. These results pave the way for new pharmacological tools based on inhibiting DNA-protein interactions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A New Metasurface Model Shows Potential to Control Acoustic Wave ReflectionTypically, when a soundwave strikes a surface, it reflects back at the same fundamental frequency with a different amplitude. A new model, reported in the Journal of Applied Physics, shows that when a sound wave hits a nonlinear elastic metasurface, the incident fundamental frequency does not bounce back. Instead, the metasurface converts that energy into the wave's second harmonic resonance. Deve
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Spa therapy helps Japan's snow monkeys cope with the coldJapanese macaques, also known as snow monkeys, have been enjoying regular baths in the hot spring at Jigokudani in Japan for decades -- and have even become a popular tourist attraction. A team of researchers led by Rafaela Takeshita of Kyoto University in Japan have now published the first study to scientifically validate the benefits of this behavior. These findings indicate how behavioral flexi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mathematical modeling offers new way to understand variable responses to targeted therapyMoffitt Cancer Center researchers are using a unique approach by combining typical cell culture studies with mathematical modeling to determine how heterogeneity within a tumor and the surrounding tumor environment affect responses to targeted drug therapies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NREL research overcomes major technical obstacles in magnesium-metal batteriesScientists at the Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have discovered a new approach for developing a rechargeable non-aqueous magnesium-metal battery.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Physicists at FAU demonstrate demixing behavior of rotating particlesPhysicists from Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) and Heinrich-Heine Universität Düsseldorf have demonstrated that demixing occurs in systems made up of macroscopic particles rotating in opposite directions and that particles turning in either a clockwise or counter-clockwise direction form homogeneous groups. The researchers used miniature robots manufactured using 3-D print
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