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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New source of global nitrogen discoveredFor centuries, the prevailing science has indicated that all of the nitrogen on Earth available to plants comes from the atmosphere. But a study from the University of California, Davis, indicates that more than a quarter comes from Earth's bedrock.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Experts propose method to monitor ocean healthIt's important to closely monitor how climate change and our increasing use of the oceans are affecting important marine resources and ecosystems.
18h
Ingeniøren

Regeringen vil slukke FM-signalet i 2021Senest i 2021 skal FM-signalet slukkes, bebuder regeringen i sit udspil til nyt medieforlig.
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LATEST

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New immunotherapy for lung cancer shows promise of successIn a groundbreaking development at the MUSC Hollings Cancer Center, results from a recent clinical trial to treat lung cancer show that a novel immunotherapy combination is surprisingly effective at controlling the disease's progression. The study, published in the journal The Lancet Oncology, focused on non-small cell lung cancer, which is the most common form of lung cancer.
5min
NYT > Science

Body of Missing C.D.C. Employee Found in Atlanta RiverThe police said there were no signs of foul play in the death of Timothy J. Cunningham, who they say likely drowned. His disappearance in February drew wide public interest.
9min
NYT > Science

Where Spring Is in Full BloomWinter hasn’t released its grip, but nature’s warm-weather beauties are actually beginning to blossom. We offer a guide, starting off at the Orchid Show in the Bronx.
9min
Live Science

How Did an App Know an Earthquake Was Hitting California Before It Happened?Some people in Los Angeles knew about today's earthquake before it even hit.
26min
The Atlantic

Senate Democrats Call for Investigation of Pruitt's Unusual RaisesScott Pruitt EPAScott Pruitt’s unusual hiring habits came under greater scrutiny on Thursday. Senators Tom Carper and Sheldon Whitehouse wrote to the inspector general of the Environmental Protection Agency, calling for a deeper probe of Scott Pruitt’s use of a special hiring authority granted to him by the Safe Drinking Water Act. In the letter , Carper and Whitehouse—top Democrats on the Environment and Public
30min
Popular Science

One dinosaur footprint is worth a thousand wordsAnimals Dinosaurs stomped all over this remote Scottish island and left the prints to prove it. Why are researchers so interested in dinosaur footprints anyways? They aren’t quite as visually striking as complete dinosaur skeletons, but scientists can get a lot of…
40min
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Area Man Frustrated by TrafficToday in 5 Lines The New York Times reports that at least five officials at the Environmental Protection Agency were reassigned or demoted “after they raised concerns about the spending and management” of the agency’s administrator, Scott Pruitt. The National Guard in Texas said that the deployment of troops to the U.S.-Mexico border is in “very early planning stages.” During a tax-reform event i
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The Scientist RSS

Robert Baker, Bat Biologist, DiesThe Texas Tech University professor also investigated the effects of the Chernobyl disaster on surrounding wildlife.
56min
New Scientist - News

Lunar X Prize to put a rover on the moon has been resurrectedThe competition for a private firm to put a rover on the moon was cancelled in January when no firm seemed close enough. It’s back now, but without a cash prize
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New Scientist - News

Old people can produce as many new brain cells as teenagersThe discovery that healthy, older adults produce just as many new neurons as young people could provide clues to how to keep our brains sharper for longer
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Popular Science

This change can make your online browsing faster and more privateTechnology Consider choosing what DNS service you use. Don’t worry, it’s easier than it sounds. There is a small, simple step you can take right now that promises to make your online browsing faster and more private.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ASU Online science course brings to life a new way of teachingArizona State University's School of Earth and Space Exploration recently released new research on its flagship Smart Course, Habitable Worlds, published in the peer-reviewed journal, Astrobiology. The study found that its student-centered, exploration-focused design resulted in high course grades and demonstrable mastery of content.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Columbia scientists build better way to decode the genomeColumbia University researchers have developed a computational tool that shines a light on the genome's most hard-to-translate segments. With this tool in hand, scientists can get closer to understanding how DNA guides everything from growth and development to aging and disease.
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The Scientist RSS

Shoddy Preclinical Data Used in Clinical Trial ProposalsApplications for Phase 1 and 2 human studies in Germany frequently lack sufficient information about an intervention's efficacy in animal experiments, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A heavy working memory load may sink brainwave 'synch'When working memory load exceeds capacity, a new study finds, feedback coupling of the prefrontal cortex with other involved regions shuts down.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New health benefits discovered in berry pigmentNaturally occurring pigments in berries, also known as anthocyanins, increase the function of the sirtuin 6 enzyme in cancer cells, a new study shows. The regulation of this enzyme could open up new avenues for cancer treatment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists develop method to repair damaged structures deep inside the earScientists found a new way to fix cells deep inside the ear, which could help millions of people who suffer hearing loss.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

An index measures similarity between cancer cells and pluripotent stem cellsThe new methodology measures tumor aggressiveness and the risk of relapse, helping doctors plan treatment, according to Brazilian scientists authors of a paper published in a special issue of the journal Cell.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA scientist collects bits of the solar system from an Antarctic glacierOn rare calm days, the most striking thing you notice at an altitude of more than 8,000 feet on an Antarctic glacier is the silence. "There was just no sound; no air handling equipment, no leaves rustling, no bugs, no planes or cars. So quiet you just heard your heartbeat," said Barbara Cohen, planetary scientist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Most of the time, howev
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Science | The Guardian

Spacewatch: India loses contact with communications satelliteGSAT 6A, primed for a 10-year mission showed no signs of malfunctioning before going silent An Indian communications satellite has stopped talking to ground controllers. The spacecraft went silent so suddenly that an unnamed official was quoted by the Times of India as saying that it was like the satellite had suffered a “cardiac arrest.” Normally ground controllers see things start to go wrong b
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

X-linked genes help explain why boys of all ages face higher respiratory riskHuman airways already demonstrate gender-based differences in DNA methylation signatures at birth, providing an early hint of infants who may be predisposed to develop respiratory disorders later in life.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Light 'relaxes' crystal to boost solar cell efficiencyScientists have discovered a novel phenomenon: Light-induced lattice expansion in perovskite materials that cures bulk and interface defects, which leads to an enhancement of the optoelectronic properties.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Coral bleaching threatens the diversity of reef fishNew research reveals that global warming also affects fish who depend on corals. The Great Barrier Reef is revered for its kaleidoscope of color. New international research reveals that coral bleaching events not only whitewash corals, but can also reduce the variety of fish occupying these highly valued ecosystems.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Unprecedented psychological distress months after Hurricane HarveyFour months after Hurricane Harvey soaked the Houston area and displaced more than a third of the population, an alarming 52 percent of Harris County residents said they were still struggling to recover.
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Science : NPR

Are Humans Biologically Programmed To Fear What They Don't Understand?In a world increasingly drawn to the black-and-white of defined categories, Allie n Steve Mullen has found living in between those categories to be invigorating. They switch between male and female throughout each day, based on their activities.
2h
New on MIT Technology Review

When science fiction inspires real technologyResearch in human-computer interaction is mentioning science fiction more than ever, a group of scientists has found.
2h
Live Science

A 5.3-Magnitude Earthquake Just Struck Southern CaliforniaA 5.3-magnitude earthquake struck 38 miles off the coast of California Thursday afternoon, rattling Los Angeles.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Microplastics may enter freshwater and soil via compostCompost is pinpointed as a source of plastic pollution, but environmental fate and effects unknown.
2h
The Atlantic

A Trade War With China May Be InevitableChinese US TradeDespite the heated rhetoric of the past few days, a trade war between the U.S. and China does not seem imminent. But it may be inevitable. Almost immediately after the Trump administration announced its plans to impose tariffs on a broad array of Chinese imports, with an eye towards compelling the Chinese government to address intellectual property theft and other alleged trade abuses, Chinese of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

French court condemns lastminute.com for 'parasitism' of Ryanair websiteThe Paris commercial court has ordered online travel agent lastminute.com to stop selling Ryanair tickets without the consent of the Irish low-cost airline, slamming the practice as "parasitism".
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Magnitude 5.3 quake strikes off Southern California coastA magnitude-5.3 earthquake struck Thursday afternoon under the ocean off Southern California and was felt widely along the mainland coast, but there were no immediate reports of damage or a tsunami warning.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Light 'relaxes' crystal to boost solar cell efficiencySome materials are like people. Let them relax in the sun for a little while and they perform a lot better.
2h
The Atlantic

The Milky Way’s Center Is a Cornucopia of Black HolesFor the last few years, Chuck Hailey has had the center of the Milky Way hanging in his office at Columbia University. The picture, pinned above his desk, shows a bright orange and yellow blob—the glow of cosmic gas as it gets devoured by the supermassive black hole at the center of the galaxy. Astronomers captured this glow using X-rays, a versatile type of radiation that’s good for seeing throu
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Popular Science

The first Antarctic greenhouse harvest may lettuce go to MarsSpace Think keeping a desk plant alive is tough? Try farming in Antarctica. Lettuce on the moon might sound like the name of a prog-rock song, but that’s the eventual plan. This morning, Germany’s Aerospace Centre DLR announced that their…
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Light 'relaxes' crystal to boost solar cell efficiencyA collaboration led by Rice University and Los Alamos National Laboratory discovered a novel phenomenon: Light-induced lattice expansion in perovskite materials that cures bulk and interface defects, which leads to an enhancement of the optoelectronic properties.
3h
Big Think

Saudi Arabia to end its 35-year cinema ban with screening of ‘Black Panther’Saudi Arabia AMC BlackSaudi Arabia began closing its cinemas in 1979. Now, the government is reopening theaters in an effort to diversify and modernize its economy. Read More
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Live Science

Virgin Galactic Completes 1st Powered Test Flight Since Fatal 2014 CrashVirgin Galactic's new SpaceShipTwo VSS Unity launched its first rocket-powered test flight over Mojave, California, on April 5, 2018. The flight did not go to space, but was the company's first powered test since a 2014 crash.
3h
Live Science

Hospital 'Breach' May Have Exposed Patients to HIV, Hepatitis: What Went Wrong?Some patients at a Colorado hospital may be at risk for HIV or hepatitis infection after the hospital discovered an issue with the way it cleaned certain surgical instruments.
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Feed: All Latest

Estonia's President Talks AI, Genetic Testing, and Dealing with RussiaKersti Kaljulaid, Estonia’s youngest and first female president, lays out her plans for moving the country from a traditional state to a digital society.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Turning food waste into animal feed could take a chunk out of livestock emissionsUsing European plant and dairy waste as an alternative to soy-based animal feed could see a big drop in agricultural emissions and prevent deforestation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Attention deficit disorders could stem from impaired brain coordinationResearchers have discovered how two brain regions work together to maintain attention, and how discordance between the regions could lead to attention deficit disorders, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression.
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Science : NPR

NASA Hopes Supersonic X Plane Will Deliver Less Bang For The BuckThe new plane will test technologies to reduce the loud boom planes make when they break the sound barrier. (Image credit: Courtesy Lockheed Martin)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Virgin Galactic conducts first powered flight of new spaceshipVirgin Galactic has conducted the first powered test flight of its new space tourism rocket.
3h
Big Think

Large crack in East African Rift is evidence of continent splitting in twoA large crack, stretching several kilometres, made a sudden appearance recently in south-western Kenya . The tear, which continues to grow, caused part of the Nairobi-Narok highway to collapse and was accompanied by seismic activity in the area. The Earth is an ever-changing planet, even though in ... Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

More Americans aware of growing problem of opioid addictionA new survey by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research reveals the number of Americans who see opioid addiction as a significant issue for their community today is up significantly over just two years ago. Forty-three percent of Americans now say the misuse of prescription drugs is a serious problem, compared with 33 percent in 2016.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

More dairy associated with higher bone density and greater spine strength in men over 50Researchers from Hebrew SeniorLife's Institute for Aging Research (IFAR), Wageningen University, Tilburg University, University of Reading, and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) have discovered that higher intake of dairy foods, such as milk, yogurt, and cheese, is associated with higher volumetric bone mineral density and vertebral strength at the spine in men. Dairy intake seems to be
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

X-linked genes help explain why boys of all ages face higher respiratory riskHuman airways already demonstrate gender-based differences in DNA methylation signatures at birth, providing an early hint of infants who may be predisposed to develop respiratory disorders later in life.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research predicts likelihood of HIV testing based on race, sex/gender & sexual orientationA new study has identified factors that lead to increased HIV testing among young adults, specifically how a person's race, sex/gender, and sexual orientation is connected to their likelihood of getting tested for HIV.
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The Atlantic

Bitcoin: A Stock Photo Cryptocurrency PrimerBitcoin, cryptocurrency, blockchain—these things are huge, right? Still unsure if you should invest your time or money? Don't know the difference between a Satoshi and a gigahash? Well, stock photography is here to help give us a sense of the inner workings, background, and the dos and don'ts of the bitcoin ecosystem. Because there's nothing better than images of collectible coins, stage props, m
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Footsteps to preventing fallsOne of four elderly persons falls every year in the United States. With more than 37 million hospitalizations every year, roughly one million falls occur in hospitals and can lead to serious injury and even death. Patients often fall while trying to get out of bed or when they walk for longer than they are able. Nurses can't constantly monitor individual patients because of the number of patients
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UK regulator investigating Facebook over political campaigningBritain's data privacy regulator said Thursday it was investigating 30 organisations including Facebook over their use of personal data and analytics in political campaigning.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Obama-era clean-air rule on methane emissions blocked again (Update)An on-again, off-again effort to restrict harmful methane emissions on federal lands is off—again.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Raccoons' bizarre behavior gets locals' attention in USRaccoons are normally shy, nocturnal creatures. But they've been acting out in the US state of Ohio, where police report strange and menacing raccoon behavior in broad daylight.
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Live Science

'Killer Robot' Lab Faces Boycott from Artificial Intelligence ExpertsThe artificial intelligence (AI) community has a clear message for researchers in South Korea: Don't make killer robots.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Coral bleaching threatens the diversity of reef fishNew research reveals that global warming also affects fish who depend on corals.
3h
Big Think

How much does it matter whether God exists?What are we really talking about when we debate the existence of God? Read More
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Science : NPR

How The NRA Worked To Stifle Gun Violence ResearchFor decades, the group stood behind legislation that has ended up suppressing such studies through budget cuts and limits on what data can be shared. (Image credit: Cliff Owen/AP)
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New on MIT Technology Review

Shaping the Future of TravelPowering nearly 600 million bookings for 1.3 billion passengers in 2012, Amadeus provides the digital technology backbone for the travel ecosystem.
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The Atlantic

'When Times Get Tough, People Make Tough Choices'15 years ago, Jason Bobbit was released from incarceration for conspiracy to distribute cocaine. He was elated to return home to his wife and five children. Every moment not spent looking for a job was a chance to be the father he couldn’t be behind bars. But employment options for ex-convicts are, of course, limited. Companies that would hire him—Home Depot, for instance—paid only $9 an hour. “I
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The Atlantic

Can Lost Embryos Give Rise to a Wrongful-Death Suit?Over a single weekend in March, an unprecedented disaster hit fertility clinics—twice. First came the news that the University Hospitals Fertility Center in Ohio, lost more than 4,000 eggs and embryos in a malfunctioning cryogenic tank. Then, in an unrelated incident, Pacific Fertility Center in California reported that liquid-nitrogen levels had fallen too low in a tank holding “ several thousan
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Attention deficit disorders could stem from impaired brain coordinationResearchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and colleagues have discovered how two brain regions work together to maintain attention, and how discordance between the regions could lead to attention deficit disorders, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression.
3h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Human brains make new nerve cells — and lots of them — well into old ageIn humans, new neurons are still born in old brains, new research suggests.
3h
Live Science

Stop Peeing in Walden Pond!Urine and climate change are destroying a historic landmark. Just Thoreau-ing that out there.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Injecting gene cocktail into mouse pancreas leads to humanlike tumorsA researcher at UT Health San Antonio (The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio) has invented a unique method to generate, in mice, pancreatic tumors that resemble human pancreatic cancer. This will be a tool researchers can use to develop new drugs that extend patients' lives, and it is a tool researchers have not had at their disposal before.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Coral bleaching threatens the diversity of reef fishNew research reveals that global warming also affects fish who depend on corals. The Great Barrier Reef is revered for its kaleidoscope of color. New international research led by Ph.D. student Laura Richardson of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University reveals that coral bleaching events not only whitewash corals, but can also reduce the variety of fish occupy
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Sleeping' stem cells could aid brain repairScientists at the Wellcome Trust/ Cancer Research UK Gurdon Institute, University of Cambridge, have identified a new type of stem cell in the brain which they say has a high potential for repair following brain injury or disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genes' interplay gives clues to how new cell types could evolveDevelopmental biologists at the University of Bath have gained insights into how a family of essential genes interact differently between different parts of the body and between species, which could offer clues about how new types of cells come to evolve.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Microplastics litter the ocean, but what about freshwater and land?Hundreds of scientific publications now show that microplastics contaminate the world's oceans, yet scientists have only just begun to document and study microplastics in freshwater and terrestrial systems.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Freed from the rocky constraints of bedrock, nitrogen supports lifeWhile nitrogen within terrestrial soils and vegetation has largely been thought to come from the atmosphere, a new study points to a previously underappreciated, additional source: weathered bedrock. Since nitrogen availability dictates plant growth, these findings have important implications for understanding the carbon cycle, in which plants are chiefly involved, and also for global climate chan
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Which education systems are best? Look past the superficial numbersInternational large-scale education assessments (ILSAs) are used to compare the performance of countries' educational systems, but these rankings can be misleading and should not be the sole determinant informing educational policy, Judith Singer and Henry Braun caution in this Policy Forum.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Boosting the ability of the brain to regain function after a strokeFollowing a stroke, application of a drug that enhances neural plasticity during rehabilitation resulted in improved recovery of motor function, a new study in mice and monkeys reports.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists reveal cryo-electron microscopy structure of a herpesvirus capsid at 3.1 ÅUsing a combination of 'block-based' reconstruction and accurate Ewald sphere corrections, the researchers at the Institute of Biophysics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, together with coworkers reconstructed the 3.1 Å structure of the herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) B-capsid and built the atomic model, thus expanding the understanding of the assembly mechanism of the capsid.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New source of global nitrogen discoveredNot all of the nitrogen on the planet comes from the atmosphere, according to a UC Davis study in the journal Science. Up to a quarter comes from Earth's bedrock. The discovery could greatly improve climate change projections.
4h
Big Think

Bee colonies make decisions the same way the human brain doesThe results have implications for psychology, neurology, robotics and A.I. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Can we imitate organisms' abilities to decode water patterns for new technologies?The shape of water. Can it tell us about what drives romance? Among fish, it might. Eva Kanso, a professor of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering studies fluid flows and almost like a forensic expert, Kanso, along with her team, is studying how aquatic signals are transported through the water.
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Science current issue

Science for state legislatures
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Science current issue

News at a glance
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Science current issue

In its second year, March for Science grows up
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Science current issue

University is quick to disclose misconduct
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Science current issue

Humane studies of octopuses get a boost
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Science current issue

Rocky start for China's James Watson center
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Science current issue

NIH looks to punish reviewers who violate confidentiality
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Science current issue

A delicate balance
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Science current issue

Edge of extinction
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Science current issue

A one-man fossil rescue mission
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Science current issue

NextGen VOICES: A postdoc's purpose
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Science current issue

Microplastics research--from sink to source
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Science current issue

Supporting recovery from brain injury
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Science current issue

Lattices for fractional Chern insulators
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Science current issue

ESCRTs offer repair service
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Science current issue

Up close with herpesviruses
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Science current issue

LRRK2 kinase in Parkinson's disease
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Science current issue

Testing international education assessments
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Science current issue

Revisiting a tragedy at Gombe
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Science current issue

2001, 50 years later
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Science current issue

On the evolution of baleen whales
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Science current issue

Postnatal perturbation by Zika virus
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Science current issue

Light relaxes hybrid perovskites
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Science current issue

Signaling hematopoietic stem cells from afar
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Science current issue

Beyond fractional quantum Hall
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Science current issue

Live imaging of DNA loop extrusion
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Science current issue

Revisiting the origins of modern horses
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Science current issue

A small molecule for stroke therapy
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Science current issue

Freed from a rocky embrace
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Science current issue

Focusing in on herpesvirus
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Science current issue

A quick fix for leaky endosomes
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Science current issue

Double rings made with heme
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Science current issue

A sulfur matchmaker for fluorous coupling
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Science current issue

Embryonic hints of adult diversity
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Science current issue

The Middle Stone Age in Africa
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Science current issue

Staging quiescent cells
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Science current issue

Microplastics everywhere
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Science current issue

A target in Parkinson's disease?
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Science current issue

From Nogo to go
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Science current issue

Specializations for alpine living
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Science current issue

Refining diabetes into five types
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Science current issue

Aging muscle: Use it or lose it
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Science current issue

Tumor-agnostic therapy gets on TRK
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Science current issue

A revealing view of oxides
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Science current issue

A balance between content and process
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Science current issue

Layers for red luminescence
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Science current issue

CRMP2-binding compound, edonerpic maleate, accelerates motor function recovery from brain damageBrain damage such as stroke is a devastating neurological condition that may severely compromise patient quality of life. No effective medication-mediated intervention to accelerate rehabilitation has been established. We found that a small compound, edonerpic maleate, facilitated experience-driven synaptic glutamate AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic-acid) receptor delivery a
4h
Science current issue

Convergent evidence for widespread rock nitrogen sources in Earths surface environmentNitrogen availability is a pivotal control on terrestrial carbon sequestration and global climate change. Historical and contemporary views assume that nitrogen enters Earth’s land-surface ecosystems from the atmosphere. Here we demonstrate that bedrock is a nitrogen source that rivals atmospheric nitrogen inputs across major sectors of the global terrestrial environment. Evidence drawn from the
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Science current issue

Observation of fractional Chern insulators in a van der Waals heterostructureTopologically ordered phases are characterized by long-range quantum entanglement and fractional statistics rather than by symmetry breaking. First observed in a fractionally filled continuum Landau level, topological order has since been proposed to arise more generally at fractional fillings of topologically nontrivial Chern bands. Here we report the observation of gapped states at fractional f
4h
Science current issue

Light-induced lattice expansion leads to high-efficiency perovskite solar cellsLight-induced structural dynamics plays a vital role in the physical properties, device performance, and stability of hybrid perovskite–based optoelectronic devices. We report that continuous light illumination leads to a uniform lattice expansion in hybrid perovskite thin films, which is critical for obtaining high-efficiency photovoltaic devices. Correlated, in situ structural and device charac
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Science current issue

Enzymatic construction of highly strained carbocyclesSmall carbocycles are structurally rigid and possess high intrinsic energy due to their ring strain. These features lead to broad applications but also create challenges for their construction. We report the engineering of hemeproteins that catalyze the formation of chiral bicyclobutanes, one of the most strained four-membered systems, via successive carbene addition to unsaturated carbon-carbon
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Science current issue

Modular radical cross-coupling with sulfones enables access to sp3-rich (fluoro)alkylated scaffoldsCross-coupling chemistry is widely applied to carbon-carbon bond formation in the synthesis of medicines, agrochemicals, and other functional materials. Recently, single-electron–induced variants of this reaction class have proven particularly useful in the formation of C(sp 2 )–C(sp 3 ) linkages, although certain compound classes have remained a challenge. Here, we report the use of sulfones to
4h
Science current issue

Early emergence of cortical interneuron diversity in the mouse embryoGABAergic interneurons (GABA, -aminobutyric acid) regulate neural-circuit activity in the mammalian cerebral cortex. These cortical interneurons are structurally and functionally diverse. Here, we use single-cell transcriptomics to study the origins of this diversity in the mouse. We identify distinct types of progenitor cells and newborn neurons in the ganglionic eminences, the embryonic prolife
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Science current issue

Environmental dynamics during the onset of the Middle Stone Age in eastern AfricaDevelopment of the African Middle Stone Age (MSA) before 300,000 years ago raises the question of how environmental change influenced the evolution of behaviors characteristic of early Homo sapiens . We used temporally well-constrained sedimentological and paleoenvironmental data to investigate environmental dynamics before and after the appearance of the early MSA in the Olorgesailie basin, Keny
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Science current issue

Long-distance stone transport and pigment use in the earliest Middle Stone AgePrevious research suggests that the complex symbolic, technological, and socioeconomic behaviors that typify Homo sapiens had roots in the middle Pleistocene
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Science current issue

Chronology of the Acheulean to Middle Stone Age transition in eastern AfricaThe origin of the Middle Stone Age (MSA) marks the transition from a highly persistent mode of stone toolmaking, the Acheulean, to a period of increasing technological innovation and cultural indicators associated with the evolution of Homo sapiens . We used argon-40/argon-39 and uranium-series dating to calibrate the chronology of Acheulean and early MSA artifact–rich sedimentary deposits in the
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Science current issue

Cell cycle heterogeneity directs the timing of neural stem cell activation from quiescenceQuiescent stem cells in adult tissues can be activated for homeostasis or repair. Neural stem cells (NSCs) in Drosophila are reactivated from quiescence in response to nutrition by the insulin signaling pathway. It is widely accepted that quiescent stem cells are arrested in G 0 . In this study, however, we demonstrate that quiescent NSCs (qNSCs) are arrested in either G 2 or G 0 . G 2 -G 0 heter
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Science current issue

Real-time imaging of DNA loop extrusion by condensinIt has been hypothesized that SMC protein complexes such as condensin and cohesin spatially organize chromosomes by extruding DNA into large loops. We directly visualized the formation and processive extension of DNA loops by yeast condensin in real time. Our findings constitute unambiguous evidence for loop extrusion. We observed that a single condensin complex is able to extrude tens of kilobas
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Science current issue

Hepatic thrombopoietin is required for bone marrow hematopoietic stem cell maintenanceHematopoietic stem cell (HSC) maintenance depends on extrinsic cues. Currently, only local signals arising from the bone marrow niche have been shown to maintain HSCs. However, it is not known whether systemic factors also sustain HSCs. We assessed the physiological source of thrombopoietin (TPO), a key cytokine required for maintaining HSCs. Using Tpo DsRed-CreER knock-in mice, we showed that TP
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Science current issue

Ancient genomes revisit the ancestry of domestic and Przewalskis horsesThe Eneolithic Botai culture of the Central Asian steppes provides the earliest archaeological evidence for horse husbandry, ~5500 years ago, but the exact nature of early horse domestication remains controversial. We generated 42 ancient-horse genomes, including 20 from Botai. Compared to 46 published ancient- and modern-horse genomes, our data indicate that Przewalski’s horses are the feral des
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Science current issue

New Products
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Science current issue

No one is an island
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Science current issue

Triggered recruitment of ESCRT machinery promotes endolysosomal repairEndolysosomes can be damaged by diverse materials. Terminally damaged compartments are degraded by lysophagy, but pathways that repair salvageable organelles are poorly understood. Here we found that the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery, known to mediate budding and fission on endolysosomes, also plays an essential role in their repair. ESCRTs were rapidly recrui
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Science current issue

Cryo-EM structure of a herpesvirus capsid at 3.1 AStructurally and genetically, human herpesviruses are among the largest and most complex of viruses. Using cryo–electron microscopy (cryo-EM) with an optimized image reconstruction strategy, we report the herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) capsid structure at 3.1 angstroms, which is built up of about 3000 proteins organized into three types of hexons (central, peripentonal, and edge), pentons, a
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Science current issue

Structure of the herpes simplex virus 1 capsid with associated tegument protein complexesHerpes simplex viruses (HSVs) rely on capsid-associated tegument complex (CATC) for long-range axonal transport of their genome-containing capsids between sites of infection and neuronal cell bodies. Here we report cryo–electron microscopy structures of the HSV-1 capsid with CATC up to 3.5-angstrom resolution and atomic models of multiple conformers of capsid proteins VP5, VP19c, VP23, and VP26 a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amid outcry over Facebook's privacy issues, new approaches are needed to protect consumersFacebook's current privacy crisis and questions about how Google gathers, uses and stores our personal information demonstrate an urgent need to review and replace inadequate and outdated ways to regulate data and information, according to research from Indiana University's Kelley School of Business.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists reveal cryo-electron microscopy structure of a herpesvirus capsid at 3.1 AngstromThe herpesvirus is genetically and structurally one of the most complex viruses. It spreads within the host population efficiently, causing a range of diseases in humans, including congenital disorders and cancers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genes' interplay gives clues to how new cell types could evolveDevelopmental biologists at the University of Bath have gained insights into how a family of essential genes interact differently between different parts of the body and between species, which could offer clues about how new types of cells come to evolve.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Sleeping' stem cells could aid brain repairScientists at the Wellcome Trust/ Cancer Research UK Gurdon Institute, University of Cambridge, have identified a new type of stem cell in the brain which they say has a high potential for repair following brain injury or disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

MRI analysis with machine learning predicts impairment after spinal injury, study showsA test of machine-learning algorithms shows promise for computer-aided prognosis of acute spinal cord injury, according to a study to be presented at the ARRS 2018 Annual Meeting, set for April 22-27 in Washington, D.C.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Amid outcry over Facebook's privacy issues, new approaches are needed to protect consumersFacebook's current privacy crisis and questions about how Google gathers, uses and stores our personal information demonstrate an urgent need to review and replace inadequate and outdated ways to regulate data and information, according to research from Indiana University's Kelley School of Business.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can we imitate organisms' abilities to decode water patterns for new technologies?The shape of water. Can it tell us about what drives romance? Among fish, it might. Eva Kanso, a professor of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering studies fluid flows and almost like a forensic expert, Kanso, along with her team, is studying how aquatic signals are transported through the water.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Parents struggle to discuss sex with LGBTQ teensParents of LGBTQ children feel especially uncomfortable and unequipped when they try to educate them about sex and dating, reports a new study. Parents don't know what constitutes safe sexual behaviors for LGBTQ teens and need resources to help them. Parents play an important role in helping their children learn how to have healthy sexual relationships.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Review of Vitamin D Research identifies ethical issues in placebo useGeorge Washington University's Dr. Leigh Frame reviewed several studies using placebo groups in clinical trials that may pose ethical issues.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Computer system transcribes words users 'speak silently'Researchers have developed a computer interface that can transcribe words that the user verbalizes internally but does not actually speak aloud. Electrodes in the device pick up neuromuscular signals in the jaw and face that are triggered by internal verbalizations -- saying words 'in your head' -- but are undetectable to the human eye.
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The Scientist RSS

Chinese Scientist Sentenced to 10 Years in Prison for Rice-Smuggling PlotThe researcher stole genetically modified seeds and planned to give them to a crop research institute in China, the US Justice Department says.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Did You Buy Bitcoins? Your Brain's Anatomy Might Be to BlameScans show people who can endure greater risk share certain neurological features -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

270 million visits made to English coastlines each yearResearch has revealed for the first time that around 271 million recreational visits are made to marine and coastal environments in England. The research found that the most common activity on these visits is walking. The study also revealed that most people head to these 'blue' environments for relaxation and social reasons.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Class clowns: Playful boys viewed more negatively than playful girls, study findsNew research finds that boys with a playful disposition in kindergarten are viewed as rebellious and disruptive by teachers, as opposed to playful girls who are not labeled this way. Teachers disregard for these 'class clowns' -- and their active discouragement of expressions of playful behavior -- is assimilated by the boys themselves as well as their peers, leading to more negative perceptions o
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How do very small particles behave at very high temperatures?A nanomaterials expert has been looking at how small gold particles survive when subjected to very high temperatures.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Carbon taxes can be both fair and effective, study showsStudy shows a tax on carbon-based fuels would go a long way toward curbing global climate change, and could be designed so that it doesn't hurt the poorest households.
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Science | The Guardian

The Guardian view on Antarctica: the worrying retreat of the ice | EditorialThe only thing more frightening than an advancing glacier may be one that is shrinking and raising sea levels round the world Both the north pole and the south pole are situated in the middle of huge ice deserts which are melting around the edges under the influence of human activity. The difference that matters between them is that the ice of the Arctic floats: if it melted nothing much would hap
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Science : NPR

What Do Hamburgers Have To Do With Gender?Meat and veggie burgers evolved together in the 20th century, but when it comes to associations with gender, their histories diverge. Anthropologist Barbara J. King explores a new book on the topic. (Image credit: Piotr Marcinski/Getty Images/EyeEm)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lessons from lemurs: To make friends, show off your smartsResearchers show that clever lemurs -- some of our earliest primate relatives -- gain social standing as the result of their problem-solving skills.
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Big Think

4 ways making beer is all about scienceBrewing beer is as much science as art, and here are four reasons why. Read More
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New on MIT Technology Review

300 genes found at the root of cancers could spur more personalized treatments
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Findings from breast and gynecological cancer study may have potential for future clinical applicatiResearchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have found a startling amount of new information about molecular features of tumors as well as identified previously unknown cancer subtypes based on a comprehensive analysis of 2,579 tumors from breast and four different types of gynecologic cancers. These new findings potentially could serve as a launching pad for future therapeu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Primary care doctors may be unsure when kids' bad moods are serious or notFamily medicine doctors and pediatricians are less confident than psychiatrists in their abilities to tell the difference between normal irritability and possibly bigger issues in children and adolescents, according to Penn State researchers. Primary care providers and pediatricians were also more likely to prescribe medications when they thought there was a problem, while psychiatrists were more
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Google Turns to Users to Improve Its AI Chops Outside the USA Google team created an app that asks users in India and elsewhere to identify household objects and public places, to boost the accuracy of its image-recognition services.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Iris weakening off Queensland coastNASA's Terra satellite passed over the Coral Sea and captured an image of Tropical Cyclone Iris as it continued weakening and moving away from the coast of Queensland, Australia.
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Live Science

Scientists Find Very Young Cells in Even Very Old BrainsA new study finds baby nerve cells even in very old brains. But the research remains controversial.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Iris weakening off Queensland coastNASA's Terra satellite passed over the Coral Sea and captured an image of Tropical Cyclone Iris as it continued weakening and moving away from the coast of Queensland, Australia. The Australian Bureau of Meteorology dropped all warnings for land areas, but maintained a High Seas Weather Warning for Metarea 10.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Organoids created from patients' bladder cancers could guide treatmentResearchers have created patient-specific bladder cancer organoids that mimic many of the characteristics of actual tumors. The use of organoids, tiny 3-D spheres derived from a patient's own tumor, may be useful in the future to guide treatment of patients.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New discovery explains why cells with identical genes perform unique jobsScientists have made a significant discovery that explains how and why the billions of different cells in our bodies look and act so differently despite containing identical genes. The discovery, made by a team from the Smurfit Institute of Genetics at Trinity College Dublin, applies to all complex animals, including humans.
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Popular Science

Air pollution might be the new leadEnvironment Scientists now think it might put young brains at risk. It’s increasingly clear that the effects of air pollution aren’t constrained to body parts below the shoulders—they can hurt the brain in a whole host of ways, many of…
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The Scientist RSS

Hundreds of Inherited Gene Variants Contribute to CancerIn the largest study of its kind to date, researchers find more than 850 rare, heritable genetic alterations that can predispose humans to cancer.
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The Scientist RSS

Abundant Neurogenesis Found in Adult Humans HippocampiResearchers identified thousands of immature neurons in the brain region, countering a recent result showing little, if any, signs of neurogenesis.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The future holds challenges and opportunities for dairy producersIn the future, global food production systems will come under increased pressure from population growth, urbanization, and climate change. Over the last two years, scientists from the United States, the United Kingdom, and Sweden have examined projections and current data to identify ways in which the dairy industry may respond to these challenges to meet increased demand for dairy products over t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dead star circled by lightNew images from ESO's Very Large Telescope and other telescopes reveal a rich landscape of stars and glowing clouds of gas in one of our closest neighboring galaxies, the Small Magellanic Cloud. The pictures have allowed astronomers to identify an elusive stellar corpse left behind by a 2,000-year-old supernova explosion. The MUSE instrument was used to establish where this object is hiding, and C
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New on MIT Technology Review

China has a new plan to create an army of AI researchers
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New guidance for safe opioid prescribing for hospitalized patients with acute painEven as current research demonstrates that hospitalized patients' exposure to opioids has contributed to the nationwide addiction epidemic, there is little guidance on the safe prescribing of these pain killers in the inpatient, non-operative setting.Now, a national working group led by an investigator at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) has developed a Consensus Statement intended to
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NYT > Science

Surgeon General Urges Americans to Carry Drug That Stops Opioid OverdosesNaloxone Americans OverdoseThe drug, naloxone, has been used to revive thousands of people, and Dr. Jerome M. Adams says family and friends of opioid users should learn how to use it.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Banking on sunshine: World added far more solar than fossil fuel power generating capacity in 2017Solar energy dominated global investment in new power generation like never before in 2017.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Vegetables may help protect elderly women from hardening of neck arteriesEating more cabbage, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower and broccoli was associated with less carotid artery wall thickness among elderly women.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Childhood exposure to flame retardant chemicals declines following phase-outExposure to flame retardants once widely used in consumer products has been falling, according to a new study. The researchers are the first to show that levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) measured in children significantly decreased over a 15-year period between 1998 and 2013, although the chemicals were present in all children tested.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

This ancient lizard may have watched the world through four eyesA lizard that lived 50 million years ago had both a third and a fourth eye.
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Live Science

Meet 7 Versions of BB-8, the Lovable 'Star Wars' DroidCreators of the endearing "Star Wars" droid BB-8 revealed how they constructed this adorable mechanical marvel.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How do very small particles behave at very high temperatures?A Swansea University nanomaterials expert has been looking at how small gold particles survive when subjected to very high temperatures.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Van Andel Research Institute scientists help redefine how cancer is categorizedVan Andel Research Institute (VARI) announced today that the work of its scientists is featured in 27 papers focused on the output of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). The papers were published across the Cell Press family of journals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New butterfly species discovered nearly 60 years after it was first collectedIn 1959, a then-teenage lepidopterist Thomas Emmel collected 13 fawn-colored butterflies in the highlands of Mexico. Nearly 60 years later, those butterflies are finally being recognized as a new species by his colleague Andrew Warren, who named the butterfly Cyllopsis tomemmeli to honor Emmel, now 76 and an internationally recognized Lepidoptera expert at the University of Florida.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chronic illnesses, functional limitations a risk in older adults with heart failureRoughly half the older adults who have heart failure also live with five or more other chronic health conditions. Researchers examined the impact of having multiple chronic conditions and having difficulty with daily activities on the health of older adults with heart failure. They published their findings in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. Until now, there's been no research on th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fentanyl overdose survivors require little if any hospital treatmentMost fentanyl overdose survivors, if given the antidote promptly, don't need prolonged hospital treatment, according to a study by University of British Columbia physicians. That finding could help standardize how first-responders and emergency departments handle overdoses from the potent drug.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New discovery explains why cells with identical genes perform unique jobsA newly discovered family of proteins -- present in humans and all complex animals -- are key players in controlling how stem cells specialise and in how embryos develop. These families of proteins may also represent key targets for drug developers looking to design new therapeutic options for some cancer patients.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New 'Pan-Cancer' analysis reveals the common roots of different cancersCancer researchers have released the results of a comprehensive analysis of genomic and molecular data characterizing 33 different types of cancer from more than 10,000 patients. Called the Pan-Cancer Atlas, it is the most comprehensive cross-cancer analysis to date and is the final output of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program, a joint effort of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Nati
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Major milestone reached in effort to ID cancers' genetic rootsResearchers nationwide have reached a major milestone in describing the genetic landscape of cancer. Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and other institutions have completed the genetic sequencing and analyses of more than 11,000 tumors from patients, spanning 33 types of cancer -- all part of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project, funded by the National Cancer In
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genomic analysis of thousands of tumors supports new cancer classificationAn analysis of thousands of tumors across 33 different cancer types by researchers from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Network supports an additional classification for human tumors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lessons from lemurs: To make friends, show off your smartsPrinceton researchers show that clever lemurs -- some of our earliest primate relatives -- gain social standing as the result of their problem-solving skills.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Largest cancer genomics study spurs efforts to promote specialized clinical trialsThe final output from the largest-ever cancer genomic study reveals new possibilities for immune-based and other novel cancer therapeutics, and provides a push for clinicians to obtain and utilize comprehensive genomic information to enroll their patients into specialized 'basket or umbrella' clinical trials. Results from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Network are highlighted in 27 studies publish
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NIH completes in-depth genomic analysis of 33 cancer typesResearchers funded by the National Institutes of Health have completed a detailed analysis from a dataset containing molecular and clinical information on over 10,000 tumors from 33 forms of cancer. Known as the Pan-Cancer Atlas, this analysis empowers cancer clinicians and researchers through a comprehensive understanding of how, where and why tumors arise in humans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study reveals how 'microbial axolotl' repairs itselfIn a new study, published in Current Biology this week, a research team from Uppsala University in Sweden reports new insights into the regenerative capabilities of Stentor, a single celled model organism for regeneration biology. The study used novel gene expression methods that allowed the researchers to identify over one thousand genes that are involved in the regeneration process of individual
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

For a better influenza vaccine, focus on the neglected 'N'In the April 5, 2018, issue of the journal Cell, researchers push for greater emphasis on the neglected viral-surface influenza protein neuraminidase. For decades, flu vaccines have concentrated on hemagglutinin. The authors maintain that a focus on neuraminidase could lower infection rates and lessen severity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How lemurs win 'friends' and influence other lemursIn human social networks, people often find it useful to spend time with others who are successful and well informed. Now researchers reporting in Current Biology on April 5 have found that the same is true in lemur society. Regardless of age or sex, the study shows that lemurs who are more likely to learn to solve a new task and retrieve a food reward after watching how it's done also had more so
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Connections between two brain regions linked with financial risk toleranceResearchers have known that connections between two areas of the brain, the amygdala and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), have been implicated in the development of affective disorders like depression and anxiety. But new research published April 5 in the journal Neuron suggests that this same brain system plays a role in a person's ability to tolerate economic risk.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Older adults grow just as many new brain cells as young peopleResearchers show for the first time that healthy older men and women can generate just as many new brain cells as younger people in a study that appears on April 5 in the journal Cell Stem Cell.
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New Scientist - News

Astronauts could 3D print tools from their own processed faecesAstronauts on long missions won't be able to bring all their tools with them. A new way of turning faeces into 3D-printable plastic may solve that problem
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Carbon taxes can be both fair and effective, study showsPutting a price on carbon, in the form of a fee or tax on the use of fossil fuels, coupled with returning the generated revenue to the public in one form or another, can be an effective way to curb emissions of greenhouse gases. That's one of the conclusions of an extensive analysis of several versions of such proposals, carried out by researchers at MIT and the National Renewable Energy Laborator
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

King penguin breeding colonies are structured like fluidsColonies of breeding king penguins behave much like particles in liquids do, according to a new study by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and international colleagues. This "liquid" organization and structure enables breeding colonies to protect themselves against predators while also keeping members together.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers identify the cells that trigger floweringHow do plants "know" it is time to flower? A new study uncovers exactly where a key protein forms before it triggers the flowering process in plants.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study reveals how unicellular organism repairs itselfIn a new study, published in Current Biology this week, a research team from Uppsala University in Sweden reports new insights into the regenerative capabilities of Stentor, a single celled model organism for regeneration biology. The study used novel gene expression methods that allowed the researchers to identify over one thousand genes that are involved in the regeneration process of individual
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Science | The Guardian

Humans produce new brain cells throughout their lives, say researchersFindings could help hunt for treatment for degenerative conditions such as Alzheimers, and psychiatric problems Humans continue to produce new neurons in a part of their brain involved in learning, memory and emotion throughout adulthood, scientists have revealed, countering previous theories that production stopped after adolescence. The findings could help in developing treatments for neurologi
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Quanta Magazine

How the DNA Computer Program Makes You and MeOne of the miracles of nature is embryogenesis: the transformation of a single fertilized egg cell into an embryo that will eventually become a fully formed baby animal. Various analogies have been applied to this process, from the primitive concept of a blueprint to Richard Dawkins’ cake recipe that calls for genetic ingredients. To my mind, the best analogy comes from Gary Marcus’ 2004 book The
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The Atlantic

Counting the Dead in MosulEighteen months ago, Iraqi forces backed by heavy coalition firepower descended on Mosul, Iraq’s second city and the largest ever controlled by the Islamic State. It took them nine months—well beyond initial estimates—to dislodge the terror group. During that time, strategies changed. Under the Obama administration, more commanders with the U.S.-led coalition were given latitude to call in strike
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The future holds challenges and opportunities for dairy producersOver the last two years, scientists from the United States, the United Kingdom, and Sweden have examined projections and current data to identify ways in which the dairy industry may respond to these challenges to meet increased demand for dairy products over the next half century. A new review published in the Journal of Dairy Science projects how dairy producers will meet these challenges and ta
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The clinical and experimental research on the treatment of endometriosis with thiostreptonForkhead Box M1 (FOXM1) is frequently activated in tumors. The researchers studied the expression and the possible mechanism of FOXM1 and evaluated the effects of thiostrepton in an endometriotic rat model.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lessons from lemurs: To make friends, show off your smartsDo smart kids make more friends? If others see their cleverness paying off, then yes—at least, that seems to be true for our primate cousins, ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta), report a team of Princeton University researchers.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Now China wants to clean up its social media, too
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Popular Science

Appalachians are slow to adopt new technology for a surprising (and refreshing) reasonTechnology We have a lot to learn from folks who resist the latest gadgets. When people hear “Appalachia,” stereotypes and even slurs often immediately jump to mind, words like “backwards,” “ignorant,” “hillbilly” or “yokel.” But Appalachian…
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Prehistoric reptile pregnant with octupletsPalaeontologists have discovered part of the skeleton of a 180-million-year-old pregnant ichthyosaur with the remains of between six and eight tiny embryos between its ribs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Enhanced therapeutic vaccine platform achieves 2 proof-of-concepts in veterinary medical useChronic allergic diseases of dogs and horses can now be treated with an innovative vaccine. The findings obtained in horses and dogs could lead to similar therapeutic vaccines for humans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How moms' brains are hard-wired to gather youngA mother's 'basic instinct' to grab her wandering offspring and return them to the nest depends on a specific set of brain cell signals, a new study in mice finds.
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The Economist: The world this week

Politics this week
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The Economist: The world this week

KAL’s cartoon
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The Economist: The world this week

Business this week
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Scientific American Content: Global

Surgeon General Urges Public to Carry Overdose-Reversal MedicationThe rare public health advisory is aimed at saving opioid users -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When kids' autistic brains can't calm downOne third of children who have autism spectrum disorder also have epilepsy. It's related to an autism risk gene. But scientists didn't now why the mutation, catnap2, caused seizures. Now scientists have discovered the mutation shrinks the neurons' dendrite arbors and synapses that enable brain cells to relay vital messages. The 'Calm down!' message gets lost in the brain, causing neurons to spin o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Risk of type 1 diabetes climbs when one population of T cells fallsJoslin researchers hypothesize that microbes in the gut, where most of the pTreg cell population is switched on, may be responsible for generating Treg cells and thus protecting against the autoimmune attack on pancreatic beta cells that cause type 1 diabetes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds brain differences in athletes playing contact vs. noncontact sportsA study from researchers at Indiana University has found differences in the brains of athletes who participate in contact sports compared to those who participate in noncontact sports.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The humble fruit fly continues to boost biomedical discoveryResearchers have developed and made available a large versatile library of fruit flies that can be used to perform efficient and elegant in vivo gene-specific manipulations using the new protocol and gene-specific integration vector CRIMIC (CRISPR-Mediated Integrated Cassette).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Negative fateful life events and the brains of middle-aged menConflict, a death in the family, financial hardship and serious medical crises are all associated with accelerated physical aging. In a new study, researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine found that such negative fateful life events -- or FLEs -- appear to also specifically accelerate aging in the brain.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genetic link to IBS identified in womenNew research coordinated by Karolinska Institutet in Sweden links certain DNA variants to increased risk of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in women. The findings, published in the scientific journal Gastroenterology, might help explain why IBS is more common in women than in men.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How do very small particles behave at very high temperatures?A Swansea University nanomaterials expert has been looking at how small gold particles survive when subjected to very high temperatures.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dead star circled by lightNew images from ESO's Very Large Telescope and other telescopes reveal a rich landscape of stars and glowing clouds of gas in one of our closest neighboring galaxies, the Small Magellanic Cloud. The pictures have allowed astronomers to identify an elusive stellar corpse left behind by a 2,000-year-old supernova explosion. The MUSE instrument was used to establish where this object is hiding, and C
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The Atlantic

How I Talk to My Daughter About Climate ChangeEditor’s Note: This article is part of Parenting in an Uncertain Age , a series about the experience of raising children in a time of great change. Late last year, a local middle-school teacher asked me to talk to her class about my work as a science journalist. When the appointed afternoon arrived, family scheduling conflicts required my young daughter to tag along. “So I’m going to be talking t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Diving deep into the blue whale genome reveals the animals’ extraordinary evolutionary historyFor the first time, scientists have deciphered the complete genome of the blue whale and three other rorquals. These insights now allow tracking the evolutionary history of the worlds’ largest animal and its relatives in unprecedented detail. Surprisingly, the genomes show that rorquals have been hybridizing during their evolutionary history. In addition, rorquals seem to have separated into diffe
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Seven-year follow-up shows lasting cognitive gains from meditationGains in the ability to sustain attention developed through intensive meditation training are maintained up to seven years later, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Older people advised to dance for better posture, flexibility, energy and happinessDancing can improve the physical and mental well-being of aging people.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Eating less enables lemurs to live longerChronic caloric restriction strongly increases the lifespan of a small primate, the grey mouse lemur. This is one of the results of a ten-year experiment. Chronic caloric restriction consists in eating a reduced but balanced diet from the outset of early adulthood. Its beneficial effect on lifespan had been established for many short-lived species (worms, flies, mice), but remained controversial f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Look up – it's a satellite!I saw my first artificial satellite with my naked eyes during the summer of 1994. I was watching pieces of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 impact Jupiter from a small observatory with a college astronomy club when someone pointed up – away from the telescope – and said, "Look, it's a satellite!"
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Daniel Ek, Spotify's tenacious and taciturn CEOSpotify's billionaire CEO Daniel Ek, who revolutionised on demand music listening for millions of people, is a resilient entrepreneur from a Swedish working-class suburb whose no-nonsense attitude has drawn investors and staff alike.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers identify the cells that trigger floweringHow do plants 'know' it is time to flower? A new study uncovers exactly where a key protein forms before it triggers the flowering process in plants.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tracking Aedes mosquito invasions in PanamaMosquitoes in the genus Aedes, which carry viruses causing yellow fever, chikungunya and Zika, invaded the crossroads of the Americas multiple times, by land and by sea.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Carbon taxes can be both fair and effective, study showsStudy shows a tax on carbon-based fuels would go a long way toward curbing global climate change, and could be designed so that it doesn't hurt the poorest households.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Presentations at #AGS18 address advance care planning, osteoporosis, hypertension and fallsBreaking barriers to advance care planning for incarcerated older adults, improving osteoporosis screenings for older men, and exploring the link between hypertension treatment and an increased risk for falls are among headline presentations anchoring the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) 2018 Annual Scientific Meeting (#AGS18), held May 3-5 (pre-conference day May 2) at the Walt Disney World Swan
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vitamin D blood test may one day speed bipolar diagnosis in kidsA blood test may have the potential to speed accurate diagnosis -- and proper treatment -- of bipolar disorder in children, new research suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

MIPT physicists design a model of Martian winterA team of researchers from MIPT and their German and Japanese colleagues have designed a numerical model of the annual water cycle in the Martian atmosphere. In this study, the MIPT team expanded the analysis to include smaller particles that are more elusive. As a result, the calculations turned out to be more accurate and consistent with the data obtained from Mars orbiters.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nicotine-imbibing teenage rats show an increased risk for drinking alcohol as adultsRats who were dosed with nicotine during their adolescence grew up to drink alcohol more often than those who weren't exposed to nicotine or were only exposed to it during adulthood. Exposure to nicotine at a young age changed the neuronal circuitry in the rat brain's reward pathways
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Patients with Medicaid have limited access to physical therapy in MassachusettsPatients with Medicaid in Massachusetts have limited access to reimbursable physical therapy (PT) after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bonobos share and share alikeBonobos are willing to share meat with animals outside their own family groups. This behavior was observed in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and is documented in a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The ban of the cave bearAt 3.5 meters long and with a shoulder height of 1.7 meters, the cave bear was one of the giants of the Ice Age. Yet few appear to have survived until the last glacial maximum 24,000 to 19,000 years ago. Researchers have conducted analyses to find out what likely caused the extinction of these large herbivores. It is believed that the renewed cooling of the climate and hunting by humans -- added t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pesticides give bees a hard timeScientists have investigated the impact of a new pesticide on the honeybee. In high doses, it has a negative impact on the insects' taste and cognition ability.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A vaccine for edible plants? A new plant protection method on the horizonNovel technologies are being sought to replace the traditional pesticides used to protect plants, particularly edible plants such as cereals. A new project is shedding light on the efficacy of environmentally friendly RNA-based vaccines that protect plants from diseases and pests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Double perovskites in environmentally friendly solar cellsA further step has been taken along the road to manufacturing solar cells from lead-free perovskites. High quality films based on double perovskites, which show promising photovoltaic properties, have been developed.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cosmic magnetic fields with astonishing orderTurbulent processes in galaxies generate vast magnetic fields – which often present a regular structure on a large scale.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researcher examines police perjury as part of legal cultureUConn law professor Julia Simon-Kerr's scholarship focuses on evidence, particularly on how legal issues of credibility are shaped by cultural presumptions. A recent article, "Systemic Lying," was accepted for presentation at the Harvard/Stanford/Yale Junior Faculty Forum.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Africa is splitting in twoA large crack, stretching several kilometres has made a sudden appearance recently in south-western Kenya, as reported by BBC news.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Neanderthals cared for each other and survived into old age – new researchWhen we think of Neanderthals, we often imagine these distant ancestors of ours to be rather brutish, dying at a young age and ultimately becoming extinct. But new findings show that at least some of these ancient Neanderthals survived into old age – despite suffering from sickness or diseases.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study suggests the elusive neutrino could make up a significant part of dark matterPhysicists trying to understand the fundamental structure of nature rely on consistent theoretical frameworks that can explain what we see and simultaneously make predictions that we can test. On the smallest scale of elementary particles, the standard model of particle physics provides the basis of our understanding.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gene loss can prove to be an advantageDuring evolution, genes can be created, get mutated or duplicated, and even can get lost. To investigate to what extent gene losses can contribute to different adaptations, scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics in Dresden developed a computational method to identify gene losses and systematically searched the genomes of 62 mammals to analyze which genes ar
7h
Scientific American Content: Global

Shell Grappled with Climate Change 20 Years Ago, Documents ShowCompany scientists foresaw a storm like Sandy, as well as climate lawsuits -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New on MIT Technology Review

Amazon has a lot to lose if the US president chases its government cloud contracts
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Samantha's suffering—why sex machines should have rights tooLate in 2017 at a tech fair in Austria, a sex robot was "molested" repeatedly and left in a "filthy" state. The robot, named Samantha, received a barrage of male attention, which resulted in her sustaining two broken fingers. This incident confirms worries that the possibility of fully functioning sex robots raises both tantalising possibilities for human desire (by mirroring human/sex-worker rela
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New butterfly species discovered nearly 60 years after it was first collectedIn 1959, a then-teenage lepidopterist Thomas Emmel collected 13 fawn-colored butterflies in the highlands of Mexico.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New in the Hastings Center Report, March-April 2018Daniel Callahan on Steven Pinker's new book, rethinking the right to know incidental findings, mental illness and gun control, and more in the March-April 2018 issue.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Charting an underexplored landscape: The genitourinary microbiomeMore sensitive cultivation methods and precise 16S rRNA gene sequencing techniques have revealed that the human bladder hosts a significant microbiome and those diverse bacteria inside the bladder impact pediatric urologic diseases.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Identifying what makes a faster typistThe largest-ever dataset on typing speeds and styles, based on 136 million keystrokes from 168,000 volunteers, finds that the fastest typists not only make fewer errors, but they often type the next key before the previous one has been released.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Penguins go through the flowColonies of breeding king penguins behave much like particles in liquids do, according to a new study by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and international colleagues. This 'liquid' organization and structure enables breeding colonies to protect themselves against predators while also keeping members together.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Online privacy must improve after the Facebook data uproarFacebook Data Cambridge AnalyticaI, like millions of others, have willingly given up some of my privacy to Facebook to achieve a sense of connection across cultures, time zones and generations. But revelations of the alleged sale and misuse of Facebook data by Cambridge Analytica has left me feeling betrayed.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

HSBC leaker Falciani freed on bail in SpainA Spanish judge on Thursday released on bail Herve Falciani, a former HSBC computer analyst detained in Madrid at the request of Switzerland for leaking documents alleging widespread tax evasion.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UK car sales slide for 12th month: industry bodyNew car sales in Britain fell for a 12th month in March, as demand for diesel vehicles slumped further, this time by more than one third, industry data showed Thursday.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

1.5 bn sensitive documents on open internet: researchersSome 1.5 billion sensitive online files, from pay stubs to medical scans to patent applications, are visible on the open internet, security researchers said Thursday.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Twitter: 1 million accounts suspended for 'terrorism promotion'Twitter Accounts ContentTwitter said Thursday it has suspended over one million accounts for "promotion of terrorism" since 2015, claiming its efforts have begun to make the platform "an undesirable place" to call for violence.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Archaeologists find remains of Greco-Roman temple in EgyptArchaeologists have unearthed the remains of a temple in Egypt's western desert dating back to the Greco-Roman period, the Antiquities Ministry said Wednesday.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

270 million visits made to English coastlines each yearResearch has revealed for the first time that around 271 million recreational visits are made to marine and coastal environments in England.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study in oxygen-deprived black sea provides insights on future carbon budgetScientists are studying the oxygen-deprived waters of the Black Sea to help answer questions about the deepest parts of the ocean and Earth's climate.
7h
Dagens Medicin

Kvinderne lider, når mændene bliver sygeKvinder, som er i et forhold til mænd, der har prostatakræft, påvirkes negativt af mændenes sygdomsforløb, viser et nyt studie. Studiet åbner for en diskussion af, hvordan de urologiske afdelinger bedre tager hensyn til de pårørende.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Freezing breakthrough offers hope for African wild dogsResearchers in Australia have helped develop a new way to save endangered African wild dogs.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New camera inspired by butterfly eyes improves image-guided cancer surgeryBy mimicking the intricate visual system of a butterfly, researchers have created a camera that provides surgeons with both a traditional color image as well as a near-infrared image that makes fluorescently labeled cancerous cells visible even under bright surgical lighting.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The traits of fast typists discovered by analyzing 136 million keystrokesAn online study with 168,000 people shows large variation in typing speeds and styles. The dataset is the largest ever on everyday typing and exposed several factors that differentiate fast vs. slow typists. In addition to making fewer errors, the researchers found that fastest typists rely on so-called 'rollover' where a letter key is typed before the previous one is released.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bonobos share and share alikeBonobos are willing to share meat with animals outside their own family groups. This behaviour was observed in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and is documented in a new study in Springer's journal Human Nature. Even though bonobo apes have been studied for years, animal behaviourists have only realised in the past 25 years that these primates do not only eat plants, but similar to the common
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A vaccine for edible plants? A new plant protection method on the horizonNovel technologies are being sought to replace the traditional pesticides used to protect plants, particularly edible plants such as cereals. A new collaborative project between the University of Helsinki and the French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) is shedding light on the efficacy of environmentally friendly RNA-based vaccines that protect plants from diseases and pests.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Like human societies, whales value culture and family tiesIt might seem like a "whale of tale," but groundbreaking research from Florida Atlantic University's Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute is the first to demonstrate that just like human societies, beluga whales appear to value culture as well as their ancestral roots and family ties.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Freezing breakthrough offers hope for African wild dogsJames Cook University researchers in Australia have helped develop a new way to save endangered African wild dogs.
7h
Ingeniøren

Cerius erstatter klimasynderen SF₆ med nyudviklet gasDet sjællandske netselskab Cerius bygger seks nye koblingsanlæg i Haslev, der skal benytte et spritnyt alternativ til den potente og udbredte industrielle drivhusgas SF₆.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Green technologies environmentally and profit friendlyCompanies looking to reduce their environmental impact without negatively affecting profits may want to consider increasing their investment in green technology and other sustainable IT solutions, according to a new study on information technology and sustainability published in Production and Operations Management.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New underwater geolocation technique takes cues from natureMarine animals such as mantis shrimp and squid have inspired a new mode of underwater navigation that allows for greater accuracy.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

World added far more solar than fossil fuel power generating capacity in 2017Solar energy dominated global investment in new power generation like never before in 2017.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Twisting laser light offers the chance to probe the nano-scaleA new method to sensitively measure the structure of molecules has been demonstrated by twisting laser light and aiming it at miniscule gold gratings to separate out wavelengths.
8h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

Should we create a solar shade to cool the earth? | Danny HillisIn this perspective-shifting talk, Danny Hillis prompts us to approach global issues like climate change with creative scientific solutions. Taking a stand for solar geoengineering, he looks at controversial solutions with open-minded curiosity.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pesticides having negative impacts on beesScientists from the University of Würzburg have investigated the impact of a new pesticide on the honeybee. In high doses, it has a negative impact on the insects' taste and cognition ability.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A vaccine for edible plants? A new plant protection method on the horizonNovel technologies are being sought to replace the traditional pesticides used to protect plants, particularly edible plants such as cereals. A new collaborative project between the University of Helsinki and the French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) is shedding light on the efficacy of environmentally friendly RNA-based vaccines that protect plants from diseases and pests.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pesticides give bees a hard timeScientists from the University of Würzburg have investigated the impact of a new pesticide on the honeybee. In high doses, it has a negative impact on the insects' taste and cognition ability.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Class clowns: Playful boys viewed more negatively than playful girls, study findsNew research finds that boys with a playful disposition in kindergarten are viewed as rebellious and disruptive by teachers, as opposed to playful girls who are not labeled this way. Teachers disregard for these 'class clowns' -- and their active discouragement of expressions of playful behavior -- is assimilated by the boys themselves as well as their peers, leading to more negative perceptions o
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mefloquine effectively prevents malaria during pregnancy but is not well toleratedThe antimalarial drug mefloquine is more effective than the currently recommended treatment to prevent malaria infection in pregnant women living in endemic countries of sub-Saharan Africa, but the high frequency of adverse events represents a barrier to its use. These are the conclusions of a meta-analysis performed by ISGlobal -- a centre supported by the 'la Caixa' Foundation -- and published i
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dr. Patricia K. Coyle, multiple sclerosis clinician and researcher to lecture on DMTsOptimal use of disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) may be one of the single most important clinical decisions made in treating multiple sclerosis (MS). Currently, there are numerous DMT options and selection can be a complex issue for the clinician and patient. Patricia K. Coyle, M.D., FAAN, FANA, Director, MS Comprehensive Care Center, Stony Brook University Medical Center, will present the Donald
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New butterfly species discovered nearly 60 years after it was first collectedA butterfly collected in Mexico nearly 60 years ago by the Florida Museum of Natural History's McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity Founding Director Thomas Emmel while he was a teenager, has been described as a new species and named in Emmel's honor by colleague Andy Warren. Warren is senior collections manager at the center on the University of Florida campus, the world's only facilit
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New point-of-care test quickly detects Lyme neuroborreliosisA new research-based point-of-care test has been developed in Finland for detecting the Lyme neuroborreliosis spread by ticks. The test makes rapid initiation of antibiotic treatment possible for patients with borreliosis, which reduces the post-treatment symptoms related to the disease. At the same time, unnecessary antibiotic treatments can be avoided.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New actors identified in atherosclerosisStroke and heart attack are the leading cause of death in the Western world. Würzburg scientists have used a special technique to get a clearer picture of the cells involved and their activity.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Theorists described an inertial lift of particles in microchannelsA group of scientists from MSU, Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, and Juelich Research Center described the mechanism of appearance of an inertial lift force acting on finite-sized particles in microchannels. Such calculations were previously possible only for some specific cases. A more accurate description allows one to use this iner
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Efficient genetic modification of immune cellsA new method enables genes in living T-cells in mice to be modified quickly and efficiently. It makes use of plasmids, a tried-and-tested method of genetic engineering. Researchers from the Department of Biomedicine at the University of Basel and University Hospital Basel reported these findings in the Journal of Immunology.
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Futurity.org

Even in young love, money matters for your well-beingFinances may begin to matter in romantic relationships long before marriage, according to new research. “…if you’re a 24-year-old, choose your dating partner wisely.” Researchers set out to see how financial socialization from three different sources affects life outcomes and well-being in young adults. The three sources they looked at were parents, romantic partners, and the young adults themsel
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The ban of the cave bearAt 3.5 meters long and with a shoulder height of 1.7 meters, the cave bear was one of the giants of the Ice Age. Yet few appear to have survived until the last glacial maximum 24,000 to 19,000 years ago. Researchers from Germany, Italy and Canada have conducted analyses to find out what likely caused the extinction of these large herbivores. It is believed that the renewed cooling of the climate a
8h
Futurity.org

Old clothes become aerogels that fight bleedingA fast, cheap, and eco-friendly method converts cotton-based fabric waste, like unwanted clothing, into aerogels. The ultra-light and highly compressible aerogels could be useful for a range of things, including control of rapid bleeding and heat insulation. Aerogels are among the lightest materials in the world and are highly porous with strong absorption capacity and low thermal conductivity. T
8h
New on MIT Technology Review

Mood disorders could be diagnosed by the way you fiddle with your phone
8h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Plastic bag litter falls in UK seasA study of litter in UK seas shows the number of plastic bags has fallen, amid a rise in other types of plastic rubbish.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Protecting the Bornean bantengNew research has found that preserving large forest areas is essential in protecting the most endangered large mammal in Sabah.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Double perovskites in environmentally friendly solar cellsA further step has been taken along the road to manufacturing solar cells from lead-free perovskites. High quality films based on double perovskites, which show promising photovoltaic properties, have been developed in collaboration between Linköping University, Sweden, and Nanyang Technological University in Singapore.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

270 million visits made to English coastlines each yearResearch has revealed for the first time that around 271 million recreational visits are made to marine and coastal environments in England. Conducted by the University of Exeter Medical School and published in the journal Marine Policy, the research found that the most common activity on these visits is walking.The study also revealed that most people head to these 'blue' environments for relaxat
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Coffee filter' helps make new cancer drug Z-endoxifen 1,000 times cheaperMaking drugs cheaper doesn't always require pricey investments. A joint initiative by researchers from Eindhoven University of Technology, the Dutch company Syncom BV and the Antoni van Leeuwenhoek hospital proves just that. What started out as a Bachelor project laid the foundation for a much cheaper production of the promising cancer drug Z-endoxifen.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New camera gives surgeons a butterfly's-eye view of cancerCancer lurking in tissue could be more easily found when looking through a butterfly's eye. Researchers at the University of Illinois and Washington University in St. Louis have developed a surgical camera inspired by the eye of the morpho butterfly. The camera sees infrared signals given off by tumor-binding dyes so that surgeons can find and remove all of the cancerous tissue. The camera was tes
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New camera inspired by butterfly eyes improves image-guided cancer surgeryBy mimicking the intricate visual system of a butterfly, researchers have created a camera that provides surgeons with both a traditional color image as well as a near-infrared image that makes fluorescently labeled cancerous cells visible even under bright surgical lighting.
8h
Feed: All Latest

Do You Weigh More at the Equator or at the North Pole?In which a physics professor very severely overthinks his daughter's science homework.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Understanding Facebook's data crisis—5 essential readsMost of Facebook's 2 billion users have likely had their data collected by third parties, the company revealed April 4. That follows reports that 87 million users' data were used to target online political advertising in the run-up to the 2016 U.S. presidential election.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How smart is your city?The proportion of the world's population that lives in cities is growing quickly. This means that we need to develop strategies for infrastructure, water supply, habitation, and climate adaptation, in all cities around the globe.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why we are measuring the health of Australian vegetation poorlyMany of Australia's ecosystems are in a much worse condition than we think. This is because officials are measuring the health of ecosystems such as forests and woodlands by their size, instead of how damaged they are by disturbances.
8h
Futurity.org

What parents need to know about virtual realityAs more children start using virtual reality, it will be critical for parents and teachers to understand the effect it can have, experts say. A new report, Virtual Reality 101: What You Need to Know About Kids and VR , is a resource to help parents better understand how this new technology can be applied to everyday life and learning. “Compared to other media, VR is an extremely powerful way to d
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New Scientist - News

Spending on renewables in rich countries has halved in six yearsSpending on renewables in developed countries has halved since 2011, with investment levels in Europe falling back below the 2006 level
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New Scientist - News

Killer AI boycott row shows there is research we can’t acceptA South Korean university has dismissed fears it would work on killer robots. The dispute reflects growing worries over autonomous weapons, says Paul Marks
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hope and mourning in the Anthropocene—understanding ecological griefWe are living in a time of extraordinary ecological loss. Not only are human actions destabilising the very conditions that sustain life, but it is also increasingly clear that we are pushing the Earth into an entirely new geological era, often described as the Anthropocene.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why suspending or expelling students often does more harm than goodThe number of students being suspended or expelled from Australian schools is "skyrocketing", according to news reports. These note a 10% increase in suspensions over two years at NSW primary schools and that students in south-western Sydney are being suspended more than four times as often as students in other parts of the city.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why ozone poses a challenge to food securityOzone is a well-known and interesting gas. It is thought of as a "good" gas when present in the stratosphere, where it forms the ozone layer sitting 15 to 30 kilometres above Earth that protect life from detrimental ultraviolet radiation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wildfires will become more frequent due to rising temperatures, but study finds changes will be far from uniformScientists have long believed that wildfires would become more frequent as global temperatures rise, but comparatively few studies have forecast fire behavior by region. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have found that while wildfires in the U.S. will become more frequent overall in the future, changes will not be straightforward and uniform, as it is likely some regions will see dec
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genome sequencing shows baleen whales intermingled more than thoughtA team of researchers with members from Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre, and Goethe University in Frankfurt am Main, Germany and the University of Lund, in Sweden has found that genetic ties between baleen whales are far more complicated than previously thought. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the group describes their study of the whales usi
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New camera inspired by butterfly eyes improves image-guided cancer surgeryBy mimicking the intricate visual system of a butterfly, researchers have created a camera that provides surgeons with both a traditional color image as well as a near-infrared image that makes fluorescently labeled cancerous cells visible even under bright surgical lighting. The new camera is designed to help surgeons remove all the cancerous cells without damaging healthy tissue, making it less
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Students who study and sleep more don't just do better in school—they're happier, tooTurns out Mom was right: Spending more time studying, and less time partying, will lead to greater academic success. But according to a new study by USC computer scientists, hitting the books and avoiding all-nighters will also make you happier.
8h
Ingeniøren

Farvekoder på rør kan forebygge ekskrementer i badevandetSeparerede kloaksystemer er godt for både miljø og rense­anlæg, men ofte ­bliver rørene koblet forkert, så spildevand ender i badevandet.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bonobos share and share alikeBonobos are willing to share meat with animals outside their own family groups. This behavior was observed in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and is documented in a new study in Springer's journal Human Nature.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Twisting laser light offers the chance to probe the nano-scaleA new method to sensitively measure the structure of molecules has been demonstrated by twisting laser light and aiming it at minuscule gold gratings to separate out wavelengths.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The traits of fast typists discovered by analyzing 136 million keystrokesAn online study with 168,000 people shows large variation in typing speeds and styles. The dataset is the largest ever on everyday typing and exposed several factors that differentiate fast vs. slow typists. In addition to making less errors, the researchers found that fastest typists rely on so-called 'rollover' where a letter key is typed already before the previous one is released. The data is
8h
Dagens Medicin

Kongemageren fra GanløseKarin Friis Bach vil som ny formand for sundhedsudvalget i Danske Regioner skabe bedre samarbejde - både internt mellem regionerne og med kommunerne. Som kræftpatient har hun oplevet sundhedsvæsenet indefra og ved derfor, hvor sårbar man er som patient.
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Dagens Medicin

Kvinderne lider, når mændene bliver sygeKvinder, som er i et forhold til mænd, der har prostatakræft, påvirkes negativt af mændenes sygdomsforløb, viser et nyt studie. Studiet åbner for en diskussion af, hvordan de urologiske afdelinger bedre tager hensyn til de pårørende.
8h
Big Think

We know diet causes depression. This one might help cure it.Going back to the basics is often the best path forward. Read More
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cosmic magnetic fields with astonishing orderTurbulent processes in galaxies generate vast magnetic fields that often present a regular structure on a large scale. These are the findings of a study conducted by astronomers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum under the auspices of Prof Dr. Ralf-Jürgen Dettmar, which have been gathered following the analysis of data compiled with state-of-the-art radio telescopes. The Ruhr-Universität's science magazin
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why noise can enhance sensitivity to weak signalsA team of Japanese researchers has discovered a new mechanism to explain stochastic resonance, in which sensitivity to weak signals is enhanced by noise. The finding is expected to help electronic devices become smaller and more energy-efficient.
8h
Popular Science

How to prevent those annoyign texting typosDIY Type faster and more accurately. Your text messages are full of misspelled words, random spaces, and hilarious autocorrect mistakes. Here’s how to prevent these keyboard betrayals.
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Feed: All Latest

Mark Zuckerberg Should Answer This One Question When He Testifies Before CongressFacebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has finally agreed to appear before Congress—which means he might finally get at the real issue behind Facebook's woes.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stunning new species of sea slugs discoveredA small team of scientists at The University of Western Australia, the Western Australian Museum, and the California Academy of Sciences has identified 18 new species of sea slugs, including some only found in WA.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A view from 50,000 feet (and higher)—scientists seek new ways to monitor crop healthA University of Virginia environmental scientist and colleagues at the University of Illinois are working to evaluate crop conditions and forecast crop yields in real time.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study shows microplastics in biowaste wind up in organic compost and fertilizersA team of researchers at the University of Bayreuth in Germany has found that microplastics that make their way into biowaste can show up in organic composts and fertilizers. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the group describes their results when testing organic composts and fertilizers from several processing plants.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A potential new therapeutic target for Ewing sarcomaIDIBELL researchers correlate EphA2 membrane receptor with the metastatic capacity of tumors in Ewing sarcoma.Ewing sarcoma is the second most frequent bone cancer among children and adolescents, and it is characterized by its aggressiveness and tendency to metastasize.Researchers are currently working on nanoengineering a molecule capable of blocking EphA2 and deliver drugs in a targeted manner.R
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why noise can enhance sensitivity to weak signalsA team of Japanese researchers has discovered a new mechanism to explain stochastic resonance, in which sensitivity to weak signals is enhanced by noise. The finding is expected to help electronic devices become smaller and more energy efficient.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New health benefits discovered in berry pigmentNaturally occurring pigments in berries, also known as anthocyanins, increase the function of the sirtuin 6 enzyme in cancer cells, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. The regulation of this enzyme could open up new avenues for cancer treatment.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Freezing breakthrough offers hope for African wild dogsJames Cook University researchers in Australia have helped develop a new way to save endangered African wild dogs.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Trap, contain and convertInjecting carbon dioxide deep underground into basalt flows holds promise as an abatement strategy. Now, new research by scientists at Washington University in St. Louis sheds light on exactly what happens underground during the process, illustrating precisely how effective the volcanic rock could be in trapping and converting CO2 emissions.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

7-year follow-up shows lasting cognitive gains from meditationGains in the ability to sustain attention developed through intensive meditation training are maintained up to seven years later, according to a new study based on the Shamatha Project, a major investigation of the cognitive, psychological and biological effects of meditation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Oldest magnetic record in the solar system discovered in a meteoriteResearchers have found that an iron-containing mineral called dusty olivine, present in meteorites, retains a record of the magnetic field from the early solar system around 4.6 billion years ago. The results are surprising, as the magnetism in dusty olivine is non-uniform, and non-uniform magnetic materials have previously been thought to be poor magnetic recorders. The discovery may lead to new
9h
Dagens Medicin

Shockbølger forbedrer nyrefunktionenDiabetespatienter med skridende nyrefunktion kan undgå at komme i dialyse, hvis de behandles med shockbølger. Sådan lyder visionen fra en gruppe forskere fra Odense Universitetshospital, som aktuelt afprøver shockbølge-behandlingen med stor succes.
9h
Dagens Medicin

Brobyggere skal sikre psykiatriske patienter ved sektorovergangeTo psykiatriske brobyggere i Aarhus Kommune skal i et to-årigt pilotprojekt sikre bedre sammenhæng mellem region og kommune for psykiatriske patienter.
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Dagens Medicin

Aarhus udnævner ny professor i psykiatriSøren Dinesen Østergaard er ny professor på Aarhus Universitet og Aarhus Universitetshospital Risskov, Afdeling for Depression og Angst.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Don't forget the 'epi' in genetics research, Johns Hopkins scientist saysIn a review article published April 5 in the New England Journal of Medicine, scientist Andrew Feinberg, M.D., calls for more integration between two fields of DNA-based research: genetics and epigenetics.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Green technologies environmentally and profit friendlyCompanies looking to reduce their environmental impact without negatively affecting profits may want to consider increasing their investment in green technology and other sustainable IT solutions.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A heavy working memory load may sink brainwave 'synch'When working memory load exceeds capacity, a new study finds, feedback coupling of the prefrontal cortex with other involved regions shuts down.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Like human societies, whales value culture and family tiesIn a detailed genetic kinship study, an international team is the first to reveal that just like human societies, beluga whales appear to value culture and their ancestral roots and family ties. They have demonstrated that related whales returned to the same locations year after year, and decade after decade. Not only do these whales know where to go and where not to go, they are passing on this i
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tolerating yourself: A novel pathway to regulate B cell activity and prevent autoimmunityAutoimmune disease is an abnormal immune response to the self and is prevented by a mechanism called tolerance. Researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina have identified a pathway that regulates B cell tolerance -- two proteins, GARP and TGF-beta, interact to temper B cell activity, thereby regulating autoimmunity. Monitoring GARP levels on B cells may provide a diagnostic marker for
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Canadian small businesses leading the way in sustainabilityNew research from the University of Waterloo shows that Canadian small businesses are important- and often overlooked- drivers of sustainability and the green economy.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Macular degeneration linked to aging immune cellsStudying mice and cells from patients, vision researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that as immune cells called macrophages get older, they are more likely to contribute to inflammation and abnormal blood vessel growth in the back of the eye. This can damage vision in patients with age-related macular degeneration.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Using friends to fight online harassmentA team from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) use that approach with 'Squadbox,' a new crowdsourcing tool that enables people who have been the targets of harassment to coordinate 'squads' of friends to filter messages and support them during attacks.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Banking on sunshine: World added far more solar than fossil fuel power generating capacity in 2017Solar energy dominated global investment in new power generation like never before in 2017.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Diabetes: A new insight of the protective role of estrogensEpidemiological data indicate an explosion of type 2 diabetes cases for women after menopause. By elucidating how estrogen affects two of the hormones involved in glucose homeostasis, researchers at the University of Geneva and at the Geneva University Hospitals prove the value of estrogen supplementation from the onset of menopause. They also show that only one of the three estrogen receptors see
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study in oxygen-deprived black sea provides insights on future carbon budgetScientists are studying the oxygen-deprived waters of the Black Sea to help answer questions about the deepest parts of the ocean and Earth's climate.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New underwater geolocation technique takes cues from natureMarine animals such as mantis shrimp and squid have inspired a new mode of underwater navigation that allows for greater accuracy. University of Queensland Queensland Brain Institute scientists are part of a group of researchers who have developed the technique using imaging equipment that was sensitive to polarizing light.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dance aids healthier agingA joint research project involving QUT and Queensland Ballet has shown dancing can improve the physical and mental well-being of aging Australians.
9h
The Atlantic

Lean on Pete: A Deeply Sad Tale of a Boy and His Horse“Don’t get attached to the horses,” a grizzled trainer named Del (Steve Buscemi) advises his young assistant Charley (Charlie Plummer) not long into Lean on Pete . It’s professional advice—he’s cautioning against forming an emotional bond with an animal you might later have to sell. But his words feel like a warning for the viewer, too, as the quiet drama of Andrew Haigh’s new film promises to bu
9h
New Scientist - News

How you and your friends can fight back against online trollsSquadbox lets people team up with their friends to fight back against trolls, so that together they can filter out abusive messages online
9h
New Scientist - News

Palm trees have been spotted changing sex for the first timeFour Quindío wax palms in Colombia have changed sex from male to female, which was thought to be impossible for such plants
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Futurity.org

How gonorrhea could mutate into a ‘superbug’Researchers have identified mutations in the bacterium responsible for gonorrhea that give it resistance to the last antibiotic effective against the organism. That resistance could lead to the global spread of drug-resistant “superbug” strains. The bacterium, Neisseria gonnorrhoeae , is resistant to multiple standard antibiotics and now threatens to develop resistance against the antibiotic ceft
9h
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How to Get the Comics Backstory for *Avengers: Infinity War* for Less Than $20Need a cram session before the next Marvel movie? This one won't break the bank.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

Culture Shapes How Children View the Natural WorldNative American kids and non-Native kids conceptualize wild animals differently -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Dagens Medicin

Urologer jagter den bedste behandling til barnløse mændSom de første i verden udfører Herlev og Gentofte Hospital et randomiseret kirurgisk studie, der sammenligner to metoder til at udtage sædceller fra mænd, som mangler dem i sædvæsken. Globalt har den ene metode fremgang, og formålet med studiet er at afklare, om denne metode med størst sandsynlighed hjælper mændene til at blive biologiske fædre.
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Ingeniøren

Kronik: Kystsikring handler om mere end at holde på sit eget sand
9h
Futurity.org

Listen: Expert offers the case against arming teachersArming teachers to protect students from shootings in schools will make the problem worse, argues Philip J. Cook, whose research focuses on gun violence in the United States. “The tragic Parkland, Florida, shooting on February 14th is yet another dreadful reminder that schools are no sanctuary against mass violence,” writes Cook, professor emeritus of public policy studies at Duke University’s Sa
9h
Live Science

Google Employees Are Livid About Company's 'Evil' Military PartnershipGoogle's motto is "don't be evil." Does making military drones smarter breach that code?
10h
Ingeniøren

Kom med ind i DTU's nye imponerende vindtunnelEfter to års arbejde er DTU Vindenergis nye, unikke vindtunnel ved at være færdig på Risø Campus udenfor Roskilde. Vi har været på rundtur i den store betonkonstruktion – heldigvis i vindstille.
10h
The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Colorful Butterfly-BotScientists engineered biomaterials similar to those chameleons use to change color and applied them to a robot.
10h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Space muscles study to use tiny wormsThe worms are being used because they have a similar muscle structure to humans.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Altering silkworm genes to cause addition of useful protein into silk productionA team of researchers with the RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies and the National Agriculture and Food Research Organization, both in Japan, has found a way to alter silkworm genes to create silk with useful proteins. In their paper published in ACS Synthetic Biology, the group describes their technique and suggest possible uses for it.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Computer simulation of boiling phenomena, bubble formation and two-phase bubbly flow inside nuclear reactorsThe intrinsic beauty of bubbles—those thin watery spheres filled with air or other gases—has long captured the imagination of children and adults alike. But bubbles are also a linchpin of nuclear engineering, helping to explain the natural world, predict safety issues and improve the operation of the existing and next-generation nuclear fleets.
10h
Popular Science

We’re ruining Walden Pond just like we ruin everything beautiful in this worldEnvironment How do we enjoy nature without destroying it? The drive to Walden Pond is more suburban than you expect. But just as you feel you must be getting close—finally approaching the hallowed place where famous naturalist…
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Animal study suggests common diabetes drug may also help with nicotine withdrawalIn a mouse study, a drug that has helped millions of people around the world manage their diabetes might also help people ready to kick their nicotine habits
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New research gives precise look at underground CO2 abatement processWhen fossil fuels are burned, carbon dioxide (CO2) is emitted. As the gas rises and becomes trapped in the atmosphere, it retains heat as part of a process called the greenhouse effect. The increased temperatures associated with the greenhouse effect can cause melting ice caps, higher sea levels and a loss of natural habitat for plant and animal species.
10h
Science-Based Medicine

St. John’s Wort for depression – A herbal remedy that works?St. John's wort is a herbal remedy that appears to be effective for the treatment of depression. But how does it compare to antidepressants?
10h
Ingeniøren

Flere VPN-tjenester lover anonymitet, men overholder det ikkeStik imod hvad der fremgår af brugerbetingelserne, så overvåger eller logger hver 5. VPN-tjeneste i en undersøgelse brugerne.
10h
Live Science

Cholla Photos: See These Amazing Desert CactiSpring has once again returned to the deserts of North America and with her return, so too has the amazing colorful blooms of desert wildflowers and cacti.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Memphis from spaceFifty years ago, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. came to Memphis, Tennessee to support striking sanitation workers. He delivered the famous speech known as "I've Been to the Mountaintop" from the Mason Temple in Memphis on April 3, 1968, and was assassinated at the Lorrain Motel (now the National Civil Rights Museum) just a day later, on April 4. Today, we honor the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Early stimulation improves performance of bioengineered human heart cellsResearchers are now able to use induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) to form a model of human adult-like cardiac muscle by introducing electric and mechanical stimulation at an early stage. Since this muscle is similar to the adult heart, it could serve as a better model for testing the effects of drugs and toxic substances than current tissue-engineered heart models. The study, performed by scie
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Same-sex marriage contributes to weakening of LGBQ community, study findsIn 2004, Massachusetts became the first state to legalize same-sex marriage. Eleven years later, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of legalizing same-sex marriage nationwide. Gaining the right to marry helped lesbian, gay, bisexual and queer (LGBQ) people feel included and accepted in society—but also contributed to a weakening of the LGBQ community as a result, according to a new study from t
10h
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Will a Huge New Flood Barrier Save Venice?Finally, construction is finishing on the delayed barrier to protect the city from high tides. But how well will MOSE actually work?
10h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Toxic chemicals turn a new material from porous to protectiveA new material switches from a comfortable, breathable form to a sealed-up, protective state when exposed to dangerous chemicals.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Using spent barley grain to lower the sugar content of certain foodsEPFL spin-off Embion Technologies has developed a soluble fiber powder made from barley residue from the beer-making process that can be used to reduce the sucrose content of a wide range of foods. This by-product also appears to lower cholesterol levels and reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists harvest first vegetables in Antarctic greenhouseScientists in Antarctica have harvested their first crop of vegetables grown without earth, daylight or pesticides as part of a project designed to help astronauts cultivate fresh food on other planets.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researcher follows dairy cows' carbon footprints from barn to fieldSometimes dairy scientist Michel Wattiaux approaches his research like a cop at a traffic stop. He uses a breath analyzer to check for problematic products of fermentation.
10h
Science : NPR

Invisibilia: When Daydreaming Gets In The Way Of Real LifeIn this episode of the Invisibilia podcast, our hosts explore how it feels to be "in between," including the story of one woman who spends so much time daydreaming that it interferes with her life. (Image credit: Lily Padula for NPR)
10h
The Atlantic

The Scientific Paper Is ObsoleteT he scientific paper—the actual form of it—was one of the enabling inventions of modernity. Before it was developed in the 1600s, results were communicated privately in letters, ephemerally in lectures, or all at once in books. There was no public forum for incremental advances. By making room for reports of single experiments or minor technical advances, journals made the chaos of science accre
10h
Scientific American Content: Global

Huge Trove of Unknown Viruses Found in Fish, Frogs and ReptilesResearchers often focus on pathogens that infect mammals and birds -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Latest Headlines | Science News

How many scientists do you know in real life?Editor in Chief Nancy Shute ponders about memorable scientists and how we can make it easier for people to connect to their work.
10h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Readers debate dinosaur designation and moreReaders had questions about the dino family tree and Venus' habitability.
10h
Dagens Medicin

Mænd med dødelig prostatakræft lever markant længereEt nyt stort studie fra Copenhagen Prostate Cancer Center viser, at tidlig diagnostik og bedre medicinsk behandling har rykket markant ved 5-års dødeligheden blandt mænd diagnosticeret med spredt prostatakræft. De sidste 15 år er dødeligheden faldet fra 80 pct. til, at det i dag er knap halvdelen af mændene, der er i live fem år efter diagnosetidspunktet. Resultatet er »lidt af en game-changer«,
10h
Dagens Medicin

Akutlæge anker afgørelseRetslægerådet skal vurdere både anke fra akutlæge og klage fra pårørende til meningitispatient.
10h
Dagens Medicin

Dansk Folkeparti truer med at trække sin støtte til MedicinrådetHvis lægerne ikke får mulighed for at fravige Medicinrådets anbefalinger og ordinere Spinraza, har systemet fejlet og rådet skal nedlægges, mener Dansk Folkeparti. »Så skal vi ikke have et Medicinråd,« siger DF’er.
10h
Dagens Medicin

Styrelse er unfair i sin bedømmelse af Cochranes forskningsindsatsNordic Cochrane Center har et højt forskningsomfang og det har været stabilt i 10 år.
10h
Science | The Guardian

Climate change threatens rare British orchid that tricks bees into matingResearchers find that warmer temperatures are upsetting the seasonal relationship between the early spider orchid and pollinating bees It is one of the most cunning and elaborate reproductive deceits: the early spider orchid ( Ophrys sphegodes) wafts a floral bouquet into the air that mimics the irresistible scent of a virgin female solitary mining bee, tricking gullible male bees into attempting
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Report shows widespread lack of support for high-ability, low-income students in U.S.Low-income students with advanced academic abilities are far less likely than their wealthier peers to have access to resources that would help them succeed, according to a new report co-authored by researchers from Johns Hopkins University.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Glassy beads hint at site of mysterious missing craterImperial experts have found a 'breadcrumb trail' of debris from an 800,000 year old meteor impact
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New report on climate change in the Sierra Nevada shows need for human adaptationThe Sierra Nevada mountain range looms over California, stretching 400 miles from Oregon to Tehachapi Pass in Kern County. The range contains the highest point in the continental United States, Mount Whitney, and is home to both the oldest and largest trees in the world—as well as diverse wildlife, from mountain lions to mosquitos.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What's happening in Orion's Horsehead Nebula?Two research teams used a map from NASA's Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, SOFIA, to uncover new findings about stars forming in Orion's iconic Horsehead Nebula. The map reveals vital details for getting a complete understanding of the dust and gas involved in star formation.
11h
Live Science

These Scientists Say Scott Pruitt Is Trying to 'Kill' the EPAAn academic suing the EPA over its decision to bar certain scientists from serving on advisory boards says the EPA needs to address legitimate criticisms to rebuild after Pruitt.
11h
Ingeniøren

Vikinger kan have navigeret med polariserede krystallerDet har været næsten umuligt at finde vej over Atlanterhavet uden moderne teknologi – og alligevel gjorde vikingerne det mange gange. Ny forskning har et bud på, hvordan vikingerne fandt vej.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers engineer new proteins to help solve global problemsResearchers from Victoria University of Wellington's Ferrier Research Institute have made significant progress in the science of protein engineering, achieving a breakthrough which has implications for tackling global problems from diseases to climate change.
11h
Dagens Medicin

Styrelsen underkender udtalelser fra tre sagkyndige i klagesagTre speciallæger fandt ingen grund til at kritisere hændelsesforløbet ved et meningitisdødsfald. Men i sin endelige afgørelse nåede Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed frem til den modsatte konklusion. »Jeg har været meget rystet og forarget,« siger en af de tre sagkyndige, Jane Gregersen.
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Dagens Medicin

Højesteret efterlader læger i et lammende tomrum
11h
Dagens Medicin

Aftale på plads: Færre læger bliver ramt af lockoutAkut- og kræftafdelinger undtages fuldstændig for lockouten. Det har Danske Regioner netop forhandlet på plads i en aftale med Yngre Læger og Overlægeforeningen.
11h
Live Science

Teeth-Baring 'Zombie' Raccoons Scaring Residents of Ohio TownRaccoons acting like "zombies" have been scaring residents of one Ohio town, according to news reports.
11h
New Scientist - News

Facebook admits data scandal may have hit 87 million usersFacebook Mark ZuckerbergFacebook boss Mark Zuckerberg has said that Cambridge Analytica may have accessed data from 87 million accounts, 37 million more than previously thought
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Training computers to recognize dynamic eventsA person watching videos that show things opening—a door, a book, curtains, a blooming flower, a yawning dog—easily understands the same type of action is depicted in each clip.
11h
The Atlantic

Nikki Giovanni: 'Martin Had Faith in the People'The day after Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination, Nikki Giovanni—the brilliant young writer who’d soon come to be known as the “Princess of Black Poetry”—wrote a poem that began with an inquiry: “What can I, a poor Black woman, do to destroy america?” For Giovanni, the question was a collective one that was “being asked in every Black heart.” And it wasn’t at all rhetorical: “There is one ans
11h
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Why AT&T-Time Warner Merger Is Bad News for EveryoneWIRED columnist Susan Crawford on why the AT&T-Time Warner merger is bad for competition, bad for content, and bad for consumers.
11h
Feed: All Latest

Ex-Google Executive Opens a School for AI, With China's HelpKai-Fu Lee, head of the investment firm Sinovation Ventures, is training Chinese professors to teach artificial-intelligence techniques.
11h
Feed: All Latest

A 200-Year-Old Idea Offers a New Way to Trace Stolen BitcoinsCambridge researchers point to an 1816 precedent that could fundamentally change how "dirty" Bitcoins are tracked.
11h
Viden

Digital ekspert: Høstede danske data næppe brugt til noget som helst41.820 danske Facebook-brugere, Cambridge Analytica har kigget over skuldrene, kan formentligt ånde lettet op, mener rådgiver.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Determining the timing of methanogen evolutionEarly forms of life very likely had metabolisms that transformed the primordial Earth, such as initiating the carbon cycle and producing most of the planet's oxygen through photosynthesis. About 3.5 billion years ago, the Earth seems to have already been covered in liquid oceans, but the sun at that time was not bright or warm enough to melt ice. To explain how the oceans remained unfrozen, it has
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New trap better at snaring stable fliesA new stable fly trap, now on the market, catches more flies than the standard trap, according to a recent Agricultural Research Service (ARS) study.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What makes a faster typist?The largest-ever dataset on typing speeds and styles, based on 136 million keystrokes from 168,000 volunteers, finds that the fastest typists not only make fewer errors, but they often type the next key before the previous one has been released.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dairy farms are using too much waterDr. David Campbell, associate professor of water conservation at Heriot-Watt University, said: "The UK uses around 40.9 billion litres of water each year to produce 14 billion litres of milk. There is certainly room for improvement and what I would like to do is meet with representatives from the dairy industry and see what we can do to cut down water use.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Weather satellite wanders through time, space, causing stray warming to contaminate dataIn the late 1990s, the NOAA-14 weather satellite went wandering through time and space, apparently changing the record of Earth's climate as it went.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Interactions within quantum batteries are key to their charge advantageRecent theoretical studies at Monash University bring us a step closer to realistic quantum batteries.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global

Here's Why the Government Should Fund "Gee-Whiz" ScienceIt can lead to useful technology, but the real reason is that it inspires people—and your representatives in Congress need to hear that -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Combining X-ray techniques for powerful insights into hyperaccumulator plantsThe complementary power of combining multiple X-ray techniques to understand the unusual properties of hyperaccumulator plants has been highlighted in a new cover article just published in New Phytologist.
11h
New Scientist - News

NASA is trying to build a supersonic aircraft without the boomNASA awarded a $247.5 million contract to Lockheed Martin to design and build an aeroplane that breaks the sound barrier without shattering the peace and quiet
12h
Viden

Facebook skruer (lidt) ned for overvågning af sms’er og telefonopkaldDet sociale medie har annonceret flere tiltag, der gør indsamlingen af brugerdata en smule mindre massiv.
12h
Scientific American Content: Global

Are Water Worlds Habitable?It looks like the galaxy is overflowing with worlds soaked in water, but scientists are divided on whether life there would succeed or fail -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
The Atlantic

The Risks to Freedom in HungaryHungary is a NATO ally, a member nation of the European Union, a signatory of the European Convention on Human Rights—and also, since 2010, an increasingly authoritarian and illiberal state. Prime Minister Viktor Orbán has politicized the country’s court, central bank, and media. On April 8, Orbán and his Fidesz party face the voters. Fidesz has recently suffered losses in local elections. Orbán
12h
The Atlantic

Trump's New Solution to Every ProblemThree times in the last two weeks, President Trump has turned in frustration from an intractable problem and landed upon an apparently elegant solution: the military. First it was Congress’s decision not to fund the president’s border wall in the omnibus spending bill. Trump twice tweeted that he wanted to “build WALL through M,” which most observers understood to mean “Mexico,” until The Washing
12h
Science | The Guardian

DNA is not our destiny; it’s just a very useful tool | Ewan BirneyYes, our genes affect everything we do, from educational attainment to health, but they are only a contributing factor The cost of DNA sequencing continues to fall, and the scale and reach of genetic research continues to grow with it. We can use genetics to study not just health and fundamental biology but many things humans do – education , behaviours , parenting skills – leading to interesting
12h
Ingeniøren

Unik vindtunnel går fra stille til storm på halvandet minutEfter to års arbejde er DTU Vindenergis nye vindtunnel til 85 mio. kroner stort set færdig på Risø og er klar til royal indvielse i næste uge. Projektleder betegner det store byggeri som et forskningsprojekt
12h
Ingeniøren

Nato: Cyberangreb kan udløse musketer-paragrafNato's generalsekretær melder nu ud, at et cyberangreb vil udløse forsvarsalliancens vigtigste artikel: Hvis du angriber en af os, angriber du os alle.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Geographers investigate ancient land use near the Jordan ValleyGeographers from Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have been investigating climate change and land use in the Southern Levant since the last ice age. In conjunction with other researchers from Jordan, Israel and Palestine, they have been examining dust deposits in ancient ruins, reservoirs and terraced fields to the east and west of the Jordan Valley. The sediments should ena
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Eating less enables lemurs to live longerChronic caloric restriction consists of eating a reduced but balanced diet from early adult life onward. Previous research, into macaques in particular (which have an average lifespan of forty years), had already demonstrated its beneficial effect on the incidence of age-related pathologies. However, its positive effect on the lifespan of primates remained controversial. To study this question, th
12h
NYT > Science

Trilobites: How Do You Count Endangered Species? Look to the StarsPairing astronomers’ algorithms for star-hunting with drones equipped with infrared cameras, scientists have developed a new tool kit to help conservation and fight poaching.
12h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Flying insects tell tales of long-distance migrationsResearchers are asking big questions about animal movements and pest control by tracking tiny insects in flight.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Quality assurance for autonomous systemsCyber-physical systems combine electronics, software and mechanics. They are highly complex, and in addition to many application possibilities, raises a whole range of issues. They are dependent on error-free software, and the issue of proven quality assurance thus becomes increasingly urgent. Using the example of autonomous vehicles, a team from TU Graz's Institute of Software Engineering togethe
12h
Dagens Medicin

Nordsjællands Hospital gør kardiologi til selvstændigt specialeKardiologien kommer i højsædet på Nordsjællands Hospital med selvstændig afdeling. Specialeansvarlige overlæge Niels Tønder konstitueres som ledende overlæge for den nye kardiologiske afdeling.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Avoid south-facing birdhouses—for the nestlings' sakeTen-day-old baby birds are able to maintain their regular body temperature despite nest box temperatures of 50 degrees C or above. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden now report that nestlings pay a high price for regulating their body temperature—they grow less. Therefore, the recommendation when putting up a nest box should be to avoid hot, south-facing locations and choosing a spot in the
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Enhanced therapeutic vaccine platform achieves 2 proof-of-concepts in veterinary medical useChronic allergic diseases of dogs and horses can now be treated with a new therapeutic vaccine technology based on enhanced virus-like nanoparticle conjugates. It was developed by an international research team led by he University of Bern and in cooperation with the University of Zurich, together with private enterprise companies. The findings obtained in horses and dogs could lead to similar the
13h
Viden

Ny type undervisning: Nu skal der fejl på skoleskemaetVæk med hårde facit i naturfagene. Elever i folkeskolen skal lære at argumentere for deres egne løsninger, og det skal være okay at fejle.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Almost 80% of UK firms pay men more than women: dataAlmost eight out of 10 companies and public sector bodies operating in Britain pay men more than women overall, said data published Thursday confirming long-standing gender inequality in the workplace.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uber scales back Greek operations after law clampdownRide-hailing service Uber on Thursday said it would suspend one of its two services in Greece after the approval of tighter sector rules.
13h
Ingeniøren

Facebook: 37 mio. flere brugere ramt af Cambridge Analytica-skandalenGodt skjult i en nyhedsblog får Facebook indrømmet, at omfanget af brugerdata, der er havnet i hænderne på forkerte, er langt højere end oprindeligt anslået.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Far Cry 5' record sales buoy gamemaker Ubisoft's sharesFrench videogame powerhouse Ubisoft saw its share price surge over six percent on the Paris CAC stock exchange Thursday, buoyed by record global sales of its "Far Cry 5" shooting game.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Eating less enables lemurs to live longerChronic caloric restriction strongly increases the lifespan of a small primate, the grey mouse lemur. This is one of the results of a ten-year experiment conducted by researchers at the CNRS and the MNHN. Chronic caloric restriction consists in eating a reduced but balanced diet from the outset of early adulthood. Its beneficial effect on lifespan had been established for many short-lived species
13h
The Atlantic

How the Government Could Fix FacebookGathered in a Washington, D.C., ballroom last Thursday for their annual “ tech prom ,” hundreds of tech-industry lobbyists and policy makers applauded politely as announcers read out the names of the event’s sponsors. But the room fell silent when “Facebook” was proclaimed—and the silence was punctuated by scattered boos and groans. These days, it seems the only bipartisan agreement in Washington
13h
Ingeniøren

Enhedslisten: Et nødvendigt opgør med biomassen
13h
Ingeniøren

Spørg Scientariet: Hvorfor kræver tv større antenner end radio?En læser undrer sig over, at man kan fange FM med små antenner, mens den ikke går, når man skal opfange tv-signaler. Det svarer DTU-professor på.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sodium-ion battery packs a punchA new sodium-ion battery chemistry that shows superior performance to existing state-of-the-art sodium-based batteries could be the catalyst to enabling mass-production of the emerging technology for large-scale energy storage, such as in applications including storing solar power for industrial sites.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Broadcom moves back to the USSemiconductor manufacturer Broadcom, which recently failed in a bid to buy US rival Qualcomm, has transferred its headquarters from Singapore to the US as promised.
13h
Viden

Cambridge Analytica kan have "høstet" 41.820 danskeres facebook-profilTusindvis af danskere kan have delt data med det omstridte Cambridge Analytica.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Congress' dilemma: tame Facebook or just accept its apology?Facebook isn't just a company. It's a behemoth, with 2.1 billion monthly users, $40 billion in revenue and more than 25,000 employees worldwide.
14h
Ingeniøren

Hollændere 3D-printer stålbroEfter tre års udvikling er det som de første lykkedes en hollandsk virksomhed at 3D-printe en hel bro i stål. De kommende måneder skal den testes, før den placeres over kanal i Amsterdam
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

LGBQ students less likely to stay in STEM majorsFor years, researchers have known that it is hard to attract and keep women and some minorities in science, technology, engineering and math - or STEM - fields. Now, a Montana State University researcher has found that the same problem applies to sexual minorities.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Experts propose method to monitor ocean healthIt's important to closely monitor how climate change and our increasing use of the oceans are affecting important marine resources and ecosystems. A new Global Change Biology paper identifies "biological essential ocean variables" that can be measured to provide key information to help effectively mitigate or manage the detrimental effects we may be having.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Prehistoric reptile pregnant with octupletsPalaeontologists have discovered part of the skeleton of a 180 million-year-old pregnant ichthyosaur with the remains of between six and eight tiny embryos between its ribs.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Captain Scott's Discovery expedition offers climate change insight 100 years onSamples collected during Captain Scott's famous 1901-1904 Discovery expedition to Antarctica, the oldest of their kind, have recently undergone new analysis using modern techniques providing scientists with exciting new data, over 100 years after the voyage.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Automated prep of MS-sensitive fluorescently labeled N-Glycans with a pipetting robotA new original research report available ahead-of-print at SLAS Technology demonstrates the semi-automation of a GlycoWorks RapiFluor-MS (RFMS) Kit using a pipetting robot to improve life sciences research productivity. This robotic platform uses standard manual pipettors and an optically guided arm to facilitate the automation of manual procedures, reducing the time researchers spend at the lab b
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Australia privacy chief to probe Facebook over data breachAustralia is investigating Facebook over alleged privacy breaches, authorities said Thursday, after the firm admitted the personal data of thousands of local users was improperly shared with a British political consultancy.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Automated prep of MS-sensitive fluorescently labeled N-Glycans with a pipetting robotA new original research report available ahead-of-print at SLAS Technology demonstrates the semi-automation of a GlycoWorks RapiFluor-MS (RFMS) Kit using a pipetting robot to improve life sciences research productivity.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lizards, mice, bats and other vertebrates are important pollinators tooBees are not the only animals that carry pollen from flower to flower. Species with backbones, among them bats, birds, mice, and even lizards, also serve as pollinators. Although less familiar as flower visitors than insect pollinators, vertebrate pollinators are more likely to have co-evolved tight relationships of high value to the plants they service, supplying essential reproductive aid for wh
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New genomic tool searches wheat's wild past to improve crops of the futureA new genetic directory launched today will enable researchers and breeders to scan the genomes of wild relatives of modern wheat to find disease-fighting properties lost to domestication.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers provide potential explanation for declines in brown bear populationsAnimals may fall into what are called evolutionary and ecological traps when they make poor decisions using seemingly reliable environmental cues. For example, animals may select habitats to occupy based on food availability, but mortality may be highest in habitats with the highest food availability. A new Mammal Review article examines how the brown (grizzly) bear can fall into such traps in hum
16h
Science | The Guardian

Scientists suggest a giant sunshade in the sky could solve global warmingScholars from developing countries call for greater say in solar geoengineering research, arguing poor nations have most at stake It sounds like the stuff of science fiction: the creation, using balloons or jets, of a manmade atmospheric sunshade to shield the most vulnerable countries in the global south against the worst effects of global warming. But amid mounting interest in “solar geoenginee
16h
Science | The Guardian

Captain Scott's polar samples re-examined 100 years onScientists from the Natural History Museum have revisited the spot where Scott and his team took samples to make a comparison They look like shrivelled pieces of leather – in fact they are dried communities of microbes scooped up by Captain Robert Falcon Scott’s team of polar explorers. And they could help scientists keep tabs on how Antarctica is changing. While perhaps most famous for the ill-f
17h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Trash Robot cleans up Chicago River's rubbishThe robot connects to the internet so web users can control it and donate to pay maintenance costs.
17h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Russians protest over 'toxic' landfill near MoscowThe Russian capital has no recycling programme and its expanding rubbish landfills are causing health problems.
17h
Ingeniøren

Professor: Ny type storage er vinderen, når man skal gemme data i 30 årDiske, der crasher, og højt strømforbrug er storage-teknologiens akilleshæl. En ny generation af NV RAM er en enhjørning, som kan udkonkurrere tape og gøre eksplosion i datamængder til at betale.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Prehistoric reptile pregnant with octupletsPalaeontologists have discovered part of the skeleton of a 180-million-year-old pregnant ichthyosaur with the remains of between six and eight tiny embryos between its ribs.
17h
Viden

Forskning: Floorball styrker helbredet hos ældreMotionsfloorball styrker knogler og mindsker risikoen for diabetes hos ældre, viser undersøgelse. Det kan også gælde andre typer holdspil, siger forsker.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Allina study shows patients with very small breast tumors may forgo lymph node biopsiesHow to treat patients who have microinvasive breast cancer - tumors that are 1 mm or less in size (the thickness of a dime) -- is somewhat controversial. Can these tiny tumors affect the lymph nodes and spread cancer to other areas of the body?
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Women who believe their sex drive changes can better cope with low libidoWomen who believe that their sex drive will change over time are better able to handle difficulties with sexual desire, according to a study from the University of Waterloo.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The relevance of GABA for diabetes is highlighted in two new studiesDynamic interactions between the nervous system, hormones and the immune system are normally on-going but in diabetes the balance is disturbed. The two studies published in EBioMedicine by an international research team from Uppsala University highlight the importance of the neurotransmitter beta-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A study by the University of Tartu scientists: Drained peatlands emit laughing gasA global study lead by geographers at the University of Tartu has revealed that drained nitrogen-rich peatlands produce laughing gas, which degrades the ozone layer and warms the climate. To avoid this, swamp forests, fens and bogs need to be conserved.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nemours study highlights psychological and social barriers to treating childhood obesityChildren whose families have elevated psychological and social risks, including child behavior problems, parent mental health issues, and family financial difficulties, were more likely to drop out of weight management treatment and less likely to have an improvement in weight status.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why do children tattle?When young children see a peer cause harm, they often tattle to a caregiver.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers provide potential explanation for declines in brown bear populationsAnimals may fall into what are called evolutionary and ecological traps when they make poor decisions using seemingly reliable environmental cues.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Web-based program may help address underage drinkingA new study supports the use of a brief, web-based program alone and in combination with a parent campaign for preventing alcohol consumption among adolescents transitioning from middle school to high school.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Urinary incontinence may have negative effects on sexual healthIn a new BJU International study, women with urinary incontinence reported declines in sexual activity and arousal over the last year, and they expressed increased concern about their frequency of sexual activity and ability to become sexually aroused.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Web-based decision aid may help with breast reconstruction decisions following mastectomyA new Psycho-Oncology study indicates that a free web-based decision aid that helps women with breast cancer make decisions regarding reconstruction surgery after mastectomy is likely cost-effective.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study examines how social support affects mental health after a natural disasterA new Journal of Traumatic Stress study found that social support may have helped alleviate depressive symptoms for displaced and nondisplaced residents who survived Hurricane Katrina.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Breast cancer detected in transmen undergoing mastectomyThe number of transmen seeking gender-confirming surgery has risen in the past decade.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Certain medications for chronic inflammatory diseases appear safe during pregnancyAnti-tumor necrosis factor medications (anti-TNFs) are effective in controlling chronic inflammatory diseases, but some physicians recommend that their patients discontinue them during pregnancy.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Analysis challenges link between pain medications and inflammatory bowel diseaseContrary to generally accepted belief, a recent review and analysis of published studies did not reveal a consistent association between the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or acetaminophen and exacerbation of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.
18h
cognitive science

A study on uploads, cyborg and super intelligencesubmitted by /u/nathan72419 [link] [comments]
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Geologist identifies hidden clues to ancient supercontinents, confirms PannotiaA geologist who first proposed the now-accepted supercontinent cycle theory in the 1980s has rallied to the cause of one of those supercontinents, Pannotia, that is in danger of being overlooked.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scoliosis surgery in children with cerebral palsy: Quality of life benefits outweigh risksFor children with severe cerebral palsy (CP), surgery for scoliosis (sideways curvature of the spine) significantly improves the quality of life (QoL) for them and their caregivers, a new study finds.
19h
Ingeniøren

Nye kvaler med DSB's gamle dieseltrækkere: Også tandhjulene er uden for toleranceDet lykkedes end ikke DSB at holde sig eget mål om at få 13 af de 33 ME-lokomotiver klar efter påske, for nu viser der sig ikke kun at være revner i hjulakslerne. Også de tandhjul, der sidder på akslerne, har sat sig for meget.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Get moving to get happier, study findsPhysical activity has long been known to reduce depression and anxiety, and is commonly prescribed to prevent or cure negative mental health conditions. A new review suggests the physical activity frequency and volume are essential factors in the relationship between physical activity and happiness.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Facilitating coral restorationGlobal declines of coral reefs -- particularly in the Caribbean -- have spurred efforts to grow corals in underwater nurseries and transplant them to enable recovery. However, current approaches rarely incorporate the key ecological reef processes critical to facilitating restoration and improving the odds of success. In a new paper, scientists advocate for the integration of essential natural pro
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cocoa bean roasting can preserve both chocolate health benefits, tasteManipulating the temperature and the length of time under which cocoa beans are roasted can simultaneously preserve and even boost the potency of some bioactive and antioxidant compounds while protecting desired sensory aspects of chocolate, according to researchers.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Frogs' and 'mushrooms' bubble up in quantum fluidsQuantum fluids may mix in very weird ways, according to new computer simulations of exotic states of matter known as Bose-Einstein condensates.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Practicing Tai Chi helps improve respiratory function in patients with COPDCurrently, pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is used where available to improve exercise capacity and quality of life, but the treatment requires access to trained staff and specialized facilities. A new study looked at Tai Chi as a lower cost, more easily accessed treatment option. Investigators found that this slow, methodical form of exercise is equivalent to PR for improving respiratory function i
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lizards, mice, bats and other vertebrates are important pollinators, tooAlthough less familiar as flower visitors than insect pollinators, vertebrate pollinators are more likely to have coevolved tight relationships of high value to the plants they service, supplying essential reproductive aid for which few or no other species may substitute.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New 'NanoZymes' use light to kill bacteriaResearchers have developed a new artificial enzyme that uses light to kill bacteria. The artificial enzymes could one day be used in the fight against infections, and to keep high-risk public spaces like hospitals free of bacteria like E. coli and Golden Staph.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rare coastal martens under high risk of extinction in coming decadesThe coastal marten, a small but fierce forest predator, is at a high risk for extinction in Oregon and northern California in the next 30 years due to threats from human activities.
20h
New on MIT Technology Review

Big Tech may be dragged into America’s gun control debate
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Regular stretching shown to improve muscles in elderlyDaily muscle stretching could bring health benefits to elderly people with reduced mobility, according to new research published today in the Journal of Physiology.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Captain Scott's Discovery expedition offers climate change insight 100 years onSamples collected during Captain Scott's famous 1901-1904 Discovery expedition to Antarctica, the oldest of their kind, have recently undergone new analysis using modern techniques providing scientists with exciting new data, over 100 years after the voyage.
22h
New Scientist - News

Neutrinos from the big bang influence where galaxies form todayJust after the big bang, waves of neutrinos and other matter raced across the cosmos. Those neutrinos reached forward in time to dictate where galaxies form now
22h
Live Science

Spleen: Function, Location & ProblemsThe spleen is an important organ for keeping bodily fluids balanced. It is possible to live without it, but removal of the spleen has serious consequences.
22h
Feed: All Latest

The Condom Snorting Challenge Is Tide Pods' Final RevengeThe alleged teen trend exists only in the articles reporting its trendiness. What went wrong?
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pulling valuable metals from e-waste makes financial senseElectronic waste -- including discarded televisions, computers and mobile phones -- is one of the fastest-growing waste categories worldwide. For years, recyclers have gleaned usable parts, including metals, from this waste stream. That makes sense from a sustainability perspective, but it's been unclear whether it's reasonable from an economic viewpoint. Now researchers report that recovering gol
23h
New on MIT Technology Review

Internet “power user” Mark Zuckerberg knows Facebook has issuesFacebook Mark ZuckerbergFacebook’s CEO talks about how he’s fixing the world’s biggest social network as it reels from a massive data scandal.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Paucity of phosphorus hints at precarious path for extraterrestrial lifeWork by Cardiff University astronomers suggests there may be a cosmic lack of a chemical element essential to life. Dr Jane Greaves and Dr. Phil Cigan will present their results at the European Week of Astronomy and Space Science in Liverpool.
23h
Futurity.org

Smiles return after this facial paralysis surgeryModifying a muscle transplant operation, a surgical team found a way to restore even smiles to the faces of patients dealing with birth defects, stroke, tumors, or Bell’s palsy. “The smile has been judged as the most important sign to express positive emotions, and people are judged to be angry when they can’t smile,” says Kofi Boahene, associate professor of otolaryngology–head and neck surgery
23h
Science : NPR

USDA Defies Advisers, Allows Carrageenan To Keep Organic LabelThe Department of Agriculture says organic-food makers can keep using carrageenan, a thickener made from seaweed. It's the second time this year that it has reversed an organic board's recommendation. (Image credit: Farley Baricuatro/Getty Images)
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Paucity of phosphorus hints at precarious path for extraterrestrial lifeWork by Cardiff University astronomers suggests there may be a cosmic lack of a chemical element essential to life. Dr. Jane Greaves and Dr. Phil Cigan will present their results at the European Week of Astronomy and Space Science in Liverpool.
23h
Futurity.org

Fragile X is visible in baby brains far before diagnosisBrain differences related to the neurodevelopmental disorder Fragile X are visible well before a diagnosis, which typically happens at age three or later, new research indicates. Researchers used MRIs to show that babies with the neurodevelopmental condition fragile X syndrome had less-developed white matter compared to infants that did not develop the condition. Imaging various sections of white
23h
Futurity.org

Japanese paper art could let electronics stretch outKirigami, a variation of origami that involves cutting folded pieces of paper, has inspired researchers’ efforts to build malleable electronic circuits. Their innovation—creating tiny sheets of strong yet bendable electronic materials made of select polymers and nanowires—could lead to improvements in smart clothing, electronic skin, and other applications that require pliable circuitry. “Traditi
23h
Futurity.org

Algorithms trace how stereotypes have changedWord embeddings—an algorithmic technique that can map relationships and associations between words—can measure changes in gender and ethnic stereotypes over the past century in the United States. Researchers analyzed large databases of American books, newspapers, and other texts and looked at how those linguistic changes correlated with actual US Census demographic data and major social shifts su
23h
The Atlantic

China and the Cost of a TelevisionChinese US TradeChina and the U.S. are firing warning shots in what could escalate to a full-on trade war. First, the U.S. announced tariffs on steel and aluminum imports, including from China. China then retaliated with levies on American products, including pork. The Trump administration then proposed $50 billion worth of measures against more than 1,000 Chinese-made items , including the components of consume
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Diverse metals mix it up in novel nanoparticlesResearchers have learned to combine up to eight different metals in a single tiny, uniformly mixed nanoparticle.
1d
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Modern-Day LegendWhat We’re Following News From the Tech World: Facebook announced that “most” of its users could have had their profile information scraped by “malicious actors” through a data-access loophole—the latest in a series of scandals that have raised questions about the company’s ability to balance business goals against users’ best interests. And authorities are investigating what might have motivated
1d
The Atlantic

Zuckerberg Says Balancing Facebook's Business and Community Is 'Quite Easy'From the outside, Facebook’s recent data-leaking problems seem to result from the tension between their business—which relies on harvesting, keeping, analyzing, and selling advertisements based on user data—and their stated goal of growing meaningful communities. To this mind-set, Facebook’s privacy policies, for example, are a set of trade-offs between making money and providing a place where pe
1d
Popular Science

Your old computer could be a better source of metals than a mineEnvironment A ray of hope in our losing battle against electronic waste. From your water-logged smartphone to your smashed smart TV, your electronics are a potential goldmine. Or a copper mine. Or—some day—a lithium mine.
1d

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